WorldWideScience

Sample records for anemometry

  1. Hot-dome anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brian E.

    1998-05-01

    Hot-dome anemometry obtains three components of flow velocity using an array of sensors, specifically five hot films in the present contribution, which are mounted around the hemispherical tip of a cylindrical support. Calibration for speed and angle resembles that of hot wires and split films except that the procedures accommodate heat transfer dominated by forced convection from the surface of a sphere rather than single or multiple cylinders. Measurements are obtained with hot domes, conventional hot wires, and impact probes in the wake of a wing to quantify measurement uncertainties.

  2. Further Studies Of Hot-Wire Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Robert; Logan, Pamela; Bershader, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Report discusses factors affecting readings of hot-wire anemometer in turbulent supersonic boundary layer. Represents extension of work described in "Hot-Wire Anemometry Versus Laser-Induced Fluorescence" (ARC-11802). Presents theoretical analysis of responses of hot-wire probe to changes in flow; also compares measurements by hot-wire probe with measurements of same flows by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF).

  3. Phase Doppler anemometry as an ejecta diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D. J.; Chapman, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    When a shock wave is incident on a free surface, micron sized pieces of the material can be ejected from that surface. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) is being developed to simultaneously measure the sizes and velocities of the individual shock induced ejecta particles; providing an important insight into ejecta phenomena. The results from experiments performed on the 13 mm bore light gas gun at the Institute of Shock Physics, Imperial College London are presented. Specially grooved tin targets were shocked at pressures of up to 14 GPa, below the melt on release pressure, to generate ejecta particles. These experiments are the first time that PDA has been successfully fielded on dynamic ejecta experiments. The results and current state of the art of the technique are discussed along with the future improvements required to optimise performance and increase usability.

  4. Hot-wire anemometry in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, C. C.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The use of hot-wire anemometry for obtaining fluctuating data in transonic flows has been evaluated. From hot-wire heat loss correlations based on previous transonic data, the sensitivity coefficients for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations have been calculated for a wide range of test conditions and sensor parameters. For sensor Reynolds number greater than 20 and high sensor overheat ratios, the velocity sensitivity remains independent of Mach number and equal to the density sensitivity. These conditions were verified by comparisons of predicted sensitivities with those from recent direct calibrations in transonic flows. Based on these results, techniques are presented to obtain meaningful measurements of fluctuating velocity, density, and Reynolds shear stress using hot-wire and hot-film anemometers. Example of these measurements are presented for two transonic boundary layers.

  5. Hot wire anemometry in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, C. C.; Rose, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of hot-wire anemometry for obtaining fluctuating data in transonic flows has been evaluated. From hot-wire heat loss correlations based on previous transonic data, the sensitivity coefficients for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations have been calculated for a wide range of test conditions and sensor parameters. For sensor Reynolds numbers greater than 20 and high sensor overheat ratios, the velocity sensitivity remains independent of Mach number and equal to the density sensitivity. These conclusions were verified by comparisons of predicted sensitivities with those from recent direct calibrations in transonic flows. Based on these results, techniques are presented to obtain meaningful measurements of fluctuating velocity, density, and Reynolds shear stress using hot-wire and hot-film anemometers. Examples of these measurements are presented for two transonic boundary layers.

  6. Constant temperature hot wire anemometry data reduction procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfer, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and data reduction procedure for constant temperature hot wire anemometry are presented. The procedure is valid for all Mach and Prandtl numbers, but limited to Reynolds numbers based on wire diameter between 0.1 and 300. The fluids are limited to gases which approximate ideal gas behavior. Losses due to radiation, free convection and conduction are included.

  7. Calibration of Direct Velocimetry Using Hot Wire Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Michael L.; DeSilva, Upul P.; Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1997-01-01

    We studied the functionality of the IFA300 Hot Wire Anemometry system and its feasibility for the calibration of Direct Estimator Velocimetry (DEV) using Laser Induced Florescence (LIF). The experimental setup consisted of a single-wire hot wire probe measuring one component of velocity, the anemometry computational hardware and software, an HP oscilloscope, and a table fan to produce a simple flow with fluctuations. Measurements were taken at several points in the stream wise and transverse directions in the flow and various parameters recorded such as mean velocities temperature, turbulence intensities, skewness coefficients and flatness coefficients. The IFA300 software also allowed us to perform statistical manipulations such as spectrum analysis on velocities samples and correlation. Utilization of data files, also produced by the anemometry software, and post analysis were performed to produce graphical representations of turbulent intensity versus probe position and a flow field velocity profile. We concluded that the IFA300 Hot Wire Anemometry system is a reliable and functional method for calibration of DEV using LIF. Our future intentions are to set up a test chamber such that both velocity measurement techniques can be applied simultaneously, thus the calibration.

  8. Hot-wire anemometry in hypersonic helium flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R. D.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry techniques are described that have been developed and used for hypersonic-helium-flow studies. The short run time available dictated certain innovations in applying conventional hot-wire techniques. Some examples are given to show the application of the techniques used. Modifications to conventional equipment are described, including probe modifications and probe heating controls.

  9. A review of hot wire anemometry in transonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper provides a review of hot wire anemometry for compressible flows, giving particular attention to the transonic flow problem. It is pointed out that the first and most important definitive work in hot wire anemometry for compressible flows was reported by Kovasznay (1953). The existence of three independent fluctuating modes in compressible flows for small perturbations was found, taking into account the vorticity mode, the entropy mode, and the sound-wave mode. A review of Kovasznays' method for supersonic flows is also presented, and advances reported by Markovin (1956) are examined. Attention is given to experiments conducted by Horstman and Rose (1977), a general solution to the hot wire problem at transonic conditions sought by Stainback et al. (1983), and some apparent problems.

