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Sample records for anemone aiptasia pallida

  1. Increased cell proliferation and mucocyte density in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida recovering from bleaching.

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    David Fransolet

    Full Text Available Recovery of coral after bleaching episodes is a critical period for the health of the reef ecosystem. While events such as symbiont (genus Symbiodinium shifting/shuffling or tissue apoptosis have been demonstrated to occur following bleaching, little is known concerning tissue recovery or cell proliferation. Here, we studied the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida exposed to a transient elevation of water temperature combined with high illumination (33°C and 1900 µmol photons x m(-2 x s(-1 for 30 h. Following such treatment bleached anemones showed a significant reduction of their Symbiodinium density. Cell proliferation in the ectodermis and gastrodermis was determined by assessing the densities of cells labeled with a thymidine analogue (EdU. Cell proliferation significantly increased during the first day following stress in both tissue types. This increased cell proliferation returned to pre-stress values after one week. Although cell proliferation was higher in the ectodermis in absence of stress, it was relatively more pronounced in the gastrodermis of stressed anemones. In addition, the ratio of ectodermal mucocytes significantly increased three weeks after induced stress. These results suggest that thermal/photic stress coupled with the loss of the symbionts is able to enhance cell proliferation in both gastrodermis and ectodermis of cnidarians. While new cells formed in the gastrodermis are likely to host new Symbiodinium, the fate of new cells in the ectodermis was only partially revealed. Some new ectodermal cells may, in part, contribute to the increased number of mucocytes which could eventually help strengthen the heterotrophic state until restoration of the symbiosis.

  2. Developing the anemone Aiptasia as a tractable model for cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis: the transcriptome of aposymbiotic A. pallida

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    Lehnert Erik M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reefs are hotspots of oceanic biodiversity, forming the foundation of ecosystems that are important both ecologically and for their direct practical impacts on humans. Corals are declining globally due to a number of stressors, including rising sea-surface temperatures and pollution; such stresses can lead to a breakdown of the essential symbiotic relationship between the coral host and its endosymbiotic dinoflagellates, a process known as coral bleaching. Although the environmental stresses causing this breakdown are largely known, the cellular mechanisms of symbiosis establishment, maintenance, and breakdown are still largely obscure. Investigating the symbiosis using an experimentally tractable model organism, such as the small sea anemone Aiptasia, should improve our understanding of exactly how the environmental stressors affect coral survival and growth. Results We assembled the transcriptome of a clonal population of adult, aposymbiotic (dinoflagellate-free Aiptasia pallida from ~208 million reads, yielding 58,018 contigs. We demonstrated that many of these contigs represent full-length or near-full-length transcripts that encode proteins similar to those from a diverse array of pathways in other organisms, including various metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, and neuropeptide precursors. The contigs were annotated by sequence similarity, assigned GO terms, and scanned for conserved protein domains. We analyzed the frequency and types of single-nucleotide variants and estimated the size of the Aiptasia genome to be ~421 Mb. The contigs and annotations are available through NCBI (Transcription Shotgun Assembly database, accession numbers JV077153-JV134524 and at http://pringlelab.stanford.edu/projects.html. Conclusions The availability of an extensive transcriptome assembly for A. pallida will facilitate analyses of gene-expression changes, identification of proteins of interest, and other studies in this

  3. Comparative analysis and culturing of the microbial community of Aiptasia pallida, A Sea Anemone Model for Coral Biology

    KAUST Repository

    Binsarhan, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Recent works has highlighted the contribution of microbes to animal function. In this regard, the microbial community associated with corals has become a growing field of research in order to understand how microbes contribute to the host organisms’ response to environmental changes. It has been shown that microbes associated with corals have important functions in the coral holobiont such as immunity and nutrient assimilation. However, corals are notoriously difficult to work with. To this end, the sea anemone Aiptasia is becoming a model organism for coral symbiosis. Given the importance of host-­microbiome interactions, the topic of this thesis is to assess microbial structure of Aiptasia, culture prominent bacterial members, and compare bacterial community structure to corals. Different molecular methods have been applied using 16S rRNA bacterial gene fragments to characterize the microbial composition of Aiptasia. 16S rRNA gene sequence derived from cultured bacteria was compared to 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from native Red Sea Aiptasia. Inter-­individual as well as methodological differences were found to account for variance in microbiome composition. However, all approaches showed a highly abundant microbial taxon belonging to the genus Alteromonas in all samples. The Alteromonas species was successfully isolated for further research targeting microbiome selection mechanisms in Aiptasia. Future investigations by using different molecular tools will help to define the functions and relationship between the Aiptasia and its complex microbiome.

  4. Generation and analysis of transcriptomic resources for a model system on the rise: the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida and its dinoflagellate endosymbiont

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    Sunagawa Shinichi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most diverse marine ecosystems, coral reefs, depend upon a functional symbiosis between cnidarian hosts and unicellular dinoflagellate algae. The molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment, maintenance, and breakdown of the symbiotic partnership are, however, not well understood. Efforts to dissect these questions have been slow, as corals are notoriously difficult to work with. In order to expedite this field of research, we generated and analyzed a collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs from the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida and its dinoflagellate symbiont (Symbiodinium sp., a system that is gaining popularity as a model to study cellular, molecular, and genomic questions related to cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses. Results A set of 4,925 unique sequences (UniSeqs comprising 1,427 clusters of 2 or more ESTs (contigs and 3,498 unclustered ESTs (singletons was generated by analyzing 10,285 high-quality ESTs from a mixed host/symbiont cDNA library. Using a BLAST-based approach to predict which unique sequences derived from the host versus symbiont genomes, we found that the contribution of the symbiont genome to the transcriptome was surprisingly small (1.6–6.4%. This may reflect low levels of gene expression in the symbionts, low coverage of alveolate genes in the sequence databases, a small number of symbiont cells relative to the total cellular content of the anemones, or failure to adequately lyse symbiont cells. Furthermore, we were able to identify groups of genes that are known or likely to play a role in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses, including oxidative stress pathways that emerged as a prominent biological feature of this transcriptome. All ESTs and UniSeqs along with annotation results and other tools have been made accessible through the implementation of a publicly accessible database named AiptasiaBase. Conclusion We have established the first large-scale transcriptomic resource for

  5. The role of complement in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida

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    Angela ePoole

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is an innate immune pathway that in vertebrates, is responsible for initial recognition and ultimately phagocytosis and destruction of microbes. Several complement molecules including C3, Factor B, and mannose binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASP have been characterized in invertebrates and while most studies have focused on their conserved role in defense against pathogens, little is known about their role in managing beneficial microbes. The purpose of this study was to (1 characterize complement pathway genes in the symbiotic sea anemone A. pallida, (2 investigate the evolution of complement genes in invertebrates, and (3 examine the potential dual role of complement genes Factor B and MASP in the onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge using qPCR based studies. The results demonstrate that A. pallida has multiple Factor B genes (Ap_Bf-1, Ap_Bf-2a, and Ap_Bf-2b and one MASP gene (Ap_MASP. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the evolutionary history of complement genes is complex, and there have been many gene duplications or gene loss events, even within members of the same phylum. Gene expression analyses revealed a potential role for complement in both onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge. Specifically, Ap_Bf-1 and Ap_MASP are significantly upregulated in the light at the onset of symbiosis and in response to challenge with the pathogen Serratia marcescens suggesting that they play a role in the initial recognition of both beneficial and harmful microbes. Ap_Bf-2b in contrast was generally downregulated during the onset and maintenance of symbiosis and in response to challenge with S. marcescens. Therefore the exact role of Ap_Bf-2b in response to microbes remains unclear, but the results suggests that the presence of microbes leads to repressed expression. Together these results indicate functional divergence between Ap

  6. Comparative lipid profiling of the cnidarian Aiptasia pallida and its dinoflagellate symbiont.

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    Teresa A Garrett

    Full Text Available Corals and other cnidarians house photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts within membrane-bound compartments inside gastrodermal cells. Nutritional interchanges between the partners produce carbohydrates and lipids for metabolism, growth, energy stores, and cellular structures. Although lipids play a central role in the both the energetics and the structural/morphological features of the symbiosis, previous research has primarily focused on the fatty acid and neutral lipid composition of the host and symbiont. In this study we conducted a mass spectrometry-based survey of the lipidomic changes associated with symbiosis in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida, an important model system for coral symbiosis. Lipid extracts from A. pallida in and out of symbiosis with its symbiont Symbiodinium were prepared and analyzed using negative-ion electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Through this analysis we have identified, by exact mass and collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (MS/MS, several classes of glycerophospholipids in A. pallida. Several molecular species of di-acyl phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine as well as 1-alkyl, 2-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidycholine were identified. The 1-alkyl, 2-acyl PEs are acid sensitive suggestive that they are plasmalogen PEs possessing a double bond at the 1-position of the alkyl linked chain. In addition, we identified several molecular species of phosphonosphingolipids called ceramide aminoethylphosphonates in anemone lipid extracts by the release of a characteristic negative product ion at m/z 124.014 during MS/MS analysis. Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG, an anionic lipid often found in photosynthetic organisms, was identified as a prominent component of Symbiodinium lipid extracts. A comparison of anemone lipid profiles revealed a subset of lipids that show dramatic differences in abundance when anemones are in the symbiotic state as

  7. Tenacibaculum aiptasiae sp. nov., isolated from a sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella.

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    Wang, Jih-Terng; Chou, Yi-Ju; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Chaolun Allen; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2008-04-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated a4T, isolated from a sea anemone (Aiptasia pulchella) in Taiwan, was characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Strain a4T was aerobic, Gram-negative, pale-yellow-pigmented and rod-shaped. It grew optimally at 30-35 degrees C, in the presence of 3-4 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 8.0. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain belonged to the genus Tenacibaculum (family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes). The closest neighbours were Tenacibaculum lutimaris TF-26T (97.6 % similarity) and Tenacibaculum aestuarii SMK-4T (97.7 % similarity). The novel isolate could be distinguished from all Tenacibaculum species by several phenotypic characteristics. The major fatty acids were summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1 omega 7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH, 19.6 %), iso-C15 : 0 (12.9 %), iso-C16 : 0 3-OH (10.2 %), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (9.9 %) and iso-C15 : 1 (9.5 %). The DNA G+C content was 35.0 mol%. Hence, genotypic and phenotypic data demonstrate that strain a4(T) should be classified as a representative of a novel species in the genus Tenacibaculum, for which the name Tenacibaculum aiptasiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is a4T (=BCRC 17655T =LMG 24004T). PMID:18398166

  8. Menthol-induced bleaching rapidly and effectively provides experimental aposymbiotic sea anemones (Aiptasia sp.) for symbiosis investigations.

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    Matthews, Jennifer L; Sproles, Ashley E; Oakley, Clinton A; Grossman, Arthur R; Weis, Virginia M; Davy, Simon K

    2016-02-01

    Experimental manipulation of the symbiosis between cnidarians and photosynthetic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) is crucial to advancing the understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in host-symbiont interactions, and overall coral reef ecology. The anemone Aiptasia sp. is a model for cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, and notably it can be rendered aposymbiotic (i.e. dinoflagellate-free) and re-infected with a range of Symbiodinium types. Various methods exist for generating aposymbiotic hosts; however, they can be hugely time consuming and not wholly effective. Here, we optimise a method using menthol for production of aposymbiotic Aiptasia. The menthol treatment produced aposymbiotic hosts within just 4 weeks (97-100% symbiont loss), and the condition was maintained long after treatment when anemones were held under a standard light:dark cycle. The ability of Aiptasia to form a stable symbiosis appeared to be unaffected by menthol exposure, as demonstrated by successful re-establishment of the symbiosis when anemones were experimentally re-infected. Furthermore, there was no significant impact on photosynthetic or respiratory performance of re-infected anemones. PMID:26596538

  9. The genome of Aiptasia, a sea anemone model for coral symbiosis.

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    Baumgarten, Sebastian; Simakov, Oleg; Esherick, Lisl Y; Liew, Yi Jin; Lehnert, Erik M; Michell, Craig T; Li, Yong; Hambleton, Elizabeth A; Guse, Annika; Oates, Matt E; Gough, Julian; Weis, Virginia M; Aranda, Manuel; Pringle, John R; Voolstra, Christian R

    2015-09-22

    The most diverse marine ecosystems, coral reefs, depend upon a functional symbiosis between a cnidarian animal host (the coral) and intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate algae. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this endosymbiosis are not well understood, in part because of the difficulties of experimental work with corals. The small sea anemone Aiptasia provides a tractable laboratory model for investigating these mechanisms. Here we report on the assembly and analysis of the Aiptasia genome, which will provide a foundation for future studies and has revealed several features that may be key to understanding the evolution and function of the endosymbiosis. These features include genomic rearrangements and taxonomically restricted genes that may be functionally related to the symbiosis, aspects of host dependence on alga-derived nutrients, a novel and expanded cnidarian-specific family of putative pattern-recognition receptors that might be involved in the animal-algal interactions, and extensive lineage-specific horizontal gene transfer. Extensive integration of genes of prokaryotic origin, including genes for antimicrobial peptides, presumably reflects an intimate association of the animal-algal pair also with its prokaryotic microbiome. PMID:26324906

  10. The genome of Aiptasia, a sea anemone model for coral symbiosis

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgarten, Sebastian

    2015-08-31

    The most diverse marine ecosystems, coral reefs, depend upon a functional symbiosis between a cnidarian animal host (the coral) and intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate algae. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this endosymbiosis are not well understood, in part because of the difficulties of experimental work with corals. The small sea anemone Aiptasia provides a tractable laboratory model for investigating these mechanisms. Here we report on the assembly and analysis of the Aiptasia genome, which will provide a foundation for future studies and has revealed several features that may be key to understanding the evolution and function of the endosymbiosis. These features include genomic rearrangements and taxonomically restricted genes that may be functionally related to the symbiosis, aspects of host dependence on alga-derived nutrients, a novel and expanded cnidarian-specific family of putative pattern-recognition receptors that might be involved in the animal–algal interactions, and extensive lineage-specific horizontal gene transfer. Extensive integration of genes of prokaryotic origin, including genes for antimicrobial peptides, presumably reflects an intimate association of the animal–algal pair also with its prokaryotic microbiome.

  11. Comparative effects of dissolved copper and copper oxide nanoparticle exposure to the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Differences between CuO NP and CuCl2 exposure were characterized. • Copper accumulation in E. pallida was concentration-dependent. • E. pallida exposed to CuCl2 accumulated higher copper tissue burdens. • The oxidative stress response was greater in E. pallida exposed to CuO NP. • Both forms of copper inhibited CA activity in E. pallida. - Abstract: Increasing use of metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) by various industries has resulted in substantial output of these NP into aquatic systems. At elevated concentrations, NP may interact with and potentially affect aquatic organisms. Environmental implications of increased NP use are largely unknown, particularly in marine systems. This research investigated and compared the effects of copper oxide (CuO) NP and dissolved copper, as copper chloride (CuCl2), on the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida. Sea anemones were collected over 21 days and tissue copper accumulation and activities of the enzymes: catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and carbonic anhydrase were quantified. The size and shape of CuO NP were observed using a ecanning electron microscope (SEM) and the presence of copper was confirmed by using Oxford energy dispersive spectroscopy systems (EDS/EDX). E. pallida accumulated copper in their tissues in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with the animals exposed to CuCl2 accumulating higher tissue copper burdens than those exposed to CuO NP. As a consequence of increased copper exposure, as CuO NP or CuCl2, anemones increased activities of all of the antioxidant enzymes measured to some degree, and decreased the activity of carbonic anhydrase. Anemones exposed to CuO NP generally had higher anti-oxidant enzyme activities than those exposed to the same concentrations of CuCl2. This study is useful in discerning differences between CuO NP and dissolved copper exposure and the findings have implications for exposure of aquatic organisms to NP in the environment

  12. Comparative effects of dissolved copper and copper oxide nanoparticle exposure to the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Samreen; Goddard, Russell H.; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K., E-mail: gkbielmyer@valdosta.edu

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Differences between CuO NP and CuCl{sub 2} exposure were characterized. • Copper accumulation in E. pallida was concentration-dependent. • E. pallida exposed to CuCl{sub 2} accumulated higher copper tissue burdens. • The oxidative stress response was greater in E. pallida exposed to CuO NP. • Both forms of copper inhibited CA activity in E. pallida. - Abstract: Increasing use of metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) by various industries has resulted in substantial output of these NP into aquatic systems. At elevated concentrations, NP may interact with and potentially affect aquatic organisms. Environmental implications of increased NP use are largely unknown, particularly in marine systems. This research investigated and compared the effects of copper oxide (CuO) NP and dissolved copper, as copper chloride (CuCl{sub 2}), on the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida. Sea anemones were collected over 21 days and tissue copper accumulation and activities of the enzymes: catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and carbonic anhydrase were quantified. The size and shape of CuO NP were observed using a ecanning electron microscope (SEM) and the presence of copper was confirmed by using Oxford energy dispersive spectroscopy systems (EDS/EDX). E. pallida accumulated copper in their tissues in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with the animals exposed to CuCl{sub 2} accumulating higher tissue copper burdens than those exposed to CuO NP. As a consequence of increased copper exposure, as CuO NP or CuCl{sub 2}, anemones increased activities of all of the antioxidant enzymes measured to some degree, and decreased the activity of carbonic anhydrase. Anemones exposed to CuO NP generally had higher anti-oxidant enzyme activities than those exposed to the same concentrations of CuCl{sub 2}. This study is useful in discerning differences between CuO NP and dissolved copper exposure and the findings have implications for exposure of aquatic

  13. Responses of the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida, to ocean acidification conditions and copper exposure.

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    Siddiqui, Samreen; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is a growing concern due to its deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. Additionally, the combined effects of OA and other local stressors like metal pollution are largely unknown. In this study, we examined physiological effects in the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida after exposure to the global stressor carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as the local stressor copper (Cu) over 7 days. Cu accumulated in the tissues of E. pallida in a concentration-dependent manner. At some time points, sea anemones exposed to 1000 ppm CO2 had higher tissue Cu concentrations than those exposed to 400 ppm CO2 at the same Cu exposure concentrations. In general, the activities of all anti-oxidant enzymes measured (catalase, CAT; glutathione peroxidase, GPx, glutathione reductase, GR) increased with exposure to increasing Cu concentrations. Significant differences in GR, CAT and to some degree GPx activity, were observed due to increasing CO2 exposure in control treatments. Sea anemones exposed to Cu in combination with higher CO2 generally had higher anti-oxidant enzyme activities than those exposed to the same concentration of Cu and lower CO2. Activity of the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), involved in acid-base balance, was significantly decreased with increasing Cu exposure. At the two lowest Cu concentrations, the extent of CA inhibition was lessened with increasing CO2 concentration. These results provide insight into toxic mechanisms of both Cu and CO2 exposure to the sensitive cnidarian E. pallida and have implications for environmental exposure of multiple contaminants. PMID:26363274

  14. Nutrients, signals, and photosynthetic release by symbiotic algae. The impact of taurine on the dinoflagellate alga Symbiodinium from the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exogenous concentrations of 10 micromolar to 1 mM of the nonprotein amino acid taurine stimulated photosynthate release from the dinoflagellate alga Symbiodinium, which had been freshly isolated from the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella. Photosynthate release, as induced by taurine and animal extract, was metabolically equivalent at both concentrations in that they (a) stimulated photosynthate release to the same extent and (b) induced the selective release of photosynthetically derived organic acids. A complex mixture of amino acids at 75 mM also promoted photosynthate release, but the release rate was reduced by 34% after the omission of taurine (3 mM) from the mixture, suggesting that much of the effect of amino acids was largely attributable to taurine. Exogenous 14C-labeled taurine was taken up by the cells, and more than 95% of the internalized 14C was recovered as taurine, indicating that taurine-induced photosynthate release was not dependent on taurine metabolism. Both taurine uptake and taurine-induced photosynthate release by Symbiodinium exhibited saturation kinetics, but with significantly different Km values of 68 and 21 micromolar, respectively. The difference in Km values is compatible with the hypothesis that Symbiodinium has a taurine signal transducer that is responsible for photosynthate release and is distinct from the taurine transporter

  15. Comparative sensitivity of the cnidarian Exaiptasia pallida and a standard toxicity test suite: testing whole effluents intended for ocean disposal.

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    Howe, P L; Reichelt-Brushett, A J; Krassoi, R; Micevska, T

    2015-09-01

    The sea anemone Exaiptasia pallida (formally Aiptasia pulchella) has been identified as a valuable test species for tropical marine ecotoxicology. Here, the sensitivities of newly developed endpoints for E. pallida to two unidentified whole effluents were compared to a standard suite of temperate toxicity test species and endpoints that are commonly used in toxicological risk assessments for tropical marine environments. For whole effluent 1 (WE1), a 96-h lethal concentration 50 % (LC50) of 40 (95 % confidence intervals, 30-54) % v/v and a 12-day LC50 of 12 (9-15) % v/v were estimated for E. pallida, exhibiting a significantly higher sensitivity than standard sub-lethal endpoints in Allorchestes compressa (96-h effective concentration 50 % (EC50) of >100 % v/v for immobilisation) and Hormosira banksii (72-h EC50 of >100 % v/v for germination), and a similar sensitivity to Mytilus edulis galloprovincialis larval development with a 48-h LC50 of 29 (28-30) % v/v. Sub-lethal effects of whole effluent 2 (WE2) on E. pallida pedal lacerate development resulted in an 8-day EC50 of 7 (3-11) % v/v, demonstrating comparable sensitivity of this endpoint to standardised sub-lethal endpoints in H. banksii (72-h EC50 of 11 (10-11) % v/v for germination), M. edulis galloprovincialis (48-h EC50 for larval development of 12 (9-14) % v/v) and Heliocidaris tuberculata (1-h EC50 of 13 (12-14) % v/v for fertilisation; 72-h EC50 of 26 (25-27) % v/v for larval development) and a significantly higher sensitivity than A. compressa immobilisation (96-h EC50 of >100 % v/v). The sensitivity of E. pallida compared to a standard test species suite highlights the value in standardising the newly developed toxicity test methods for inclusion in routine toxicological risk assessment of complex whole effluents. Importantly, this species provides an additional taxonomic group to the test species that are currently available for tropical marine ecotoxicology and

  16. Symbiosis induces widespread changes in the proteome of the model cnidarian Aiptasia.

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    Oakley, Clinton A; Ameismeier, Michael F; Peng, Lifeng; Weis, Virginia M; Grossman, Arthur R; Davy, Simon K

    2016-07-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are metabolically founded on the mutualism between corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. The glass anemone Aiptasia sp. has become a tractable model for this symbiosis, and recent advances in genetic information have enabled the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics in this model. We utilized label-free liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the effects of symbiosis on the proteomes of symbiotic and aposymbiotic Aiptasia. We identified and obtained relative quantification of more than 3,300 proteins in 1,578 protein clusters, with 81 protein clusters showing significantly different expression between symbiotic states. Symbiotic anemones showed significantly higher expression of proteins involved in lipid storage and transport, nitrogen transport and cycling, intracellular trafficking, endocytosis and inorganic carbon transport. These changes reflect shifts in host metabolism and nutrient reserves due to increased nutritional exchange with the symbionts, as well as mechanisms for supplying inorganic nutrients to the algae. Aposymbiotic anemones exhibited increased expression of multiple systems responsible for mediating reactive oxygen stress, suggesting that the host derives direct or indirect protection from oxidative stress while in symbiosis. Aposymbiotic anemones also increased their expression of an array of proteases and chitinases, indicating a metabolic shift from autotrophy to heterotrophy. These results provide a comprehensive Aiptasia proteome with more direct relative quantification of protein abundance than transcriptomic methods. The extension of "omics" techniques to this model system will allow more powerful studies of coral physiology, ecosystem function, and the effects of biotic and abiotic stress on the coral-dinoflagellate mutualism. PMID:26716757

  17. A journey into the wild of the cnidarian model system Aiptasia and its symbionts

    KAUST Repository

    Voolstra, Christian R.

    2013-08-27

    The existence of coral reef ecosystems relies critically on the mutualistic relationship between calcifying cnidarians and photosynthetic, dinoflagellate endosymbionts in the genus Symbiodinium. Reef-corals have declined globally due to anthropogenic stressors, for example, rising sea-surface temperatures and pollution that often disrupt these symbiotic relationships (known as coral bleaching), exacerbating mass mortality and the spread of disease. This threatens one of the most biodiverse marine ecosystems providing habitats to millions of species and supporting an estimated 500 million people globally (Hoegh-Guldberg et al. 2007). Our understanding of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses has improved notably with the recent application of genomic and transcriptomic tools (e.g. Voolstra et al. 2009; Bayer et al. 2012; Davy et al. 2012), but a model system that allows for easy manipulation in a laboratory environment is needed to decipher underlying cellular mechanisms important to the functioning of these symbioses. To this end, the sea anemone Aiptasia, otherwise known as a \\'pest\\' to aquarium hobbyists, is emerging as such a model system (Schoenberg & Trench 1980; Sunagawa et al. 2009; Lehnert et al. 2012). Aiptasia is easy to grow in culture and, in contrast to its stony relatives, can be maintained aposymbiotically (i.e. dinoflagellate free) with regular feeding. However, we lack basic information on the natural distribution and genetic diversity of these anemones and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates. These data are essential for placing the significance of this model system into an ecological context. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Thornhill et al. (2013) are the first to present genetic evidence on the global distribution, diversity and population structure of Aiptasia and its associated Symbiodinium spp. By integrating analyses of the host and symbiont, this research concludes that the current Aitpasia taxonomy probably needs revision and that two

  18. Aiptasia sp. larvae as a model to reveal mechanisms of symbiont selection in cnidarians

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    Wolfowicz, Iliona; Baumgarten, Sebastian; Voss, Philipp A.; Hambleton, Elizabeth A.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Hatta, Masayuki; Guse, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis, defined as the persistent association between two distinct species, is an evolutionary and ecologically critical phenomenon facilitating survival of both partners in diverse habitats. The biodiversity of coral reef ecosystems depends on a functional symbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the highly diverse genus Symbiodinium, which reside in coral host cells and continuously support their nutrition. The mechanisms underlying symbiont selection to establish a stable endosymbiosis in non-symbiotic juvenile corals are unclear. Here we show for the first time that symbiont selection patterns for larvae of two Acropora coral species and the model anemone Aiptasia are similar under controlled conditions. We find that Aiptasia larvae distinguish between compatible and incompatible symbionts during uptake into the gastric cavity and phagocytosis. Using RNA-Seq, we identify a set of candidate genes potentially involved in symbiosis establishment. Together, our data complement existing molecular resources to mechanistically dissect symbiont phagocytosis in cnidarians under controlled conditions, thereby strengthening the role of Aiptasia larvae as a powerful model for cnidarian endosymbiosis establishment. PMID:27582179

  19. Aiptasia sp. larvae as a model to reveal mechanisms of symbiont selection in cnidarians.

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    Wolfowicz, Iliona; Baumgarten, Sebastian; Voss, Philipp A; Hambleton, Elizabeth A; Voolstra, Christian R; Hatta, Masayuki; Guse, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis, defined as the persistent association between two distinct species, is an evolutionary and ecologically critical phenomenon facilitating survival of both partners in diverse habitats. The biodiversity of coral reef ecosystems depends on a functional symbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the highly diverse genus Symbiodinium, which reside in coral host cells and continuously support their nutrition. The mechanisms underlying symbiont selection to establish a stable endosymbiosis in non-symbiotic juvenile corals are unclear. Here we show for the first time that symbiont selection patterns for larvae of two Acropora coral species and the model anemone Aiptasia are similar under controlled conditions. We find that Aiptasia larvae distinguish between compatible and incompatible symbionts during uptake into the gastric cavity and phagocytosis. Using RNA-Seq, we identify a set of candidate genes potentially involved in symbiosis establishment. Together, our data complement existing molecular resources to mechanistically dissect symbiont phagocytosis in cnidarians under controlled conditions, thereby strengthening the role of Aiptasia larvae as a powerful model for cnidarian endosymbiosis establishment. PMID:27582179

  20. The Genome of Aiptasia and the Role of MicroRNAs in Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Endosymbiosis

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgarten, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs form marine-biodiversity hotspots of enormous ecological, economic, and aesthetic importance that rely energetically on a functional symbiosis between the coral animal and a photosynthetic alga. The ongoing decline of corals worldwide due to anthropogenic influences heightens the need for an experimentally tractable model system to elucidate the molecular and cellular biology underlying the symbiosis and its susceptibility or resilience to stress. The small sea anemone Aiptasia is such a model organism and the main aims of this dissertation were 1) to assemble and analyze its genome as a foundational resource for research in this area and 2) to investigate the role of miRNAs in modulating gene expression during the onset and maintenance of symbiosis. The genome analysis has revealed numerous features of interest in relation to the symbiotic lifestyle, including the evolution of transposable elements and taxonomically restricted genes, linkage of host and symbiont metabolism pathways, a novel family of putative pattern-recognition receptors that might function in host-microbe interactions and evidence for horizontal gene transfer within the animal-alga pair as well as with the associated prokaryotic microbiome. The new genomic resource was used to annotate the Aiptasia miRNA repertoire to illuminate the role of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in regulating endosymbiosis. Aiptasia encodes a majority of species-specific miRNAs and first evidence is presented that even evolutionary conserved miRNAs are undergoing recent differentiations within the Aiptasia genome. The analysis of miRNA expression between different states of Symbiodinium infection further revealed that species-specific and conserved miRNAs are symbiotically regulated. In order to detect functional miRNA-mRNA interactions and to investigate the downstream effects of such miRNA action, a protocol for cross-linking immunoprecipitations of Argonaute, the central protein of the mi

  1. HISTOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF THE SEA ANEMONE A. PALLIDA TO BLEACHING INDUCING STRESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Fransolet, David

    2014-01-01

    Tropical Coral reefs are among the richest and most important ecosystem on Earth. This success would not be possible without the symbiosis established between corals and unicellular algae of the genus Symbiodinium that provide them with photosynthesis-derived carbon. Unfortunately, with the climatic upheaval that we witness today, the long-term survival of coral reefs could be in jeopardy. Massive loss of symbiotic algae, a phenomenon known as coral bleaching, becomes indeed more and more fre...

  2. Elevated temperature inhibits recruitment of transferrin-positive vesicles and induces iron-deficiency genes expression in Aiptasia pulchella host-harbored Symbiodinium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Po-Ching; Wu, Tsung-Meng; Hong, Ming-Chang; Chen, Ming-Chyuan

    2015-10-01

    Coral bleaching is the consequence of disruption of the mutualistic Cnidaria-dinoflagellate association. Elevated seawater temperatures have been proposed as the most likely cause of coral bleaching whose severity is enhanced by a limitation in the bioavailability of iron. Iron is required by numerous organisms including the zooxanthellae residing inside the symbiosome of cnidarian cells. However, the knowledge of how symbiotic zooxanthellae obtain iron from the host cells and how elevated water temperature affects the association is very limited. Since cellular iron acquisition is known to be mediated through transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis, a vesicular trafficking pathway specifically regulated by Rab4 and Rab5, we set out to examine the roles of these key proteins in the iron acquisition by the symbiotic Symbiodinium. Thus, we hypothesized that the iron recruitments into symbiotic zooxanthellae-housed symbiosomes may be dependent on rab4/rab5-mediated fusion with vesicles containing iron-bound transferrins and will be retarded under elevated temperature. In this study, we cloned a novel monolobal transferrin (ApTF) gene from the tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and confirmed that the association of ApTF with A. pulchella Rab4 (ApRab4) or A. pulchella Rab5 (ApRab5) vesicles is inhibited by elevated temperature through immunofluorescence analysis. We confirmed the iron-deficient phenomenon by demonstrating the induced overexpression of iron-deficiency-responsive genes, flavodoxin and high-affinity iron permease 1, and reduced intracellular iron concentration in zooxanthellae under desferrioxamine B (iron chelator) and high temperature treatment. In conclusion, our data are consistent with algal iron deficiency being a contributing factor for the thermal stress-induced bleaching of symbiotic cnidarians. PMID:25997368

  3. Activation of hatching in diapaused and quiescent Globodera pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Jones, John T; Cock, Peter J; Castillo, Pablo; Blok, Vivian C

    2013-04-01

    The potato cyst nematodes (PCN) Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis are major pests of potatoes. The G. pallida (and G. rostochiensis) life cycle includes both diapause and quiescent stages. Nematodes in dormancy (diapause or quiescent) are adapted for long-term survival and are more resistant to nematicides. This study analysed the mechanisms underlying diapause and quiescence. The effects of several compounds (8Br-cGMP, oxotremorine and atropine) on the activation of hatching were studied. The measurements of some morphometric parameters in diapaused and quiescent eggs after exposure to PRD revealed differences in dorsal gland length, subventral gland length and dorsal gland nucleolus. In addition, the expression of 2 effectors (IVg9 and cellulase) was not induced in diapaused eggs in water or PRD, while expression was slightly induced in quiescent eggs. Finally, we performed a comparative study to identify orthologues of C. elegans diapause related genes in plant-parasitic nematodes (G. pallida, Meloidogyne incognita, M. hapla and Bursaphelenchus xylophilus). This analysis suggested that it was not possible to identify G. pallida orthologues of the majority of C. elegans genes involved in the control of dauer formation. All these data suggest that G. pallida may use different mechanisms to C. elegans in regulating the survival stage. PMID:23253858

  4. Unravelling the role of zooxanthellae in the uptake and depuration of an essential metal in Exaiptasia pallida; an experiment using a model cnidarian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examined zooxanthellae and tissue zinc partitioning in Exaiptasia pallida. • Zooxanthellae density has a strong influence on whole organism metal loading. • Zooxanthellae loss through stress is likely to result in metal depuration. • There are implications for interpreting studies of metal loads in symbiotic organisms. • Studies of metal loads in symbiotic organisms must consider zooxanthellae density. - Abstract: Coral skeletons record historical trace metal levels in the environment, however, the use of coral skeletal records for biomonitoring studies mostly fail to consider the influence of metal regulation by the living components of coral and subsequent incorporation into the skeleton. This study presents Exaiptasia pallida as a representative of the living components of coral and shows metal partitioning between the tissue and zooxanthellae after chronic exposure to Zn. A strong tendency for preferential accumulation in the zooxanthellae occurred after 32 days exposure and Zn concentrations in tissue and zooxanthellae were 123.3 ± 0.7 mg kg−1 and 294.9 ± 8.5 respectively. This study shows zooxanthellae density plays an important role in controlling Zn loading in whole anemones and must be considered when investigating metal uptake and loading in zooxanthellate organisms. Further studies that investigate links between aragonite deposition rates and zooxanthellae density and incorporation pathways of metals into skeleton are warranted

  5. Chemical constituents from rhizome of Anemone amurensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chong-Ning; Li, Yan-Jiao; Wang, Jing; Qin, Ru-Lan; Lei, Tian-Li; Lu, Jin-Cai

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the 70% EtOH extract of the rhizome of Anemone amurensis led to the isolation of two new oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins 1 and 2. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and spectral analysis, including 1D, 2D NMR data, and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 1 and 2 were tested for cytotoxicities against two human cancer cell lines (A549 and Hep-G2). Compound 2 showed potent cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 38.53 and 66.17 μM, respectively, while compound 1 with IC50 > 100 μM. PMID:26978669

  6. Natural history of Javeta pallida Baly, 1858 on Phoenix palms in India (Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae, Coelaenomenoderini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameem, Koormath Mohammed; Prathapan, Kaniyarikkal Divakaran; Nasser, Mannankadiyan; Chaboo, Caroline Simmrita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Members of the Old World hispine tribe, Coelaenomenoderini, are documented on host plants of Arecaceae, Cyperaceae, and Zingiberales. A few species are renowned pests of oil palm, especially in Africa. The host plants and natural history of Javeta pallida Baly, 1858, the only Indian species of the tribe, is reported for the first time. These beetles can densely infest indigenous wild date palms, Phoenix sylvestris (L.) Roxb. (Arecaceae), and also use the introduced date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L., which is an expanding crop in India. Javeta females lay single eggs and cover each with an ootheca. All larval stages mine the leaves and pupation occurs within the larval mine. Adults are exophagous, leaving linear feeding trenches. Natural and induced infestations of Javeta pallida on these two palms were observed and the potential of Javeta pallida as a pest of date palm in India is discussed. Javeta pallida completed development on Phoenix palms in 52–88 days (mean 66.38 days) with egg period 11–15 days (mean 12.8 days), larval period 21–54 days (mean 33.02 days) and pupal period 17–23 days (mean 20.52 days). Elasmus longiventris Verma and Hayat and Pediobius imbreus Walker (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) parasitize the larva and pupa of Javeta pallida. PMID:27408585

  7. Searching for a toxic key to unlock the mystery of anemonefish and anemone symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M Nedosyko

    Full Text Available Twenty-six species of anemonefish of the genera Amphiprion and monospecific Premnas, use only 10 species of anemones as hosts in the wild (Families: Actiniidae, Stichodactylidae and Thalassianthidae. Of these 10 anemone species some are used by multiple species of anemonefish while others have only a single anemonefish symbiont. Past studies have explored the different patterns of usage between anemonefish species and anemone species; however the evolution of this relationship remains unknown and has been little studied over the past decade. Here we reopen the case, comparing the toxicity of crude venoms obtained from anemones that host anemonefish as a way to investigate why some anemone species are used as a host more than others. Specifically, for each anemone species we investigated acute toxicity using Artemia francisca (LC50, haemolytic toxicity using ovine erythrocytes (EC50 and neurotoxicity using shore crabs (Ozius truncatus. We found that haemolytic and neurotoxic activity varied among host anemone species. Generally anemone species that displayed greater haemolytic activity also displayed high neurotoxic activity and tend to be more toxic on average as indicated by acute lethality analysis. An overall venom toxicity ranking for each anemone species was compared with the number of anemonefish species that are known to associate with each anemone species in the wild. Interestingly, anemones with intermediate toxicity had the highest number of anemonefish associates, whereas anemones with either very low or very high toxicity had the fewest anemonefish associates. These data demonstrate that variation in toxicity among host anemone species may be important in the establishment and maintenance of anemonefish anemone symbiosis.

  8. Two new triterpenoid saponins from rhizome of Anemone raddeana Regel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Li; Lu, Jincai; Wang, Jing;

    2009-01-01

    Two new 27-hydroxyoleanolic acid-type triterpenoid saponins, raddeanoside Ra (1) and raddeanoside Rb (2), were isolated from the rhizome of Anemone raddeana Regel. The structures of the two compounds were elucidated to be 27-hydroxyoleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D: -glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 4)-alpha...

  9. First observations of attempted nudibranch predation by sea anemones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, van der S.E.T.; Reijnen, B.T.

    2011-01-01

    On two separate occasions during fieldwork in Semporna (eastern Sabah, Malaysia), sea anemones of the family Edwardsiidae were observed attempting to feed on the nudibranch species Nembrotha lineolata and Phyllidia ocellata. These are the first in situ observations of nudibranch predation by sea ane

  10. Neutron activation analysis of Tradescantia Pallida plant for environmental pollutant monitoring; Analise por ativacao com neutrons da planta Tradescantia Pallida para uso na monitoracao de poluentes atmosfericos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavaraya, Andre K.; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sumita, Nairo M.; Saldiva, Paulo H.N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2002-07-01

    Tradescantia pallida (Rose) D.R. Hunt. cv. Purpurea is a plant from Commelinaceae family easily cultivated even in regions with high level of pollution. In recent years, Tradescantia plants have become widely acknowledged for detection of clastogenic effects of heavy metal ions by micronuclei assay and it is suggested to be used to biomonitor metal-contaminated soils. In this work, elemental concentrations were determined in T. pallida plant leaves collected in two sites of Sao Paulo city: Jabaquara and Cidade Universitaria and from a clean region called Caucaia do Norte, to evaluate the possibility of using this species in the atmospheric pollutant biomonitoring. The method of instrumental neutron activation analysis was used in the evaluation of elements accumulated by this plant. Comparisons were made between the results obtained for T. pallida from different sites. The accuracy and the precision of the analytical results were also evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials NIST 1515 Apple Leaves and NIST 1570a Spinach Leaves. (author)

  11. Density-dependent phytotoxicity of impatiens pallida plants exposed to extracts of Alliaria petiolata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barto, E Kathryn; Cipollini, Don

    2009-04-01

    Invasive plants are by definition excellent competitors, either indirectly through competition for resources or directly through allelopathic inhibition of neighboring plants. Although both forms of competition are commonly studied, attempts to explore the interactions between direct and indirect competition are rare. We monitored the effects of several doses of extracts of Alliaria petiolata, a Eurasian invader in North America, on the growth of Impatiens pallida, a North American native, at several planting densities. The density-dependent phytotoxicity model predicts that as plant density increases, individual plant size will decrease, unless a toxin is present in the soil. In this case, individual plant size is predicted to increase as plant density increases, as plants share a limited toxin dose. We tested this model using fractions of an A. petiolata extract enriched in flavonoids or glucosinolates, as well as a combined fraction. The flavonoid-enriched fraction and the combined fraction suppressed I. pallida growth but only when applied at a dose eight times higher than that expected in the field. When treated with a dose equivalent to estimated field exposure levels, I. pallida growth was not distinguishable from that of control plants that received no extract, showing that indirect competition for resources was more important for determining the growth of I. pallida than direct allelopathic inhibition by A. petiolata. This is an important reminder that, even though many plants have the demonstrated potential to exert strong allelopathic effects, those effects may not always be apparent when other forms of competition are considered as well. PMID:19381723

  12. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids Negatively Affect a Generalist Herbivore Feeding on the Chemically Protected Legume Crotalaria pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogni, R; Trigo, J R

    2016-06-01

    Plant secondary metabolites can have opposing effects on adapted specialist and non-adapted, generalist herbivores. In this study, we used Heliothis virescens (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) as a generalist, non-adapted model herbivore to test the possible effects of Crotalaria pallida (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae) defenses on herbivore performance. Neonate H. virescens larvae were able to consume C. pallida leaves and fruits and grow for a few instars, but none of them survived to pupation. We added isolated pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) to an artificial diet at different concentrations, and PA concentration significantly affected the number of larvae that achieved pupation. Larval survival was not reduced at a PA concentration similar to the concentration on green seeds of C. pallida, but it was significantly reduced at PA concentration 5 and 100 times higher. These results suggest that PAs in isolation are not the defense responsible for the mortality in fresh C. pallida plants, indicating the importance of other possible defenses. The negative effect of PAs on fitness of the non-adapted, generalist herbivore is in agreement with few previous studies, but it is in clear contrast to a previous study on the effects of PAs on the adapted specialist herbivore Utetheisa ornatrix (L.) that were able to sequester PAs with no fitness costs. PMID:26830432

  13. Characterization of inorganic constituents in leaves of Tradescantia pallida species by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the element levels in T. pallida leaves, as well as, to establish appropriate experimental conditions for sampling and preparation the sample for the elemental analysis. Leaves of this plant species were collected in different sites of Sao Paulo state. The method of neutron activation analysis (NAA) was applied in the element determinations. To evaluate the accuracy and the precision of the results, a certified reference material INCT-MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs was analyzed. The results obtained in these analyses indicated good precision and agreement with the certified values. The relative errors and the relative standard deviations obtained were lower than 8.2% and 8.6%, respectively. Results obtained in the replicate analyses of T. pallida samples also presented good reproducibility indicating the homogeneity of the prepared sample. In the analyses of young and adult leaves separately, higher concentrations of most of the elements were found in adult leaves than those in young ones. A preliminary comparison made between the results obtained for T. pallida leaves collected in different sites indicated differences depending on the element. The results indicated a good precision with the relative standard deviations lower than 11.3%, except Br. The findings of this study indicated the possibility of using T. pallida in an active biomonitoring by exposure of this plant species cultivated in vases. (author)

  14. Microbial Communities in Globodera pallida Females Raised in Potato Monoculture Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Caroline; Heuer, Holger; Vidal, Stefan; Westphal, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Globodera spp. are under strict quarantine in many countries. Suppressiveness to cyst nematodes can evolve under monoculture of susceptible hosts. Females developing in potato monoculture soil infested with G. pallida populations Chavornay or Delmsen were examined for inherent microbial communities. In the greenhouse, nonheated and heat-treated (134°C for 10 min) portions of this soil were placed in root observation chambers, planted with Solanum tuberosum 'Selma', and inoculated with G. pallida Pa3 Chavornay. At harvest in Delmsen soil, cysts had fewer eggs in nonheated than heat-treated soil. In denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, bacterial and fungal fingerprints were characterized by a high variability between replicates; nonheated soils displayed more dominant bands than heated soils, indicating more bacterial and fungal populations. In amplicon pyrosequencing, females from nonheated portions frequently contained internal transcribed spacer sequences of the fungus Malassezia. Specific for the Chavornay and Delmsen population, ribosomal sequences of the bacteria Burkolderia and Ralstonia were abundant on eggs. In this first report of microbial communities in G. pallida raised in potato monoculture, candidate microorganisms perhaps associated with the health status of the eggs of G. pallida were identified. If pathologies on cyst nematodes can be ascertained, these organisms could improve the sustainability of production systems. PMID:26863445

  15. MUTAGENESIS IN Tradescantia pallida AS A BIOMARKER OF THE EFFECTS OF WATER POLLUTED WITH URBAN EFFLUENT = MUTAGÊNESE EM Tradescantia pallida COMO BIOMARCADOR DE EFEITOS DE EFLUENTES URBANOS POLUÍDOS

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Lúzia de Souza Araújo; Eliane Tigre Guimarães; Robson Seriani

    2014-01-01

    The present paper evaluated the toxicity of effluent released into the Tiete River, in Barra Bonita City, São Paulo State, using the test micronucleus with Tradescantia pallida. Young inflorescences of T. pallida (n = 20) were partially immersed in one of three treatments: water containing effluent, a positive control (0.1% formaldehyde), and a negative control (distilled water). The results showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups, indicating the genotoxicity o...

  16. DNA extraction from sea anemone (Cnidaria: Actiniaria) tissues for molecular analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto S.M.; Fernandes-Matioli F.M.C.; Schlenz E.

    2000-01-01

    A specific DNA extraction method for sea anemones is described in which extraction of total DNA from eight species of sea anemones and one species of corallimorpharian was achieved by changing the standard extraction protocols. DNA extraction from sea anemone tissue is made more difficult both by the tissue consistency and the presence of symbiotic zooxanthellae. The technique described here is an efficient way to avoid problems of DNA contamination and obtain large amounts of purified and in...

  17. Cadherin-23 May Be Dynamic in Hair Bundles of the Model Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis

    OpenAIRE

    Pei-Ciao Tang; Watson, Glen M.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin 23 (CDH23), a component of tip links in hair cells of vertebrate animals, is essential to mechanotransduction by hair cells in the inner ear. A homolog of CDH23 occurs in hair bundles of sea anemones. Anemone hair bundles are located on the tentacles where they detect the swimming movements of nearby prey. The anemone CDH23 is predicted to be a large polypeptide featuring a short exoplasmic C-terminal domain that is unique to sea anemones. Experimentally masking this domain with anti...

  18. Sea Anemone (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Actiniaria Toxins: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Antunes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Cnidaria phylum includes organisms that are among the most venomous animals. The Anthozoa class includes sea anemones, hard corals, soft corals and sea pens. The composition of cnidarian venoms is not known in detail, but they appear to contain a variety of compounds. Currently around 250 of those compounds have been identified (peptides, proteins, enzymes and proteinase inhibitors and non-proteinaceous substances (purines, quaternary ammonium compounds, biogenic amines and betaines, but very few genes encoding toxins were described and only a few related protein three-dimensional structures are available. Toxins are used for prey acquisition, but also to deter potential predators (with neurotoxicity and cardiotoxicity effects and even to fight territorial disputes. Cnidaria toxins have been identified on the nematocysts located on the tentacles, acrorhagi and acontia, and in the mucous coat that covers the animal body. Sea anemone toxins comprise mainly proteins and peptides that are cytolytic or neurotoxic with its potency varying with the structure and site of action and are efficient in targeting different animals, such as insects, crustaceans and vertebrates. Sea anemones toxins include voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels toxins, acid-sensing ion channel toxins, Cytolysins, toxins with Kunitz-type protease inhibitors activity and toxins with Phospholipase A2 activity. In this review we assessed the phylogentic relationships of sea anemone toxins, characterized such toxins, the genes encoding them and the toxins three-dimensional structures, further providing a state-of-the-art description of the procedures involved in the isolation and purification of bioactive toxins.

  19. Environmental factors affect calcium oxalate crystals formation in tradescantia pallida (commelinaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tradescantia pallida has major types of calcium oxalate crystals i.e., raphide, prismatic, and druse that are widely distributed within collenchmya, cortical and vascular parenchyma in the stem. However, mechanisms involved in crystal formation in response to stress conditions are not properly understood. In order to evaluate formation of these crystals in response to heavy metals i.e., mercury, sections of control (untreated) and mercury treated plants were prepared, stained with toluidine blue and photographed (infinity software). Mercuric chloride at high doses increased all types of crystals as compared with low doses; suggesting that mercury stress increases metabolic activities of Tradescantia that produce crystals may be, in order to defend themselves. So in T. pallida, crystal formation is influenced by mercury stress that increased raphide and prismatic crystals in the treated plants. However, biochemical aspects involved in oxalic acid formation and release of Ca by Hg need to be explored more. (author)

  20. INAA applied to Tradescantia pallida plant study for environmental pollution monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, INAA was applied to analyse T. pallida plant in order to establish an adequate protocol for its sampling and treatment and so that it can be used for further environmental biomonitoring. Concentrations of most elements obtained in leaves, stems and flowers plus peduncles separately were found to have the same magnitude. Results obtained in leaf samples collected in several sites with distinct levels of pollution indicated that the cleaning of the sample must be done to eliminate dry and wet deposition on leaf surfaces. Moreover, concentrations of elements accumulated by plant depend on leaf age. Results obtained in this study have indicated the viability of using T. pallida in environmental pollution biomonitoring. (author)

  1. Intraspecific Variation in Ribosomal DNA in Populations of the Potato Cyst Nematode Globodera pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, V C; Malloch, G; Harrower, B; Phillips, M S; Vrain, T C

    1998-06-01

    The relationships among a number of populations of Globodera pallida from Britian, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, and South America were examined using PCR amplification of the ribosomal cistron between the 18S and 28S genes that include the two intergenic spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene. Amplifications produced a similar-sized product of 1150 bp from all populations. Digestion of the amplified fragment with a number of restriction enzymes showed differences among the populations. The restriction enzyme RsaI distinguished the most populations. The RFLP patterns revealed by this enzyme were complex and could have arisen from heterogeneity between individuals within populations and from differences between the repeats of an individual. Sequence analysis from six of the populations, together with RFLP analysis of PCR products, shows that there is intraspecific variation in the rDNA of G. pallida. PMID:19274220

  2. Estrogenic and mutagenic activities of Crotalaria pallida measured by recombinant yeast assay and Ames test

    OpenAIRE

    Boldrin, Paula Karina; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; Höhne, Ana Paula Oliveira; de Camargo, Mariana Santoro; Espanha, Lívia Greghi; Nogueira, Catarine Haidê; Melo, Maria do Socorro F; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Background Crotalaria pallida Ailton is a plant belonging to the Fabaceae family, popularly known as “rattle or rattlesnake” and used in traditional medicine to treat swelling of the joints and as a vermifuge. Previous pharmacological studies have also reported anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifungal activities. Nevertheless, scientific information regarding this species is scarce, and there are no reports related to its possible estrogenic and mutagenic effects. Thus, the purpose of ...

  3. Kariološka analiza nekih populacija vrsta Iris pallida, I. illyrica i I. pseudopallida (Iridaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Mitić, Božena

    1991-01-01

    Izvršena je kariološka analiza nekih populacija taksona Iris pallida Lam., I. illyrica Tomm. i I. pseudopallida Trinajstić. U svim slučajevima dobiven je mitotski broj kromosoma 2n = 24. Ustanovljena je morfološka varijabilnost kariotipova između istraživanih vrsta, kao i između različitih populacija vrste I. illyrica.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of Tradescantia Pallida plant for environmental pollutant monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tradescantia pallida (Rose) D.R. Hunt. cv. Purpurea is a plant from Commelinaceae family easily cultivated even in regions with high level of pollution. In recent years, Tradescantia plants have become widely acknowledged for detection of clastogenic effects of heavy metal ions by micronuclei assay and it is suggested to be used to biomonitor metal-contaminated soils. In this work, elemental concentrations were determined in T. pallida plant leaves collected in two sites of Sao Paulo city: Jabaquara and Cidade Universitaria and from a clean region called Caucaia do Norte, to evaluate the possibility of using this species in the atmospheric pollutant biomonitoring. The method of instrumental neutron activation analysis was used in the evaluation of elements accumulated by this plant. Comparisons were made between the results obtained for T. pallida from different sites. The accuracy and the precision of the analytical results were also evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials NIST 1515 Apple Leaves and NIST 1570a Spinach Leaves. (author)

  5. The reproduction of the anemone Sagartia troglodytes (PRICE): no influence of tidal manipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, H.; Bogaards, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The reproductive cycle and the glycogen content were monitored in the subtidal anemone Sagartia troglodytes (PRICE). Moreover, these parameters were followed for periods of 3 to 30 days over the course of 1 year in anemones previously submerged in stagnant water and thus subjected to a reduced food

  6. Parasitic anemone infects the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Møller, Lene Friis; Sundberg, Per;

    2010-01-01

    We report of the first finding of parasitic sea anemone larvae infecting the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic. Parasitic anemone larvae are common in the native habitat of Mnemiopsis, but have not previously been reported from any of the locations where Mnemiopsis...

  7. Anemonefish depletion reduces survival, growth, reproduction and fishery productivity of mutualistic anemone-anemonefish colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Ashley J.; Rizzari, Justin R.; Munkres, Katherine P.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Intimate knowledge of both partners in a mutualism is necessary to understand the ecology and evolution of each partner, and to manage human impacts that asymmetrically affect one of the partners. Although anemonefishes and their host anemones are iconic mutualists and widely sought by ornamental fisheries, the degree to which anemones depend on anemonefishes, and thus the colony-level effects of collecting anemonefishes, is not well understood. We tracked the size and abundance of anemone Entacmaea quadricolor and anemonefish Amphiprion melanopus colonies for 3 yr after none, some, or all of the resident anemonefish were experimentally removed. Total and partial removal of anemonefish had rapid and sustained negative effects on growth, reproduction and survival of anemones, as well as cascading effects on recruitment and productivity of anemonefish in the remaining colony. As predicted, total removal of anemonefish caused acute declines in size and abundance of anemones, although most anemone colonies (76 %) slowly resumed growth and reproduction after the arrival of anemonefish recruits, which subsequently grew and defended the hosts. Partial removal of anemonefish had similar but typically less severe effects on anemones. Remarkably, the colony-level effects on anemones and anemonefish were proportional to the size and number of anemonefish that were experimentally removed. In particular, anemone survival and anemonefish productivity were highest when one or more adult anemonefish remained in the colony, suggesting that adult fish not only enhanced the protection of anemones, but also increased the recruitment and/or survival of conspecifics. We conclude that the relationship between E. quadricolor and A. melanopus is not only obligate, but also demographically rigid and easily perturbed by anemonefish fisheries. Clearly, these two species must be managed together as a unit and with utmost precaution. To this end, we propose several tangible management actions

  8. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    KAUST Repository

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2013-08-08

    Background:Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms.Methodology/Principal Findings:This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species) at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%); however, this percentage was much higher (19-100%) during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance.Conclusions/Significance:Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked to the ability of host

  9. Taxonomic, spatial and temporal patterns of bleaching in anemones inhabited by anemonefishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul A Hobbs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments. Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%; however, this percentage was much higher (19-100% during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked

  10. Comprehensive EST analysis of the symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deleury Emeline

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reef ecosystems are renowned for their diversity and beauty. Their immense ecological success is due to a symbiotic association between cnidarian hosts and unicellular dinoflagellate algae, known as zooxanthellae. These algae are photosynthetic and the cnidarian-zooxanthellae association is based on nutritional exchanges. Maintenance of such an intimate cellular partnership involves many crosstalks between the partners. To better characterize symbiotic relationships between a cnidarian host and its dinoflagellate symbionts, we conducted a large-scale EST study on a symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis, in which the two tissue layers (epiderm and gastroderm can be easily separated. Results A single cDNA library was constructed from symbiotic tissue of sea anemones A. viridis in various environmental conditions (both normal and stressed. We generated 39,939 high quality ESTs, which were assembled into 14,504 unique sequences (UniSeqs. Sequences were analysed and sorted according to their putative origin (animal, algal or bacterial. We identified many new repeated elements in the 3'UTR of most animal genes, suggesting that these elements potentially have a biological role, especially with respect to gene expression regulation. We identified genes of animal origin that have no homolog in the non-symbiotic starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis genome, but in other symbiotic cnidarians, and may therefore be involved in the symbiosis relationship in A. viridis. Comparison of protein domain occurrence in A. viridis with that in N. vectensis demonstrated an increase in abundance of some molecular functions, such as protein binding or antioxidant activity, suggesting that these functions are essential for the symbiotic state and may be specific adaptations. Conclusion This large dataset of sequences provides a valuable resource for future studies on symbiotic interactions in Cnidaria. The comparison with the closest

  11. Extratos aquosos de Trichilia pallida e a traça-do-tomateiro Aqueous extracts of Trichilia pallida and the tomato pinworm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Paes de Barros Werckmeister Thomazini

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito de extratos aquosos de folhas e de ramos da planta inseticida Trichilia pallida sobre o desenvolvimento e oviposição da traça-do-tomateiro, Tuta absoluta. Acompanhou-se o desenvolvimento do inseto em folhas de tomateiro (Lycopersicon esculentum, cv. Santa Clara previamente submersas nos extratos nas concentrações de 0,1; 1,0 e 5,0%. Também foi avaliado o efeito dos extratos de folhas a 1,0 e 5,0%, pulverizados sobre ovos do inseto, e a não-preferência para oviposição, com chance de escolha, em folhas de tomateiro com e sem esse extrato a 5%. Verificou-se que os extratos de folhas e de ramos prejudicam o desenvolvimento do inseto afetando principalmente a fase larval, aumentando a duração e reduzindo a viabilidade deste período. O extrato de folhas apresenta maior atividade que o de ramos, reduzindo a viabilidade larval a valores próximos a 20%, já na concentração de 1%. O extrato de folhas a 5% não apresenta efeito ovicida mas, o substrato tratado pode tornar-se menos preferido para oviposição.The effect of aqueous extracts of Trichilia pallida leaves and twigs on the development and oviposition of Tuta absoluta was evaluated. Larvae of T. absoluta were fed with tomato leaves (Lycopersicon esculentum, cv. Santa Clara previously treated with extracts at concentrations of 0.1; 1.0 and 5.0%. The effects of the leaf extracts at 1.0 and 5.0% were evaluated on eggs of this pest. Free-choice non-preference tests for oviposition were also conducted with treated and non-treated tomato leaves with the extract at concentration of 5.0%. Leaf and twig extracts affect the insect development mainly at the larval stage, increasing the length and reducing viability of this stage. The activity of the leaf extract is greater than that of the twig extract with the reduction of larval viability to approximately 20% at concentration of 1.0%. No ovicidal activity was detected with T. pallida leaf extract at 5.0%, however, the

  12. DNA extraction from sea anemone (Cnidaria: Actiniaria tissues for molecular analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A specific DNA extraction method for sea anemones is described in which extraction of total DNA from eight species of sea anemones and one species of corallimorpharian was achieved by changing the standard extraction protocols. DNA extraction from sea anemone tissue is made more difficult both by the tissue consistency and the presence of symbiotic zooxanthellae. The technique described here is an efficient way to avoid problems of DNA contamination and obtain large amounts of purified and integral DNA which can be used in different kinds of molecular analyses.

  13. Molecular cloning of a peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase from sea anemones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, F; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    activity. No cDNA coding for PAL could be identified, suggesting that sea anemone PAL is coded for by a gene that is different from the sea anemone PHM gene, a situation similar to the one found in insects. This is the first report on the molecular cloning of a cnidarian PHM. Udgivelsesdato: 1997-Dec-18...... conserved regions of PHM, we have now cloned a PHM from the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica showing 42% amino acid sequence identity with rat PHM. Among the conserved (identical) amino acid residues are five histidine and one methionine residue, which bind two Cu2+ atoms that are essential for PHM...

  14. Cytotoxic Activity and G1 Cell Cycle Arrest of a Dienynone from Echinacea pallida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chicca, Andrea; Adinolfi, Barbara; Pellati, Federica; Orlandini, Giulia; Benvenuti, Stefania; Nieri, Paola

    2009-01-01

    (Jurkat and HL-60), breast carcinoma (MCF-7), and melanoma (MeWo) cells. As part of its mechanism of action, the ability of this constituent to arrest the cell cycle in the G1 phase was demonstrated on HL-60 cells. Furthermore, a stability test of the target compound over 72 h was carried out, indicating......In the present study, a further investigation of the cytotoxic activity of an acetylenic constituent of ECHINACEA PALLIDA roots, namely, pentadeca-(8 Z,13 Z)-dien-11-yn-2-one, was performed, revealing a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity on several human cancer cell lines, including leukemia...

  15. Biomonitoring of the air with Tradescantia pallida (Rose) D. R. Hunt var purpurea Boom (Commelinaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes Barbério; Mateus Cabral Vasconcellos Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    The population growth and the comfort generated by progress have greatly contributed with the increase in the air pollution, making the air in several urban centers polluted by substances that are harmful to human being. This study characterized the air quality in the city of Taubaté, Vale do Paraíba-SP using biomonitoring with Tradescantia pallida (Rose) D. R. Hunt purpurea Boom (Commelinaceae). The study was developed in a period of 10 months (September/2010 to June/2011) in five locations ...

  16. Analysis of Tradescantia pallida plant exposed in different sites for biomonitoring purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparisons were made between the results obtained for elements accumulated by Tradescantia pallida plant exposed in sites with different pollution levels: Cerqueira Cesar and Congonhas districts, considered polluted areas of Sao Paulo city, and Caucaia do Alto county, considered a non polluted site. Statistical test applied to the results indicated that plant samples from polluted areas presented higher concentrations of Ba, Ce, Cr, Co, Fe, La, Sb and Sc than those found for ones from a non-polluted site. Discriminant analysis applied to the results obtained revealed three groups of results corresponding to sites with different levels of pollution. (author)

  17. MUTAGENESIS IN Tradescantia pallida AS A BIOMARKER OF THE EFFECTS OF WATER POLLUTED WITH URBAN EFFLUENT = MUTAGÊNESE EM Tradescantia pallida COMO BIOMARCADOR DE EFEITOS DE EFLUENTES URBANOS POLUÍDOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúzia de Souza Araújo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper evaluated the toxicity of effluent released into the Tiete River, in Barra Bonita City, São Paulo State, using the test micronucleus with Tradescantia pallida. Young inflorescences of T. pallida (n = 20 were partially immersed in one of three treatments: water containing effluent, a positive control (0.1% formaldehyde, and a negative control (distilled water. The results showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 between groups, indicating the genotoxicity of the effluent. = O presente estudo avaliou a toxicidade de efluentes lançados no Rio Tietê, na cidade de Barra Bonita/SP, utilizando o teste do micronúcleo em Tradescantia pallida. Inflorescências jovens (n=20 de T. pallida foram parcialmente imersas em água do efluente e os outros dois grupos: controle positivo (0,1% de formaldeído e controle negativo (água destilada. Os resultados mostraram uma diferença estatisticamente significativa (p<0,05 entre os grupos, indicando genotoxicidade do efluente.

  18. The Antitumor Effects of Triterpenoid Saponins from the Anemone flaccida and the Underlying Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Lin-Tao Han; Ying Fang; Ming-Ming Li; Hong-Bing Yang; Fang Huang

    2013-01-01

    Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, a family of ancient hopanoids, have been used as traditional Asian herbs for the treatments of inflammation and convulsant diseases. Previous study on HeLa cells suggested that triterpenoid saponins from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt may have potential antitumor effect due to their apoptotic activities. Here, we confirmed the apoptotic activities of the following five triterpenoid saponins: glycoside St-I4a (1), glycoside St-J (2), anhuienoside E (3), hedera sapon...

  19. Determination of the Cl, Mg, Mn and Na, in samples of Tradescantia pallida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing number of industries and automotive vehicles are causing the increase of the air pollution. Less expensive methodologies are been studying for the evaluation of these pollution levels. This work evaluates the concentrations of Cl, Mg, Mn and Na, present in the leaves of Tradescantia pallida viewing validation of the specie for use in the bio monitoring of the air pollution. Those leaves were collected and analysed using the short irradiation of the neutron activation analysis technique. The certified reference material INCT-MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs were analysed for the quality control of the results and presented very good accuracy, with relative errors less than 4.2 %, and good precision less than 8.7 %. The element concentrations (in μg g-1) obtained in the T. pallida samples analysed showed variation from 2324 to 33897 for Cl, from 3602 to 14450 for Mg, from 132 to 314 for Mn, and 21 to 615 for Na. Values obtained in the analyses of Tradescantia present great variability in the element concentrations. The short irradiation showed to be appropriated for determination of the elements studied in the bio monitoring of air pollution

  20. Growth duration and root length density of Solanum sisymbriifolium (Lam.) as determinants of hatching of Globodera pallida (Stone)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, B.G.H.; Vos, J.; Stomph, T.J.; Nieuwburg, van J.G.W.; Putten, van der P.E.L.

    2006-01-01

    Solanum sisymbriifolium is a trap crop for potato cyst nematodes (PCN). In this study, we quantified the effect of different periods of growth of S. sisymbriifolium and root length density on hatching of Globodera pallida, using potato and fallow treatments as references. One-year-old and 2-year-old

  1. Analgesic Compound from Sea Anemone Heteractis crispa Is the First Polypeptide Inhibitor of Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1)*

    OpenAIRE

    Yaroslav A. Andreev; Kozlov, Sergey A.; Koshelev, Sergey G.; Ekaterina A. Ivanova; Monastyrnaya, Margarita M.; Kozlovskaya, Emma P.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2008-01-01

    Venomous animals from distinct phyla such as spiders, scorpions, snakes, cone snails, or sea anemones produce small toxic proteins interacting with a variety of cell targets. Their bites often cause pain. One of the ways of pain generation is the activation of TRPV1 channels. Screening of 30 different venoms from spiders and sea anemones for modulation of TRPV1 activity revealed inhibitors in tropical sea anemone Heteractis crispa venom. Several separation steps result...

  2. Continuous drug release by sea anemone Nematostella vectensis stinging microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yossi; Ayalon, Ari; Sharaev, Agnesa; Kazir, Zoya; Brekhman, Vera; Lotan, Tamar

    2014-02-01

    Transdermal delivery is an attractive option for drug delivery. Nevertheless, the skin is a tough barrier and only a limited number of drugs can be delivered through it. The most difficult to deliver are hydrophilic drugs. The stinging mechanism of the cnidarians is a sophisticated injection system consisting of microcapsular nematocysts, which utilize built-in high osmotic pressures to inject a submicron tubule that penetrates and delivers their contents to the prey. Here we show, for the first time, that the nematocysts of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis can be isolated and incorporated into a topical formulation for continuous drug delivery. We demonstrate quantitative delivery of nicotinamide and lidocaine hydrochloride as a function of microcapsular dose or drug exposure. We also show how the released submicron tubules can be exploited as a skin penetration enhancer prior to and independently of drug application. The microcapsules are non-irritant and may offer an attractive alternative for hydrophilic transdermal drug delivery. PMID:24473172

  3. The physiology and biochemistry of the Laminaria pallida/Carpoblepharis minima and Ecklonia maxima/Suhria vittata associations from south-western Cape waters, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two laminarian brown algae Laminaria pallida Grev. ex. J. Ag. and Ecklonia maxima were studied. The red algae, growing attached to the brown algae namely, Carpoblepharis minima Bart. and Suhria vittata (L.) J. Ag. Pallida/C. minima and E. maxima/S. vittata associations were studied. Carpoblepharis minima has only been observed on L. pallida, whereas S. vittata has been found attached to various substrates as well as to E. maxima. Physiological studies were undertaken on both brown and red algae. Translocation was found to occur in the brown algae at a velocity of 50-100mm h-1 in L. pallida and 240-300mm h-1 in E. maxima after incubation in seawater containing 14C-sodium bicarbonate (1μCi ml-1). Movement of 14C-assimilates in L. pallida was slower than in E. maxima probably due to a difference in the medulla structure. The only 14C-labelled assimilates in the brown/red algal association were the acyclic polyol mannitol and certain amino acids. Mannitol was the major translocant in L. pallida and E. maxima. The mannitol concentration varied seasonally. Studies using 15N-potassium nitrate showed that the major 'free' amino acids in L. pallida were alanine, glutamic acid and histadine, whereas in E. maxima they were alanine, glutamic acid and glutamine. The red algae contained mannitol and the major 'free' aminoacids were alanine, glutamine and histadine in C. minima and glutamine, glutamic acid and glycine in S. vittata. Both red algae were found to possess photosynthetic pigments, undergo 14C-assimilation and to incorporate exogenously supplied mannitol. There was transfer of the 14C-labelled assimilates of photosynthesis from the brown to the red algal partner in the L. pallida/C. minima association, but this did not occur in th E. maxima/S. vittata relationship

  4. The genome and life-stage specific transcriptomes of Globodera pallida elucidate key aspects of plant parasitism by a cyst nematode

    OpenAIRE

    Cotton, James A.; Lilley, Catherine J; Jones, Laura M.; Kikuchi, Taisei; Reid, Adam J; Thorpe, Peter; Tsai, Isheng J.; Beasley, Helen; Blok, Vivian; Cock, Peter J A; den Akker, Sebastian Eves-van; Holroyd, Nancy; Hunt, Martin; Mantelin, Sophie; Naghra, Hardeep

    2014-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 03/03/2014 Background: Globodera pallida is a devastating pathogen of potato crops, making it one of the most economically important plant parasitic nematodes. It is also an important model for the biology of cyst nematodes. Cyst nematodes and root-knot nematodes are the two most important plant parasitic nematode groups and together represent a global threat to food security. Results: We present the complete genome sequence of G. pallida, together with transcriptomic d...

  5. The expansion behaviour of sea anemones may be coordinated by two inhibitory neuropeptides, Antho-KAamide and Antho-RIamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McFarlane, I D; Hudman, D; Nothacker, H P;

    1993-01-01

    Antho-KAamide (L-3-phenyllactyl-Phe-Lys-Ala-NH2) and Antho-RIamide (L-3-phenyllactyl-Tyr-Arg-Ile-NH2) are novel neuropeptides isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. They both inhibited spontaneous contractions of isolated muscle preparations from a wide variety of anemone species...

  6. Masquerade, mimicry and crypsis of the polymorphic sea anemone Phyllodiscus semoni and its aggregations in South Sulawesi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, B.; Crowther, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Phyllodiscus semoni is a morphologically variable sea anemone species from the Indo-Pacific with morphotypes ranging from upright and branched to low-lying and rounded. The apparent camouflage strategies of this sea anemone allow it to resemble other species or objects in its environment, such as st

  7. Cadherin-23 may be dynamic in hair bundles of the model sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ciao Tang

    Full Text Available Cadherin 23 (CDH23, a component of tip links in hair cells of vertebrate animals, is essential to mechanotransduction by hair cells in the inner ear. A homolog of CDH23 occurs in hair bundles of sea anemones. Anemone hair bundles are located on the tentacles where they detect the swimming movements of nearby prey. The anemone CDH23 is predicted to be a large polypeptide featuring a short exoplasmic C-terminal domain that is unique to sea anemones. Experimentally masking this domain with antibodies or mimicking this domain with free peptide rapidly disrupts mechanotransduction and morphology of anemone hair bundles. The loss of normal morphology is accompanied, or followed by a decrease in F-actin in stereocilia of the hair bundles. These effects were observed at very low concentrations of the reagents, 0.1-10 nM, and within minutes of exposure. The results presented herein suggest that: (1 the interaction between CDH23 and molecular partners on stereocilia of hair bundles is dynamic and; (2 the interaction is crucial for normal mechanotransduction and morphology of hair bundles.

  8. Continuous Drug Release by Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis Stinging Microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Tal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal delivery is an attractive option for drug delivery. Nevertheless, the skin is a tough barrier and only a limited number of drugs can be delivered through it. The most difficult to deliver are hydrophilic drugs. The stinging mechanism of the cnidarians is a sophisticated injection system consisting of microcapsular nematocysts, which utilize built-in high osmotic pressures to inject a submicron tubule that penetrates and delivers their contents to the prey. Here we show, for the first time, that the nematocysts of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis can be isolated and incorporated into a topical formulation for continuous drug delivery. We demonstrate quantitative delivery of nicotinamide and lidocaine hydrochloride as a function of microcapsular dose or drug exposure. We also show how the released submicron tubules can be exploited as a skin penetration enhancer prior to and independently of drug application. The microcapsules are non-irritant and may offer an attractive alternative for hydrophilic transdermal drug delivery.

  9. Antimicrobial properties of sea anemone Stichodactyla mertensii and Stichodactyla gigantea from Mandapam coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Thangaraj; S Bragadeeswaran; K Suganthi; N Sri Kumaran

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial activities of the methanol and aqueous extract of sea anemone Stichodactyla mertensii (S. mertensii) and Stichodactyla gigantea (S. gigantea).Methods:The sea anemone S. mertensii and S. gigantea were subjected to extraction by using methanol and distilled water. They were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Results: In antibacterial activity, S. gigantea exhibited significantly inhibitory activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa than the S. mertensii of butanolic extract. In antifungal activity, the S. mertensii extract showed good activity against Aspergillus niger (A. niger)compared with other strains. Whereas S. gigantea recorded maximum and minimum zone of inhibition against Botrytis cinerea, A. niger and Cladosporium cucumerinum respectively. Conclusions: The results support that the sea anemones S. mertensii and S. gigantea extracts for treatment of some bacterial and fungal diseases as an ethanomedicinal source.

  10. Aboveground biomass in Prosopis pallida (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd.) H. B. K. ecosystems using Landsat 7 ETM+ images

    OpenAIRE

    Padrón, Eva; Navarro Cerrillo, Rafael M.

    2007-01-01

    The significance of field work in remote sensing studies when applied to large areas has often been underestimated. The combination of specific forest inventories for the estimation of aboveground biomass in large dry tropical forest areas with remote sensor data has scarcely been explored to date. In this work, a systematic, stratified forest inventory involving 100 × 100 m square plots in an area of Peruvian Prosopis pallida dry forest, roughly one million hectares in size in th...

  11. RAPD and microsatellite transferability studies in selected species of Prosopis (section Algarobia) with emphasis on Prosopis juliflora and P. pallida

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minu Sherry; Steve Smith; Ashok Patel; Phil Harris; Paul Hand; Liz Trenchard; Janey Henderson

    2011-08-01

    The genus Prosopis (Leguminosae, Mimosoideae), comprises 44 species widely distributed in arid and semi-arid zones. Prosopis pallida (Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd.) Kunth and P. juliflora (Sw.) DC. are the two species that are truly tropical apart from P. africana, which is native to tropical Africa (Pasiecznik et al. 2004), and they have been introduced widely beyond their native ranges. However, taxonomic confusion within the genus has hampered exploitation and better management of the species. The present study focusses primarily on evaluating the genetic relationship between Prosopis species from the section Algarobia, containing most species of economic importance, though P. tamarugo from section Strombocarpa is also included for comparison. In total, 12 Prosopis species and a putative P. pallida × P. chilensis hybrid were assessed for their genetic relationships based on RAPD markers and microsatellite transferability. The results show that P. pallida and P. juliflora are not closely related despite some morphological similarity. Evidence also agrees with previous studies which suggest that the grouping of series in section Algarobia is artificial.

  12. Juvenile Thalassoma amblycephalum Bleeker (Labridae, Teleostei) dwelling among the tentacles of sea anemones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvedlund, Michael; Iwao, Kenji; Brolund, Thea Marie;

    2006-01-01

    each) of the juvenile wrasse Thalassoma amblycephalum dwelling among the tentacles of the two sea anemones Entacmaea quadricolor (clonal type), and Heteractis magnifica at a coral reef in southern Japan during 16 months in daylight hours. There are only two past records of this facultative association......, one from east Africa and one from Indonesia. The wrasse remained close to and was occasionally in physical contact with the host when foraging amongst the tentacles. When frightened, they took shelter among corals, away from the host anemone. The wrasse co-existed with the anemonefishes Amphiprion...

  13. Phytoremediation of crude oil-contaminated soil employing Crotalaria pallida Aiton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, P; Deka, S; Baruah, P P

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the phytoremediation potentiality of a herb named Crotalaria pallida which are abundantly grown on crude oil-contaminated soil of oil field situated at upper Assam, India, so that this plant could be used to remediate hydrocarbon from contaminated soil. To evaluate the potentiality of the plant, a pot culture experiment was conducted taking 3 kg of rice field soil mixed with crude oil at a concentration of 10,000 (10 g/kg), 20,000 (20 g/kg), 30,000 (30 g/kg), 40,000 (40 g/kg), 50,000 (50 g/kg), 60,000 (60 g/kg), 70,000 (70 g/kg), 80,000 (80 g/kg), 90,000 (90 g/kg), and 100,000 (100 g/kg) ppm. Ten numbers of healthy seeds of C. pallida were sown in three pots of each concentration for germination, and after 15 days of germination, single healthy seedling in each pot was kept for the study. A control setup was also maintained without adding crude oil. The duration of the experiment was fixed for 6 months. The results showed that uptake of hydrocarbon by the plants was increased with increasing the concentration of crude oil in the soil up to 60,000 ppm. After that, uptake of hydrocarbon by the plants was found to be lower with increasing doses of crude oil concentration. Uptake of hydrocarbon by the shoot was found to be maximum, i.e., 35,018 ppm in 60,000 ppm concentration. Dissipation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) from the soil was also gradually increased with increasing concentration of crude oil in the soil up to 60,000 ppm. Maximum dissipation, i.e., 78.66 %, occurred in 60,000 ppm concentration of crude oil-mixed soil. The plant could not survive in 100,000 ppm concentration of crude oil-mixed soil. The results also demonstrated that there was a reduction in plant shoot and root biomass with an increase of crude oil concentration. Furthermore, results revealed that the shoot biomass was higher than root biomass in all the treatments. PMID:26865490

  14. Characteristics of Anemone Active Regions Appearing in Coronal Holes Observed with {\\it Yohkoh} Soft X-ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Asai, Ayumi; Hara, Hirohisa; Nitta, Nariaki V

    2008-01-01

    Coronal structure of active regions appearing in coronal holes is studied by using the data obtained with the Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) aboard {\\it Yohkoh} from 1991 November to 1993 March. The following characteristics are found; Many of active regions appearing in coronal holes show a structure that looks like a ``sea-anemone''. Such active regions are called {\\it anemone ARs}. About one-forth of all active regions that were observed with SXT from their births showed the anemone structure. For almost all the anemone ARs, the order of magnetic polarities is consistent with the Hale-Nicholson's polarity law. These anemone ARs also showed more or less east-west asymmetry in X-ray intensity distribution, such that the following (eastern) part of the ARs is brighter than its preceding (western) part. This, as well as the anemone shape itself, is consistent with the magnetic polarity distribution around the anemone ARs. These observations also suggest that an active region appearing in coronal holes has simpler ...

  15. Anemone altaica Induces Apoptosis in Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I-Chang; Chiang, Tsay-I; Lo, Chun; Lai, Yi-Hua; Yue, Chia-Herng; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hsu, Li-Sung; Lee, Chia-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, no significant improvement has been made in chemotherapy for osteosarcoma (OS). To develop improved agents against OS, we screened 70 species of medicinal plants and treated two human OS cell lines with different agent concentrations. We then examined cell viability using the MTT assay. Results showed that a candidate plant, particularly the rhizomes of Anemone altaica Fisch. ex C. A. Mey aqueous extract (AAE), suppressed the viability of HOS and U2OS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that AAE significantly increased the amount of cell shrinkage (Sub-G1 fragments) in HOS and U2OS cells. Moreover, AAE increased cytosolic cytochrome c and Bax, but decreased Bcl-2. The amount of cleaved caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) were significantly increased. AAE suppressed the growth of HOS and U2OS through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Data suggest that AAE is cytotoxic to HOS and U2OS cells and has no significant influence on human osteoblast hFOB cells. The high mRNA levels of apoptosis-related factors (PPP1R15A, SQSTM1, HSPA1B, and DDIT4) and cellular proliferation markers (SKA2 and BUB1B) were significantly altered by the AAE treatment of HOS and U2OS cells. Results show that the anticancer activity of AAE could up-regulate the expression of a cluster of genes, especially those in the apoptosis-related factor family and caspase family. Thus, AAE has great potential as a useful therapeutic drug for human OS. PMID:26224029

  16. Characteristics of Gas Exchange in Three Domesticated Anemone Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihu Liu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of three Anemone species were collected from the suburban areas of Kunming and planted in a nursery for three and a half years at Kunming, Yunnan Province, China. Leaf gas exchange measurement indicated that these species had similar one-peak diurnal trends of net photosynthetic rate (PN, although A. rivularis had lower transpiration rate (TR, stomatal conductance (gs and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci, and higher stomatal limit in the afternoon. Species differences in response of PN to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR were observed, especially under strong light. A. rivularis had the highest PN and Ci under strong light which corresponded with its highest gs and TR. A. rivularis had the highest light saturation point (LSP (1000 mol m-2 s-1 and light compensation point (LCP (69 mol m-2 s-1, while A. hupehensis var. japonica had the lowest LSP (800 ?mol m-2 s-1 and a lower LCP (53 mol m-2 s-1. But the three species responded similarly to the change of CO2 concentration in the air from 0 to 350 ?mol (CO2 mol-1, and their observed CO2 compensation point showed little difference (47, 53 and 56 ?mol (CO2 mol-1. Moreover, A. rivularis had the highest apparent quantum yield (0.032, carboxylation efficiency (0.049, PN (11.68 ?mol (CO2 m-2 s-1 and TR (5.36 mmol (H2O m-2 s-1 based on the PN -PAR response. The results implied that A. rivularis is able to grow well under higher radiation, while A. hupehensis var. japonica is the best one to grow under partial shade.

  17. Characteristics of Anemone Active Regions Appearing in Coronal Holes Observed with {\\it Yohkoh} Soft X-ray Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari; Hara, Hirohisa; Nitta, Nariaki V.

    2008-01-01

    Coronal structure of active regions appearing in coronal holes is studied by using the data obtained with the Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) aboard {\\it Yohkoh} from 1991 November to 1993 March. The following characteristics are found; Many of active regions appearing in coronal holes show a structure that looks like a ``sea-anemone''. Such active regions are called {\\it anemone ARs}. About one-forth of all active regions that were observed with SXT from their births showed the anemone structure....

  18. [Bioactivity of Trichilia pallida Swartz (Meliaceae) derived molecules on Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Uemerson S; Vendramim, José D; Rocha, Waldireny C; Vieira, Paulo C

    2008-01-01

    Dichloromethane (DIC) leaf and fruit extracts of Trichiliapallida Swartz were obtained for the isolation and identification of molecules with insecticidal activity against the tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick). DIC leaf extracts of T. pallida yielded six compounds, the triterpenes 24-methylenecycloarta-3beta-ol (TRIT-1), 24-methylenecycloarta-3beta-26-diol (TRIT-2) and cycloarta-23-eno-3beta,25-diol (TRIT-3), the sterols 24-methylene-3,22-dihydroxycholesterol (EST-1), 24-methylenecholesterol (EST-2) and 24-methylene-3beta,4beta,22-trihydroxycholesterol (EST-3), while the fruit extract yielded the limonoid gedunine (LIM). These molecules were dissolved in acetone and sprayed at 0.1% on tomato leaflets infested with newly-hatched larvae. Larval mortality at day 5 and 9 after infestation, larval and pupal developmental time and survival, pupal weight and adult malformation were evaluated. TRIT-1, EST-1 and LIM were the most effective against T. absoluta due to larval development arrestment and reduced larval survivorship. PMID:19169560

  19. Bioactivity of Trichilia pallida Swartz (Meliaceae) derived molecules on Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichloromethane (DIC) leaf and fruit extracts of Trichiliapallida Swartz were obtained for the isolation and identification of molecules with insecticide activity against the tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick). DIC leaf extracts of T. pallida yielded six compounds, the triterpenes 24-methylenecycloarta-3β-ol (TRIT-1), 24-methylenecycloarta-3β-26-diol (TRIT-2) and cycloarta-23-eno-3β,25-diol (TRIT-3), the sterols 24-methylene-3,22-dihydroxycholesterol (EST-1), 24-methylenecholesterol (EST-2) and 24-methylene-3β,4β,22-trihydroxycholesterol (EST-3), while the fruit extract yielded the limonoid gedunine (LIM). These molecules were dissolved in acetone and sprayed at 0.1% on tomato leaflets infested with newly-hatched larvae. Larval mortality at day 5 and 9 after infestation, larval and pupal developmental time and survival, pupal weight and adult malformation were evaluated. TRIT-1, EST-1 and LIM were the most effective against T. absoluta due to larval development arrestment and reduced larval survivorship. (author)

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JETS ASSOCIATED WITH MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liping; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Zhang, Lei [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Peter, Hardi [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Feng, Xueshang [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100871 Beijing (China); Zhang, Shaohua, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com [Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2013-11-01

    Observations with the space-based solar observatory Hinode show that small-scale magnetic structures in the photosphere are found to be associated with a particular class of jets of plasma in the chromosphere called anemone jets. The goal of our study is to conduct a numerical experiment of such chromospheric anemone jets related to the moving magnetic features (MMFs). We construct a 2.5 dimensional numerical MHD model to describe the process of magnetic reconnection between the MMFs and the pre-existing ambient magnetic field, which is driven by the horizontal motion of the magnetic structure in the photosphere. We include thermal conduction parallel to the magnetic field and optically thin radiative losses in the corona to account for a self-consistent description of the evaporation process during the heating of the plasma due to the reconnection process. The motion of the MMFs leads to the expected jet and our numerical results can reproduce many observed characteristics of chromospheric anemone jets, topologically and quantitatively. As a result of the tearing instability, plasmoids are generated in the reconnection process that are consistent with the observed bright moving blobs in the anemone jets. An increase in the thermal pressure at the base of the jet is also driven by the reconnection, which induces a train of slow-mode shocks propagating upward. These shocks are a secondary effect, and only modulate the outflow of the anemone jet. The jet itself is driven by the energy input due to the reconnection of the MMFs and the ambient magnetic field.

  1. Traça Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) em cultivares de tomateiro tratadas com extratos aquosos de Trichilia pallida Swartz Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) on tomato cultivars treated with aqueous extracts of Trichilia pallida Swartz

    OpenAIRE

    José Djair Vendramim; Ariane Paes de Barros Werckmeister Thomazini

    2001-01-01

    A traça Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) é atualmente uma das principais pragas do tomateiro no Brasil. Com o objetivo de obter um método de controle eficiente e não poluente, avaliou-se a atividade dos extratos aquosos de folhas e ramos de Trichilia pallida Swartz associados a duas cultivares de tomateiro (Santa Clara e IPA-5) sobre essa praga. Acompanhou-se o desenvolvimento do inseto em folhas de cada uma das cultivares previamente submersas nos extratos a 1% de concentração, avaliando-se a duração...

  2. Identification of a novel type of processing sites in the precursor for the sea anemone neuropeptide Antho-RFamide (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmutzler, C; Darmer, D; Diekhoff, D;

    1992-01-01

    Neuropeptides are synthesized as large precursor proteins that undergo posttranslational cleavages and modifications to produce bioactive peptides. Here, we have cloned two closely related precursor proteins for the sea anemone neuropeptide Antho-RFamide (...

  3. Enhancement of the efficacy of a carbamate nematicide against the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, through mycorrhization in commercial potato fields

    OpenAIRE

    Deliopoulos, T.; Minnis, S. T.; Jones, P W; Haydock, P. P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted over 2 years in commercial potato fields in Shropshire, UK, to evaluate the compatibility of the nematicide aldicarb with commercial inocula of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the control of the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. The AMF used were Vaminoc (mixed-AMF inoculum), Glomus intraradices (BioRize BB-E) and G. mosseae (isolate BEG 12). In the absence of AMF, the in-soil hatch of G. pallida increased 30% (P < 0.01) from wk-2 to wk-4 after plant...

  4. Traça Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) em cultivares de tomateiro tratadas com extratos aquosos de Trichilia pallida Swartz

    OpenAIRE

    Vendramim José Djair; Thomazini Ariane Paes de Barros Werckmeister

    2001-01-01

    A traça Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) é atualmente uma das principais pragas do tomateiro no Brasil. Com o objetivo de obter um método de controle eficiente e não poluente, avaliou-se a atividade dos extratos aquosos de folhas e ramos de Trichilia pallida Swartz associados a duas cultivares de tomateiro (Santa Clara e IPA-5) sobre essa praga. Acompanhou-se o desenvolvimento do inseto em folhas de cada uma das cultivares previamente submersas nos extratos a 1% de concentração, avaliando-se a duração...

  5. First evidence of regular common cuckoo, Cuculus canorus, parasitism on eastern olivaceous warblers, Hippolais pallida elaeica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Anton; Stokke, Bård G.; Moksnes, Arne; Røskaft, Eivin

    2007-04-01

    Coevolution is defined as specialized relationships between species that lead to a reciprocal evolutionary change. A particularly suitable model system for studying coevolution is the interactions between obligate avian brood parasites and their hosts. The common cuckoo ( Cuculus canorus, hereafter cuckoo) is a well-known brood parasite, which utilizes a range of smaller passerines as hosts. However, warblers of the genus Hippolais have rarely been reported as being victims of cuckoos, and furthermore, few data exist on the occurrence of antiparasite defenses in these hosts. In this study, we examined possible host-parasite coevolution between cuckoos and eastern olivaceous warblers ( Hippolais pallida elaeica, hereafter olivaceous warblers) in three closely situated areas in northwestern Bulgaria. The olivaceous warbler has never been reported to be a regular cuckoo host. However, the present study, carried out in 2001-2003 shows that the olivaceous warbler is regularly and heavily parasitized by the cuckoo in this area. Parasitism rate was high (26.6%, 34/128) and consistent among years, with some variation between areas. The cuckoo egg mimicry was moderately good, and olivaceous warbler rejection rate of such eggs was 50%. Cuckoo eggs laid in olivaceous warbler nests had a whitish to whitish-green ground color, and the majority appeared to be distinctly different from cuckoo eggs found in other host species in the area. The olivaceous warbler proved to be a rather good host for cuckoos as 20.6% (7/34) of cuckoo eggs laid produced fledglings, a breeding success comparable to other suitable hosts in Europe. This is the first in-depth study of brood parasitism in a warbler of the genus Hippolais, and cuckoos parasitizing olivaceous warblers probably represent a previously unknown gens.

  6. Biomonitoring of the air with Tradescantia pallida (Rose D. R. Hunt var purpurea Boom (Commelinaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Barbério

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The population growth and the comfort generated by progress have greatly contributed with the increase in the air pollution, making the air in several urban centers polluted by substances that are harmful to human being. This study characterized the air quality in the city of Taubaté, Vale do Paraíba-SP using biomonitoring with Tradescantia pallida (Rose D. R. Hunt purpurea Boom (Commelinaceae. The study was developed in a period of 10 months (September/2010 to June/2011 in five locations (Rodovia Presidente Dutra – heavy vehicle traffic; Estiva – residential area; Parque Aeroporto – industrial area; Campus Bom Conselho – area in the city with heavy vehicle traffic and Agronomy – rural area. Samples were collected on a weekly basis from young inflorescences of exposed plants. After the inflorescences were collected, they were fixed in an absolute ethanol-glacial acetic acid (3:1 solution for 24 h, transferred to ethanol 70% solution and maintained under refrigeration. They were submitted to coloration with acetic carmine and the number of micronucleus was quantified in approximately 300 tetrads for each inflorescence, and slides were prepared with 10 inflorescences/week for each point of study. The average and standard deviations were: Dutra (2.24 ± 1.58, Estiva (2.07 ± 1.33, Parque Aeroporto (1.47 ± 1.05, Bom Conselho (1.42 ± 0.90 and Agronomy (0.82 ± 0.80. Although Taubaté area is a region experiencing urban growth, the data revealed that the air in the city has good quality. Maintaining this balance is very important, requires effort and periodic measurements, and, for this, biomonitoring is a fast, cheap and effective method.

  7. Symbiont type influences trophic plasticity of a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Miguel C; Hoadley, Kenneth; Pettay, D Tye; Grajales, Alejandro; Calado, Ricardo; Warner, Mark E

    2015-03-01

    The association between cnidarians and photosynthetic dinoflagellates within the genus Symbiodinium is a prevalent relationship in tropical and subtropical marine environments. Although the diversity of Symbiodinium provides a possible axis for niche diversification, increased functional range and resilience to physical stressors such as elevated temperature, how such diversity relates to the physiological balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy of the host animal remains unknown. Here, we experimentally show interspecific and intraspecific variability of photosynthetic carbon fixation and subsequent translocation by Symbiodinium to the model cnidarian host Aiptasia pallida. By using a clonal anemone line harboring different species of Symbiodinium, we determined that symbiont identity influences trophic plasticity through its density, capacity to fix carbon, quantity of translocated carbon and ultimately the host's capacity to ingest and digest prey. Symbiont carbon translocation and host prey ingestion were positively correlated across symbiont combinations that consisted of different isoclonal lines of Symbiodinium minutum, while a combination with type D4-5 Symbiodinium displayed lower carbon translocation, and prey capture and digestion more similar to Aiptasia lacking symbionts. The absence of a shift toward greater heterotrophy when carbon translocation is low suggests that the metabolic demand of feeding and digestion may overwhelm nutritional stores when photosynthesis is reduced, and amends the possible role of animal feeding in resistance to or recovery from the effects of climate change in more obligate symbioses such as reef-building corals. PMID:25617454

  8. Ability of Allium cepa L. root tips and Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea in N-nitrosodiethylamine genotoxicity and mutagenicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rainho, Claudia R; Kaezer, Andréa; Aiub, Claudia A F; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2010-12-01

    N-nitroso compounds, such as N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), can be formed by the reaction of secondary amines with nitrosating agents, and are suspected to be involved in tumors in humans. NDEA has been considered a weak carcinogen in genotoxic assays probably due to the inefficient nitrosamine activation system that is used and/or to the efficient repair system. In this work, we evaluated the sensibility of Allium cepa L. root tips and Tradescantia stamen hair mutation assay (Trad-SH) using Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea for NDEA (0.1; 0.5; 5 and 25 mM) genotoxicity and mutagenicity induction. Allium cepa L. was treated with different NDEA concentrations for 3h, for 3 consecutive days, including negative control (distilled water) and positive control maleic hydrazide (MH 30 mg/mL). After treatment, the roots were hydrolyzed, squashed, and the mitotic index (MI) and cytological abnormalities were scored. The results revealed a cytostatic effect of NDEA (0.5 and 5mM), showing a significant reduction in the MI. Chromosome stickiness suggests a NDEA toxic effect. T. pallida purpurea did not respond to mutagens with a dose-dependent pattern. In conclusion, our study indicates that the root tips of Allium cepa L. have sensibility to detect NDEA genotoxicity, but not for Trad-SH test. PMID:21152767

  9. Antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities of Terminalia pallida Linn. fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M T Sampathkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia contributes significantly in the manifestation and development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD. Although synthetic lipid-lowering drugs are useful in treating hyperlipidemia, there are number of adverse effects. So the current interest has stimulated the search for new lipid-lowering agents with minimal side effects from natural sources. The present study was designed to investigate the antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic potentiality of ethanolic extract of Terminalia pallida fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. T. pallida fruits ethanolic extract (TPEt was prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. Sprague-Dawley male rats were made hyperlipidemic by giving high fat diet, supplied by NIN (National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India. TPEt was administered in a dose of 100 mg/kg.b.w./day for 30 days in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. The body weights, plasma lipid, and lipoprotein levels were measured before and after the treatment. TPEt showed significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities as evidenced by significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels coupled together with elevation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and diminution of atherogenic index in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. There was a significantly reduced body weight gain in TPEt-treated hyperlipidemic rats than in the control group. The present study demonstrates that TPEt possesses significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic properties, thus suggesting its beneficial effect in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of tissue and associated bacteria from benthic sea anemone Stichodactyla haddoni against microbial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G Prakash; Babu, S; Ravikumar, S; Kathiresan, K; Prathap, S Arul; Chinnapparaj, S; Marian, M P; Alikhan, S Liakath

    2007-10-01

    Associated bacteria from Stichodactyla haddoni are found maximum in tentacle tissues than the body tissue. There are eight associated bacterial species viz., Alcaligenes sp, Corynebacterium sp, Aeromonas sp, Sporosarcina sp, Renibacterium sp, Camobacterium sp1, Camobacterium sp2 and Salinococcus sp were recorded. The culture extracts from the associated bacterial species showed sensitivity against human bacterial and fungalpathogens. However, the hexane tissue extract of sea anemone showed maximum sensitivity (24 mm dia.) against the fish bacterial pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila than the other chosen pathogens. Comparatively the tissue extracts showed promising antimicrobial sensitivity than the cell free extracts of associated bacteria, and hence, the tissue samples from the sea anemone Stichodactyla haddoni is recommended for further exploration of novel antimicrobial drugs than the associated bacteria. PMID:18405113

  11. Comparison of alternative methods for the control of potatoes nematodes (globodera rostochiensis and Globodera pallida) in soils of SA Pobla. Majorca, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomila, I.; Olmo, D.; Rotger, B.; Rossello, M. I.; Nieto, A.; Rossello, J.; Lopez-Lopez, G.; Ibanez, A.; Sastre Conde, I.; Juan Serra, A.

    2009-07-01

    Among phytoparistic nematodes. Globodera rostochiensis and Globodera pallida represent one the highest problem of potato crop and as so need to be controlled years. Tradicionally, this control was performed through soil chemical disinfection before starting the crop. Nowadays most of the products used for this disinfection are eliminated from the market due to the UE directive 91/444. (Author)

  12. Comparison of alternative methods for the control of potatoes nematodes (globodera rostochiensis and Globodera pallida) in soils of SA Pobla. Majorca, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among phytoparistic nematodes. Globodera rostochiensis and Globodera pallida represent one the highest problem of potato crop and as so need to be controlled years. Tradicionally, this control was performed through soil chemical disinfection before starting the crop. Nowadays most of the products used for this disinfection are eliminated from the market due to the UE directive 91/444. (Author)

  13. Profiling molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in the non-symbiotic sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

    OpenAIRE

    Oren, Matan; Tarrant, Ann M.; Alon, Shahar; Simon-Blecher, Noa; Elbaz, Idan; Appelbaum, Lior; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are poorly understood within early-diverging animal lineages. We have characterized circadian behavioral patterns and identified potential components of the circadian clock in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis: a model cnidarian which lacks algal symbionts. Using automatic video tracking we showed that Nematostella exhibits rhythmic circadian locomotor activity, which is persistent in constant dark, shifted or disrupted by external dark/light cues and...

  14. Characterizing the spatiotemporal expression of RNAs and proteins in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolenski, Francis S.; Layden, Michael J; Martindale, Mark Q; Gilmore, Thomas D.; Finnerty, John R.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to reconstruct the early evolution of animal genes and proteins, there is an increasing focus on basal animal lineages such as sponges, cnidarians, ctenophores and placozoans. Among the basal animals, the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (phylum Cnidaria) has emerged as a leading laboratory model organism partly because it is well suited to experimental techniques for monitoring and manipulating gene expression. Here we describe protocols adapted for use in Nematostella...

  15. Two new triterpenoid saponins from the aerial parts of Anemone taipaiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Wang, Xia-Yin; Hua, Dong; Liu, Yang; Tang, Hai-Feng

    2015-05-01

    Phytochemical study on the aerial parts of Anemone taipaiensis for the first time led to the isolation of two new oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins 1 and 2, together with four known saponins (3-6). Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis and chemical evidences. Saponins 2-4 exhibited cytotoxicity against human glioblastoma U251MG cell line with IC50 values ranging from 1.56 to 80.62 μM. PMID:26021881

  16. Distribution and impact of the alien anemone Sagartia ornata in the West Coast National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara B. Robinson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sagartia ornata is an alien anemone that occurs intertidally within the West Coast National Park (WCNP. Whilst baseline distributional data was gathered in 2001, the range and abundance of this alien has not been reassessed. The present study aimed to determine the current status and distribution of this anemone, to assess its diet so as to establish the role it may play as predator and to investigate its impact on sandy-shore communities. Sagartia ornata was found to be restricted to the WCNP, where it occurred in densities of up to 508 ± 218 individuals per m2 . Within the park the distribution of this anemone had changed. Populations were recorded in Nanozostera capensis seagrass beds for the first time and this alien was absent from two areas in which it had previously occurred. Diet analysis revealed indigenous polychaetes and amphipods as the dominant prey items consumed by S. ornata. This alien was found to significantly alter sandy-shore community structure, with differences caused primarily by increases in the abundance and biomass of the tanaid Anatanais gracilis and the polychaete Orbinia angrapequensis. Additionally, invaded areas supported significantly greater invertebrate diversity, density and biomass. It is concluded that whilst this anemone negatively affects native biota, its current dependence on restricted habitats precludes widespread impacts with the park.Conservation implications: With regard to conservation implications, this invasion should be routinely monitored outside the WCNP as in its native range S. ornata occurs on rocky shores and kelp holdfasts, suggesting a potential for spread along the west coast of South Africa.

  17. The Antitumor Effects of Triterpenoid Saponins from the Anemone flaccida and the Underlying Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Tao Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, a family of ancient hopanoids, have been used as traditional Asian herbs for the treatments of inflammation and convulsant diseases. Previous study on HeLa cells suggested that triterpenoid saponins from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt may have potential antitumor effect due to their apoptotic activities. Here, we confirmed the apoptotic activities of the following five triterpenoid saponins: glycoside St-I4a (1, glycoside St-J (2, anhuienoside E (3, hedera saponin B (4, and flaccidoside II (5 on human BEL-7402 and HepG2 hepatoma cell lines, as well as the model of HeLa cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We found that COX-2/PGE2 signaling pathway, which plays key roles in the development of cancer, is involved in the antitumor activities of these saponins. These data provide the evidence that triterpenoid saponins can induce apoptosis via COX-2/PGE2 pathway, implying a preventive role of saponins from Anemone flaccida in tumor.

  18. Broad-scale Population Genetics of the Host Sea Anemone, Heteractis magnifica

    KAUST Repository

    Emms, Madeleine

    2015-12-01

    Broad-scale population genetics can reveal population structure across an organism’s entire range, which can enable us to determine the most efficient population-wide management strategy depending on levels of connectivity. Genetic variation and differences in genetic diversity on small-scales have been reported in anemones, but nothing is known about their broad-scale population structure, including that of “host” anemone species, which are increasingly being targeted in the aquarium trade. In this study, microsatellite markers were used as a tool to determine the population structure of a sessile, host anemone species, Heteractis magnifica, across the Indo-Pacific region. In addition, two rDNA markers were used to identify Symbiodinium from the samples, and phylogenetic analyses were used to measure diversity and geographic distribution of Symbiodinium across the region. Significant population structure was identified in H. magnifica across the Indo-Pacific, with at least three genetic breaks, possibly the result of factors such as geographic distance, geographic isolation and environmental variation. Symbiodinium associations were also affected by environmental variation and supported the geographic isolation of some regions. These results suggests that management of H. magnifica must be implemented on a local scale, due to the lack of connectivity between clusters. This study also provides further evidence for the combined effects of geographic distance and environmental distance in explaining genetic variance.

  19. Symbiodinium diversity in the sea anemone Entacmaea quadricolor on the east Australian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontasch, S.; Scott, A.; Hill, R.; Bridge, T.; Fisher, P. L.; Davy, S. K.

    2014-06-01

    The diversity of Symbiodinium spp. in Entacmaea quadricolor was analysed from five locations along ~2,100 km on the east coast of Australia using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2) combined with bacterial cloning. DGGE revealed that E. quadricolor predominantly associated with six types of clade C (four of which are novel) and that most anemones harboured multiple types simultaneously. Anemones from southern locations associated with a mixed assemblage of C25 and a variant of C3. This assemblage also dominated the central location, but was absent at the northern location. At central and northern sites, two novel variants of C42(type2) and C1 were found. Anemones hosting C42(type2) also showed a low abundance of variants of C3 and C1, and E1 was found in one sample, as revealed by bacterial cloning. The occurrence of geographically distinct ITS2 types or a consortium of types might reflect a need to optimise physiological performance of the symbiosis at different latitudes.

  20. The 'Antenna Balloon Anemone' Found in the Seto Inland Sea: New Genus and Species of Sea Anemone, Antennapeachia setouchi (Cnidaria, Actinaria, Haloclavidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Takato; Yanagi, Kensuke; Fujita, Toshihiko

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, we report the identification of a sea anemone, Antennapeachia setouchi, collected in the Seto Inland Sea, which represents a new genus and new species. This new species has unusual tentacle and mesenterial arrangements that have not been observed in other species of Haloclavidae. There are 12 regular marginal tentacles and two 'antenna tentacles,' with the latter always rising upward and located on the oral disk near the mouth; the species is also characterized by its peculiar mesenterial pairs, consisting of a macrocneme and a microcneme. Furthermore, this species shows an interesting behavior: it can inflate its body like a balloon, lift above the seafloor, and drift with the sea current. The presence of a single, strong siphonoglyph, physa-like aboral end, and the lack of sphincter muscle classify this sea anemone within Haloclavidae. It resembles Peachia species, but cannot be classified in this genus as the new species has two pairs of mesenteries, consisting of a macrocneme and a microcneme, and irregular antenna tentacles. Therefore, we propose a new genus Antennapeachia to accommodate this species. PMID:27498806

  1. Ability of Allium cepa L. root tips and Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea in N-nitrosodiethylamine genotoxicity and mutagenicity evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. de Rainho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available N-nitroso compounds, such as N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA, can be formed by the reaction of secundary amines with nitrosating agents, and are suspected to be involved in tumors in humans. NDEA has been considered a weak carcinogen in genotoxic assays probably due to the inefficient nitrosamine activation system that is used and/or to the efficient repair system. In this work, we evaluated the sensibility of Allium cepa L. root tips and Tradescantia stamen hair mutation assay (Trad-SH using Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea for NDEA (0.1; 0.5; 5 and 25mM genotoxicity and mutagenicity induction. Allium cepa L. was treated with different NDEA concentrations for 3h, for 3 consecutive days, including negative control (distilled water and positive control maleic hydrazide (MH 30mg/mL. After treatment, the roots were hydrolyzed, squashed, and the mitotic index (MI and cytological abnormalities were scored. The results revealed a cytostatic effect of NDEA (0.5 and 5mM, showing a significant reduction in the MI. Chromosome stickiness suggests a NDEA toxic effect. T. pallida purpurea did not respond to mutagens with a dose-dependent pattern. In conclusion, our study indicates that the root tips of Allium cepa L. have sensibility to detect NDEA genotoxicity, but not for Trad-SH test.Nitrocompostos, como N-nitrosodietilamina (NDEA, podem ser formados pela reação entre uma amina secundária e agentes nitrosantes e são suspeitos de estarem envolvidos na formação de tumores em humanos. NDEA é considerada um carcinógeno fraco e ensaios genotóxicos provavelente pela utilização de um sistema de ativação ineficiente e/ou pela utilização de um eficiente sistema de reparo. Neste trabalho, nós avaliamos a sensibilidade de ensaios com Alliu cepa L. e Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea (Trad-SH à genotoxicidade e mutagenicidade induzidas por diferentes concentrações de NDEA (0,1; 0,5; 5 e 25mM por 3h, por 3 dias consecutivos, incluindo controle

  2. Isolation of L-3-phenyllactyl-Phe-Lys-Ala-NH2 (Antho-KAamide), a novel neuropeptide from sea anemones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nothacker, H P; Rinehart, K L; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced the neuropeptide L-3-phenyllactyl-Phe-Lys-Ala-NH2 from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. This neuropeptide (named Antho-KAamide) has the unusual N-terminal L-3-phenyllactyl blocking group which has recently also been discovered in 2 other neuropeptides from...... sea anemones. We propose that the L-3-phenyllactyl residue renders Antho-KAamide resistant to nonspecific aminopeptidases, thereby increasing the stability of the neuropeptide after neuronal release. The existence of the L-3-phenyllactyl residue in 3 neuropeptides isolated so far suggests...... that this blocking group is more generally occurring....

  3. Cytotoxic Oleanane-Type Triterpenoid Saponins from the Rhizomes of Anemone rivularis var. flore-minore

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyang Wang; Minchang Wang; Min Xu; Yi Wang; Haifeng Tang; Xiaoli Sun

    2014-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the n-BuOH extract of the rhizomes of Anemone rivularis var. flore-minore led to the isolation of five new oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins 1–5, together with five known saponins 6–10. Their structures were determined by the extensive use of 1D and 2D NMR experiments, along with ESIMS analyses and acid hydrolysis. The aglycone of 4 and 5 was determined as 21α-hydroxyoleanolic acid, which was reported in this genus for the first time. The cytotoxicity of these...

  4. Genomic organization and splicing variants of a peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase from sea anemones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, M; Hauser, F; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    Cnidarians are primitive animals that use neuropeptides as their transmitters. All the numerous cnidarian neuropeptides isolated, so far, have a carboxy-terminal amide group that is essential for their actions. This strongly suggests that alpha-amidating enzymes are essential for the functioning......, peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), which is coded for by a single gene. In a previous paper (F. Hauser et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 241, 509-512, 1997) we have cloned the first known cnidarian PHM from the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica. In the present paper we have determined...

  5. The genome and life-stage specific transcriptomes of Globodera pallida elucidate key aspects of plant parasitism by a cyst nematode

    KAUST Repository

    Cotton, James A

    2014-03-03

    Background: Globodera pallida is a devastating pathogen of potato crops, making it one of the most economically important plant parasitic nematodes. It is also an important model for the biology of cyst nematodes. Cyst nematodes and root-knot nematodes are the two most important plant parasitic nematode groups and together represent a global threat to food security. Results: We present the complete genome sequence of G. pallida, together with transcriptomic data from most of the nematode life cycle, particularly focusing on the life cycle stages involved in root invasion and establishment of the biotrophic feeding site. Despite the relatively close phylogenetic relationship with root-knot nematodes, we describe a very different gene family content between the two groups and in particular extensive differences in the repertoire of effectors, including an enormous expansion of the SPRY domain protein family in G. pallida, which includes the SPRYSEC family of effectors. This highlights the distinct biology of cyst nematodes compared to the root-knot nematodes that were, until now, the only sedentary plant parasitic nematodes for which genome information was available. We also present in-depth descriptions of the repertoires of other genes likely to be important in understanding the unique biology of cyst nematodes and of potential drug targets and other targets for their control. Conclusions: The data and analyses we present will be central in exploiting post-genomic approaches in the development of much-needed novel strategies for the control of G. pallida and related pathogens. 2014 Cotton et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Pollen mother cells of Tradescantia clone 4430 and Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea are equally sensitive to the clastogenic effects of X-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyama F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tradescantia micronucleus test is a sensitive bioassay for mutagenesis that may be employed both under field and laboratory conditions. This test has been standardized mostly on the basis of the results obtained with clone 4430. However, this clone is not well adapted to tropical weather, frequently showing problems with growth and flowering. In addition, it is attacked by parasites and insects, a fact that limits its use in field studies aiming at the biomonitoring of air pollution. In the city of São Paulo, Tradescantia pallida (Rose Hunt. var. purpurea Boom is widely distributed as an ornamental plant in gardens and along roadsides and streets, mostly because of its natural resistance and its easy propagation. In this report, we present dose-response curves indicating that the sensitivity of T. pallida and clone 4430 to X-radiation (1, 10, 25 and 50 cGy is similar. The results confirm our previous suggestion that T. pallida represents a good alternative for in situ mutagenesis testing in tropical regions, especially biomonitoring studies in which the exposure conditions may not be fully controllable.

  7. Traça Tuta absoluta (Meyrick em cultivares de tomateiro tratadas com extratos aquosos de Trichilia pallida Swartz Tuta absoluta (Meyrick on tomato cultivars treated with aqueous extracts of Trichilia pallida Swartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Djair Vendramim

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A traça Tuta absoluta (Meyrick é atualmente uma das principais pragas do tomateiro no Brasil. Com o objetivo de obter um método de controle eficiente e não poluente, avaliou-se a atividade dos extratos aquosos de folhas e ramos de Trichilia pallida Swartz associados a duas cultivares de tomateiro (Santa Clara e IPA-5 sobre essa praga. Acompanhou-se o desenvolvimento do inseto em folhas de cada uma das cultivares previamente submersas nos extratos a 1% de concentração, avaliando-se a duração e viabilidade das fases larval e pupal e o peso de pupas. A cultivar IPA-5 provocou alongamento da fase larval e, quando associada aos extratos de folhas e de ramos, reduziu a viabilidade pupal do inseto. Os extratos de folhas e de ramos também alongaram o período larval de T. absoluta, na cultivar Santa Clara. O extrato de folhas foi mais prejudicial ao desenvolvimento da traça do que o extrato de ramos dessa planta, reduzindo a viabilidade larval em ambas as cultivares.The tomato pinworm Tuta absoluta (Meyrick is one of the main tomato pests in Brazil. With the objective of obtaining an efficient and not pollutant method of control, the activity of aqueous extracts of Trichilia pallida Swartz leaves and twigs on this pest was studied associated to the tomato cultivars Santa Clara and IPA-5. The development of the insect was observed on leaves of each cultivar, previously treated with extracts at 1% of concentration. Length and viability of larval and pupal stages and pupal weight were evaluated. The larval period of the insect was more prolonged on 'IPA-5' and, when associated with leaf and twig extracts, reduced pupal viability. Leaf and twig extracts also prolonged the larval stage in 'Santa Clara'. The leaf extract affected more negatively the insect development than the twig extract, reducing larval viability on both cultivars.

  8. Reef fishes can recognize bleached habitat during settlement: sea anemone bleaching alters anemonefish host selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anna; Dixson, Danielle L

    2016-05-25

    Understanding how bleaching impacts the settlement of symbiotic habitat specialists and whether there is flexibility in settlement choices with regard to habitat quality is essential given our changing climate. We used five anemonefishes (Amphiprion clarkii, Amphiprion latezonatus, Amphiprion ocellaris, Amphiprion percula and Premnas biaculeatus) and three host sea anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis crispa and Heteractis magnifica) in paired-choice flume experiments to determine whether habitat naive juveniles have the olfactory capabilities to distinguish between unbleached and bleached hosts, and how this may affect settlement decisions. All anemonefishes were able to distinguish between bleached and unbleached hosts, and responded only to chemical cues from species-specific host anemones irrespective of health status, indicating a lack of flexibility in host use. While bleached hosts were selected as habitat, this occurred only when unbleached options were unavailable, with the exception of A. latezonatus, which showed strong preferences for H. crispa regardless of health. This study highlights the potential deleterious indirect impacts of declining habitat quality during larval settlement in habitat specialists, which could be important in the field, given that bleaching events are becoming increasingly common. PMID:27226472

  9. Patterns of Symbiodinium spp. associations within the family Aiptasiidae, a monophyletic lineage of symbiotic of sea anemones (Cnidaria, Actiniaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Thornhill, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    Although the symbiotic relationships between dinoflagellates and cnidarians are well recognized, few studies have examined these associations from an evolutionary perspective. This is especially true for symbiotic sea anemones, in which many reports consist of an approximate species identification of the host, followed by the identification of the dinoflagellate symbiont using molecular genetic markers. To further explore the evolutionary history of sea anemone-dinoflagellate associations, we documented the diversity of Symbiodinium spp. in a monophyletic clade of sea anemones, the family Aiptasiidae. We combined information from several molecular genetic markers, including nuclear ITS2 and plastid cp23S-rDNA, to evaluate the patterns of evolution and diversification of Symbiodinium in the light of an existing phylogenetic framework for the sea anemone host. At the host family level, we found no evidence for coevolution or reciprocal phylogenies between host and endosymbiont. However, within some individual host species, Symbiodinium spp. exhibited patterns of host specialization and cladogenesis. This pattern suggests that coevolution between host and symbiont occurred within species and genera lineages, but that this process was regularly disrupted and symbiotic partners were recombined during the longer-term evolutionary history of the Aiptasiidae. Furthermore, we observed independent cases of phylogeographical partitioning of Symbiodinium within a single host species, suggesting that ecological speciation along an environmental gradient contributed to the diversity of associations found in nature.

  10. Bioactivity of Trichilia pallida Swartz (Meliaceae) derived molecules on Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae); Bioatividade de moleculas isoladas de Trichilia pallida Swartz (Meliaceae) sobre Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Uemerson S. da [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade]. E-mail: uscunha@ufpel.edu.br; Vendramim, Jose D. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ-USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia, Fitopatologia e Zoologia Agricola; Rocha, Waldireny C.; Vieira, Paulo C. [Universidade de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2008-11-15

    Dichloromethane (DIC) leaf and fruit extracts of Trichiliapallida Swartz were obtained for the isolation and identification of molecules with insecticide activity against the tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick). DIC leaf extracts of T. pallida yielded six compounds, the triterpenes 24-methylenecycloarta-3{beta}-ol (TRIT-1), 24-methylenecycloarta-3{beta}-26-diol (TRIT-2) and cycloarta-23-eno-3{beta},25-diol (TRIT-3), the sterols 24-methylene-3,22-dihydroxycholesterol (EST-1), 24-methylenecholesterol (EST-2) and 24-methylene-3{beta},4{beta},22-trihydroxycholesterol (EST-3), while the fruit extract yielded the limonoid gedunine (LIM). These molecules were dissolved in acetone and sprayed at 0.1% on tomato leaflets infested with newly-hatched larvae. Larval mortality at day 5 and 9 after infestation, larval and pupal developmental time and survival, pupal weight and adult malformation were evaluated. TRIT-1, EST-1 and LIM were the most effective against T. absoluta due to larval development arrestment and reduced larval survivorship. (author)

  11. Extrato aquoso de ramos de Trichilia pallida e o desenvolvimento de Spodoptera frugiperda em genótipos de milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrecillas Sônia Martins

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se o desenvolvimento e a sobrevivência da lagarta-do-cartucho, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith criada em folhas de dois genótipos de milho (o padrão comercial C 901 e o resistente CMS 23 tratados com extratos aquosos (0,1 e 1% de ramos da planta inseticida Trichilia pallida Swartz (Meliaceae. As variáveis biológicas avaliadas foram peso, duração e viabilidade das fases larval e pupal. Em plantas tratadas com o extrato a 1%, ocorreu mortalidade total das lagartas nos dois genótipos, enquanto que a 0,1% o extrato reduziu a sobrevivência e o peso larval e prolongou o período de desenvolvimento. Lagartas alimentadas com o genótipo CMS 23 apresentaram menor sobrevivência, menor peso e maior período de desenvolvimento do que no genótipo C 901.

  12. Examination of Environmental Trends in Hawaii Based on the Trace Element Distributions in Cores of the Kiawe tree (Prosopis pallida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Y. S.; de Carlo, E. H.; Spengler, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    Annual growth rings of trees have the potential for providing a chronology of bioavailable contaminants extant in the environment in which the trees grow. Recent studies have documented a significant correlation between concentrations of metals in atmospheric particulate matter and those observed in surface and groundwater. The Kiawe (Prosopis pallida), a hardwood tree commonly found in Hawaii, represents a potential environmental tape recorder because of its life span on the order of multiple decades. Because the Kiawe is phreatophytic and has high transpiration rates, it may be ideally suited to examine past (temporal) and current (spatial) variability in the quality of groundwater where these trees grow. Because of the potential correlation between airborne and groundwater pollution we hypothesize that growth rings of Kiawe may yield clues to help unravel recent (50-100 yrs) changes in contamination patterns in Hawaii. We will present concentrations of trace elements (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sb, and Pb) in cores of Kiawe trees growing on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Oahu, the locus of more than 80 percent of the population of the State of Hawaii, is heavily urbanized, but other land uses include agriculture, conservation (rainforest), and military reservations, where live-fire military training activities over the past 60 years have raised public concern about potential contamination of natural resources. Preliminary analyses indicate that trace element concentrations in Kiawe wood range from a less than one to tens of micrograms per kilogram, depending on the element and the provenance of the tree.

  13. Cytotoxic Oleanane-Type Triterpenoid Saponins from the Rhizomes of Anemone rivularis var. flore-minore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the n-BuOH extract of the rhizomes of Anemone rivularis var. flore-minore led to the isolation of five new oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins 1–5, together with five known saponins 6–10. Their structures were determined by the extensive use of 1D and 2D NMR experiments, along with ESIMS analyses and acid hydrolysis. The aglycone of 4 and 5 was determined as 21α-hydroxyoleanolic acid, which was reported in this genus for the first time. The cytotoxicity of these compounds was evaluated against four human cancer cell line, including HL-60 (promyelocytic leukemia, HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma, A549 (lung carcinoma and HeLa (cervical carcinoma. The monodesmosidic saponins 6–8 exhibited cytotoxic activity toward all tested cancer cell lines, with IC50 values in the 7.25–22.38 μM range.

  14. Chemical Constituents of the Roots of Anemone altaica Fisch. ex C. A. Mey.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Jie ZOU; Yue-Sheng DONG; Jun-Shan YANG

    2005-01-01

    The roots of Anemone altaica Fisch. ex C. A. Mey. have been used in the treatment of epilepsia,neurasthenia, and arthritis in Chinese folk medicine for a long time. In order to find new and bioactive compounds, the chemical constituents of the roots of A. altaica were investigated and nine compounds were isolated from the EtOH extract of this plant. On the basis of spectroscopic methods, the structures of these compounds were elucidated as 4-(9H-β-carbolin-1-yl)-4-oxo-butyric acid (1), carboxymethyl isoferulate (2), isoferulic acid (3), cirsiumaldehyde (4), 5-hydroxy-4-oxo-pentanoic acid (5), triacontane (6), palmic acid (7), β-sitosterol (8), and daucosterol (9). Among them, 1 and 2 were new compounds, and 3 and 4 were obtained from this genus for the first time.

  15. Variation in partner benefits in a shrimp-sea anemone symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, C Seabird; O'Donnell, James L

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic interactions, where two species occur in close physical proximity for the majority of the participants' lifespans, may constrain the fitness of one or both of the participants. Host choice could result in lineage divergence in symbionts if fitness benefits vary across the interaction with hosts. Symbiotic interactions are common in the marine environment, particularly in the most diverse marine ecosystems: coral reefs. However, the variation in symbiotic interactions that may drive diversification is poorly understood in marine systems. We measured the fecundity of the symbiotic shrimp Periclimenes yucatanicus on two anemone hosts on coral reefs in Panama, and found that while fecundity varies among host species, this variation is explained largely by host size, not species. This suggests that shrimp on larger hosts may have higher fitness regardless of host species, which in turn could drive selection for host choice, a proposed driver of diversification in this group. PMID:26618082

  16. Force-dependent discharge of nematocysts in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae (Verrill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Todaro

    2012-05-01

    Sea anemones discharge cnidae (‘stinging capsules’ including nematocysts to capture prey and to defend themselves. In the present study, we tested the relationship between the force of test probes striking feeding tentacles and discharge of microbasic p-mastigophore nematocysts into the test probes. In seawater alone, the response curve is bimodal with maximal discharge observed at 0.33 and 1.10 millinewtons (mN and with minimal discharge at 1.50 mN. Upon activating chemoreceptors for N-acetylated sugars, maximal discharge is observed across a broad range of smaller forces from 0.16 to 0.9 mN before decreasing to a minimum at 1.50 mN. Likewise, in the presence of nearby vibrations at key frequencies, maximal discharge is observed over a broad range of smaller forces before decreasing to a minimum at 1.50 mN. It appears that sensory input indicating proximity of potential prey expands the range of small forces of impact that stimulate maximal discharge (i.e. to less than 1.10 mN but not at larger forces of impact (i.e. at approximately 1.50 mN. Thus, contact by small prey would stimulate maximal discharge, and all the more so if such contact is accompanied by specific odorants or by vibrations at specific frequencies. Nevertheless, anemones would not maximally discharge nematocysts into large animals that blunder into contact with their tentacles.

  17. Aboveground biomass in Prosopis pallida (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd.) H. B. K. ecosystems using Landsat 7 ETM+ images Biomasa aérea en ecosistemas de Prosopis pallida (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd.) H. B. K. usando imágenes Landsat 7 ETM+

    OpenAIRE

    EVA PADRÓN; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M.

    2007-01-01

    The significance of field work in remote sensing studies when applied to large areas has often been underestimated. The combination of specific forest inventories for the estimation of aboveground biomass in large dry tropical forest areas with remote sensor data has scarcely been explored to date. In this work, a systematic, stratified forest inventory involving 100 X 100 m square plots in an area of Peruvian Prosopis pallida dry forest, roughly one million hectares in size in the Piura prov...

  18. Observations on a population of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (Forskal, 1775) in the North Aegean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chariton Chintiroglou, C. [Thessaloniki, Aristotle Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Zoology

    1996-12-31

    The present paper is concerned with the structural aspects of Anemonia viridis populations found in the North Aegean Sea. It was found that mean wet weight and density of anemone populations increases with depth and distance from shore. Differences in the structure of the Anemonia viridis populations were attributed both to the specific hydrodynamic characteristics of the biotopes and to a number biotic interactions. From our results and t previous investigations the adoption of three different lifestyles by the anemones was assumed.: (1) a colonial form, with population densities around 650 individuals per m{sup 2}, found in substrates exposed to increased hydrodynamism; (2) a colonial form, with lower densities (90 indiv. per m{sup 2}), found in less exposed sites; (3) finally, large individuals in deeper waters chose a solitary lifestyle, as mechanical stresses were much lower.

  19. Stylobates birtlesi sp. n., a new species of carcinoecium-forming sea anemone (Cnidaria, Actiniaria, Actiniidae from eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Crowther

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of carcinoecium-forming sea anemone, Stylobates birtlesi sp. n., from sites 680-960 m deep in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia. An anemone of this genus settles on a gastropod shell inhabited by a hermit crab, then covers and extends the shell to produce a chitinous structure termed a carcinoecium. Stylobates birtlesi sp. n. is symbiotic with the hermit crab Sympagurus trispinosus (Balss, 1911. The nature of marginal sphincter muscle and nematocyst size and distribution distinguish Stylobates birtlesi sp. n. from other species in the genus. The four known species are allopatric, each inhabiting a separate ocean basin of the Indo-west Pacific. We also extend the known range of Stylobates loisetteae in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Western Australia.

  20. A sea anemone-like CuO/Co3O4 composite: an effective catalyst for electrochemical water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiumin; Guan, Guoqing; Du, Xiao; Cao, Ji; Hao, Xiaogang; Ma, Xuli; Jagadale, Ajay D; Abudula, Abuliti

    2015-10-18

    A facile unipolar pulse electrodeposition combined with the thermal oxidation method was applied for fabrication of CuO/Co3O4 composites on carbon electrode for water electrolysis, and it was found that the sea anemone-like one with a 3D hierarchical structure formed at -0.8 V exhibited excellent performance for water electrolysis at a low overpotential with high stability. PMID:26311303

  1. Notes on the genus Amphiprion Bloch & Schneider, 1801 (Teleostei: Pomacentridae) and its host sea anemones in the Seychelles

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, den, J.M.P.

    1997-01-01

    The genus Amphiprion Bloch & Schneider, 1801, is represented in the Seychelles by two species, A. akallopisos Bleeker, 1853, and the endemic A. fuscocaudatus Allen, 1972. Throughout its distributional range Amphiprion akallopisos has exclusively been recorded to associate with the clownfish anemones Heteractis magnifica (Quoy & Gaimard, 1833) and Stichodactyla mertensii Brandt, 1835. During the Netherlands Indian Ocean Programme (NIOP) Seychelles Expedition 19921993 this was confirmed for the...

  2. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles from two acidophilic strains of Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida and their antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golińska, Patrycja; Wypij, Magdalena; Rathod, Dnyaneshwar; Tikar, Sagar; Dahm, Hanna; Rai, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is an eco-friendly approach by using different biological sources; for example, plants and microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and actinobacteria. In this report, we present the biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by acidophilic actinomycetes SL19 and SL24 strains isolated from pine forest soil (pH < 4.0). The isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequence were identified as Pilimelia columellifera subsp. pallida. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by visual observations of colour change from light-yellow to dark-brown. The UV-vis spectra of AgNPs were recorded at 425 and 430 nm. The AgNPs were further characterized by Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), Zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). FTIR analysis revealed the presence of proteins as a capping agent. TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical and polydispersed NPs of 12.7 and 15.9 nm sizes. The in vitro antibacterial activity of AgNPs alone and in combination with antibiotics was evaluated against clinical bacteria viz., Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and uropathogens such as Enterobacter, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and E. coli. The lowest MIC (40 μg ml(-1) ) was demonstrated by AgNPs synthesized from SL24 against E. coli. However, the AgNPs of SL19 showed lowest MIC (70 μg ml(-1) ) against S. aureus. The activity of antibiotic was enhanced, when tested in combination with silver nanoparticles synthesized from both actinobacterial strains. PMID:27151174

  3. Characterization, purification and phylogenetic analysis of a cytolysin from the sea anemone Heteractis magnifica of the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Karthikayalu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that sea anemones comprise a rich source of cytolytic toxins. The present study reports the isolation and characterization of a cytolysin obtained from the sea anemone Heteractis magnifica collected in the Andaman Islands of the Indian Ocean. The crude extract was screened for hemolytic activity by a blood agar plate method and a 6-mm zone of clearance was observed after incubation. The hemolytic property of the crude extract, tested by the microtiter plate method, revealed positive results at concentrations as low as 120 ng/mL. Furthermore, it was favored by alkaline pH and was stable up to 60°C. On the other hand, the hemolytic effect was abolished by the addition of human serum. Purification steps involved ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequent desalting by dialysis, followed by anion- and cation-exchange chromatographies. The purified fractions displayed the presence of a 19-kDa cytolysin when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The conserved region of the cytolysin (with 303 bp was amplified by RT-PCR and was sequenced. The sequence showed maximum homology (97% with the already reported cytolysins from other sea anemone species.

  4. Reproductive biology of the sea anemone shrimp Periclimenes rathbunae (Caridea, Palaemonidae, Pontoniinae), from the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofeifa-Solano, Juan Carlos; Elizondo-Coto, Marcelo; Wehrtmann, Ingo S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Caridean shrimps are a highly diverse group and many species form symbiotic relationships with different marine invertebrates. Periclimenes rathbunae is a brightly colored shrimp that lives predominantly in association with sea anemones. Information about the reproductive ecology of the species is scarce. Therefore, we collected 70 ovigerous females inhabiting the sun sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus in coral reefs from the southern Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. Females produced on average 289 ± 120 embryos. The volume of recently-produced embryos was on average 0.038 mm3, and embryo volume increased by 192% during the incubation period. The average embryo mortality during embryogenesis was 24%. The reproductive output was 0.24 ± 0.094, considerably higher than in many other pontoniine shrimps. Females carrying embryos close to hatching showed fully developed ovaries, suggesting consecutive spawning. We assume that the sheltered habitat, living on sea anemones, allows Periclimenes rathbunae to allocate more energy in embryo production than most other free-living caridean shrimps. This is the first record of Periclimenes rathbunae for Costa Rica. PMID:25561838

  5. Fine-scale population structure of two anemones (Stichodactyla gigantea and Heteractis magnifica) in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea

    KAUST Repository

    Gatins, Remy

    2014-12-01

    Anemonefish are one of the main groups that have been used over the last decade to empirically measure larval dispersal and connectivity in coral reef populations. A few species of anemones are integral to the life history of these fish, as well as other obligate symbionts, yet the biology and population structure of these anemones remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to measure the genetic structure of these anemones within and between two reefs in order to assess their reproductive mode and dispersal potential. To do this, we sampled almost exhaustively two anemones species (Stichodactyla gigantea and Heteractis magnifica) at two small islands in Kimbe Bay (Papua New Guinea) separated by approximately 25 km. Both the host anemones and the anemonefish are heavily targeted for the aquarium trade, in addition to the populations being affected by bleaching pressures (Hill and Scott 2012; Hobbs et al. 2013; Saenz- Agudelo et al. 2011; Thomas et al. 2014), therefore understanding their biology is crucial for better management strategies. Panels of microsatellite markers were developed for each species using next generation sequencing tools. Clonality analyses confirm six pairs of identical genotypes for S. gigantea (n=350) and zero for H. magnifica (n=128), indicating presence/absence of asexual reproduction in this region. S. gigantea showed low structure between islands (FST= 0.003, p-value= 0.000), however, even if the majority of the individuals were unrelated (r~0), 81 families that shared 50% of their genetic material formed from two to four members were found. Out of these families, 45% were found with individuals only within Tuare Island, 11% only in Kimbe Island, and 44% were sharing individuals among islands. In comparison, H. magnifica showed no structure (FST= 0.002, p-value= 0.278), mean relatedness indicated the majority of individuals were unrelated, and 31 families were identified. Families again consisted from two to four members and

  6. Prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 promotes growth of the algal symbiont Symbiodinium muscatinei in the intertidal sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha Towanda

    2012-05-01

    Some photosynthetic organisms benefit from elevated levels of carbon dioxide, but studies on the effects of elevated PCO2 on the algal symbionts of animals are very few. This study investigated the impact of hypercapnia on a photosynthetic symbiosis between the anemone Anthopleura elegantissima and its zooxanthella Symbiodinium muscatinei. Anemones were maintained in the laboratory for 1 week at 37 Pa PCO2 and pH 8.1. Clonal pairs were then divided into two groups and maintained for 6 weeks under conditions naturally experienced in their intertidal environment, 45 Pa PCO2, pH 8.1 and 231 Pa PCO2, pH 7.3. Respiration and photosynthesis were measured after the 1-week acclimation period and after 6 weeks in experimental conditions. Density of zooxanthellal cells, zooxanthellal cell size, mitotic index and chlorophyll content were compared between non-clonemate anemones after the 1-week acclimation period and clonal anemones at the end of the experiment. Anemones thrived in hypercapnia. After 6 weeks, A. elegantissima exhibited higher rates of photosynthesis at 45 Pa (4.2 µmol O2 g−1 h−1 and 231 Pa (3.30 µmol O2 g−1 h−1 than at the initial 37 Pa (1.53 µmol O2 g−1 h−1. Likewise, anemones at 231 Pa received more of their respiratory carbon from zooxanthellae (CZAR  = 78.2% than those at 37 Pa (CZAR  = 66.6% but less than anemones at 45 Pa (CZAR  = 137.3%. The mitotic index of zooxanthellae was significantly greater in the hypercapnic anemones than in anemones at lower PCO2. Excess zooxanthellae were expelled by their hosts, and cell densities, cell diameters and chlorophyll contents were not significantly different between the groups. The response of A. elegantissima to hypercapnic acidification reveals the potential adaptation of an intertidal, photosynthetic symbiosis for high PCO2.

  7. Re-description of Phymactis papillosa (Lesson, 1830) and Phymanthea pluvia (Drayton in Dana, 1846) (Cnidaria: Anthozoa), two common actiniid sea anemones from the south east Pacific with a discussion of related genera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Häussermann, V.

    2004-01-01

    Actiniid sea anemones possess few characteristics of taxonomic value, which makes columnar outgrowths one of the most important features for systematic work. There are two species of actiniid sea anemones known from Chile and southern Peru that exhibit a column densely covered with non-adhesive vesi

  8. Profiling molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in the non-symbiotic sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Matan; Tarrant, Ann M; Alon, Shahar; Simon-Blecher, Noa; Elbaz, Idan; Appelbaum, Lior; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are poorly understood within early-diverging animal lineages. We have characterized circadian behavioral patterns and identified potential components of the circadian clock in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis: a model cnidarian which lacks algal symbionts. Using automatic video tracking we showed that Nematostella exhibits rhythmic circadian locomotor activity, which is persistent in constant dark, shifted or disrupted by external dark/light cues and maintained the same rate at two different temperatures. This activity was inhibited by a casein kinase 1δ/ε inhibitor, suggesting a role for CK1 homologue(s) in Nematostella clock. Using high-throughput sequencing we profiled Nematostella transcriptomes over 48 hours under a light-dark cycle. We identified 180 Nematostella diurnally-oscillated transcripts and compared them with previously established databases of adult and larvae of the symbiotic coral Acropora millepora, revealing both shared homologues and unique rhythmic genes. Taken together, this study further establishes Nematostella as a non-symbiotic model organism to study circadian rhythms and increases our understanding about the fundamental elements of circadian regulation and their evolution within the Metazoa. PMID:26081482

  9. Iodine labelling of sea anemone toxin II, and binding to normal and denervated diaphragm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Sea anemone toxin II (ATX II) which keeps the activated sodium channels open, can be labelled at its histidine residues with 125I up to a specific radioactivity of 500 Ci/mmole. Upon intraventricular injection in mice, ATX II causes acute, short-lasting hyperexcitation and convulsions. Its LD50 in mice is between 25 and 50 ng of the native peptide, and between 50 and 100 ng of the radioactive material per animal. 2. The labelled peptide is bound to mouse diaphragm from where it can be displaced by ATX II and, even better, by scorpion neurotoxin but not by other basic peptides, e.g., histone or aprotinin. Binding is not significantly influenced by 50 mM potassium, by replacing sodium with choline, by veratridine or tetrodotoxin. In contrast to binding of α-bungarotoxin, binding of ATX II is not changed by denervation of the diaphragm. ATX II binds not only to the muscular but also to the tendinous moiety of the mouse diaphragm. 3. ATX II lowers the surface tension of water. Further experiments are needed to establish the usefulness of 125I-ATX for labelling sodium channels in excitable membranes. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of an Anemone-Type Eruption in an On-Disk Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Allyn; Sterling, Alphonse; Adams, Mitzi; Alexander, Caroline; Moore, Ronald; Woolley, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We report on an eruption seen in a very small coronal hole (about 120 arcseconds across), beginning at approximately 19:00 Universal Time on March 3, 2016. The event was initially observed by an amateur astronomer (RW) in an H-alpha movie from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG); the eruption attracted the attention of the observer because there was no nearby active region. To examine the region in detail, we use data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) in wavelengths 193 angstroms, 304 angstroms, and 94 angstroms, and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Data analysis and calibration activities such as scaling, rotation so that north is up, and removal of solar rotation are accomplished with SunPy. The eruption in low-cadence HMI data begins with the appearance of a bipole in the location of the coronal hole, followed by (apparent) expansion outwards when the intensity of the AIA wavelengths brighten; as the event proceeds, the coronal hole disappears. From high-cadence data, we will present results on the magnetic evolution of this structure, how it is related to intensity brightenings seen in the various SDO/AIA wavelengths, and how this event compares with the standard-anemone picture.

  11. Analysis of an Anemone-Type Eruption in an On-Disk Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi; Tennant, Allyn F.; Alexander, Caroline E.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Woolley, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We report on an eruption seen in a very small coronal hole (about 120'' across), beginning at approximately 19:00 UT on March 3, 2016. The event was initially observed by an amateur astronomer (RW) in an H-alpha movie from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG); the eruption attracted the attention of the observer because there was no nearby active region. To examine the region in detail, we use data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) in wavelengths 193 Å, 304 Å, and 94 Å, and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Data analysis and calibration activities such as scaling, rotation so that north is up, and removal of solar rotation are accomplished with SunPy. The eruption in low-cadence HMI data begins with the appearance of a bipole in the location of the coronal hole, followed by (apparent) expansion outwards when the intensity of the AIA wavelengths brighten; as the event proceeds, the coronal hole disappears. From high-cadence data, we will present results on the magnetic evolution of this structure, how it is related to intensity brightenings seen in the various SDO/AIA wavelengths, and how this event compares with the standard-anemone picture.

  12. High in situ repeatability of behaviour indicates animal personality in the beadlet anemone Actinia equina (Cnidaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Briffa

    Full Text Available 'Animal personality' means that individuals differ from one another in either single behaviours or suites of related behaviours in a way that is consistent over time. It is usually assumed that such consistent individual differences in behaviour are driven by variation in how individuals respond to information about their environment, rather than by differences in external factors such as variation in microhabitat. Since behavioural variation is ubiquitous in nature we might expect 'animal personality' to be present in diverse taxa, including animals with relatively simple nervous systems. We investigated in situ startle responses in a sea anemone, Actinia equina, to determine whether personalities might be present in this example of an animal with a simple nervous system. We found very high levels of repeatability among individuals that were re-identified in the same locations over a three week sampling period. In a subset of the data, where we used tide-pool temperature measurements to control for a key element of variation in microhabitat, these high levels of repeatability remained. Although a range of other consistent differences in micro-habitat features could have contributed to consistent differences between the behaviour of individuals, these data suggest the presence of animal personality in A. equina. Rather than being restricted to certain groups, personality may be a general feature of animals and may be particularly pronounced in species with simple nervous systems.

  13. Variations in the Life Cycle of Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae in Wild Populations of Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kricsfalusy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on a study of a perennial herb Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae in a variety of natural habitats in Saskatchewan, Canada, eight life stages (seed, seedling, juvenile, immature, vegetative, generative, subsenile, and senile are distinguished and characterized in detail. The species ontogenetic growth patterns are investigated. A. patens has a long life cycle that may last for several decades which leads to the formation of compact clumps. The distribution and age of clumps vary substantially in different environments with different levels of disturbance. The plant ontogeny includes the regular cycle with reproduction occurring through seeds. There is an optional subsenile vegetative disintegration at the end of the life span. The following variations in the life cycle of A. patens are identified: with slower development in young age, with an accelerated development, with omission of the generative stage, with retrogression to previous life stages in mature age, and with vegetative dormancy. The range of variations in the life cycle of A. patens may play an important role in maintaining population stability in different environmental conditions and management regimes.

  14. Pharmacological effects of two cytolysins isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T García; D Martinez; A Palmero; C Soto; M Tejuca; F Pazos; R Menéndez; C Alvarez; A Garateix

    2009-12-01

    Sticholysins I and II (St I/II) are cytolysins purified from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. In this study, we show their pharmacological action on guinea-pig and snail models in native and pH-denatured conditions in order to correlate the pharmacological findings with the pore-forming activity of both isoforms. In guinea-pig erythrocytes ( = 3), St II possessed higher haemolytic activity in comparison with St I and this activity was lost at an alkaline pH. In molluscan central neurons ( = 30), they irreversibly decreased the amplitude of the cholinergic response; St I (EC50 0.6 molL–1) was more potent than St II (EC50 > 6.6 molL–1) and they both increased the duration of the action potential; these effects were absent at an alkaline pH. In guinea-pig isolated atrium ( = 25), both increased the amplitude of the contraction force, but St II was more potent than St I (EC50 0.03 molL–1 and 0.3 molL–1, respectively) and this effect persisted at an alkaline pH. In summary, both cytolysins have neuroactive and cardioactive properties. The main mechanism in molluscan neurons seems to be associated with the cytolytic activity of these molecules, whereas in guinea-pig atrium, the existence of an additional pharmacological mechanism might be contributing to the observed effect.