  10. In-vitro laser anemometry blood flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, Dieter W.; Poll, Axel; Pflugbeil, Gottlieb

    1993-08-01

    Lasers are used in a wide variety of medical applications. While laser catheters have been developed for highly accurate velocity measurements these are invasive; noninvasive techniques are more desirable but not as precise. The laser is, however, a great tool for in vitro measurements. Several groups internationally are using the laser in the study of local velocity distribution in microscopic areas of specially constructed models. Laser Doppler anemometry is widely used to measure the local, time-dependent velocities, while phase Doppler anemometry has been developed to measure particle size, distribution and velocity. Most recently, laser analyzer techniques have been developed for analyzing the particle size of two phase flow systems. It has become increasingly important for physicians to visualize blood flow. In addition to the techniques mentioned above, several laser sheet techniques have been developed for precise measurements. This paper presents a short review of laser techniques and shows some applications especially for the laser-Doppler anemometer.

  11. Turbulence measurements in shock induced flow using hot wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Duffy, Robert E.; Trolier, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements over various geometric shapes have been made by immersing models in shock-induced flows. The heat transfer to a body is strongly dependent on the turbulence level of the stream. The interpretation of such heat transfer measurements requires a knowledge of the turbulence intensity. Turbulence intensity measurements, using hot-wire anemometry, have been successfully carried out in shock-induced flows. The experimental procedures for making such measurements and the techniques required are discussed.

  12. Fiber optic laser Doppler anemometry in swirling jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, R.; Rice, E. J.

    1991-01-01

    Time-averaged and fluctuating quantities are measured in a free turbulent swirling jet. Data from a two-component laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) are compared to the measurements via hot-wire and 5-hole pitot probes. To acquire the proper seeding density near the axis of a swirling jet for LDA measurements proved difficult. This is due to an imbalance of the centrifugal force and radial pressure gradient, which throws the seeding material off the axis. Despite this problem, close agreement between various measurement techniques is obtained.

  13. Sonic anemometry to measure natural ventilation in greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Valera, Diego Luis; Molina-Aiz, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The present work has developed a methodology for studying natural ventilation in Mediterranean greenhouses by means of sonic anemometry. In addition, specific calculation programmes have been designed to enable processing and analysis of the data recorded during the experiments. Sonic anemometry allows us to study the direction of the airflow at all the greenhouse vents. Knowing through which vents the air enters and leaves the greenhouse enables us to establish the airflow pattern of the greenhouse under natural ventilation conditions. In the greenhouse analysed in this work for Poniente wind (from the southwest), a roof vent designed to open towards the North (leeward) could allow a positive interaction between the wind and stack effects, improving the ventilation capacity of the greenhouse. The cooling effect produced by the mass of turbulent air oscillating between inside and outside the greenhouse at the side vents was limited to 2% (for high wind speed, u(o) ≥ 4 m s(-1)) reaching 36.3% when wind speed was lower (u(o) = 2 m s(-1)).

  14. The Sphere Anemometer - A Fast Alternative to Cup Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heißelmann, Hendrik; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    The main problem of cup anemometry is the different response time for increasing and decreasing wind velocities due to its moment of inertia. This results in an overestimation of wind speed under turbulent wind conditions, the so-called over-speeding. Additionally, routine calibrations are necessary due to the wear of bearings. Motivated by these problems the sphere anemometer, a new simple and robust sensor for wind velocity measurements without moving parts, was developed at the University of Oldenburg. In contrast to other known thrust-based sensors, the sphere anemometer uses the light pointer principle to detect the deflection of a bending tube caused by the drag force acting on a sphere mounted at its top. This technique allows the simultaneous determination of wind speed and direction via a two-dimensional position sensitive detector.

  15. Capacitive Ultrasonic Transducer Development for Acoustic Anemometry on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard-Pugh, Eurion; Wilson, C.; Calcutt, S.; Davis, L.

    2012-10-01

    Previous Mars missions have used either mechanical or thermal anemometry techniques. The moving parts of mechanical anemometers are prone to damage during launch and landing and their inertia makes them unsuited for turbulence studies. Thermal anemometers have been used successfully on Mars but are difficult to calibrate and susceptible to varying ambient temperatures. In ultrasonic anemometry, wind speed and sound speed are calculated from two-way time-of-flight measurements between pairs of transducers; three pairs of transducers are used to return a 3-D wind vector. These high-frequency measurements are highly reliable and immune from drift. Piezo-electric ultrasonic anemometers are widely used on Earth due to their full-range accuracy and high measurement frequency. However these transducers have high acoustic impedances and would not work on Mars. We are developing low-mass capacitive ultrasonic transducers for Mars missions which have significantly lower acoustic impedances and would therefore have a much stronger coupling to the Martian atmosphere. These transducers consist of a metallised polymer film pulled taught against a machined metal backplane. The film is drawn towards the backplane by a DC bias voltage. A varying signal is used on top of the DC bias to oscillate the film; generating acoustic waves. This poster will look at the operation of such sensors and the developments necessary to operate the devices under Martian conditions. Transducer performance is determined primarily by two elements; the front film and the backplane. The sensitivity of the transducer is affected by the thickness of the front film; as well as the diameter, curvature and roughness of the metal backplane. We present data on the performance of the sensors and instrument design considerations including signal shapes and transducer arrangements.

  16. Use of the Hot Wire Anemometry for Velocity and Temperature Measurements in a Turbomachine

    OpenAIRE

    Blidi, Sami; Miton, Hubert

    1995-01-01

    The hot film anemometry in a highly heterogeneous unsteady flow is a quite complex measurement technique. The velocity is determined from the heat flux measurement. The part of the signal related to velocity must be kept apart from one related to temperature and to pressure of flow. After a brief return to the principle of hot wire anemometry and the different heat transfer models between hot wire and flow, an experimentally established heat flux expression is presented. This study was achiev...

  17. Basic ideas and concepts in hot wire anemometry: an experimental approach for introductory physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of hot wire anemometry is to measure the speed of an air stream. The classical method is based on the measure of the value of a temperature dependant resistor inserted in a Wheatstone bridge (Lomas 1986 Fundamentals of Hot Wire Anemometry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). In this paper we exhibit the physics behind this method and show that by using a wire whose resistance does not vary on the field of temperature explored (from 20 °C to 200 °C), it is however possible to make accurate measurements. Finally, limitations of the method are discussed.

  18. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements in a circulating fluidized bed of metal particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Claus Hübbe; Solberg, Tron; Hjertager, Bjørn Helge;

    2002-01-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed in a 1/9 scale model of a 12 MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. The model was operated according to scaling laws. The 2D-LDA system used was positioned in two different ways to obtain the three velocity components u, v and w...

  19. Measurements of temperature and velocity fluctuations in oscillating flows using thermal anemometry – application to thermoacoustic refrigerators

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaelle; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper summarizes our recent work on the development of thermal anemometry to measure velocity and temperature fluctuations in oscillating flows. First, we demonstrate that velocity cannot be measured accurately by hot-wire anemometry in oscillating flows when the flow reverses its direction. Indeed, there is no unique and well-defined correlation between the flow velocity and heat transfer near flow reversal, which prevents the recovery of velocity fluctuations fr...

  20. Development of absolute hot-wire anemometry by the 3ω method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyd, Rodolphe; Hadaoui, Abdallah; Fliyou, Mohamed; Koumina, Abdelaziz; Ameziane, Lahcen El Hassani; Outzourhit, Abdelkader; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2010-04-01

    We have developed hot-wire anemometry applying the 3ω method. The approach is based on the same heat transfer process as traditional anemometry, but substituting the constant current by a sinusoidal current and using synchronous detection to measure the conductive-convective exchange coefficient and the gas flow rate. Our theoretical model is tested with air flow at 300 K under atmospheric pressure: The experimental results are in agreement with the numerical simulation, justifying the technical choices in the 3ω method and the approximations made. The effectiveness of the 3ω method for measuring the flow rate and the conductive-convective exchange coefficient between the hot wire and flowing gas is discussed.

  1. Development of absolute hot-wire anemometry by the 3omega method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyd, Rodolphe; Hadaoui, Abdallah; Fliyou, Mohamed; Koumina, Abdelaziz; El Hassani Ameziane, Lahcen; Outzourhit, Abdelkader; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2010-04-01

    We have developed hot-wire anemometry applying the 3omega method. The approach is based on the same heat transfer process as traditional anemometry, but substituting the constant current by a sinusoidal current and using synchronous detection to measure the conductive-convective exchange coefficient and the gas flow rate. Our theoretical model is tested with air flow at 300 K under atmospheric pressure: The experimental results are in agreement with the numerical simulation, justifying the technical choices in the 3omega method and the approximations made. The effectiveness of the 3omega method for measuring the flow rate and the conductive-convective exchange coefficient between the hot wire and flowing gas is discussed.

  2. Use of hot wire anemometry to measure velocity of the limb during human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S C; Mote, C D; Skinner, H B

    1992-09-01

    Hot film anemometry, x-configuration probes were used in two experiments to evaluate their effectiveness at measurement of limb velocity. Data from tests with a probe attached to the end of a pendulum establish that the hot films measure velocity in the swing phase within 0.098 ms-1. The kinetic energy per unit mass of the pendulum was predicted within +/- 0.005 m2 s-2, from the measured velocity. In gait experiments with one human subject at speeds greater than 0.25 ms-1, the hot film anemometer and a video system predicted speeds within 0.083 ms-1. The hot film data are electronic signals that are easily stored and processed. The results from these experiments demonstrate that hot film anemometry is an effective and efficient method for direct measurement and analysis of the limb velocity.

  3. Hot-wire anemometry for turbulence measurements in helium-air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, P. A.; Larue, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of extended hot-wire anemometry involving an interfering probe is shown to permit measurements of variable density turbulence such as arises in the mixing of helium and air. The methods of calibration and data reduction leading to time series in one or more velocity components, in the mass fraction of helium, and in the mixture density are described. Typical results in various flows to which the technique has been applied are discussed.

  4. Modelling and operation of sub-miniature constant temperature hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, M.; Watmuff, J. H.; Van Buren, T.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Hultmark, M.; Smits, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    High-Reynolds number flows are very common in technological applications and in nature, and hot-wire anemometry is the preferred method for measuring the time-series of fluctuating velocity in such flows. However, measurement of very high-Reynolds number flows requires hot-wires with higher temporal and spatial resolution than is available with conventional probes. Much effort has therefore been devoted to decreasing the size of the hot-wire probes and this has led to associated challenges with operation. It is this latter operation problem which is the focus of this paper. To this end, an existing theoretical model of constant-temperature hot-wire anemometers (Perry 1982 Hot-Wire Anemometry (New York: Oxford University Press), Watmuff 1995 Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 11 117-34) is applied, and its accuracy is tested for the first time by comparison to measurements using an in-house constant temperature anemometer (CTA) for both conventional 5~μ m-diameter wires and sub-miniature hot-wires. With the aid of this model, we propose modifications to the CTA design and demonstrate successful operation of the CTA with the Princeton nano-scale thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) (Bailey et al 2010 J. Fluid Mech. 663 160-79). It is also shown that the transfer function obtained from the model can be utilized to estimate the true frequency response and cut-off frequency of a hot-wire-CTA system to the velocity fluctuations, which is essential in accurate measurements of energy spectrum and higher order statistics of turbulent flows.

  5. A Method of Estimating Low Turbulence Levels in Near Real Time Using Laser Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Louis J.; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    Laser anemometry was used to make two independent measurements of the flow velocity by capturing individual Doppler signals with high-speed digitizing boards. The two independent measurements were cross-correlated to reduce the contribution of photo detector shot noise on the frequency determination and subsequently on the turbulence estimate. In addition, criteria were developed to eliminate "bad" Doppler bursts from the data set, which then allowed reasonable low turbulence estimates to be made. The laser anemometer measurements were obtained at the inlet of an annular cascade and at the exit of a flow calibration nozzle and were compared with hot-wire data.