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of the Triterpenoid Saponins Biosynthetic Pathway in Anemone flaccida by Transcriptome and Proteome Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chuansong; Li, Xiaohua; Zhao, Zeying; Yang, Tewu; Wang, Xuekui; Luo, Biaobiao; Zhang, Qiyun; Hu, Yanru; Hu, Xuebo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anemone flaccida Fr. Shmidt (Ranunculaceae), commonly known as ‘Di Wu’ in China, is a perennial herb with limited distribution. The rhizome of A. flaccida has long been used to treat arthritis as a tradition in China. Studies disclosed that the plant contains a rich source of triterpenoid saponins. However, little is known about triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis in A. flaccida. Results: In this study, we conducted the tandem transcriptome and proteome profiling of a non-model medicinal plant, A. flaccida. Using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing and iTRAQ technique, a total of 46,962 high-quality unigenes were obtained with an average sequence length of 1,310 bp, along with 1473 unique proteins from A. flaccida. Among the A. flaccida transcripts, 36,617 (77.97%) showed significant similarity (E-value HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and iTRAQ technique was shown to be a powerful method for the discovery of candidate genes, which encoded enzymes that were responsible for the biosynthesis of novel secondary metabolites in a non-model plant. The transcriptome data of our study provides a very important resource for the understanding of the triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis of A. flaccida. PMID:27504115

  16. Antifouling and Fungicidal Resorcylic Acid Lactones from the Sea Anemone-Derived Fungus Cochliobolus lunatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Ai; Shao, Chang-Lun; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Blum, Mathias; Gan, Li-She; Wang, Kai-Ling; Chen, Min; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2014-03-25

    Three new 14-membered resorcylic acid lactones, cochliomycins D-F, 1-3, and eight known analogues, 4-11, were isolated from the sea anemone-derived fungus Cochliobolus lunatus. Compounds 1-4 are diastereomers differing from each other by the absolute configurations of the 4',5'-diol chiral centers. The absolute configurations of 1-4 were established by the CD exciton chirality method and TDDFT ECD calculations. In antifouling assays, 1, 3-6, and 6a exhibited potent antifouling activities against the larval settlement of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite at nontoxic concentrations, with EC50 values ranging from 1.82 to 22.5 μg/mL. Noticeably, fungicide whole-plant assays indicated that 6 showed excellent activity on the Plasmopara viticola preventative test at 6 ppm and concentration-dependent activity on the Phytophthora infestans preventative application at 200, 60, and 20 ppm. Preliminary structure-activity relationships are also discussed. PMID:24635109

  17. Changes of Cellular Superficial Configuration of Symbiotic Algae During Cultivation from Two Anemones Found in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Symbiotic algae from two anemones, Radianthus macrodactylus and Stichodactyla mertensii, found in the South China Sea, were cultivated in ASP-8A medium in this study. Changes of superficial configuration of symbiotic algae during the cultivation were studied by means of a microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A number of small cavities appeared on the surfaces of symbiotic algae after they were cultivated for 10 h. The cavities enlarged and the cell contents were lost with extended cultivation. Our data suggested that the presence of cavities on symbiotic algae surfaces may be one of the main reasons for failure to culture symbiotic algae in an artificial medium.

  18. Genotoxicity on Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea plants exposed to urban and rural environments in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G M; Droste, A

    2012-11-01

    The Trad-MCN bioassay was used to investigate the genotoxicity on Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea plants exposed to variations in the environmental conditions in urban and rural sites in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, southern Brazil, over a one-year period. In spring 2009 and in summer, autumn and winter 2010, potted plants of T. pallida var. purpurea were exposed at two sites with different characteristics: the urban area of the municipality of Estância Velha, with leather and footwear industrial activity, and a Site of Special Environmental Interest in the rural area of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo. Other plants comprised the control group and were kept indoors. Frequencies of micronuclei (MCN) were determined in early tetrads of pollen mother cells and expressed as MCN/100 tetrads. Climate data were also registered during the experiment. MCN frequencies in the urban area were significantly higher (up to 8.13) than those found in the rural area (up to 1.26) and in the control group (up to 1.10), which did not differ statistically from each other over the year. The higher MCN frequencies observed in the urban site can be attributed to air pollution, but also may have been influenced by microclimatic and daily thermal variation differences between sites. Higher temperatures recorded in spring and summer may have influenced MCN frequencies observed in the urban site. No clear relation was observed between rainfall and MCN frequencies. Similar and high relative humidity percentages were registered over the period of the study. Considering that the bioindicator plant presents an integrated response to abiotic factors such as pollutants and weather conditions, it can be used as an additional tool that can point to synergistic effects of environmental variables on organisms. PMID:23295507

  19. Differential distribution of lipids in epidermis, gastrodermis and hosted Symbiodinium in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Johana; Massi, Lionel; Mehiri, Mohamed; Boutoute, Marc; Mayzaud, Patrick; Capron, Laure; Sabourault, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis mainly relies on nutrient recycling, thus providing both partners with a competitive advantage in nutrient-poor waters. Essential processes related to lipid metabolism can be influenced by various factors, including hyperthermal stress. This can affect the lipid content and distribution in both partners, while contributing to symbiosis disruption and bleaching. In order to gain further insight into the role and distribution of lipids in the cnidarian metabolism, we investigated the lipid composition of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis and its photosynthetic dinoflagellate endosymbionts (Symbiodinium). We compared the lipid content and fatty acid profiles of the host cellular layers, non-symbiotic epidermal and symbiont-containing gastrodermal cells, and those of Symbiodinium, in a mass spectrometry-based assessment. Lipids were more concentrated in Symbiodinium cells, and the lipid class distribution was dominated by polar lipids in all tissues. The fatty acid distribution between host cell layers and Symbiodinium cells suggested potential lipid transfers between the partners. The lipid composition and distribution was modified during short-term hyperthermal stress, mainly in Symbiodinium cells and gastrodermis. Exposure to elevated temperature rapidly caused a decrease in polar lipid C18 unsaturated fatty acids and a strong and rapid decrease in the abundance of polar lipid fatty acids relative to sterols. These lipid indicators could therefore be used as sensitive biomarkers to assess the physiology of symbiotic cnidarians, especially the effect of thermal stress at the onset of cnidarian bleaching. Overall, the findings of this study provide some insight on key lipids that may regulate maintenance of the symbiotic interaction. PMID:26478191

  20. Identification of hemolytic and neuroactive fractions in the venom of the sea anemone Bunodosoma cangicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lagos

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Sea anemones are a rich source of biologically active substances. In crayfish muscle fibers, Bunodosoma cangicum whole venom selectively blocks the I K(Ca currents. In the present study, we report for the first time powerful hemolytic and neuroactive effects present in two different fractions obtained by gel-filtration chromatography from whole venom of B. cangicum. A cytolytic fraction (Bcg-2 with components of molecular mass ranging from 8 to 18 kDa elicited hemolysis of mouse erythrocytes with an EC50 = 14 µg/ml and a maximum dose of 22 µg/ml. The effects of the neuroactive fraction, Bcg-3 (2 to 5 kDa, were studied on isolated crab nerves. This fraction prolonged the compound action potentials by increasing their duration and rise time in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was evident after the washout of the preparation, suggesting the existence of a reversible substance that was initially masking the effects of an irreversible one. In order to elucidate the target of Bcg-3 action, the fraction was applied to a tetraethylammonium-pretreated preparation. An additional increase in action potential duration was observed, suggesting a blockade of a different population of K+ channels or of tetraethylammonium-insensitive channels. Also, tetrodotoxin could not block the action potentials in a Bcg-3-pretreated preparation, suggesting a possible interaction of Bcg-3 with Na+ channels. The present data suggest that B. cangicum venom contains at least two bioactive fractions whose activity on cell membranes seems to differ from the I K(Ca blockade described previously.

  1. Staining protocol for the histological study of sea anemones (Anthozoa: Actiniaria with recommendations for anesthesia and fixation of specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many of the characteristics used in sea anemone taxonomy can only be examined through histological sections. Since there is no standardized procedure for this purpose, various anesthesia and fixation techniques applied to specimens of the intertidal species Anthopleura hermaphroditica and Bunodactis hermafroditica are discussed. Additionally, further modifications are proposed to the Masson's trichrome method according to the results obtained on these species. The combined effect of the short application of menthol crystals, together with small doses of MgCl2 were the most satisfactory anesthetics for maintaining the specimens expanded. The best preparations were obtained from samples fixed for several months in 8% seawater formalin; however, in order to achieve a good differentiation of the tissue, mordanting the samples with Bouin's fixative was necessary. Besides being a fast method, the modified Masson's trichrome gives very good contrasts between the epithelia and the mesoglea, and allows controlling the timing of differentiation during staining. The present paper includes suggestions and precautions and thus offers practical help for the histological study of sea anemones.

  2. Characterization of a novel EF-hand homologue, CnidEF, in the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Laura L; Phillips, Wendy S; Weis, Virginia M

    2007-04-01

    The superfamily of EF-hand proteins is comprised of a large and diverse group of proteins that contain one or more characteristic EF-hand calcium-binding domains. This study describes and characterizes a novel EF-hand cDNA, CnidEF, from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima (Phylum Cnidaria, Class Anthozoa). CnidEF was found to contain two EF-hand motifs near the C-terminus of the deduced amino acid sequence and two regions near the N-terminus that could represent degenerate EF-hand motifs. CnidEF homologues were also identified from two other sea anemone species. A combination of bioinformatic and molecular phylogenetic analyses was used to compare CnidEF to EF-hand proteins in other organisms. The closest homologues identified from these analyses were a luciferin binding protein (LBP) involved in the bioluminescence of the anthozoan Renilla reniformis, and a sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) involved in fluorescence of the annelid worm Nereis diversicolor. Predicted structure and folding analysis revealed a close association with bioluminescent aequorin (AEQ) proteins from the hydrozoan cnidarian Aequorea aequorea. Neighbor-joining analyses grouped CnidEF within the SARC lineage along with AEQ and other cnidarian bioluminescent proteins rather than in the lineage containing calmodulin (CAM) and troponin-C (TNC). PMID:17280859

  3. From Sea Anemone to Homo Sapiens: The Evolution of the p53 Family of Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Arnold (Institute for Advanced Study)

    2009-09-14

    The human genome contains three transcription factors termed p53, p63 and p73 which are related orthologues. The function of the p53 protein is to respond to a wide variety of stresses which can disrupt the fidelity of DNA replication and cell division in somatic cells of the body. These stress signals, such as DNA damage, increase the mutation rate during DNA duplication and so an active p53 protein responds by eliminating clones of cells with mutations employing apoptosis, senescence or cell cycle arrest. In this way the p53 protein acts as a tumor suppressor preventing the mutations that can lead to cancers. The p63 and p73 proteins act in a similar fashion to protect the germ line cells in females (eggs). In addition the p63 protein plays a central role in the formation of epithelial cell layers and p73 plays a critical role in the formation of several structures in the central nervous system. Based upon their amino acid sequences and structural considerations the oldest organisms that contain an ancestor of the p53/p63/p73 gene are the sea anemone or hydra. The present day representatives of these animals contain a p63/p73 like ancestor gene and the protein functions in germ cells of this animal to enforce the fidelity of DNA replication after exposure to ultraviolet light. Thus the structure and functions of this gene family have been preserved for over one billion years of evolution. Other invertebrates such as the worm, the fly and the clam contain a very similar ancestor gene with a similar set of functions. The withdrawal of a food source from a worm results in the p63/p73 mediated apoptosis of the eggs so that new organisms will not be hatched into a poor environment. A similar response is thought to occur in humans. Thus this ancestor gene ensures the fidelity of the next generation of organisms. The first time a clearly distinct new p53 gene arises is in the cartilaginous fish and in the bony fish a separation of the p

  4. Population genetics of the invasive cryptogenic anemone, Anemonia alicemartinae, along the southeastern Pacific coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales-Aguirre, C. B.; Quiñones, A.; Hernández, C. E.; Neill, P. E.; Brante, A.

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important issues in biological invasions is understanding the factors and mechanisms determining the invasion success of non-native species. Theoretical and empirical works have shown that genetic diversity is a determinant of invasion success; thus, studying spatial patterns of genetic diversity, and exploring how biological and physical factors shape this population trait, are fundamental for understanding this phenomenon. Coastal marine ecosystems are one of the most susceptible habitats to invasion given the complex network of maritime transport. In this work we study the cryptogenic anemone, Anemonia alicemartinae, which has rapidly increased its geographical range southward during the last 50 years (approx. 2000 km) along the southeastern Pacific coast. Based on COI mtDNA sequences we evaluated three main hypotheses: a) the genetic diversity of A. alicemartinae decreases according to the direction of invasion (from north to south); b) there is biogeographic-phylogeographic concordance at the 30°S biogeographic break; and c) the demographic history is coherent with a recent geographic expansion. A total of 161 individual samples of A. alicemartinae were collected along the southeastern Pacific coast range of distribution, covering more than 2000 km, including samples along the 30°S biogeographical break. Results showed low genetic diversity (Hd = 0.253; π = 0.08) and a lack of geographic population genetic structure (FST = - 0.009, p-value = 0.656). The highest genetic diversity was observed in Peru (Chero and Mesas) and at localities close to the main Chilean seaports. We did not observe concordance between biogeographic and phylogeographic patterns or isolation by distance. Demographic indices (D = - 2.604, p < 0.001; Fu's = - 26.619, p < 0.001), as well as a star-like configuration of the haplotype network support recent population expansion of this species. Our results, together with historical field observations, support the idea that

  5. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction

  6. The rise of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis as a model system to investigate development and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, Michael J; Rentzsch, Fabian; Röttinger, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Reverse genetics and next-generation sequencing unlocked a new era in biology. It is now possible to identify an animal(s) with the unique biology most relevant to a particular question and rapidly generate tools to functionally dissect that biology. This review highlights the rise of one such novel model system, the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Nematostella is a cnidarian (corals, jellyfish, hydras, sea anemones, etc.) animal that was originally targeted by EvoDevo researchers looking to identify a cnidarian animal to which the development of bilaterians (insects, worms, echinoderms, vertebrates, mollusks, etc.) could be compared. Studies in Nematostella have accomplished this goal and informed our understanding of the evolution of key bilaterian features. However, Nematostella is now going beyond its intended utility with potential as a model to better understand other areas such as regenerative biology, EcoDevo, or stress response. This review intends to highlight key EvoDevo insights from Nematostella that guide our understanding about the evolution of axial patterning mechanisms, mesoderm, and nervous systems in bilaterians, as well as to discuss briefly the potential of Nematostella as a model to better understand the relationship between development and regeneration. Lastly, the sum of research to date in Nematostella has generated a variety of tools that aided the rise of Nematostella to a viable model system. We provide a catalogue of current resources and techniques available to facilitate investigators interested in incorporating Nematostella into their research. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:408-428. doi: 10.1002/wdev.222 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26894563

  7. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Taufiq, E-mail: mtur2@cam.ac.uk; Smith, Ewan St. John

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction.

  8. Pharmacological and biomedical properties of sea anemones Paracondactylis indicus, Paracondactylis sinensis, Heteractis magnificaand Stichodactyla haddonifrom East coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bragadeeswaran Subramanian; Thangaraj Sangappellai; Rajiv Chandra Rajak; Balaji Diraviam

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To explore the biomedical and pharmacological activity ofParacondactylis indicus (P. indicus),Paracondactylis sinensis(P. sinensis),Heteractis magnifica (H. magnifica) and Stichodactyla haddoni (S. haddoni).Methods: The live sea anemones were kept inside the glass bowl along with some amount of distilled water in an ice container for15 min. During stress condition, nematocysts released from the tentacles were collected and centrifuged at5 000 rpm for 15 min. The supernatant were collected in separate cleaned beakers for lyophilisation.Results:The protein content of crude extracts was15.2, 28.7, 18.2 and35.4μg/mL. In hemolytic assay, the P. indicus was sensitive (16.842 HT/mg) on chicken blood butP. sinensis was less sensitive (1.114 HT/mg) on chicken and goat blood. WhereasH. magnificaandS. haddoni showed hemolysis (0.879, 0.903 HT/mg and 56.263, 0.451 HT/mg) in chicken and goat blood. In antimicrobial assay, the methanol extract ofP. indicus showed maximum inhibition zone of9.7mm againstS. typhii andP. sinensisshowed9.8 mm againstK. pneumonia in methanol and ethanol extracts. Whereas theH. magnifica andS. haddoni showed maximum of10 mm againstS. typhii, K. pneumonia in methanol and ethanol extracts.Conclusions: The high toxic sea anemones may also contain some biologically active agents which has haemolytic, analgesic and anti-infilamatory activity.

  9. Desenvolvimento de Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith em genótipos de milho tratados com extrato acetato de etila de Trichilia pallida (Swartz Development of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith on corn genotypes treated with ethyl acetade extract from Trichilia pallida (Swartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Railda Roel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito do extrato acetato de etila obtido de folhas e ramos de Trichillia pallida, (a 0,001%, sobre o desenvolvimento de Spodoptera frugiperda alimentada com folhas de quatro genótipos de milho, um suscetível, 'Piranão', e três resistentes, 'CMS 14C', 'Zapalote Chico', 'ESALQ-PB-4', à referida praga. Os parâmetros biológicos avaliados foram peso, duração e viabilidade das fases larval e pupal. Verificou-se que o extrato provocou alongamento da fase larval e redução dos pesos larval e pupal e que os genótipos resistentes não confirmaram esse comportamento pois quando comparados ao genótipo suscetível, apenas reduziram o peso pupal. Não houve interação significativa entre os fatores genótipo e extrato.The effect of the ethyl acetate extract of leaves and branches of Trichilia pallida was evaluated (at 0.001% on larvae of S. frugiperda, fed on leaves of the corn genotypes 'Zapalote Chico', 'CMS 14C' and 'ESALQ-PB-4', considered resistant to this pest, and the susceptible genotype 'Piranão'. The parameters evaluated were length, weight and viability of larval and pupal stages. The extract increased the length of the larval stage, and larval and pupal weight, while resistant genotypes only reduced the pupal weight, did however not confirm the resistant behaviour. There was no interaction between genotype and extract.

  10. Efeito do extrato acetato de etila de Trichilia pallida Swartz (Meliaceae no desenvolvimento e sobrevivência da lagarta-do-cartucho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROEL ANTONIA RAILDA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available O efeito de diferentes concentrações (massa/volume do extrato acetato de etila de folhas e ramos de Trichilia pallida, em relação à lagarta-do-cartucho Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, foi avaliado em condições de laboratório. As folhas de milho foram imersas em diferentes concentrações (0,0001%; 0,0008%; 0,006%; 0,05%; 0,4% e 3% desse extrato e oferecidas a lagartas recém-eclodidas e com dez dias de idade, avaliando-se a duração e viabilidade das fases larval e pupal e a massa de pupas. A concentração letal 50 (CL50 estimada para lagartas com sete dias de idade foi de 0,048%. Verificou-se que o extrato causou mortalidade larval de 100% (em concentração igual ou superior a 0,05%, afetou a sobrevivência e o desenvolvimento do inseto (na concentração de 0,006% e não provocou qualquer efeito no mesmo, em concentração igual ou inferior a 0,0008%. Lagartas alimentadas desde a eclosão foram mais afetadas do que as alimentadas a partir dos dez dias.

  11. Horizontal Gene Transfer from Bacteria Has Enabled the Plant-Parasitic Nematode Globodera pallida to Feed on Host-Derived Sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Etienne G J; Guzeeva, Elena A; Mantelin, Sophie; Berepiki, Adokiye; Jones, John T

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN) is unusual in that these organisms have acquired a range of genes from bacteria via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The proteins encoded by most of these genes are involved in metabolism of various components of the plant cell wall during invasion of the host. Recent genome sequencing projects for PPN have shown that Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 32 (GH32) sequences are present in several PPN species. These sequences are absent from almost all other animals. Here, we show that the GH32 sequences from an economically important cyst nematode species, Globodera pallida are functional invertases, are expressed during feeding and are restricted in expression to the nematode digestive system. These data are consistent with a role in metabolizing host-derived sucrose. In addition, a detailed phylogenetic analysis shows that the GH32 sequences from PPN and those present in some insect species have distinct bacterial origins and do not therefore derive from a gene present in the last common ancestor of ecdysozoan species. HGT has therefore played at least two critical roles in the evolution of PPN, enabling both invasion of the host and feeding on the main translocation carbohydrate of the plant. PMID:26915958

  12. Scientific Opinion on the risks to plant health posed by European versus non-European populations of the potato cyst nematodes Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, R.; Candresse, T.; Dormannsné Simon, E.; Gilioli, G.; Grégoire, J.-C.; Jeger, M. J.; Karadjova, O. E.; Lövei, G.; Makowski, D.; Manceau, C.; Navajas, M.; Porta Puglia, A.; Rafoss, T.; Rossi, V.; Schans, J.; Schrader, G.; Urek, G.; van Lenteren, J. C.; Vloutoglou, I; Winter, S.; Zlotina, M.

    2012-01-01

    relating to place of production freedom and soil origin were noted, and the Panel identified additional risk reduction options for certain plants for planting (e.g. bulbs) and additional requirements to confirm the absence of PCN in places of production. The Panel also identified some problems with the......The Panel on Plant Health has delivered a scientific opinion on the different risks posed by European and non-European populations of the potato cyst nematodes (PCN) Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis to solanaceous plants in the EU and on the effectiveness of current control measures...

  13. Aboveground biomass in Prosopis pallida (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd. H. B. K. ecosystems using Landsat 7 ETM+ images Biomasa aérea en ecosistemas de Prosopis pallida (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd. H. B. K. usando imágenes Landsat 7 ETM+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EVA PADRÓN

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The significance of field work in remote sensing studies when applied to large areas has often been underestimated. The combination of specific forest inventories for the estimation of aboveground biomass in large dry tropical forest areas with remote sensor data has scarcely been explored to date. In this work, a systematic, stratified forest inventory involving 100 X 100 m square plots in an area of Peruvian Prosopis pallida dry forest, roughly one million hectares in size in the Piura province (Peru has been compiled. The inventory encompassed the principal silvicultural variables defining the ecosystem studied, which were used in allometric equations for the different species, genera and plant associations in the area in order to estimate the amount of aboveground biomass present in each plot. Field data were related to a Landsat 7 ETM+ image by using six different vegetation indices derived from an image mosaic for the area. Two regression equations (relating the amount of aboveground phytomass to the different vegetation indices provided reasonably acceptable phytomass predictions for the type of ecosystem concerned (R² between 0.72 and 0.52La importancia del trabajo de campo en estudios de teledetección radica en la necesidad de proveer una validación a los valores de reflectividad incluidos en los datos de los sensores remotos. La diversidad ecológica del medio forestal y la evaluación de grandes superficies de difícil acceso hacen de la combinación del inventario forestal y de la teledetección una herramienta compleja y útil en el análisis del medio terrestre. El presente trabajo muestra la aplicación de un inventario sistemático estratificado sobre un millón de hectáreas de bosque tropical seco de Prosopis pallida en el Departamento de Piura (Perú en la validación de diferentes tipos de clasificación realizadas sobre dicho ecosistema mediante el uso de imágenes Landsat ETM+. El inventario recoge las principales

  14. Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia (DC.) Hell., Echinacea pallida (Nutt.) Nutt.,Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench): a review of their chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Joanne; Anderson, Linda A; Gibbons, Simon; Phillipson, J David

    2005-08-01

    This paper reviews the chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties of Echinacea species used medicinally. The Echinacea species Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida and Echinacea purpurea have a long history of medicinal use for a variety of conditions, particularly infections, and today echinacea products are among the best-selling herbal preparations in several developed countries. Modern interest in echinacea is focused on its immunomodulatory effects, particularly in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. The chemistry of Echinacea species is well documented, and several groups of constituents, including alkamides and caffeic acid derivatives, are considered important for activity. There are, however, differences in the constituent profile of the three species. Commercial echinacea samples and marketed echinacea products may contain one or more of the three species, and analysis of samples of raw material and products has shown that some do not meet recognized standards for pharmaceutical quality. Evidence from preclinical studies supports some of the traditional and modern uses for echinacea, particularly the reputed immunostimulant (or immunomodulatory) properties. Several, but not all, clinical trials of echinacea preparations have reported effects superior to those of placebo in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. However, evidence of efficacy is not definitive as studies have included different patient groups and tested various different preparations and dosage regimens of echinacea. On the basis of the available limited safety data, echinacea appears to be well tolerated. However, further investigation and surveillance are required to establish the safety profiles of different echinacea preparations. Safety issues include the possibility of allergic reactions, the use of echinacea by patients with autoimmune diseases and the potential for echinacea preparations to interact with

  15. Two variants of the major serine protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Ziegelmüller, Patrick; González, Lidice; Mansur, Manuel; Machado, Yoan; Redecke, Lars; Hahn, Ulrich; Betzel, Christian; Chávez, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-07-01

    The major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (ShPI-1) is a non-specific inhibitor that binds trypsin and other trypsin-like enzymes, as well as chymotrypsin, and human neutrophil elastase. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of ShPI-1 to produce two variants (rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S) that were expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and characterized. After a single purification step, 65 mg and 15 mg of protein per liter of culture supernatant were obtained for rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S, respectively. Functional studies demonstrated a 100-fold decreased trypsin inhibitory activity as result of the K13L substitution at the reactive (P1) site. This protein variant has a novel tight-binding inhibitor activity of pancreatic elastase and increased activity toward neutrophil elastase in comparison to rShPI-1A. In contrast, the substitution Y15S at P2' site did not affect the Ki value against trypsin, but did reduce activity 10-fold against chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase. Our results provide two new ShPI-1 variants with modified inhibitory activities, one of them with increased biomedical potential. This study also offers new insight into the functional impact of the P1 and P2' sites on ShPI-1 specificity. PMID:26993255

  16. Studies on the comparison of pollen morphology and viability of four naturally distributed and commercial varieties of anemone coronaria L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study presents a comparison of the pollen morphology and viability of naturally distributed four varieties of Anemone coronaria L. These are A. coronaria var. coccinea (Jord.) Burn, A. coronaria var. rosea (Hanry) Batt, A. coronaria var. cyanea, A. coronaria var. alba Goaty and Pens) and its commercial cultivars. The four varieties were collected from areas near the road side along the Kirkagac-Soma highway in the State of Manisa. The commercial cultivars were obtained from the commercial flower growers in the Urla region of zmir. Pollen viability levels decreased in all commercial cultivars of A. coronaria. The highest reduction in pollen viability was recorded in A. coronaria pink cultivars of de Caen group. The general pollen type is prolate spheroidal in all pure forms, but there are some pollen morphological features which were not observed in the natural ones, although encountered in all commercial cultivars. On the other hand, various non-viable pollen types like wrinkled pollens, with abnormally shaped pollens or pollinia were found in the commercial cultivars. It was concluded that pesticides used to produce more flowers with rapid growth are the major cause for his reduction. Another reason could be the use of tetraploid F1 hybrids of A. coronaria cultivars of de Caen group as commercial samples. (author)

  17. Nme gene family evolutionary history reveals pre-metazoan origins and high conservation between humans and the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Desvignes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Nme gene family is involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes such as cellular differentiation, development, metastatic dissemination, and cilia functions. Despite the known importance of Nme genes and their use as clinical markers of tumor aggressiveness, the associated cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Over the last 20 years, several non-vertebrate model species have been used to investigate Nme functions. However, the evolutionary history of the family remains poorly understood outside the vertebrate lineage. The aim of the study was thus to elucidate the evolutionary history of the Nme gene family in Metazoans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a total of 21 eukaryote species including 14 metazoans, the evolutionary history of Nme genes was reconstructed in the metazoan lineage. We demonstrated that the complexity of the Nme gene family, initially thought to be restricted to chordates, was also shared by the metazoan ancestor. We also provide evidence suggesting that the complexity of the family is mainly a eukaryotic innovation, with the exception of Nme8 that is likely to be a choanoflagellate/metazoan innovation. Highly conserved gene structure, genomic linkage, and protein domains were identified among metazoans, some features being also conserved in eukaryotes. When considering the entire Nme family, the starlet sea anemone is the studied metazoan species exhibiting the most conserved gene and protein sequence features with humans. In addition, we were able to show that most of the proteins known to interact with human NME proteins were also found in starlet sea anemone. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, our observations further support the association of Nme genes with key cellular functions that have been conserved throughout metazoan evolution. Future investigations of evolutionarily conserved Nme gene functions using the starlet sea anemone could shed new light on a wide variety of

  18. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from sea anemones containing numerous copies of a metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide: a likely role for dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in neuropeptide precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important group of hormones mediating or modulating neuronal communication. Neuropeptides are especially abundant in evolutionarily "old" nervous systems, such as those of cnidarians, the lowest animal group having a nervous system. Cnidarians often have a life cycle including...... a polyp, a medusa, and a planula larva stage. Recently, a neuropeptide, isolated from sea anemones that induces metamorphosis in a hydroid planula larva to become a hydropolyp [Leitz, T., Morand, K. & Mann, M. (1994) Dev. Biol. 163, 440-446]. Here, we have cloned...

  19. Pre-bilaterian origins of the Hox cluster and the Hox code: evidence from the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F Ryan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hox genes were critical to many morphological innovations of bilaterian animals. However, early Hox evolution remains obscure. Phylogenetic, developmental, and genomic analyses on the cnidarian sea anemone Nematostella vectensis challenge recent claims that the Hox code is a bilaterian invention and that no "true" Hox genes exist in the phylum Cnidaria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phylogenetic analyses of 18 Hox-related genes from Nematostella identify putative Hox1, Hox2, and Hox9+ genes. Statistical comparisons among competing hypotheses bolster these findings, including an explicit consideration of the gene losses implied by alternate topologies. In situ hybridization studies of 20 Hox-related genes reveal that multiple Hox genes are expressed in distinct regions along the primary body axis, supporting the existence of a pre-bilaterian Hox code. Additionally, several Hox genes are expressed in nested domains along the secondary body axis, suggesting a role in "dorsoventral" patterning. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A cluster of anterior and posterior Hox genes, as well as ParaHox cluster of genes evolved prior to the cnidarian-bilaterian split. There is evidence to suggest that these clusters were formed from a series of tandem gene duplication events and played a role in patterning both the primary and secondary body axes in a bilaterally symmetrical common ancestor. Cnidarians and bilaterians shared a common ancestor some 570 to 700 million years ago, and as such, are derived from a common body plan. Our work reveals several conserved genetic components that are found in both of these diverse lineages. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that a set of developmental rules established in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians is still at work today.

  20. Spatial gene expression quantification: a tool for analysis of in situ hybridizations in sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botman Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatial gene expression quantification is required for modeling gene regulation in developing organisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is the model system most widely applied for spatial gene expression analysis due to its unique embryonic properties: the shape does not change significantly during its early cleavage cycles and most genes are differentially expressed along a straight axis. This system of development is quite exceptional in the animal kingdom. In the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis the embryo changes its shape during early development; there are cell divisions and cell movement, like in most other metazoans. Nematostella is an attractive case study for spatial gene expression since its transparent body wall makes it accessible to various imaging techniques. Findings Our new quantification method produces standardized gene expression profiles from raw or annotated Nematostella in situ hybridizations by measuring the expression intensity along its cell layer. The procedure is based on digital morphologies derived from high-resolution fluorescence pictures. Additionally, complete descriptions of nonsymmetric expression patterns have been constructed by transforming the gene expression images into a three-dimensional representation. Conclusions We created a standard format for gene expression data, which enables quantitative analysis of in situ hybridizations from embryos with various shapes in different developmental stages. The obtained expression profiles are suitable as input for optimization of gene regulatory network models, and for correlation analysis of genes from dissimilar Nematostella morphologies. This approach is potentially applicable to many other metazoan model organisms and may also be suitable for processing data from three-dimensional imaging techniques.

  1. Structure-function relationships of the major neurotoxin from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus with a new sodium channel receptor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined that ShN I, a 48-residue type 2 sea anemone toxin, delays the inactivation of the Na channel in lobster olfactory somas. The receptor for ShN I was identified in vesicle preparations of neuronal tissues from both crustaceans and mammals; however, the KD values for the former is more than 1,000 fold lower for the later. The binding of [125I]-ShN I to this receptor was determined to be unaffected by Anemonia sulcata II, depolarization of the membrane, or veratridine. ShN I was unable to displace [125I]-Androctonus austrialis Hector II, whereas unlabeled AaH II and As II displaced the labeled scorpion toxin from rat brain synaptosomes. This is the first characterization of a new Na channel receptor site which specifically binds type 2 anemone toxins. To study the interactions that specific amino acid residues of ShN I have with this receptor, we developed a strategy using solid phase peptide synthesis. Prior to the synthesis of analogs to ShN I, we assembled the native ShN I sequence and reoxidized the three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Chemical, physical, and pharmacological characterization of the purified synthetic ShN I showed it to be indistinguishable from the natural toxin

  2. Evolution of an ancient venom: recognition of a novel family of cnidarian toxins and the common evolutionary origin of sodium and potassium neurotoxins in sea anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouiaei, Mahdokht; Sunagar, Kartik; Federman Gross, Aya; Scheib, Holger; Alewood, Paul F; Moran, Yehu; Fry, Bryan G

    2015-06-01

    Despite Cnidaria (sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids) being the oldest venomous animal lineage, structure-function relationships, phyletic distributions, and the molecular evolutionary regimes of toxins encoded by these intriguing animals are poorly understood. Hence, we have comprehensively elucidated the phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary histories of pharmacologically characterized cnidarian toxin families, including peptide neurotoxins (voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channel-targeting toxins: NaTxs and KTxs, respectively), pore-forming toxins (actinoporins, aerolysin-related toxins, and jellyfish toxins), and the newly discovered small cysteine-rich peptides (SCRiPs). We show that despite long evolutionary histories, most cnidarian toxins remain conserved under the strong influence of negative selection-a finding that is in striking contrast to the rapid evolution of toxin families in evolutionarily younger lineages, such as cone snails and advanced snakes. In contrast to the previous suggestions that implicated SCRiPs in the biomineralization process in corals, we demonstrate that they are potent neurotoxins that are likely involved in the envenoming function, and thus represent the first family of neurotoxins from corals. We also demonstrate the common evolutionary origin of type III KTxs and NaTxs in sea anemones. We show that type III KTxs have evolved from NaTxs under the regime of positive selection, and likely represent a unique evolutionary innovation of the Actinioidea lineage. We report a correlation between the accumulation of episodically adaptive sites and the emergence of novel pharmacological activities in this rapidly evolving neurotoxic clade. PMID:25757852

  3. Molecular cloning of a novel, putative G protein-coupled receptor from sea anemones structurally related to members of the FSH, TSH, LH/CG receptor family from mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nothacker, H P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1993-01-01

    hormone (FSH, TSH, LH/CG) receptor family from mammals, including a very large, extracellular N terminus (18-25% sequence identity) and a 7 transmembrane region (44-48% sequence identity). As with the mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptor genes, the sea anemone receptor gene yields transcripts which can...

  4. Redescription of Oulactis concinnata (Drayton in Dana, 1846) (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniidae), an actiniid sea anemone from Chile and Perú with special fighting tentacles; with a preliminary revision of the genera with a “frond-like” marginal ruff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Häussermann, V.

    2003-01-01

    Two species of sea anemones with a conspicuous marginal ruff of frond-like structures encompassing the tentacular crown occur on the Chilean coast. Oulactis concinnata (= Isoulactis chilensis) (Drayton in Dana, 1846) is re-described in detail and further information is provided for Oulactis coliumen

  5. Natural selection and neutral evolution jointly drive population divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant Anemone multifida (Ranunculaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie R McEwen

    Full Text Available Population differentiation can be driven in large part by natural selection, but selectively neutral evolution can play a prominent role in shaping patters of population divergence. The decomposition of the evolutionary history of populations into the relative effects of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution enables an understanding of the causes of population divergence and adaptation. In this study, we examined heterogeneous genomic divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant, Anemone multifida. Using peak height and dominant AFLP data, we quantified population differentiation at non-outlier (neutral and outlier loci to determine the potential contribution of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution to population divergence. We found 13 candidate loci, corresponding to 2.7% of loci, with signatures of divergent natural selection between alpine and lowland populations and between alpine populations (Fst  = 0.074-0.445 at outlier loci, but neutral population differentiation was also evident between alpine populations (FST  = 0.041-0.095 at neutral loci. By examining population structure at both neutral and outlier loci, we determined that the combined effects of selection and neutral evolution are associated with the divergence of alpine populations, which may be linked to extreme abiotic conditions and isolation between alpine sites. The presence of outlier levels of genetic variation in structured populations underscores the importance of separately analyzing neutral and outlier loci to infer the relative role of divergent natural selection and neutral evolution in population divergence.

  6. Cyclisation Increases the Stability of the Sea Anemone Peptide APETx2 but Decreases Its Activity at Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan D. Rash

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available APETx2 is a peptide isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. It is the most potent and selective inhibitor of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 and it is currently in preclinical studies as a novel analgesic for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain. As a peptide it faces many challenges in the drug development process, including the potential lack of stability often associated with therapeutic peptides. In this study we determined the susceptibility of wild-type APETx2 to trypsin and pepsin and tested the applicability of backbone cyclisation as a strategy to improve its resistance to enzymatic degradation. Cyclisation with either a six-, seven- or eight-residue linker vastly improved the protease resistance of APETx2 but substantially decreased its potency against ASIC3. This suggests that either the N- or C-terminus of APETx2 is involved in its interaction with the channel, which we confirmed by making N- and C-terminal truncations. Truncation of either terminus, but especially the N-terminus, has detrimental effects on the ability of APETx2 to inhibit ASIC3. The current work indicates that cyclisation is unlikely to be a suitable strategy for stabilising APETx2, unless linkers can be engineered that do not interfere with binding to ASIC3.

  7. Triterpenoid saponin flaccidoside II from Anemone flaccida triggers apoptosis of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors via the MAPK-HO-1 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han LT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lin-tao Han,1 Yin Fang,1 Yan Cao,2 Feng-hua Wu,1 E Liu,2 Guo-yan Mo,2 Fang Huang1 1China Key Laboratory of TCM Resource and Prescription, Ministry of Education, 2Department of Pharmacy, Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs are highly aggressive soft tissue neoplasms that are extremely rare and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. MPNSTs are typically fatal, and there is no effective treatment so far. In our previous study, we showed that flaccidoside II, one of the triterpenoid saponins isolated from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, has antitumor potential by inducing apoptosis. In the present study, we found that flaccidoside II inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis in MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and S462. Furthermore, this study provides a mechanism by which the downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways is involved in the apoptotic role of flaccidoside II. This study suggested the potential of flaccidoside II as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for MPNSTs. Keywords: flaccidoside II, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, apoptosis, MAPK, HO-1

  8. Characterization of the Cadherin-Catenin Complex of the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis and Implications for the Evolution of Metazoan Cell-Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Donald Nathaniel; Miller, Phillip W; Lowe, Christopher J; Weis, William I; Nelson, William James

    2016-08-01

    The cadherin-catenin complex (CCC) mediates cell-cell adhesion in bilaterian animals by linking extracellular cadherin-based adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton. However, it is unknown whether the basic organization of the complex is conserved across all metazoans. We tested whether protein interactions and actin-binding properties of the CCC are conserved in a nonbilaterian animal, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis We demonstrated that N. vectensis has a complete repertoire of cadherin-catenin proteins, including two classical cadherins, one α-catenin, and one β-catenin. Using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering, we showed that α-catenin and β-catenin formed a heterodimer that bound N. vectensis Cadherin-1 and -2. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin bound F-actin with equivalent affinity as either a monomer or an α/β-catenin heterodimer, and its affinity for F-actin was, in part, regulated by a novel insert between the N- and C-terminal domains. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin inhibited Arp2/3 complex-mediated nucleation of actin filaments, a regulatory property previously thought to be unique to mammalian αE-catenin. Thus, despite significant differences in sequence, the key interactions of the CCC are conserved between bilaterians and cnidarians, indicating that the core function of the CCC as a link between cell adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton is ancestral in the eumetazoans. PMID:27189570

  9. Characterization of the Cadherin–Catenin Complex of the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis and Implications for the Evolution of Metazoan Cell–Cell Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Donald Nathaniel; Miller, Phillip W.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Weis, William I.; Nelson, William James

    2016-01-01

    The cadherin–catenin complex (CCC) mediates cell–cell adhesion in bilaterian animals by linking extracellular cadherin-based adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton. However, it is unknown whether the basic organization of the complex is conserved across all metazoans. We tested whether protein interactions and actin-binding properties of the CCC are conserved in a nonbilaterian animal, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. We demonstrated that N. vectensis has a complete repertoire of cadherin–catenin proteins, including two classical cadherins, one α-catenin, and one β-catenin. Using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering, we showed that α-catenin and β-catenin formed a heterodimer that bound N. vectensis Cadherin-1 and -2. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin bound F-actin with equivalent affinity as either a monomer or an α/β-catenin heterodimer, and its affinity for F-actin was, in part, regulated by a novel insert between the N- and C-terminal domains. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin inhibited Arp2/3 complex-mediated nucleation of actin filaments, a regulatory property previously thought to be unique to mammalian αE-catenin. Thus, despite significant differences in sequence, the key interactions of the CCC are conserved between bilaterians and cnidarians, indicating that the core function of the CCC as a link between cell adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton is ancestral in the eumetazoans. PMID:27189570

  10. Primary structure of the precursor for the sea anemone neuropeptide Antho-RFamide (less than Glu-Gly-Arg-Phe-NH2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darmer, D; Schmutzler, C; Diekhoff, D; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1991-01-01

    Neuropeptides containing the carboxylterminal sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 are found throughout the animal kingdom and are important substances mediating neuronal communication. Here, we have cloned the cDNA coding for the precursor protein of the sea anemone neuropeptide (Antho-RFamide) less than Glu......-Gly-Arg-Phe-NH2. This precursor is 334 amino acids in length and contains 19 copies of unprocessed Antho-RFamide (Gln-Gly-Arg-Phe-Gly), which are tandemly arranged in the C-terminal part of the protein. Paired basic residues (Lys-Arg) or single basic residues (Arg) occur at the C-terminal side of each Antho...... glutamic acid residues. Such processing is, to our knowledge, hitherto unknown for peptidergic neurons. The Antho-RFamide precursor also contains two copies of the putative Antho-RFamide-related peptide Phe-Gln-Gly-Arg-Phe-NH2 and one copy of Tyr-Val-Pro-Gly-Arg-Tyr-NH2. In addition, the precursor protein...

  11. Floral Morphogenesis of Anemone rivularis Buch.-Ham. ex DC. var.flore-minore Maxim. (Ranunculaceae) with Special Emphasis on Androecium Developmental Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Li CHANG; Yi REN; An-Min LU

    2005-01-01

    The floral morphogenesis and androecium developmental sequence of Anemone rivularis Buch.-Ham. ex DC. var. flore-minore Maxim. were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM)and by means of histological methods in order to expand our knowledge of the morphogenesis and development of the floral organs of the Ranunculaceae. The initiation of the floral elements is a centripetal spiral and the direction of the spiral is clockwise or anti-clockwise. However, the development of the androecium is highly unusual: in a longitudinal series of four stamens, the second stamen develops first from the inner to outer, then the third one, the fourth one and the first one in turn. The microsporogenesis and anther maturation follows the same developmental sequence. The tepals are different from the bracts and the stamens in both shape and size in the early developmental stage, but there is no difference between the stamens and carpels in the early developmental stage. Therefore, we established a spatio-temporal process of the floral morphogenesis of4. rivularis var.flore-minore and offer another meaning of the floral diversity patterns attributed to the level of the genus.

  12. Evidence for participation of GCS1 in fertilization of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis: Implication of a common mechanism of sperm–egg fusion in plants and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • GCS1 is a sperm transmembrane protein that is essential for gamete fusion in flowering plants. • The GCS1 gene is present not only in angiosperms but also in unicellular organisms and animals. • NvGCS1 gene is expressed in the testis and GCS1 protein exists in sperm of a sea anemone. • Anti-GCS1 antibodies inhibited the fertilization, showing the participation in fertilization. - Abstract: It has been reported that GCS1 (Generative Cell Specific 1) is a transmembrane protein that is exclusively expressed in sperm cells and is essential for gamete fusion in flowering plants. The GCS1 gene is present not only in angiosperms but also in unicellular organisms and animals, implying the occurrence of a common or ancestral mechanism of GCS1-mediated gamete fusion. In order to elucidate the common mechanism, we investigated the role of GCS1 in animal fertilization using a sea anemone (Cnidaria), Nematostella vectensis. Although the existence of the GCS1 gene in N. vectensis has been reported, the expression of GCS1 in sperm and the role of GCS1 in fertilization are not known. In this study, we showed that the GCS1 gene is expressed in the testis and that GCS1 protein exists in sperm by in situ hybridization and proteomic analysis, respectively. Then we made four peptide antibodies against the N-terminal extracellular region of NvGCS1. These antibodies specifically reacted to NvGCS1 among sperm proteins on the basis of Western analysis and potently inhibited fertilization in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicate that sperm GCS1 plays a pivotal role in fertilization, most probably in sperm–egg fusion, in a starlet sea anemone, suggesting a common gamete-fusion mechanism shared by eukaryotic organisms

  13. Characteristics and biosynthetic pathway of melanin in Ascochyta anemones%白头翁叶斑病菌黑色素的理化性质及其生物合成途径初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏丹; 吕国忠; 周如军; 杨红; 傅俊范

    2014-01-01

    对白头翁叶斑病菌胞壁结合黑色素和胞外黑色素进行了理化性质和红外光谱扫描测定,结果表明两者具有相似的理化性质,均易溶于KOH、H2 O2和NaClO,不溶于水、乙醇和丙酮。红外光谱分析表明,白头翁叶斑病菌YS-24菌株的胞壁结合黑色素与胞外黑色素为同一种类型的黑色素。DHN黑色素的特异性抑制剂—三环唑,对白头翁叶斑病菌黑色素的产生有明显的抑制作用;以白头翁叶斑病菌基因组DNA为模板,通过PCR扩增,得到了聚酮体合成酶基因的同源片段AaPKS,初步推断白头翁叶斑病菌黑色素合成属于DHN途径。%The characteristics of melanin,extracted from cell wall and fermented filtrate of Ascochyta anemones, were determined by diagnostic test and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that they have similar physical and chemical properties,and they are soluble in KOH,H2 O2 and NaClO,but not in water,ethanol and acetone. Infrared spectrum analysis showed that the wall-bound melanin and extracellular melanin belonged to the same type. Tricyclazole,a specific inhibitor of DHN melanin synthesis,could inhibit the fungal melanin’s biosynthesis of A.anemones. The homologous fragment of polyketide synthase gene (AaPKS)was amplified by PCR using A.anemones genomic DNA as a template. The results suggested that the melanin in A.anemones might be synthe-sized from DHN pathway.

  14. CgNa, a type I toxin from the giant Caribbean sea anemone Condylactis gigantea shows structural similarities to both type I and II toxins, as well as distinctive structural and functional properties

    OpenAIRE

    Salceda, Emilio; Pérez-Castells, Javier; López-Méndez, Blanca; Garateix, Anoland; Salazar, Hector; López, Omar; Aneiros, Abel; Ständker, Ludger; Béress, Lászlo; Forssmann, Wolf Georg; Soto, Enrique; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract CgNa is a toxin from the sea anemone Condylactis gigantea that is comprised of 47-residues. The structure of CgNa, solved by 1}H NMR spectroscopy, is somewhat atypical, displaying significant homologies to both type I and II anemonae toxins, as well as a considerable number of exceptions to what are considered as canonical structural elements of this group of toxins, and that are thought to be essential for their activity. Furthermore, unique residues in CgNa define a cha...

  15. Antifouling activity by sea anemone (Heteractis magnifica and H. aurora extracts against marine biofilm bacteria Actividades antiincrustantes de las extractos de las anémonas marinas Heteractis magnifica y H. aurora frente a biofilm de bacterias marinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Bragadeeswaran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sea anemones (Actiniaria are solitary, ocean-dwelling members of the phylum Cnidaria and the class Anthozoa. In this study, we screened antibacterial activity of two benthic sea anemones (Heteractis magnifica and H. aurora collected from the Mandapam coast of southeast India. Crude extracts of the sea anemone were assayed against seven bacterial biofilms isolated from three different test panels. The crude extract of H. magnifica showed a maximum inhibition zone of 18 mm against Pseudomonas sp. and Escherichia coli and a minimum inhibition zone of 3 mm against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus sp., and Bacillus cerens for methanol, acetone, and DCM extracts, respectively. The butanol extract of H. aurora showed a maximum inhibition zone of 23 mm against Vibrio parahaemolyticus, whereas the methanol extract revealed a minimum inhibition zone of 1 mm against V. parahaemolyticus. The present study revealed that the H. aurora extracts were more effective than those of H. magnifica and that the active compounds from the sea anemone can be used as antifouling compounds.Las anémonas de mar (Actiniaria son solitarias, habitantes oceánicos del phylum Cnidaria y de la clase Anthozoa. En este estudio se determina la actividad antibacteriana de dos anémonas bentónicas Heteractis magnifica y H. aurora recolectadas en la costa de Mandapam, sudeste de India. Los extractos crudos de estas anémonas fueron ensayados frente a siete biofilms bacterianos aislados de tres paneles de control distintos. El extracto crudo de la anémona H. magnifica mostró una zona inhibición máxima de 18 mm contra Psudomonas sp. y Escherichia coli y la zona de inhibición mínima de 3 mm fue encontrada frente a Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococus sp. y Bacillus cerens de extractos de metanol, acetona y DCM respectivamente. El extracto de butanol de la anémona H. magnifica mostró una zona de inhibición máxima de 23 mm frente a Vibrio parahemolyticus, mientras que con el

  16. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION FROM AN ANEMONE ACTIVE REGION: RECONNECTION AND DEFLECTION OF THE 2005 AUGUST 22 ERUPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a numerical investigation of the coronal evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2005 August 22 using a three-dimensional thermodynamic magnetohydrodynamic model, the space weather modeling framework. The source region of the eruption was anemone active region (AR) 10798, which emerged inside a coronal hole. We validate our modeled corona by producing synthetic extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images, which we compare to EIT images. We initiate the CME with an out-of-equilibrium flux rope with an orientation and chirality chosen in agreement with observations of an Hα filament. During the eruption, one footpoint of the flux rope reconnects with streamer magnetic field lines and with open field lines from the adjacent coronal hole. It yields an eruption which has a mix of closed and open twisted field lines due to interchange reconnection and only one footpoint line-tied to the source region. Even with the large-scale reconnection, we find no evidence of strong rotation of the CME as it propagates. We study the CME deflection and find that the effect of the Lorentz force is a deflection of the CME by about 30 R-1sun toward the east during the first 30 minutes of the propagation. We also produce coronagraphic and EUV images of the CME, which we compare with real images, identifying a dimming region associated with the reconnection process. We discuss the implication of our results for the arrival at Earth of CMEs originating from the limb and for models to explain the presence of open field lines in magnetic clouds.

  17. Distribution of CpG Motifs in Upstream Gene Domains in a Reef Coral and Sea Anemone: Implications for Epigenetics in Cnidarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Adam G.; Hoadley, Kenneth D.; Warner, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are under assault from stressors including global warming, ocean acidification, and urbanization. Knowing how these factors impact the future fate of reefs requires delineating stress responses across ecological, organismal and cellular scales. Recent advances in coral reef biology have integrated molecular processes with ecological fitness and have identified putative suites of temperature acclimation genes in a Scleractinian coral Acropora hyacinthus. We wondered what unique characteristics of these genes determined their coordinate expression in response to temperature acclimation, and whether or not other corals and cnidarians would likewise possess these features. Here, we focus on cytosine methylation as an epigenetic DNA modification that is responsive to environmental stressors. We identify common conserved patterns of cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) motif frequencies in upstream promoter domains of different functional gene groups in two cnidarian genomes: a coral (Acropora digitifera) and an anemone (Nematostella vectensis). Our analyses show that CpG motif frequencies are prominent in the promoter domains of functional genes associated with environmental adaptation, particularly those identified in A. hyacinthus. Densities of CpG sites in upstream promoter domains near the transcriptional start site (TSS) are 1.38x higher than genomic background levels upstream of -2000 bp from the TSS. The increase in CpG usage suggests selection to allow for DNA methylation events to occur more frequently within 1 kb of the TSS. In addition, observed shifts in CpG densities among functional groups of genes suggests a potential role for epigenetic DNA methylation within promoter domains to impact functional gene expression responses in A. digitifera and N. vectensis. Identifying promoter epigenetic sequence motifs among genes within specific functional groups establishes an approach to describe integrated cellular responses to environmental stress in

  18. Distribution of CpG Motifs in Upstream Gene Domains in a Reef Coral and Sea Anemone: Implications for Epigenetics in Cnidarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G Marsh

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are under assault from stressors including global warming, ocean acidification, and urbanization. Knowing how these factors impact the future fate of reefs requires delineating stress responses across ecological, organismal and cellular scales. Recent advances in coral reef biology have integrated molecular processes with ecological fitness and have identified putative suites of temperature acclimation genes in a Scleractinian coral Acropora hyacinthus. We wondered what unique characteristics of these genes determined their coordinate expression in response to temperature acclimation, and whether or not other corals and cnidarians would likewise possess these features. Here, we focus on cytosine methylation as an epigenetic DNA modification that is responsive to environmental stressors. We identify common conserved patterns of cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG motif frequencies in upstream promoter domains of different functional gene groups in two cnidarian genomes: a coral (Acropora digitifera and an anemone (Nematostella vectensis. Our analyses show that CpG motif frequencies are prominent in the promoter domains of functional genes associated with environmental adaptation, particularly those identified in A. hyacinthus. Densities of CpG sites in upstream promoter domains near the transcriptional start site (TSS are 1.38x higher than genomic background levels upstream of -2000 bp from the TSS. The increase in CpG usage suggests selection to allow for DNA methylation events to occur more frequently within 1 kb of the TSS. In addition, observed shifts in CpG densities among functional groups of genes suggests a potential role for epigenetic DNA methylation within promoter domains to impact functional gene expression responses in A. digitifera and N. vectensis. Identifying promoter epigenetic sequence motifs among genes within specific functional groups establishes an approach to describe integrated cellular responses to

  19. 国产毛茛科银莲花族十七种植物的细胞学研究%Cytology of ten species in Anemone,one in Anemoclema and six in Clematis (Trib. Anemoneae, Ranunculaceae) from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨亲二

    2002-01-01

    研究了国产毛茛科银莲花族Trib. Anemoneae 17种植物的染色体数目和核型.10种银莲花属Anemone L.植物中,1种(西南银莲花A. davidii)为x=8的四倍体(2n=4x=32),5种 (匍枝银莲花A. stolonifera、草玉梅A. rivularis、卵叶银莲花A. begoniifolia、水棉花 A. hupehensis f. alba、大火草A. tomentosa)为x=8的二倍体 (2n=2x=16), 4种 (鹅掌草A. flaccida、湿地银莲花A. rupestris、蓝匙叶银莲花A. trullifolia var. colestina、拟条叶银莲花A. trullifolia var. holophylla、展毛银莲花A. demissa) 为x=7 的二倍体 (2n=2x=14).罂粟莲花 Anemoclema glaucifolium为x=8 的二倍体.6种铁线莲属Clematis L. 植物 (滇川铁线莲C. kockiana、长花铁线莲 C. rehderiana、毛茛铁线莲 C. ranunculoides、扬子铁线莲C. puberula var. ganpiniana、短尾铁线莲 C. brevicaudata、金毛铁线莲 A. chrysocoma)均为 x=8的二倍体.银莲花属中x=7的种类的核型彼此十分相似,均由6对大型具中部着丝点的染色体和1对具端部着丝点的染色体组成;x=8的二倍体种类的核型与罂粟莲花属和铁线莲属植物的核型十分相似,均由5对大型具中部着丝点和3对具端部或近端部着丝点的染色体组成.%The somatic chromosome number and detailed chromosome morphology have been studied in ten species of Anemone, one species of Anemoclema, and six species of Clematis, all from China, namely Anemone davidii Franch. (2n=4x=32), A. stolonifera Maxim. (2n=2x=16), A. flaccida Fr. Schmidt (2n=2x=14), A. rivularis Buch.-Ham. (2n=2x=16), A. begoniifolia Lévl. et Vant. (2n=2x=16), A. hupehensis Lem. f. alba W. T. Wang (2n=2x =16), A. tomentosa (Maxim.) Péi (2n=2x=16), A. rupestris Hook. f. et Thoms. (2n=2x=14), A. trullifolia var. colestina (Franch.) Finet et Gagnep. (2n=2x=14), A. trullifolia var. holophylla Diels (2n=2x=14), A. demissa Hook. f. et Thoms. (2n=2x=14), Anemoclema glaucifolium (Franch.) W. T. Wang (2n=2x=16), Clematis kockiana Schneid. (2n=2x=16

  20. 白色紫锥菊不定根诱导及咖啡酸衍生物积累研究%Induction of adventitious roots of Echinacea pallida and accumulation of caffeic acid derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴春华; 黄韬; 崔锡花; 白基烨

    2012-01-01

    以白色紫锥菊试管苗子叶为外植体,研究了植物生长素2,4-D,IAA,IBA,NAA对不定根诱导以及IBA浓度对液体悬浮培养中不定根的生长及咖啡酸衍生物积累的影响,并进行了生物反应器培养.结果表明,对白色紫锥不定根诱导最适合植物生长素是IBA1.0mg· L-1,不定根诱导数目达到22.5根/培养皿.液体悬浮培养中IBA 1.0 mg·L-1最适合不定根生长及咖啡酸衍生物的积累.白色紫锥菊不定根在5L气升式生物反应器中培养30 d后可获得8.98 g· L-1干重,是三角瓶悬浮培养干重4.38 g·L-1的2.05倍;生物反应器培养的不定根中紫锥菊苷质量分数为14.08 mg·g-1(干重),是栽培根的2.4倍;氯原酸,菊苣酸,总咖啡酸衍生物含量是栽培根的4.0 ~25.6倍.该研究为大量生产紫锥菊药品可提供富含紫锥菊苷等咖啡酸衍生物的高品质生物医学药材.%Objective:To investigate the effect of auxins 2,4-D, IAA, IBA, NAA on induction of adventitious roots as well as that of IBA concentrations on the growth of adventitious roots and the accumulation of caffeic acid derivatives, with test-tube seedling leaves Echinacea pallida as the explant,and cultivate adventitious roots in bioreactors. Result: 1.0 mg·L-1 IBA was found the best for the induction of adventitious roots,with the numer of induced adventitious roots up to 22. 5 in each culture dish. Among different concentrations for suspension cultivation of IBA tested, 1. 0 mg·L-1lBA was found the most suitable for the growth of adventitious roots and the accumulation of caffeic acid derivatives. In a 5 L balloon type bubble bioreactor,8. 98 g·L-1 dry weight was achieved after one month,which was 2. 05 times of 4. 38 g·L-1 dry weight cultivated in a triangular flask. The content of echinacoside cultivated in a bioreactor was 14. 08 mg g -1 DW, which was 2. 4 times of cultivated roots. The contents of chlorogenic acid, chicoric acid and total caffeic acid derivatives were

  1. Functional Expression in Escherichia coli of the Disulfide-Rich Sea Anemone Peptide APETx2, a Potent Blocker of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn F. King

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are proton-gated sodium channels present in the central and peripheral nervous system of chordates. ASIC3 is highly expressed in sensory neurons and plays an important role in inflammatory and ischemic pain. Thus, specific inhibitors of ASIC3 have the potential to be developed as novel analgesics. APETx2, isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima, is the most potent and selective inhibitor of ASIC3-containing channels. However, the mechanism of action of APETx2 and the molecular basis for its interaction with ASIC3 is not known. In order to assist in characterizing the ASIC3-APETx2 interaction, we developed an efficient and cost-effective Escherichia coli periplasmic expression system for the production of APETx2. NMR studies on uniformly 13C/15N-labelled APETx2 produced in E. coli showed that the recombinant peptide adopts the native conformation. Recombinant APETx2 is equipotent with synthetic APETx2 at inhibiting ASIC3 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Using this system we mutated Phe15 to Ala, which caused a profound loss of APETx2’s activity on ASIC3. These findings suggest that this expression system can be used to produce mutant versions of APETx2 in order to facilitate structure-activity relationship studies.

  2. 香格里拉高山植物园银莲花属访花者初步研究%Preliminary Investigation on Visitors of Anemone in Shangri-La Alpine Botanical Garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤晓辛; 黄至欢; 王向平; 张潮

    2012-01-01

    Visitors of three species of Anemone were compared in Shangri-La Alpine Botanical Garden in this article, and the visitors of A. demissa with different floral colors were observed and compared. The results indicated that A, ruptstris and A. rivutaris have more visitor types than A. demissa. The visiting frequency of different visitors to A. demissa with different flower colors is not significantly different, and floral color and visitor types have no significant effect on visiting frequency. Further study should focus on flower color change in A. demissa, so as to provide conditions for exploiting wild flower resources.%对香格里拉高山植物园3种银莲花属植物的访花者进行比较,并对不同颜色展毛银莲花的访问者进行观察和比较.结果表明,湿地银莲花与草玉梅的访花者种类较多,而展毛银莲花的则相对较少.访问者不同对花色展毛银莲花的访问次数没有明显差异,颜色不同和访问者不同对访问频次没有明显影响.应对展毛银莲花的花色变化进行深入研究,为开发利用野生花卉资源创造条件.

  3. Actiniarian Sea anemone fauna of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    stream_size 11 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Mar_Biofouling_Power_Plants_1990_218.pdf.txt stream_source_info Mar_Biofouling_Power_Plants_1990_218.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sea anemone [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nia_equina_S.png Actinia_equina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=L h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=NS ...

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05275-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hromosome 14, complete... 36 9.4 11 ( ET086857 ) QM0AAA10BC02FM1 CCL1 Citrus clementina genomic cl... 34 9.7 2 >( AC11... CUGI Rice BAC Library Oryza sativa J... 44 6.0 1 ( CL933348 ) OA_ABa0042L11.f OA...054800 ) Lotus japonicus cDNA, clone:SPDL044h11_f, 3' end. 44 6.0 1 ( GH575179 ) CC...AS2865.g1_c Aiptasia pallida clone CC7 holobion... 44 6.0 1 ( BX255967 ) Zebrafish DNA sequence from clone CH211...5-1 (Contig-U05275-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U05275-1Q.Seq.d CACCACCACATTCAAATATATACAATTAATATATATATATTTAACACTCG CAAACACC

  6. Rapid identification of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in a marine extract by HPLC-MS using data-dependent acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael C; Dunn, Simon R; Altvater, Jens; Dove, Sophie G; Nette, Geoffrey W

    2012-07-17

    The collision-induced dissociation (CID) of a range of deprotonated fatty acid standards was studied using linear ion trap mass spectrometry. Neutral losses of 78, 98, and 136 Da were consistently observed for fatty acids with five or more double bonds. Comparison of the MS/MS spectra of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and universally (13)C-labeled DHA allowed the molecular formulas for these neutral losses to be determined as C(6)H(6), C(5)H(6)O(2), and C(8)H(8)O(2). Knowledge of fatty acid fragmentation processes was then applied to identify fatty acids from a sea anemone, Aiptasia pulchella, and dinoflagellate symbiont, Symbiodinium sp. extract. Using HPLC-MS, fatty acids were separated and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in data-dependent acquisition mode. Neutral loss chromatograms for 78, 98, and 136 Da allowed the identification of long-chain fatty acids with five or more double bonds. On the basis of precursor ion m/z ratios, chain length and degree of unsaturation for these fatty acids were determined. The application of this technique to an Aiptasia sp.-Symbiodinium sp. lipid extract enabled the identification of the unusual, long-chain fatty acids 24:6, 26:6, 26:7, 28:7, and 28:8 during a single 40 min HPLC-MS analysis. PMID:22816781

  7. Partitioning of Respiration in an Animal-Algal Symbiosis: Implications for Different Aerobic Capacity Between Symbiodinium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas David Hawkins

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses are ecologically important and the subject of much investigation. However, our understanding of critical aspects of symbiosis physiology, such as the partitioning of total respiration between the host and symbiont, remains incomplete. Specifically, we know little about how the relationship between host and symbiont respiration varies between different holobionts (host-symbiont combinations. We applied molecular and biochemical techniques to investigate aerobic respiratory capacity in naturally symbiotic Exaiptasia pallida sea anemones, alongside animals infected with either homologous ITS2-type A4 Symbiodinium or a heterologous isolate of Symbiodinium minutum (ITS2-type B1. In naturally symbiotic anemones, host, symbiont, and total holobiont mitochondrial citrate synthase (CS enzyme activity, but not host mitochondrial copy number, were reliable predictors of holobiont respiration. There was a positive association between symbiont density and host CS specific activity (mg protein-1, and a negative correlation between host- and symbiont CS specific activities. Notably, partitioning of total CS activity between host and symbiont in this natural E. pallida population was significantly different to the host/symbiont biomass ratio. In re-infected anemones, we found significant between-holobiont differences in the CS specific activity of the algal symbionts. Furthermore, the relationship between the partitioning of total CS activity and the host/symbiont biomass ratio differed between holobionts. These data have broad implications for our understanding of cnidarian-algal symbiosis. Specifically, the long-held assumption of equivalency between symbiont/host biomass and respiration ratios can result in significant overestimation of symbiont respiration and potentially erroneous conclusions regarding the percentage of carbon translocated to the host. The interspecific variability in symbiont aerobic capacity provides

  8. Continuous Drug Release by Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis Stinging Microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Yossi Tal; Ari Ayalon; Agnesa Sharaev; Zoya Kazir; Vera Brekhman; Tamar Lotan

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal delivery is an attractive option for drug delivery. Nevertheless, the skin is a tough barrier and only a limited number of drugs can be delivered through it. The most difficult to deliver are hydrophilic drugs. The stinging mechanism of the cnidarians is a sophisticated injection system consisting of microcapsular nematocysts, which utilize built-in high osmotic pressures to inject a submicron tubule that penetrates and delivers their contents to the prey. Here we show, for the fi...

  9. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D; Demoulin, P; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Green, L M; Steed, K; Carlyle, J

    2013-01-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EIS instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359 arcsec x 485 arcsec. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the AR age, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP b...

  10. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  11. Host–symbiont recombination versus natural selection in the response of coral–dinoflagellate symbioses to environmental disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Todd C.; Smith, Robin; Walther, Mariana; Pinzón, Jorge; Pettay, Daniel T.; McGinley, Michael; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Medina-Rosas, Pedro; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar L.; Pérez, Andrés López; Reyes-Bonilla, Hector; Warner, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Mutualisms between reef-building corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates are particularly sensitive to environmental stress, yet the ecosystems they construct have endured major oscillations in global climate. During the winter of 2008, an extreme cold-water event occurred in the Gulf of California that bleached corals in the genus Pocillopora harbouring a thermally ‘sensitive’ symbiont, designated Symbiodinium C1b-c, while colonies possessing Symbiodinium D1 were mostly unaffected. Certain bleached colonies recovered quickly while others suffered partial or complete mortality. In most colonies, no appreciable change was observed in the identity of the original symbiont, indicating that these partnerships are stable. During the initial phases of recovery, a third species of symbiont B1Aiptasia, genetically identical to that harboured by the invasive anemone, Aiptasia sp., grew opportunistically and was visible as light-yellow patches on the branch tips of several colonies. However, this symbiont did not persist and was displaced in all cases by C1b-c several months later. Colonies with D1 were abundant at inshore habitats along the continental eastern Pacific, where seasonal turbidity is high relative to offshore islands. Environmental conditions of the central and southern coasts of Mexico were not sufficient to explain the exclusivity of D1 Pocillopora in these regions. It is possible that mass mortalities associated with major thermal disturbances during the 1997–1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation eliminated C1b-c holobionts from these locations. The differential loss of Pocillopora holobionts in response to thermal stress suggests that natural selection on existing variation can cause rapid and significant shifts in the frequency of particular coral–algal partnerships. However, coral populations may take decades to recover following episodes of severe selection, thereby raising considerable uncertainty about the long-term viability of these communities

  12. Host-symbiont recombination versus natural selection in the response of coral-dinoflagellate symbioses to environmental disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Todd C; Smith, Robin; Walther, Mariana; Pinzón, Jorge; Pettay, Daniel T; McGinley, Michael; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Medina-Rosas, Pedro; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar L; Pérez, Andrés López; Reyes-Bonilla, Hector; Warner, Mark E

    2010-10-01

    Mutualisms between reef-building corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates are particularly sensitive to environmental stress, yet the ecosystems they construct have endured major oscillations in global climate. During the winter of 2008, an extreme cold-water event occurred in the Gulf of California that bleached corals in the genus Pocillopora harbouring a thermally 'sensitive' symbiont, designated Symbiodinium C1b-c, while colonies possessing Symbiodinium D1 were mostly unaffected. Certain bleached colonies recovered quickly while others suffered partial or complete mortality. In most colonies, no appreciable change was observed in the identity of the original symbiont, indicating that these partnerships are stable. During the initial phases of recovery, a third species of symbiont B1(Aiptasia), genetically identical to that harboured by the invasive anemone, Aiptasia sp., grew opportunistically and was visible as light-yellow patches on the branch tips of several colonies. However, this symbiont did not persist and was displaced in all cases by C1b-c several months later. Colonies with D1 were abundant at inshore habitats along the continental eastern Pacific, where seasonal turbidity is high relative to offshore islands. Environmental conditions of the central and southern coasts of Mexico were not sufficient to explain the exclusivity of D1 Pocillopora in these regions. It is possible that mass mortalities associated with major thermal disturbances during the 1997-1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation eliminated C1b-c holobionts from these locations. The differential loss of Pocillopora holobionts in response to thermal stress suggests that natural selection on existing variation can cause rapid and significant shifts in the frequency of particular coral-algal partnerships. However, coral populations may take decades to recover following episodes of severe selection, thereby raising considerable uncertainty about the long-term viability of these communities. PMID

  13. Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runia, W.T.; Molendijk, L.P.G.; Stevens, L.; Schilder, M.T.; Postma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Seed potato production is threatened by potato cyst nematodes (PCN). Seed potatoes can only be grown on PCN-free declared potato fields. A seed potato grower chose inundation, flooding his soil, for controlling PCN because resistant cultivars are economically less advantageous and catch crops or gra

  14. Cost Optimal Joint Management of Interdependent Resources: Groundwater vs. Kiawe (Prosopis pallida)

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Burnett; James Roumasset; Christopher Wada

    2014-01-01

    Local and global changes continue to influence interactions between groundwater and terrestrial ecosystems. Changes in precipitation, surface water, and land cover can affect the water balance of a given watershed, and thus affect both the quantity and quality of freshwater entering the ground. Groundwater management frameworks often abstract from such interactions. However, in some cases, management instruments can be designed to target simultaneously both groundwater and an interdependent r...

  15. Potato crop growth as influenced by potato cyst nematodes (Globodera pallida) and abiotic factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruijter, de, J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to determine the major mechanisms by which potato cyst nematodes reduce potato crop growth and to explain interactions known to occur with cultivar and abiotic factors. Understanding of these interactions may lead to strategies that potato growers can use to minimise nematode damage.The research concentrated on the interaction between nematodes and soil-related factors. Experiments were carried out, mainly under field conditions, in w...

  16. Characterization of the gacA-dependent surface and coral mucus colonization by an opportunistic coral pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krediet, Cory J; Carpinone, Emily M; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2013-05-01

    Opportunistic pathogens rely on global regulatory systems to assess the environment and to control virulence and metabolism to overcome host defenses and outcompete host-associated microbiota. In Gammaproteobacteria, GacS/GacA is one such regulatory system. GacA orthologs direct the expression of the csr (rsm) small regulatory RNAs, which through their interaction with the RNA-binding protein CsrA (RsmA), control genes with functions in carbon metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. The csrB gene was controlled by gacA in Serratia marcescens PDL100. A disruption of the S. marcescens gacA gene resulted in an increased fitness of the mutant on mucus of the host coral Acropora palmata and its high molecular weight fraction, whereas the mutant was as competitive as the wild type on the low molecular weight fraction of the mucus. Swarming motility and biofilm formation were reduced in the gacA mutant. This indicates a critical role for gacA in the efficient utilization of specific components of coral mucus and establishment within the surface mucopolysaccharide layer. While significantly affecting early colonization behaviors (coral mucus utilization, swarming motility, and biofilm formation), gacA was not required for virulence of S. marcescens PDL100 in either a model polyp Aiptasia pallida or in brine shrimp Artemia nauplii. PMID:23278392

  17. Relative Contributions of Various Cellular Mechanisms to Loss of Algae during Cnidarian Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Tamaki; Onishi, Masayuki; Xiang, Tingting; Grossman, Arthur R.; Pringle, John R

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress such as high seawater temperature, corals and other cnidarians can bleach due to loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue and/or loss of pigments from the algae. Although the environmental conditions that trigger bleaching are reasonably well known, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of at least four different cellular mechanisms for the loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue: in situ degradation of algae, exocytic release of algae from the host, detachment of host cells containing algae, and death of host cells containing algae. The relative contributions of these several mechanisms to bleaching remain unclear, and it is also not known whether these relative contributions change in animals subjected to different types and/or durations of stresses. In this study, we used a clonal population of the small sea anemone Aiptasia, exposed individuals to various precisely controlled stress conditions, and quantitatively assessed the several possible bleaching mechanisms in parallel. Under all stress conditions tested, except for acute cold shock at 4°C, expulsion of intact algae from the host cells appeared to be by far the predominant mechanism of bleaching. During acute cold shock, in situ degradation of algae and host-cell detachment also became quantitatively significant, and the algae released under these conditions appeared to be severely damaged. PMID:27119147

  18. Environ: E00407 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00407 Anemone altaica rhizome ... Rhizoma anemone Crude drug Anemone altaica, Anemone [TAX:22868] R ... anunculaceae (buttercup family) Anemone altaica rhizome ... (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Dicot plants: oth ... culaceae (buttercup family) E00407 Anemone altaica rhizome ...