  6. Hot-wire anemometry for in-flight measurement of aircraft wake vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A development program has demonstrated that hot-wire anemometry can be used successfully on an aircraft in flight to make measurements of wake vortices produced by another aircraft. The probe, whose wires were made of platinum/rhodium, 10 microns in diameter, provides unambiguous results for inflow angles less than about 35 deg. off the probe axis. The high frequency response capability of the hot-wire system allows detailed measurement of the flow structure, and the study of aircraft hazards associated with wake turbulence.

  7. Thermography and Sonic Anemometry to Analyze Air Heaters in Mediterranean Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Peña

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work has developed a methodology based on thermography and sonic anemometry for studying the microclimate in Mediterranean greenhouses equipped with air heaters and polyethylene distribution ducts to distribute the warm air. Sonic anemometry allows us to identify the airflow pattern generated by the heaters and to analyze the temperature distribution inside the greenhouse, while thermography provides accurate crop temperature data. Air distribution by means of perforated polyethylene ducts at ground level, widely used in Mediterranean-type greenhouses, can generate heterogeneous temperature distributions inside the greenhouse when the system is not correctly designed. The system analyzed in this work used a polyethylene duct with a row of hot air outlet holes (all of equal diameter that expel warm air toward the ground to avoid plant damage. We have observed that this design (the most widely used in Almería’s greenhouses produces stagnation of hot air in the highest part of the structure, reducing the heating of the crop zone. Using 88 kW heating power (146.7 W∙m−2 the temperature inside the greenhouse is maintained 7.2 to 11.2 °C above the outside temperature. The crop temperature (17.6 to 19.9 °C was maintained above the minimum recommended value of 10 °C.

  8. Thermography and Sonic Anemometry to Analyze Air Heaters in Mediterranean Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Valera, Diego L.; Molina-Aiz, Francisco; Peña, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    The present work has developed a methodology based on thermography and sonic anemometry for studying the microclimate in Mediterranean greenhouses equipped with air heaters and polyethylene distribution ducts to distribute the warm air. Sonic anemometry allows us to identify the airflow pattern generated by the heaters and to analyze the temperature distribution inside the greenhouse, while thermography provides accurate crop temperature data. Air distribution by means of perforated polyethylene ducts at ground level, widely used in Mediterranean-type greenhouses, can generate heterogeneous temperature distributions inside the greenhouse when the system is not correctly designed. The system analyzed in this work used a polyethylene duct with a row of hot air outlet holes (all of equal diameter) that expel warm air toward the ground to avoid plant damage. We have observed that this design (the most widely used in Almería's greenhouses) produces stagnation of hot air in the highest part of the structure, reducing the heating of the crop zone. Using 88 kW heating power (146.7 W·m−2) the temperature inside the greenhouse is maintained 7.2 to 11.2 °C above the outside temperature. The crop temperature (17.6 to 19.9 °C) was maintained above the minimum recommended value of 10 °C. PMID:23202025

  9. Thermography and sonic anemometry to analyze air heaters in Mediterranean greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Valera, Diego L; Molina-Aiz, Francisco; Peña, Araceli

    2012-10-16

    The present work has developed a methodology based on thermography and sonic anemometry for studying the microclimate in Mediterranean greenhouses equipped with air heaters and polyethylene distribution ducts to distribute the warm air. Sonic anemometry allows us to identify the airflow pattern generated by the heaters and to analyze the temperature distribution inside the greenhouse, while thermography provides accurate crop temperature data. Air distribution by means of perforated polyethylene ducts at ground level, widely used in Mediterranean-type greenhouses, can generate heterogeneous temperature distributions inside the greenhouse when the system is not correctly designed. The system analyzed in this work used a polyethylene duct with a row of hot air outlet holes (all of equal diameter) that expel warm air toward the ground to avoid plant damage. We have observed that this design (the most widely used in Almería's greenhouses) produces stagnation of hot air in the highest part of the structure, reducing the heating of the crop zone. Using 88 kW heating power (146.7 W ∙ m(-2)) the temperature inside the greenhouse is maintained 7.2 to 11.2 °C above the outside temperature. The crop temperature (17.6 to 19.9 °C) was maintained above the minimum recommended value of 10 °C.

  10. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovandir Bazan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. OBJECTIVE: To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. METHODS: To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min. and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. RESULTS: It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series. Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves.

  11. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  12. A calibration technique to correct sensor drift issues in hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talluru, K. M.; Kulandaivelu, V.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2014-10-01

    Accurate calibration is imperative to obtain reliable flow measurements using hot-wire anemometry. Calibration errors owing to temperature drift, wire degradation, changes in ambient conditions etc can lead to substantial uncertainties in hot-wire measurements. A new calibration procedure is implemented here to account for most forms of drift that are typically encountered during high quality flow measurements using hot-wires. The method involves obtaining single point recalibrations of the hot-wire (in the free-stream) at regular intervals during the course of an actual experiment, and using these during post-processing to correct for any drift encountered. Unlike many other existing schemes, this proposed calibration correction method is not solely restricted to correcting temperature drift.

  13. Wind turbine power performance measurement with the use of spinner anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demurtas, Giorgio

    for power performance measurements. First development of spinner anemometer was related to calibration of yaw misalignment measurements. Here the first innovation was made in the spinner anemometer mathematical model, introducing a new calibration constant, kα =k1/k2. This constant was found to be directly...... related to measurements of inflow angle (yaw misalignment and flow inclination). The calibration of the constant was based on yawing the stopped turbine several times in and out of the wind comparing the varying inflow angle measurement with the yaw position sensor. The calibration for inflow angle...... is now used as default in commercial calibrations. To evaluate the power performance of a wind turbine with the use of spinner anemometry, an experiment was organized in collaboration with Romo Wind and Vattenfall. A met-mast was installed close to two wind turbines equipped with spinner anemometers...

  14. Turbulence measurements in pipe flow using a nano-scale thermal anemometry probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallikivi, M.; Hultmark, M.; Smits, A.J. [Princeton University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bailey, S.C.C. [University of Kentucky, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A new nano-scale thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) has been developed using a novel procedure based on deep reactive ion etching. The performance of the new probe is shown to be superior to that of the previous design by Bailey (J Fluid Mech 663:160-179, 2010). It is then used to measure the streamwise velocity component of fully developed turbulent pipe flow, and the results are compared with data obtained using conventional hot-wire probes. The NSTAP agrees well with the hot-wire at low Reynolds numbers, but it is shown that it has better spatial resolution and frequency response. The data demonstrate that significant spatial filtering effects can be seen in the hot-wire data for probes as small as 7 viscous units in length. (orig.)

  15. Measuring on-line compliance in ventilated infants using hot wire anemometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baboolal, R; Kirpalani, H

    1990-10-01

    We investigated the validity of using tidal volume (VT) as measured by the neonatal volume monitor (NVM) to derive respiratory compliance. The NVM is a noninvasive device that measures VT by hot wire anemometry. The quotient of VT and the inflation pressure amplitude from the mechanical ventilator provided a measure of respiratory compliance. This was validated against the single breath occlusion technique in 15 infants (birth weight 0.9 to 4.4 kg). To ensure fully passive expiration, only paralyzed or sedated patients were studied. Only 12 of the 15 infants were analyzed because of limitations in the single breath technique. In three infants the flow-volume curves obtained were alinear, indicating inhomogeneity. In the 12 infants with acceptable single breath data, agreement between the two methods was excellent. Using the expired volume, r2 was .99. We conclude that the NVM can be used to obtain valid estimates of respiratory compliance on-line in intubated infants.

  16. Spatial resolution correction for hot-wire anemometry in wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, C.; Hutchins, N.; Ooi, A.; Marusic, I. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    We investigate spatial resolution issues in hot-wire anemometry measurements of turbulence intensity and energy spectra. Single normal hot-wire measurements are simulated by means of filtering direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow at Re{sub {tau}} = 934. Through analysis of the two-dimensional energy spectra from the DNS, the attenuation of the small-scale energy levels is documented, especially in the near-wall region. The missing energy displays anisotropic characteristics, and an attempt is made to model this using an empirical equation, thus providing a correction scheme for all wall normal locations. The empirical model is assessed using experimental boundary layer data and shown to effectively correct both the streamwise one-dimensional energy spectra and turbulence intensity at a Reynolds number significantly above that of the DNS. (orig.)

  17. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  18. Comparison of digital holographic interferometry and constant temperature anemometry for measurement of temperature field in fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít.; Vít, Tomáś; Dančová, Petra; Kopecký, Václav

    2015-05-01

    The presented paper shows possibility of using digital holographic interferometry (DHI) for temperature field measurement in moving fluids. This method uses a modified Twymann-Green setup having double sensitivity instead of commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of interferometer in order to obtain sufficient phases change of the field. On the other hand this setup is not light efficient as Mach-Zehnder interferometer. For measurement of the fast periodical phenomenon is not necessary to use always the high speed camera. One can consider this field to coherent phenomenon. With employing one digital camera synchronized to periodic field and external triggered one can capture whole period of the phenomenon. However the projections form one viewing direction of asymmetrical temperature field maybe misguided. Hence for sufficient examination of the asymmetrical field one should capture a large number of the phenomenon's projections from different viewing directions. This projections are later used for 3D tomographic reconstruction of the whole temperature field and its time evolution. One of the commonly used method for temperature field measurement in moving fluids is hot wire method - constant temperature anemometry (CTA). In contrast to whole field measurement of DHI it is an invasive point temperature measurement method. One of the limiting factor of using CTA in moving fluids is frequency of temperature changes. This changes should not exceed 1 kHz. This limitation could be overcome by using of optical methods such as DHI. The results of temperature field measurement achieved by both method are compared in the paper.

  19. Comparison of Global Sizing Velocimetry and Phase Doppler Anemometry measurements of alternative jet fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Reza; Kannaiyan, Kumaran

    2013-11-01

    Atomization plays a crucial precursor role in liquid fuel combustion that directly affects the evaporation, mixing, and emission levels. Laser diagnostic techniques are often used to study the spray characteristics of liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to compare the spray measurements of Gas-to Liquid (GTL) jet fuels obtained using Global Sizing Velocimetry (GSV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques at global and local levels, respectively. The chemical and physical properties of GTL fuels are different from conventional jet fuels, owing to the difference in their production methodology. In this work, the experimental facility, the measurement techniques, and spray characteristics of two different GTL fuels are discussed and compared with those of Jet A-1 fuel. Results clearly demonstrate that although the global measurement gives an overall picture of the spray, fine details are obtained only through local measurements and complement in gaining more inferences into the spray characteristics. The results also show a close similarity in spray characteristics between GTL and Jet A-1 fuels. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  20. Experimental study on spray characteristics of alternate jet fuels using Phase Doppler Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels have gained global attention due to their cleaner combustion characteristics. The chemical and physical properties of GTL jet fuels are different from conventional jet fuels owing to the difference in their production methodology. It is important to study the spray characteristics of GTL jet fuels as the change of physical properties can affect atomization, mixing, evaporation and combustion process, ultimately affecting emission process. In this work, spray characteristics of two GTL synthetic jet fuels are studied using a pressure-swirl nozzle at different injection pressures and atmospheric ambient condition. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) measurements of droplet size and velocity are compared with those of regular Jet A-1 fuel at several axial and radial locations downstream of the nozzle exit. Experimental results show that although the GTL fuels have different physical properties such as viscosity, density, and surface tension, among each other the resultant change in the spray characteristics is insignificant. Furthermore, the presented results show that GTL fuel spray characteristics exhibit close similarity to those of Jet A-1 fuel. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  1. Sonic anemometry measurements to determine airflow patterns in multi-tunnel greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A.; Valera, D. L.; Molina-aiz, F. D.; Pena, A.