  19. Ability of Allium cepa L. root tips and Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea in N-nitrosodiethylamine genotoxicity and mutagenicity evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia R. de Rainho; Andréa Kaezer; Claudia A. F. Aiub; Israel Felzenszwalb

    2010-01-01

    N-nitroso compounds, such as N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), can be formed by the reaction of secundary amines with nitrosating agents, and are suspected to be involved in tumors in humans. NDEA has been considered a weak carcinogen in genotoxic assays probably due to the inefficient nitrosamine activation system that is used and/or to the efficient repair system. In this work, we evaluated the sensibility of Allium cepa L. root tips and Tradescantia stamen hair mutation assay (Trad-SH) using T...

  20. Distribution, habitat use and ecology of deepwater Anemones (Actiniaria) in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammons, Archie W.; Daly, Marymegan

    2008-12-01

    The distribution of deepwater Actiniaria is poorly known. Rarely are these organisms identified to family, as this requires both well-preserved specimens and taxonomic expertise. Ecological information is similarly lacking. From the results of a comprehensive surveying program in the deep Gulf of Mexico, we report the occurrence of nine species of Actiniaria. For the most abundant four of these, we plot distributions and discuss habitat use, morphological variation, and feeding strategies. Actiniaria in the Gulf appear to have broad, basin-wide distributions with little depth preference. Faunal biomass is highest in the NE Gulf within submarine canyons or at the base of slope escarpments. Attachment mode is mostly opportunistic on various types of hard substrata, including trash. Sediment-dwelling forms are very abundant at an organically rich site within a large submarine canyon.

  1. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Frisch, Ashley J.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Thums, Michele; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Furby, Kathryn A.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of a...

  2. NMR analysis of sequence of toxin II from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxin II from Radianthus paumotensis (Rp/sub II/) has been investigated by high-resolution NMR and chemical sequencing methods. Resonance assignments have been obtained for this protein by the sequential approach. NMR assignments could not be made consistent with the previously reported primary sequence for this protein, and chemical methods have been used to determine a sequence with which the NMR data are consistent. Analysis of the 2D NOE spectra shows that the protein secondary structure is comprised of two sequences of β-sheet, probably joined into a distorted continuous sheet, connected by turns and extended loops, without any regular α-helical segments. The residues previously implicated in activity in this class of proteins, D8 and R13, occur in a loop region

  3. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Ashley J Frisch; Ford, Benjamin M.; Michele Thums; Pablo Saenz-Agudelo; Kathryn A Furby; Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of...

  4. New records on sea anemones (Anthozoa: Actiniaria) from hydrothermal vents and cold seeps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López-González, P.J.; Rodríguez, E.; Gili, J.-M.; Segonzac, M.

    2003-01-01

    During several cruises carried out by the Ifremer (Institut français de recherche pour l’exploitation de la mer) with the submersile “Nautile” at different hydrothermal sites and cold seeps, an important collection of anthozoans - mainly actiniarians - was sampled. Additional material was collected

  5. Signaling-mediated cross-talk modulates swarming and biofilm formation in a coral pathogen Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagely, Ali; Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2011-10-01

    Interactions within microbial communities associated with marine holobionts contribute importantly to the health of these symbiotic organisms formed by invertebrates, dinoflagellates and bacteria. However, mechanisms that control invertebrate-associated microbiota are not yet fully understood. Hydrophobic compounds that were isolated from surfaces of asymptomatic corals inhibited biofilm formation by the white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, indicating that signals capable of affecting the associated microbiota are produced in situ. However, neither the origin nor structures of these signals are currently known. A functional survey of bacteria recovered from coral mucus and from cultures of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. revealed that they could alter swarming and biofilm formation in S. marcescens. As swarming and biofilm formation are inversely regulated, the ability of some native α-proteobacteria to affect both behaviors suggests that the α-proteobacterial signal(s) target a global regulatory switch controlling the behaviors in the pathogen. Isolates of Marinobacter sp. inhibited both biofilm formation and swarming in S. marcescens PDL100, without affecting growth of the coral pathogen, indicative of the production of multiple inhibitors, likely targeting lower level regulatory genes or functions. A multi-species cocktail containing these strains inhibited progression of a disease caused by S. marcescens in a model polyp Aiptasia pallida. An α-proteobacterial isolate 44B9 had a similar effect. Even though ∼4% of native holobiont-associated bacteria produced compounds capable of triggering responses in well-characterized N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) biosensors, there was no strong correlation between the production of AHL-like signals and disruption of biofilms or swarming in S. marcescens. PMID:21509042

  6. Dicty_cDB: VSK450 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VS (Link to library) VSK450 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U01944-1 VSK450P (Link to Original ... tage EST's from Globodera pallida, the potato cyst nematode ... Globodera pallida cDNA similar to Homology:(blast ... tage EST's from Globodera pallida, the potato cyst nematode ... Globodera pallida cDNA similar to Homology:(blast ...

  7. Contrasting physiological plasticity in response to environmental stress within different cnidarians and their respective symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Kenneth D.; Pettay, Daniel. T.; Dodge, Danielle; Warner, Mark E.

    2016-06-01

    Given concerns surrounding coral bleaching and ocean acidification, there is renewed interest in characterizing the physiological differences across the multiple host-algal symbiont combinations commonly found on coral reefs. Elevated temperature and CO2 were used to compare physiological responses within the scleractinian corals Montipora hirsuta ( Symbiodinium C15) and Pocillopora damicornis ( Symbiodinium D1), as well as the corallimorph (a non-calcifying anthozoan closely related to scleractinians) Discosoma nummiforme ( Symbiodinium C3). Several physiological proxies were affected more by temperature than CO2, including photochemistry, algal number and cellular chlorophyll a. Marked differences in symbiont number, chlorophyll and volume contributed to distinctive patterns of chlorophyll absorption among these animals. In contrast, carbon fixation either did not change or increased under elevated temperature. Also, the rate of photosynthetically fixed carbon translocated to each host did not change, and the percent of carbon translocated to the host increased in the corallimorph. Comparing all data revealed a significant negative correlation between photosynthetic rate and symbiont density that corroborates previous hypotheses about carbon limitation in these symbioses. The ratio of symbiont-normalized photosynthetic rate relative to the rate of symbiont-normalized carbon translocation (P:T) was compared in these organisms as well as the anemone, Exaiptasia pallida hosting Symbiodinium minutum, and revealed a P:T close to unity ( D. nummiforme) to a range of 2.0-4.5, with the lowest carbon translocation in the sea anemone. Major differences in the thermal responses across these organisms provide further evidence of a range of acclimation potential and physiological plasticity that highlights the need for continued study of these symbioses across a larger group of host taxa.

  8. Metabolite profiling of symbiont and host during thermal stress and bleaching in a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Katie E; Tumanov, Sergey; Villas-Bôas, Silas; Davy, Simon K

    2016-02-01

    Bleaching (dinoflagellate symbiont loss) is one of the greatest threats facing coral reefs. The functional cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, which forms coral reefs, is based on the bi-directional exchange of nutrients. During thermal stress this exchange breaks down; however, major gaps remain in our understanding of the roles of free metabolite pools in symbiosis and homeostasis. In this study we applied gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to explore thermally induced changes in intracellular pools of amino and non-amino organic acids in each partner of the model sea anemone Aiptasia sp. and its dinoflagellate symbiont. Elevated temperatures (32 °C for 6 days) resulted in symbiont photoinhibition and bleaching. Thermal stress induced distinct changes in the metabolite profiles of both partners, associated with alterations to central metabolism, oxidative state, cell structure, biosynthesis and signalling. Principally, we detected elevated pools of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the symbiont, indicative of modifications to lipogenesis/lysis, membrane structure and nitrogen assimilation. In contrast, reductions of multiple PUFAs were detected in host pools, indicative of increased metabolism, peroxidation and/or reduced translocation of these groups. Accumulations of glycolysis intermediates were also observed in both partners, associated with photoinhibition and downstream reductions in carbohydrate metabolism. Correspondingly, we detected accumulations of amino acids and intermediate groups in both partners, with roles in gluconeogenesis and acclimation responses to oxidative stress. These data further our understanding of cellular responses to thermal stress in the symbiosis and generate hypotheses relating to the secondary roles of a number of compounds in homeostasis and heat-stress resistance. PMID:26685173

  9. Pollen mother cells of Tradescantia clone 4430 and Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea are equally sensitive to the clastogenic effects of X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Suyama F.; Guimarães E.T.; Lobo D.-J.A.; Rodrigues G.S.; Domingos M.; Alves E.S.; Carvalho H.A.; Saldiva P.H.N.

    2002-01-01

    The Tradescantia micronucleus test is a sensitive bioassay for mutagenesis that may be employed both under field and laboratory conditions. This test has been standardized mostly on the basis of the results obtained with clone 4430. However, this clone is not well adapted to tropical weather, frequently showing problems with growth and flowering. In addition, it is attacked by parasites and insects, a fact that limits its use in field studies aiming at the biomonitoring of air pollution. In t...

  10. Nanoporous TiO2 nanoparticle assemblies with mesoscale morphologies: nano-cabbage versus sea-anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Masih; Gebre, Tesfaye; Mitchell, Lucas; Erwin, William; Bardhan, Rizia; Levan, M Douglas; Mochena, Mogus D; Dickerson, James H

    2014-06-01

    We report the novel synthesis of nanoporous TiO2 nanoparticle ensembles with unique mesoscale morphologies. Constituent nanoparticles evolved into multifaceted assemblies, exhibiting excellent crystallinity and enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with commercial TiO2. Such materials could be exploited for applications, like organic pollutant degradation. PMID:24760418

  11. Selective and oriented immobilization of (phospho lipases from the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (Ellis, 1768 by interfacial adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto del Monte-Martínez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Las lipasas inmovilizadas por adsorción interfacial a soportes hidrofóbicos constituyen sistemas enzimáticos con potencialidades comprobadas para diversas aplicaciones como la bioconversión. Por otro lado, las enzimas de invertebrados marinos muestran especificidades de sustrato poco usuales, que las convierten en blancos atractivos para el desarrollo de biocatalizadores inmovilizados. En este trabajo se describe la inmovilización por adsorción interfacial al soporte Octyl-Sepharose CL 4B de dos (fosfolipasas: las Sticholysinas I y II, y una actividad esterasa de alto peso molecular, a partir del extracto total de la anémona del mar Caribe Stichodactyla helianthus. La inmovilización fue selectiva para las lipasas, que mostraron actividad esterolítica frente a p-nitrofenilacetato, B-naftilcaprilato y tributirina. Esta actividad esterolítica de las Sticholysinas frente a sustratos no fosfolípidos no había sido informada con anterioridad. La actividad enzimática específica máxima aparente frente a p-nitrofenilacetato fue menor en los derivados inmovilizados que en las muestras solubles. La inmovilización resultó además orientada, ya que aumentó la afinidad aparente por el sustrato, lo que indica una mayor accesibilidad a los centros activos. El 68 % de las (fosfolipasas inmovilizadas conservaron la actividad hidrolítica frente a la tributirina. Estas enzimas requieren el ion Ca2+ para hidrolizar p-nitrofenilacetato y se inhibieron a concentraciones de p-nitrofenilacetato mayores que 1,185 mmol/L. Concentraciones de Ca2+ iguales a 40 mmol/L eliminaron la inhibición por exceso de sustrato en el extracto inmovilizado. Estas características cinéticas sugieren un posible uso de los biocatalizadores obtenidos en bioconversión enzimática.

  12. Granulocytes of sea anemone Actinia equina (Linnaeus, 1758 body fluid contain and release cytolysins forming plaques of lysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MG Parisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cnidaria phylum includes organisms that are among the most poisonous animals. The exact composition of cnidarian bioactive molecules is not known in detail, but little is known on the cells that produce the toxins. Here we have shown that the presence of cytolysins is not exclusive of nematocysts. A plaque-forming assay was carried out with cell populations extracted from the percoled body fluid showed for the first time that anthozoan granulocytes are able to form plaque of lysis. We have partitioned the total population of free cells into three distinct discrete bands by discontinuous Percoll gradient, and we have identified six small different types cells: morular granulocytes; cells with large or small peripherical granules, granulocytes with irregular shape containing blue and red granules, cells showing one fine red granule of uniform size and, finally, cells with elongated shape and small dispersed granules. Cell lysate of each cellular band resulted cytolytic toward different erythrocytes types. SDS page analysis of the lysate cell fraction showed a predominant of 20 kDa that corresponds to the weight of the cytolytic equinatoxin. The nature of equinatoxins-related activity was demonstrated by inhibition experiments using bovine sphingomyelin.

  13. Dicty_cDB: VSK449 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VS (Link to library) VSK449 (Link to dictyBase) - G24015 DDB0206488 Contig-U11149-1 VSK449P (Lin ... tage EST's from Globodera pallida, the potato cyst nematode ... Globodera pallida cDNA similar to Homology:(blast ... tage EST's from Globodera pallida, the potato cyst nematode ... Globodera pallida cDNA similar to Homology:(blast ...

  14. Micronúcleos em tétrades de Tradescantia pallida (Rose Hunt. cv. purpurea Boom: alterações genéticas decorrentes de poluição aérea urbana = Micronuclei in tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose Hunt. cv. purpurea Boom: genetic changes caused by urban air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizenando José de Andrade Júnior

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A atmosfera urbana contém uma mistura de poluentes que inclui substâncias mutagênicas e carcinogênicas. Associação entre estas substâncias e problemas respiratório e cardiovascular, além do aumento de determinados tipos de cânceres, é estabelecida na literatura. Assim, o biomonitoramento é importante para avaliar o potencial genotóxico da atmosfera urbana. O Teste de Micronúcleo em Tradescantia (Trad-MCN é um dos bioensaios usados para detecção de efeitos genotóxicos. Este teste é baseado na formação de micronúcleos resultante de quebra cromossômica na meiose das células-mãe do grão de pólen de inflorescências de Tradescantia ssp. Neste estudo, Trad-MCN foi utilizado para avaliar o potencial mutagênico do aratmosférico em duas áreas de tráfego diferenciado na cidade de Senhor do Bonfim, Estado da Bahia: 1 Rodovia Lomanto Júnior (RLJ, uma área de tráfego intenso, e 2 Praça Nova do Congresso (PNC, área de menor fluxo de veículos. O controle negativo (CTR foi instalado noCampus VII da Universidade do Estado da Bahia. Plantas expostas na RLJ e na PNC apresentaram frequência de micronúcleo (MCN mais alta em comparação com as plantas CTR (p The urban atmosphere contains a mixture of air pollutants, including mutagenic and carcinogenic substances. Associations betweenurban pollutants and respiratory/cardiovascular diseases and a greater incidence of certain cancer types have already been established in literature. Thus, biomonitoring procedures are required to evaluate the genotoxic potential of urban atmospheres. The Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad- MCN test is one of the most commonly used bioassays for the detection of genotoxic effects. Itis based on the formation of micronuclei resulting from chromosome breakage in the meiotic pollen mother cells of Tradescantia ssp. inflorescences. This study dealt with Trad-MCN for assessing the genotoxic potential of air in two areas of the municipality of Senhor do Bonfim/BA: (1 Lomanto Júnior Highway (RLJ, an area of intense vehicular traffic; and (2 Nova do Congresso Plaza (PNC, an area with lower flow of vehicles. The negative control (CTR wasinstalled in Campus VII of the State University of Bahia. Plants exposed in RLJ and PNC presented the highest frequency of micronuclei (MCN, in comparison with CTR plants (p < 0.05. The increase in the frequency of observed MCN points to the efficiency of the Trad-MCN and indicates the potential mutagenic risk of substances present in atmospheric air.

  15. Micronúcleos em tétrades de Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. purpurea Boom: alterações genéticas decorrentes de poluição aérea urbana = Micronuclei in tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. purpurea Boom: genetic changes caused by urban air pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Sizenando José de Andrade Júnior; José Cleub Silva Santos Júnior; Jesiane da Luz Oliveira; Eneida de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira; José Roberto Cardoso Meireles

    2008-01-01

    A atmosfera urbana contém uma mistura de poluentes que inclui substâncias mutagênicas e carcinogênicas. Associação entre estas substâncias e problemas respiratório e cardiovascular, além do aumento de determinados tipos de cânceres, é estabelecida na literatura. Assim, o biomonitoramento é importante para avaliar o potencial genotóxico da atmosfera urbana. O Teste de Micronúcleo em Tradescantia (Trad-MCN) é um dos bioensaios usados para detecção de efeitos genotóxicos. Este teste é baseado n...

  16. Sea-anemone toxin ATX-II elicits A-fiber-dependent pain and enhances resurgent and persistent sodium currents in large sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klinger Alexandra B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gain-of-function mutations of the nociceptive voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 lead to inherited pain syndromes, such as paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD. One characteristic of these mutations is slowed fast-inactivation kinetics, which may give rise to resurgent sodium currents. It is long known that toxins from Anemonia sulcata, such as ATX-II, slow fast inactivation and skin contact for example during diving leads to various symptoms such as pain and itch. Here, we investigated if ATX-II induces resurgent currents in sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRGs and how this may translate into human sensations. Results In large A-fiber related DRGs ATX-II (5 nM enhances persistent and resurgent sodium currents, but failed to do so in small C-fiber linked DRGs when investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Resurgent currents are thought to depend on the presence of the sodium channel β4-subunit. Using RT-qPCR experiments, we show that small DRGs express significantly less β4 mRNA than large sensory neurons. With the β4-C-terminus peptide in the pipette solution, it was possible to evoke resurgent currents in small DRGs and in Nav1.7 or Nav1.6 expressing HEK293/N1E115 cells, which were enhanced by the presence of extracellular ATX-II. When injected into the skin of healthy volunteers, ATX-II induces painful and itch-like sensations which were abolished by mechanical nerve block. Increase in superficial blood flow of the skin, measured by Laser doppler imaging is limited to the injection site, so no axon reflex erythema as a correlate for C-fiber activation was detected. Conclusion ATX-II enhances persistent and resurgent sodium currents in large diameter DRGs, whereas small DRGs depend on the addition of β4-peptide to the pipette recording solution for ATX-II to affect resurgent currents. Mechanical A-fiber blockade abolishes all ATX-II effects in human skin (e.g. painful and itch-like paraesthesias, suggesting that it mediates its effects mainly via activation of A-fibers.

  17. Sea-anemone toxin ATX-II elicits A-fiber-dependent pain and enhances resurgent and persistent sodium currents in large sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger Alexandra B; Eberhardt Mirjam; Link Andrea S; Namer Barbara; Kutsche Lisa K; Schuy E; Sittl Ruth; Hoffmann Tali; Alzheimer Christian; Huth Tobias; Carr Richard W; Lampert Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Gain-of-function mutations of the nociceptive voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 lead to inherited pain syndromes, such as paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). One characteristic of these mutations is slowed fast-inactivation kinetics, which may give rise to resurgent sodium currents. It is long known that toxins from Anemonia sulcata, such as ATX-II, slow fast inactivation and skin contact for example during diving leads to various symptoms such as pain and itch. Her...

  18. Tree litter and forest understorey vegetation: a conceptual framework to understand the effects of tree litter on a perennial geophyte, Anemone nemorosa

    OpenAIRE

    Baltzinger, M; Archaux, F.; Dumas, Y.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Litter is a key factor in structuring plant populations, through positive or negative interactions. The litter layer forms a mechanical barrier that is often strongly selective against individuals lacking hypocotyle plasticity. Litter composition also interacts with plant growth by providing beneficial nutrients or, inversely, by allowing harmful allelopathic leaching. As conspicuous litter fall accumulation is often observed under deciduous forests, interactions betwe...

  19. For she that hath, to her shall be given…Implications of flowering in Anemone nemorosa L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Maj-Britt; Petersen, Peter Milan; Philipp, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    the following spring. We hypothesised that the decision to invest in flower buds depends on the amount of resources stored in the recently formed annual segment. We also hypothesised a trade-off between flowering and segment growth and, finally, as a consequence, we expected individual rhizomes to...... alternate between the flowering and the non-flowering state. We found that segments producing flower buds were significantly longer than non-flowering segments, indicating that resource level influences the function of the preformed buds. Contrary to our expectations, we found flowering rhizomes produced...... longer annual segments than non-flowering rhizomes. We suggest the larger leaf area of flowering rhizomes and occasional abortion of flowers or seeds as possible mechanisms behind this pattern. Our study shows that even though the decision to produce a flower bud is taken in another time-frame than that...

  20. Micronúcleos em tétrades de Tradescantia pallida (Rose Hunt. cv. purpúrea Boom: alterações genéticas decorrentes de poluição aérea urbana - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5017 Micronuclei in tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose Hunt. cv. purpurea Boom: genetic changes caused by urban air pollution - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneida de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A atmosfera urbana contém uma mistura de poluentes que inclui substâncias mutagênicas e carcinogênicas. Associação entre estas substâncias e problemas respiratório e cardiovascular, além do aumento de determinados tipos de cânceres, é estabelecida na literatura. Assim, o biomonitoramento é importante para avaliar o potencial genotóxico da atmosfera urbana. O Teste de Micronúcleo em Tradescantia (Trad-MCN é um dos bioensaios usados para detecção de efeitos genotóxicos. Este teste é baseado na formação de micronúcleos resultante de quebra cromossômica na meiose das células-mãe do grão de pólen de inflorescências de Tradescantia ssp. Neste estudo, Trad-MCN foi utilizado para avaliar o potencial mutagênico do ar atmosférico em duas áreas de tráfego diferenciado na cidade de Senhor do Bonfim, Estado da Bahia: 1 Rodovia Lomanto Júnior (RLJ, uma área de tráfego intenso, e 2 Praça Nova do Congresso (PNC, área de menor fluxo de veículos. O controle negativo (CTR foi instalado no Campus VII da Universidade do Estado da Bahia. Plantas expostas na RLJ e na PNC apresentaram frequência de micronúcleo (MCN mais alta em comparação com as plantas CTR (p The urban atmosphere contains a mixture of air pollutants, including mutagenic and carcinogenic substances. Associations between urban pollutants and respiratory/cardiovascular diseases and a greater incidence of certain cancer types have already been established in literature. Thus, biomonitoring procedures are required to evaluate the genotoxic potential of urban atmospheres. The Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN test is one of the most commonly used bioassays for the detection of genotoxic effects. It is based on the formation of micronuclei resulting from chromosome breakage in the meiotic pollen mother cells of Tradescantia ssp. inflorescences. This study dealt with Trad-MCN for assessing the genotoxic potential of air in two areas of the municipality of Senhor do Bonfim/BA: (1 Lomanto Júnior Highway (RLJ, an area of intense vehicular traffic; and (2 Nova do Congresso Plaza (PNC, an area with lower flow of vehicles. The negative control (CTR was installed in Campus VII of the State University of Bahia. Plants exposed in RLJ and PNC presented the highest frequency of micronuclei (MCN, in comparison with CTR plants (p < 0.05. The increase in the frequency of observed MCN points to the efficiency of the Trad-MCN and indicates the potential mutagenic risk of substances present in atmospheric air.

  1. Micronúcleos em tétrades de Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. purpúrea Boom: alterações genéticas decorrentes de poluição aérea urbana - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5017 Micronuclei in tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. purpurea Boom: genetic changes caused by urban air pollution - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5017

    OpenAIRE

    Eneida de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira; Jesiane da Luz Oliveira; José Cleub Silva Santos Júnior; Sizenando José de Andrade Júnior; José Roberto Cardoso Meireles

    2008-01-01

    A atmosfera urbana contém uma mistura de poluentes que inclui substâncias mutagênicas e carcinogênicas. Associação entre estas substâncias e problemas respiratório e cardiovascular, além do aumento de determinados tipos de cânceres, é estabelecida na literatura. Assim, o biomonitoramento é importante para avaliar o potencial genotóxico da atmosfera urbana. O Teste de Micronúcleo em Tradescantia (Trad-MCN) é um dos bioensaios usados para detecção de efeitos genotóxicos. Este teste é baseado na...

  2. Re-description of two species of the cardinalfish genus Archamia (Teleostei: Apogonidae) from the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Ofer; Gouws, Gavin; Mwale, Monica; Mwaluma, James

    2013-01-01

    The cardinalfishes Archamia bilineata and A. pallida were originally described from a small number of specimens collected in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea and Oman, respectively. Both species are re-described using specimens collected recently in Yemen and Kenya, including the first known adult of A. pallida. These new collections increased the geographical range of both species considerably. Differences between the two populations now known for each of the species are discussed. PMID:24614490

  3. CALLING AQUARIUM LOVERS...

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN's anemones will soon be orphans. We are looking for someone willing to look after the aquarium in the main building, for one year. If you are interested, or if you would like more information, please call 73830. (The anemones living in the aquarium thank you in anticipation.)

  4. Marine organisms and their adaption - Adaptions solve the challenges of existence in the sea.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gonsalves, M.J.B.D.; Das, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    great diversity of organisms. To survive, these organisms need to secure food, successfully reproduce and avoid predation. Simple animals, such as anemones or worms, absorb the gases through their skin. Mobile animals use gills, or even lungs to absorb...

  5. Etologie sasankové krevety \\kur{Ancylomenes longicarpus} v Rudém moři

    OpenAIRE

    KARÁSKOVÁ, Martina

    2011-01-01

    In this Master thesis the behaviour of anemone shrimp Ancylomenes longicarpus was studied in situ in the Red Sea. The diurnal activity, signalling behaviour and also cleaning behaviour was observed and analyzed.

  6. Plant-derived visual signals may protect beetle herbivores from bird predators

    OpenAIRE

    Tamar Keasar; Miriam Kishinevsky; Avi Shmida; Yoram Gerchman; Nicka Chinkov; Avi Koplovich; Gadi Katzir

    2013-01-01

    Insect herbivores often use chemical signals obtained from their food plants to deter enemies and/or attract sexual partners. Do plant-based visual signals act similarly, i.e., repel consumers' enemies and appeal to potential mates? We explored this question using the pollen-feeding beetle Pygopleurus israelitus (Glaphyridae), a specialized pollinator of Anemone coronaria's chemically defended red-morph flowers. We presented dead beetles, which had fed either on anemones or on cat-food, to yo...

  7. flp-32 Ligand/receptor silencing phenocopy faster plant pathogenic nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise E Atkinson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Restrictions on nematicide usage underscore the need for novel control strategies for plant pathogenic nematodes such as Globodera pallida (potato cyst nematode that impose a significant economic burden on plant cultivation activities. The nematode neuropeptide signalling system is an attractive resource for novel control targets as it plays a critical role in sensory and motor functions. The FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs form the largest and most diverse family of neuropeptides in invertebrates, and are structurally conserved across nematode species, highlighting the utility of the FLPergic system as a broad-spectrum control target. flp-32 is expressed widely across nematode species. This study investigates the role of flp-32 in G. pallida and shows that: (i Gp-flp-32 encodes the peptide AMRNALVRFamide; (ii Gp-flp-32 is expressed in the brain and ventral nerve cord of G. pallida; (iii migration rate increases in Gp-flp-32-silenced worms; (iv the ability of G. pallida to infect potato plant root systems is enhanced in Gp-flp-32-silenced worms; (v a novel putative Gp-flp-32 receptor (Gp-flp-32R is expressed in G. pallida; and, (vi Gp-flp-32R-silenced worms also display an increase in migration rate. This work demonstrates that Gp-flp-32 plays an intrinsic role in the modulation of locomotory behaviour in G. pallida and putatively interacts with at least one novel G-protein coupled receptor (Gp-flp-32R. This is the first functional characterisation of a parasitic nematode FLP-GPCR.

  8. Novas espécies de Callia Audinet-Serville da América do Sul (Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Calliini)

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Ubirajara R.; Galileo, Maria Helena M.; Luís José Joly

    2010-01-01

    Espécies novas descritas de Callia procedentes da Venezuela: C. bordoni sp. nov. (Zulia); C. apyra sp. nov. e C. pallida sp. nov., ambas de Mérida; C. terminata (Falcón), C. variabilis (Táchira, Mérida); do Brazil: C. catuaba (Minas Gerais); C. oby (Paraná).New species of Callia described from Venezuela: C. bordoni sp. nov. (Zulia); C. apyra sp. nov. and C. pallida sp. nov., both from Mérida; C. terminata (Falcón), C. variabilis (Táchira, Mérida); from Brazil: C. catuaba (Minas Gerais); C. ob...

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09620-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a pneumoniae NTUH-K204... 77 2e-12 EF179418_1( EF179418 |pid:none) Xenopsylla cheopis ...hila melanogaster chromos... 70 2e-10 FJ499507_1( FJ499507 |pid:none) Globodera pallida acetylcholineste... ...:none) Globodera pallida acetylcholineste... 69 3e-10 AJ515150_1( AJ515150 |pid...vmvviislkmnnnypmk*ii igqislimliqikvyqfqlngqnmilqilnhfn*isqyllqliy*vhnvif*imlvilqd nkkkkkkkqidnnknkkkikikkkky Frame C: ksnli...bacter usitatus Ellin6076, ... 91 8e-17 AY061975_1( AY061975 |pid:none) Plutella xylostella acetylcholi

  10. Novos Cerambycinae (Cerambycidae da Região Neotropical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Descrevem-se e ilustram-se espécies novas da Bolívia (Santa Cruz, em Ectenessini, Ectenessa zamalloae sp. nov. e Bomarion amborense sp. nov.; em Eburiini, Beraba pallida sp. nov.; em Piezocerini, Gorybia quadrispinosa sp. nov. e em Tillomorphini, Epropetes bolivianus sp. nov.; da Costa Rica (Guanacaste, Xalitla lezamai sp. nov.New species described and illustrated from Bolivia (Santa Cruz, in Ectenessini: Ectenessa zamalloae sp. nov. and Bomarion amborense sp. nov.; in Eburiini: Beraba pallida sp. nov.; in Piezocerini: Gorybia quadrispinosa sp. nov. and in Tillomorphini: Epropetes bolivianus sp. nov.; from Costa Rica (Guanacaste: Xalitla lezamai sp. nov.

  11. Morphological and functional study of the marginal sphincter of the sea anemones Phymactis clematis and Aulactinia marplatensis from intertidal of Mar del Plata, Argentina Estudio morfológico y funcional del esfínter marginal de las anémonas de mar Phymactis clematis y Aulactinia marplatensis del intermareal de Mar del Plata, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira A. González Oliveira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It was made the characterization of marginal sphincter to the species Phymactis clematis (Drayton in Dana, 1849 and Aulactinia marplatensis (Zamponi, 1977, from intertidal ecosystem through their morphogical and functional study. The species P. clematis has a circumscript sphincter of palmate type. This muscle is constituted by a mesogloeal axis and several mesogloeal subaxes. Axis as well as subaxes give a support to the endoderm which border is smooth. Aulactinia marplatensis has a circunscript sphincter pinnate type. The axis has a truncated cone shape while in P. clematis the shape is cylindrical on its origin and it is bifurcated at the end. Both species experiments were carried out using the isolated muscles. They were stimulated at increasing KCl concentrations ranging from 20 to 200 mM. The results were analysed in the form of dose-response curves expressed in tension in grams force vs concentration. Contractil force increases in a sigmoid form to increasing KCl concentrations. The correlation between morphology and function and the differences shown in both species would be related to their intertidal distribution.Se realizó la caracterización de las anémonas de mar Phymactis clematis (Drayton in Dana, 1849 y Aulactinia marplatensis (Zamponi, 1977 del ecosistema intermareal mediante estudio morfológico y funcional. La especie P. clematis tiene un esfínter circunscripto de tipo palmado. Este músculo está constituido por un eje mesogloeal y varios subejes mesogloeales. Tanto el eje como los subejes dan soporte al endodermo cuyo borde es liso. La especie A. marplatensis tiene un esfínter circunscripto de tipo pinnado. El eje tiene forma de cono truncado mientras que en P. clematis es cilíndrico en su origen bifurcándose en su parte final. Los experimentos fueron llevados a cabo usando el músculo aislado de ambas especies. Estos fueron estimulados a concentraciones crecientes de KCl en un rango de 20 a 200 mM. Los resultados fueron analizados mediante curvas dosis-respuesta expresados en tensión en gramos fuerza vs concentración. La fuerza contráctil se incrementó en forma sigmoidea. La correlación entre la morfología y función y las diferencias mostradas en ambas especies podrían estar relacionadas con su distribución en el intertidal.

  12. Morphological and functional study of the marginal sphincter of the sea anemones Phymactis clematis and Aulactinia marplatensis from intertidal of Mar del Plata, Argentina Estudio morfológico y funcional del esfínter marginal de las anémonas de mar Phymactis clematis y Aulactinia marplatensis del intermareal de Mar del Plata, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira A. González Oliveira; Darlo Luis Patronelli; Mauricio O. Zamponi

    2009-01-01

    It was made the characterization of marginal sphincter to the species Phymactis clematis (Drayton in Dana, 1849) and Aulactinia marplatensis (Zamponi, 1977), from intertidal ecosystem through their morphogical and functional study. The species P. clematis has a circumscript sphincter of palmate type. This muscle is constituted by a mesogloeal axis and several mesogloeal subaxes. Axis as well as subaxes give a support to the endoderm which border is smooth. Aulactinia marplatensis has a circun...

  13. The rapid separation and identification of saponins from Chinese herb Anemone raddeana REGEL by RP-HPLC-MS-MS%高效液相色谱-质谱-质谱法快速鉴定中药竹节香附的皂苷

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李顺意; 李紫; 王世敏; 陈勇

    2000-01-01

    应用反相高效液相色谱-电喷雾-质谱-质谱(RP-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS)方法对竹节香附皂苷提取物的化学成分进行分析.通过一步分析可以同时 分离并鉴定出竹节香附中的竹节香附皂苷R2、R3、R6、R7、R8和R9等6种有效 成分.同时也发现一些本药材中原来没有报道的成分.本研究结果为竹节香附及其相关药品有效成分分析和鉴定提供一种快速鉴定方法.

  14. 75 FR 54592 - Pale Cyst Nematode; Update of Quarantined Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... INFORMATION: Background The pale cyst nematode (PCN, Globodera pallida) is a major pest of potato crops in..._pest_info/potato/pcn.shtml ). The description of the quarantined area will include the date the..._health/plant_pest_info/potato/pcn.shtml ). Authority: 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772 and 7781-7786; 7 CFR 2.22,...

  15. Diversity and biological activities of endophytic fungi associated with micropropagated medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echinacea is one of the top ten selling medicinal herbs in Europe and United States. Commercially available formulations may contain different plant parts of three species (Echinacea purpurea, E. pallida, and E. angustifolia). Our study evaluates the diversity of microbial community associated with ...

  16. 7 CFR 301.86-1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... eligible for interstate movement in accordance with § 301.86-4. Field. A defined production site that is..., or to be replanted. Pale cyst nematode. The pale cyst nematode (Globodera pallida), in any stage of development. Person. Any association, company, corporation, firm, individual, joint stock company,...

  17. Environ: E00764 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00764 Echinacea Medicinal herb Caffeic acid derivatives, Echinacoside [CPD:C10450]...Isobutyramide, Essential oil, Pyrrolizidine alkaloid Echinacea angustifolia [TAX:308558], Echinacea pallida [TAX:53749], Echina...cea purpurea [TAX:53751] Asteraceae Echinacea aerial part and ...1565] inhibitor Medicinal herbs [BR:br08322] Dicot plants: asterids Asteraceae (daisy family) E00764 Echinacea ...

  18. An annotated checklist of opisthobranch fauna (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia of the Nicobar Islands, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Sreeraj

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents 52 species of opisthobranchs recorded from the Nicobar group of Islands. Of these, Aldisa erwinkoehleri, Dermatobranchus rodmani, Glossodoris pallida, Noumea simplex, Pectenodoris trilineata, Okenia kendi, Tambja morosa, Phyllidia elegans, Phyllidiopsis annae, Flabellina riwo and Phidiana indica represent new records for Indian waters.

  19. Transgenic potatoes for potato cyst nematode control can replace pesticide use without impact on soil quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Green

    Full Text Available Current and future global crop yields depend upon soil quality to which soil organisms make an important contribution. The European Union seeks to protect European soils and their biodiversity for instance by amending its Directive on pesticide usage. This poses a challenge for control of Globodera pallida (a potato cyst nematode for which both natural resistance and rotational control are inadequate. One approach of high potential is transgenically based resistance. This work demonstrates the potential in the field of a new transgenic trait for control of G. pallida that suppresses root invasion. It also investigates its impact and that of a second transgenic trait on the non-target soil nematode community. We establish that a peptide that disrupts chemoreception of nematodes without a lethal effect provides resistance to G. pallida in both a containment and a field trial when precisely targeted under control of a root tip-specific promoter. In addition we combine DNA barcoding and quantitative PCR to recognise nematode genera from soil samples without microscope-based observation and use the method for nematode faunal analysis. This approach establishes that the peptide and a cysteine proteinase inhibitor that offer distinct bases for transgenic plant resistance to G. pallida do so without impact on the non-target nematode soil community.

  20. Cohabitation promotes high diversity of clownfishes in the Coral Triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Emma F; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; De Brauwer, Maarten; Dumbrell, Alex J; Smith, David J

    2016-03-30

    Global marine biodiversity peaks within the Coral Triangle, and understanding how such high diversity is maintained is a central question in marine ecology. We investigated broad-scale patterns in the diversity of clownfishes and their host sea anemones by conducting 981 belt-transects at 20 locations throughout the Indo-Pacific. Of the 1508 clownfishes encountered, 377 fish occurred in interspecific cohabiting groups and cohabitation was almost entirely restricted to the Coral Triangle. Neither the diversity nor density of host anemone or clownfish species alone influenced rates of interspecific cohabitation. Rather cohabitation occurred in areas where the number of clownfish species exceeds the number of host anemone species. In the Coral Triangle, cohabiting individuals were observed to finely partition their host anemone, with the subordinate species inhabiting the periphery. Furthermore, aggression did not increase in interspecific cohabiting groups, instead dominant species were accepting of subordinate species. Various combinations of clownfish species were observed cohabiting (independent of body size, phylogenetic relatedness, evolutionary age, dentition, level of specialization) in a range of anemone species, thereby ensuring that each clownfish species had dominant reproductive individuals in some cohabiting groups. Clownfishes are obligate commensals, thus cohabitation is an important process in maintaining biodiversity in high diversity systems because it supports the persistence of many species when host availability is limiting. Cohabitation is a likely explanation for high species richness in other obligate commensals within the Coral Triangle, and highlights the importance of protecting these habitats in order to conserve unique marine biodiversity. PMID:27030417

  1. Regulatory volume decrease in isolated nematocytes is affected by crude venom from the jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Morabito

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Crude venom from nematocysts of the Scyphozoan Pelagia noctiluca possesses hemolytic and cytotoxic power on cultured cells and elicits local and systemic inflammation reactions in vivo. The ability of regulating their volume after exposure to an anisosmotic solution is a fundamental feature common to cells from vertebrates and invertebrates, including Cnidarians. The aim of the present work i s to assay whether crude venom from Pelagia noctiluca may affect the regulatory volume decrease (RVD of nematocytes isolated from the Anthozoan Aiptasia mutabilis, here employed as a cell model. For this purpose, nematocytes were isolated by 605 mM NaSCN plus 0.01 mM Ca2+ application on acontia of Aiptasia mutabilis, while crude venom was obtained by sonication of a population of, respectively, 10, 25 and 50 nematocysts/µL (n/µL. Isolated nematocytes were pre-treated for 30 min with crude venom, submitted to hypotonic stress and their osmotic response and RVD were measured optically. Our results show that, after exposure to crude venom, nematocytes were morphologically intact, as shown by the Trypan blue exclusion test, but did not exhibit RVD. This effect was dose-dependent and reversed by the ionopho re gramicidin. The last observation suggests an inhibitory effect of venom on cell membrane ion transport mechanisms involved in RVD. Further studies are needed to verify this hypothesis and ascertain if a similar effect could be observed in human cells.

  2. 101 questions on corals: Towards awareness

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Wafar, S.

    . In reality, a coral is a simple animal like the sea anemone we find on rocky beaches. Unlike the anemone, the coral animal is generally small and constructs a skeleton around its body for protection. A coral animal is also called a polyp. 2.... Are polyp and coral the same? No. The term coral is usually denotes the skeleton though at times the polyp is also called coral animal. 3. What does a polyp look like? Each polyp is a hollow cylinder of tissues with tentacles and a central mouth opening...

  3. Crustaceans associated with Cnidaria, Bivalvia, Echinoidea and Pisces at São Tomé and Príncipe islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirtz, P.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic crustaceans were searched for at sea anemones (Actiniaria, encrusting anemones (Zoantharia, horny coral (Gorgonaria, black coral (Antipatharia, bivalves (Bivalvia, and sea urchins (Echinoidea at São Tomé and Príncipe Islands (Gulf of Guinea, eastern central Atlantic. Sixteen species of crustaceans were found in association with these invertebrate hosts; eleven of them were new records for the area and two species, belonging to the genera Hippolyte and Heteromysis, were new for science. The thalassinid Axiopsis serratifrons was occasionally associated with an undescribed species of gobiid fish.

  4. Efeito de extratos aquosos de meliáceas sobre Bemisia tabaci biótipo B em tomateiro Effect of aqueous extracts of meliaceous plants on Bemisia tabaci B biotype on tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO PANCRÁCIO DE SOUZA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparou-se a bioatividade de extratos aquosos a 3% (p/v de três meliáceas, Melia azedarach L. (frutos verdes, Trichilia pallida Swartz (ramos e Azadirachta indica A. Juss (sementes, em relação à mosca branca Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biótipo B, criada em tomateiro. No primeiro experimento os extratos foram aplicados sobre ovos e sobre ninfas com três dias de idade, avaliando-se a mortalidade e a duração das fases de ovo e de ninfa. No segundo experimento os extratos foram aplicados apenas sobre as ninfas, avaliando-se a mortalidade nessa fase e a longevidade e fecundidade dos adultos. Em relação à fase de ovo, o extrato de T. pallida foi o que provocou maior mortalidade, seguindo-se os de A. indica e M. azedarach. A maior mortalidade ninfal foi constatada com o extrato de A. indica, seguindo-se os de T. pallida e M. azedarach. Nenhum dos extratos afetou a duração das fases de ovo e de ninfa, assim como a longevidade e fecundidade.The objective of this research was to compare the effect of aqueous extracts of fresh fruits of Melia azedarach L., twigs of Trichilia pallida Swartz and seeds of zadirachta indica A. Juss, on eggs and nymphs of silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius B biotype reared on tomato plants. The extracts were tested at a concentration of 3%. In the first experiment, the extracts were applied on eggs and 3-day-old nymphs. Records were taken on mortality, duration of egg and nymphal stages. In the second experiment the extracts were applied on 3-day-old nymphs and records were taken on nymphal mortality, adult longevity and fecundity. The extracts of T. pallida were the most effective on eggs, followed by A. indica and M. azedarach. The extracts of A. indica were the most effective on nymphs followed by T. pallida and M. azedarach. In both experiments, the duration of egg and nymph stages, longevity and fecundity were not affected by the extracts.

  5. Interaction between resistant tomato genotypes and plant extracts on Bemisia tabaci (Genn. biotype B Interação de genótipos resistentes de tomateiro e extratos vegetais sobre Bemisia tabaci (Genn. biótipo B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Luiz Lopes Baldin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The tomato (Lycopersicon spp. productivity is severely reduced by attack of several insects and microorganisms. It is economically one of the most important crops that has been extensively cultivated in the Americas. Therefore, assays were performed in the greenhouse and the laboratory to evaluate the possible interaction between resistant tomato genotypes and plant extracts on the control of the pest Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae biotype B. This evaluation was performed for genotypes IAC-Santa Clara, PI-134417, LA-716, PI-134418, and PI-127826, and aqueous extracts from seeds of Azadirachta indica A. de Jussieu (Rutales: Meliaceae, branches and leaves of Trichilia pallida Swartz (Rutales: Meliaceae. In the greenhouse, spraying with extracts from seeds of A. indica, and leaves and branches of T. pallida reduced whitefly attraction with IAC-Santa Clara; on PI-134417, LA-716, PI-134418, and PI-127826 the extracts did not affect the attractiveness to the B. tabaci biotype B. Extracts from A. indica seeds and T. pallida leaves and branches reduced oviposition on IAC-Santa Clara; extracts from T. pallida branches reduced oviposition on PI-134417, PI-134418, and PI-127826, while the extract from A. indica seeds reduced oviposition in PI-127826. The extracts did not affect oviposition on LA-716. In the laboratory, the extracts increased the mortality of nymphs on the genotypes. The "genotype × extract" interaction was significant, indicating an addictive effect between resistant genotypes and plant extracts on whitefly control.O tomate (Lycopersicon spp. é uma das hortaliças mais importantes do mundo em termos econômicos e tem sido extensivamente cultivado nas Américas há séculos. Entretanto, a produtividade poderia ser mais alta se ela não fosse suscetível a ataques de insetos e microorganismos. Foram realizados ensaios em casa-de-vegetação e laboratório visando avaliar a possível interação de genótipos de tomateiro

  6. The families Carditidae and Condylocardiidae in the Magellan and Perú-Chile provinces (Bivalvia: Carditoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güller, Marina; Zelaya, Diego G

    2013-01-01

    Based on the study of available types and extant collections, this paper provides a systematic revision of the living species of Carditoidea occurring in the Magellan and Perú-Chile Provinces. Out of the 19 nominal species reported for the area, eight species are recognized as valid: Cyclocardia compressa, C. spurca, C. thouarsii, C. velutina, Carditella naviformis, C. semen, C. tegulata and Carditopsis flabellum. Other eight nominal species are regarded as synonyms: Cardita magellanica of Cyclocardia velutina; Carditella pallida of C. tegulata; Cardita australis and Actinobolus philippi of Carditella naviformis; Cardium pygmaeum of Carditella semen; Cardita paeteliana of Cyclocardia spurca; Carditella pallida duodecimcostata of Carditopsis flabellum; and Cardita congelascens of Cyclocardia thouarsii. Furthermore, Cardita malvinae and Cardium parvulum are nomina dubia, and the occurrence of Carditella exulata in Magellanic waters is doubtful. PMID:25243284

  7. Morphology and DNA sequence data reveal the presence of Globodera ellingtonae in the Andean region

    OpenAIRE

    Lax, P.; Rondan Dueñas, J.C.; Franco-Ponce, J.; Gardenal, C.N.; Doucet, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes, G. rostochiensis and G. pallida, are the most economically important nematode pests of potatoes worldwide and are subject to strict quarantine regulations in many countries. Globodera ellingtonae was recently described from Oregon (USA), with its host-plant in the field being still unknown. Roots of Andean potatoes from the North of Argentina have been found attacked by this nematode, providing further evidence that this is a potato cyst nematode species, along with G. ...

  8. A database on endemic plants at Tirumala hills in India

    OpenAIRE

    Latheef, Shaik Abdul; Prasad, Beerkam; Bavaji, Middi; Subramanyam, Gangapatnam

    2008-01-01

    Medicinal plants play an important role in health care. The use of medicinal plants for treatment is growing in view of cost and non-compliance of modern medicine as in case of non-communicable diseases. Plants such as Boswellia, ovalifoliolata, Cycas beddomei, Pimpinella tirupatiensis, Pterocarpus santalinus, Shorea thumbuggaia, Syzygium alternifolium, Terminalia pallida are endemic to Tirumala hills of seshachalam range falling under the Eastern Ghats of India. These plants species have med...

  9. Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, A.M. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Santos, A.G. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil); Csipak, A.R.; Caliri, C.M.; Silva, I.C. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Arbex, M.A. [UNIFESP — Federal University of São Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, F.S.; Marchi, M.R.R. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Cavalheiro, A.J.; Silva, D.H.S.; Bolzani, V.S. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Soares, C.P., E-mail: soarescp@hotmail.com [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract—3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)—or with casearin X—0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW—after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ► We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ► We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ► We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ► We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ► The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

  10. Seasonal phoresy as an overwintering strategy of a phytophagous mite

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Sai; Li, Jianling; Guo, Kun; Qiao, Haili; Xu, Rong; Chen, Jianmin; Xu, Changqing; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Migration by attachment to insects is common among mites that live in temporary habitats. However, because plants provide relatively stable habitats, phytophagous mites are generally not dependent on other animals for dispersal, so whether these mites can consistently be phoretic on insects through a particular life stage remains unclear and controversial. Here, we describe an obligate phoresy of a wholly phytophagous mite, Aceria pallida, in which the mites accompanied the psyllid Bactericer...

  11. 十九种林业检疫性有害生物简介(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋玉双

    2005-01-01

    美国白蛾Hyphantria cunea(Drury),异名Bombyx cunea Drury、Phalrna punctissima Abbot & Smith、Cycnia budea Htibn、Hyphantria textor Harris.、Spilosoma mutans Wlk.、Hyphantria puctata Fitch.、Spilosoma candida Wlk.、Hyphantria pallida Paek.,隶属鳞翅目Lepidoptera夜蛾总科Noctuoidea灯蛾科Arctiidae白蛾属Hyphantria。

  12. Some aspects of resistance to and tolerance of potato cyst nematodes in potato.

    OpenAIRE

    Arntzen, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN), Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida , are major pests of the potato. In this thesis, research on some aspects of resistance to and tolerance of PCN is presented. The distinction of virulence groups with a hierarchical clustering procedure is proposed as an alternative for the currently distinguished pathotypes. Resistance in potato cultivars should be expressed in a quantitative way, tested against PCN populations representative of virulence groups. A previousl...

  13. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    OpenAIRE

    Picard, D; Sempéré, Thierry; Plantard, O.

    2008-01-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida. a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures ...

  14. Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract—3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)—or with casearin X—0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW—after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ► We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ► We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ► We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ► We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ► The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

  15. Peptides in the nervous systems of cnidarians: structure, function, and biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Leviev, I; Carstensen, Kathrine

    1996-01-01

    Cnidarians are the lowest animal group having a nervous system and it was probably within this phylum or in a related ancestor group that nervous systems first evolved. The primitive nervous systems of cnidarians are strongly peptidergic. From a single sea anemone species, Anthopleura elegantissi...

  16. Multi-scale modeling of gene regulation of morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Kaandorp; D. Botman; C. Tamulonis; R Dries

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a spatio-temporal gene regulatory network for early gastrulation in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. We measure gene expression during early gastrulation using a gene expression quantification tool. We measure gene expression during early gastrulation when the emb

  17. Toelating Herbasan SC welkom voor dahlia, A. coronaria en narcis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van P.J.; Koster, A.T.J.; Trompert, J.P.T.

    2005-01-01

    Onlangs is Herbasan SC voor de onkruidbestrijding in onder meer dahlia, narcis en Anemone coronaria toegelaten. PPO ging na hoe het middel het beste is in te zetten. In dit artikel zijn de resultaten van het onderzoek vermeld en een advies voor toepassing

  18. To Build an Ecosystem: An Introductory Lab for Environmental Science & Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Daniel; Finnerty, John R.

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis-driven laboratory is described that introduces students to the complexities of ecosystem function. Students work with live algae, brine shrimp, and sea anemones to test hypotheses regarding the trophic interactions among species, the exchange of nutrients and gases, and the optimal ratio of producers to consumers and predators in…

  19. Gastrin/CCK-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Sundler, F; Rehfeld, J F

    1980-01-01

    Using immunocytochemistry, gastrin/CCK-like immunoreactivity is found in sensory nerve cells in the ectoderm of the mouth region of hydra and in nerve cells in the endoderm of all body regions of the sea anemone tealia. These results are corroborated by radioimmunoassay: One hydra contains at least...

  20. The proteomic profile of Stichodactyla duerdeni secretion reveals the presence of a novel O-linked glycopeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassoli, Juliana Silva; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Oliveira, Joacir Stolarz;

    2013-01-01

    , a new peptide of 3431Da, named U-SHTX-Sdd1, was purified and completely sequenced by automated Edman's degradation and tandem mass spectrometry. An analysis of U-SHTX-Sdd1 revealed a modified O-HexNAc-Threonine at position 1, which, at the best of our knowledge, constitutes the first sea anemone toxin...

  1. Assessment of the relationship between total suspended particles and the response of two biological indicators transplanted to an urban area in central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, H. A.; Rodriguez, J. H.; González, C. M.; Wannaz, E. D.; Garcia Ferreyra, F.; Perez, C. A.; Pignata, M. L.

    Samples of the vascular plant Tradescantia pallida and the lichen Usnea amblyoclada were exposed from October 2004 to April 2005 in three sites with different local sources of air pollution in Córdoba city, Argentina. Simultaneous determinations of the ambient levels of total suspended particles were made for each site. Young inflorescenses of T. pallida were collected in November, February and April and the frequency of micronuclei was determined on early tetrads of pollen mother cells. Physiological parameters and the elemental composition of lichen thalli were measured from samples exposed and replaced every month. Significant differences among sampling sites were observed in the frequency of micronuclei measured in T. pallida as well as in many physiological parameters and elements accumulated in lichen thalli. The mass of particulate material as well as the concentration of Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn and Sr was significantly different in different sampling sites, too. These results suggest that in situ biomonitoring using both higher plants and lichens may be of use to characterize air pollution in areas devoid of instrumental monitoring techniques or where it is necessary to explore the distribution of air contaminants at a microscale.

  2. Análisis numérico de las especies de Prosopis L. (Fabaceae de las costas de Perú y Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia D. Burghardt

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes revisiones coinciden en señalar 2 o 3 especies de Prosopis para el sur de Ecuador y norte de Perú: P. juliflora (SW DC, P. pallida (Humb. et Bonpl. ex Willd. Kunth y P. affinis Sprengel. En el presente trabajo se informa del análisis cuantitativo de caracteres foliares de especímenes del genero Prosopis, recolectados a lo largo de la costa desde Arequipa (Perú a Manta (Ecuador. Los resultados señalan tres grupos bien definidos. Del análisis comparativo de los tipos y ejemplares de herbario de todas las especies y sinónimos citados para la zona de estudio surge que los taxones existentes son: P. pallida, P. limensis Bentham, ambos de amplia distribución, y P. chilensis (Molina Stuntz emend Burkart restringido al valle del río Camaná. Estos tres taxones se corresponden con los tres grupos obtenidos del análisis numérico. Debe señalarse la exclusión del área de P. juliflora y P. affinis. Se sugiere no utilizar las numerosas variedades señaladas para P. pallida.

  3. Atividade ovicida de extratos aquosos de meliáceas sobre a mosca branca Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biótipo B em tomateiro Ovicidal activity of aqueous extracts of meliaceae on the silverleaf whitefly for tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pancrácio de Souza

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A mosca branca Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biótipo B atualmente é uma das principais pragas do tomateiro. O uso de extratos botânicos no controle desse inseto é uma alternativa promissora, mas que ainda precisa ser melhor pesquisada. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo determinar a bioatividade de extratos aquosos de folhas de Melia azedarach L. e de ramos de Trichilia pallida Swartz, sobre a mosca branca Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biótipo B, criada em tomateiro. Foram realizados dois experimentos, avaliando-se a mortalidade e duração das fases de ovo e ninfa, após o tratamento da fase de ovo com os referidos extratos. No primeiro experimento, foram testadas as concentrações de 1 e 2% (p/v, acrescentando-se a concentração de 3% no segundo experimento. Em todos os tratamentos houve efeito ovicida, sendo o maior valor obtido com T. pallida a 3% (52,32%. Nos demais tratamentos, a mortalidade variou entre 16 e 37%. Os extratos aplicados sobre os ovos pouco afetaram a sobrevivência ninfal. Com exceção do tratamento com T. pallida a 2%, no primeiro experimento, em que a mortalidade ninfal foi de 26,42%, nos demais a mortalidade foi inferior a 16%. Em nenhum dos experimentos foi verificada alteração na duração dos períodos de incubação e ninfal.The silverleaf whitefly is today one of most important pests of tomato. The use of botanical extracts to control this insect is an interesting technique, but more research about it should be carried out. The objective of this work was to determine the bioactivity of aqueous extracts of Melia azedarach leaves and Trichilia pallida twigs on the silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biotype B, reared on tomato. Extracts were applied to eggs, and mortality and duration of egg and nymphal stages were evaluated in two experiments. In the first experiment, extracts were tested at concentrations of 1 and 2% (w/v and in the second experiment the concentration of 3% was added. The ovicidal

  4. Efeito de extratos aquosos de plantas na oviposição da traça-das-crucíferas, em couve Effect of plants aqueous extracts on oviposition of the diamondback, in kale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Augusto Manfré Medeiros

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito de extratos aquosos de Achillea millefolium L. (folhas, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (folhas, Bidens pilosa L. (folhas, frutos e ramos, Bougainvillea glabra Choisy (folhas, Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (folhas, frutos e ramos, Datura suaveolens Humb & Bonpl. ex. Willd (folhas, Enterolobium contortisilliquum (Vell. Morong (frutos, Mentha crispa L. (folhas e ramos, Nicotiana tabacum L. (folhas, Piper nigrum L. (folhas, Plumbago capensis Thunb. (folhas e ramos, Pothomorphe umbellata L. (folhas, Sapindus saponaria L. (folhas, S. saponaria (frutos, Solanum cernuum Vell. (folhas, Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart Coville (casca, Symphytum officinale L. (folhas, Trichilia catigua A. Juss. (folhas, T. catigua (ramos, Trichilia pallida Sw. (folhas e T. pallida (ramos, em relação à preferência para oviposição de Plutella xylostella. Discos de folhas de couve (Brassica oleracea var. acephala cultivar Georgia foram imersos em cada extrato à concentração de 10% (massa/volume por um minuto. Em seguida, foram divididos em quatro partes iguais e duas partes foram colocadas alternadamente com outras duas partes tratadas com água destilada, em uma gaiola. A contagem dos ovos foi feita após 24 horas. Os extratos apresentaram efeito deterrente na oviposição da praga, com exceção do extrato de S. adstringens, que não diferiu da testemunha, tratada apenas com água destilada. Os extratos de E. contortisilliquum, S. saponaria (frutos e T. pallida (folhas foram os mais eficientes, apresentando 100% de deterrência.The effect of aqueous extracts from Achillea millefolium L. (leaves, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (leaves, Bidens pilosa L. (leaves, fruits e branches, Bougainvillea glabra Choisy (leaves, Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (leaves, fruits e branches, Datura suaveolens Humb & Bonpl. ex. Willd (leaves, Enterolobium contortisilliquum (Vell. Morong (fruits, Mentha crispa L. (leaves e branches, Nicotiana tabacum L. (leaves, Piper nigrum

  5. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  6. Isolation and distribution of iridescent Cellulophaga and further iridescent marine bacteria in the Charente Maritime coast, French Atlantic coast

    OpenAIRE

    Kientz, Betty; Agogué, Hélène; Lavergne, Céline; Marié, Pauline; Rosenfeld, Eric

    2013-01-01

    An intense colored marine bacterium, identified as Cellulophaga lytica, has been previously isolated from a sea anemone surface on the Charente Maritime rocky shore (Atlantic Coast, France). Iridescence of the colonies under direct light was recently described and proved physically. Iridescence intensities were found to strongly differ among C. lytica strains from culture collections. Importantly, the occurrence and distribution of iridescent bacteria in the marine environment were still unkn...

  7. Enzymes of the shikimic acid pathway encoded in the genome of a basal metazoan, Nematostella vectensis, have microbial origins

    OpenAIRE

    Starcevic, Antonio; Akthar, Shamima; Dunlap, Walter C.; Shick, J. Malcolm; Hranueli, Daslav; Cullum, John; Long, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The shikimic acid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of many aromatic compounds by a broad range of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and some protozoans. Animals are considered to lack this pathway, as evinced by their dietary requirement for shikimate-derived aromatic amino acids. We challenge the universality of this traditional view in this report of genes encoding enzymes for the shikimate pathway in an animal, the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Molecula...

  8. Strategies toward structural and functional 'optimization' of animal peptide toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Andreotti N; Ziadi H; Mouhat S; De Waard M; Sabatier J-M

    2012-01-01

    Background: venoms of a variety of animal species (i.e. scorpions, snakes, spiders, sea anemones, marine cone snails, worms, and insects) are rich sources of bioactive compounds that possess obvious pharmacological, therapeutic and/or biotechnological values. A majority of these compounds are peptides that mainly target enzymes, membrane receptors or ion channels. Aim: In recent years, much efforts of researchers have been focused on characterizing and ‘improving’ the pharmacological profile ...

  9. Evolutionary conservation of the mature oocyte proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Lotan

    2014-06-01

    Significance: The current study provides the first proteomic profile of an oocyte of a cnidarian organism the starlet sea anemone N. vectensis and gives new insights on the ancient origin of an oocyte proteome template. The comparative analysis with a chordate oocyte suggests that the oocyte proteome predates the divergence of the cnidarian and bilaterian lineages. In addition, the data generated in the study will serve as a valuable resource for further developmental and evolutional studies.

  10. Cell Biology of Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Davy, Simon K; Allemand, Denis; Weis, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The symbiosis between cnidarians (e.g., corals or sea anemones) and intracellular dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium is of immense ecological importance. In particular, this symbiosis promotes the growth and survival of reef corals in nutrient-poor tropical waters; indeed, coral reefs could not exist without this symbiosis. However, our fundamental understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and of its links to coral calcification remains poor. Here we review ...

  11. Saponin 1 Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses NF-κB-Mediated Survival Signaling in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Juan; Tang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yun; Tang, Chi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuangang; Gao, Zhenhui; Luo, Peng; Yin, Anan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Guang; Fei, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Saponin 1 is a triterpeniod saponin extracted from Anemone taipaiensis, a traditional Chinese medicine against rheumatism and phlebitis. It has also been shown to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity against human leukemia (HL-60 cells) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-G2 cells). Herein we investigated the effect of saponin 1 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) U251MG and U87MG cells. Saponin 1 induced significant growth inhibition in both glioblastoma cell lines, with a 50% inhi...

  12. Environ: E00378 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available monin [CPD:C16913] Pulsatilla chinensis, Pulsatilla dahurica, Pulsatilla koreana [TAX:387930], Pulsatilla [T...931], Artemisia [TAX:4219], Gerbera piloselloides [TAX:496626], Saussurea radiata, Saussurea...e (buttercup family) Anemone, Asteraceae (daisy family) Inula cappa, Artemisia, Gerbera piloselloides, Saussurea...4], Potentilla chinensis [TAX:210858], Potentilla discolor [TAX:648872], Polycarpaea cor...ymbosa, Polycarpaea [TAX:431020] Ranunculaceae (buttercup family) Pulsatilla root Homonym: Ranunculacea

  13. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A.; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  14. Mechanisms of equinatoxin II-induced transport through the membrane of a giant phospholipid vesicle.

    OpenAIRE

    Mally, M; Majhenc, J; Svetina, S; Zeks, B.

    2002-01-01

    Protein equinatoxin II from sea anemone Actinia equina L. was used to form pores in phospholipid membranes. We studied the effect of these pores on the net transmembrane transport of sucrose and glucose by observing single giant (cell-size) vesicles under the phase contrast microscope. Sugar composition in the vesicle was determined by measuring the width of the halo, which appears around the vesicle in the phase contrast image. The transport of sugars was induced when a vesicle, filled with ...

  15. A metagenetic approach to determine the diversity and distribution of cyst nematodes at the level of the country, the field and the individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Lilley, Catherine J; Reid, Alex; Pickup, Jon; Anderson, Eric; Cock, Peter J A; Blaxter, Mark; Urwin, Peter E; Jones, John T; Blok, Vivian C

    2015-12-01

    Distinct populations of the potato cyst nematode (PCN) Globodera pallida exist in the UK that differ in their ability to overcome various sources of resistance. An efficient method for distinguishing between populations would enable pathogen-informed cultivar choice in the field. Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA) annually undertake national DNA diagnostic tests to determine the presence of PCN in potato seed and ware land by extracting DNA from soil floats. These DNA samples provide a unique resource for monitoring the distribution of PCN and further interrogation of the diversity within species. We identify a region of mitochondrial DNA descriptive of three main groups of G. pallida present in the UK and adopt a metagenetic approach to the sequencing and analysis of all SASA samples simultaneously. Using this approach, we describe the distribution of G. pallida mitotypes across Scotland with field-scale resolution. Most fields contain a single mitotype, one-fifth contain a mix of mitotypes, and less than 3% contain all three mitotypes. Within mixed fields, we were able to quantify the relative abundance of each mitotype across an order of magnitude. Local areas within mixed fields are dominated by certain mitotypes and indicate towards a complex underlying 'pathoscape'. Finally, we assess mitotype distribution at the level of the individual cyst and provide evidence of 'hybrids'. This study provides a method for accurate, quantitative and high-throughput typing of up to one thousand fields simultaneously, while revealing novel insights into the national genetic variability of an economically important plant parasite. PMID:26607216

  16. Seabird nutrient subsidies benefit non-nitrogen fixing trees and alter species composition in South American coastal dry forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Havik

    Full Text Available Marine-derived nutrients can increase primary productivity and change species composition of terrestrial plant communities in coastal and riverine ecosystems. We hypothesized that sea nutrient subsidies have a positive effect on nitrogen assimilation and seedling survival of non-nitrogen fixing species, increasing the relative abundance of non-nitrogen fixing species close to seashore. Moreover, we proposed that herbivores can alter the effects of nutrient supplementation by preferentially feeding on high nutrient plants. We studied the effects of nutrient fertilization by seabird guano on tree recruitment and how these effects can be modulated by herbivorous lizards in the coastal dry forests of northwestern Peru. We combined field studies, experiments and stable isotope analysis to study the response of the two most common tree species in these forests, the nitrogen-fixing Prosopis pallida and the non-nitrogen-fixing Capparis scabrida. We did not find differences in herbivore pressure along the sea-inland gradient. We found that the non-nitrogen fixing C. scabrida assimilates marine-derived nitrogen and is more abundant than P. pallida closer to guano-rich soil. We conclude that the input of marine-derived nitrogen through guano deposited by seabirds feeding in the Pacific Ocean affects the two dominant tree species of the coastal dry forests of northern Peru in contrasting ways. The non-nitrogen fixing species, C. scabrida may benefit from sea nutrient subsidies by incorporating guano-derived nitrogen into its foliar tissues, whereas P. pallida, capable of atmospheric fixation, does not.

  17. Determination of trace elements in lichen samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of Canoparmelia texana lichen collected in different sites of Sao Paulo and Parana States, Brazil, were analysed by neutron activation analysis in order to obtain preliminary information on the air quality in these regions and also to select a region of interest for biomonitoring studies. Also Tadescantia pallida plant has been analysed in order to study the viability of using this specimen in environmental pollution monitoring. Lichens samples were collected from tree barks which were also collected to investigate the contribution of substrate derived elements to elements present in lichens. Young and old leaves of T. pallida were collected separately in order to study the leaf age effects on their elemental levels. The samples were cleaned, washed with distilled water, dried and ground for the analyses. Samples and standards were irradiated at the IEA-Rlm nuclear reactor for short and long periods and concentrations of the elements Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, Mg, Mn, Rb, Sb, Sc, D, Th, U, V Zn and lanthanides were determined. Preliminary results obtained for T. texana lichen indicated that three sites (Ibiuna, Botanical Garden and Parque de Vila Velha) present low concentrations of the most elements analysed. Therefore lichens from these regions could be analysed to establish baseline levels of elements for monitoring purposes. Samples collected in open areas presented high concentrations of some elements probably due to the accumulation of elements originating from soil and from heavy vehicular traffic. Elemental concentrations obtained in outer barks were similar or smaller than those results obtained for lichens. Results obtained for T. pallida indicated that concentrations of elements in old leaves of this plant are of the same magnitude or slightly higher than those presented in young ones. (author)

  18. The multigene families of actinoporins (part II): Strategies for heterologous production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, A; Hervis, Y P; Socas, L B P; Canet, L; Faheem, M; Barbosa, J A R G; Lanio, M E; Pazos, I F

    2016-08-01

    The sea anemone venom contains pore-forming proteins (PFP) named actinoporins, due to their purification from organisms belonging to Actiniaria order and its ability to form pores in sphingomyelin-containing membranes. Actinoporins are generally basic, monomeric and single-domain small proteins (∼20 kDa) that are classified as α-type PFP since the pore formation in membranes occur through α-helical elements. Different actinoporin isoforms have been isolated from most of the anemones species, as was analyzed in the first part of this review. Several actinoporin full-length genes have been identified from genomic-DNA libraries or messenger RNA. Since the actinoporins lack carbohydrates and disulfide bridges, their expression in bacterial systems is suitable. The actinoporins heterologous expression in Escherichia coli simplifies their production, replaces the natural source reducing the ecological damage in anemone populations, and allows the production of site-specific mutants for the study of the structure-function relationship. In this second part of the review, the strategies for heterologous production of actinoporins in Escherichia coli are analyzed, as well as the different approaches used for their purification. The activity of the recombinant proteins with respect to the wild-type is also reviewed. PMID:27080349

  19. Prva molekularna identifikacija populacija krumpirovih cistolikih nematoda primjenom lančane reakcije polimerazom (PCR) u Hrvatskoj.

    OpenAIRE

    Grubišić, Dinka; Pajač Živković, Ivana; Gotlin Čuljak, Tanja; Brmež, Mirjana; Benković-Lačić, Teuta; MEŠIĆ, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Krumpirove cistolike nematode (engl. PCN), Globodera rostochiensis i Globodera pallida ekonomski su štetnici krumpira (Solanum tuberosum L. subsp. tuberosum) koji se nalaze na međunarodnoj listi karantenskih štetnika. U Hrvatskoj su krumpirove cistolike nematode prvi put utvrđene 2001. godine u Međimurskoj županiji. Od tada sve identifikacije populacija ovih vrsta radi monitoringa temeljile su se na morfološkim karakteristikama. Metoda lančane reakcije polimerazom (eng. PCR) provedena je po p...

  20. Reproducción y alimentación de Phytotoma raimondii, cortarrama peruana en El Gramadal, Ancash

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Rosina; Mónica Romo

    2012-01-01

    Se confirma la existencia de un buen hábitat con buena disponibilidad de alimento y de sitios para reproducción de la cortarrama peruana en El Gramadal (Huarmey). Las dos especies más importantes para su alimentación “algarrobo” (Prosopis pallida) y “palo negro” (Grabowskia boerhaviifolia), se encuentran en suficiente cantidad en el lugar. Esta última planta también es crucial para la reproducción, ya que todos los nidos hallados fueron construidos en esta especie. Hasta el momento se han enc...

  1. Pantothenate kinase 2 mutation with classic pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration without 'eye-of-the-tiger' sign on MRI in a pair of siblings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been postulated that all patients with pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) mutations causing pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) are associated with the 'eye-of-the-tiger' sign on MRI. We report a pair of siblings who presented with dystonia and who have been found to be homozygous for 104C>A, S35X mutation, confirming the diagnosis of PKAN. They do not have the typical iron deposition in the globi pallida or substantia nigra on MR imaging. (orig.)

  2. Hatching behavior of potato cyst nematodes from the Canary Islands

    OpenAIRE

    González-Pérez, José Antonio; Phillips, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    The present work investigated early hatching differences in naturally occuring field populations and newly reared populations of potato cyst nematodes from the Canary Islands. Hatching behavior of the two species appears to be distinct, with more juveniles hatched from G. pallida that hatch earlier and over a shorter time than G. rostochiensis. The hatching rate of 3-year-old PCN populations was more than double (mean 44.5% ñ 1) that shown by newly reared populations (mean 19.1% ñ 12.5), and ...

  3. Comportamento silvicultural de especies de Prosopis, em Petrolina-PE, regiãosemi-arida brasileira

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Paulo Cesar Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Performance e produtividades madeireira e forrageira foram avaliadas em Prosopis alba, P. chilensis e P. tamarugo introduzidas do Chile; 1'. glandulosa e P. velutina dos Estados Unidos; P. pallida do Peru e P. juliflora do Nordeste do Brasil, até a idade de 96 meses. O experimento, conduzido em Petrolina (P2), foi avaliado sob os aspectos de sobrevivência, crescimento, fenologia, produtividades madeireira e forrageira e fitossanidade. Dados das medições aos 3, 13, 24, 39, 63, 75, 87 e 96 mese...

  4. Taxonomic Diversity of Fungi Associated with Some PCN Populations from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Oro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased content of pesticides in food chain resulted in using microorganisms asagents of biological control. The potato cyst nematodes (PCN - Globodera pallida and G.rostochiensis belong to the group of the most important parasites - the quarantine organisms.The external and internal area of a cyst harbor numerous fungal and bacterial species.The aim of this study was to identify antagonistic fungi associated with some PCN populationsfrom Serbia. Fungal antagonists of potato cyst nematodes have not been previouslyinvestigated in our country. The diversity of PCN fungal antagonists is not reflected only atthe species level but also at the level of higher taxonomic categories.

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16361-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n... 45 0.021 EU423621_1( EU423621 |pid:none) Echinacea pallida isolate 315A-112....:none) Variovorax paradoxus S110 chrom... 42 3e-04 DQ014506_1( DQ014506 |pid:none) Eucalyptu...nthase ... 45 0.007 CP000077_888( CP000077 |pid:none) Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM 63... 40 0.008 DQ898153_1( DQ898153 |pid...:none) Pinus radiata cellulose synthase (... 44 0.009 AF458083_1( AF458083 |pid:none) Arabidopsis thali... letters Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Contig-U16361-1 (C

  6. Há 100 anos, a descoberta do Treponema pallidum A hundred years ago, the discovery of Treponema pallidum

    OpenAIRE

    Elemir Macedo de Souza

    2005-01-01

    A descoberta do Treponema pallidum por Schaudinn & Hoffmann em 3 de março de 1905 foi influenciada pela comunicação de Siegel, sobre a descoberta do agente etiológico da sífilis. Encarada com ceticismo, a comunicação acarretou novas investigações, conduzidas pelo zoologista Schaudinn e pelo dermatologista Hoffmann -primeiros observadores do agente da sífilis, denominado Spirochaeta pallida. A descoberta foi o passo inicial para o desenvolvimento dos procedimentos diagnósticos e terapêuticos n...

  7. Tenacibaculum halocynthiae sp. nov., a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from sea squirt Halocynthia roretzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ok; Park, Sooyeon; Nam, Bo-Hye; Jung, Yong-Taek; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Jee, Young-Ju; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2013-06-01

    A Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, aerobic, non-flagellated, non-gliding and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated P-R2A1-2(T), was isolated from sea squirt (Halocynthia roretzi) collected from the South Sea, Korea. It grew optimally at 25-28 °C, at pH 7.0-8.0 and in the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl. Neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strain fell within the clade comprising Tenacibaculum species. Strain P-R2A1-2(T) exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 97.6, 97.2 and 97.0 % to Tenacibaculum aestuarii SMK-4(T), T. lutimaris TF-26(T) and T. aiptasiae a4(T), respectively, and of 94.5-96.8 % to the type strains of the other Tenacibaculum species. Strain P-R2A1-2(T) contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone and C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH, iso-C15:0 3-OH and iso-C15:0 as the major fatty acids. The DNA G + C content of strain P-R2A1-2(T) was 30.7 mol % and its DNA-DNA relatedness values with the type strains of T. aestuarii, T. lutimaris and T. aiptasiae were 17 ± 4.2, 21 ± 6.1 and 16 ± 5.2 %, respectively. Differential phenotypic properties, together with the phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that the novel strain is separate from other Tenacibaculum species. On the basis of the data presented, strain P-R2A1-2(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Tenacibaculum, for which the name Tenacibaculum halocynthiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is P-R2A1-2(T) (=KCTC 32262(T )= CCUG 63681(T)). PMID:23543245

  8. Evaluation of genotoxicity from low exposure rates of ionizing radiation by using Trad-MCN bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomonitoring has been recognized as an important tool in the field of environmental studies. Biological assays have been used to evaluate genotoxic agents present in the environment. Among the bioassays using plants, the micronucleus tests of Tradescantia sp. (Trad-MCN) has shown sensitivity to several environmental conditions, including radiation. Several studies have demonstrated that Tradescantia sp. is sensitive to the harmful effects of X-rays, internal and external radioisotopic sources and cosmic rays. The toxicity is evaluated by observing the frequency of broken chromosomes presented as a small rounded structure in the pollen cells (tetrads), called micronucleus. The present study was developed in Centro Experimental Aramar where, since the 80's, an Environmental Monitoring Program has been carried out by the Radioecological Laboratory. The purpose of this work was to evaluate, by using the Trad-MCN bioassay, the genotoxicity from low exposure rates of ionizing radiation on Tradescantia pallida inflorescences exposed to a uranium ore, in a closed dynamic system. The plants were also submitted to a control exposure with filtered air (negative control). The assay was developed according to the usual protocol. Micronuclei frequencies were compared using Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis. The negative control presented a significantly different micronuclei frequency from all the groups exposed to radiation (P -1). The obtained results indicated that T. pallida is sensitive to ionizing radiation even in low exposure rates and it can be used for in vitro environmental monitoring(author)

  9. The study of the mutagenetical effects of low dose level exposure to ionizing radiation using a bio indicator system close to deposits of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Leal, T.C. dos; Kelecom, A. [Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Ambiental (PGCA)-UFF-Niteroi (Brazil); Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X. da [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE/UFRJ-Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Frota, M. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria (LARARA)-Dept. Biologia Geral UFF-Niteroi (Brazil)].e-mail: teresa@tcleal.eng.br

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the biological mutational effects caused by low doses of ionizing radiation in biological samples placed close to and around deposits of radioactive waste, as a way of monitoring the environment close to these deposits. In order to do this the Tradescantia pallida, was chosen, and through micronuclei tests one could verify the sensitivity of the dose/ Response to bio-monitoring. The plants were exposed for a period of 24 hours in previously chosen sites around Brazil, within the proximity of deposits of nuclear waste. In each location, three points were chosen for bio-monitoring. The results obtained at these locations shows a small increment in the frequency of micronuclei per cell analyzed by the biosensor. From this data, a scale of mutagenesis affects from low dosage radiation was built up. The Tradescantia pallida is a good alternative in environmental bio-monitoring for tropical climates, as it is an excellent alternative tool in the studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. (Author)

  10. The study of the mutagenetical effects of low dose level exposure to ionizing radiation using a bio indicator system close to deposits of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the biological mutational effects caused by low doses of ionizing radiation in biological samples placed close to and around deposits of radioactive waste, as a way of monitoring the environment close to these deposits. In order to do this the Tradescantia pallida, was chosen, and through micronuclei tests one could verify the sensitivity of the dose/ Response to bio-monitoring. The plants were exposed for a period of 24 hours in previously chosen sites around Brazil, within the proximity of deposits of nuclear waste. In each location, three points were chosen for bio-monitoring. The results obtained at these locations shows a small increment in the frequency of micronuclei per cell analyzed by the biosensor. From this data, a scale of mutagenesis affects from low dosage radiation was built up. The Tradescantia pallida is a good alternative in environmental bio-monitoring for tropical climates, as it is an excellent alternative tool in the studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. (Author)

  11. Há 100 anos, a descoberta do Treponema pallidum A hundred years ago, the discovery of Treponema pallidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elemir Macedo de Souza

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A descoberta do Treponema pallidum por Schaudinn & Hoffmann em 3 de março de 1905 foi influenciada pela comunicação de Siegel, sobre a descoberta do agente etiológico da sífilis. Encarada com ceticismo, a comunicação acarretou novas investigações, conduzidas pelo zoologista Schaudinn e pelo dermatologista Hoffmann -primeiros observadores do agente da sífilis, denominado Spirochaeta pallida. A descoberta foi o passo inicial para o desenvolvimento dos procedimentos diagnósticos e terapêuticos nos anos subseqüentes.The discovery of Treponema pallidum by Schaudinn & Hoffmann, on March 3rd 1905, was influenced by Siegels' communication on the finding of the etiological agent of syphilis. John Siegel, working at the Institut of Zoology, University of Berlin, claimed to have found a flagellate protozoon in syphilitic lesions. Because of the skepticism it was received with, this communcation yielded further investigation, conducted by zoologist Schaudinn and dermatologist Hoffmann. They were the first investigators to find the etiological agent of syphilis, described under the name of Spirochaeta pallida. The discovery of Treponema pallidum on March 3rd 1905 was the first step towards the development of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in subsequent years.

  12. Morphological and physiological comparison of taxa comprising the Sporothrix schenckii complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHAO, Ming-dan; ZHOU, Xun; LIU, Ting-ting; YANG, Zhi-bang

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent molecular data, it has been suggested that Sporothrix globosa is the main causal agent of sporotrichosis in China. The objective of this study was to compare the morphology, growth characteristics, patterns of carbon source usage, and susceptibility to antifungal agents among Sporothrix strains. A total of 15 clinical strains confirmed to be S. globosa, from three different regions of China, and 11 ex-type strains from the CBS-KNAW biodiversity center were obtained. The elongated conidia of S. pallida, S. variecibatus, S. schenckii, and S. schenckii luriei were clearly different from the subglobose and globose conidia of S. globosa strains. S. schenckii is able to assimilate sucrose, raffinose, and ribitol. Susceptibility profiles of these Sporothrix species were evaluated by measuring minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Fluconazole, itraconazole, terbinafine, and amphotericin B showed good activity against most S. globosa clinical isolates from China. Potassium iodide also showed a low MIC against S. pallida, while fluconazole showed a high MIC for S. mexicana, S. humicola, S. globosa, S. schenckii, and S. inflata; these strains might be considered tolerant. The species showed differences in susceptibility to antifungal drugs and should therefore be properly identified during diagnosis prior to designing therapeutic strategies. PMID:26537212

  13. Characterization of small HSPs from Anemonia viridis reveals insights into molecular evolution of alpha crystallin genes among cnidarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Nicosia

    Full Text Available Gene family encoding small Heat-Shock Proteins (sHSPs containing α-crystallin domain are found both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms; however, there is limited knowledge of their evolution. In this study, two small HSP genes termed AvHSP28.6 and AvHSP27, both organized in one intron and two exons, were characterised in the Mediterranean snakelocks anemone Anemonia viridis. The release of the genome sequence of Hydra magnipapillata and Nematostella vectensis enabled a comprehensive study of the molecular evolution of α-crystallin gene family among cnidarians. Most of the H. magnipapillata sHSP genes share the same gene organization described for AvHSP28.6 and AvHSP27, differing from the sHSP genes of N. vectensis which mainly show an intronless architecture. The different genomic organization of sHSPs, the phylogenetic analyses based on protein sequences, and the relationships among Cnidarians, suggest that the A.viridis sHSPs represent the common ancestor from which H. magnipapillata genes directly evolved through segmental genome duplication. Additionally retroposition events may be considered responsible for the divergence of sHSP genes of N. vectensis from A. viridis. Analyses of transcriptional expression profile showed that AvHSP28.6 was constitutively expressed among different tissues from both ectodermal and endodermal layers of the adult sea anemones, under normal physiological conditions and also under different stress condition. Specifically, we profiled the transcriptional activation of AvHSP28.6 after challenges with different abiotic/biotic stresses showing induction by extreme temperatures, heavy metals exposure and immune stimulation. Conversely, no AvHSP27 transcript was detected in such dissected tissues, in adult whole body cDNA library or under stress conditions. Hence, the involvement of AvHSP28.6 gene in the sea anemone defensome is strongly suggested.

  14. The Alkaloid Ageladine A, Originally Isolated from Marine Sponges, Used for pH-Sensitive Imaging of Transparent Marine Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Bickmeyer

    2012-01-01

    The brominated pyrrole-imidazole Ageladine A was used for live imaging of the jellyfish (jellies) Nausithoe werneri, the sea anemone Metridium senile and the flatworm Macrostomum lignano. The fluorescence properties of Ageladine A allow for estimation of pH values in tissue and organs in living animals. The results showed that Nausithoe werneri had the most acidic areas in the tentacles and close to the mouth (pH 4–6.5), Metridium senile harbours aggregates of high acidity in the tentacles (p...

  15. Neurones and neuropeptides in coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Ebbesen, Ditte Graff; McFarlane, I D

    1989-01-01

    The first nervous system probably evolved in coelenterates. Many neurons in coelenterates have morphological characteristics of both sensory and motor neurones, and appear to be multifunctional. Using immunocytochemistry with antisera to the sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide), RFamide-like peptides......) was isolated, which also belongs to the less than Glu...Arg-X-NH2 family. Using specific antisera it was shown that all four peptides were located in neurones. Application of low doses of Antho-RFamide, or Antho-RWamide I or II induced contractions of endodermal muscles of sea anemones. This indicates...

  16. DOĞU AKDENİZ BÖLGESİNDE YETİŞEN BAZI OTSU VE ODUNSU MAKİ BİTKİLERİNİN TOPRAK ÖZELLİKLERİNİN KARŞILAŞTIRILMASI

    OpenAIRE

    Kızıldağ, Nacide; Özer, Gülistan; Cenkseven, Şahin; Kutlay, Ahu; KOÇAK, Burak; Aka Sağlıker, Hüsniye; Darıcı, Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Bu çalışmada Akdeniz Bölgesi’ne özgü üç farklı otsu (Anemone coronaria, Asphodelus aestivus, Cyclamen sp.), çalı (Calycotome villosa, Cistus creticus, Osyris alba) ve odunlu bitki yaprağının (Cupressus sempervirens, Olea europaea ve Pinus brutia) C, N ve P içerikleri (%) ile topraklarının bazı fiziksel ve kimyasal özellikleri ve bu toprakların 30 günlük karbon mineralizasyonu belirlenerek aynı ekosistem içindeki farkl...

  17. Caryological notes in some portuguese Ranunculaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Queirós, Margarida

    1990-01-01

    Chromosome numbers of fourteen portuguese laxa of Ranunculaceae are reported: Helleborus foetidus 20 = 32; Nigella damascena 2n = 12; N. gallica 2n = 12; Delphinium Pentagynum 2n = 16; D. Halteratum subsp. verdunense 2n = 16; Anemone palmeta 2n = 32; Clematis campaniflora 2n = 16; Ranunculus muricatus 2n =...

  18. The transcriptomic response of the coral Acropora digitifera to a competent Symbiodinium strain: the symbiosome as an arrested early phagosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A R; Cumbo, V; Harii, S; Shinzato, C; Chan, C X; Ragan, M A; Bourne, D G; Willis, B L; Ball, E E; Satoh, N; Miller, D J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the ecological significance of the relationship between reef-building corals and intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in its establishment. Indeed, microarray-based analyses point to the conclusion that host gene expression is largely or completely unresponsive during the establishment of symbiosis with a competent strain of Symbiodinium. In this study, the use of Illumina RNA-Seq technology allowed detection of a transient period of differential expression involving a small number of genes (1073 transcripts; corals and symbiotic sea anemones with their endosymbionts. PMID:27094992

  19. Do juvenile Amphiprion ocellaris (Pisces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolund, Thea Marie; Nielsen, Lis Engdahl; Arvedlund, Michael

    2003-01-01

    results indicate that juvenile A. ocellaris recognize conspecifics visually rather than by olfaction. This is contrary to their finding mechanism of their host anemone. However, the results also indicate that the juvenile A ocellaris are neither attracted nor deterred by the presence of conspecifics. This...... is contrary to the settling mechanisms of the damselfish D. aruanus and D. reticulatus, and of the temperate herring Clupea harengus. Hence the results emphasize the variation of sensory abilities and behaviours in fish larvae and juveniles. It is not an area prone for generalizations....

  20. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Damien; Sempere, Thierry; Plantard, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes, biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida, a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures and thus thrives above 2.0-2.5 km in these tropical highlands. The Peruvian populations of this species exhibit a clear evolutionary pattern with deeper, more ancient lineages occurring in Andean southern Peru and shallower, younger lineages occurring progressively northwards. Genetically diverging G. pallida populations thus progressively colonized highland areas as these were expanding northwards, demonstrating that altitude in the Peruvian Andes was acquired longitudinally from south to north, i.e. in the direction of decreasing orogenic volume. This phylogeographic structure is recognized in other, independent highland biotaxa, and point to the Central Andean Orocline (CAO) as the region where high altitudes first emerged. Moreover, molecular clocks relative to Andean taxa, including the potato-tomato group, consistently estimate that altitudes high enough to induce biotic radiation were first acquired in the Early Miocene. After calibration by geological and biological tie-points and intervals, the phylogeny of G. pallida is used as a molecular clock, which estimates that the 2.0-2.5 km threshold elevation range was reached in the Early Miocene in southernmost Peru, in the Middle and Late Miocene in the Abancay segment (NW southern Peru), and from the latest Miocene in central and northern Peru. Although uncertainties attached to phylochronologic ages are significantly larger than those derived from geochronological methods, these results are fairly consistent with coeval

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03226-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 38 2.4 6 ( BX001055 ) Zebrafish DNA sequence from clone CH211-87M5 in l... 38 2.4 5 ( AC005139 ) Plasmodium falcipar...oideum cDNA clone:ddc12i12, 3' ... 482 e-161 3 ( AF272706 ) Arabidopsis thaliana BAC F7P1. 42 8e-06 6 ( AC005504 ) Plas...modium falciparum DNA *** SEQUENCING IN PROGR... 30 7.6 7 ( CR392036 ) Zebrafi... Mixed Stage EST's from Globodera pallida,... 40 1.4 2 ( CR450831 ) Zebrafish DNA...E03.v1 SAIL Collection Arabidopsis thali... 32 3.2 3 ( BX936358 ) Zebrafish DNA sequence from clone CH211-15

  2. Molecular Components of the Sporothrix schenckii Complex that Induce Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; López-Romero, Everardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal disease caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex that includes species such as S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto, S. globosa, S. luriei, S. mexicana, and S. pallida, which exhibit different potentially antigenic molecular components. The immune response of susceptible hosts to control infection and disease caused by these fungi has been little studied. Besides, the fungus-host interaction induces the activation of different types of immune response. This mini-review analyzes and discusses existing reports on the identification and functional characterization of molecules from species of the S. schenckii complex with clinical relevance, and the mechanisms that mediate the type and magnitude of the immune response in experimental models in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge is expected to contribute to the development of protective and therapeutic strategies against sporotrichosis and other mycoses. PMID:27117164

  3. Seasonal phoresy as an overwintering strategy of a phytophagous mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sai; Li, Jianling; Guo, Kun; Qiao, Haili; Xu, Rong; Chen, Jianmin; Xu, Changqing; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Migration by attachment to insects is common among mites that live in temporary habitats. However, because plants provide relatively stable habitats, phytophagous mites are generally not dependent on other animals for dispersal, so whether these mites can consistently be phoretic on insects through a particular life stage remains unclear and controversial. Here, we describe an obligate phoresy of a wholly phytophagous mite, Aceria pallida, in which the mites accompanied the psyllid Bactericera gobica to its winter hibernation sites, thus successfully escaping unfavourable winter conditions, and returned to reach the buds of their host plant early the following spring. This finding provides evidence of a new overwintering strategy that has contributed to the evolutionary success of these tiny phytophagous mites. PMID:27150196

  4. Orchid Inventory and the Host in Meru Betiri National Park – East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DWI MURTI PUSPITANINGTYAS

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Meru Betiri National Park is located in southern part of East Java Province. Inventory of orchid species was conducted to study orchid diversity in Meru Betiri National Park, especially in Bandealit coastal area. Observation of orchid within host trees was also done to study the preference host trees for orchid growth. It was recorded that there were 25 orchid species belonging to 20 genera. Twenty species of which are epiphyte and 5 species are terrestrial. The most common epiphyte orchids were Pomatocalpa latifolia, Pomatocalpa spicata, Rhynchostylis retusa, Micropera pallida and Grosourdya appendiculata. While terrestrial orchid was only found in a small number, with common terrestrial orchids were Corymborkis veratrifolia and Goodyera rubicunda. The most preference host trees for epiphyte orchid were Tectona grandis (Teak, Clausena indica, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Mangifera indica (Mango, but there is no specific relationship between host trees and epiphyte orchid.

  5. A Study of the Epiphytic Orchids in Jobolarangan Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADIANI VIVIATI

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to know the species of epiphytic orchids in Jobolarangan forest. The orchid samples were taken from all stand-plants. The plants were chosen randomly by considering the diversity and richness of orchids that attach on it. Each plant was sampled in three repetitions. Sampling of orchids existence in the plant’s stand were done using transect method through a zonation system. In this research 11 epiphytic-orchids such as Bulbophyllum bakhuizenii Stenn, Coelogyne miniata Lindl, Coelogyne rochussenii de Vr., Dendrobium bigibbum Lindl., Dendrobchilum longifolium, Eria bogoriensis, J.J.S. Liparis caespitosa (Thou. Lindl., Liparis pallida (Bl.. Pholidota globosa (Bl. Lindl., Polystachya flavescens (Bl. J.J.S., and Trichoglottis sp. were found. The host plant stand that was attached with most orchids was Schefflera fastigiata and Saurauia bracteosa, generally in zone three.

  6. Repelência e deterrência na oviposição de Bemisia tabaci biótipo B pelo uso de extratos vegetais em Cucurbita pepo L Repellence and deterrence on oviposition of Bemisia tabaci biotype B by the use of vegetal extracts in Cucurbita pepo L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P.G.F. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bemisia tabaci biótipo B é um dos principais insetos-praga na cultura da abobrinha (Cucurbita pepo L.. O manejo dessa mosca-branca tornou-se grande desafio aos agricultores, uma vez que esta apresenta rápida capacidade de desenvolver resistência a diferentes classes de inseticidas. Como alternativa vem sendo investigado o uso de extratos vegetais com atividades inseticida e/ou insetistática, os quais têm revelado resultados promissores no combate a inseto. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar os possíveis efeitos de sete extratos provenientes de cinco espécies vegetais, Ruta graveolens L. (folhas, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (folhas + ramos, Trichilia pallida Swartz (ramos, T. pallida (folhas, A. indica (amêndoas, Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (inflorescências + ramos+ folhas e Mentha pulegium L. (folhas, sobre Bemisia tabaci biótipo B em abobrinha, por meio de testes de repelência e deterrência para oviposição. Em teste com chance de escolha, avaliou-se a atratividade e determinou-se o índice de repelência após 6, 24 e 48 horas da aplicação dos extratos. A oviposição foi verificada após a terceira contagem do número de adultos. O extrato à base de folhas de M. pulegium mostrou repelência e deterrência à oviposição de B. tabaci biótipo B, podendo ser recomendado como alternativa para o manejo do inseto.Bemisia tabaci biotype B is one of the main pests in squash (Cucurbita pepo L.. The management of this whitefly has become a major challenge to growers, since they have the ability to quickly develop resistance to different classes of insecticides. Alternatively, the use of plant extracts with insecticide and/or insectistatic activities has been investigated, showing promising results for the whitefly control. The present study evaluated the possible effects of seven extracts from five plant species, Ruta graveolens L. (leaves, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (leaves + branches, Trichilia pallida Swartz (branches

  7. Ultrastructural Study of Dermatic Tissues in Secondary Syphilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓东; 脱朝伟; 张庆瑞; 宋芳吉

    2001-01-01

    Objective: For the purpose of understanding the changing process of syphilis histomorphology and its injury mechanism,the ultrastructure of dermatic tissues of secondary syphilis was studied.Methods: Different skin injury tissues of secondary syphilis patients, whose serum RPR and TPHA tests in the lab both appeared positive reaction, were observed through transmission electron microscope (TEM).Results: Inflammations appeared on epidermides and coria,a great deal of neutrocytes, lymphocytes and a small amount of plasma infiltrated them. Karyopyknosis, karyorrhexis,epicyte lysis and mitochondrion vacular degeneration occurred. Spirocheta pallida was distributed on intercellular substances, epicytes and coilagenous fibers. The epicytes were pressed to foveation. Conclusion The pathological change of characteristic tissue ultrastructure reported here is a histomorphological foundation to study the organism injury mechanism caused by syphilis.

  8. Eficiência de produtos vegetais no controle da lagarta-do-cartucho-do-milho Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E.Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae Efficience of extracts of plantas in control of fall armyworm in corn Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E.Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Souza Silva Oliveira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a eficiência de produtos vegetais no controle de Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E.Smith, 1797 na cultura do milho. Os experimentos foram instalados, nos anos de 2002 e 2004, com a pulverização dos produtos vegetais em cinco tratamentos, e quatro repetições. No ano de 2002, os produtos testados foram: Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (extrato aquoso 2%, e óleo a 1%; Melia azedarach L. (extrato aquoso 2%; Quassia amara L. (extrato aquoso 2%; óleo de nim, Azadirachta indica 1 e 2%. No ano de 2004, os produtos testados foram: A. indica (extrato aquoso 5%, e óleo a 2%, M. azedarach (extrato aquoso 5%, Trichilia pallida Sw. (extrato aquoso 5%. As avaliações, porcentagem de infestação da lagarta-do-cartucho por parcela, foram efetuadas aos três, sete e dez dias após a pulverização dos extratos. Conclui-se que extratos aquosos das plantas A. indica 2%, T.pallida 5%, Q. amara 2% e M. azedarach 2% e 5% e óleo de A. indica 1% e 2% com adição de tenso ativo não iônico, não possuem eficiência necessária como único método de controle da largarta-do-cartucho S. frugiperda em condições de campo. Os produtos começam a afetar o desenvolvimento da lagarta após alguns dias da ingestão das folhas pulverizadas, observado na avaliação efetuada aos sete dias após a aplicação dos extratos.The objective of this work was to study the efficiency of vegetable pesticides in the control of Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E.Smith, 1797 in corn culture. The experiments were installed, in the years of 2002 and 2004, with the spraying of the vegetable products in five treatments, and four repetitions. In the year of 2002 the tested products were: Azadirachta indica A. Juss (aqueous extract 2%, and oil at 1%; Melia azedarach L. (aqueous extract 2%; Quassia amara L. (aqueous extract 2%; nim oil, Azadirachta indica 1 and 2%. In the year of 2004 the tested products were: A. indica (aqueous extract 5%, and oil at 2%, M

  9. Biodiversity of Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM Fungi in Some of The Wild Medicinal Legumes of Barak Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Malina Singha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Present investigation was aimed to isolate and study the rhizobacteria and AM fungi from rhizosphere of wild legumes: Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant, Crotolaria pallida (Sunhemp, Cassia tora (Sickle pod and Desmodium . The molecular characterization of four bacterial isolates were done. Four bacterial species - Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus aerophilus, Microbacterium laevaniformans and - Staphylococcus xylosus were isolated from strains M1, RT, D5 and D7 respectively. Also, the distribution of AM fungi population was studied from rhizosphere soils of these legumes. Among the AM fungi, Glomus species was dominant and bacterial genus - Bacillus was found to be dominant. Maximum number of VAM infection was found in the rhizosphere soil of Mimosa pudica of Srikona.

  10. Analytical characterisation of homoeopathic mother tinctures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, A; Franck-Karl, G; Waimer, F; Riegert, U; Wiget, R

    2009-03-01

    Quality of homoeopathic mother tinctures is assured by the definition of the starting material, the manufacturing process and the analytical characteristics described in the monograph. Traditionally analytical characterisation of the mother tincture comprises appearance, odour, identity, density and dry residue. According to annex I of directive 2001/83/EC an assay is only performed in case of a health hazard due to toxic compounds. The concept of marker substances as usually used in phytotherapy cannot be transferred to mother tinctures without research effort. For example the marker substances echinacoside, apigenin-7-glucoside and rosmarinic acid found in dried underground parts of Echinacea pallida Nutt., dried flower heads of Matricaria recutita L. and dried herb of Pulmonaria officinalis L. cannot be found in homoeopathic mother tinctures prepared from fresh material thereof. PMID:19275866

  11. Ecotoxicological monitoring at CEA - Centro Experimental Aramar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental preservation has been one of the major targets of the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), since its foundation. The research center is located near Ipero, SP, and is maintained by Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo - CTMSP. An Environmental Monitoring Program is developed with many types of matrices being periodically collected and analysed, including all the gaseous and liquids emissions liberated by the facilities. Besides radiometric and chemical analysis we have been testing bioassays for the effluents to accomplish the new recommendations from governmental agencies. The microcrustacean Daphnia similis has been tested in toxicity assays on liquid effluents and the garden plant Tradescantia pallida has been used to assess the genotoxicity effects from gaseous emissions. The results show that liquid and gaseous emissions from CEA are bellow the regulatory levels. (author)

  12. Ecotoxicological monitoring at CEA - Centro Experimental Aramar; Monitoramento ecotoxicologico no CEA - Centro Experimental Aramar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattiolo, Sandra Regina; Machado, Alessandra Carla Fattori Ergesse [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: sandra@ctmsp.mar.mil.br; alessan@ctmsp.mar.mil.br

    2005-07-01

    The environmental preservation has been one of the major targets of the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), since its foundation. The research center is located near Ipero, SP, and is maintained by Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo - CTMSP. An Environmental Monitoring Program is developed with many types of matrices being periodically collected and analysed, including all the gaseous and liquids emissions liberated by the facilities. Besides radiometric and chemical analysis we have been testing bioassays for the effluents to accomplish the new recommendations from governmental agencies. The microcrustacean Daphnia similis has been tested in toxicity assays on liquid effluents and the garden plant Tradescantia pallida has been used to assess the genotoxicity effects from gaseous emissions. The results show that liquid and gaseous emissions from CEA are bellow the regulatory levels. (author)

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15834-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16306 ) OP21396 Mixed Stage EST's from Globodera pallida,... 38 0.50 2 ( EB717815...bud EST. 48 1.9 1 ( CT578387 ) Pinus pinaster bud EST. 48 1.9 1 ( CF669957 ) RTCNT1_47_D09.b1_A029 Root control... ( FF297949 ) 279318894 Pea aphid whole body normalized full le... 36 4.3 2 ( EY328030 ) CAWY13028.fwd CAWY Helobdella rob...ns genomic DNA, 8q24.3, PCR product: KP... 34 4.4 2 ( EK464327 ) 1095469412086 Glob...270572 ) CH230-107M14.TV CHORI-230 Segment 1 Rattus norveg... 48 1.9 1 ( EK455975 ) 1095468239714 Global-Oce

  14. Molecular assessment of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) infections in wild canids and rodents from north Africa, with implications for transmission dynamics across taxonomic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, João P; Alvares, Francisco; Boratyński, Zbyszek; Brito, José C; Leite, João V; Harris, D James

    2014-10-01

    Parasites play a major role in ecosystems, and understanding of host-parasite interactions is important for predicting parasite transmission dynamics and epidemiology. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about the distribution, diversity, and impact of parasites in wildlife, especially from remote areas. Hepatozoon is a genus of apicomplexan parasites that is transmitted by ingestion of infected arthropod vectors. However, alternative modes of transmission have been identified such as trophic transmission. Using the 18S rRNA gene as a marker, we provide an assessment of Hepatozoon prevalence in six wild canid and two rodent species collected between 2003 and 2012 from remote areas in North Africa. By combining this with other predator-prey systems in a phylogenetic framework, we investigate Hepatozoon transmission dynamics in distinct host taxa. Prevalence was high overall among host species (African jerboa Jaculus jaculus [17/47, 36%], greater Egyptian jerboa Jaculus orientalis [5/7, 71%], side-striped jackal Canis adustus [1/2, 50%], golden jackal Canis aureus [6/32, 18%], pale fox Vulpes pallida [14/28, 50%], Rüppell's fox Vulpes rueppellii [6/11, 55%], red fox Vulpes vulpes [8/16, 50%], and fennec fox Vulpes zerda [7/11, 42%]). Phylogenetic analysis showed further evidence of occasional transmission of Hepatozoon lineages from prey to canid predators, which seems to occur less frequently than in other predator-prey systems such as between snakes and lizards. Due to the complex nature of the Hepatozoon lifecycle (heteroxenous and vector-borne), future studies on these wild host species need to clarify the dynamics of alternative modes of Hepatozoon transmission and identify reservoir and definitive hosts in natural populations. We also detected putative Babesia spp. (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmida) infections in two canid species from this region, V. pallida (1/28) and V. zerda (1/11). PMID:25050803

  15. A revision of Passiflora L. subgenus Decaloba (DC. Rchb. supersection Cieca (Medik. J. M. MacDougal & Feuillet (Passifloraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Porter-Utley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Passiflora subgenus Decaloba supersection Cieca is a monophyletic group of herbaceous to woody climbers found in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. The 19 species recognized here are primarily distributed in the southern United States, Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Two species, P. suberosa and P. pallida, are also naturalized in various regions of the Old World. The species of the supersection are recognized by their small, apetalous, usually greenish flowers with the filaments of the corona mostly in two series. The plants commonly lack c-glycosylflavones but possess flavonol 3-O-glycosides. The supersection contains two problematic species complexes, P. suberosa and P. coriacea. Phylogenetic relationships within supersection Cieca are investigated by means of phenetic and cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular (ITS 1 & 2 characters. The morphological and molecular data sets were analyzed separately because of incongruity due to taxon sampling and the complicated evolutionary history of entities within the P. suberosa complex. All analyses confirm the monophyly of the supersection. They also show that the P. suberosa complex is a non-monophyletic group of cryptic species, and inter-taxic hybridization and polyploidy have contributed to the confusing and complex pattern of variation evident within the group. Four taxa that were formerly included in this complex are recognized: P. pallida, P. suberosa subsp. suberosa, P. suberosa subsp. litoralis, and P. tridactylites. On the basis of molecular and morphological data, three species from the P. coriacea complex are recognized: P. coriacea, P. sexocellata, and P. megacoriacea. A key, detailed descriptions, distribution maps, and illustrations are included in the revision. Pollination, dispersal, and herbivory of the group are reviewed. The distribution and ecology of the species within the supersection are also discussed.

  16. Adiciones a la Biota de Uredinales (fungi de Colombia Addictions to the Uredinales Biota (fungi in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherin Maritza Vanegas Berrouet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Colecciones de plantas con síntomas de hongos royas (Uredinales, Basidiomycota realizadas en los últimos años en los departamentos de Amazonas, Antioquia, Caldas, Cundinamarca, Tolima y Valle del Cauca han sido estudiadas y depositadas en el Museo Micológico de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín (MMUNM. Entre las novedades encontradas, se registran por primera vez para Colombia las royas: Puccinia investita, Sphenospora pallida, Crossopsora piperis, Uredo psychotriicola y Pucciniosira solani. Se adiciona la familia botánica Dioscoreaceae para la Biota de Uredinales colombianos. Se hace la corrección del nombre anamórfico Uredo parthenii publicado para Colombia en 2003, por el nombre teliomorfico válido Puccinia schileana. Son registrados seis nuevos hospedantes parasitados por royas en Colombia, entre estos reviste importancia la colección sobre Origanum vulgare L. una planta aromática y medicinal cultivada mundialmente.Plant collections with symptoms of rusts fungi (Uredinales, Basidiomycota made during recent years in provinces of Amazonas, Antioquia, Caldas, Cundinamarca, Tolima and Valle del Cauca have been studied and deposited in Museo Micológico of Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín (MMUNM. The rusts species Puccinia investita, Sphenospora pallida, Crossopsora piperis, Uredo psychotriicola and Pucciniosira solani are new records for Colombia. A first record for this country of rust fungi in plants of family Dioscoreaceae has been also made. The anamorphic name Uredo parthenii published in 2003 in Colombia, has been corrected by the valid teleomorph Puccinia schileana. Finally, six new hosts parasitized by rusts are recorded, including Origanum vulgare L. a world-wide important aromatic and medicinal plant.

  17. In situ monitoring of urban air in Córdoba, Argentina using the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, H. A.; Pignata, M. L.; Saldiva, P. H. N.

    During the last decades, a significant deterioration of ambient air quality has been observed in Argentina. However, the availability of air pollution monitoring stations is still limited to only few cities. In this study, we investigated the genotoxicity of ambient levels of air pollution in Córdoba using the Tradescantia micronucleus assay. The experiment was performed from October, 2004 to April 2005. Pots with Tradescantia pallida were placed in three sites: Córdoba city center, characterized by important avenues with high traffic activity (cars, taxis, and public transport vehicles); the university campus, along a side road with heavy traffic of gasoline and diesel powered vehicles, buses and trucks; and a residential area, with no significant local sources of air pollution. Twenty young T. pallida inflorescences were collected from each sampling site in November, February and April. Micronuclei frequencies were determined in early tetrads of pollen mother cells and expressed as MCN/100 tetrads. Simultaneously, the environmental levels of total suspended particles (24 h mean) were determined for each site. A significant difference in micronuclei frequency was observed among sites ( p=0.036). Post-hoc analysis revealed that the residential area exhibited a lower micronuclei frequency than the university and city center areas. In conclusion, we found that the gradients of ambient air pollution of Córdoba are associated with changes in the spontaneous micronuclei frequency of Tradescantia pollen mother cells. These results indicate that in situ biomonitoring with higher plants may be useful for characterizing air pollution in areas without instrumental monitoring techniques, or for exploring the distribution of air contaminants at a microscale.

  18. Nomenclatural and taxonomic review of Passifloraceae species illustrated and described by Vellozo in Flora Fluminensis Revisão nomenclatória e taxonômica das espécies de Passifloraceae descritas e ilustradas por Vellozo na Flora Fluminensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Carlos Cervi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The nomenclature and taxonomy of the 25 species of Passifloraceae named by Vellozo in Flora Fluminensis were reviewed by examining the plates and Latin diagnoses. Passiflora mediterranea, P. ovalis, P. porophylla, P. silvestris, P. tetraden, and P. villosa are species proposed by Vellozo that are accepted herein. Fifteen species (P. arvensis, P. bilobata, P. dentata, P. diaden, P. globosa, P. lunata, P. maliformis, P. oliviformis, P. pallida, P. pertusa, P. polyaden, P. quadrangularis, P. rubra, P. sururuca, and P. violacea are synonyms, were misidentified, or have illegitimate names.Passiflora edulis, P. foetida, and P. racemosa were correctly identified; however, the plant recognized by Vellozo as P. foetida is now considered P. foetida var. fluminensis. Passiflora obtusa was considered incertae sedis.A nomenclatura e a taxonomia das 25 espécies de Passifloraceae nomeadas por Vellozo na Flora Fluminensis foram revisadas com base na consulta das estampas e diagnoses latinas. Passiflora mediterranea, P. ovalis, P. porophylla, P. silvestris, P. tetraden e P. villosa são as espécies propostas por Vellozo aceitas aqui. Quinze espécies (P. arvensis, P. bilobata, P. dentata, P. diaden, P. globosa, P. lunata, P. maliformis, P. oliviformis, P. pallida, P. pertusa, P. polyaden, P. quadrangularis, P. rubra, P. sururuca e P. violacea são sinônimas, foram identificadas erroneamente ou possuem nomes ilegítimos: Passiflora edulis, P. foetida e P. racemosa foram corretamente identificadas; no entanto, a planta reconhecida por Vellozo como P. foetida é atualmente considerada P. foetida var. fluminensis. Passiflora obtusa foi considerada incertae sedis.

  19. Phylogeny and temporal diversification of the New World pond turtles (Emydidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Phillip Q; Thomson, Robert C; McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-10-01

    We present a comprehensive multigene phylogeny and time tree for the turtle family Emydidae. Our phylogenetic analysis, based on 30 nuclear and four mitochondrial genes (23,330 total base pairs) sequenced for two individuals for each of the currently recognized species of the subfamily Emydinae and two species from each of the more species-rich Deirochelyinae genera, yielded a well-supported tree that provides an evolutionary framework for this well-studied clade and a basis for a stable taxonomy. We calibrated an emydid time tree using three well-vetted fossils, modeled uncertainty in fossil ages to reflect their accuracy in node dating, and extracted stem/crown ages of a number of key diversification events. We date the age of crown emydids at a relatively young 44Ma, and the crown age of both contained subfamilies at roughly 30Ma. One deirochelyine clade, which includes the genera Graptemys, Malaclemys, Pseudemys, and Trachemys and contains 11% of all turtle species, dates to 21Ma just prior to the mid-Miocene climatic optimum, suggesting a potential causal link between warm, moist conditions and rapid species accumulation of these highly aquatic turtles. Both nuclear DNA data alone and in combination with mitochondrial DNA support the monophyly of an inclusive genus Emys containing the old world species orbicularis and trinacris and the New World blandingii, marmorata and pallida. Given that all members of this group were originally aligned in the genus Emys and that the age of the clade is roughly equal to other emydine genera, we strongly support a classification that places these five species in a single genus rather than the alternative three-genus scheme (Emys (orbicularis, trinacris), Actinemys (marmorata, pallida), Emydoidea (blandingii)). The phylogeny and resulting time tree presented here provides a comprehensive foundation for future comparative analyses of the Emydidae that will shed light on the historical ecology and conservation prioritization of

  20. Musgos (Bryophyta na Ilha Trambioca, Barcarena, PA, Brasil Mosses (Bryophyta in Trambioca Island, Barcarena, Pará State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Paula da Silva Souza

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado o inventário dos musgos em diferentes ecossistemas da Ilha Trambioca, município de Barcarena, PA. Foram encontradas 40 espécies, pertencentes a 20 gêneros e 13 famílias. As famílias com maior número de espécies foram Calymperaceae (12 spp., Sematophyllaceae (6 spp. e Leucobryaceae (5 spp., as quais destacaram-se também quanto ao número de indivíduos. As espécies mais comuns foram Sematophyllum subsimplex (Hedw. Mitt, Calymperes erosum Müll. Hal., Pilosium chlorophyllum (Hornsch. Müll. Hal., Taxithelium planum (Brid. Mitt., Callicostella pallida (Hornsch. Årgstr. e Trichosteleum papillosum (Hornsch. A. Jaeger. Evidenciou-se maior diversidade de espécies na mata de terra firme, confirmando a preferência das briófitas por este ecossistema. Philonotis gracillima Ångstr. é citada como primeira referência para o Estado do Pará.This work presents a survey of mosses from different ecosystems of Trambioca Island, municipality of Barcarena, Pará State, Brazil. Forty taxa of mosses were found, belonging to 20 genera and 13 families. The families with highest number of species were Calymperaceae (12 spp., Sematophyllaceae (6 spp., and Leucobryaceae (5 spp., which also presented the highest number of individuals. The most common species were Sematophyllum subsimplex (Hedw. Mitt, Calymperes erosum Müll. Hal., Pilosium chlorophyllum (Hornsch. Müll. Hal., Callicostella pallida (Hornsch. Årgstr., and Trichosteleum papillosum (Honrsch. A. Jaeger. It was observed a higher richness of species in the primary low land rainforest, confirming the preference of bryophytes for this ecosystem. Philonotis gracillima Ångstr. is mentioned as the first report to Pará State.

  1. Long-term phyto-, ornitho- and ichthyophenological time-series analyses in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahas, Rein

    This study analyzes a long-term phenological time series for the impact assessment of climate changes on Estonian nature and for the methodological study of the possible limitations of using phenological time series for climate trend analyses. These limiting factors can influence the results of studies more than the real impact of climate changes, which may have a much smaller numeric value. The 132-year series of the arrival of the skylark (Alauda arvensis) and the white wagtail (Motacilla alba), the 78-year series of the blossoming of the wood anemone (Anemone nemorosa), the bird cherry (Padus racemosa), apple trees (Malus domestica) and lilacs (Syringa vulgaris), and the 44-year series of the spawning of pike (Esox lucius) and bream (Abramis brama) were studied at three selected observation points in Estonia. The study of the phenological time series shows that Estonian springs have, on the basis of the database, advanced 8 days on average over the last 80-year period; the last 40-year period has warmed even faster.

  2. Ascertaining the potential effects of temperature on growth, survival and feeding of different juvenile clown ifsh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishwas Rao Methari; Mohideen Abdul Badhul Haq; Chinna Raja; Sheik Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the physiological and ecological responses of marine ornamental fishes to the change of water temperature with its potential effects on the growth, survival and feeding in clown fish. Methods: Three different sea anemone fish (Premnas biaculeatus, Amphiprion clarkii, Amphiprion akallopisos) were reared in confinement at water temperatures of 26, 28, 30, 32, and 34 oC using thermostat and they were maintained up to the marketable size, and growth, survival and feeding were evaluated during the experimental period. Results: The results illustrated that water temperature influenced the physiological performance of juveniles of three different sea anemone fish significantly. The growth and survival rates of juveniles of three different clown fish significantly increased with the increase of water temperature from 26 oC to 34 oC (P Conclusions:This study deliberately reveals that the physiological response of juveniles of clown fish as the change of water temperature and substantiated that water temperature influenced juvenile growth, survival and feeding significantly. This study also put forward that the reduced growth, survival and feeding of juveniles at lower temperature which have ecological impacts on clown fish juveniles in settlement and population replacement in the wild.

  3. Trimethylamine oxide, betaine and other osmolytes in deep-sea animals: depth trends and effects on enzymes under hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, P H; Rhea, M D; Kemp, K M; Bailey, D M

    2004-06-01

    Most shallow teleosts have low organic osmolyte contents, e.g. 70 mmol/kg or less of trimethylamine oxide (TMAO). Our previous work showed that TMAO contents increase with depth in muscles of several Pacific families of teleost fishes, to about 180 mmol/kg wet wt at 2.9 km depth in grenadiers. We now report that abyssal grenadiers (Coryphaenoides armatus, Macrouridae) from the Atlantic at 4.8 km depth contain 261 mmol/kg wet wt in muscle tissue. This precisely fits a linear trend extrapolated from the earlier data. We also found that anemones show a trend of increasing contents of methylamines (TMAO, betaine) and scyllo-inositol with increasing depth. Previously we found that TMAO counteracts the inhibitory effects of hydrostatic pressure on a variety of proteins. We now report that TMAO and, to a lesser extent, betaine, are generally better stabilizers than other common osmolytes (myo-inositol, taurine and glycine), in terms of counteracting the effects of pressure on NADH Km of grenadier lactate dehydrogenase and ADP Km of anemone and rabbit pyruvate kinase. PMID:15529747

  4. Protease Inhibitors from Marine Venomous Animals and Their Counterparts in Terrestrial Venomous Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B. F. Mourão

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Kunitz-type protease inhibitors are the best-characterized family of serine protease inhibitors, probably due to their abundance in several organisms. These inhibitors consist of a chain of ~60 amino acid residues stabilized by three disulfide bridges, and was first observed in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI-like protease inhibitors, which strongly inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin. In this review we present the protease inhibitors (PIs described to date from marine venomous animals, such as from sea anemone extracts and Conus venom, as well as their counterparts in terrestrial venomous animals, such as snakes, scorpions, spiders, Anurans, and Hymenopterans. More emphasis was given to the Kunitz-type inhibitors, once they are found in all these organisms. Their biological sources, specificity against different proteases, and other molecular blanks (being also K+ channel blockers are presented, followed by their molecular diversity. Whereas sea anemone, snakes and other venomous animals present mainly Kunitz-type inhibitors, PIs from Anurans present the major variety in structure length and number of Cys residues, with at least six distinguishable classes. A representative alignment of PIs from these venomous animals shows that, despite eventual differences in Cys assignment, the key-residues for the protease inhibitory activity in all of them occupy similar positions in primary sequence. The key-residues for the K+ channel blocking activity was also compared.

  5. Lesions of Copper Toxicosis in Captive Marine Invertebrates With Comparisons to Normal Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDouceur, E E B; Wynne, J; Garner, M M; Nyaoke, A; Keel, M K

    2016-05-01

    Despite increasing concern for coral reef ecosystem health within the last decade, there is scant literature concerning the histopathology of diseases affecting the major constituents of coral reef ecosystems, particularly marine invertebrates. This study describes histologic findings in 6 species of marine invertebrates (California sea hare [Aplysia californica], purple sea urchin [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus], sunburst anemone [Anthopleura sola], knobby star [Pisaster giganteus], bat star [Asterina miniata], and brittle star [Ophiopteris papillosa]) with spontaneous copper toxicosis, 4 purple sea urchins with experimentally induced copper toxicosis, and 1 unexposed control of each species listed. The primary lesions in the California sea hare with copper toxicosis were branchial and nephridial necrosis. Affected echinoderms shared several histologic lesions, including epidermal necrosis and ulceration and increased numbers of coelomocytes within the water-vascular system. The sunburst anemone with copper toxicosis had necrosis of both epidermis and gastrodermis, as well as expulsion of zooxanthellae from the gastrodermis. In addition to the lesions attributed to copper toxicosis, our results describe normal microscopic features of these animals that may be useful for histopathologic assessment of marine invertebrates. PMID:26459519

  6. Nucleosides from Anthopleura stell%绿海葵中的核苷类成分

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禚如朋; 付宏征; 张礼和; 林文翰

    2001-01-01

    目的 为了寻找抗肿瘤的活性成分。方法 利用溶剂法和色谱法对绿海葵进行了研究。结果 分离得到5 个核苷,经波谱学解析鉴定为2-羟基嘌呤核苷(Ⅰ),脱氧肌苷(Ⅱ),1-甲基黄嘌呤核苷(Ⅲ),脱氧鸟苷(Ⅳ),脱氧核糖胸腺嘧啶(Ⅴ)。结论 Ⅲ为一新天然产物,其余均为海洋生物中首次发现。%To study the chemical constituents of sea anemone, Anthopleura stell Verrill.Methods The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by chromatographic methods and their structures elucidated by chemical evidences and spectra data.Results 5 nucleosides were obtained and identified from the ethanolic extract as 2-hydroxy purine (Ⅰ); deoxyinosine (Ⅱ); 1-methylxanthosine (Ⅲ); deoxyguanosine (Ⅳ), and deoxyribo-thymidine (Ⅴ).Conclusion Compound Ⅲ was a new natural product, while the others were found from sea anemone for the first time.

  7. Elucidating the evolutionary relationships of the Aiptasiidae, a widespread cnidarian-dinoflagellate model system (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniaria: Metridioidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Estefanía

    2016-01-01

    Sea anemones of the family Aiptasiidae sensu Grajales and Rodríguez (2014) are conspicuous members of shallow-water environments, including several species widely used as model systems for the study of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and coral bleaching. Although previously published phylogenetic studies of sea anemones recovered Aiptasiidae as polyphyletic, they only included a sparse sample in terms of its taxonomic diversity and membership of the family had not been yet revised. This study explores the phylogenetic relationships of this family using five molecular markers and including newly collected material from the geographical distribution of most of the currently described genera and species. We find a monophyletic family Aiptasiidae. All the currently proposed genera were recovered as monophyletic units, a finding also supported by diagnostic morphological characters. Our results confirm Bellactis and Laviactis as members of Aiptasiidae, also in agreement with previous morphological studies. The monophyly of the group is congruent with the morphological homogeneity of the members of this family. The obtained results also allow discussing the evolution of morphological characters within the family. Furthermore, we find evidence for and describe a new cryptic species, Exaiptasia brasiliensis sp. nov., based on molecular data, geographical distribution, and the identity of its endosymbiotic dinoflagellate. PMID:26375331

  8. Members of native coral microbiota inhibit glycosidases and thwart colonization of coral mucus by an opportunistic pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Alagely, Ali; Teplitski, Max

    2013-05-01

    The outcome of the interactions between native commensal microorganisms and opportunistic pathogens is crucial to the health of the coral holobiont. During the establishment within the coral surface mucus layer, opportunistic pathogens, including a white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, compete with native bacteria for available nutrients. Both commensals and pathogens employ glycosidases and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase to utilize components of coral mucus. This study tested the hypothesis that specific glycosidases were critical for the growth of S. marcescens on mucus and that their inhibition by native coral microbiota reduces fitness of the pathogen. Consistent with this hypothesis, a S. marcescens transposon mutant with reduced glycosidase and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities was unable to compete with the wild type on the mucus of the host coral Acropora palmata, although it was at least as competitive as the wild type on a minimal medium with glycerol and casamino acids. Virulence of the mutant was modestly reduced in the Aiptasia model. A survey revealed that ∼8% of culturable coral commensal bacteria have the ability to inhibit glycosidases in the pathogen. A small molecular weight, ethanol-soluble substance(s) produced by the coral commensal Exiguobacterium sp. was capable of the inhibition of the induction of catabolic enzymes in S. marcescens. This inhibition was in part responsible for the 10-100-fold reduction in the ability of the pathogen to grow on coral mucus. These results provide insight into potential mechanisms of commensal interference with early colonization and infection behaviors in opportunistic pathogens and highlight an important function for the native microbiota in coral health. PMID:23254513

  9. A lipidomic approach to understanding free fatty acid lipogenesis derived from dissolved inorganic carbon within cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R Dunn

    Full Text Available The cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis is arguably one of the most important within the marine environment in that it is integral to the formation of coral reefs. However, the regulatory processes that perpetuate this symbiosis remain unresolved. It is essential to understand these processes, if we are to elucidate the mechanisms that support growth and resource accumulation by coral host, and conversely, recently observed reduction and/or mortality of corals in response to rapid environmental change. This study specifically focused on one area of metabolic activity within the symbiosis, that of free fatty acid synthesis within both the dinoflagellate symbionts and cnidarian host. The main model system used was Aiptasia pulchella and Symbiodinium sp. in combination with aposymbiotic A. pulchella, the symbiotic coral Acropora millepora system and dinoflagellate culture. Fatty acids (FAs were selected because of their multiple essential roles inclusive of energy storage (resource accumulation, membrane structure fluidity and cell signaling. The study addressed free FA lipogenesis by using a new method of enriched stable isotopic ((13C incorporation from dissolved inorganic carbon (DI(13C combined with HPLC-MS. FAs derived from DI(13C aligned with a mixture of known lipogenesis pathways with the addition of some unusual FAs. After 120 hr, (13C-enriched FA synthesis rates were attributed to only a complex integration of both n-3 and n-6 lipogenesis pathways within the dinoflagellate symbionts. Furthermore, there was no detectible evidence of symbiont derived enriched isotope fatty acids, catabolized (13C derivatives or DI(13C being directly utilized, in host late n-6 pathway long-chain FA lipogenesis. These findings do not align with a popular mutualistic translocation model with respect to the use of translocated symbiont photoassimilates in host long-chain FA lipogenesis, which has important connotations for linking nutrient sources with

  10. Comparing chemolithoautotrophic subseafloor communities across geochemical gradients using meta-omics and RNA-SIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, C. S.; Huber, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. Past studies have shown that the taxonomic structure of subseafloor communities differs based on the geochemical signatures of individual vents. In this study, we expanded beyond phylogeny and used a combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and the active autotrophic players and genomic pathways present in venting fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano off the coast of Oregon, USA. Low-temperature diffuse vent fluids from three hydrothermal vents, Marker 113, Marker 33, and Anemone, were filtered and preserved on the seafloor for metagenome and metatranscriptome analyses. Fluid for RNA-SIP was also collected and incubated shipboard with 13C-labeled sodium bicarbonate at 30ºC, 55ºC, and 80ºC for each vent. Taxonomically, Epsilonproteobacteria comprised a significant proportion of the community at all three vents, but each vent also had distinct groups that were abundant including SUP05 at Anemone and Methanococcus at Marker 113. Functionally, vents shared many metabolic processes including genes for denitrification, sulfur reduction and sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, which were present and expressed in similar abundance across all three vents. One metabolic difference between vents was the presence and expression of genes for methanogenesis, which were highly abundant and expressed at Marker 113, in lower abundance and expression at Marker 33, and not present at Anemone. RNA-SIP analysis is ongoing but initial results from Marker 113 revealed that at mesophilic, thermophilic, or hyperthemophilic temperatures, different genera and autotrophic metabolisms dominated

  11. Morphological changes of V-79 cells after equinatoxin II treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, U; Jezernik, K

    1992-02-01

    Morphological observations on the V-79-379 A cells after treatment with equinatoxin II (EqT II), isolated from the sea anemone Actina equina L., and fetal calf serum (FCS) treated toxin were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the cells incubated with FCS treated EqT II were almost ultrastructurally unaltered. When the cells were treated with low concentrations of EqT II alone cell ultrastructure was altered with the evidence of numerous blebs and decreased microvilli number on the cell surface and appearance of numerous vesicles in the Golgi regions. High concentrations of EqT II caused disintegration of plasmalemma and intracellular membranes as well as degradation of cytosol. PMID:1348018

  12. Autocrine-Based Selection of Drugs That Target Ion Channels from Combinatorial Venom Peptide Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkai; Du, Mingjuan; Xie, Jia; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Wei; Xin, Xiu; Possani, Lourival D; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Animal venoms represent a rich source of pharmacologically active peptides that interact with ion channels. However, a challenge to discovering drugs remains because of the slow pace at which venom peptides are discovered and refined. An efficient autocrine-based high-throughput selection system was developed to discover and refine venom peptides that target ion channels. The utility of this system was demonstrated by the discovery of novel Kv1.3 channel blockers from a natural venom peptide library that was formatted for autocrine-based selection. We also engineered a Kv1.3 blocker peptide (ShK) derived from sea anemone to generate a subtype-selective Kv1.3 blocker with a long half-life in vivo. PMID:27197631

  13. Effect of power plant heated effluent on distribution of sedentary fauna and flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedentary fauna and floral assemblages at heated (st.3) and non-heated (st.2) areas of the discharge canal of Madras atomic power station (MAPS) were observed over an annual cycle and compared with those of the intake area (st.1). Barnacles (30-57%) followed by hydroids, ascidians, gree mussels, tube worms (8-12%) brown mussels (5-10%), and sea anemones (10-14%) were conspicuous in the intake area. Macroalgae (15-59%) followed by barnacle (12-34%), tube worm (8-21%) and brown mussel (10-15%) were the components at st.2 whereas st.3 was bare except for bluegreen algal mats (100%) with few periwinkles. (author). 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from Hydra magnipapillata containing multiple copies of Hydra-L Wamide (Leu-Trp-NH2) neuropeptides: evidence for processing at Ser and Asn residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    The simple, freshwater polyp Hydra is often used as a model to study development in cnidarians. Recently, a neuropeptide, < Glu-Gln-Pro-Gly-Leu-Trp-NH2, has been isolated from sea anemones that induces metamorphosis in a hydroid planula larva to become a polyp. Here, we have cloned a preprohormone...... from Hydra magnipapillata containing 11 (eight different) immature neuropeptide sequences that are structurally related to the metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anermones. During the final phase of our cloning experiments, another research team independently isolated and sequenced five of...... processing sites. Thus, the structure of the Hydra preprohormone confirms our earlier findings that cnidarian preprohormones contain unusual or novel processing sites. Nearly all neuropeptide copies located on the Hydra preprohormone will give rise to mature neuropeptides with a C-terminal Gly-Leu-Trp-NH2...

  15. First molecular identification of the transgene red fluorescent protein (RFP in transgenic ornamental zebrafish (Danio rerio introduced in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Scotto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the transgenic fluorescent red, orange and pink zebra fish (Danio rerio, found in local aquariums in Peru, were identified using the PCR technique to amplify the transgene RFP sea anemone belonging to Discosoma spp. The gene expression of the red fluorescent protein (RFP transgene was found to determine different gradients-of-bioluminescence (shades in color in each GMO fish analyzed. We performed sequence analysis of the two variants of the RFP along with six variants of the existing fluorescent protein GFP from the Genbank, this could help identify quickly if they are new genes or variants thereof as these novel fluorescent proteins may be introduced in aquatic GMO in the future. Thus, developing and improving biosecurity measures through its timely detection at the molecular genetic level.

  16. The Alkaloid Ageladine A, Originally Isolated from Marine Sponges, Used for pH-Sensitive Imaging of Transparent Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Bickmeyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The brominated pyrrole-imidazole Ageladine A was used for live imaging of the jellyfish (jellies Nausithoe werneri, the sea anemone Metridium senile and the flatworm Macrostomum lignano. The fluorescence properties of Ageladine A allow for estimation of pH values in tissue and organs in living animals. The results showed that Nausithoe werneri had the most acidic areas in the tentacles and close to the mouth (pH 4–6.5, Metridium senile harbours aggregates of high acidity in the tentacles (pH 5 and in Macrostomum lignano, the rhabdoids, the gonads and areas close to the mouth were the most acidic with values down to pH 5.

  17. The alkaloid Ageladine A, originally isolated from marine sponges, used for pH-sensitive imaging of transparent marine animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The brominated pyrrole-imidazole Ageladine A was used for live imaging of the jellyfish (jellies) Nausithoe werneri, the sea anemone Metridium senile and the flatworm Macrostomum lignano. The fluorescence properties of Ageladine A allow for estimation of pH values in tissue and organs in living animals. The results showed that Nausithoe werneri had the most acidic areas in the tentacles and close to the mouth (pH 4-6.5), Metridium senile harbours aggregates of high acidity in the tentacles (pH 5) and in Macrostomum lignano, the rhabdoids, the gonads and areas close to the mouth were the most acidic with values down to pH 5. PMID:22363232

  18. Axis Patterning by BMPs: Cnidarian Network Reveals Evolutionary Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory Genikhovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BMP signaling plays a crucial role in the establishment of the dorso-ventral body axis in bilaterally symmetric animals. However, the topologies of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling networks vary drastically in different animal groups, raising questions about the evolutionary constraints and evolvability of BMP signaling systems. Using loss-of-function analysis and mathematical modeling, we show that two signaling centers expressing different BMPs and BMP antagonists maintain the secondary axis of the sea anemone Nematostella. We demonstrate that BMP signaling is required for asymmetric Hox gene expression and mesentery formation. Computational analysis reveals that network parameters related to BMP4 and Chordin are constrained both in Nematostella and Xenopus, while those describing the BMP signaling modulators can vary significantly. Notably, only chordin, but not bmp4 expression needs to be spatially restricted for robust signaling gradient formation. Our data provide an explanation of the evolvability of BMP signaling systems in axis formation throughout Eumetazoa.

  19. Potent Human α-Amylase Inhibition by the β-Defensin-like Protein Helianthamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) are an effective means of controlling blood sugar levels in the management of diabetes. A high-throughput screen of marine natural product extracts led to the identification of a potent (Ki = 10 pM) peptidic HPA inhibitor, helianthamide, from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Active helianthamide was produced in Escherichia coli via secretion as a barnase fusion protein. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex of helianthamide with porcine pancreatic α-amylase revealed that helianthamide adopts a β-defensin fold and binds into and across the amylase active site, utilizing a contiguous YIYH inhibitory motif. Helianthamide represents the first of a novel class of glycosidase inhibitors and provides an unusual example of functional malleability of the β-defensin fold, which is rarely seen outside of its traditional role in antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27066537

  20. A deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Vestheim, Hege

    2015-02-26

    Approximately 25 deep sea brine pools occur along the mid axis of the Red Sea. These hypersaline, anoxic, and acidic environments have previously been reported to host diverse microbial communities. We visited the Kebrit brine pool in April 2013 and found macrofauna present just above the brine–seawater interface (~1465 m). In particular, inactive sulfur chimneys had associated epifauna of sea anemones, sabellid type polychaetes, and hydroids, and infauna consisting of capitellid polychaetes, gastropods of the genus Laeviphitus (fam. Elachisinidae), and top snails of the family Cocculinidae. The deep Red Sea generally is regarded as extremely poor in benthos. We hypothesize that the periphery along the Kebrit holds increased biomass and biodiversity that are sustained by prokaryotes associated with the brine pool or co-occurring seeps.

  1. The phylogenetic significance of fruit structures in ranunculaceae of china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The external and internal structures of fruits from 95 taxa representing 27 Ranunculaceae genera of China were studied. The results show that Ranunculaceae could be divided into 4 groups based on the fruit types, epidermal surface, vascular bundle, mesocarp cell, and endocarp cell structures: Group 1: follicle or achene, branching or branching and anastomosing vascular bundles, mesocarp parenchyma, and endocarp with one layer of lignified cells (including Aconitum and other genera); Group 2: achene, vascular bundle branching, mesocarp lignified, endocarp with one layer of irregular and partly lignified cells (Thalictrum only); Group 3: achene, endocarp with multilayered thick-walled cells (including Adonis, Batrachium and Ranunculus); Group 4: achene, two non-branching vascular bundles, and endocarp with one layer of fibers (including Anemone, Clematis and Pulsatilla). This study show that the fruit structures of Ranunculaceae could provide morphological and anatomical evidences for molecular phylogeny. (author)

  2. 小菊品种‘钟山金桂’与亚菊属细裂亚菊F1回交后代的性状遗传表现%Genetic Presentation of BC1 Between ‘Zhongshanjingui' and ‘Zhongshanjingui' x Ajania przewalskii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱文莹; 刘新春; 房伟民; 管志勇; 陈素梅; 蒋甲福; 陈发棣

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Genetic presentation of BC1 between 'Zhongshanjingui' and 'Zhongshanjingui' ×Ajania przewalskii. Was studied in order to obtain new germplasm with higher ornamental and cold tolerance. [Method] Backcross hybridizations were made between Dendranthema morifolium variety 'Zhongshanjingui' (as female) and 'Zhongshanjingui' Xajania przewalskⅡ (as male). The backcross hybrids were obtained and their hybridity was confirmed by a combination of morphological, cytological analysis and resistance comparison. [Result] A total of 17 backcross hybrids were obtained. The hybrids differentiated obviously from their parents in many morphological characters and all hybrid lines bloomed normally. There happened three flower types, I.e. standard anemone type, mid-anemone type and non-anemone type, and most were anemone type. Some hybeids' inflorescence diameter was greater than 'Zhongshanjingui', the flower color was the same as 'Zhongshanjingui'. Compared with the male parent, the ornamental value was greatly improved. The chromosome number of 'Zhongshanjingui' and 'Zhongshanjingui' ×Ajania przewalskⅡ were 54 and 45, respectively. Their backcross hybrids chromosome number was between 41-54. In comparison of cold resistance, almost all the hybrids showed higher tolerance than 'Zhongshanjingui', which illustrated the backcross hybrids preserved the cold tolerance of Ajania przewalskii. [ Conclusion ] By using backcross between intergeneric hybrid F1 and its chrysanthemum parent, not only the intergeneric hybrid's ornamental vatue can be improved, but new germplasm of chrysanthemum also can be created.%[目的]对菊属栽培菊‘钟山金桂’与亚菊属细裂亚菊F1回交后代的性状遗传表现进行研究,获得观赏性和抗性改良的优异属间新种质.[方法]以‘钟山金桂’×细裂亚菊F1为父本,‘钟山金桂’为轮回亲本开展回交试验.对获得的回交后代进行细胞学鉴定,对BC1代的形态性状观测,对经过越冬

  3. Expanded functional diversity of shaker K(+ channels in cnidarians is driven by gene expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Jegla

    Full Text Available The genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis (starlet sea anemone provides a molecular genetic view into the first nervous systems, which appeared in a late common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Nematostella has a surprisingly large and diverse set of neuronal signaling genes including paralogs of most neuronal signaling molecules found in higher metazoans. Several ion channel gene families are highly expanded in the sea anemone, including three subfamilies of the Shaker K(+ channel gene family: Shaker (Kv1, Shaw (Kv3 and Shal (Kv4. In order to better understand the physiological significance of these voltage-gated K(+ channel expansions, we analyzed the function of 18 members of the 20 gene Shaker subfamily in Nematostella. Six of the Nematostella Shaker genes express functional homotetrameric K(+ channels in vitro. These include functional orthologs of bilaterian Shakers and channels with an unusually high threshold for voltage activation. We identified 11 Nematostella Shaker genes with a distinct "silent" or "regulatory" phenotype; these encode subunits that function only in heteromeric channels and serve to further diversify Nematostella Shaker channel gating properties. Subunits with the regulatory phenotype have not previously been found in the Shaker subfamily, but have evolved independently in the Shab (Kv2 family in vertebrates and the Shal family in a cnidarian. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that regulatory subunits were present in ancestral cnidarians, but have continued to diversity at a high rate after the split between anthozoans and hydrozoans. Comparison of Shaker family gene complements from diverse metazoan species reveals frequent, large scale duplication has produced highly unique sets of Shaker channels in the major metazoan lineages.

  4. Recombinant expression and solution structure of antimicrobial peptide aurelin from jellyfish Aurelia aurita

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Aurelin was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR. ► Aurelin compact structure encloses helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. ► Aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones. ► Aurelin binds to the anionic lipid vesicles, but does not interact with zwitterionic ones. ► Aurelin binds to DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two helical regions. -- Abstract: Aurelin is a 40-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide isolated from the mezoglea of a scyphoid jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Aurelin and its 15N-labeled analogue were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. Aurelin represents a compact globule, enclosing one 310-helix and two α-helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. The peptide binds to anionic lipid (POPC/DOPG, 3:1) vesicles even at physiological salt concentration, it does not interact with zwitterionic (POPC) vesicles and interacts with the DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two α-helical regions. Although aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones, its surface does not possess the “functional dyad” required for the high-affinity interaction with the K+-channels. The obtained data permit to correlate the modest antibacterial properties and membrane activity of aurelin.

  5. Raddeanin A induces human gastric cancer cells apoptosis and inhibits their invasion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Raddeanin A is a triterpenoid saponin in herb medicine Anemone raddeana Regel. •Raddeanin A can inhibit 3 kinds of gastric cancer cells’ proliferation and invasion. •Caspase-cascades’ activation indicates apoptosis induced by Raddeanin A. •MMPs, RECK, Rhoc and E-cad are involved in Raddeanin A-induced invasion inhibition. -- Abstract: Raddeanin A is one of the triterpenoid saponins in herbal medicine Anemone raddeana Regel which was reported to suppress the growth of liver and lung cancer cells. However, little was known about its effect on gastric cancer (GC) cells. This study aimed to investigate its inhibitory effect on three kinds of different differentiation stage GC cells (BGC-823, SGC-7901 and MKN-28) in vitro and the possible mechanisms. Proliferation assay and flow cytometry demonstrated Raddeanin A’s dose-dependent inhibitory effect and determined its induction of cells apoptosis, respectively. Transwell assay, wounding heal assay and cell matrix adhesion assay showed that Raddeanin A significantly inhibited the abilities of the invasion, migration and adhesion of the BGC-823 cells. Moreover, quantitative real time PCR and Western blot analysis found that Raddeanin A increased Bax expression while reduced Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Survivin expressions and significantly activated caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Besides, Raddeanin A could also up-regulate the expression of reversion inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK), E-cadherin (E-cad) and down-regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, MMP-14 and Rhoc. In conclusion, Raddeanin A inhibits proliferation of human GC cells, induces their apoptosis and inhibits the abilities of invasion, migration and adhesion, exhibiting potential to become antitumor drug

  6. Raddeanin A induces human gastric cancer cells apoptosis and inhibits their invasion in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Gang [Department of Oncology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Zou, Xi [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Zhou, Jin-Yong [Laboratory Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Sun, Wei [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Wu, Jian [Laboratory Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Xu, Jia-Li [Department of Oncology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Wang, Rui-Ping, E-mail: ruipingwang61@hotmail.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Raddeanin A is a triterpenoid saponin in herb medicine Anemone raddeana Regel. •Raddeanin A can inhibit 3 kinds of gastric cancer cells’ proliferation and invasion. •Caspase-cascades’ activation indicates apoptosis induced by Raddeanin A. •MMPs, RECK, Rhoc and E-cad are involved in Raddeanin A-induced invasion inhibition. -- Abstract: Raddeanin A is one of the triterpenoid saponins in herbal medicine Anemone raddeana Regel which was reported to suppress the growth of liver and lung cancer cells. However, little was known about its effect on gastric cancer (GC) cells. This study aimed to investigate its inhibitory effect on three kinds of different differentiation stage GC cells (BGC-823, SGC-7901 and MKN-28) in vitro and the possible mechanisms. Proliferation assay and flow cytometry demonstrated Raddeanin A’s dose-dependent inhibitory effect and determined its induction of cells apoptosis, respectively. Transwell assay, wounding heal assay and cell matrix adhesion assay showed that Raddeanin A significantly inhibited the abilities of the invasion, migration and adhesion of the BGC-823 cells. Moreover, quantitative real time PCR and Western blot analysis found that Raddeanin A increased Bax expression while reduced Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Survivin expressions and significantly activated caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Besides, Raddeanin A could also up-regulate the expression of reversion inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK), E-cadherin (E-cad) and down-regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, MMP-14 and Rhoc. In conclusion, Raddeanin A inhibits proliferation of human GC cells, induces their apoptosis and inhibits the abilities of invasion, migration and adhesion, exhibiting potential to become antitumor drug.