    2012-11-01

    The present work describes a methodology for studying natural ventilation in Mediterranean greenhouses using sonic anemometry. The experimental work took place in the three-span greenhouse located at the agricultural research farm belonging to the University of Almeria. This methodology has allowed us to obtain patterns of natural ventilation of the experimental greenhouse under the most common wind regimes for this region. It has also enabled us to describe how the wind and thermal effects interact in the natural ventilation of the greenhouse, as well as to detect deficiencies in the ventilation of the greenhouse, caused by the barrier effect of the adjacent greenhouse (imply a mean reduction in air velocity close to the greenhouse when facing windward of 98% for u, 63% for u, and more importantly 88% for ux, the component of air velocity that is perpendicular to the side vent). Their knowledge allows us to improve the current control algorithms that manage the movement of the vents. In this work we make a series of proposals that could substantially improve the natural ventilation of the experimental greenhouse. For instance, install vents equipped with ailerons which guide the air inside, or with vents in which the screen is not placed directly over the side surface of the greenhouse. A different proposal is to prolong the opening of the side vents down to the soil, thus fomenting the entrance of air at crop level. (Author) 34 refs.

  2. Reference measurements on a Francis model turbine with 2D Laser-Doppler-Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, A.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.; Jester-Zuerker, R.; Jung, A.

    2016-11-01

    To validate the investigations of a high-resolution CFD simulation of a Francis turbine, measurements with 2D Laser-Doppler-Anemometry are carried out. The turbine is operated in part load, where a rotating vortex rope occurs. To validate both, mean velocities and velocity fluctuations, the measurements are classified relative to the vortex rope position. Several acrylic glass windows are installed in the turbine walls such as upstream of the spiral case inlet, in the vaneless space and in the draft tube. The current investigation is focused on a measurement plane below the runner. 2D velocity components are measured on this whole plane by measuring several narrow spaced radial lines. To avoid optical refraction of the laser beam a plan parallel window is inserted in the cone wall. The laser probe is positioned with a 2D traverse system consisting of a circumferential rail and a radial aligned linear traverse. The velocity data are synchronized with the rotational frequency of the rotating vortex rope. The results of one measurement line show the dependency of the axial and circumferential velocities on the vortex rope position.

  3. Airflow Measurement of the Car HVAC Unit Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fojtlín Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal environment in a vehicular cabin significantly influence drivers’ fatigue and passengers’ thermal comfort. This environment is traditionally managed by HVAC cabin system that distributes air and modifies its properties. In order to simulate cabin thermal behaviour, amount of the air led through car vents must be determined. The aim of this study was to develop methodology to measure airflow from the vents, and consequently calculate corresponding air distribution coefficients. Three climatic cases were selected to match European winter, summer, and spring / fall conditions. Experiments were conducted on a test vehicle in a climatic chamber. The car HVAC system was set to automatic control mode, and the measurements were executed after the system stabilisation—each case was independently measured three times. To be able to evaluate precision of the method, the airflow was determined at the system inlet (HVAC suction and outlet (each vent, and the total airflow values were compared. The airflow was calculated by determining a mean value of the air velocity multiplied by an area of inlet / outlet cross-section. Hot-wire anemometry was involved to measure the air velocity. Regarding the summer case, total airflow entering the cabin was around 57 l s-1 with 60 % of the air entering the cabin through dashboard vents; no air was supplied to the feet compartment. The remaining cases had the same total airflow of around 42 l s-1, and the air distribution was focused mainly on feet and windows. The inlet and outlet airflow values show a good match with a maximum mass differential of 8.3 %.

  4. Airflow Measurement of the Car HVAC Unit Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtlín, Miloš; Planka, Michal; Fišer, Jan; Pokorný, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    Thermal environment in a vehicular cabin significantly influence drivers' fatigue and passengers' thermal comfort. This environment is traditionally managed by HVAC cabin system that distributes air and modifies its properties. In order to simulate cabin thermal behaviour, amount of the air led through car vents must be determined. The aim of this study was to develop methodology to measure airflow from the vents, and consequently calculate corresponding air distribution coefficients. Three climatic cases were selected to match European winter, summer, and spring / fall conditions. Experiments were conducted on a test vehicle in a climatic chamber. The car HVAC system was set to automatic control mode, and the measurements were executed after the system stabilisation—each case was independently measured three times. To be able to evaluate precision of the method, the airflow was determined at the system inlet (HVAC suction) and outlet (each vent), and the total airflow values were compared. The airflow was calculated by determining a mean value of the air velocity multiplied by an area of inlet / outlet cross-section. Hot-wire anemometry was involved to measure the air velocity. Regarding the summer case, total airflow entering the cabin was around 57 l s-1 with 60 % of the air entering the cabin through dashboard vents; no air was supplied to the feet compartment. The remaining cases had the same total airflow of around 42 l s-1, and the air distribution was focused mainly on feet and windows. The inlet and outlet airflow values show a good match with a maximum mass differential of 8.3 %.

  5. Calibration, Data Acquisition, and Post Analysis of Turbulent Fluid Flow in a Calibration Jet Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    The Turbine Branch concentrates on the following areas: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), and implementing experimental procedures to obtain physical modeling data. Hot-wire Anemometry is a valuable tool for obtaining physical modeling data. Hot-wire Anemometry is likely to remain the principal research tool for most turbulent air/gas flow studies. The Hot-wire anemometer consists of a fine wire heated by electric current. When placed in a fluid stream, the hot-wire loses heat to the fluid by forced convection. In forced convection, energy transfer is due to molecular motion imposed by an extraneous force moving fluid parcels. When the hot-wire is in "equilibrium", the rate of heat input to the wire is equal to the rate of heat loss at the wire ends. The equality between heat input and heat loss is the basis for King s equation, which relates the electrical parameters of the hot-wire to the flow parameters of the fluid. Hot-wire anemometry is based on convective heat transfer from a heated wire element placed in a fluid flow. Any change in the fluid flow condition that affects the heat transfer from the heated element will be detected virtually instantaneously by a constant-temperature Hot-wire anemometry system. The system implemented for this research is the IFA 300. The system is a fully-integrated, thermal anemometer-based system that measures mean and fluctuating velocity components in air, water, and other fluids. It also measures turbulence and makes localized temperature measurements. A constant-temperature anemometer is a bridge and amplifier circuit that controls a tiny wire at constant temperature. As a fluid flow passes over the heated sensor, the amplifier senses the bridge off-balance and adjusts the voltage to the top of the bridge, keeping the bridge in balance. The voltage on top of the bridge can then be related to the velocity of the flow. The bridge voltage is sensitive to temperature as well as velocity and so the built-in thermocouple

  6. Applying Laser Doppler Anemometry inside a Taylor-Couette geometry - Using a ray-tracer to correct for curvature effects

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, Sander G.; van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Sun, Chao

    2012-01-01

    In the present work it will be shown how the curvature of the outer cylinder affects Laser Doppler anemometry measurements inside a Taylor-Couette apparatus. The measurement position and the measured velocity are altered by curved surfaces. Conventional methods for curvature correction are not applicable to our setup, and it will be shown how a ray-tracer can be used to solve this complication. By using a ray-tracer the focal position can be calculated, and the velocity can be corrected. The ...