  7. A vertical wall dominated by Acesta excavata and Neopycnodonte zibrowii, part of an undersampled group of deep-sea habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Johnson

    Full Text Available We describe a novel biotope at 633 to 762 m depth on a vertical wall in the Whittard Canyon, an extensive canyon system reaching from the shelf to the deep sea on Ireland's continental margin. We explored this wall with an ROV and compiled a photomosaic of the habitat. The assemblage contributing to the biotope was dominated by large limid bivalves, Acesta excavata (mean shell height 10.4 cm, and deep-sea oysters, Neopycnodonte zibrowii, at high densities, particularly at overhangs. Mean density of N. zibrowii increased with depth, with densities of the most closely packed areas of A. excavata also increasing with depth. Other taxa associated with the assemblage included the solitary coral Desmophyllum dianthus, cerianthid anemones, comatulid crinoids, the trochid gastropod Margarites sp., the portunid crab Bathynectes longispina and small fish of the family Bythitidae. The scleractinian coral Madrepora oculata, the pencil urchin Cidaris cidaris and a species of Epizoanthus were also common. Prominent but less abundant species included the flytrap anemone Actinoscyphia saginata, the carrier crab Paramola cuvieri, and the fishes Lepidion eques and Conger conger. Observations of the hydrography of the canyon system identified that the upper 500 m was dominated by Eastern North Atlantic Water, with Mediterranean Outflow Water beneath it. The permanent thermocline is found between 600 and 1000 m depth, i.e., in the depth range of the vertical wall and the dense assemblage of filter feeders. Beam attenuation indicated nepheloid layers present in the canyon system with the greatest amounts of suspended material at the ROV dive site between 500 and 750 m. A cross-canyon CTD transect indicated the presence of internal waves between these depths. We hypothesise that internal waves concentrate suspended sediment at high concentrations at the foot of the vertical wall, possibly explaining the large size and high density of filter-feeding molluscs.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of a cnidarian – dinoflagellate mutualism reveals complex modulation of host gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Wendy S

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cnidarian – dinoflagellate intracellular symbioses are one of the most important mutualisms in the marine environment. They form the trophic and structural foundation of coral reef ecosystems, and have played a key role in the evolutionary radiation and biodiversity of cnidarian species. Despite the prevalence of these symbioses, we still know very little about the molecular modulators that initiate, regulate, and maintain the interaction between these two different biological entities. In this study, we conducted a comparative host anemone transcriptome analysis using a cDNA microarray platform to identify genes involved in cnidarian – algal symbiosis. Results We detected statistically significant differences in host gene expression profiles between sea anemones (Anthopleura elegantissima in a symbiotic and non-symbiotic state. The group of genes, whose expression is altered, is diverse, suggesting that the molecular regulation of the symbiosis is governed by changes in multiple cellular processes. In the context of cnidarian – dinoflagellate symbioses, we discuss pivotal host gene expression changes involved in lipid metabolism, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Conclusion Our data do not support the existence of symbiosis-specific genes involved in controlling and regulating the symbiosis. Instead, it appears that the symbiosis is maintained by altering expression of existing genes involved in vital cellular processes. Specifically, the finding of key genes involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis have led us to hypothesize that a suppression of apoptosis, together with a deregulation of the host cell cycle, create a platform that might be necessary for symbiont and/or symbiont-containing host cell survival. This first comprehensive molecular examination of the cnidarian – dinoflagellate associations provides critical insights into the maintenance and regulation of the

  9. Adaptations to endosymbiosis in a cnidarian-dinoflagellate association: differential gene expression and specific gene duplications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Ganot

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trophic endosymbiosis between anthozoans and photosynthetic dinoflagellates forms the key foundation of reef ecosystems. Dysfunction and collapse of symbiosis lead to bleaching (symbiont expulsion, which is responsible for the severe worldwide decline of coral reefs. Molecular signals are central to the stability of this partnership and are therefore closely related to coral health. To decipher inter-partner signaling, we developed genomic resources (cDNA library and microarrays from the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Here we describe differential expression between symbiotic (also called zooxanthellate anemones or aposymbiotic (also called bleached A. viridis specimens, using microarray hybridizations and qPCR experiments. We mapped, for the first time, transcript abundance separately in the epidermal cell layer and the gastrodermal cells that host photosynthetic symbionts. Transcriptomic profiles showed large inter-individual variability, indicating that aposymbiosis could be induced by different pathways. We defined a restricted subset of 39 common genes that are characteristic of the symbiotic or aposymbiotic states. We demonstrated that transcription of many genes belonging to this set is specifically enhanced in the symbiotic cells (gastroderm. A model is proposed where the aposymbiotic and therefore heterotrophic state triggers vesicular trafficking, whereas the symbiotic and therefore autotrophic state favors metabolic exchanges between host and symbiont. Several genetic pathways were investigated in more detail: i a key vitamin K-dependant process involved in the dinoflagellate-cnidarian recognition; ii two cnidarian tissue-specific carbonic anhydrases involved in the carbon transfer from the environment to the intracellular symbionts; iii host collagen synthesis, mostly supported by the symbiotic tissue. Further, we identified specific gene duplications and showed that the cnidarian-specific isoform was also up-regulated both

  10. Life history and feeding biology of the deep-sea pycnogonid Nymphon hirtipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Annie; Baillon, Sandrine; Hamel, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    Pycnogonids (sea spiders) are commonly collected at bathyal and abyssal depths all around the world; however, little is known about species from deep-water habitats. The present study explores the life history of Nymphon hirtipes collected in northeastern Newfoundland between 700 and 1450 m depth and monitored in mesocosms for over 2 years. The pycnogonids were found in association with octocorals, hydrozoans and sea anemones. Adult females developed mature oocytes between June and August. Paired mating followed by oviposition occurred between early July and mid-October. Up to three egg masses were brooded by each male. It took a maximum of 4 months for the propagules to hatch from the egg mass. Offspring developed from walking leg-bearing larvae to early juveniles over the next ~5 months before leaving the male's protection. Mating and oviposition coincided with the highest water temperatures of the annual cycle and dispersal of juveniles occurred in spring, when phytodetritus deposition was high and as ocean temperature rose markedly. All the females died after oviposition and the males ~9 months later, after juvenile dispersal. The sex ratio of mature individuals (~55-60 mm leg span) was 2 males for 3 females. Fecundity was estimated to be 184-288 eggs per adult female. Adults of N. hirtipes were seen feeding on hydrozoan polyps, small sea anemones (Stephanauge nexilis) and nudibranchs. Larvae and early juveniles did not feed while brooded by the male. Upon dispersal, their feeding apparatus became functional and they began feeding on hydrozoan polyps. After 13 months of growth post hatching, the juveniles reached ~21 mm leg span. Curve fitting estimated that ~7 years are required to reach the adult size of 55 mm leg span.

  11. Plants as warning signal for exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stamen-hair system of Tradescantia for flower colour has proven to be one of the most suitable materials to study the frequency of mutations induced by low doses of various ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens. The system has also been used successfully for detecting mutagenic synergisms among chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations as well as for studying the variations of spontaneous mutation frequency. In this study of radiobiology, the main objective is to observe somatic mutation (occurrence of pink cells from blue cells) induced on stamen hairs of five Tradescantia sp. available in Malaysia after exposure to low doses of chronic gamma irradiation using Gamma Green House. Pink cells appeared only on Tradescantia Pallida Purpurea stamen hairs after 13 days of exposure to irradiation with different doses of gamma rays. The highest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded from flowers irradiated with the highest dose of 6.37 Gy with 0.07 Gy/ h of dose rate. The lowest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded with an average of 0.57, irradiated with the lowest dose of 0.91 Gy with 0.01 Gy/ h of dose rate. There were no pink cells observed on Tradescantia Spathaceae Discolor after exposure to different doses of gamma rays. Similar negative results were observed for the control experiments. The principal cells in this assay are the mitotic stamen hair cells developing in the young flower buds. After exposure to radiation, the heterozygous dominant blue character of the stamen hair cell is prevented, resulting in the appearance of the recessive pink color. Furthermore, no pink cell appears on all species of Tradescantia spathaceae after irradiated with different doses of gamma rays. The sensitivity of the Tradescantia has been used widely and has demonstrated the relation between radiation dose and frequency of mutation observed at low doses which can contribute to the effects of low doses and their consequences for human health. This system

  12. Myxomycetes em Palmeiras (Arecaceae Myxomycetes on palm trees (Arecaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Alves

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available As palmeiras oferecem um ecossistema especializado que abriga organismos variados, incluindo Myxomycetes. Este trabalho relata doze espécies de Myxomycetes encontradas em folhas mortas, espata e estipe de Acrocomia intumescens Drude (macaúba, Copernicea prunifera (Mill. H. E. Moore (carnaúba, Mauritia flexuosa Mart, (buriti e Orbygnia phalerata Mart, (babaçu. Constitui-se área de coleta o Município do Crato, Ceará, Nordeste do Brasil (7º 30'00" S, 39º 00' 00" W, 400-1200 m de altitude. Coletas aleatórias foram efetuadas e as frutificações foram pesquisadas em órgãos vivos ou mortos das palmeiras. Exsicatas foram depositadas no Herbário UFP (Departamento de Botânica da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife - PE, Brasil. As espécies registradas pertencem aos gêneros Ceratiomyxa (1, Dictydium (1, Arcyria (1, Hemitrichia (1, Badhamia (1, Fuligo (1, Physarum (3, Stemonitis (2 e Comatricha (1. Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa (Miill. Macbr., Physarum stellatum (Mass. Mart., Stemonitis pallida Win. e Comatricha typhoides (Bull. Rost. são referidas pela primeira vez para este tipo de substrato. Este trabalho eleva para 35 o número de espécies de Myxomycetes assinaladas sobre palmeiras até o momento.Palm trees are specialized ecossystems which hosts a wide variety of organisms, including Myxomycetes. This paper reports twelve species of Myxomycetes found on dead leaves, spathes and stipitis of Acrocomia intumescens Drude, Copernicea prunifera (Mill. H. E. Moore, Mauritia flexuosa Mart., and Orbygnia phalerata Mart. The collecting area is located in the Municipality Crato of Ceará State, Northeastern Brazil (7º 30'00" S, 39º 00' 00" W, 400-1200 m altitude. Samples were taken at random and Myxomycetes fructifications were searched on dead and living organs of palm trees. Exsiccatae have been deposited in the Herbarium UFP (Department of Botany, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife-PE, Brazil. The species registered belong to the

  13. Coral population dynamics across consecutive mass mortality events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegl, Bernhard; Purkis, Sam

    2015-11-01

    Annual coral mortality events due to increased atmospheric heat may occur regularly from the middle of the century and are considered apocalyptic for coral reefs. In the Arabian/Persian Gulf, this situation has already occurred and population dynamics of four widespread corals (Acropora downingi, Porites harrisoni, Dipsastrea pallida, Cyphastrea micropthalma) were examined across the first-ever occurrence of four back-to-back mass mortality events (2009-2012). Mortality was driven by diseases in 2009, bleaching and subsequent diseases in 2010/2011/2012. 2009 reduced P. harrisoni cover and size, the other events increasingly reduced overall cover (2009: -10%; 2010: -20%; 2011: -20%; 2012: -15%) and affected all examined species. Regeneration was only observed after the first disturbance. P. harrisoni and A. downingi severely declined from 2010 due to bleaching and subsequent white syndromes, while D. pallida and P. daedalea declined from 2011 due to bleaching and black-band disease. C. microphthalma cover was not affected. In all species, most large corals were lost while fission due to partial tissue mortality bolstered small size classes. This general shrinkage led to a decrease of coral cover and a dramatic reduction of fecundity. Transition matrices for disturbed and undisturbed conditions were evaluated as Life Table Response Experiment and showed that C. microphthalma changed the least in size-class dynamics and fecundity, suggesting they were 'winners'. In an ordered 'degradation cascade', impacts decreased from the most common to the least common species, leading to step-wise removal of previously dominant species. A potentially permanent shift from high- to low-coral cover with different coral community and size structure can be expected due to the demographic dynamics resultant from the disturbances. Similarities to degradation of other Caribbean and Pacific reefs are discussed. As comparable environmental conditions and mortality patterns must be

  14. Tenacibaculum holothuriorum sp. nov., isolated from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Li, Xiaoyi; Hu, Dong; Lai, Qiliang; Shao, Zongze

    2015-12-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated S2-2T, was isolated from the intestine of a sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus in Xiapu, Fujian province, China. Strain S2-2T was found to be aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, pale yellow, rod-shaped, oxidase- and catalase-positive. Growth occurred at 15-36 °C (optimum, 25-32 °C), in the presence of 2-7% sea salt (w/v, optimum, 3-5%) and at pH 6-9 (optimum, pH 7.0). The isolate was able to hydrolyse gelatin, casein and DNA, but unable to degrade Tween 20, 40 and 80, starch and cellulose. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain S2-2T represented a member of the genus Tenacibaculum, with highest sequence similarity to Tenacibaculum aiptasiae a4T (96.9% similarity), followed by Tenacibaculum xiamenense WJ-1T (96.5% similarity) and showed lower similarities (93.3-95.9%) with other members of the genus Tenacibaculum. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c, 33.8%), iso-C15 : 0 (13.7%), iso-C15 : 1G (8.6%), iso-C15 : 0 3-OH (5.3%) and C15 : 0 3-OH (5.1%). The DNA G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was determined to be 31.8 mol%. The respiratory quinone was determined to be MK-6. Phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown aminophospholipid, one unknown phospholipid, one unknown glycolipid and five unknown lipids were detected as major polar lipids. Hence, the combined genotypic and phenotypic data indicated that strain S2-2T represents a novel species of the genus Tenacibaculum, for which the name Tenacibaculum holothuriorum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S2-2T ( = MCCC 1A09872T = LMG 27758T). PMID:26345588

  15. Reproducción y alimentación de Phytotoma raimondii, cortarrama peruana en El Gramadal, Ancash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rosina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Se confirma la existencia de un buen hábitat con buena disponibilidad de alimento y de sitios para reproducción de la cortarrama peruana en El Gramadal (Huarmey. Las dos especies más importantes para su alimentación “algarrobo” (Prosopis pallida y “palo negro” (Grabowskia boerhaviifolia, se encuentran en suficiente cantidad en el lugar. Esta última planta también es crucial para la reproducción, ya que todos los nidos hallados fueron construidos en esta especie. Hasta el momento se han encontrado nueve nidos entre los años 2010 y 2012 entre diciembre y abril: siete nidos activos, 2 el 2010 (abril, 4 el 2011, (marzo y diciembre y uno el 2012 (enero. También se encontraron dos nidos vacíos el 2011 (marzo y junio, además de volantones e individuos juveniles desde diciembre a junio.

  16. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated NO production by crotafuran B in RAW 264.7 macrophages involves the blockade of NF-κB activation through the increase in IκBα synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crotafuran B, a natural pterocarpanoid isolated from Crotalaria pallida, inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production (IC5 16.4 ± 0.7 μM) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and mRNA expression (IC5 11.5 ± 0.6 μM and 11.8 ± 2.2 μM, respectively), but not via its cytotoxicity or the inhibition of iNOS enzyme activity, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Crotafuran B also reduced the iNOS promoter activity (IC5 13.4 ± 0.1 μM) in piNOS-LUC-transfected cells. Crotafuran B treatment inhibited the p65 nuclear translocation and the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity in LPS-activated macrophages. Crotafuran B also reduced the NF-κB transcriptional activity in pNF-κB-LUC-transfected cells. Crotafuran B had no effect on the LPS-induced phosphorylation of inhibitory κBα (IκBα), but enhanced the cellular level of IκBα that rebounded to the basal levels and increased the IκBα mRNA expression. These results indicate that the crotafuran B inhibition of NO production involves a decrease in the iNOS gene expression via the inhibition of NF-κB activation through the increase in IκBα synthesis

  17. Environmental monitoring to the sources of atmospheric emission by the Trad-MCN bioassay and analysis of the accumulative potential for uranium and fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomonitoring of the atmospheric contamination constitutes important procedure for adoption of environmental control measures. Biological assays have been employed to evaluate genotoxic agents in the atmosphere. The Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay has been extensively used in environmental monitoring owing to its efficiency in the detection of chromosomic damages in cytological preparations of easy execution. In this study we tested the viability of use of Trad-MCN with Tradescantia pallida cv. Purpurea for environmental monitoring in the Experimental Center Aramar (CEA), in Ipero - SP and its leaf accumulation capacity. The plants were exposed in situ, in flower-beds or flowerpots, established close to the sources of atmospheric emission. The bioassay was accomplished according to the usual protocol. The micronucleus frequencies were compared using the variance Kruskal-Wallis test. The obtained results indicated that the biomonitoring model adopted was not the ideal for the CEA, considering that the plant suffered the influence of climatic condition. However the plant showed to have accumulative potential for uranium. (author)

  18. Microhabitat Use by Trichoptera in a Lake Erie Coastal Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, C. M.; Keiper, J.

    2005-05-01

    We examined the differences in microhabitat use by caddisfly (Trichoptera) adults at a Lake Erie coastal wetlands complex in northwestern Ohio. Light traps were employed in three vegetative zones; a Pontedaria stand, a submerged willow/cottonwood forest, and an adjacent open water area. We used concealed UV lights inside of replicate traps (n = 4 per habitat), attracting only caddisflies near the habitat, that were run May, June, and September 2004. Analysis of the data revealed differences in adult abundance between habitats and months for some taxa. Principal components analyses run at the level of genera and species showed that sites cluster by habitat type and by month, suggesting differences occur temporally and spatially but not exclusively of each other. ANOVA reveals statistical differences between habitats and months for the most common taxa. Hydroptilidae, including Agraylea multipunctata, Orthotrichia aegerfasciella, and Oxyethira pallida, were the most abundant taxa contributing approximately 90% of samples depending on vegetative zone. Information on the microscale preferences of adult caddisflies indicates potential habitat specificity. This may aid managers who decide which habitats within wetlands to conserve based on productivity and unique potential contribution of insect taxa.

  19. Coral reef recovery status in south Andaman Islands after the bleaching event 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, N.; Jerald Wilson, J.; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are one of the Union Territories of India, located in the eastern part of the Bay of Bengal. In 2010 summer, the increment in sea surface water temperature (up to 34°C) resulted in the bleaching of about 74% to 77% of corals in the South Andaman. During this event, coral species such as Acropora cerealis, A. humilis, Montipora sp., Favia pallida, Diploastrea sp., Goniopora sp. Fungia concinna, Gardineroseries sp., Porites sp., Favites abdita and Lobophyllia robusta were severely affected. This study is to assess the recovery status of the reef ecosystem by estimating the percentage of Live Coral cover, Bleached coral cover, Dead coral with algae, Rubble, Sandy flat, Algal assemblage and other associated organisms. The sedimentation rate (mg cm-2 d-1) and coral coverage (%) were assessed during this study period. The average sedimentation rate was ranged between 0.27 and 0.89 mg cm-2 d-1. The observed post bleaching recovery of coral cover was 21.1% at Port Blair Bay and 13.29% at Havelock Island. The mortality rate of coral cover due to this bleaching was estimated as 2.05% at Port Blair Bay and 9.82% at Havelock Island. Once the sea water temperature resumed back to the normal condition, most of the corals were found recovered.

  20. Environmental monitoring to the sources of atmospheric emission by the Trad-MCN bioassay and analysis of the accumulative potential for uranium and fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra C.F.E., E-mail: alessandra@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Monitoracao Ambiental; Ramos, Monique M.B., E-mail: monique@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Analise de Seguranca; Alves, Edenise S., E-mail: ealves@ibot.sp.gov.b [Instituto de Botanica de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Anatomia

    2009-07-01

    The biomonitoring of the atmospheric contamination constitutes important procedure for adoption of environmental control measures. Biological assays have been employed to evaluate genotoxic agents in the atmosphere. The Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay has been extensively used in environmental monitoring owing to its efficiency in the detection of chromosomic damages in cytological preparations of easy execution. In this study we tested the viability of use of Trad-MCN with Tradescantia pallida cv. Purpurea for environmental monitoring in the Experimental Center Aramar (CEA), in Ipero - SP and its leaf accumulation capacity. The plants were exposed in situ, in flower-beds or flowerpots, established close to the sources of atmospheric emission. The bioassay was accomplished according to the usual protocol. The micronucleus frequencies were compared using the variance Kruskal-Wallis test. The obtained results indicated that the biomonitoring model adopted was not the ideal for the CEA, considering that the plant suffered the influence of climatic condition. However the plant showed to have accumulative potential for uranium. (author)

  1. Coral Reef Recovery Status in South Andaman Islands after the Bleaching Event 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Marimuthu; J. Jerald Wilson; N.V. Vinithkumar; R. Kirubagaran

    2013-01-01

    The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are one of the Union Territories of India,located in the eastern part of the Bay of Bengal.In 2010 summer,the increment in sea surface water temperature (up to 34℃) resulted in the bleaching of about 74% to 77% of corals in the South Andaman.During this event,coral species such as Acropora cerealis,A.humilis,Montipora sp.,Favia pallida,Diploastrea sp.,Goniopora sp.Fungia concinna,Gardineroseries sp.,Porites sp.,Favites abdita and Lobophyllia robusta were severely affected.This study is to assess the recovery status of the reef ecosystem by estimating the percentage of Live Coral cover,Bleached coral cover,Dead coral with algae,Rubble,Sandy fiat,Algal assemblage and other associated organisms.The sedimentation rate (mg cm-2 d-1) and coral coverage (%) were assessed during this study period.The average sedimentation rate was ranged between 0.27 and 0.89mg cm-2 d-1.The observed post bleaching recovery of coral cover was 21.1% at Port Blair Bay and 13.29% at Havelock Island.The mortality rate of coral cover due to this bleaching was estimated as 2.05% at Port Blair Bay and 9.82% at Havelock Island.Once the sea water temperature resumed back to the normal condition,most of the corals were found recovered.

  2. Evaluation of antihyperglycemia and antihypertension potential of native Peruvian fruits using in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marcia Da Silva; Ranilla, Lena Galvez; Apostolidis, Emmanouil; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Genovese, Maria Inés; Shetty, Kalidas

    2009-04-01

    Local food diversity and traditional crops are essential for cost-effective management of the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and associated complications of hypertension. Water and 12% ethanol extracts of native Peruvian fruits such as Lucuma (Pouteria lucuma), Pacae (Inga feuille), Papayita arequipeña (Carica pubescens), Capuli (Prunus capuli), Aguaymanto (Physalis peruviana), and Algarrobo (Prosopis pallida) were evaluated for total phenolics, antioxidant activity based on 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay, and functionality such as in vitro inhibition of alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) relevant for potential management of hyperglycemia and hypertension linked to type 2 diabetes. The total phenolic content ranged from 3.2 (Aguaymanto) to 11.4 (Lucuma fruit) mg/g of sample dry weight. A significant positive correlation was found between total phenolic content and antioxidant activity for the ethanolic extracts. No phenolic compound was detected in Lucuma (fruit and powder) and Pacae. Aqueous extracts from Lucuma and Algarrobo had the highest alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Papayita arequipeña and Algarrobo had significant ACE inhibitory activities reflecting antihypertensive potential. These in vitro results point to the excellent potential of Peruvian fruits for food-based strategies for complementing effective antidiabetes and antihypertension solutions based on further animal and clinical studies. PMID:19459727

  3. Sobre os tipos de Hesperiidae descritos por Roeber (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf H. H. Mielke

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available Comments on the systematic position and synonymy of the Hesperiidae described by J. Roeber are presented. The Syn. n. are the following: Jemadia gigantea Roeber, 1925 of Nosphistia zonara (Hewitson, 1866, Pyrrhopyga josepha Ploetz, 1879 of Hegesippe luteizona (Mabille, 1877, Phocides palaemonides Roeber, 1925 of Phocides palemon palemon (Cramer, 1777, Phocides xenocrates Bell, 1935 of Phocides vulcanides Roeber, 1925, Phocides parvus Roeber, 1925 of Phocides pialia pialia (Hewitson, 1857, Thymele aulicusi Roeber, 1925 of Astraptes enotrus (Cramer, 1781, Pythonides zonula Mabille, 1889 of Paches loxus loxus (Westwood, 1852, Thespieus chlorocephala Roeber, 1925 of Thespieus lutetia (Hewitson, 1866, Xeniades cecropteroides Roeber, 1925 of Niconiades caeso (Mabille, 1891 and Thracides nanea chiricana Roeber, 1925 of Thracides nanea nanea (Hewtson, 1867. Metron leucogaster leucomelas (Roeber, 1925 is a Comb. n. and a Stat. n. for Zenis leucomelas. Lectotypes are designated for the following species or subspecies: Mimoniades hemitaenia Roeber, 1925, Mimoniades inaequalis Roeber, 1925, Amenis similis Roeber, 1925, Mysoria erythrostigma Roeber, Myscelus nobilis meridionalis Roeber, 1925, Phocides iocularis Roeber, 1925, Phocides parvus Roeber, 1925, Polygonus amyntas pallida Roeber, 1925, Thymele albifasciatus Roeber, 1925, Thymele subfasciatus Roeber, 1925, Thymele aulicus Roeber, 1925, Phyrrhocalles kruegeri Roeber, 1925, Vettius phyllides Roeber, 1925 and Xeniades cecropteroides Roeber, 1925.

  4. Cerambycidae (Coleoptera do Museu de Zoologia da Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies em Cerambycinae são descritas do Brasil, Piauí: Compsibidion paragraphycum sp. nov. (Neoibidionini. Em Lamiinae, - do Piauí: Trichohippopsis vestita sp. nov. (Agapanthiini; Oncioderes piauiensis sp. nov. (Onciderini; Cotycicuiara caracolensis sp. nov. (Desmiphorini; Xenofrea peculiaris sp. nov. (Xenofreini; Mariliana bellula sp. nov. (Hemilophini; - da Paraíba: Ataxia arenaria sp. nov. (Pteropliini; Dadoychus atrus sp. nov. (Hemilophini. Novos registros em Cerambycinae para o Piauí: Methia longipennis Martins, 1997 (Methiini; Tropidion sipolisi (Gounelle, 1909, Compsibidion decoratum (Gounelle, 1909, Cycnidolon obliquum Martins, 1969 (Neoibidionini; - para o Ceará: Paranyssicus conspicillatus (Erichson, 1847 (Elaphidiini; Aglaoschema collorata (Napp, 1993 (Compsocerini; - para a Bahia: Stizocera phtisica Gounelle, 1909 (Elaphidiini. Novos registros em Lamiinae para o Piauí: Dolichosybra tubericollis Breuning, 1942 (Apomecynini; Ceiupaba lineata Martins & Galileo, 1998, Cicuiara striata (Bates, 1866, Desmiphora pallida Bates, 1874 (Desmiphorini; Nesozineus apharus Galileo & Martins, 1996, Psapharochrus nigrovittatus (Zajciw, 1969 (Acanthoderini; - para o Ceará: Trichohippopsis rufula Breuning, 1958 (Agapanthiini; Ataxia parva Galileo & Martins, 2011 (Pteropliini; Desmiphora cirrosa Erichson, 1847 (Desmiphorini; - para a Paraíba: Eudesmus rubefactus Bates, 1865 (Onciderini; Laraesima ochreoapicalis Breuning, 1973 (Compsosomatini; Psapharochrus itatiayensis (Melzer, 1935 (Acanthoderini; - para a Bahia: Brasiliosoma tibialis (Breuning, 1948 (Compsosomatini; Adesmus hemispilus (Germar, 1821 (Hemilophini.

  5. Effect of increasing levels of seven tree species extracts added to a high concentrate diet on in vitro rumen gas output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Kholif, Ahmed E; Elghandour, Mona M Y; Hernandez, Saul R; Domínguez-Vara, Ignacio A; Mellado, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of increasing levels of extracts of Byrsonima crassifolia, Celtis pallida, Enterolobium cyclocarpum, Fraxinus excelsior, Ficus trigonata, Phoradendrom brevifolium and Prunus domestica on in vitro gas production (GP) and ruminal fermentation of a high concentrate diet. Plant extracts were prepared at 1 g dry matter (DM)/8 mL of solvent mixture (methanol : ethanol : water, 1:1:8) and added at levels of 0, 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8 mL/g DM of a high concentrate diet. In vitro GP was recorded at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation. Increasing addition of extracts linearly increased (P  0.05) occurred between the extracts and doses, it could be conclude that all extracts positively modified rumen fermentation at doses of 1.2 to 1.8 mL extract/g diet DM. PMID:24796241

  6. Variation in the size structure of corals is related to environmental extremes in the Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Andrew G; Pratchett, Morgan S; Baird, Andrew H; Riegl, Bernhard; Heron, Scott F; Feary, David A

    2013-03-01

    The size structure of coral populations is the culmination of key demographic events, including recruitment, mortality and growth, thereby providing important insights to recent ecological dynamics. Importantly, the size structure of corals reflects both intrinsic (inherent life-history characteristics) and extrinsic (enhanced mortality due to chronic or acute disturbances) forcing on local populations, enabling post-hoc assessment of spatial and taxonomic differences in susceptibility to disturbance. This study examined the size structure of four locally abundant corals (Acropora downingi, Favia pallida, Platygyra daedalea, and massive Porites spp.) in two regions of the Persian Gulf: the southern Gulf (Dubai and Abu Dhabi) and eastern Gulf (western Musandam). Significant and consistent differences were apparent in mean colony sizes and size-distributions between regions. All corals in the southern Gulf were significantly smaller, and their size structure positively skewed and relatively more leptokurtic (i.e., peaky) compared to corals in the eastern Gulf. Sea surface temperatures, salinity, and the recent frequency of mass bleaching are all higher, in the southern Gulf, suggesting higher mortality rates and/or slower growth in these populations. Differences in size structure between locations were more pronounced than differences between species at each location, suggesting that extreme differences in environmental conditions and disturbance events have a greater influence on population dynamics in the Gulf than inherent differences in their life-history characteristics. PMID:23245870

  7. Non-experimental validation of ethnoveterinary plants and indigenous knowledge used for backyard pigs and chickens in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, C; Georges, K; Brown, G

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study on ethnoveterinary medicines used for backyard pigs and backyard chickens in Trinidad and Tobago. Research data was collected from 1995 to September 2000. Six plants are used for backyard pigs. Crushed leaves of immortelle (Erythrina pallida, E. micropteryx) are used to remove dead piglets from the uterus. Leaf decoctions of bois canôt (Cecropia peltata) and bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) are used for labour pains or leaves are fed as a postpartum cleanser. Boiled green papaya fruit (Carica papaya) is fed to pigs to induce milk let-down. The leaves and flowers of male papaya plants (Carica papaya) are fed to deworm pigs. Sour orange juice (Citrus aurantium) is given to pigs to produce lean meat, and coffee grounds are used for scours. Eyebright and plantain leaves (Plantago major) are used for eye injuries of backyard chickens. Worm grass (Chenopodium ambrosioides) and cotton bush (Gossypium species) are used as anthelmintics. Aloe gel (Aloe vera) is used for internal injuries and the yellow sap from the cut Aloe vera leaf or the juice of Citrus limonia is used to purge the birds. A literature review revealed few toxicity concerns and the potential usefulness of the plants. PMID:17944308

  8. Genotoxic potential generated by biomass burning in the Brazilian Legal Amazon by Tradescantia micronucleus bioassay: a toxicity assessment study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artaxo Paulo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Brazilian Amazon has suffered impacts from non-sustainable economic development, especially owing to the expansion of agricultural commodities into forest areas. The Tangará da Serra region, located in the southern of the Legal Amazon, is characterized by non-mechanized sugar cane production. In addition, it lies on the dispersion path of the pollution plume generated by biomass burning. The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic potential of the atmosphere in the Tangará da Serra region, using Tradescantia pallida as in situ bioindicator. Methods The study was conducted during the dry and rainy seasons, where the plants were exposed to two types of exposure, active and passive. Results The results showed that in all the sampling seasons, irrespective of exposure type, there was an increase in micronucleus frequency, compared to control and that it was statistically significant in the dry season. A strong and significant relationship was also observed between the increase in micronucleus incidence and the rise in fine particulate matter, and hospital morbidity from respiratory diseases in children. Conclusions Based on the results, we demonstrated that pollutants generated by biomass burning in the Brazilian Amazon can induce genetic damage in test plants that was more prominent during dry season, and correlated with the level of particulates and elevated respiratory morbidity.

  9. Annotated type catalogue of the Orthalicoidea (Mollusca, Gastropoda in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Breure

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The type status is described of 96 taxa classified within the superfamily Orthalicoidea and present in the Mollusca collection of the Museum für Naturkunde der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Lectotypes are designated for the following taxa: Orthalicus elegans Rolle, 1895; Bulimus maranhonensis Albers, 1854; Orthalicus nobilis Rolle, 1895; Orthalichus tricinctus Martens, 1893. Orthalicus sphinx tresmariae is introduced as new name for Zebra sphinx turrita Strebel, 1909, not Z. quagga turrita Strebel, 1909. The following synonyms are established: Zebra crosseifischeri Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus princeps fischeri Martens, 1893; Orthalicus isabellinus Martens, 1873 = O. bensoni (Reeve, 1849; Zebra zoniferus naesiotes Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus undatus (Bruguière, 1789; Porphyrobaphe (Myiorthalicus dennisoni pallida Strebel, 1909 = Hemibulimus dennisoni (Reeve, 1848; Zebra delphinus pumilio Strebel, 1909 = Orthalicus delphinus (Strebel, 1909; Orthalicus (Laeorthalicus reginaeformis Strebel, 1909 = Corona perversa (Swainson, 1821; Bulimus (Eurytus corticosus Sowerby III, 1895 = Plekocheilus (Eurytus stuebeli Martens, 1885. The taxon Bulimus (Eudioptus psidii Martens, 1877 is now placed within the family Sagdidae, tentatively in the genus Platysuccinea. Appendices are included with an index to all the types of Orthalicoidea extant (including those listed by Köhler 2007 and a partial list of letters present in the correspondence archives.

  10. Composition and mutagenicity of PAHs associated with urban airborne particles in Córdoba, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet assay and micronucleous test were used to assess the genotoxicity of organic compounds associated with particulate material collected in the city of Córdoba, Argentina. Samples were collected on fiber glass filters and their organic extracts were analyzed by GC-MS. These extracts were used for the comet assay on human lymphocytes and for the MCN test with Tradescantia pallida. The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as some of their nitro derivates were higher during winter. Their composition suggested that their main emission sources were gasoline and diesel vehicles. We observed genotoxic effects of these organic extracts due to the presence of both direct and indirect acting mutagens. We found a good agreement between the two test systems employed, which encourages the further use of plant bioassays for air pollution monitoring, especially in developing countries, due to their flexibility, low cost and efficiency. -- Highlights: •PAHs and nitro-PAHs were higher during winter and fall seasons. •Concentrations of PAHs were below the daily potential dose of carcinogenic PAH. •The comet assay revealed that indirect mutagens were more abundant than direct ones. •The MCN test and the comet assay demonstrated the presence of human carcinogens. -- Capsule: Indirect mutagens were more abundant during winter and fall, in agreement with the higher concentrations of PAHs and nitro-PAHs being associated with atmospheric particles

  11. Impacts of the 1998 and 2010 mass coral bleaching events on the Western Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthacheep, Makamas; Yucharoen, Mathinee; Klinthong, Wanlaya; Pengsakun, Sittiporn; Sangmanee, Kanwara; Yeemin, Thamasak

    2013-11-01

    A long-term study of coral reef ecology in the Gulf of Thailand provides a good opportunity to examine the temporal variation on the impact of mass coral bleaching at those reef sites. We compared the bleaching and mortality of corals between the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 at a coral community in the Western Gulf of Thailand. The aim was to identify the coral species which were most likely to suffer from (and to be able to tolerate) changes in seawater temperature. Significant differences in the susceptibility of the coral taxa to bleaching events between the years 1998 and 2010 and among coral species were documented. Bleaching was significantly different between the most dominant corals. Diploastrea heliopora was the most resistant coral to bleaching in both years. Some coral species showed more resistance to bleaching in 2010. The coral mortality following the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 varied significantly between the years and the coral taxa. Mortality of some dominant coral taxa was also lower in 2010. Seven coral species, i.e. Astreopora myriophthalma, Pachyseris rugosa, Turbinaria mesenterina, Goniastrea pectinata, Favia pallida, F. maritima, Favites halicora, Platygyra daedalea and Galaxea fascicularis, were tolerant to the coral bleaching events. An ecosystem-based approach to managing coral reefs in the Gulf of Thailand is needed to identify appropriate marine protected area networks and to strengthen marine and coastal resource policies in order to build coral reef resilience.

  12. Modiolarca lateralis (Pteryomorphia: Mytilidae: bivalve associated to six species of ascidians from Bocas del Toro, Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I Cañete

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe the presence of the bivalve Modiolarca lateralis (Say, 1822 in six tropical ascidians Ascidia curvata, A. sydneiensis, A. panamensis, A. interrupta, Herdmania pallida and Polycarpa spongiabilis collected at depths of 1-3 m on coral reefs, mangrove roots and dock supports in Almirante Bay, Bocas del Toro, Panama (9°18'N, 82°13'W during June-July 2011. Bivalve prevalence varied between 9-30% across species, but was mainly associated with A. panamensis, P. spongiabilis and A. interrupta. Prevalence seems to be influenced by tunic thickness rather than by the ascidian size. Bivalves varied in size (0.6-11 mm shell length, with the smallest individual found in A. sydneiensis. There were only one or two bivalves per ascidians, although a maximum of 18 was found in one A. panamensis. M. lateralis seems to behave similarly to its temperate counterparts: it has a variety of hosts, occurs mainly in the anterior region of the ascidians, and has a variable abundance per host.

  13. Asociaciones de marcadores moleculares con la resistencia a enfermedades, caracteres morfológicos y agronómicos en familias diploides de papa (Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Gabriel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fefteen families of potato (840 genotypes originated from inter-specific crosses among Solanum stenotomum, S. goniocalyx and S. phureja were genotyped in order to associate six molecular markers (GP94, HC, Nl25, Gro 1-4, RYSC3 y CP60. These molecular markers are linked to major genes for resistance to late blight (Phytophthora infestans, wart (Synchytrium endobioticum, root cyst nematode (Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis and viruses PVY and PVX. Results showed that five of six molecular markers were polymorphic and primers amplified in more than 80 % of the families. Molecular marker RYSC3 that is linked to Ryadg gene did not amplify in any family. All individuals in Family 8 scored positive for three markers (CP60, GP94, and NL25. χ2 test was used to determine the significance of the segregation ratios of each marker in every single family; so to the possible genotype of its parents was inferred. Nine morphological and agronomical characters were assessed during the harvest. Cluster analysis classified and selected 107 genotypes by putative resistance to PVX, P. infestans, G. rostochiensis and S. endobioticum, high yield, tuber volume and tuber number and shallow eyes. According to our results, practical aspects of efficient use of marker assisted selection in potato are discussed in this paper.

  14. Construction and analysis of the cDNA subtraction library of yeast and mycelial phases of Sporothrix globosa isolated in China: identification of differentially expressed genes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-bi; He, Yu; Zhou, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Species included in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are temperature-dependent with dimorphic growth and cause sporotrichosis that is characterized by chronic and fatal lymphocutaneous lesions. The putative species included in the Sporothrix complex are S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, S. schenckii, and S. lurei. S. globosa is the causal agent of sporotrichosis in China, and its pathogenicity appears to be closely related to the dimorphic transition, i.e. from the mycelial to the yeast phase, it adapts to changing environmental conditions. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the switching process that mediates the dimorphic transition of S. globosa, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to prepare a complementary DNA (cDNA) subtraction library from the yeast and mycelial phases. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to profile the relationship between differently expressed genes and the dimorphic transition. Two genes that were expressed at higher levels by the yeast form were selected, and their differential expression levels were verified using a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It is believed that these differently expressed genes are involved in the pathogenesis of S. globosa infection in China. PMID:26642182

  15. Seasonal variation of macro and trace mineral contents in 14 browse species that grow in northeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R G.; Haenlein, G F.W.; Núñez-González, M A.

    2001-02-01

    Leaves and twigs from shrub species consumed by range goats: Acacia berlandieri, Acacia farnesiana, Acacia greggii, Acacia rigidula, Celtis pallida, Cercidium macrum, Condalia obovata, Cordia boissieri, Desmanthus virgathus, Leucaena leucocephala, Leucophyllum texanum, Opuntia lindehimieri, Porlieria angustifolia, Prosopis glandulosa, and Ziziphus obtusifolia were evaluated for comparative seasonal contents of Ca, P, Mg K, Zn, Mn, Cu and Fe. Plants were collected in summer (September 12, 1992), fall (November 20, 1992), winter (February 20, 1993) and spring (May 22, 1993) in Marín, County, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. During spring and summer mineral concentrations were higher in general. Only Ca, Mg, K, and Fe were in substantial amounts in all seasons to meet adult goat requirements. With the exception of spring, shrubs had extremely low P concentrations. Manganese, Cu and Zn in most plants had low marginal levels to meet adult goat requirements. Moreover, potential intake of P, Mn, Cu and Zn in shrub species by goats weighing 50kg BW consuming 2.0kg per day DM was low. However, plants such as D. virgathus, L. texanum, P. glandulosa, L. leucocephala and C. macrum can be considered prominent components in diets of range goats because of their high mineral concentrations. It appears that ration formulations for range goats in northeastern Mexico should include P, Mn, Cu and Zn in all seasons of the year. PMID:11182308

  16. Isolation, biosynthesis and biological activity of alkaloids of Tylophora asthmatica, a versatile medicinal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylophorine and related new alkaloids have been isolated from Tylophora asthmatics, Pergularia pallida and Ficus hispida plants. Biosynthesis of this group of alkaloids has been carried out using various labelled precursors for the first time and from the systematic degradation of the isolated radiolabelled tylophorine, it has been concluded that these alkaloids arise from one molecule each of tyrosine, phenylalanine and ornithine. The interactions of Tylophora alkaloids particularly tylophorinidine with biomolecules such as lysozyme and bovine serum albumin have also been studied and binding characteristics determined. It was found that Tylophora alkaloid extract possesses antianaphylactic activity as observed in passive peritoneal anaphylaxis in rats. The drug also possessed mild antihistaminic and anticholinergic activities. Studies of the extract on the bronchial smooth muscle both in vivo and in vitro did not reveal bronchiodilator potential of the drug. In addition, the distribution and metabolism of the drug was studied in vivo using 14C radiolabelled alkaloids prepared by biosynthetic method. This study further revealed its usefulness since the drug is absorbed by vital organs and also it is not metabolised into fragments which could cause some other damage. Tylophora alkaloids have also been found to be anti-mutagenic. 10 tables, 5 figures, 24 refs. (author)

  17. The evolution of modern corals and their early history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, George D.

    2003-02-01

    Scleractinians are a group of calcified anthozoan corals, many of which populate shallow-water tropical to subtropical reefs. Most of these corals calcify rapidly and their success on reefs is related to a symbiotic association with zooxanthellae. These one-celled algal symbionts live in the endodermal tissues of their coral host and are thought responsible for promoting rapid calcification. The evolutionary significance of this symbiosis and the implications it holds for explaining the success of corals is of paramount importance. Scleractinia stands out as one of the few orders of calcified metazoans that arose in Triassic time, long after a greater proliferation of calcified metazoan orders in the Paleozoic. The origin of this coral group, so important in reefs of today, has remained an unsolved problem in paleontology. The idea that Scleractinia evolved from older Paleozoic rugose corals that somehow survived the Permian mass extinction persists among some schools of thought. Paleozoic scleractiniamorphs also have been presented as possible ancestors. The paleontological record shows the first appearance of fossils currently classified within the order Scleractinia to be in the Middle Triassic. These earliest Scleractinia provide a picture of unexpectedly robust taxonomic diversity and high colony integration. Results from molecular biology support a polyphyletic evolution for living Scleractinia and the molecular clock, calibrated against the fossil record, suggests that two major groups of ancestors could extend back to late Paleozoic time. The idea that Scleractinia were derived from soft-bodied, "anemone-like" ancestors that survived the Permian mass extinction, has become a widely considered hypothesis. The 14-million year Mesozoic coral gap stands as a fundamental obstacle to verification of many of these ideas. However, this obstacle is not a barrier for derivation of scleractinians from anemone-like, soft-bodied ancestors. The hypothesis of the

  18. Environmental Impact of a Submarine Cable: Case Study of the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC)/ Pioneer Seamount Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, I.; Paull, C. K.; Kuhnz, L.; von Thun, S.; Burton, E.; Greene, H. G.; Barry, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    substrates on the continental shelf whereas much of the cable remains exposed in sediments at deeper depths. The cable is exposed in rocky environments of the nearshore region and on all of Pioneer Seamount. The main biological features associated with the cable were organisms utilizing the cable as substrate and occasionally as shelter. Considerable care was taken to count megafauna in video transects and macrofauna from the top 5 cm of push cores. Few differences were found between cable and control sites at the 95% confidence level. Anemones Metridium farcimen and Stomphia sp. colonized the cable and were more abundant in cable transects at most soft sediment sites. Coarse extrapolation of the transect data suggest that more than 5,000 M. farcimen may live on the continental shelf portion of the cable. Several other species of anemones living on the cable are common along deeper sections of the cable route. Where the cable was buried, the presence of linear rows of sea anemones proved to be a reliable indicator of the cable's position. Flatfish and rockfish apparently congregate near the cable and were as much as 1 order of magnitude more abundant near the cable at some sites.

  19. Caryological notes in some portuguese Ranunculaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queirós, Margarida

    1990-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome numbers of fourteen portuguese laxa of Ranunculaceae are reported: Helleborus foetidus 20 = 32; Nigella damascena 2n = 12; N. gallica 2n = 12; Delphinium Pentagynum 2n = 16; D. Halteratum subsp. verdunense 2n = 16; Anemone palmeta 2n = 32; Clematis campaniflora 2n = 16; Ranunculus muricatus 2n = 48; R. repens 2n = 32; R. bulbosus subsp. aleae var. adscendens 2n =16; R. sceleratus 2n = 32; R. paludosus 2n = 32; R. nigrescens 2n = 16; Aquilegia vulgaris subsp. dichroa 2n = 14. The chromosome numbers are in accordance with previous results.

    Se estudia el número cromosómico de algunos táxones de Ranunculaceae portugueses: Helleborus foetidus 2n = 32; Nigella damascena 2n = 12; N. gallica 2n = 12; Delphinium Pentagynum 2n = 16; D. Halteratum subsp. verdunense 2n = 16; Anemone palmeta 2n = 32; Clematis campaniflora 2n = 16; Ranunculus muricatus 2n = 48; R. repens 2n = 32; R. bulbosus subsp. aleae var. adscendens 2n =16; R. sceleratus 2n = 32; R. paludosus 2n = 32; R. nigrescens 2n = 16; Aquilegia vulgaris subsp. dichroa 2n = 14. Estos recuentos coinciden con los obtenidos anteriormente por otros autores.

  20. 云南云龙水库库区野生药用种子植物资源调查与分析%Investigation and Analysis on the Wild Resources of Medicinal Seed Plants from Yunlong Reservoir Area in Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李孙文; 赵昶灵; 张丽梅; 李荣春; 赵蕾; 李信

    2006-01-01

    In the area of Yunlong reservoir of Yunnan province,there are 104 species of wild resources of medicinal seed plants which belong to 56 families and 94 genera. The percentage of the medicinal seed plants to the total seed plants in the same area is 23.3%. The preponderant families of medicinal seed plants are Compositae,Labiatae,Campanulaceae,Umbelliferae,Ranunculaceae,Rosaceae,Rubiaceae and Scrophulariaceae. The preponderant genera are Anemone,Artemisia,Carpesium,Conyza and Elsholtzia. The perpendicular distribution of the medicinal seed plants is asymmetrical. The species number in the altitude of 2 070~2 080 m is the maximum,next is the 2 010~2 030 m and the third is the 2 430~2 440 m. After the water-storing of reservoir is fulfilled entirely,53.8% of the wild resources of medicinal seed plants will permanently be submerged. This research may provide a preparatory information for the protection of the entironment surrounding the reservoir and for the scientific safeguard and utilization of the wild resources of medicinal seed plants.%云南云龙水库库区共有药用种子植物104种,隶属于56科94属,占该区全部种子植物种的23.3%,优势科为Compositae,Labiatae,Campanulaceae,Umbelliferae,Ranunculaceae,Rosaceae,Rubiaceae和Scrophulariaceae,优势属为Anemone,Artemisia,Carpesium,Conyza和Elsholtzia.该区药用种子植物垂直分布不均匀,在海拔2 070~2 080 m种最多,其次是2 010~2 030 m,再次是2 430~2 440 m.水库完成蓄水后,将53.8%的药用种子植物被永久淹没.研究结果可为库区周边生态环境保护和对该区药用种子植物资源的科学保护和开发利用提供参考.

  1. Cashew nut roasting: Chemical characterization of particulate matter and genotocixity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Particulate matter (PM) is potentially harmful to health and related to genotoxic events, an increase in the number of hospitalizations and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The present study conducted the first characterization of elemental composition and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analysis of PM, as well as the biomonitoring of genotoxic activity associated to artisanal cashew nut roasting, an important economic and social activity worldwide. Methods: The levels of PM2.5 and black carbon were also measured by gravimetric analysis and light reflectance. The elemental composition was determined using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and PAH analysis was carried out by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Genotoxic activity was measured by the Tradescantia pallida micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN). Other biomarkers of DNA damage, such as nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear fragments, were also quantified. Results: The mean amount of PM2.5 accumulated in the filters (January 2124.2 µg/m3; May 1022.2 µg/m3; September 1291.9 µg/m3), black carbon (January 363.6 µg/m3; May 70 µg/m3; September 69.4 µg/m3) and concentrations of Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br and Pb were significantly higher than the non-exposed area. Biomass burning tracers K, Cl, and S were the major inorganic compounds found. Benzo[k]fluoranthene, indene[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, phenanthrene and benzo[b]fluoranthene were the most abundant PAHs. Mean benzo[a]pyrene-equivalent carcinogenic power values showed a significant cancer risk. The Trad-MCN bioassay revealed an increase in micronucleus frequency, 2–7 times higher than the negative control and significantly higher in all the months analyzed, possibly related to the mutagenic PAHs found. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that artisanal cashew nut roasting is a serious occupational problem, with harmful effects on workers' health. Those involved in this

  2. Use of coccidiostat in mineral salt and study on ovine eimeriosis Uso de coccidiostático no sal mineral e estudo da eimeriose ovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Luiz Freire de Andrade Júnior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Coccidiosis is a serious obstacle to sheep production, which is becoming a limiting factor, especially with regard to lamb production. However, there are few studies on this parasite in the State of Rio Grande do Norte. The aim of this study was to evaluate the action of decoquinate, added to mineral salt, for controlling Eimeria infection in lambs, and to identify which species are infecting sheep in the eastern region of the state. This study was carried out from August 2009 to January 2010, and used 76 animals. These were divided into two treatment groups: one with common mineral salt, and the other with mineral salt enriched with 6% micronized decoquinate. Fecal samples and body weight measurements were taken every 14 days for parasitological diagnosis, weight gain follow-up and quantitative analysis. The study showed that there was a significant difference in OPG only at the 7th collection, but no significant difference in weight gain. The Eimeria species found were E. ahsata. E. crandallis. E. granulosa. E. intrincata. E. ovina. E. faurei. E. ovinoidalis. E. pallida and E. parva. It was concluded that addition of decoquinate to mineral salt gave rise to lower oocyst elimination, thus favoring eimeriosis control in sheep.A coccidiose constitui-se num sério obstáculo à ovinocultura, a qual vem se tornando um fator limitante para a exploração, especialmente para a produção de cordeiros precoces. Porém, poucos são os estudos com esse parasito no Estado do Rio Grande do Norte. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a ação do decoquinato, adicionado ao sal mineral, no controle da infecção causada por parasitas do gênero Eimeria em cordeiros, e identificar quais as espécies infectam ovinos na região leste Potiguar. O trabalho foi desenvolvido entre agosto de 2009 e janeiro de 2010, e foram usados 76 animais, distribuídos em dois tratamentos, um com sal mineral comum e o outro com sal mineral enriquecido com decoquinato a 6

  3. Cashew nut roasting: Chemical characterization of particulate matter and genotocixity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Galvão, Marcos Felipe de [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Melo Cabral, Thiago de; André, Paulo Afonso de [Departamento de Patologia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fátima Andrade, Maria de; Miranda, Regina Maura de [Departamento de Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento [Departamento de Patologia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro Vasconcellos, Pérola de [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia Regina, E-mail: sbatistu@cb.ufrn.br [Departamento de Biologia Celular e Genética, CB – UFRN, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Lagoa Nova, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    Background: Particulate matter (PM) is potentially harmful to health and related to genotoxic events, an increase in the number of hospitalizations and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The present study conducted the first characterization of elemental composition and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analysis of PM, as well as the biomonitoring of genotoxic activity associated to artisanal cashew nut roasting, an important economic and social activity worldwide. Methods: The levels of PM{sub 2.5} and black carbon were also measured by gravimetric analysis and light reflectance. The elemental composition was determined using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and PAH analysis was carried out by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Genotoxic activity was measured by the Tradescantia pallida micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN). Other biomarkers of DNA damage, such as nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear fragments, were also quantified. Results: The mean amount of PM{sub 2.5} accumulated in the filters (January 2124.2 µg/m{sup 3}; May 1022.2 µg/m{sup 3}; September 1291.9 µg/m{sup 3}), black carbon (January 363.6 µg/m{sup 3}; May 70 µg/m{sup 3}; September 69.4 µg/m{sup 3}) and concentrations of Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br and Pb were significantly higher than the non-exposed area. Biomass burning tracers K, Cl, and S were the major inorganic compounds found. Benzo[k]fluoranthene, indene[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, phenanthrene and benzo[b]fluoranthene were the most abundant PAHs. Mean benzo[a]pyrene-equivalent carcinogenic power values showed a significant cancer risk. The Trad-MCN bioassay revealed an increase in micronucleus frequency, 2–7 times higher than the negative control and significantly higher in all the months analyzed, possibly related to the mutagenic PAHs found. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that artisanal cashew nut roasting is a serious occupational problem, with harmful

  4. Controle de mosca-branca com extratos vegetais, em tomateiro cultivado em casa-de-vegetação Use of plant extracts on whitefly control in tomato grown in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson LL Baldin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Visando buscar métodos alternativos no controle da mosca-branca Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biótipo B em tomateiro, foram realizados testes de atratividade e preferência para oviposição em casa-de-vegetação, utilizando-se quatorze extratos aquosos a 3% (peso/volume. Os extratos foram preparados com partes de Azadirachta indica, Trichilia pallida,Chenopodium ambrosioides,Piper nigrum,Melia azedarach,Ruta graveolens,Ricinus communis,Mentha pulegium,Tagetes erecta,Eucalyptus citriodora,Cymbopogon nardus e Coriandrum sativum. Numa segunda etapa, os extratos mais eficientes em casa-de-vegetação foram observados em laboratório, a fim de avaliar o possível efeito sistêmico dos mesmos sobre ninfas da mosca-branca. Constatou-se que as plantas de tomateiro pulverizadas com extratos à base de folhas de M. pulegium e folhas e sementes de A. indica foram menos atrativas aos adultos do inseto. Plantas pulverizadas com extratos de folhas de A. indica e folhas + ramos de R. communis mostraram efeitos deterrentes à oviposição do inseto, reduzindo o número de ovos; em contrapartida, o extrato à base de folhas de C. nardus estimulou a oviposição da mosca-branca sobre as plantas. O uso dos extratos por via sistêmica não afetou o período de desenvolvimento (ovo-adulto da mosca-branca; entretanto, a presença de extratos de sementes e folhas de A. indica e de folhas de M. pulegium provocou aumento significativo na mortalidade de ninfas de B. tabaci biótipo B.Looking for alternative methods of control to silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biotype B in tomato, attractiveness and oviposition preference tests were accomplished in greenhouse using fourteen aqueous extracts at 3% (weight/volume. The extracts were prepared with parts from Azadirachta indica,Trichilia pallida,Chenopodium ambrosioides,Piper nigrum,Melia azedarach,Ruta graveolens,Ricinus communis,Mentha pulegium,Tagetes erecta,Eucalyptus citriodora, Cymbopogon nardus and

  5. Integral assessment of pollution in the Suquía River (Córdoba, Argentina) as a contribution to lotic ecosystem restoration programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, C; Abril, A; Amé, M V; Argüello, G A; Carreras, H A; Chiappero, M S; Hued, A C; Wannaz, E; Galanti, L N; Monferrán, M V; González, C M; Solís, V M

    2011-11-01

    The Suquía River lower-middle basin (Córdoba, Argentina) is subject to a strong anthropic impact because it receives pollutants from different sources (industries, wastewaters, heavy traffic, agricultural land use, etc.) We have assessed the degree of watershed degradation of Suquía River lower-middle sections through the analysis of different ecosystem compartments (air, water, riparian soil, sediments and biota), in order to provide useful data to be considered in future river restoration programs. Four study sites were selected along the river (La Calera city, Córdoba city, Corazón de María village and Río Primero city) which were sampled during the low- and high-water flow periods. We analyzed: a) chemical and physical characteristics of water, sediments, and riparian soil; b) heavy metal content of water and sediments, and c) semi-volatile organic compounds in air. Besides, pollutant bioindicators such as fish assemblages, lichens (Usnea amblyoclada), vascular plants (Tradescantia pallida), and microorganisms (fecal coliform and Escherichia coli) were used to further assess the status of the river. All analyzed ecological compartments were affected by water pollution, particularly, fish assemblages, sediments and riparian soils by heavy metal and coliform bacteria. Moreover, we detected a possible contribution of sulfur and a high pollutant content in air that merit further research about other air-water exchanges. Accordingly, we strongly suggest that an action to restore or remediate the anthropic effect on the Suquía River be extended to all possible compartments along the river. PMID:21925711

  6. The Relationship between Temperature and Development in Globodera ellingtonae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Wendy S; Kieran, Shannon Rose; Zasada, Inga A

    2015-12-01

    A new cyst nematode species, Globodera ellingtonae, was recently described from populations in Oregon and Idaho. This nematode has been shown to reproduce on potato. Because of this nematode's close relationship to the potato cyst nematodes, G. rostochiensis and G. pallida, an understanding of the risk of its potential spread, including prediction of potential geographical distribution, is required. To determine the development of G. ellingtonae under different temperatures, we conducted growth chamber experiments over a range of temperatures (10.0°C to 26.5°C) and tracked length of time to various developmental stages, including adult females bearing the next generation of eggs. Both the time to peak population densities of G. ellingtonae life stages and their duration in roots generally increased with decreasing temperature. Regression of growth rate to second-stage (J2) and third-stage (J3) juveniles on temperature yielded different base temperatures: 6.3°C and 4.4°C for J2 and J3, respectively. Setting a base temperature of 6°C allowed calculation of the degree-days (DD6) over which different life stages occurred. The largest population densities of J2 were found in roots between 50 and 200 DD6. Population densities of J3 peaked between 200 and 300 DD6. Adult males were detected in soil starting at 300 to 400 DD6 and remained detectable for approximately 500 DD6. By 784 to 884 DD6, half of the eggs in adult females contained vermiform juveniles. Given the similarity in temperature ranges for successful development between G. ellingtonae and G. rostochiensis, G. ellingtonae populations likely could survive in the same geographic range in which G. rostochiensis now occurs. PMID:26941455

  7. StyletChip: a microfluidic device for recording host invasion behaviour and feeding of plant parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunxiao; Kearn, James; Urwin, Peter; Lilley, Catherine; O' Connor, Vincent; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Morgan, Hywel

    2014-07-21

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) infest the roots of crops and cause global losses with a severe economic impact on food production. Current chemical control agents are being removed from use due to environmental and toxicity concerns and there is a need for new approaches to crop protection. A key feature of parasitic behaviour for the majority of PPNs is a hollow stomastyle or odontostyle required for interaction with the host plant and feeding. This lance-like microscopic structure, often called a stylet, protrudes from the mouth of the worm and thrusts in a rhythmic manner to stab the host root. Studying stylet activity presents technical challenges and as a consequence the underlying biology is poorly understood. We have addressed this by designing a microfluidic chip which traps the PPN Globodera pallida and permits the recording of an electrophysiological signal concomitant with stylet thrusting. The PDMS chip incorporates a precisely designed aperture to trap the nematode securely around a mid-point of its body. It is fabricated using a novel combination of conventional photolithography and two photon polymerization. The chip incorporates valves for rapid application of test compounds and integral electrodes to facilitate acquisition of electrical signals. We show that stylet thrusting can be induced by controlled application of 5-HT (serotonin) to the worm. Each thrust and retraction produces an electrical waveform that characterises the physiological activity associated with the worm's behaviour. The ability to reproducibly record the stylet activity of PPNs provides a new platform for nematicide screening that specifically focuses on a behaviour that is integral to the parasite host interaction. This is the first report of a microfluidic chip capable of electrophysiological recording from nematodes other than Caenorhabditis elegans. The unique approach is optimised for trapping and recording from smaller worms or worms with distinct anterior body shapes

  8. Heterozygote deficits in cyst plant-parasitic nematodes: possible causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montarry, Josselin; Jan, Pierre-Loup; Gracianne, Cecile; Overall, Andrew D J; Bardou-Valette, Sylvie; Olivier, Eric; Fournet, Sylvain; Grenier, Eric; Petit, Eric J

    2015-04-01

    Deviations of genotypic frequencies from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) expectations could reveal important aspects of the biology of populations. Deviations from HWE due to heterozygote deficits have been recorded for three plant-parasitic nematode species. However, it has never been determined whether the observed deficits were due (i) to the presence of null alleles, (ii) to a high level of consanguinity and/or (iii) to a Wahlund effect. The aim of the present work was, while taking into the possible confounding effect of null alleles, to disentangle consanguinity and Wahlund effect in natural populations of those three economically important cyst nematodes using microsatellite markers: Globodera pallida, G. tabacum and Heterodera schachtii, pests of potato, tobacco and sugar beet, respectively. The results show a consistent pattern of heterozygote deficiency in the three nematode species sampled at the spatial scale of the host plant. We demonstrate that the prevalence of null alleles is weak and that heterozygote deficits do not have a single origin. Our results suggested that it is restricted dispersal that leads to heterozygote deficits through both consanguinity and substructure, which effects can be linked to soil movement, cyst density, and the number of generations per year. We discuss potential implications for the durability of plant resistances that are used to protect crops against parasites in which mating between relatives occur. While consanguineous mating leads to homozygosity at all loci, including loci governing avirulence/virulence, which favours the expression of virulence when recessive, the Wahlund effect is expected to have no particular effect on the adaptation of nematodes to resistances. PMID:25735762

  9. Analysis of the Transcriptome of the Infective Stage of the Beet Cyst Nematode, H. schachtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fosu-Nyarko

    Full Text Available The beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, is a major root pest that significantly impacts the yield of sugar beet, brassicas and related species. There has been limited molecular characterisation of this important plant pathogen: to identify target genes for its control the transcriptome of the pre-parasitic J2 stage of H. schachtii was sequenced using Roche GS FLX. Ninety seven percent of reads (i.e., 387,668 with an average PHRED score > 22 were assembled with CAP3 and CLC Genomics Workbench into 37,345 and 47,263 contigs, respectively. The transcripts were annotated by comparing with gene and genomic sequences of other nematodes and annotated proteins on public databases. The annotated transcripts were much more similar to sequences of Heterodera glycines than to those of Globodera pallida and root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.. Analysis of these transcripts showed that a subset of 2,918 transcripts was common to free-living and plant parasitic nematodes suggesting that this subset is involved in general nematode metabolism and development. A set of 148 contigs and 183 singletons encoding putative homologues of effectors previously characterised for plant parasitic nematodes were also identified: these are known to be important for parasitism of host plants during migration through tissues or feeding from cells or are thought to be involved in evasion or modulation of host defences. In addition, the presence of sequences from a nematode virus is suggested. The sequencing and annotation of this transcriptome significantly adds to the genetic data available for H. schachtii, and identifies genes primed to undertake required roles in the critical pre-parasitic and early post-parasitic J2 stages. These data provide new information for identifying potential gene targets for future protection of susceptible crops against H. schachtii.

  10. Micromonospora fluostatini sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Kudo, Takuji; Mori, Mihoko; Shiomi, Kazuro; Pittayakhajonwut, Pattama; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2015-12-01

    The novel actinomycete strain PWB-003T, which produced fluostatins B and C antibiotics, was isolated from nearshore sediment collected from Panwa Cape, Phuket Province, Thailand. Data from the present polyphasic study indicated that strain PWB-003T represented a member of the genus Micromonospora. It produced single spores on substrate mycelia and contained meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Whole-cell hydrolysate contained ribose, xylose, arabinose, mannose and glucose. The predominant menaquinone was MK-10 (H4). Cellular fatty acids comprised C18 : 1ω9c, iso-C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis, the novel strain was closely related to Micromonospora eburnea LK2-10T (99.38 %), Micromonospora chaiyaphumensis MC5-1T (99.16 %), Micromonospora yangpuensis FXJ6.011T (98.97 %), Micromonospora echinaurantiaca DSM 43904T (98.97 %), Micromonospora pallida DSM 43817T (98.97 %), Micromonospora sagamiensis DSM 43912T and Micromonospora auratinigra JCM 12357T (both 98.97 %). The G+C content of the DNA was 74.5 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness values among strain PWB-003T and related type strains ranged from 11.3 ± 1.3 to 38.8 ± 1.1 %. On the basis of these observations, strain PWB-003T could be distinguished from its closely related type strains and is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Micromonospora, for which the name Micromonospora fluostatini sp. nov. (type strain PWB-003T = JCM 30529T = PCU 341T = TISTR 2345T) is proposed. PMID:26358439

  11. The potential influence of plant-based feed supplements on sperm quantity and quality in livestock: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, C; Witschi, U; Kreuzer, M

    2012-05-01

    The reproductive performance of male livestock is of economic importance, and improving semen quantity and quality, especially for artificial insemination, additionally helps to avoid the loss of valuable genotypes. The review focuses on the impact of oxidative stress on sperm production and quality in livestock, and the potential role of plant based anti-oxidants to control this impact. From scientific reports dealing with livestock, the paper compiles evidence on effective dietary measures affecting sperm production and quality. Where little or no data are available on livestock, it refers to sources regarding other mammals, including man. The review concentrates on the use of distinct plants as feed supplements rather than on ways to treat deficiencies and imbalances in energy or macro- and micronutrients. Feeding of maca (Lepidium meyenii) and khat (Catha edulis) has been shown to positively affect sperm production and quality in animals. Some evidence points to favourable effects of leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala and Leucaena pallida), sesbania (Sesbania sesban), pomegranate (Punica granatum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) as well, but studies are either superficial or results are partially contradictory. Finally, the review considers the potential usefulness of medicinal herbs. The list of such plants includes Chinese herbs such as Lycium barbarum, Astralagus membranaceus, Acanthopanacis senticosi, Magnolia officinalis, Cornus officinalis and Psoralea corylifolia and the Indonesian plant Eurycoma longifolia. European candidate plants are Tribulus terrestris and Pendulum murex. Future research should include the screening of other plants, concentrating on the large number of plants rich in metabolites because of their presumed effectiveness. The modes of action often require clarification for the plants with demonstrated effects. PMID:22575847

  12. Les jachères longues pâturées dans les Andes. Acquis interdisciplinaires

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    Dominique Hervé

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An interdisciplinary approach comes into view between the lines of this team investigation synthesis which deals with Andean fallow dynamics. lt questions agronomic and social sciences. An agronomistand a anthropologist, facing initial semantic difficulty to define fallow, gather their points of view concerning the same peasant community of Bolivian high plateau. This community is still functioning as the archetype of Andean communities. They challenge to explain why land has been fallowing during ten years since such a long time, and how collective management is changing. Firstly each research worker tries to answer within his proper scientific sphere. The agronomist checks more deeply some of the fallow functions: soil fertility restoration (quimical, biological and physical depending on fallow duration, the impact of long fallow on parasitism (Globodera pallida, Premnotrypes latithorax and fuelwood production. The best fallow duration is not ten years for every fallow functions. The combination of these functions may have changed in the past. The anthropologist studies history of land access and actual social representations. Interdisciplinary dialog occur between them, but reality looks to be more complex and quiet unpredictable as expecting specific fallow dynamics repeatly fail. Fallow duration looks not to change because this time is fix, cyclical; it represents the history and the memory of the community. What actually changes is the type of land access, from collective to private, and the desigual access to these types of land. It implies a new focus to on-farm management. We conclude that edafological constraints are not the only deterministicreason for long fallow duration. We teased out the different reasons, which are multiple, jerarquized and linked within a dynamic process, as threads are. It is the main goal of an interdisciplinary research.

  13. Diesel emissions significantly influence composition and mutagenicity of ambient particles: a case study in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2003, a bus strike paralyzed the fleet of buses in Sao Paulo, Brazil during 3 days, from 6 to 8 of April, the complete interruption of services being achieved on the 7th. We evaluated the effect of the absence of this source of pollution on the composition, mutagenicity, and toxicity of the fine particulate material collected during this period. Particles were sampled in glass fiber filters on days 7 and 15 of April of 2003 (strike and nonstrike days, respectively), using a high-volume sampler. Trace element determinations (As, Br, Co, Cl, Fe, La, Mn, Sb, Sc, and Th) of particulate material samples were carried out by neutron activation analysis. Sulfur determination was done by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The ratio between nonstrike/strike concentrations of hydrocarbons associated with automotive emissions (benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylenes; BTEX) was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Mutagenesis of testing solutions was determined by means of the Tradescantia micronucleus assay in early tetrads of Tradescantia pallida. The inhibition of mitosis of the cells of the primary meristema of the root tips of Allium cepa was used as an index of the toxicity. Fine particle trace element contents were lower during the strike. The concentrations of sulfur and BTEX were 50% and 39.3% lower, respectively, on the strike day. A significant (P=0.038) reduction of micronuclei induced by fine particles sampled during the strike was observed. No effect of the strike on toxicity was detected. These results indicate that a program aiming to reduce emissions of the bus fleet in our town may impact positively the air quality by reducing the mutagenic potential of ambient particles

  14. Factors affecting population dynamics of leaf beetles in a subarctic region: The interplay between climate warming and pollution decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, Elena L; Hunter, Mark D; Zverev, Vitali; Kozlov, Mikhail V

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which abiotic drivers, such as climate and pollution, influence population dynamics of animals is important for our ability to predict the population trajectories of individual species under different global change scenarios. We monitored four leaf beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding on willows (Salix spp.) in 13 sites along a pollution gradient in subarctic forests of north-western Russia from 1993 to 2014. During a subset of years, we also measured the impacts of natural enemies and host plant quality on the performance of one of these species, Chrysomela lapponica. Spring and fall temperatures increased by 2.5-3°C during the 21-year observation period, while emissions of sulfur dioxide and heavy metals from the nickel-copper smelter at Monchegorsk decreased fivefold. However, contrary to predictions of increasing herbivory with climate warming, and in spite of discovered increase in host plant quality with increase in temperatures, none of the beetle species became more abundant during the past 20years. No directional trends were observed in densities of either Phratora vitellinae or Plagiodera versicolora, whereas densities of both C. lapponica and Gonioctena pallida showed a simultaneous rapid 20-fold decline in the early 2000s, remaining at very low levels thereafter. Time series analysis and model selection indicated that these abrupt population declines were associated with decreases in aerial emissions from the smelter. Observed declines in the population densities of C. lapponica can be explained by increases in mortality from natural enemies due to the combined action of climate warming and declining pollution. This pattern suggests that at least in some tri-trophic systems, top-down factors override bottom-up effects and govern the impacts of environmental changes on insect herbivores. PMID:27266523

  15. Species-specific responses of corals to bleaching events on anthropogenically turbid reefs on Okinawa Island, Japan, over a 15-year period (1995-2009.

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    Chuki Hongo

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching, triggered by elevated sea-surface temperatures (SSTs has caused a decline in coral cover and changes in the abundances of corals on reefs worldwide. Coral decline can be exacerbated by the effects of local stressors like turbidity, yet some reefs with a natural history of turbidity can support healthy and resilient coral communities. However, little is known about responses of coral communities to bleaching events on anthropogenically turbid reefs as a result of recent (post World War II terrestrial runoff. Analysis of region-scale coral cover and species abundance at 17-20 sites on the turbid reefs of Okinawa Island (total of 79 species, 30 genera, and 13 families from 1995 to 2009 indicates that coral cover decreased drastically, from 24.4% to 7.5% (1.1%/year, subsequent to bleaching events in 1998 and 2001. This dramatic decrease in coral cover corresponded to the demise of Acropora species (e.g., A. digitifera by 2009, when Acropora had mostly disappeared from turbid reefs on Okinawa Island. In contrast, Merulinidae species (e.g., Dipsastraea pallida/speciosa/favus and Porites species (e.g., P. lutea/australiensis, which are characterized by tolerance to thermal stress, survived on turbid reefs of Okinawa Island throughout the period. Our results suggest that high turbidity, influenced by recent terrestrial runoff, could have caused a reduction in resilience of Acropora species to severe thermal stress events, because the corals could not have adapted to a relatively recent decline in water quality. The coral reef ecosystems of Okinawa Island will be severely impoverished if Acropora species fail to recover.

  16. Taxonomy and species boundaries in the coral genus Favia Milne Edwards and Haime, 1857 (Cnidaria: Scleractinia) from Thailand revealed by morphological and genetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongjandtre, N.; Ridgway, T.; Cook, L. G.; Huelsken, T.; Budd, A. F.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2012-06-01

    While Faviidae is a widely and uniformly distributed coral family throughout the Indo-Pacific, the extensive phenotypic plasticity of colony surface and corallite features often confounds the use of macromorphological characters in species identification, and contributes to conflict between traditional classification and molecular analyses of the group. Recent advances in morphological and molecular techniques now provide a suite of methods to re-address coral taxonomy in complex groups, such as that represented by the Faviidae. This study combines morphologic measurements including "3D coordinates landmarks" data with phylogenetic assessments of nuclear (ITS) and mitochondrial (COI-trnM) DNA to assess species boundaries in nine species of Faviidae with para-septothecal walls from Thailand. Strong concordance was found between morphological features and a priori groupings based on both morphospecies and genetically defined groups (ITS and COI-trnM). Favia truncatus was the most well-defined species based on morphological analyses, and it was also shown to be monophyletic using phylogenetic analyses. Besides F. truncatus, the only other species that was found to be monophyletic in analyses of both genes was F. cf. helianthoides, but its skeletal morphology overlapped with the F. favus species complex (comprised of F. favus, F. speciosa, F. matthaii and F. rotumana). Although not genetically monophyletic, the F. favus species complex and F. pallida were fairly well delineated morphologically. Morphospecies within the F. favus species complex are therefore possibly a result of genetic drift and/or stable polymorphisms driven by divergent selection. These results represent a first step toward a taxonomic revision of the Indo-Pacific Favia, which will integrate morphological methods with the study of type material, genetic information, reproductive data, and tests of phenotypic plasticity—given that multiple lines of evidence are needed to resolve ambiguous species

  17. Multilocus phylogeny and phylogenomics of Eriochrysis P. Beauv. (Poaceae-Andropogoneae): Taxonomic implications and evidence of interspecific hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Cassiano A D; Souza-Chies, Tatiana T; Longhi-Wagner, Hilda M; Peichoto, Myriam Carolina; McKain, Michael R; Kellogg, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Species delimitation is a vital issue concerning evolutionary biology and conservation of biodiversity. However, it is a challenging task for several reasons, including the low interspecies variability of markers currently used in phylogenetic reconstructions and the occurrence of reticulate evolution and polyploidy in many lineages of flowering plants. The first phylogeny of the grass genus Eriochrysis is presented here, focusing on the New World species, in order to examine its relationships to other genera of the subtribe Saccharinae/tribe Andropogoneae and to define the circumscriptions of its taxonomically complicated species. Molecular cloning and sequencing of five regions of four low-copy nuclear genes (apo1, d8, ep2-ex7 and ep2-ex8, kn1) were performed, as well as complete plastome sequencing. Trees were reconstructed using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference analyses. The present phylogenetic analyses indicate that Eriochrysis is monophyletic and the Old World E. pallida is sister to the New World species. Subtribe Saccharinae is polyphyletic, as is the genus Eulalia. Based on nuclear and plastome sequences plus morphology, we define the circumscriptions of the New World species of Eriochrysis: E. laxa is distinct from E. warmingiana, and E. villosa is distinct from E. cayennensis. Natural hybrids occur between E. laxa and E. villosa. The hybrids are probably tetraploids, based on the number of paralogues in the nuclear gene trees. This is the first record of a polyploid taxon in the genus Eriochrysis. Some incongruities between nuclear genes and plastome analyses were detected and are potentially caused by incomplete lineage sorting and/or ancient hybridization. The set of low-copy nuclear genes used in this study seems to be sufficient to resolve phylogenetic relationships and define the circumscriptions of other species complexes in the grass family and relatives, even in the presence of polyploidy and reticulate evolution

  18. Parallel evolution of TCP and B-class genes in Commelinaceae flower bilateral symmetry

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    Preston Jill C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flower bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy has evolved multiple times independently across angiosperms and is correlated with increased pollinator specialization and speciation rates. Functional and expression analyses in distantly related core eudicots and monocots implicate independent recruitment of class II TCP genes in the evolution of flower bilateral symmetry. Furthermore, available evidence suggests that monocot flower bilateral symmetry might also have evolved through changes in B-class homeotic MADS-box gene function. Methods In order to test the non-exclusive hypotheses that changes in TCP and B-class gene developmental function underlie flower symmetry evolution in the monocot family Commelinaceae, we compared expression patterns of teosinte branched1 (TB1-like, DEFICIENS (DEF-like, and GLOBOSA (GLO-like genes in morphologically distinct bilaterally symmetrical flowers of Commelina communis and Commelina dianthifolia, and radially symmetrical flowers of Tradescantia pallida. Results Expression data demonstrate that TB1-like genes are asymmetrically expressed in tepals of bilaterally symmetrical Commelina, but not radially symmetrical Tradescantia, flowers. Furthermore, DEF-like genes are expressed in showy inner tepals, staminodes and stamens of all three species, but not in the distinct outer tepal-like ventral inner tepals of C. communis. Conclusions Together with other studies, these data suggest parallel recruitment of TB1-like genes in the independent evolution of flower bilateral symmetry at early stages of Commelina flower development, and the later stage homeotic transformation of C. communis inner tepals into outer tepals through the loss of DEF-like gene expression.

  19. De novo transcriptome sequencing and analysis of the cereal cyst nematode, Heterodera avenae.

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    Mukesh Kumar

    Full Text Available The cereal cyst nematode (CCN, Heterodera avenae is a major pest of wheat (Triticum spp that reduces crop yields in many countries. Cyst nematodes are obligate sedentary endoparasites that reproduce by amphimixis. Here, we report the first transcriptome analysis of two stages of H. avenae. After sequencing extracted RNA from pre parasitic infective juvenile and adult stages of the life cycle, 131 million Illumina high quality paired end reads were obtained which generated 27,765 contigs with N50 of 1,028 base pairs, of which 10,452 were annotated. Comparative analyses were undertaken to evaluate H. avenae sequences with those of other plant, animal and free living nematodes to identify differences in expressed genes. There were 4,431 transcripts common to H. avenae and the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and 9,462 in common with more closely related potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida. Annotation of H. avenae carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy revealed fewer glycoside hydrolases (GHs but more glycosyl transferases (GTs and carbohydrate esterases (CEs when compared to M. incognita. 1,280 transcripts were found to have secretory signature, presence of signal peptide and absence of transmembrane. In a comparison of genes expressed in the pre-parasitic juvenile and feeding female stages, expression levels of 30 genes with high RPKM (reads per base per kilo million value, were analysed by qRT-PCR which confirmed the observed differences in their levels of expression levels. In addition, we have also developed a user-friendly resource, Heterodera transcriptome database (HATdb for public access of the data generated in this study. The new data provided on the transcriptome of H. avenae adds to the genetic resources available to study plant parasitic nematodes and provides an opportunity to seek new effectors that are specifically involved in the H. avenae-cereal host interaction.

  20. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson M; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 10(6) copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  1. Rapid identification of emerging human-pathogenic Sporothrix species with rolling circle amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Messias Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 x 10 6 copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0, supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies.

  2. A Study of Eimeria Species in Sheep in Mosul City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to diagnose and study species of Eimeria in sheep in Mosul city from beginning of September2009 to end May 2010, as well as to determine the percentage and intensity of infection of Eimeria species. Five hundredfecal samples of sheep with different ages were collected from different areas of the Mosul city. The results showed that totalpercentage of Emeria infection was 63.6%. The variations in percentage of infection were recorded according to month ofstudy. Highest percentage was recorded in March being 89.2% and the lowest in September 25.9%. The species E. ovinarecorded the highest infection rate 86.7%, while the species E. granulosa represented lowest infection rate 10%. Moreover theintensity of infection was higher in young ages and lower in adult. The results were detected that indoor sheep infection withhigh parasitic infection 69.9% whereas outdoor animals have an infection rate 25.3%. The morphological characters of oocystswere varied according to species of Eimeria has been studied. Fifty of intestinal and abomasal samples from both slaughteredin shops butchery in Mosul city and dead animals were examined to detect Eimeria infection, and results show that infectionpercentage was 56.4% in intestine of slaughtered animals and 36.3% in dead animal. Moreover no infection of Eimeria weredetected in abomasums in both slaughtered and dead animals. The oocysts of (E. parva, E.pallida and E. ovinoidalis detectedat more than 5000 oocysts per gram of intestinal contents. The intestinal secraping stained with Giemsa stain reveals thepresence of different developmental stages of parasites in wall of intestine. The histopathological sections of intestine revealedthe different pathological changes concerning of Eimeria infection.

  3. De novo transcriptome sequencing and analysis of the cereal cyst nematode, Heterodera avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Thakur, Prasoon Kumar; Banakar, Prakash; Shukla, Rohit N; Jones, Michael G K; Rao, Uma

    2014-01-01

    The cereal cyst nematode (CCN, Heterodera avenae) is a major pest of wheat (Triticum spp) that reduces crop yields in many countries. Cyst nematodes are obligate sedentary endoparasites that reproduce by amphimixis. Here, we report the first transcriptome analysis of two stages of H. avenae. After sequencing extracted RNA from pre parasitic infective juvenile and adult stages of the life cycle, 131 million Illumina high quality paired end reads were obtained which generated 27,765 contigs with N50 of 1,028 base pairs, of which 10,452 were annotated. Comparative analyses were undertaken to evaluate H. avenae sequences with those of other plant, animal and free living nematodes to identify differences in expressed genes. There were 4,431 transcripts common to H. avenae and the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and 9,462 in common with more closely related potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida. Annotation of H. avenae carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy) revealed fewer glycoside hydrolases (GHs) but more glycosyl transferases (GTs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs) when compared to M. incognita. 1,280 transcripts were found to have secretory signature, presence of signal peptide and absence of transmembrane. In a comparison of genes expressed in the pre-parasitic juvenile and feeding female stages, expression levels of 30 genes with high RPKM (reads per base per kilo million) value, were analysed by qRT-PCR which confirmed the observed differences in their levels of expression levels. In addition, we have also developed a user-friendly resource, Heterodera transcriptome database (HATdb) for public access of the data generated in this study. The new data provided on the transcriptome of H. avenae adds to the genetic resources available to study plant parasitic nematodes and provides an opportunity to seek new effectors that are specifically involved in the H. avenae-cereal host interaction. PMID:24802510

  4. Avoidance of unconventional oil wells and roads exacerbates habitat loss for grassland birds in the North American great plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah J.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Nieumuth, Neal; Ribic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Oil development in the Bakken shale region has increased rapidly as a result of new technologies and strong demand for fossil fuel. This region also supports a particularly high density and diversity of grassland bird species, which are declining across North America. We examined grassland bird response to unconventional oil extraction sites (i.e. developed with hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling techniques) and associated roads in North Dakota. Our goal was to quantify the amount of habitat that was indirectly degraded by oil development, as evidenced by patterns of avoidance by birds. Grassland birds avoided areas within 150 m of roads (95% CI: 87–214 m), 267 m of single-bore well pads (95% CI: 157–378 m), and 150 m of multi-bore well pads (95% CI: 67–233 m). Individual species demonstrated variable tolerance of well pads. Clay-colored sparrows (Spizella pallida) were tolerant of oil-related infrastructure, whereas Sprague's pipit (Anthus spragueii) avoided areas within 350 m (95% CI: 215–485 m) of single-bore well pads. Given these density patterns around oil wells, the potential footprint of any individual oil well, and oil development across the region, is greatly multiplied for sensitive species. Efforts to reduce new road construction, concentrate wells along developed corridors, combine numerous wells on multi-bore pads rather than build many single-bore wells, and to place well pads near existing roads will serve to minimize loss of suitable habitat for birds. Quantifying environmental degradation caused by oil development is a critical step in understanding how to better mitigate harm to wildlife populations.

  5. Review and Assessment of Medicinal Safety Data of Orally Used Echinacea Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bauer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifoli and Echinacea pallida are frequently used as medicinal plants. Besides asking for evidence on their efficacy, there is an increasing interest for safety data. This review systematically presents the available literature on drug interactions, contraindications, adverse events, duration of use, and safety of use in pregnant and nursing women, and assesses the safety profile of corresponding Echinacea preparations. It is noteworthy that all safety data reported are as product specific as the pharmacological or efficacy data are. In pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction studies performed in vivo, no significant inhibitions of human CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 isoforms have been found after the administration of standardized E. purpurea preparations. However, contradictory results exist in studies using liver microsomes. Adverse events reported during clinical trials following administration of Echinacea spp. mono-preparations were generally mild and mostly without causality. Due to published long term studies with continuous ingestion of different Echinacea preparations up to 6 month with no reported toxicological concerns, Echinacea can be recommended also for long-term use. Moreover, the contraindications in cases of autoimmune diseases and immune-suppression are questionable, since lipophilic Echinacea preparations containing alkamides suppress cellular immune responses, and beneficial effects in autoimmunity were reported. The same applies for the use during pregnancy. Although there has been some impact reported on embryonic angiogenesis in mice, no association with an increased risk for major or minor malformations during organogenesis was found in a literature review. Altogether, the different evaluated Echinacea preparations are well-tolerated herbal medicines in the management in children and adults alike. PMID:26441065

  6. Can artificial reefs mimic natural reef communities? The roles of structural features and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkol-Finkel, S; Shashar, N; Benayahu, Y

    2006-03-01

    In light of the deteriorating state of coral reefs worldwide, the need to rehabilitate marine environments has greatly increased. Artificial reefs (ARs) have been suggested as a tool for reef conservation and rehabilitation. Although successions of AR communities have been thoroughly studied, current understanding of the interactions between artificial and natural reefs (NRs) is poor and a fundamental question still to be answered is that of whether AR communities can mimic adjacent NR communities. We suggest three alternative hypotheses: Neighboring ARs and NRs will (1) achieve a similar community structure given sufficient time; (2) be similar only if they possess similar structural features; (3) always differ, regardless of age or structural features. We examined these hypotheses by comparing the community structure on a 119-year old shipwreck to a neighboring NR. Fouling organisms, including stony and soft corals, sponges, tunicates, sea anemones and hydrozoans were recorded and measured along belt transects. The ahermatypic stony coral Tubastrea micrantha dominated vertical AR regions while the soft corals Nephthea sp. and Xenia sp. dominated both artificial and natural horizontal surfaces. Our results support the second hypothesis, indicating that even after a century an AR will mimic its adjacent NR communities only if it possesses structural features similar to those of the natural surroundings. However, if the two differ structurally, their communities will remain distinct. PMID:16198411

  7. Sicily in D.H. Lawrence’s Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Comellini

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available D.H. Lawrence, who spent two years in Sicily, precisely in Fontana Vecchia, near Taormina and Aetna (where the God Vulcan used to live, has always been fascinated by Italy and Sicily in particular, the places where, in his opinion, most myths are rooted. His fascination for Sicily is due both to the sculpture of The Seated Demeter or Core, that he saw in the archaeological Museum in Syracuse, and to the Sicilians, described “as handsome as Adonis”, and who seem to manifest and share the sexual energy usually connected to Pan and Dionysus. The image of Sicily recurs in D.H. Lawrence’s entire production, often indirectly suggested by images such as: the volcanoes, the mythical Sicilian monsters “Scylla and Charybdis”, and the references to the Myth of Pluto and Persephone, which took place in Enna, as told in his poem "Purple Anemones" (in Birds, Beasts and Flowers. Moreover, his novella Sun deals with the flourishing Mediterranean landscape of Sicily, with Aetna in the distance, and the memory of the Sicules, the archaic inhabitants of the island. It is also worth mentioning that D.H. Lawrence translated several works by the Sicilian Giovanni Verga: from Mastro-Don Gesualdo (1923 to Cavalleria Rusticana and Other Stories (1928.

  8. Analyses of Simulated Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M. A.; Uritsky, V. M.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Solar polar jets are observed to originate in regions within the open field of solar coronal holes. These so called "anemone" regions are generally accepted to be regions of opposite polarity, and are associated with an embedded dipole topology, consisting of a fan-separatrix and a spine line emanating from a null point occurring at the top of the dome shaped fan surface. Previous analysis of these jets (Pariat et al. 2009,2010) modeled using the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver (ARMS) has supported the claim that magnetic reconnection across current sheets formed at the null point between the highly twisted closed field of the dipole and open field lines surrounding it releases the energy necessary to drive these jets. However, these initial simulations assumed a "static" environment for the jets, neglecting effects due to gravity, solar wind and the expanding spherical geometry. A new set of ARMS simulations taking into account these additional physical processes was recently performed. Initial results are qualitatively consistent with the earlier Cartesian studies, demonstrating the robustness of the underlying ideal and resistive mechanisms. We focus on density and velocity fluctuations within a narrow radial slit aligned with the direction of the spine of the jet, as well as other physical properties, in order to identify and refine their signatures in the lower heliosphere. These refined signatures can be used as parameters by which plasma processes initiated by these jets may be identified in situ by future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  9. Bacterial communities associated with the ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Camille; Breitbart, Mya

    2012-10-01

    Residing in a phylum of their own, ctenophores are gelatinous zooplankton that drift through the ocean's water column. Although ctenophores are known to be parasitized by a variety of eukaryotes, no studies have examined their bacterial associates. This study describes the bacterial communities associated with the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and its natural predator Beroe ovata in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Investigations using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that ctenophore bacterial communities were distinct from the surrounding water. In addition, each ctenophore genus contained a unique microbiota. Ctenophore samples contained fewer bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) by T-RFLP and lower diversity communities by 16S rRNA gene sequencing than the water column. Both ctenophore genera contained sequences related to bacteria previously described in marine invertebrates, and sequences similar to a sea anemone pathogen were abundant in B. ovata. Temporal sampling revealed that the ctenophore-associated bacterial communities varied over time, with no single OTU detected at all time points. This is the first report of distinct and dynamic bacterial communities associated with ctenophores, suggesting that these microbial consortia may play important roles in ctenophore ecology. Future work needs to elucidate the functional roles and mode of acquisition of these bacteria. PMID:22571334

  10. Gigantoxin-4-4D5 scFv is a novel recombinant immunotoxin with specific toxicity against HER2/neu-positive ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinxin; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Rui; Dong, Yuguo; Sun, Aiyou; Shen, Yaling; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-07-01

    Immunotoxins are a new class of antibody-targeted therapy in clinical development. Traditional immunotoxins that are constructed from the toxins of plants or bacteria need to be internalized to the cytoplasm and thus have limited antitumor efficacy. In the present study, we combined a recently reported sea anemone cytolysin Gigantoxin-4 with an anti-HER2/neu single-chain variable fragment 4D5 scFv to construct a novel immunotoxin. We fused a SUMO tag to the N-terminus of Gigantoxin-4-4D5 scFv and it was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) in a soluble form. After purification, the purity of Gigantoxin-4-4D5 scFv reached 96 % and the yield was 14.3 mg/L. Our results demonstrated that Gigantoxin-4-4D5 scFv exerted a highly cytotoxic effect on the HER2/neu-positive ovarian carcinoma SK-OV-3 cell line. And the hemolytic activity was weaker, making it safe for normal cells. The results of immunofluorescence analysis showed that this novel immunotoxin could specifically bind to SK-OV-3 cells with no recognition of human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Scanning electron microscope observations and extracellular lactate dehydrogenase activity indicated that it could induce necrosis in SK-OV-3 cells by disrupting the cell membrane. Moreover, it could also mediate apoptosis of SK-OV-3 cells. PMID:27063011

  11. Structural and Developmental Disparity in the Tentacles of the Moon Jellyfish Aurelia sp.1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Gold

    Full Text Available Tentacles armed with stinging cells (cnidocytes are a defining trait of the cnidarians, a phylum that includes sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydras. While cnidarian tentacles are generally characterized as structures evolved for feeding and defense, significant variation exists between the tentacles of different species, and within the same species across different life stages and/or body regions. Such diversity suggests cryptic distinctions exist in tentacle function. In this paper, we use confocal and transmission electron microscopy to contrast the structure and development of tentacles in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia species 1. We show that polyp oral tentacles and medusa marginal tentacles display markedly different cellular and muscular architecture, as well as distinct patterns of cellular proliferation during growth. Many structural differences between these tentacle types may reflect biomechanical solutions to different feeding strategies, although further work would be required for a precise mechanistic understanding. However, differences in cell proliferation dynamics suggests that the two tentacle forms lack a conserved mechanism of development, challenging the textbook-notion that cnidarian tentacles can be homologized into a conserved bauplan.

  12. Catalog to families, genera, and species of orders Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautin, Daphne Gail

    2016-01-01

    This book inventories all available (and some unavailable) names in the family, genus, and species groups of extant members of orders Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia [cnidarian subclass Hexacorallia (Zoantharia) of class Anthozoa], providing a benchmark of names, their status, and taxon membership. I have attempted to make the compilation complete as of 2010; some names created after 2010 are included. The book is derived from a database I compiled that was available through a website. Most of the book is from the literature that defines taxa and documents their geographic distribution-primarily publications on nomenclature, taxonomy, and biogeography, but also some on ecology, pharmacology, reproductive biology, physiology, etc. of anemones (the common name for these groups); the reference section comprises 845 entries. As for previous anemone catalogs, this contains taxonomic as well as nomenclatural information,  the former based on subjective opinion of working biologists, the latter objectively verifiable and unchanging (except by action of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature).        Each family-group name, genus-group name, and original combination for species-group names has an entry. The entry contains the bibliographic reference to the publication in which each name was made available. This book contains for Corallimorpharia seven family names (four considered valid [57%]), 20 generic names (10 considered valid [50%] and one unavailable), and 65 species names (46 considered valid [70%]). It contains for Actiniaria 86 family names (50 considered valid [58%] and three unavailable), 447 generic names (264 considered valid [59%] and two unavailable), and 1427 species names (1101 considered valid [77%] and nine unavailable). Type specimens are inventoried from more than 50 natural history museums in Africa, Australia, Europe, New Zealand, and North America, including those with the largest collections of anemones; the geographic

  13. Morphological Variability and Distinct Protein Profiles of Cultured and Endosymbiotic Symbiodinium cells Isolated from Exaiptasia pulchella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaribu, Buntora; Weng, Li-Chi; Lin, I.-Ping; Camargo, Eddie; Tzen, Jason T. C.; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Ho, Shin-Lon; Lin, Mong-Rong; Wang, Li-Hsueh; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Jiang, Pei-Luen

    2015-10-01

    Symbiodinium is a dinoflagellate that plays an important role in the physiology of the symbiotic relationships of Cnidarians such as corals and sea anemones. However, it is very difficult to cultivate free-living dinoflagellates after being isolated from the host, as they are very sensitive to environmental changes. How these symbiont cells are supported by the host tissue is still unclear. This study investigated the characteristics of Symbiodinium cells, particularly with respect to the morphological variability and distinct protein profiles of both cultured and endosymbiotic Symbiodinium which were freshly isolated from Exaiptasia pulchella. The response of the cellular morphology of freshly isolated Symbiodinium cells kept under a 12 h L:12 h D cycle to different temperatures was measured. Cellular proliferation was investigated by measuring the growth pattern of Symbiodinium cells, the results of which indicated that the growth was significantly reduced in response to the extreme temperatures. Proteomic analysis of freshly isolated Symbiodinium cells revealed twelve novel proteins that putatively included transcription translation factors, photosystem proteins, and proteins associated with energy and lipid metabolism, as well as defense response. The results of this study will bring more understandings to the mechanisms governing the endosymbiotic relationship between the cnidarians and dinoflagellates.

  14. Isolation and distribution of iridescent Cellulophaga and other iridescent marine bacteria from the Charente-Maritime coast, French Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kientz, Betty; Agogué, Hélène; Lavergne, Céline; Marié, Pauline; Rosenfeld, Eric

    2013-06-01

    An intense colored marine bacterium, identified as Cellulophaga lytica, was isolated previously from a sea anemone surface on the Charente-Maritime rocky shore (Atlantic Coast, France), and iridescence of its colonies under direct light was recently described. In addition, iridescence intensities were found to differ strongly between C. lytica strains from different culture collections. However, importantly, the occurrence and distribution of iridescent bacteria in the marine environment were still unknown. Therefore, in this study, a search was undertaken for marine iridescent bacterial strains in different biotopes of the Charente-Maritime coast. Various marine samples (water, sediment, macroalgae, other macroorganisms and detritus) were collected from seven biotopes using a direct plate inoculation method. As a result, 34 iridescent strains related to the genus Cellulophaga, as well as 63 iridescent strains affiliated to the genera Tenacibaculum and Aquimarina, were isolated. Iridescent colors were different according to the genera but iridescent marine bacteria were widely distributed. However, a majority of strains were isolated from rocky shores and, in particular, red seaweed surfaces and mollusks. The data from the study suggested that isolates with iridescent properties were well conserved in stressful environments such as the coastal shoreline. This origin may provide an insight into the ecological and biological functions of iridescence. PMID:23623798

  15. Enzymes of the shikimic acid pathway encoded in the genome of a basal metazoan, Nematostella vectensis, have microbial origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic, Antonio; Akthar, Shamima; Dunlap, Walter C; Shick, J Malcolm; Hranueli, Daslav; Cullum, John; Long, Paul F

    2008-02-19

    The shikimic acid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of many aromatic compounds by a broad range of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and some protozoans. Animals are considered to lack this pathway, as evinced by their dietary requirement for shikimate-derived aromatic amino acids. We challenge the universality of this traditional view in this report of genes encoding enzymes for the shikimate pathway in an animal, the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Molecular evidence establishes horizontal transfer of ancestral genes of the shikimic acid pathway into the N. vectensis genome from both bacterial and eukaryotic (dinoflagellate) donors. Bioinformatic analysis also reveals four genes that are closely related to those of Tenacibaculum sp. MED152, raising speculation for the existence of a previously unsuspected bacterial symbiont. Indeed, the genome of the holobiont (i.e., the entity consisting of the host and its symbionts) comprises a high content of Tenacibaculum-like gene orthologs, including a 16S rRNA sequence that establishes the phylogenetic position of this associate to be within the family Flavobacteriaceae. These results provide a complementary view for the biogenesis of shikimate-related metabolites in marine Cnidaria as a "shared metabolic adaptation" between the partners. PMID:18268342

  16. High contents of trimethylamine oxide correlating with depth in deep-sea teleost fishes, skates, and decapod crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R H; Yancey, P H

    1999-02-01

    In muscles of shallow-living marine animals, the osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is reportedly found (in millimoles of TMAO per kilogram of tissue wet weight) at 30-90 in shrimp, 5-50 in crabs, 61-181 in skates, and 10-70 in most teleost fish. Recently our laboratory reported higher levels (83-211 mmol/kg), correlating with habitat depth, in deep-sea gadiform teleosts. We now report the same trend in muscles of other animals, collected off the coast of Oregon from bathyal (1800-2000 m) and abyssal plain (2850 m) sites. TMAO contents (mmol/kg +/- SD) were as follows: zoarcid teleosts, 103 +/- 9 (bathyal) and 197 +/- 2 (abyssal); scorpaenid teleosts, 32 +/- 0 (shallow) and 141 +/- 16 (bathyal); rajid skates, 215 +/- 13 (bathyal) and 244 +/- 23 (abyssal); caridean shrimp, 76 +/- 16 (shallow), 203 +/- 35 (bathyal), and 299 +/- 28 (abyssal); Chionoecetes crabs, 22 +/- 2 (shallow) and 164 +/- 15 (bathyal). Deep squid, clams, and anemones also had higher contents than shallow species. Osmoconformers showed compensation between TMAO and other osmolytes. Urea contents (typically 300 mmol/kg in shallow elasmobranchs) in skates were 214 +/- 5 (bathyal) and 136 +/- 9 (abyssal). Glycine contents in shrimp were 188 +/- 17 (shallow) and 52 +/- 20 (abyssal). High TMAO contents may reflect diet, reduce osmoregulatory costs, increase buoyancy, or counteract destabilization of proteins by pressure. PMID:25575382

  17. Food web of the intertidal rocky shore of the west Portuguese coast - Determined by stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Catarina; Mendonça, Vanessa; Narciso, Luís; Madeira, Carolina

    2015-09-01

    The characterization of food web structure, energy pathways and trophic linkages is essential for the understanding of ecosystem functioning. Isotopic analysis was performed on food web components of the rocky intertidal ecosystem in four sites along the Portuguese west coast. The aim was to 1) determine the general food web structure, 2) estimate the trophic level of the dominant organisms and 3) track the incorporation of organic carbon of different origins in the diet of the top consumers. In this food web, fish are top consumers, followed by shrimp. Anemones and gastropods are intermediate consumers, while bivalves and zooplankton are primary consumers. Macroalgae Bifurcaria bifurcata, Ulva lactuca, Fucus vesiculosus, Codium sp. and phytoplankton are the dominant producers. Two energy pathways were identified, pelagic and benthic. Reliance on the benthic energy pathway was high for many of the consumers but not as high as previously observed in subtidal coastal food webs. The maximum TL was 3.3, which is indicative of a relatively short food web. It is argued that the diet of top consumers relies directly on low levels of the food web to a considerable extent, instead of on intermediate levels, which shortens the trophic length of the food web. PMID:26275753

  18. The Mauve Stinger Pelagia noctiluca (Forsskål, 1775. Distribution, Ecology, Toxicity and Epidemiology of Stings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Pane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of Cnidaria is a subject of concern due to its influence on humans. In particular, jellyfish blooms can highly affect human economical activities, such as bathing, fishery, tourism, etc., as well as the public health. Stinging structures of Cnidaria (nematocysts produce remarkable effects on human skin, such as erythema, swelling, burning and vesicles, and at times further severe dermonecrotic, cardio- and neurotoxic effects, which are particularly dangerous in sensitive subjects. In several zones the toxicity of jellyfish is a very important health problem, thus it has stimulated the research on these organisms; to date toxicological research on Cnidarian venoms in the Mediterranean region is not well developed due to the weak poisonousness of venoms of jellyfish and anemones living in this area. In spite of this, during last decades several problems were also caused in the Mediterranean by stinging consequent to Cnidarian blooms mainly caused by Pelagia noctiluca (Forsskål, 1775 which is known to be the most venomous Mediterranean jellyfish. This paper reviews the knowledge on this jellyfish species, particularly considering its occurrence and toxicity.

  19. Strategies toward structural and functional ‘optimization’ of animal peptide toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreotti N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: venoms of a variety of animal species (i.e. scorpions, snakes, spiders, sea anemones, marine cone snails, worms, and insects are rich sources of bioactive compounds that possess obvious pharmacological, therapeutic and/or biotechnological values. A majority of these compounds are peptides that mainly target enzymes, membrane receptors or ion channels. Aim: In recent years, much efforts of researchers have been focused on characterizing and ‘improving’ the pharmacological profile of some venom toxins, mainly because of their structural/functional diversity and potential value as chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of specific human pathologies. Materials and methods: This study reviews the strategies towards optimization of animal peptide toxins. Results: These peptides are most often in a size range that allows their production in vitro by chemical synthesis or genetic engineering. Unfortunately, they rarely display the required characteristics in terms of selectivity, affinity, stability and targeting with regard to the desired application. During the last decade, a number of successful structural approaches or strategies have been developed to improve the intrinsic potential of venom peptides. Using different strategies (reviewed herein, a number of highly potent and selective toxin-derived candidate drugs were designed and produced by chemical synthesis. Conclusion: Such strategies proved to be effective as several toxin-based drugs are already marketed while an increasing number of candidate chemotherapeutics are currently being developed in clinical phase.

  20. Initiation and recovery processes of endotoxin induced disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC: scanning and transmission electron microscopic observations of rat renal tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyashima,Takanao

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the initiation, development and recovery processes of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, rat glomerular capillaries and fibrin thrombi were examined under transmission and scanning electron microscopes. DIC was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (Et., 7.5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide:B, E. coli 026:B6. At 2 h after Et. injection, the endothelial surface of the glomerular capillary became irregular with projections like a sea anemone. At 4 h after Et. injection, agglomerated fibrin thrombi composed of fibrin fiber bundles with fine cross-striated fibriform structures were observed in the capillary lumen. The fibrin thrombi gradually changed into fine reticular systems suggesting a degradation process by 6 h after Et. injection, and formed a coarse granular agglomerate by 8 h after Et. injection. These fibrin thrombi disappeared within 12 h of Et. injection, but the endothelial surface remained edematous. At 24 h after Et. injection, the microstructure of the glomerular capillaries returned normal. Based on these observations, we concluded that DIC was primarily initiated by injury to the capillary endothelium, and that changes on the endothelial surface contributed to the development of DIC.

  1. Transcriptomic responses to heat stress and bleaching in the elkhorn coral Acropora palmata

    KAUST Repository

    DeSalvo, MK

    2010-03-08

    The emergence of genomic tools for reef-building corals and symbiotic anemones comes at a time when alarming losses in coral cover are being observed worldwide. These tools hold great promise in elucidating novel and unforeseen cellular processes underlying the successful mutualism between corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts Symbiodinium spp. Since thermal stress triggers a breakdown in the symbiosis (coral bleaching), measuring the transcriptomic response to thermal stress-induced bleaching offers an extraordinary view of cellular processes that are specific to coral–algal symbioses. In the present study, we utilized a cDNA microarray containing 2059 genes of the threatened Caribbean elkhorn coral Acropora palmata to identify genes that are differentially expressed upon thermal stress. Fragments from replicate colonies were exposed to elevated temperature for 2 d, and samples were frozen for microarray analysis after 24 and 48 h. Totals of 204 and 104 genes were differentially expressed in samples that were collected 1 and 2 d after thermal stress, respectively. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicates a cellular stress response in A. palmata involving (1) growth arrest, (2) chaperone activity, (3) nucleic acid stabilization and repair, and (4) removal of damaged macromolecules. Other differentially expressed processes include sensory perception, metabolite transfer between host and endosymbiont, nitric oxide signaling, and modifications to the actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. The results are compared with those from a previous coral microarray study of thermal stress in Montastraea faveolata, and point to an overall evolutionary conserved bleaching response in scleractinian corals.

  2. Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in Scleractinia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Takaoka, Tori L.; Kuehl,Jennifer; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    Hexacorallia includes the Scleractinia, or stony corals, characterized by having an external calcareous skeleton made of aragonite, and the Corallimorpharia, or mushroom corals, that lack such a skeleton. Although each group has traditionally been considered monophyletic, some molecular phylogenetic analyses have challenged this, suggesting that skeletal features are evolutionarily plastic, and reviving notions that the scleractinian skeleton may be ephemeral and that the group itself may be polyphyletic. Nevertheless, the most comprehensive phylogenetic study of Hexacorallia supported scleractinian monophyly (REF), and so this remains controversial. In order to resolve this contentious issue, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of nine scleractinians and four corallimorpharians and performed phylogenetic analysis that also included three outgroups (an octocoral and two sea anemones). Our data provide the first strong evidence that Scleractinia is paraphyletic and that the Corallimorpharia is derived from within the group, from which we conclude that skeletal loss has occurred in the latter group secondarily. It is possible that a driving force in such skeletal loss could be the high levels of CO{sub 2} in the ocean during the mid-Cretaceous, which would have impacted aragonite solubility. We estimate from molecular divergence measures that the Corallimorpharia arose in the mid-Cretaceous, approximately 87 million years ago (Ma), supporting this view. These data also permit us to date the origin of Scleractinia to 265 Ma, narrowing the gap between the group's phylogenetic origin and its earliest fossil record.

  3. [Intoxications specific to the Aquitaine region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédry, R; Gromb, S

    2009-07-01

    Some intoxications are more specifically linked to the Aquitaine region than to other regions of France, due to environmental circumstances (fauna, flora, climate) or traditional activities (gastronomy). Three types of intoxications are particular in this area. Pine processionary caterpillar envenomations (Thaumetopoea pityocampa), a Southern Europe pinewood parasite, are frequently encountered in the Landes' forest. They are responsible of ocular and/or skin lesions with urticaria or contact dermatitis, seldom associated with immediate IgE hypersensitivity. According to the south Atlantic coastal region geology and the marine streams, venomous marine animals are mainly located in Charente-Maritime for jellyfish, in Gironde and in Landes for weeverfish and in Atlantic Pyrenees for sea anemone. Usually not dangerous, first-aid workers treat most cases of these envenomations. Some endemic mushrooms (Tricholoma auratum) which grow on the dunes of the Atlantic coastal region, are usually considered as very good comestibles, but were recently responsible for serious intoxications: T.auratum was responsible of several cases of rhabdomyolysis, without neurological involvement, nor renal or hepatic lesion. Three deaths were notified. Animal studies confirmed the responsibility of the mushrooms. PMID:19375827

  4. Mutation Breeding of various spray chrysanthemum cultivars by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to analyze mutation rate and spectrum of chrysanthemum by gamma-ray irradiation. Five flower types, 16 cultivars including 'Geumsu', 'Hwiparam', 'Ilwol', 'Magic', 'Moonlight', 'Noblewine', 'Pinky', 'Progy', 'Sangtte', 'Waterfog', 'Whitneypangpang', 'Yelloweye', 'Yellowpangpang', 'Yesmiso', 'Yesmorning', and 'Yestogether' were irradiated as 30, 50, and 70 Gy dose during 24 hours. As a result, mutation rate was identified as the highest in single type among five flower types, but there was a little difference according to cultivars. Mutation rate was increased in proportion to irradiation dose in anemone, pompon, and spider type cultivars, but there wasn't clear in single and semi-double type cultivars. Mutation spectrum was identified as the highest in the cultivar 'Noblewine'. The most sensitive cultivars to radiation were revealed as 'Noblewine' and 'Yesmorning' and the least were Moonlight', 'Waterfog', and 'Yellowpangpang'. Consequently, there was much difference in radio-sensitivity according to cultivars of chrysanthemum and flower type was correlated a little with mutation rate

  5. Expression in Pichia pastoris and characterization of APETx2, a specific inhibitor of acid sensing ion channel 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anangi, Raveendra; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Wen; Cheng, Yuan-Ren; Cheng, Chun-Ho; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chu, Yuan-Ping; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2010-12-01

    Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are family of proteins predominantly present in the central and peripheral nervous system. They are known to play important roles in the pathophysiology of pain and ischemic stroke. APETx2 is a potent and selective inhibitor of ASIC3-containing channels and was isolated from sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. To facilitate the study on the molecular determinants of ASIC3-ligand interactions, we expressed recombinant APETx2 in the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression system and purified it to homogeneity. Recombinant APETx2 produced in P. pastoris inhibited the acid-evoked ASIC3 current with the IC(50) value of 37.3 nM. The potency of recombinant toxin is similar to that of native APETx2. The sequential assignment and structure analysis of APETx2 were obtained by 2D and 3D (15)N-edited NMR spectra. Our NMR data suggests that APETx2 produced in P. pastoris retained its native fold. The results presented here provide the first direct evidence that highly disulfide bonded peptide inhibitor of ASIC3, APETx2, can be expressed in P. pastoris with correct fold and high yield. We also showed that the R17A mutant exhibited a decrease in activity, suggesting the feasibility of the use of this expression system to study the interactions between APETx2 and ASIC3. These evidences may serve as the basis for understanding the selectivity and activity of APETx2. PMID:20813121

  6. Coral Reef Bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep Atolls, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramar Vinoth; Mohan Gopi; Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith Kumar; Thirunavukarassu Thangaradjou; Thangavel Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010.Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon,which triggered widespread bleaching of corals.The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%).The SST increased up to 34 ℃ with an average maximum SST of 32.5℃ during the study period between May and June 2010.Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side.This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST.Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010,at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  7. The mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein in marine invertebrates: biochemical purification and molecular characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choresh, Omer; Loya, Yossi; Müller, Werner E.G.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Azem, Abdussalam

    2004-01-01

    Sessile marine invertebrates undergo constant direct exposure to the surrounding environmental conditions, including local and global environmental fluctuations that may lead to fatal protein damage. Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) constitutes an important defense mechanism that protects these organisms from deleterious stress conditions. In a previous study, we reported the immunological detection of a 60-kDa Hsp (Hsp60) in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (formerly called Anemonia sulcata) and studied its expression under a variety of stress conditions. In the present study, we show that the sponge Tetilla sp. from tidal habitats with a highly variable temperature regime is characterized by an increased level of Hsp60. Moreover, we show the expression of Hsp60 in various species among Porifera and Cnidaria, suggesting a general importance of this protein among marine invertebrates. We further cloned the hsp60 gene from A viridis, using a combination of conventional protein isolation methods and screening of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid library by polymerase chain reaction. The cloned sequence (1764 bp) encodes for a protein of 62.8 kDa (588 amino acids). The 62.8-kDa protein, which contains an amino terminal extension that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal, shares a significant identity with mitochondrial Hsp60s from several animals but less identity with Hsp60s from either bacteria or plants. PMID:15270076

  8. Tox-Prot, the toxin protein annotation program of the Swiss-Prot protein knowledgebase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungo, Florence; Bairoch, Amos

    2005-03-01

    The Tox-Prot program was initiated in order to provide the scientific community a summary of the current knowledge on animal protein toxins. The aim of this program is to systematically annotate all proteins which act as toxins and are produced by venomous and poisonous animals. Venomous animals such as snakes, scorpions, spiders, jellyfish, insects, cone snails, sea anemones, lizards, some fish, and platypus are equipped with a specialized organ to inject venom in their prey. In contrast, poisonous animals such as some fish or worms, lack such organs. Each toxin is annotated according to the quality standards of Swiss-Prot. This means providing a wealth of information that includes the description of the function, domain structure, subcellular location, tissue specificity, variants, similarities to other proteins, keywords, etc. In the framework of this program, particular care has been made to capture what is known on the function and mode of action, posttranslational modifications and 3D structural data which are all relatively abundant in the field of protein toxins. Researchers are welcome to contribute their knowledge to the scientific community by submitting relevant findings to Swiss-Prot concerning toxins at Tox-Prot@isb-sib.ch. More information on Tox-Prot can be found at http://www.expasy.org/sprot/tox-prot. PMID:15683867

  9. The Mucus of Actinia equina (Anthozoa, Cnidaria: An Unexplored Resource for Potential Applicative Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Stabili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mucus produced by many marine organisms is a complex mixture of proteins and polysaccharides forming a weak watery gel. It is essential for vital processes including locomotion, navigation, structural support, heterotrophic feeding and defence against a multitude of environmental stresses, predators, parasites, and pathogens. In the present study we focused on mucus produced by a benthic cnidarian, the sea anemone Actinia equina (Linnaeus, 1758 for preventing burial by excess sedimentation and for protection. We investigated some of the physico-chemical properties of this matrix such as viscosity, osmolarity, electrical conductivity, protein, carbohydrate, and total lipid contents. Some biological activities such as hemolytic, cytotoxic, and antibacterial lysozyme-like activities were also studied. The A. equina mucus is mainly composed by water (96.2% ± 0.3%, whereas its dry weight is made of 24.2% ± 1.3% proteins and 7.8% ± 0.2% carbohydrates, with the smallest and largest components referable to lipids (0.9% and inorganic matter (67.1%. The A. equina mucus matrix exhibited hemolytic activity on rabbit erythrocytes, cytotoxic activity against the tumor cell line K562 (human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia and antibacterial lysozyme-like activity. The findings from this study improve the available information on the mucus composition in invertebrates and have implications for future investigations related to exploitation of A. equina and other sea anemones’ mucus as a source of bioactive compounds of high pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest.

  10. Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1, an unusual hemolysin from the nematocyst venom of Hydra magnipapillata which belongs to an extended gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Eliezra; Rachamim, Tamar; Aharonovich, Dikla; Sher, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Cnidarians rely on their nematocysts and the venom injected through these unique weaponry systems to catch prey and protect themselves from predators. The development and physiology of the nematocysts of Hydra magnipapillata, a classic model organism, have been intensively studied, yet the composition and biochemical activity of their venom components are mostly unknown. Here, we show that hydra actinoporin-like toxins (HALTs), which have previously been associated with Hydra nematocysts, belong to a multigene family comprising six genes, which have diverged from a single common ancestor. All six genes are expressed in a population of Hydra magnipapillata. When expressed recombinantly, HALT-1 (Δ-HYTX-Hma1a), an actinoporin-like protein found in the stenoteles (the main penetrating nematocysts used in prey capture), reveals hemolytic activity, albeit about two-thirds lower than that of the anemone actinoporin equinatoxin II (EqTII, Δ-AITX-Aeq1a). HALT-1 also differs from EqTII in the size of its pores, and likely does not utilize sphingomyelin as a membrane receptor. We describe features of the HALT-1 sequence which may contribute to this difference in activity, and speculate on the role of this unusual family of pore-forming toxins in the ecology of Hydra. PMID:24768765

  11. Coral larvae move toward reef sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J A Vermeij

    Full Text Available Free-swimming larvae of tropical corals go through a critical life-phase when they return from the open ocean to select a suitable settlement substrate. During the planktonic phase of their life cycle, the behaviours of small coral larvae (<1 mm that influence settlement success are difficult to observe in situ and are therefore largely unknown. Here, we show that coral larvae respond to acoustic cues that may facilitate detection of habitat from large distances and from upcurrent of preferred settlement locations. Using in situ choice chambers, we found that settling coral larvae were attracted to reef sounds, produced mainly by fish and crustaceans, which we broadcast underwater using loudspeakers. Our discovery that coral larvae can detect and respond to sound is the first description of an auditory response in the invertebrate phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, anemones, and hydroids as well as corals. If, like settlement-stage reef fish and crustaceans, coral larvae use reef noise as a cue for orientation, the alleviation of noise pollution in the marine environment may gain further urgency.

  12. Domain combination of the vertebrate-like TLR gene family: implications for their origin and evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baojun Wu; Tianxiao Huan; Jing Gong; Pin Zhou; Zengliang Bai

    2011-12-01

    Domain shuffling, which is an important mechanism in the evolution of multi-domain proteins, has shaped the evolutionary development of the immune system in animals. Toll and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of proteins that play a key role in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Draft genome sequences provide the opportunity to compare the Toll/TLR gene repertoire among representative metazoans. In this study, we investigated the combination of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains of metazoan Toll/TLRs. Before Toll with both domains occurred in Cnidaria (sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis), through domain combinations, TIR-only and LRR-only proteins had already appeared in sponges (Amphimedon queenslandica). Although vertebrate-like TIR (V-TIR) domain already appeared in Cnidaria, the vertebrate-like TLR (V-TLR) with both domains appeared much later. The first combination between V-TIR domain and vertebrate-like LRR (V-LRR) domain for V-TLR may have occurred after the divergence of Cnidaria and bilateria. Then, another combination for V-TLR, a recombination of both domains, possibly occurred before or during the evolution of primitive vertebrates. Taken together, two rounds of domain combinations may thus have co-shaped the vertebrate TLRs.

  13. A novel astaxanthin-binding photooxidative stress-inducible aqueous carotenoprotein from a eukaryotic microalga isolated from asphalt in midsummer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Mizuguchi, Keisuke; Sato, Masaru; Kono, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hirofumi

    2013-07-01

    Water-soluble orange carotenoid proteins (OCPs) that bind 3'-hydroxyechinenone are found in cyanobacteria, and are thought to play a key role in photoprotection. The distribution of OCPs in eukaryotes remains largely unknown. In this study, we identified a novel OCP that predominantly binds astaxanthin from a eukaryotic microalga, strain Ki-4, isolated from a dry surface of heated asphalt in midsummer. A purified astaxanthin-binding OCP, named AstaP, shows high solubility in water with an absorption peak at 484 nm, and possesses a heat-stable activity that quenches singlet oxygen. The deduced amino acid sequence of AstaP comprises an N-terminal hydrophobic signal peptide, fasciclin domains found in secreted and cell surface proteins, and N-linked glycosylation sites, the first example of a carotenoprotein among fasciclin family proteins. AstaP homologs of unknown function are distributed mainly in organisms from the hydrosphere, such as marine bacteria, cyanobacteria, sea anemone and eukaryotic microalgae; however, AstaP exhibits a unique extraordinarily high isoelectric point (pI) value among homologs. The gene encoding AstaP, as well as the AstaP peptide, is expressed abundantly under conditions of dehydration and salt stress in conjunction with high light exposure. As a unique aqueous carotenoprotein, AstaP will provide a novel function of OCPs in protection against extreme photooxidative stresses. PMID:23737502

  14. Deep-sea food web analysis using cross-reacting antisera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Robert J.; Zagursky, Gregory; Day, Elizabeth A.

    1985-04-01

    The high incidence of unrecognizable prey in the stomachs of deep-sea predators prompted the application of serological methods for identification of trophic connections. Antisera to whole-organism extracts of estuarine taxa cross-reacted with antigenic protein extracts of mid-water and deep-sea taxa along phylogenetically correct lines, indicating their potential as tools for gut contents immunoassay. Stomach, intestine, and rectum contents of grenadiers ( Coryphaenoides armatus) trapped at 2500 m in the North Atlantic were analyzed visually and with 32 antisera representing taxa from 10 common deep-sea phyla. While visual analysis only revealed the presence of fluids, parasites, crustacean exoskeletons, and gastropod opercula, the immunoassay indicated the presence of antigenic proteins from holothurian, anemone, gastropod, decapod, and foraminiferan prey in the same samples. This qualitative serological identification of prey at non-specific taxonomic levels provides evidence that benthic predation may be important within deep-sea communities. The immunoassay technique, although not a panacea for elucidating food web dynamics in remote environments, may be useful when other methods fail to identify trophic pathways.

  15. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore-forming proteins sticholysin I and II is modulated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions as well as lipid composition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uris Ros; Lohans Pedrera; Daylín Díaz; Juan C De Karam; Tatiane P Sudbrack; Pedro A Valiente; Diana Martínez; Eduardo M Cilli; Fabiola Pazos; Rosangela Itri; Maria E Lanio; Shirley Schreier; Carlos Álvarez

    2011-12-01

    The sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus produces two pore-forming proteins, sticholysins I and II (St I and St II). Despite their high identity (93%), these toxins exhibit differences in hemolytic activity that can be related to those found in their N-terminal. To clarify the contribution of the N-terminal amino acid residues to the activity of the toxins, we synthesized peptides spanning residues 1–31 of St I (StI1-31) or 1–30 of St II (StII1-30) and demonstrated that StII1-30 promotes erythrocyte lysis to a higher extent than StI1-31. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the peptide activity, here we studied their binding to lipid monolayers and pemeabilizing activity in liposomes. For this, we examined the effect on peptide membranotropic activity of including phospatidic acid and cholesterol in a lipid mixture of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. The results suggest the importance of continuity of the 1–10 hydrophobic sequence in StII1-30 for displaying higher binding and activity, in spite of both peptides’ abilities to form pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, the different peptide membranotropic action is explained in terms of the differences in hydrophobic and electrostatic peptide properties as well as the enhancing role of membrane inhomogeneities.

  16. Chromophore Deprotonation State Alters the Optical Properties of Blue Chromoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yi Chiang

    Full Text Available Chromoproteins (CPs have unique colors and can be used in biological applications. In this work, a novel blue CP with a maximum absorption peak (λmax at 608 nm was identified from the carpet anemone Stichodactyla gigantea (sgBP. In vivo expression of sgBP in zebrafish would change the appearance of the fishes to have a blue color, indicating the potential biomarker function. To enhance the color properties, the crystal structure of sgBP at 2.25 Å resolution was determined to allow structure-based protein engineering. Among the mutations conducted in the Gln-Tyr-Gly chromophore and chromophore environment, a S157C mutation shifted the λmax to 604 nm with an extinction coefficient (ε of 58,029 M-1·cm-1 and darkened the blue color expression. The S157C mutation in the sgBP chromophore environment could affect the color expression by altering the deprotonation state of the phenolic group in the chromophore. Our results provide a structural basis for the blue color enhancement of the biomarker development.

  17. A thrombospondin in the anthozoan Nematostella vectensis is associated with the nervous system and upregulated during regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Tucker

    2012-12-01

    Thrombospondins are multimeric extracellular matrix glycoproteins that play important roles in development, synaptogenesis and wound healing in mammals. We previously identified four putative thrombospondins in the genome of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. This study presents the first analysis of these thrombospondins, with the goals of understanding fundamental roles of thrombospondins in the Eumetazoa. Reverse transcriptase PCR showed that each of the N. vectensis thrombospondins (Nv85341, Nv22035, Nv168100 and Nv30790 is transcribed. Three of the four thrombospondins include an RGD or KGD motif in their thrombospondin type 3 repeats at sites equivalent to mammalian thrombospondins, suggesting ancient roles as RGD integrin ligands. Phylogenetic analysis based on the C-terminal regions demonstrated a high level of sequence diversity between N. vectensis thrombospondins. A full-length cDNA sequence was obtained for Nv168100 (NvTSP168100, which has an unusual domain organization. Immunohistochemistry with an antibody to NvTSP168100 revealed labeling of neuron-like cells in the mesoglea of the retractor muscles and the pharynx. In situ hybridization and quantitative PCR showed that NvTSP168100 is upregulated during regeneration. Immunohistochemistry of the area of regeneration identified strong immunostaining of the glycocalyx, the carbohydrate-rich matrix coating the epidermis, and electron microscopy identified changes in glycocalyx organization during regeneration. Thus, N. vectensis thrombospondins share structural features with thrombospondins from mammals and may have roles in the nervous system and in matrix reorganization during regeneration.

  18. Palytoxin found in Palythoa sp. zoanthids (Anthozoa, Hexacorallia sold in the home aquarium trade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Deeds

    Full Text Available Zoanthids (Anthozoa, Hexacorallia are colonial anemones that contain one of the deadliest toxins ever discovered, palytoxin (LD(50 in mice 300 ng/kg, but it is generally believed that highly toxic species are not sold in the home aquarium trade. We previously showed that an unintentionally introduced zoanthid in a home aquarium contained high concentrations of palytoxin and was likely responsible for a severe respiratory reaction when an individual attempted to eliminate the contaminant colonies using boiling water. To assess the availability and potential exposure of palytoxin to marine aquarium hobbyists, we analyzed zoanthid samples collected from local aquarium stores for palytoxin using liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry and attempted to identify the specimens through genetic analysis of 16S and cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI markers. We found four specimens of the same apparent species of zoanthid, that we described previously to be responsible for a severe respiratory reaction in a home aquarium, to be available in three aquarium stores in the Washington D.C. area. We found all of these specimens (n = 4 to be highly toxic with palytoxin or palytoxin-like compounds (range 0.5-3.5 mg crude toxin/g zoanthid. One of the most potent non-protein compounds ever discovered is present in dangerous quantities in a select species of zoanthid commonly sold in the home aquarium trade.

  19. Identification of a membrane-bound prepore species clarifies the lytic mechanism of actinoporins

    CERN Document Server

    Morante, Koldo; Gil-Cartón, David; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Sot, Jesús; Scheuring, Simon; Valle, Mikel; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M

    2016-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are cytolytic proteins belonging to the molecular warfare apparatus of living organisms. The assembly of the functional transmembrane pore requires several intermediate steps ranging from a water-soluble monomeric species to the multimeric ensemble inserted in the cell membrane. The non-lytic oligomeric intermediate known as prepore plays an essential role in the mechanism of insertion of the class of $\\beta$-PFT. However, in the class of $\\alpha$-PFT like the actinoporins produced by sea anemones, evidence of membrane-bound prepores is still lacking. We have employed single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify, for the first time, a prepore species of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) bound to lipid vesicles. The size of the prepore coincides that of the functional pore, except for the transmembrane region, which is absent in the prepore. Biochemical assays indicated that, in the prepore species, the N-terminus is not inserte...

  20. Signatures of interchange reconnection: STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations combined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Combining STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations has presented an opportunity to follow a filament eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME on 17 October 2007 from an active region (AR inside a coronal hole (CH into the heliosphere. This particular combination of "open" and closed magnetic topologies provides an ideal scenario for interchange reconnection to take place. With Hinode and STEREO data we were able to identify the emergence time and type of structure seen in the in-situ data four days later. On the 21st, ACE observed in-situ the passage of an ICME with "open" magnetic topology. The magnetic field configuration of the source, a mature AR located inside an equatorial CH, has important implications for the solar and interplanetary signatures of the eruption. We interpret the formation of an "anemone" structure of the erupting AR and the passage in-situ of the ICME being disconnected at one leg, as manifested by uni-directional suprathermal electron flux in the ICME, to be a direct result of interchange reconnection between closed loops of the CME originating from the AR and "open" field lines of the surrounding CH.

  1. Signatures of Interchange Reconnection: STEREO, ACE and Hinode Observations Combined

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Demoulin, P; Harra, L K; Lavraud, B; Davies, J A; Optiz, A; Luhmann, J G; Sauvaud, J A; Galvin, A B

    2009-01-01

    Combining STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations has presented an opportunity to follow a filament eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME) on the 17th of October 2007 from an active region (AR) inside a coronal hole (CH) into the heliosphere. This particular combination of `open' and closed magnetic topologies provides an ideal scenario for interchange reconnection to take place. With Hinode and STEREO data we were able to identify the emergence time and type of structure seen in the in-situ data four days later. On the 21st, ACE observed in-situ the passage of an ICME with `open' magnetic topology. The magnetic field configuration of the source, a mature AR located inside an equatorial CH, has important implications for the solar and interplanetary signatures of the eruption. We interpret the formation of an `anemone' structure of the erupting AR and the passage in-situ of the ICME being disconnected at one leg, as manifested by uni-directional suprathermal electron flux in the ICME, to be a direct result of i...

  2. [Dangerous marine animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antensteiner, G

    1999-01-01

    Sea-biological basic knowledge for divers is offered only in special lessons for advanced scuba divers. According to statistics, however, five per cent of the deadly diving accidents are caused by underwater organisms. This number could be reduced to a fraction, by correct behaviour during the dive and after an accident. The most frequent accidents with sea animals during water sports are not by unprovoked shark attacks, which cause six deaths world-wide per year on the average, but turn out with usually well camouflaged sea inhabitants, that do not attack humans, rather by their inadvertence coincidentally get in contact with it. The various defense instruments of the often small, inconspicuous organisms reach from teeth over poison stings, pricks, spines, scalpelles, nettle injections and chemical weapons up to poison arrows. Due to that variety of the maritime life, the most important representatives of its type are explained including severity level of the caused injury or contamination. Both, diagnostic position and therapy possibility are described as follows: 1. Porifera (sponge), 2. Hydrozoa (white weed, yellow flower head), Actinaria (sea anemones), 3. Conidae (cone shells), Tridocna (giant clam), octopoda (octopus), 4. Acanthaster planci (crown of thorns), Echinodea (sea urchins), Holothurioidea (sea cucumber), 5. Selachoidei (shark), Batoidei (Ray), Muraenidae (moray), Plotosidae (barbel eels), Synanciidae (stonefish), Scorpaenidae (scorpionfish), Pterois (lion fish), Sphyraena Spec. (barracuda), Balistidae (triggerfish), Ostracionidae (puffer). PMID:11315406

  3. [Marine life envenomations: example in New Caledonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rual, F

    1999-01-01

    Marine life in the waters of New Caledonia is extraordinarily rich. However some of the animals inhabiting this wonderland are dangerous including a number of venomous species. A retrospective study conducted at the Territorial Hospital in Noumea for the three-year period between 1995 and 1998 showed that nearly 200 people/year were victims of envenomation by marine animals. Findings also indicated that the incidence of envenomation was rising as the practice of marine activities by the local population and tourists increased. Venomous species can be classified into 4 categories according to the mechanism of envenomation, i.e., biting animals such as sea snakes, cephalopoda, and eels; stinging animals including not only fish such as scorpion fish (Pterois, stonefish), sting-rays, saltwater catfish, surgeon fish, and flatfish but also cones and crown of thorns (Acanthaster planci); animals with contact venoms such as cnidaria (jellyfish, corals, sea anemones, and men-of-war), glaucus, sea cucumbers (holothurioidae), and sponges; and animals with more than one envenomation apparatus such as sea urchins and sea worms which can bite and sting. Study focused on the characteristics of each species including biology, envenomation apparatus, and chemical composition and action of the venom; pharmacological and clinical aspects of envenomation; and management and prevention of accidents. PMID:10701210

  4. Biological and Geological Characteristics of the Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, T. M.; Bailey, J.; Edmonds, H.; Forte, P.; Helmke, E.; Humphris, S.; Kemp, J.; Nakamura, K.; Reves-Sohn, R.; Singh, H.; Willis, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) is one of the slowest (1.0 cm per yr), deepest (5000 m axial depth), and most hydrographically and tectonically isolated mid-ocean ridge systems on earth. This isolation from the global ridge system should have profound implications for the evolution and ecology of resident chemosynthetic fauna. The July 2007 Arctic GAkkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) sought to define this Arctic biogeographic province and the relationship of Arctic vent fauna to Atlantic, Pacific, and hydrocarbon seep fauna through the use of an new under- ice vehicle `Camper', a fiber-optic video-guided sampling system drift towed 1 to 3 m above the seafloor. The imaging, sampling, and sensing capabilities were used to obtain high-resolution seafloor imagery to identify and collect benthic samples with a clamshell `grab' sampler and a suction 'slurp' sampler. Imagery from five video cameras, including obliquely-mounted video and downlooking digital high-definition color cameras were used to construct maps of seafloor features and faunal composition during 3 dives in the peridotite-hosted 7°E region and 13 dives in the volcanic 85°E region. The 7°E site was dominated by an almost continuous cover of pelagic sediment with abundant animal tracks, brittle stars, anemones, and shrimp. The explored 85°E area was dominated by relatively diverse and young lava morphologies- from large pillows hosting delicate surface ornamentation to lobates, long lava tubes, and fresh sheet flows, all with the upper surfaces covered (often cm thick) of fresh volcanic glass 'sediment' suggestive of explosive volcanic activity in the `recent' past. Fauna in these areas consisted mainly of sponges, anemones, amphipods and shrimp. Characterization of the newly-discovered Asgard volcanic chain, including `Oden', `Thor', and `Loke' volcanoes, in the 85°E axial valley revealed extensive microbial mats in the form of: 1) yellow `fluffy' material (often >5 cm thick) in places; and 2) yellow

  5. Patrones asociados a la conducta de desplazamiento local en Phymactis clematis Drayton (Anthozoa: Actiniidae Patterns of local movement behavior in Phymactis clematis Drayton (Anthozoa: Actiniidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO M. RIVADENEIRA

    2001-12-01

    species of sea anemone along the South American coast. Likewise other sea anemone species, the adults of the P. clematis would have an active ability to make local movements. However, these have not been properly described, and causal factors are unknown. In this work we try to describe some of the basic patterns associated to the local movement behavior in P. clematis, assessed indirectly from the presence of bare rock halos around individuals in two rocky intertidal sites in the coast of northern Chile (Cavancha and Colorado Chico. Movements were more frequent and had a higher intensity at Colorado Chico, where over 50 % of individuals showed movements, although they were mainly lower than 60 mm in length. At Colorado Chico, movements would occur in individuals larger than 40 mm of pedal diameter, whereas their intensity would decrease with body size. We discussed that causes of higher movement activity at Colorado Chico could be associated to the higher abundance and lower inter-individual spacing, which would produce physical interference among individuals. In this way, we suggested that the patterns associated to the individual's body size would arise secondarily, being dependent on the levels of local abundance. Despite local movements of P. clematis at Colorado Chico occurred at a scale of a few centimeters, they could be affecting significantly the inter-individual spacing, increasing the average nearest neighbor distance. We argue that local movements could be an effective mechanism reducing the intraspecific competition in P. clematis

  6. Are Hox genes ancestrally involved in axial patterning? Evidence from the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria.

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    Roxane Chiori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a "Hox code" predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations.

  7. Response of megabenthic assemblages to different scales of habitat heterogeneity on the Mauritanian slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O. B.; Brewer, Michael E.

    2012-09-01

    The topographically complex deep seabed on the Mauritanian slope, from 990 to 1460 m water depth, was imaged with video in an extensive quantitative survey of 17,199 m2 of seafloor using a Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV). This study investigated the influence of habitat heterogeneity at two scales on the megafaunal assemblages observed by ROV. Changes in megafaunal assemblages on the Mauritanian slope were assessed at a broad scale, within depth zones, and at a finer scale, in response to changes in local geomorphology associated with submarine landslides. Geomorphology was determined by classification of habitat parameters (slope, aspect, bathymetric position, curvature, fractal dimension and ruggedness) derived from an autonomous underwater vehicle-based multibeam bathymetry survey. Habitat parameters were classified by Iterative Self Organizing Clustering into six major geomorphological groups, four of which were assessed in the ROV video survey. A total of 29 megafaunal taxa were observed along the entire survey, with an overall average faunal density of 0.344 ind m-2. Megafaunal assemblage density, species richness and evenness varied significantly across the depth range of the survey in the most common geomorphological zone (sedimentary plains of low slope and complexity). Characteristic species inhabited the shallow areas (asteroid, ophiuroid, anemone, small macrourid), intermediate areas (Benthothuria funabris, black cerianthid, squat lobster) and deeper areas (the holothurians Enypniastes eximia and Elipidia echinata). Megafaunal density, species richness and evenness were not significantly different between geomorphogical groups within one depth zone (1300-1400 m). However, the steepest zone, on the edge of a major headwall feature, had four unique taxa (Parapagurus pilosimanus, a comatulid crinoid, a gorgonian and its associated ophiuroid).

  8. Na+ channels as sites of action of the cardioactive agent DPI 201-106 with agonist and antagonist enantiomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows the interaction of the cardiotonic agent 4-[3-(4-diphenylmethyl-1-piperazinyl)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (DPI 201-106) and its optic enantiomers R-DPI (205-429) and S-DPI (205-430) with the Na+ channel of a variety of excitable cells. Voltage-clamp experiments show that DPI 201-106 acts on neuroblastoma cells and rat cardiac cells. S-DPI (205-430) increases the peak Na+ current, slows down the kinetics of Na+ channel inactivation, and is cardiotonic on heart cells. Conversely, R-DPI (205-429) reduces the peak Na+ current and blocks Na+ channel activity and cardiac contractions. Binding experiments using radioactively labeled toxins indicate that DPI 201-106 and its enantiomers do not interact with sites already identified for tetrodotoxin or sea anemone and scorpion toxins. DPI 201-106 and its enantiomers inhibit binding of a 3H-labeled batrachotoxin derivative, [3H]batrachotoxinin A 20-α-benzoate, to brain membranes. The dissociation constant of the complex formed between the Na+ channel and both R-DPI and S-DPI is K/sub d/ ∼ 100 nM. 22Na+ uptake experiments using different cell types have shown that R and S enantiomers of DPI 201-106 are active on the different Na+ channel subtypes with similar IC50 values. These results are discussed in relation with the cardiotonic properties of DPI 201-106 that are not accompanied by cardiotoxic effects

  9. Mutations in Nature Conferred a High Affinity Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate-binding Site in Vertebrate Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Larry, Trevor; Hendra, Kalen; Yamamoto, Erica; Bell, Jessica; Cui, Meng; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Boland, Linda M

    2015-07-01

    All vertebrate inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels are activated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) (Logothetis, D. E., Petrou, V. I., Zhang, M., Mahajan, R., Meng, X. Y., Adney, S. K., Cui, M., and Baki, L. (2015) Annu. Rev. Physiol. 77, 81-104; Fürst, O., Mondou, B., and D'Avanzo, N. (2014) Front. Physiol. 4, 404-404). Structural components of a PIP2-binding site are conserved in vertebrate Kir channels but not in distantly related animals such as sponges and sea anemones. To expand our understanding of the structure-function relationships of PIP2 regulation of Kir channels, we studied AqKir, which was cloned from the marine sponge Amphimedon queenslandica, an animal that represents the phylogenetically oldest metazoans. A requirement for PIP2 in the maintenance of AqKir activity was examined in intact oocytes by activation of a co-expressed voltage-sensing phosphatase, application of wortmannin (at micromolar concentrations), and activation of a co-expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. All three mechanisms to reduce the availability of PIP2 resulted in inhibition of AqKir current. However, time-dependent rundown of AqKir currents in inside-out patches could not be re-activated by direct application to the inside membrane surface of water-soluble dioctanoyl PIP2, and the current was incompletely re-activated by the more hydrophobic arachidonyl stearyl PIP2. When we introduced mutations to AqKir to restore two positive charges within the vertebrate PIP2-binding site, both forms of PIP2 strongly re-activated the mutant sponge channels in inside-out patches. Molecular dynamics simulations validate the additional hydrogen bonding potential of the sponge channel mutants. Thus, nature's mutations conferred a high affinity activation of vertebrate Kir channels by PIP2, and this is a more recent evolutionary development than the structures that explain ion channel selectivity and inward rectification. PMID:25957411

  10. CoralWatch Data Analysis at Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park, Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A.; Hodgson, P.

    2015-12-01

    CoralWatch is a conservation organization that is based at the University of Queensland in Australia. Their development of the "Coral Health Chart" standardized the colour of corals for the further investigation of coral health and bleaching. The location of this project is in the NE part of Hong Kong in New Territories. The location faces ShenZhen, a heavily industrialized city, which is known for its pollution of the Pearl River. This area is protected by the Hong Kong Government and the WWF since 1996.Human activities have caused large amounts of greenhouse gasses to be released into the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide has caused the global temperature to rise and made ocean waters more acidic due to ocean respiration. The ocean is a carbon sink for mankind and the effect of severe acidification is negatively affecting marine life. The increase of temperature diminishes the amount of diversity of marine life; the decreasing acidity of the water has eliminated many species of shellfish and sea anemone; the increase of marine exploitation has decreased the diversity of marine life. The release of toxic waste, mainly mercury, waste and plastic products has also polluted the oceans which negatively impact coral reefs and endanger marine life.The data has been collected by observing the colours and discolouration (bleaching) of the corals of approximately 40 colonies per month. The species of coral in Hoi Ha Wan include, Favites flexuosa, Goniopora columna,Leptastrea purpurea, Lithophyllon undulatum, Pavona decussata. and Platygyra acuta (AFCD,1). The evaluation of four years of coralwatch data has shown the bleaching of hard boulder corals in Hoi Ha Wan, Hong Kong, has halted and the reefs are being to show signs of regeneration. Local marine biologists credited the improved situation of the corals to protected status of the area.