  7. The Effect of Nitrogen Cross-over on Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Water Balance Measurements Using Constant Temperature Anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the PEMFC water balance by employing a constant temperature hot wire anemometry has been developed by our fuel cell research group. In this work, the effect of nitrogen-cross over on this method is experimentally demonstrated....... This is due to the effect of 1% nitrogen on power law constant’s “m” which can be used in determining the water balance as explained in previous work was extremely low. Thus, the hot wire technique for measuring the PEMFC water balance is still accurate with the nitrogen cross-over...

  8. Fibre Optic Laser Doppler Anemometry, The Potential For Measurements In Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Walker D.

    1984-10-01

    Fibre optic laser Doppler anemometry (FOLDA) is a useful technique for in vitro studies but has yet to be used successfully for the measurement of intravascular velocity in man. Some reasons for this are: 1. The difficulty of locating the position of the fibre within the vessel. 2. Lack of knowledge of the precise velocity profile across the vessel. 3. The effects of flow perturbation at the tip of the probe. These problems have been assessed using a FOLDA system developed in our laboratory. Three dimensional velocity profiles of blood flowing in arteries with and without stenoses have been plotted at different rates of flow. The results show that the parabolic profile of fully developed laminar flow is flattened in an arterial stenosis and the degree of flattening increases as flow increases. This means the relationship of the flow and velocity is nonlinear. Any use of FOLDA to assess vessel dimension must take this into account. The position of the fibre in the vessel can only be adequately controlled in in-vitro studies. The region of measurement is only 50 μm diameter and must be at the position of the peak velocity to enable quantitative measurement. Thus the technique is useful in humans only when there is a flat velocity profile such as in the coronary sinus. The relationship between coronary sinus flow and FOLDA velocity is linear in experimental animals. The current FOLDA system has a limited range of projection into the blood stream. The velocity is not linearly related to blood flow when the direction of flow is the same as the projected light, probably due to flow perturbation at the fibre tip. This means that a probe introduced into a coronary artey would not measure linear flow however a probe introduced against the flow could be used to assess the severity of peripheral arterial stenoses. To measure flow across a stenoses before and after angioplasty is possible but requires a method of obtaining an average spatial velocity before it is practicable.

  9. The Effect of Nitrogen Cross-Over on Water Balance Measurements in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Using Constant Temperature Anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the PEMFC water balance by employing a constant temperature hot wire anemometry has been developed by our fuel cell research group. In this work, the effect of nitrogen-cross over on this method is experimentally demonstrated b...

  10. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell for a pre-humidified hydrogen stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Shakhshir, Saher Al

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication it has been shown how the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be determined employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor has to be placed into the anode outlet pipe of the operating fuel cell, and the voltage signal E that is read from the senso...

  11. Applying hot wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Al Shakhshir, Saher

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately determine the water balance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell it has recently been suggested to employ constant temperature anemometry (CTA), a frequently used method to measure the velocity of a fluid stream. CTA relies on convective heat transfer around a heated wire...... at around 200 °C. The heat loss to the fluid stream is balanced by electrical power dissipation, and the required voltage E is the output signal which is highly sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient of the wire and therefore provides accurate readings. This work explains the theory and summarizes...... the equations required to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and the resulting voltage signal as function of the fuel cell water balance. The most critical and least understood part is the determination of the Nusselt number to calculate the heat transfer between the wire and the gas stream. Different...

  12. Characterization of particles in the Langley 0.3 meter transonic cryogenic tunnel using hot wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Marple, C. G.; Davis, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Hot wire anemometry was used to identify the nature of particles reportedly observed during free stream velocity measurements in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter. Since the heat-transfer process from the hot wire depends on the thermal conductivity and sticking capability of the particles, it was anticipated that the hot wire anemometer response would be affected differently upon impaction by liquid droplets and solid aerosols in the test gas stream. Based on the measured time response of the hot-wire anemometer in the cryogenic tunnel operated in the 0.3-0.8 Mach number range, it is concluded that the particles impacting the hot wire are liquid in nature rather than solid aerosols. It is further surmised that the liquid aerosols are unevaporated liquid nitrogen droplets used for cooling the tunnel test gas.

  13. An LDA (Laser-Doppler Anemometry) investigation of three-dimensional normal shock wave boundary-layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriss, R. M.; Hingst, W. R.; Strazisar, A. J.; Keith, T. G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Nonintrusive measurements were made of a normal shock wave/boundary layer interaction. Two dimensional measurements were made throughout the interaction region while 3-D measurements were made in the vicinity of the shock wave. The measurements were made in the corner of the test section of a continuous supersonic wind tunnel in which a normal shock wave had been stabilized. Laser Doppler Anemometry, surface pressure measurement and flow visualization techniques were employed for two freestream Mach number test cases: 1.6 and 1.3. The former contained separated flow regions and a system of shock waves. The latter was found to be far less complicated. The results define the flow field structure in detail for each case.