  11. A critical assessment of marine aquarist biodiversity data and commercial aquaculture: identifying gaps in culture initiatives to inform local fisheries managers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M Murray

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that if well managed, the marine aquarium trade could provide socio-economic stability to local communities while incentivising the maintenance of coral reefs. However, the trade has also been implicated as having potentially widespread environmental impacts that has in part driven developments in aquaculture to relieve wild collection pressures. This study investigates the biodiversity in hobbyist aquaria (using an online survey and those species currently available from an aquaculture source (commercial data and hobbyist initiatives in the context of a traffic light system to highlight gaps in aquaculture effort and identify groups that require fisheries assessments. Two hundred and sixty nine species including clown fish, damsels, dotty backs, angelfish, gobies, sea horses and blennies, have reported breeding successes by hobbyists, a pattern mirrored by the European and US commercial organisations. However, there is a mismatch (high demand and low/non-existent aquaculture for a number of groups including tangs, starfish, anemones and hermit crabs, which we recommend are priority candidates for local stock assessments. Hobbyist perception towards the concept of a sustainable aquarium trade is also explored with results demonstrating that only 40% of respondents were in agreement with industry and scientists who believe the trade could be an exemplar of a sustainable use of coral reefs. We believe that a more transparent evidence base, including the publication of the species collected and cultured, will go some way to align the concept of a sustainable trade across industry stakeholders and better inform the hobbyist when purchasing their aquaria stock. We conclude by proposing that a certification scheme established with government support is the most effective way to move towards a self-regulating industry. It would prevent industry "greenwashing" from multiple certification schemes, alleviate conservation concerns

  12. Impact of grazing management with large herbivores on forest ground flora and bramble understorey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Uytvanck, Jan; Hoffmann, Maurice

    2009-07-01

    We investigated whether grazing management with large herbivores is appropriate to reduce expanding bramble ( Rubus sp.) in an ancient forest in Flanders (N. Belgium). We further studied interaction effects of four years (all year-round) grazing and Rubus cover on the presence, cover, and flowering of five forest ground flora species (unpalatable: Anemone nemorosa and Primula elatior; palatable: Hyacinthoides non-scripta, Vinca minor and Hedera helix). We collected data on eight transects and in 412 plots in adjacent grazed and ungrazed forest and used baseline datasets of 1996 and 2002 in the same area (i.e. before grazing). In a field experiment, we simulated grazing (by clipping) and trampling (by pressing a weight) in eight homogeneous A. nemorosa vegetation stands. Large Rubus thickets had a clear negative impact on cover and flowering of A. nemorosa due to competition for light. Four years of cattle grazing reduced bramble cover by more than 50%, but then the limiting factor for A. nemorosa cover and flowering shifted to trampling damage. We also found lower cover and flowering of H. non-scripta in grazed plots, as a consequence of direct grazing. The evergreen species V. minor and H. helix totally disappeared from the grazed forest. Simulated once-only effects of grazing and trampling had a small and short term negative impact on cover of A. nemorosa, but flowering was strongly reduced. Grazing reduced biomass with 25-30% in the following years. Year-round grazing with large herbivores is an appropriate measure for bramble control in forests, but negative effects on ground flora are possible if grazing pressure is high. A low or moderate grazing pressure (<0.25 animal units ha -1 y -1) should be maintained in landscape mosaics with grassland and forest; or intermittent periods of non-grazing should be provided to maintain forest ground flora diversity.

  13. Identification Of Some Strains Of Dinoflagellates Based On Morphology And Molecular Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmah Thoha

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are the important primary producers in aquatic environments. In oceans, they play interesting role in ecological functions such as red tide forming organisms, symbiont of coral reef or sea anemone and DSP (Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning or PSP (Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning producing organisms. Morphology and molecular analysis of dinoflagellates were conducted on November 2002 to March 2003. The phylogenetic studies based on 18S rDNA analyses, sequence have begun to appear more frequently in the literature, as attention has turned to relationships within the major eukaryotic lineages, particular importance for the taxonomy of the armored and unarmored genera of dinoflagellates (Gyrodinium sp., Cachonina sp., Gymnodinium sp., Amphidinium sp., because many of the genera cause extensive plankton blooms, fish kills and other harmful events, were studied used to amplify 18S rDNA, present in the total DNA extracted from algal pellet. The amplify approximately 1400 bp of the nuclear-encoded LSU rDNA gene using terminal primeirs DIR, products were cheked by 1.0 % agarose gel electrophoresis, then cloning with TA cloning KIT. Sequencing were analyzed by the GENETIX Mac Software, Homology search by Blast and Phylogenetic analysis. Results of hylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA are: Strain no. 10893 (un identified from the genera, it is belonging Gymnodinium or Polarella. Strain no. 10795 is closely related other species Cachonina hallii. We tentatively named strain no 11151 and 11160 similar to Gyrodinium or Gymnodinium based on morphology, but these strain indepently position in this tree and is not a real of Gymnodinium sensu stricto. It is possible, we can establish the new genera for strain no. 11151; 11160 because this not cluster any other unarmored species.

  14. Current-Voltage Relationship for Late Na(+) Current in Adult Rat Ventricular Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R B; Giles, W R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that the slowly inactivating component of the Na(+) current (INa-L) in the mammalian heart is a significant regulator of the action potential waveform. This insight has led to detailed studies of the role of INa-L in a number of important and challenging pathophysiological settings. These include genetically based ventricular arrhythmias (LQT 1, 2, and 3), ventricular arrhythmias arising from progressive cardiomyopathies (including diabetic), and proarrhythmic abnormalities that develop during local or global ventricular ischemia. Inhibition of INa-L may also be a useful strategy for management of atrial flutter and fibrillation. Many important biophysical parameters that characterize INa-L have been identified; and INa-L as an antiarrhythmia drug target has been studied extensively. However, relatively little information is available regarding (1) the ion transfer or current-voltage relationship for INa-L or (2) the time course of its reactivation at membrane potentials similar to the resting or diastolic membrane potential in mammalian ventricle. This chapter is based on our preliminary findings concerning these two very important physiological/biophysical descriptors for INa-L. Our results were obtained using whole-cell voltage clamp methods applied to enzymatically isolated rat ventricular myocytes. A chemical agent, BDF 9148, which was once considered to be a drug candidate in the Na(+)-dependent inotropic agent category has been used to markedly enhance INa-L current. BDF acts in a potent, selective, and reversible fashion. These BDF 9148 effects are compared and contrasted with the prototypical activator of INa-L, a sea anemone toxin, ATX II. PMID:27586292

  15. A framework for the establishment of a cnidarian gene regulatory network for "endomesoderm" specification: the inputs of ß-catenin/TCF signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Röttinger

    Full Text Available Understanding the functional relationship between intracellular factors and extracellular signals is required for reconstructing gene regulatory networks (GRN involved in complex biological processes. One of the best-studied bilaterian GRNs describes endomesoderm specification and predicts that both mesoderm and endoderm arose from a common GRN early in animal evolution. Compelling molecular, genomic, developmental, and evolutionary evidence supports the hypothesis that the bifunctional gastrodermis of the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor is derived from the same evolutionary precursor of both endodermal and mesodermal germ layers in all other triploblastic bilaterian animals. We have begun to establish the framework of a provisional cnidarian "endomesodermal" gene regulatory network in the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, by using a genome-wide microarray analysis on embryos in which the canonical Wnt/ß-catenin pathway was ectopically targeted for activation by two distinct pharmaceutical agents (lithium chloride and 1-azakenpaullone to identify potential targets of endomesoderm specification. We characterized 51 endomesodermally expressed transcription factors and signaling molecule genes (including 18 newly identified with fine-scale temporal (qPCR and spatial (in situ analysis to define distinct co-expression domains within the animal plate of the embryo and clustered genes based on their earliest zygotic expression. Finally, we determined the input of the canonical Wnt/ß-catenin pathway into the cnidarian endomesodermal GRN using morpholino and mRNA overexpression experiments to show that NvTcf/canonical Wnt signaling is required to pattern both the future endomesodermal and ectodermal domains prior to gastrulation, and that both BMP and FGF (but not Notch pathways play important roles in germ layer specification in this animal. We show both evolutionary conserved as well as profound differences in endomesodermal GRN structure compared

  16. Analysis of karyotype diversity of 40 Chinese chrysanthemum cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZHANG; Ming-Li ZHU; Si-Lan DAI

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the genetic differences in Chinese large-flowered chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum×morifolium Ramat.) cultivars,we selected 40 typical and stable cultivars on which to carry out cytological studies using karyotype analysis.The results showed that 67.5% of these cultivars were hexaploid-based aneuploid and that the proportion of hexaploid decreased with passing time.Moreover,35% of the cultivars had 1-4 satellite chromosome(s).The probability of satellite chromosomes rose with increasing chromosome number.Most of the karyotypes were 2A and 2B.The probability of types 2A and 2C also increased with increasing ploidy of the cultivars.The mean of long-/short-arm ratio and the variation of long-/short-ann ratio were positively correlated (r2 =0.72).There was no obvious difference in the asymmetry coefficient of karyotypes,but the discrepancy in the variance of karyotype asymmetry index and relative length of chromosomes was quite distinct.In terms ofkaryotype parameters,the petal types of chrysanthemums were classified to five groups as flat,tubular,spoon,abnormal,and anemone.We did not observe any obvious orderliness among flower head types.Considering the relationship between karyotype parameters and phenotypic characters,variation of long-/short-arm ratio and asymmetry coefficient ofkaryotypes had the greatest relevance toward most phenotypic characters.The above results indicate that karyotype parameters possess great values for cultivar identification,classification,and genetic analysis in chrysanthemums.

  17. Global transcriptome analysis of the scorpion Centruroides noxius: new toxin families and evolutionary insights from an ancestral scorpion species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rendón-Anaya

    Full Text Available Scorpion venoms have been studied for decades, leading to the identification of hundreds of different toxins with medical and pharmacological implications. However, little emphasis has been given to the description of these arthropods from cellular and evolutionary perspectives. In this report, we describe a transcriptomic analysis of the Mexican scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann, performed with a pyrosequencing platform. Three independent sequencing experiments were carried out, each including three different cDNA libraries constructed from RNA extracted from the whole body of the scorpion after telson removal, and from the venom gland before and after venom extraction. Over three million reads were obtained and assembled in almost 19000 isogroups. Within the telson-specific sequences, 72 isogroups (0.4% of total unique transcripts were found to be similar to toxins previously reported in other scorpion species, spiders and sea anemones. The annotation pipeline also revealed the presence of important elements of the small non-coding RNA processing machinery, as well as microRNA candidates. A phylogenomic analysis of concatenated essential genes evidenced differential evolution rates in this species, particularly in ribosomal proteins and proteasome components. Additionally, statistical comparison of transcript abundance before and after venom extraction showed that 3% and 2% of the assembled isogroups had higher expression levels in the active and replenishing gland, respectively. Thus, our sequencing and annotation strategies provide a general view of the cellular and molecular processes that take place in these arthropods, allowed the discovery of new pharmacological and biotechnological targets and uncovered several regulatory and metabolic responses behind the assembly of the scorpion venom. The results obtained in this report represent the first high-throughput study that thoroughly describes the universe of genes that are expressed in

  18. The role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef

    KAUST Repository

    Bonin, Mary C.

    2015-11-21

    The development of parentage analysis to track the dispersal of juvenile offspring has given us unprecedented insight into the population dynamics of coral reef fishes. These tools now have the potential to inform fisheries management and species conservation, particularly for small fragmented populations under threat from exploitation and disturbance. In this study we resolve patterns of larval dispersal for a population of the anemonefish Amphiprion melanopus in the Keppel Islands (southern Great Barrier Reef). Habitat loss and fishing appear to have impacted this population and a network of no-take marine reserves currently protects 75% of the potential breeders. Using parentage analysis, we estimate that 21% of recruitment in the island group was generated locally, and that breeding adults living in reserves were responsible for 79% (31 out of 39) of these of locally-produced juveniles. Overall, the network of reserves was fully connected via larval dispersal; however one reserve was identified as a critical source of larvae for the island group. The population in the Keppel Islands also appears to be well-connected to other source populations at least 60 km away, given that 79% (145 out of 184) of the juveniles sampled remained unassigned in the parentage analysis. We estimated the effective size of the A. melanopus metapopulation to be 745 (582-993 95% CI) and recommend continued monitoring of its genetic status. Maintaining connectivity with populations beyond the Keppel Islands and recovery of local recruitment habitat, potentially through active restoration of host anemone populations, will be important for its long-term persistence.

  19. Molecular cloning and in silico characterization of knottin peptide, U2-SCRTX-Lit2, from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Gabriel Otto; de Resende Lara, Pedro Túlio; Scott, Luis Paulo Barbour; Braz, Antônio Sérgio Kimus; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Soares, Eduardo Mendonça; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Chaim, Olga Meiri

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are a family of structural peptides with a large number of cysteine residues that form intramolecular disulfide bonds, resulting in a knot. These peptides are involved in a variety of biological functions including predation and defense, and are found in various species, such as spiders, scorpions, sea anemones, and plants. The Loxosceles intermedia venom gland transcriptome identified five groups of ICK peptides that represent more than 50 % of toxin-coding transcripts. Here, we describe the molecular cloning of U2-Sicaritoxin-Lit2 (U2-SCRTX-Lit2), bioinformatic characterization, structure prediction, and molecular dynamic analysis. The sequence of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 obtained from the transcriptome is similar to that of μ-Hexatoxin-Mg2, a peptide that inhibits the insect Nav channel. Bioinformatic analysis of sequences classified as ICK family members also showed a conservation of cysteine residues among ICKs from different spiders, with the three dimensional molecular model of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 similar in structure to the hexatoxin from μ-hexatoxin-Mg2a. Molecular docking experiments showed the interaction of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 to its predictable target-the Spodoptera litura voltage-gated sodium channel (SlNaVSC). After 200 ns of molecular dynamic simulation, the final structure of the complex showed stability in agreement with the experimental data. The above analysis corroborates the existence of a peptide toxin with insecticidal activity from a novel ICK family in L. intermedia venom and demonstrates that this peptide targets Nav channels. PMID:27488102

  20. Comparative study on the fauna composition of intertidal invertebrates between natural and artificial substrata in the northeastern coast of Jeju Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Bae; Song, Ji-Na; Kim, In-Soo; Seo, Jeong-Bin; Kwoun, Chul-Hwi

    2013-12-01

    This study was carried out to learn about differences in the sessile macrobenthic fauna communities between the artificial and natural habitats. There were some differences in terms of species composition and dominant species and community structure between two habitat types. The dominant species include Pollicipes mitella and Granuilittorina exigua in natural rocky intertidal zones; Monodonta labio confusa, Ligia exotica, Tetraclita japonica in the artificial rocky intertidal zones. Among all the species, L. exotica and T. japonica occurred only in the artificial rocky intertidal zone. The results of cluster analysis and nMDS analysis showed a distinct difference in community structure between artificial and natural rocky intertidal zones. The fauna in the natural rocky intertidal zones were similar to each other and the fauna in the artificial rocky intertidal zones were divided depending on the slope of the substratum. In the case of a sloping tetrapod, M. labio confusa and P. mitella were dominant, but at the vertical artificial seawall, Cellana nigrolineata, L. exotica T. japonica were dominant. The analysis of the species presented in natural and artificial rocky intertidal areas showed the exclusive presence of 10 species on natural rocks and 12 species on artificial rocks. The species in the natural rocky intertidal area included mobile gastropods and cnidarians (i.e. rock anemones), and the species in the artificial rocky intertidal area mostly included non-mobile attached animals. The artificial novel structure seems to contribute to increasing the heterogeneity of habitats for marine invertebrate species and an increase the species diversity in rocky coastal areas.

  1. Animal venom studies: Current benefits and future developments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuri; N; Utkin

    2015-01-01

    Poisonous organisms are represented in many taxa, including kingdom Animalia. During evolution, animals have developed special organs for production and injection of venoms. Animal venoms are complex mixtures, compositions of which depend on species producing venom. The most known and studied poisonous terrestrial animals are snakes, scorpions and spiders. Among marine animals, these are jellyfishes, anemones and cone snails. The toxic substances in the venom ofthese animals are mainly of protein and peptide origin. Recent studies have indicated that the single venom may contain up to several hundred different components producing diverse physiological effects. Bites or stings by certain poisonous species result in severe envenomations leading in some cases to death. This raises the problem of bite treatment. The most effective treatment so far is the application of antivenoms. To enhance the effectiveness of such treatments, the knowledge of venom composition is needed. On the other hand, venoms contain substances with unique biological properties, which can be used both in basic science and in clinical applications. The best example of toxin application in basic science is α-bungarotoxin the discovery of which made a big impact on the studies of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Today compositions of venom from many species have already been examined. Based on these data, one can conclude that venoms contain a large number of individual components belonging to a limited number of structural types. Often minor changes in the amino acid sequence give rise to new biological properties. Change in the living conditions of poisonous animals lead to alterations in the composition of venoms resulting in appearance of new toxins. At the same time introduction of new methods of proteomics and genomics lead to discoveries of new compounds, which may serve as research tools or as templates for the development of novel drugs. The application of these sensitive and

  2. SECOM: A novel hash seed and community detection based-approach for genome-scale protein domain identification

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Ming

    2012-06-28

    With rapid advances in the development of DNA sequencing technologies, a plethora of high-throughput genome and proteome data from a diverse spectrum of organisms have been generated. The functional annotation and evolutionary history of proteins are usually inferred from domains predicted from the genome sequences. Traditional database-based domain prediction methods cannot identify novel domains, however, and alignment-based methods, which look for recurring segments in the proteome, are computationally demanding. Here, we propose a novel genome-wide domain prediction method, SECOM. Instead of conducting all-against-all sequence alignment, SECOM first indexes all the proteins in the genome by using a hash seed function. Local similarity can thus be detected and encoded into a graph structure, in which each node represents a protein sequence and each edge weight represents the shared hash seeds between the two nodes. SECOM then formulates the domain prediction problem as an overlapping community-finding problem in this graph. A backward graph percolation algorithm that efficiently identifies the domains is proposed. We tested SECOM on five recently sequenced genomes of aquatic animals. Our tests demonstrated that SECOM was able to identify most of the known domains identified by InterProScan. When compared with the alignment-based method, SECOM showed higher sensitivity in detecting putative novel domains, while it was also three orders of magnitude faster. For example, SECOM was able to predict a novel sponge-specific domain in nucleoside-triphosphatase (NTPases). Furthermore, SECOM discovered two novel domains, likely of bacterial origin, that are taxonomically restricted to sea anemone and hydra. SECOM is an open-source program and available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx. © 2012 Fan et al.

  3. Selective Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibition prevents Ca2+ overload-induced triggered arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Norbert; Kormos, Anita; Kohajda, Zsófia; Szebeni, Áron; Szepesi, Judit; Pollesello, Piero; Levijoki, Jouko; Acsai, Károly; Virág, László; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Tóth, András

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Augmented Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity may play a crucial role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis; however, data regarding the anti-arrhythmic efficacy of NCX inhibition are debatable. Feasible explanations could be the unsatisfactory selectivity of NCX inhibitors and/or the dependence of the experimental model on the degree of Ca2+i overload. Hence, we used NCX inhibitors SEA0400 and the more selective ORM10103 to evaluate the efficacy of NCX inhibition against arrhythmogenic Ca2+i rise in conditions when [Ca2+]i was augmented via activation of the late sodium current (INaL) or inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump. Experimental Approach Action potentials (APs) were recorded from canine papillary muscles and Purkinje fibres by microelectrodes. NCX current (INCX) was determined in ventricular cardiomyocytes utilizing the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ca2+i transients (CaTs) were monitored with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye, Fluo-4. Key Results Enhanced INaL increased the Ca2+ load and AP duration (APD). SEA0400 and ORM10103 suppressed INCX and prevented/reversed the anemone toxin II (ATX-II)-induced [Ca2+]i rise without influencing APD, CaT or cell shortening, or affecting the ATX-II-induced increased APD. ORM10103 significantly decreased the number of strophanthidin-induced spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ release events; however, SEA0400 failed to restrict the veratridine-induced augmentation in Purkinje-ventricle APD dispersion. Conclusions and Implications Selective NCX inhibition – presumably by blocking revINCX (reverse mode NCX current) – is effective against arrhythmogenesis caused by [Na+]i-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, without influencing the AP waveform. Therefore, selective INCX inhibition, by significantly reducing the arrhythmogenic trigger activity caused by the perturbed Ca2+i handling, should be considered as a promising anti-arrhythmic therapeutic strategy. PMID:25073832

  4. Symbiotic association between symbiodinium and the gastropod Strombus gigas: larval acquisition of symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ramos, Maribel; Banaszak, Anastazia T

    2014-04-01

    The importance of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. was studied in the early life stages of the gastropod Strombus gigas. This dinoflagellate was not found in the eggs or the gelatinous mass surrounding the eggs of the mollusk; therefore, Symbiodinium is not inherited directly. To determine whether the planktonic veligers can acquire these algae from the environment, they were exposed to freshly isolated Symbiodinium from adult S. gigas (homologous). The optimal stage for Symbiodinium inoculation was found at 48 h post-hatching. Survival and growth rates of veligers and juveniles were higher when inoculated with freshly isolated Symbiodinium in conjunction with daily feeding of Isochrysis spp. Veligers inoculated with Symbiodinium freshly isolated from three host species elicited distinct responses: (1) veligers did not take up Symbiodinium isolated from the hydrozoan Millepora alcicornis suggesting that there is discrimination on contact prior to ingestion, (2) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from the anemone Bartholomea annulata, but the algae did not persist in the host tissue suggesting that selection against this type took place after ingestion or that the algae did not divide in the host, and (3) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from Pterogorgia anceps where it persisted and was associated with metamorphosis of the larvae. In contrast, the Symbiodinium freshly isolated from S. gigas were not associated with metamorphosis and required an inducer such as the red alga Laurencia poitei. These data present a significant advancement for the establishment of a new approach in the aquaculture of this important but declining Caribbean species. PMID:24037186

  5. 铁线莲属一新分类系统%A new system of classification of the genus Clematis(Ranunculaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文采; 李良千

    2005-01-01

    提出毛茛科Ranunculaceae铁线莲属Clematis一新分类系统.首先,简要回顾了此属的分类学研究历史,继对此属的营养器官和生殖器官的重要形态特征和花粉特征进行了分析,揭示出一系列演化趋势.这些趋势,尤其是萼片和雄蕊的演化趋势说明在现存的铁线莲属植物中,绣球藤Clematis montana与其少数近缘种的花构造最接近比铁线莲属原始的银莲花属Anemone,因此,包括绣球藤等植物的绣球藤组sect.Cheirpsis被认为是铁线莲属的原始群.主要根据花构造对铁线莲属现存的15组的亲缘关系进行了分析,发现它们是在4条演化干(绣球藤干、欧洲铁线莲干、尾叶铁线莲干、长瓣铁线莲干)的演化过程中先后形成的.本文将此4条演化干处理为亚属.最后做出属下各级分类群的系统排列,并给出简要的形态特征.

  6. Putative cross-kingdom horizontal gene transfer in sponge (Porifera) mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rot, Chagai; Goldfarb, Itay; Ilan, Micha; Huchon, Dorothée

    2006-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome of Metazoa is usually a compact molecule without introns. Exceptions to this rule have been reported only in corals and sea anemones (Cnidaria), in which group I introns have been discovered in the cox1 and nad5 genes. Here we show several lines of evidence demonstrating that introns can also be found in the mitochondria of sponges (Porifera). Results A 2,349 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cox1 gene was sequenced from the sponge Tetilla sp. (Spirophorida). This fragment suggests the presence of a 1143 bp intron. Similar to all the cnidarian mitochondrial introns, the putative intron has group I intron characteristics. The intron is present in the cox1 gene and encodes a putative homing endonuclease. In order to establish the distribution of this intron in sponges, the cox1 gene was sequenced from several representatives of the demosponge diversity. The intron was found only in the sponge order Spirophorida. A phylogenetic analysis of the COI protein sequence and of the intron open reading frame suggests that the intron may have been transmitted horizontally from a fungus donor. Conclusion Little is known about sponge-associated fungi, although in the last few years the latter have been frequently isolated from sponges. We suggest that the horizontal gene transfer of a mitochondrial intron was facilitated by a symbiotic relationship between fungus and sponge. Ecological relationships are known to have implications at the genomic level. Here, an ecological relationship between sponge and fungus is suggested based on the genomic analysis. PMID:16972986

  7. Putative cross-kingdom horizontal gene transfer in sponge (Porifera mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Micha

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial genome of Metazoa is usually a compact molecule without introns. Exceptions to this rule have been reported only in corals and sea anemones (Cnidaria, in which group I introns have been discovered in the cox1 and nad5 genes. Here we show several lines of evidence demonstrating that introns can also be found in the mitochondria of sponges (Porifera. Results A 2,349 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cox1 gene was sequenced from the sponge Tetilla sp. (Spirophorida. This fragment suggests the presence of a 1143 bp intron. Similar to all the cnidarian mitochondrial introns, the putative intron has group I intron characteristics. The intron is present in the cox1 gene and encodes a putative homing endonuclease. In order to establish the distribution of this intron in sponges, the cox1 gene was sequenced from several representatives of the demosponge diversity. The intron was found only in the sponge order Spirophorida. A phylogenetic analysis of the COI protein sequence and of the intron open reading frame suggests that the intron may have been transmitted horizontally from a fungus donor. Conclusion Little is known about sponge-associated fungi, although in the last few years the latter have been frequently isolated from sponges. We suggest that the horizontal gene transfer of a mitochondrial intron was facilitated by a symbiotic relationship between fungus and sponge. Ecological relationships are known to have implications at the genomic level. Here, an ecological relationship between sponge and fungus is suggested based on the genomic analysis.

  8. Temporal dynamics in a shallow coastal benthic food web: Insights from fatty acid biomarkers and their stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Sabbe, Koen; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the temporal variation of pelagic and benthic food sources in the diet of benthic taxa at a depositional site in the Southern Bight of the North Sea by means of fatty acid (FA) biomarkers and compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA). The taxa were the non-selective deposit feeding nematodes (Sabatieria spp. and 'other nematodes'), and three dominant macrobenthic species: two true suspension-deposit feeders (the bivalve Abra alba and the tube dwelling polychaete Owenia fusiformis) and the suspected predatory mud-dwelling anemone Sagartia sp. These species make up on average 16% (Abra alba), 17% (Sagartia sp.) and 20% (Owenia fusiformis) of the biomass in the Abra alba-Kurtiella bidentata community in this area. Phytoplankton dynamics in the suspended particulate matter of the water column as inferred from cell counts, chlorophyll-a and organic carbon content were clearly visible in sediment and animal FA abundance as well, whereas phytodetritus dynamics in the sediment FA composition were less clear, probably due to patchy distribution or stripping of FA by macrofauna. Nematodes appeared to assimilate mainly Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) from their sedimentary environment and were further non-selectively accumulating more (Sabatieria spp.) or less ('other nematodes') FA from the deposited phytodetritus. In contrast, Abra alba FA composition was consistent with a diatom-dominated diet and consumption of Phaeocystis was observed in Owenia fusiformis, whereas Sagartia sp. showed evidence of a predatory behaviour. While the total FA content in Owenia fusiformis remained constant throughout the year, Sagartia sp. doubled and Abra alba increased its FA level more than 10-fold in response to the organic matter deposition from the phytoplankton bloom. This leads to the conclusion that there is no resource partitioning between non-selective deposit feeding nematodes and the suspension-deposit feeding macrobenthic organisms, suggesting they

  9. Effect of mexiletine on long QT syndrome model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGHong-Wei; ZHENGYan-Qian; 等

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To make a LQT3 model(one form of the long QT syndromes)and to investigate the effect of mexiletine on LQT3.METHODS:Sea anemone toxin(ATX Ⅱ)was used to produce the LQT3 model.The Effect of mexiletine on LQT3 was performed on single Na channel,action potential,and electrocardiography in guinea pigs,RESULTS.With the binding of ATXⅡto the Na+ channels,the probability of being in the open state and the open time constant of single Na+ channel with long opening mode increased significantly.Action potential duration APD50,APD90,and the maximal upstroke velocity of phase 0 were increased by 25.8%,26.1%,and 12%,respectively.The QT interval and QTc,a rectifed QT interval,increased by 12.8% and 16.9%.On the contrary,after application of mexiletine,the open probability of single Na+ channel was reduced greatly.In the presence of ATXⅡ(40nmol/L),mexiletine(1,5,15,45,70μmol/L)shortened the APD50 by 0.5%,6.7%,14.4%,19.45,and 18.8%,respectively,and decreased the APD90and Vmax accordingly.In the experiments with ECG,mexiletine reversed the ATX0Ⅱ-produced prolongation effects on QTc in a dose-dependent manner.CONCLUSION:Mexiletine may be an effective drug in the treatment of LQT3.

  10. Development of the aboral domain in Nematostella requires β-catenin and the opposing activities of Six3/6 and Frizzled5/8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclère, Lucas; Bause, Markus; Sinigaglia, Chiara; Steger, Julia; Rentzsch, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of the oral pole in cnidarians and the posterior pole in bilaterians is regulated by canonical Wnt signaling, whereas a set of transcription factors, including Six3/6 and FoxQ2, controls aboral development in cnidarians and anterior identity in bilaterians. However, it is poorly understood how these two patterning systems are initially set up in order to generate correct patterning along the primary body axis. Investigating the early steps of aboral pole formation in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, we found that, at blastula stage, oral genes are expressed before aboral genes and that Nvβ-catenin regulates both oral and aboral development. In the oral hemisphere, Nvβ-catenin specifies all subdomains except the oral-most, NvSnailA-expressing domain, which is expanded upon Nvβ-catenin knockdown. In addition, Nvβ-catenin establishes the aboral patterning system by promoting the expression of NvSix3/6 at the aboral pole and suppressing the Wnt receptor NvFrizzled5/8 at the oral pole. NvFrizzled5/8 expression thereby gets restricted to the aboral domain. At gastrula stage, NvSix3/6 and NvFrizzled5/8 are both expressed in the aboral domain, but they have opposing activities, with NvSix3/6 maintaining and NvFrizzled5/8 restricting the size of the aboral domain. At planula stage, NvFrizzled5/8 is required for patterning within the aboral domain and for regulating the size of the apical organ by modulation of a previously characterized FGF feedback loop. Our findings suggest conserved roles for Six3/6 and Frizzled5/8 in aboral/anterior development and reveal key functions for Nvβ-catenin in the patterning of the entire oral-aboral axis of Nematostella. PMID:26989171

  11. Development and short-term dynamics of macrofouling assemblages on fish-cage nettings in a tropical estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madin, John; Chong, V. C.; Basri, Badrulnizam

    2009-06-01

    A study was conducted at a fish culture farm in the Jaha River estuary, Malaysia, to examine the structure and development of macrofouling assemblages on floating net-cages. The study was conducted during the dry (August-October 2001) and wet (December-February 2002) seasons. Biofouling on 1.6 cm mesh net panels (size 0.2 m × 2 m) suspended inside (P, T) and outside (O) experimental net-cages was monitored every week until net openings were completely occluded by macrofouling organisms (8 wk and 12 wk for dry and wet seasons respectively). Seven species (6 phyla) of sessile organisms and 23 species (3 phyla) of non-sessile associates were recorded. Macro-colonization of net panels began with the hydroid Plumularia sp. irrespective of season and treatment (P, T, and O), while other species only appeared after 1 or 2 weeks of immersion. Inside net-cages where water flow was slow (mean macroalgae ( Polysiphonia sp.), anthozoans (unidentified anemone), barnacles ( Balanus amphitrite), amphipods ( Gammaropsis sp. & Photis sp.), and tanaids ( Leptognathia sp.) were dominant on the net panels during the dry season. In the wet season, hydroid ( Plumularia sp.), mussel ( Xenostrobus mangle), and nematode abundance were however significant. With stronger water flow (mean ≈ 20 cm s -1) as occurring outside the net-cages, macrofouling assemblages for both seasons comprised mainly Plumularia sp. and Gammaropsis sp. The macrofouling assemblage showed a clear succession of species that occupied different layers of the net panels. The study shows that while organic enrichment and retarded water flow together enhance the development of macrofouling assemblages, salinity, depth, substrate (net) area and species competition specifically influence community structure, colonization, and depth distribution of the macrofouling organisms.

  12. Overview on the diversity of sounds produced by clownfishes (Pomacentridae: importance of acoustic signals in their peculiar way of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orphal Colleye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clownfishes (Pomacentridae are brightly colored coral reef fishes well known for their mutualistic symbiosis with tropical sea anemones. These fishes live in social groups in which there is a size-based dominance hierarchy. In this structure where sex is socially controlled, agonistic interactions are numerous and serve to maintain size differences between individuals adjacent in rank. Clownfishes are also prolific callers whose sounds seem to play an important role in the social hierarchy. Here, we aim to review and to synthesize the diversity of sounds produced by clownfishes in order to emphasize the importance of acoustic signals in their way of life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recording the different acoustic behaviors indicated that sounds are divided into two main categories: aggressive sounds produced in conjunction with threat postures (charge and chase, and submissive sounds always emitted when fish exhibited head shaking movements (i.e. a submissive posture. Both types of sounds showed size-related intraspecific variation in dominant frequency and pulse duration: smaller individuals produce higher frequency and shorter duration pulses than larger ones, and inversely. Consequently, these sonic features might be useful cues for individual recognition within the group. This observation is of significant importance due to the size-based hierarchy in clownfish group. On the other hand, no acoustic signal was associated with the different reproductive activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Unlike other pomacentrids, sounds are not produced for mate attraction in clownfishes but to reach and to defend the competition for breeding status, which explains why constraints are not important enough for promoting call diversification in this group.

  13. Ontogenetic changes in responses to settlement cues by Anemonefish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, D. L.; Munday, P. L.; Pratchett, M.; Jones, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Population connectivity for most marine species is dictated by dispersal during the pelagic larval stage. Although reef fish larvae are known to display behavioral adaptations that influence settlement site selection, little is known about the development of behavioral preferences throughout the larval phase. Whether larvae are attracted to the same sensory cues throughout their larval phase, or exhibit distinct ontogenetic shifts in sensory preference is unknown. Here, we demonstrate an ontogenetic shift in olfactory cue preferences for two species of anemonefish, a process that could aid in understanding both patterns of dispersal and settlement. Aquarium-bred naïve Amphiprion percula and A. melanopus larvae were tested for olfactory preference of relevant reef-associated chemical cues throughout the 11-day pelagic larval stage. Age posthatching had a significant effect on the preference for olfactory cues from host anemones and live corals for both species. Preferences of olfactory cues from tropical plants of A. percula, increased by approximately ninefold between hatching and settlement, with A. percula larvae showing a fivefold increase in preference for the olfactory cue produced by the grass species. Larval age had no effect on the olfactory preference for untreated seawater over the swamp-based tree Melaleuca nervosa, which was always avoided compared with blank seawater. These results indicate that reef fish larvae are capable of utilizing olfactory cues early in the larval stage and may be predisposed to disperse away from reefs, with innate olfactory preferences drawing newly hatched larvae into the pelagic environment. Toward the end of the larval phase, larvae become attracted to the olfactory cues of appropriate habitats, which may assist them in identification of and navigation toward suitable settlement sites.

  14. The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the southern ocean and implications for biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D Rogers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp., stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae, bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more

  15. Spatial differences in East scotia ridge hydrothermal vent food webs: influences of chemistry, microbiology and predation on trophodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D K Reid

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal vents on the East Scotia Ridge are the first to be explored in the Antarctic and are dominated by large peltospiroid gastropods, stalked barnacles (Vulcanolepas sp. and anomuran crabs (Kiwa sp. but their food webs are unknown. Vent fluid and macroconsumer samples were collected at three vent sites (E2, E9N and E9S at distances of tens of metres to hundreds of kilometres apart with contrasting vent fluid chemistries to describe trophic interactions and identify potential carbon fixation pathways using stable isotopes. δ(13C of dissolved inorganic carbon from vent fluids ranged from -4.6‰ to 0.8‰ at E2 and from -4.4‰ to 1.5‰ at E9. The lowest macroconsumer δ(13C was observed in peltospiroid gastropods (-30.0‰ to -31.1‰ and indicated carbon fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle by endosymbiotic gamma-Proteobacteria. Highest δ(13C occurred in Kiwa sp. (-19.0‰ to -10.5‰, similar to that of the epibionts sampled from their ventral setae. Kiwa sp. δ(13C differed among sites, which were attributed to spatial differences in the epibiont community and the relative contribution of carbon fixed via the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA and CBB cycles assimilated by Kiwa sp. Site differences in carbon fixation pathways were traced into higher trophic levels e.g. a stichasterid asteroid that predates on Kiwa sp. Sponges and anemones at the periphery of E2 assimilated a proportion of epipelagic photosynthetic primary production but this was not observed at E9N. Differences in the δ(13C and δ(34S values of vent macroconsumers between E2 and E9 sites suggest the relative contributions of photosynthetic and chemoautotrophic carbon fixation (rTCA v CBB entering the hydrothermal vent food webs vary between the sites.

  16. Massive asphalt deposits, oil seepage, and gas venting support abundant chemosynthetic communities at the Campeche Knolls, southern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahling, Heiko; Borowski, Christian; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Gaytán-Caballero, Adriana; Hsu, Chieh-Wei; Loher, Markus; MacDonald, Ian; Marcon, Yann; Pape, Thomas; Römer, Miriam; Rubin-Blum, Maxim; Schubotz, Florence; Smrzka, Daniel; Wegener, Gunter; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Hydrocarbon seepage is a widespread process at the continental margins of the Gulf of Mexico. We used a multidisciplinary approach, including multibeam mapping and visual seafloor observations with different underwater vehicles to study the extent and character of complex hydrocarbon seepage in the Bay of Campeche, southern Gulf of Mexico. Our observations showed that seafloor asphalt deposits previously only known from the Chapopote Knoll also occur at numerous other knolls and ridges in water depths from 1230 to 3150 m. In particular the deeper sites (Chapopopte and Mictlan knolls) were characterized by asphalt deposits accompanied by extrusion of liquid oil in form of whips or sheets, and in some places (Tsanyao Yang, Mictlan, and Chapopote knolls) by gas emission and the presence of gas hydrates in addition. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of gaseous hydrocarbons suggest their primarily thermogenic origin. Relatively fresh asphalt structures were settled by chemosynthetic communities including bacterial mats and vestimentiferan tube worms, whereas older flows appeared largely inert and devoid of corals and anemones at the deep sites. The gas hydrates at Tsanyao Yang and Mictlan Knolls were covered by a 5-to-10 cm-thick reaction zone composed of authigenic carbonates, detritus, and microbial mats, and were densely colonized by 1-2 m-long tube worms, bivalves, snails, and shrimps. This study increased knowledge on the occurrences and dimensions of asphalt fields and associated gas hydrates at the Campeche Knolls. The extent of all discovered seepage structure areas indicates that emission of complex hydrocarbons is a widespread, thus important feature of the southern Gulf of Mexico.

  17. Moytirra: Discovery of the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge north of the Azores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A. J.; Murton, B.; Copley, J.; Lim, A.; Carlsson, J.; Collins, P.; Dorschel, B.; Green, D.; Judge, M.; Nye, V.; Benzie, J.; Antoniacomi, A.; Coughlan, M.; Morris, K.

    2013-10-01

    Geological, biological, morphological, and hydrochemical data are presented for the newly discovered Moytirra vent field at 45oN. This is the only high temperature hydrothermal vent known between the Azores and Iceland, in the North Atlantic and is located on a slow to ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridge uniquely situated on the 300 m high fault scarp of the eastern axial wall, 3.5 km from the axial volcanic ridge crest. Furthermore, the Moytirra vent field is, unusually for tectonically controlled hydrothermal vents systems, basalt hosted and perched midway up on the median valley wall and presumably heated by an off-axis magma chamber. The Moytirra vent field consists of an alignment of four sites of venting, three actively emitting "black smoke," producing a complex of chimneys and beehive diffusers. The largest chimney is 18 m tall and vigorously venting. The vent fauna described here are the only ones documented for the North Atlantic (Azores to Reykjanes Ridge) and significantly expands our knowledge of North Atlantic biodiversity. The surfaces of the vent chimneys are occupied by aggregations of gastropods (Peltospira sp.) and populations of alvinocaridid shrimp (Mirocaris sp. with Rimicaris sp. also present). Other fauna present include bythograeid crabs (Segonzacia sp.) and zoarcid fish (Pachycara sp.), but bathymodiolin mussels and actinostolid anemones were not observed in the vent field. The discovery of the Moytirra vent field therefore expands the known latitudinal distributions of several vent-endemic genera in the north Atlantic, and reveals faunal affinities with vents south of the Azores rather than north of Iceland.

  18. Glypican1/2/4/6 and sulfated glycosaminoglycans regulate the patterning of the primary body axis in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bause, Markus; van der Horst, Roddy; Rentzsch, Fabian

    2016-06-01

    Glypicans are members of the heparan sulfate (HS) subfamily of proteoglycans that can function in cell adhesion, cell crosstalk and as modulators of the major developmental signalling pathways in bilaterians. The evolutionary origin of these multiple functions is not well understood. In this study we investigate the role of glypicans in the embryonic and larval development of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a member of the non-bilaterian clade Cnidaria. Nematostella has two glypican (gpc) genes that are expressed in mutually exclusive ectodermal domains, NvGpc1/2/4/6 in a broad aboral domain, and NvGpc3/5 in narrow oral territory. The endosulfatase NvSulf (an extracellular modifier of HS chains) is expressed in a broad oral domain, partially overlapping with both glypicans. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of NvGpc1/2/4/6 leads to an expansion of the expression domains of aboral marker genes and a reduction of oral markers at gastrula stage, strikingly similar to knockdown of the Wnt receptor NvFrizzled5/8. We further show that treatment with sodium chlorate, an inhibitor of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sulfation, phenocopies knockdown of NvGpc1/2/4/6 at gastrula stage. At planula stage, knockdown of NvGpc1/2/4/6 and sodium chlorate treatment result in alterations in aboral marker gene expression that suggest additional roles in the fine-tuning of patterning within the aboral domain. These results reveal a role for NvGpc1/2/4/6 and sulfated GAGs in the patterning of the primary body axis in Nematostella and suggest an ancient function in regulating Frizzled-mediated Wnt signalling. PMID:27090806

  19. Modelling climate change effects on benthos: Distributional shifts in the North Sea from 2001 to 2099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Michael; Mathis, Moritz; Kröncke, Ingrid; Neumann, Hermann; Pohlmann, Thomas; Reiss, Henning

    2016-06-01

    In the marine realm, climate change can affect a variety of physico-chemical properties with wide-ranging biological effects, but the knowledge of how climate change affects benthic distributions is limited and mainly restricted to coastal environments. To project the response of benthic species of a shelf sea (North Sea) to the expected climate change, the distributions of 75 marine benthic species were modelled and the spatial changes in distribution were projected for 2099 based on modelled bottom temperature and salinity changes using the IPCC scenario A1B. Mean bottom temperature was projected to increase between 0.15 and 5.4 °C, while mean bottom salinity was projected to moderately increase by 1.7. The spatial changes in species distribution were modelled with Maxent and the direction and extent of these changes were assessed. The results showed a latitudinal northward shift for 64% of the species (maximum 109 km; brittle star Ophiothrix fragilis) and a southward shift for 36% (maximum 101 km; hermit crab Pagurus prideaux and the associated cloak anemone Adamsia carciniopados; 105 km). The relatively low rates of distributional shifts compared to fish or plankton species were probably influenced by the regional topography. The environmental gradients in the central North Sea along the 50 m depth contour might act as a 'barrier', possibly resulting in a compression of distribution range and hampering further shifts to the north. For 49 species this resulted in a habitat loss up to 100%, while only 11 species could benefit from the warming in terms of habitat gain. Particularly the benthic communities of the southern North Sea, where the strongest temperature increase was projected, would be strongly affected by the distributional changes, since key species showed northward shifts and high rates of habitat loss, with potential ramifications for the functioning of the ecosystem.

  20. Breeding and mass scale rearing of clownfish Amphiprion percula: feeding and rearing in brackishwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DHANEESH Kottila Veettil; AJITH KUMAR Thipramalai Thankappan; SWAGAT Ghosh; BALASUBRAMANIAN Thangavel

    2012-01-01

    Breeding and mass scale larval rearing of clownfish Amphiprion percula is very limited in brackishwater.We designed an indoor program of A.percula culture in brackishwater with a salinity of 24±1,during which the impacts of feed type,water temperature,and light intensity,on the efficiency of its reproduction,were revealed.The fish were accommodated along with sea anemones in fibre glass tanks to determine the influence of brooder diet on breeding efficiency.Higher reproductive efficiency [number of eggs laid (276±22.3 eggs)] was observed when fish were fed live Acetes sp.rather than clam (204±16.4eggs),trash fish (155±12 eggs) and formulated feed (110±10 eggs).The spawning rate was increased during September and October (water temperature,28.74±0.55℃) on average of 2.4 spawning per month; and low spawning rate was in January (water temperature,24.55±0.45℃) on average of 1 spawning per month.Among three light intensities (100,500,and 900 Ix) set to evaluate larval survival rate,larvae showed the highest survival rate (65.5%) at 900 Ix.The breeding method specifically in brackishwater developed in the present study is a new approach,will help the people from the regions of estuary and backwater to enhance their livelihood and it will lead to reduce the exploitation from the wild habitat.

  1. Gene discovery in the threatened elkhorn coral: 454 sequencing of the Acropora palmata transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Polato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cnidarians, including corals and anemones, offer unique insights into metazoan evolution because they harbor genetic similarities with vertebrates beyond that found in model invertebrates and retain genes known only from non-metazoans. Cataloging genes expressed in Acropora palmata, a foundation-species of reefs in the Caribbean and western Atlantic, will advance our understanding of the genetic basis of ecologically important traits in corals and comes at a time when sequencing efforts in other cnidarians allow for multi-species comparisons. RESULTS: A cDNA library from a sample enriched for symbiont free larval tissue was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 960,000 reads were obtained and assembled into 42,630 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 57% of the assembled sequences. Analysis of the assembled sequences indicated that 83-100% of all A. palmata transcripts were tagged, and provided a rough estimate of the total number genes expressed in our samples (~18,000-20,000. The coral annotation data contained many of the same molecular components as in the Bilateria, particularly in pathways associated with oxidative stress and DNA damage repair, and provided evidence that homologs of p53, a key player in DNA repair pathways, has experienced selection along the branch separating Cnidaria and Bilateria. Transcriptome wide screens of paralog groups and transition/transversion ratios highlighted genes including: green fluorescent proteins, carbonic anhydrase, and oxidative stress proteins; and functional groups involved in protein and nucleic acid metabolism, and the formation of structural molecules. These results provide a starting point for study of adaptive evolution in corals. CONCLUSIONS: Currently available transcriptome data now make comparative studies of the mechanisms underlying coral's evolutionary success possible. Here we identified candidate genes that enable corals to maintain genomic integrity despite

  2. In vivo assessment of the ability of condensed tannins to interfere with the digestibility of plant protein in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effect of condensed tannin (CT) astringency on the digestibility of protein post-ruminally, CT were purified from four types (accessions) of Mulga (Acacia aneura), and a Leucaena pallida and dosed into sheep as complexes with 15N-plant protein (tannin-protein complexes, TPC), together with an indigestible marker, chromium-EDTA (Cr-EDTA). Each CT treatment dose comprised 12 mg CT, 10 mg 15N-protein, and 2.77 mg of Cr. A protein-only control (same as the other TPC solutions but without any CT) treatment was also included to make a total of six treatments. Treatments were applied in two 6 x 6 Latin Square designs with 72 h between each infusion for each sheep. In the first, the solutions were infused post-ruminally via an abomasal cannula. In the second they were dosed directly into the mouth following an intra-nasal dose of an analogue of vasopressin in an attempt to stimulate the oesophageal groove reflex to direct the solutions more efficiently toward the small intestine. Results showed no detectable effect of CT type on the in vivo digestibility of the 15N-protein. Protein digestibilities were uniformly high, indicative of complete dissociation of the TPC. There was no correlation between protein digestibility, mouth to faeces, and protein digestibility, abomasum to faeces (P > 0.05). In vivo digestibility was also uncorrelated with CT astringencies defined in vitro (P > 0.05). Astringency in vitro was defined as the mg of CT required to achieve half-maximal precipitation of 0.5 mg of protein (bovine serum albumin). In vitro, the most astringent CT (A. aneura 883558), had at least 1.6 times the astringency of the weakest CT (A. aneura 842394). The A. aneura with the weakest CT also contained less than 1/3 the total amount of CT/g leaf dry matter than that with the strongest, highlighting the scope for selection of more nutritionally useful types of A. aneura. Limitations of the in vivo protocol used are discussed and it is concluded that the effect

  3. Dynamics and evolution of tree populations and soil-vegetation relationships in Fogscapes: Observations over a period of 14 years at the experimental sites of Meija (Peru).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbitano, F.; Calamini, G.; Certini, G.; Ortega, A.; Pierguidi, A.; Villasante, L.; Caceres, R.; Coaguila, D.; Delgado, M.

    2010-07-01

    The Fogscapes, i.e. fog-dependent landscapes, and the sub mountain drylands of the Pacific Coast from Ecuador to Northern Chile are amongst the most fragile regions of the planet. The so-called "Lomas" (i.e. Hills) ecosystems are characterised by pre-desertic flora and vegetation where the plant phenological pattern coincides with the fog season from June to December every year. The occurance of ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) affects these ecosystems inducing, occasionally, a sudden change in the characteristics of the vegetation. Relics of low-density woodlands dominated by Caesalpinea spinosa and scattered trees of the same species (which during the fog season appear as savannah-like ecosystems) are still present but becoming increasingly rare due to past and present overgrazing In the experimental site of Las Cuchillas, located on the coastal hills close to Meija (Dept. Arequipa, South Peru) trees of native species (Caesalpinaea spinosa and Prosopis pallida) and exotic species (Acacia saligna, Casuarina equisetifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata) were planted in 1996, in order to look at the rehabilitation potential of the degraded "lomas" ecosystems. This paper deals with the results observed over a period of 14 years’ of tree growth patterns and the related results concerning the soil and habitat dynamics. Among indigenous species Caesalpinea spinosa shows the heighest rate of survival even if the height increment is low and the tree crowns tend to dry out at a height of approximately two metres, followed by the appearance of new shoots produced during the course of the seasons. The exotic Acacia saligna shows the maximum height, diameter and crown volume increments. The habitat conditions, both in term of diversity / frequency of plant and animal populations, and plant cover (LAI estimated by processing fish-eye lens images) have changed substantially over the years. A number of samples from the top mineral soil and random samples from the forest floor were

  4. Voxel-based morphometry in epileptic baboons: Parallels to human juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, C Ákos; Salinas, Felipe S

    2016-08-01

    The epileptic baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE), closely resembling juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Due to functional neuroimaging and pathological differences between epileptic (SZ+) and asymptomatic control (CTL) baboons, we expected structural differences in gray matter concentration (GMC) using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Standard anatomical (MP-RAGE) MRI scans using a 3T Siemens TIM Trio (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) were available in 107 baboons (67 females; mean age 16±6years) with documented clinical histories and scalp-electroencephalography (EEG) results. For neuroimaging, baboons were anesthetized with isoflurane 1% (1-1.5 MAC) and paralyzed with vecuronium (0.1-0.3mg/kg). Data processing and analysis were performed using FSL's VBM toolbox. GMC was compared between CTL and SZ+ baboons, epileptic baboons with interictal epileptic discharges on scalp EEG (SZ+/IED+), asymptomatic baboons with abnormal EEGs (SZ-/IED+), and IED+ baboons with (IED+/PS+) and without (IED+/PS-) photosensitivity, and the subgroups amongst themselves. Age and gender related changes in gray matter volumes were also included as confound regressors in the VBM analyses of each animal group. Significant increases in GMC were noted in the SZ+/IED+ subgroup compared to the CTL group, including bilaterally in the frontopolar, orbitofrontal and anterolateral temporal cortices, while decreases in GMC were noted in the right more than left primary visual cortices and in the specific nuclei of the thalamus, including reticular, anterior and medial dorsal nuclei. No significant differences were noted otherwise, except that SZ+/IED+ baboons demonstrated increased GMC in the globus pallidae bilaterally compared to the SZ-/IED+ group. Similar to human studies of JME, the epileptic baboons demonstrated GMC decreases in the thalami and occipital cortices, suggesting secondary injury due to chronic epilepsy. Cortical GMC, on the other hand, was increased

  5. In vivo assessment of the ability of condensed tannins to interfere with the digestibility of plant protein in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrabi, S.M.; Ritchie, M.M.; Stimson, C.; Horadagoda, A.; Hyde, M.; McNeill, D.M. [MC Franklin Laboratory, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: karalue@bigpond.net.au

    2005-08-19

    To assess the effect of condensed tannin (CT) astringency on the digestibility of protein post-ruminally, CT were purified from four types (accessions) of Mulga (Acacia aneura), and a Leucaena pallida and dosed into sheep as complexes with {sup 15}N-plant protein (tannin-protein complexes, TPC), together with an indigestible marker, chromium-EDTA (Cr-EDTA). Each CT treatment dose comprised 12 mg CT, 10 mg {sup 15}N-protein, and 2.77 mg of Cr. A protein-only control (same as the other TPC solutions but without any CT) treatment was also included to make a total of six treatments. Treatments were applied in two 6 x 6 Latin Square designs with 72 h between each infusion for each sheep. In the first, the solutions were infused post-ruminally via an abomasal cannula. In the second they were dosed directly into the mouth following an intra-nasal dose of an analogue of vasopressin in an attempt to stimulate the oesophageal groove reflex to direct the solutions more efficiently toward the small intestine. Results showed no detectable effect of CT type on the in vivo digestibility of the {sup 15}N-protein. Protein digestibilities were uniformly high, indicative of complete dissociation of the TPC. There was no correlation between protein digestibility, mouth to faeces, and protein digestibility, abomasum to faeces (P > 0.05). In vivo digestibility was also uncorrelated with CT astringencies defined in vitro (P > 0.05). Astringency in vitro was defined as the mg of CT required to achieve half-maximal precipitation of 0.5 mg of protein (bovine serum albumin). In vitro, the most astringent CT (A. aneura 883558), had at least 1.6 times the astringency of the weakest CT (A. aneura 842394). The A. aneura with the weakest CT also contained less than 1/3 the total amount of CT/g leaf dry matter than that with the strongest, highlighting the scope for selection of more nutritionally useful types of A. aneura. Limitations of the in vivo protocol used are discussed and it is concluded

  6. Phylogenetic reconstruction using secondary structures of Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2, rDNA: finding the molecular and morphological gap in Caribbean gorgonian corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Juan A

    2007-06-01

    morphological characteristics (sclerites. Eunicea flexuosa, E. pallida, E. laxispica and E. mammosa formed a separate clade in the molecular phylogenies, and were reciprocally monophyletic with respect to other Eunicea (Euniceopsis subgenus, e.g. E. tourneforti and E. laciniata in the molecular morphometrics tree, with the exception of E. fusca. Moreover, we suggest a new diagnostic character for Eunicea, also present in E. flexuosa: middle layer sclerites > 1 mm in length. Conclusion ITS2 was a reliable sequence for intrageneric studies in gorgonian octocorals because of the amount of phylogenetic signal, and was corroborated against morphological characters separating Eunicea from Plexaura. The ITS2 RNA secondary structure approach to phylogeny presented here did not rely on alignment methods such as INDELS, but provided clearly homologous characters for partition analysis and RNA molecular morphometrics. These approaches support the divergence of Eunicea flexuosa comb. nov. from the outgroup Plexaura, although it has been considered part of this outgroup for nearly two centuries because of morphological resemblance.

  7. Extraction systems for isolating esterases having interfacial adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto del Monte Martínez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En el presente trabajo se optimizaron las condiciones de extracción de esterasas con actividad en interfaces, a partir de la anémona marina Stichodactyla helianthus y del camarón peneido Litopenaeus vannamei. Las esterasas interfaciales, cuya presencia en estas especies había sido informada previamente, presentan características funcionales que las hacen muy atractivas para su empleo industrial. Los homogenados de los animales se trataron con los detergentes Tritón X-100, Tween 20 y Tween 80 en dos concentraciones cada uno: la Concentración Micelar Crítica (CMC y la mitad de ésta. Además se empleó NaCl 0,5 mol/L y n-butanol a las proporciones 5, 10 y 20%. Cada variante fue comparada con el método tradicional de extracción con agua destilada, que fue tomado como control. Los mejores resultados se obtuvieron empleando n-butanol al 20%, para recuperar las actividades esterasa y fosfolipasa, y al 10%, en el aislamiento de la actividad lipasa. La efectividad de este solvente en el aislamiento de estas enzimas con afinidad por las interfaces lípido/agua, pudiera estar dada por su capacidad para romper los agregados entre estas moléculas y causar la desorción de las mismas a los restos de membrana y tejidos presentes en la preparación.Palabras clave: activación interfacial, esterasas interfaciales, lipasas, Stichodactyla helianthus, Litopenaeus vannamei.interfacial activation, interfacial esterase, lipase, Stichodactyla helianthus, Litopenaeus vannamei.Abstract: Interfacial esterases present great functional versatility, making them very attractive molecules for industrial applications. The conditions for extracting interfacial esterases previously detected in the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus and the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were optimised in this work. Animal homogenates were treated with Triton X-100, Tween 20 and Tween 80 detergents at two different concentrations: critical micellar concentration (CMC and half

  8. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  9. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki J Hendrick

    Full Text Available The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura, the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus, showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa. With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally

  10. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degnan Bernard M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LIM homeobox (Lhx transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. Results We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. Conclusions The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In

  11. Development and field application of a 6-bottle serial gas-tight fluid sampler for collecting seafloor cold seep and hydrothermal vent fluids with autonomous operation capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.; Ding, K.; Yang, C.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Schaen, A. T.; Luhmann, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    A 6-bottle serial gas-tight sampler (so-called "six-shooter") was developed for application with deep-sea vent fluids. The new device is composed of a custom-made 6-channel valve manifold and six sampling bottles which are circularly distributed around the valve manifold. Each valve channel consists of a high-pressure titanium cartridge valve and a motor-driven actuator. A sampling snorkel is connected to the inlet of the manifold that delivers the incoming fluid to different bottles. Each sampling bottle has a 160 ml-volume chamber and an accumulator chamber inside where compressed nitrogen is used to maintain the sample at near in-situ pressure. An electronics chamber that is located at the center of the sampler is used to carry out all sampling operations, autonomously, if desired. The sampler is of a compact circular configuration with a diameter of 26 cm and a length of 54 cm. During the SVC cruise AT 26-12, the sampler was deployed by DSV2 Alvin at a cold seep site MC036 with a depth of 1090 m in the Gulf of Mexico. The sampler collected fluid samples automatically following the tidal cycle to monitor the potential impact of the tide cycle on the fluid chemistry of cold seep in a period of two day. During the cruise AT 26-17, the sampler was used with newly upgraded DSV2 Alvin three times at the hydrothermal vent sites along Axial Seamount and Main Endeavor Field on Juan de Fuca Ridge. During a 4-day deployment at Anemone diffuse site (Axial Caldera), the sampler was set to work in an autonomous mode to collect fluid samples according to the preset interval. During other dives, the sampler was manually controlled via ICL (Inductively Coupled Link) communication through the hull. Gas-tight fluid samples were collected from different hydrothermal vents with temperatures between 267 ℃ and 335 ℃ at the depth up to 2200 m. The field results indicate unique advantages of the design. It can be deployed in extended time period with remote operation or working

  12. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project, Duxbury Reef, Bolinas, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Prescutti, K.; Ball, O.; Chang, E.; Darakananda, K.; Jessup, K.; Poutian, J.; Schwalbe, H.; Storm, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal ecology, interpretation and monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B), and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will analyze the population densities of aggregating anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima, for seasonal abundance variations as well as long-term population trends. We will also follow the seasonal and long-term population fluctuations of red algal turf, Endocladia muricata and Gelidium coulteri, and black turban snails, Tegula funebralis. Comparing populations of turf algae and the herbivorous black turban snails gathered before and after the November 7, 2007 San Francisco Bay oil spill shows very little impact on the Duxbury Reef intertidal inhabitants. Future analyses will

  13. Effect of hypoxia and anoxia on invertebrate behaviour: ecological perspectives from species to community level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Riedel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Coastal hypoxia and anoxia have become a global key stressor to marine ecosystems, with almost 500 dead zones recorded wordwide. By triggering cascading effects from the individual organism to the community and ecosystem-level, oxygen depletions threat marine biodiversity and can alter ecosystem structure and function. By integrating both physiological function and ecological processes, animal behaviour is ideal for assessing the stress state of benthic macrofauna to low dissolved oxygen. The initial response of organisms can serve as an early-warning signal, while the successive behavioural reactions of key species indicate hypoxia levels and help assess community degradation. Here we document the behavioural responses of a representative spectrum of benthic macrofauna in the natural setting in the Northern Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean. We experimentally induced small-scale anoxia with a benthic chamber in 24 m depth to overcome the difficulties in predicting the onset of hypoxia, which often hinders full documentation in the field. The behavioural reactions were documented with a time-lapse camera. Oxygen depletion elicited significant and repeatable changes in general (visibility, locomotion, body movement and posture, location and species-specific reactions in virtually all organisms (302 individuals from 32 species and 2 species groups. Most atypical (stress behaviours were associated with specific oxygen thresholds: arm-tipping in the ophiuroid Ophiothrix quinquemaculata, for example, with the onset of mild hypoxia (2 L−1, the emergence of polychates on the sediment surface with moderate hypoxia (2 L−1, the emergence of the infaunal sea urchin Schizaster canaliferus on the sediment with severe hypoxia (2 L−1 and heavy body rotations in sea anemones with anoxia. Other species changed their activity patterns, i.e. circadian rhythm in the hermit crab Paguristes eremita or the bioherm-associated crab Pisidia longimana. Intra- and

  14. Baseline seabed habitat and biotope mapping for a proposed marine reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonny T M; Kelly, Michelle; Langlois, Tim J; Costello, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Seabed mapping can quantify the extent of benthic habitats that comprise marine ecosystems, and assess the impact of fisheries on an ecosystem. In this study, the distribution of seabed habitats in a proposed no-take Marine Reserve along the northeast coast of Great Barrier Island, New Zealand, was mapped using underwater video combined with bathymetry and substratum data. As a result of the boundary extending to the 12 nautical mile Territorial Limit, it would have been the largest coastal Marine Reserve in the country. Recreational and commercial fisheries occur in the region and would be expected to affect species' abundance. The seabed of the study area and adjacent coastal waters has been trawled up to five times per year. Benthic communities were grouped by multivariate cluster analysis into four biotope classes; namely (1) shallow water macroalgae Ecklonia sp. and Ulva sp. on rocky substrata (Eck.Ulv); and deeper (2) diverse epifauna of sponges and bryozoans on rocky substrata (Por.Bry), (3) brittle star Amphiura sp. and sea anemone Edwardsia sp. on muddy sand (Amph.Edw), and (4) hydroids on mud (Hyd). In biotopes Por.Bry, Amph.Edw and Hyd, there where boulders and rocks were present, and diverse sponge, bryozoan and coral communities. Fifty species were recorded in the deep water survey including significant numbers of the shallow-water hexactinellid glass sponges Symplectella rowi Dendy, 1924 and Rossella ijimai Dendy, 1924, the giant pipe demosponge Isodictya cavicornuta Dendy, 1924, black corals, and locally endemic gorgonians. The habitats identified in the waters to the northeast of Great Barrier Island are likely to be representative of similar depth ranges in northeast New Zealand. This study provides a baseline of the benthic habitats so that should the area become a Marine Reserve, any habitat change might be related to protection from fishing activities and impacts, such as recovery of epifauna following cessation of trawling. The habitat map may

  15. Evaluation of selected wild plants flowering season 1991 - 2009 (1991 - 2000 & 2001 - 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajkova, L.; Nekovar, J.; Novak, M.; Richterova, D.

    2009-09-01

    The subsequent wild plants are observed by volunteer observers at CHMI phenological network: CALTHA palustris L., ANEMONE nemorosa L., HEPATICA nobilis Mill., RANUNCULUS acer L., FRAGARIA vesca L., TRIFOLIUM repens L., HYPERICUM perforatum L., CHAMAENERION angustifolium L. Holub, VACCINIUM myrtillus L., LAMIUM album L., CHRYSANTHEMUM leucanthemum L., TUSSILAGO farfara L., PETASITES albus (L.) Gaert., PETASITES hybridus (L.) G. M. Sch., CONVALLARIA majalis L., GALANTHUS nivalis L., DACTYLIS glomerata L., ALOPECURUS pratensis L. and others. Some of them start to blossom in early spring, some others in the summer. Part of them belong to very important allergens, part of them have medicinal effects. Phenophases first leaves (FL - BBCH11), inflorescence emergence (IE - BBCH 51), beginning and end of flowering (BF - BBCH 61, EF - BBCH 69) are observed by these species. Statistical parameters (average, median, lower quartile, upper quartile, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, variation range and variation coefficient) of phenophase onset are computed from all of phenological stations in Czechia for the period 1991 - 2009. The phenophase onset and phenophase duration depend not only on genetic base but also on external effects such as weather. We have compiled dynamics of temperature to phenophase onset according CHMI meteorological stations for the same period 1991 - 2009 (especially sums of active temperatures above biological minimum 5°C and progression of extreme temperatures). We have also compared results between two periods (1991 - 2000, 2001 - 2009). Phenological stations are at different altitude. At this case study were used results from 4 phenological stations at altitude ( 500 m asl). GALANTHUS nivalis L. Station: Lednice (165 m n. m.) Period: 1991 - 2000 Statistical parameter/phenophase BBCH 61 BBCH 69 Average 62 94 Median 60 97 Lower quartile 57 86 Upper quartile 66 101 Minimum 51 70 Maximum 79 116 Variation range 28 46 Standard deviation 8,6 12

  16. Discovery of a distinct superfamily of Kunitz-type toxin (KTT from tarantulas.

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    Chun-Hua Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of ktts in spiders (TARANTULAS: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana, which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (omega for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications

  17. Specific retention of the protostome-specific PsGEF may parallel with the evolution of mushroom bodies in insect and lophotrochozoan brains

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    Kohno Keigo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene gain and subsequent retention or loss during evolution may be one of the underlying mechanisms involved in generating the diversity of metazoan nervous systems. However, the causal relationships acting therein have not been studied extensively. Results We identified the gene PsGEF (protostome-specific GEF, which is present in all the sequenced genomes of insects and limpet but absent in those of sea anemones, deuterostomes, and nematodes. In Drosophila melanogaster, PsGEF encodes a short version of a protein with the C2 and PDZ domains, as well as a long version with the C2, PDZ, and RhoGEF domains through alternative splicing. Intriguingly, the exons encoding the RhoGEF domain are specifically deleted in the Daphnia pulex genome, suggesting that Daphnia PsGEF contains only the C2 and PDZ domains. Thus, the distribution of PsGEF containing the C2, PDZ, and RhoGEF domains among metazoans appears to coincide with the presence of mushroom bodies. Mushroom bodies are prominent neuropils involved in the processing of multiple sensory inputs as well as associative learning in the insect, platyhelminth, and annelid brains. In the adult Drosophila brain, PsGEF is expressed in mushroom bodies, antennal lobe, and optic lobe, where it is necessary for the correct axon branch formation of alpha/beta neurons in mushroom bodies. PsGEF genetically interacts with Rac1 but not other Rho family members, and the RhoGEF domain of PsGEF induces actin polymerization in the membrane, thus resulting in the membrane ruffling that is observed in cultured cells with activated forms of Rac. Conclusion The specific acquisition of PsGEF by the last common ancestor of protostomes followed by its retention or loss in specific animal species during evolution demonstrates that there are some structural and/or functional features common between insect and lophotrochozoan nervous systems (for example, mushroom bodies, which are absent in all deuterostomes

  18. Biofouling community pattern on various metallic surfaces in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam, Southwestern Bay of Bengal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . 100 cm-2. The major fouling organisms such as, barnacle, green mussel and ascidian constituted ∼ 70-80% of the total fouling. In the present study, sequence of fouling succession was as follows, barnacle - hydroid - sea anemone - ascidian and finally green mussel (Perna viridis Linn. 1758). The paper also discusses species diversity indices (diversity, richness and evenness) in detail. (author)

  19. How do plant communities and flower visitors relate? A case study of semi-natural xerothermic grasslands

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    Damian Chmura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the relationships between the species composition of flower visitors and plants in the semi-natural xerothermic grasslands in southern and central Poland. Thirty 10 × 10 m permanent plots were laid out in total, mainly in nature reserves. The vegetation units studied were classified according to the Braun-Blanquet system; these were phytocoenoses of the Festuco-Brometea classes Inuletum ensifoliae, Adonido-Brachypodietum pinnati and the transitional plant community. Entomological research was performed using the Pollard method within the same plots. A particular site was visited only once and different sites were studied between April and August 2008. We applied, among others, co-correspondence-analysis Co-CA, detrended correspondence analysis (DCA and redundancy analysis (RDA to investigate the co-occurrence patterns of plants and flower visitors and their biotopic requirements. We found that the species composition of flower visitors cannot be predicted by floristic composition when the duration of the study is restricted to one day (but under similar weather conditions; however, there is a positive relationship between the species richness of insects and plants and a positive relationship between the number of plant species and the abundance of flower visitors. The Ellenberg moisture index and the cover of meadow species significantly explained the species composition of insects. The three various vegetation units and five dominant xerothermic species, i.e. Adonis vernalis, Anemone sylvestris, Inula ensifolia, Linum hirsutum and Carlina onopordifolia that were studied across time differed in the species richness of insects. Our results demonstrate that possible patterns in the species composition and the assembly rules of flower visitors are not apparent when the Pollard method is applied. Based on the data obtained using this method, the flower visiting assemblages seem not to be driven by competition and they primarily

  20. [Essentials of pharmacophylogeny: knowledge pedigree, epistemology and paradigm shift].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-cheng; Xiao, Pei-gen; Liu, Li-wei; Peng, Yong; He, Chun-nian

    2015-09-01

    Chinese materia medica resource (CMM resource) is the foundation of the development of traditional Chinese medicine. In the study of sustainable utilization of CMM resource, adopting innovative theory and method to find new CMM resource is one of hotspots and always highlighted. Pharmacophylogeny interrogates the phylogenetic relationship of medicinal organisms (especially medicinal plants), as well as the intrinsic correlation of morphological taxonomy, molecular phylogeny, chemical constituents, and therapeutic efficacy (ethnopharmacology and pharmacological activity). This new discipline may have the power to change the way we utilize medicinal plant resources and develop plant-based drugs. Phylogenomics is the crossing of evolutionary biology and genomics, in which genome data are utilized for evolutionary reconstructions. Phylogenomics can be integrated into the flow chart of drug discovery and development, and extends the field of pharmacophylogeny at the omic level, thus the concept of pharmacophylogenomics could be redefined in the context of plant pharmaceutical resources. This contribution gives a brief discourse of knowledge pedigree of pharmacophylogeny, epistemology and paradigm shift, highlighting the theoretical and practical values of pharmacophylogenomics. Many medicinally important tribes and genera, such as Clematis, Pulsatilla, Anemone, Cimicifugeae, Nigella, Delphinieae, Adonideae, Aquilegia, Thalictrum, and Coptis, belong to Ranunculaceae family. Compared to other plant families, Ranunculaceae has the most species that are recorded in China Pharmacopoeia (CP) 2010. However, many Ranunculaceae species, e. g., those that are closely related to CP species, as well as those endemic to China, have not been investigated in depth, and their phylogenetic relationship and potential in medicinal use remain elusive. As such, it is proposed to select Ranunculaceae to exemplify the utility of pharmacophylogenomics and to elaborate the new concept