  14. On the use of hot-wire anemometry in pulsating flows. A comment on 'A critical review on advanced velocity measurement techniques in pulsating flows'

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In their recent topical review, Nabavi and Siddiqui (Meas. Sci. Technol. 2010 21 042002) recommended the use of hot-wire anemometry for velocity measurements in pulsating flows, especially at high frequency. This recommendation is misleading. The procedures invoked by these authors are valid only for small-amplitude fluctuations, which are of little interest for pulsating flows. When large-amplitude velocity changes occur without flow reversal, new procedures for the c...

  15. Investigations of unsteady flow in the draft tube of the pump- turbine model using laser Doppler anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaznacheev, A.; Kuznetsov, I.

    2014-03-01

    The measurements and video observation of unsteady flow in the draft tube cone of the pump-turbine model were conducted in the Laboratory of Water Turbines, property of OJSC "Power machines" - "LMZ". The prototype head was about 250 m. The experiments were performed for the turbine mode of operation. Measurements were taken for the unit speed value n11 corresponding to rated head in the generating mode of operation, for a wide range of guide vanes openings at loads ranging from partial to maximum value. The researches of the velocity field in function of the Thoma number were carried out in some operating conditions. The mean values and RMS deviations of the velocity components were the results of laser measurements. The curves of the intensity of the vortex versus the guide vane opening and the Thoma number were plotted. The energy velocity spectra were presented for the points at which the most pronounced frequency precession of the helical axial vortex was observed. Video recording and laser Doppler anemometry were made in the operating conditions of the developed cavitation. Based on the results of video observations and energy spectra obtained via LDA, vortex frequencies were determined i.e. the frequencies of the vortex precession under the runner in the draft tube cone.

  16. An experimental study on the spray characteristics of diesel-dimethyl ether (DME) blended fuels by phase doppler anemometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the spray characteristics of diesel-dimethyl ether (DME) blended fuels by phase doppler anemometry (PDA). Blended fuels with DME mass fractions of 15%, 30% and pure diesel fuel were used to evaluate the effect of the DME concentration on the spray pattern, droplet size and velocity. The data for spray velocity vector and droplet size field were obtained. The experimental results reveal that the micro-explosive function exists in the jet of diesel-dimethyl ether (DME) blended fuels and the radial velocity of the blended fuels spray is larger than that of conventional diesel fuel spray near the nozzle exit. At the downstream part of the spray, the radial velocity and its attenuation rate of blended fuels are much more uniform and smaller than those of pure diesel spray. At the centerline of the spray, the attenuation rates of all spray axial velocities are similar. With the in- crease of DME concentration in the fuel, the spray angle and the exit velocity increase and the droplet size deceases.

  17. An experimental study on the spray characteristics of diesel-dimethyl ether (DME) blended fuels by phase doppler anemometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jin; HUANG Zhen; QIAO XinQi

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the spray characteristics of diesel-dimethyl ether (DME) blended fuels by phase doppler anemometry (PDA). Blended fuels with DME mass fractions of 15%,30% and pure diesel fuel were used to evaluate the effect of the DME concentration on the spray pattern,droplet size and velocity. The data for spray velocity vector and droplet size field were obtained. The experimental results reveal that the micro-explosive function exists in the jet of diesel-dimethyl ether (DME) blended fuels and the radial velocity of the blended fuels spray is larger than that of conventional diesel fuel spray near the nozzle exit. At the downstream part of the spray, the radial velocity and its attenuation rate of blended fuels are much more uniform and smaller than those of pure diesel spray. At the centerline of the spray, the attenuation rates of all spray axial velocities are similar. With the increase of DME concentration in the fuel, the spray angle and the exit velocity increase and the droplet size deceases.

  18. Study of cyclic and steady particle motion in a realistic human airway model using phase-Doppler anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Transport and deposition of particles in human airways has been of research interest for many years. Various experimental methods such as constant temperature anemometry, particle image velocimetry and laser-Doppler based techniques were employed for study of aerosol transport in the past. We use Phase-Doppler Particle Analyser (P/DPA for time resolved size and velocity measurement of liquid aerosol particles in a size range 1 to 8 μm. The di-2ethylhexyl sabacate (DEHS particles were produced by condensation monodisperse aerosol generator. A thin-wall transparent model of human airways with non-symmetric bifurcations and non-planar geometry containing parts from throat to 3rd-4th generation of bronchi was fabricated for the study. Several cyclic (sinusoidal breathing regimes were simulated using pneumatic breathing mechanism. Analogous steady-flow regimes were also investigated and used for comparison. An analysis of the particle velocity data was performed with aim to gain deeper understanding of the transport phenomena in the realistic bifurcating airway system. Flows of particles of different sizes in range 1 – 10 μm was found to slightly differ for extremely high Stokes numbers. Differences in steady and cyclic turbulence intensities were documented in the paper. Systematically higher turbulence intensity was found for cyclic flows and mainly in the expiration breathing phase. Negligible differences were found for behaviour of different particle size classes in the inspected range 1 to 8 μm. Possibility of velocity spectra estimation of air flow using the P/DPA data is discussed.

  19. A study of the turbulent wake of an airfoil in an air stream with a 90° curvature using hot-wire anemometry and large eddy simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Farsimadan, Ehsaan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The broad aim of the work presented in this thesis is to investigate the wake of an airfoil under the combined effects of streamwise curvature and pressure gradient. This was accomplished by an experimental investigation using hot-wire anemometry and large eddy simulation (LES). The wake was generated by placing a NACA 0012 airfoil in a uniform stream of air, which is then subjected to an abr...

  20. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Part 2: Experimental

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work an ex-situ experimental investigation is performed to examine the effect of the wire diameter and the outlet pipe diameter on the voltage signal. For a laboratory fuel cell where the mass flow rate the anode outlet is small......In order to better understand and more accurately measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, our group has recently proposed to apply hot wire anemometry in the fuel cell's anode outlet. It was theoretically shown that the electrical signal obtained from the hot wire sensor...

  1. Turbulence measurements in a transonic boundary layer and free-shear flow using laser velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.; Rose, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the turbulence fluctuations in velocity and mass flux have been obtained in Mach 0.6 and 0.8 turbulent boundary layer and free-shear layer flows by laser velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry techniques. To evaluate the effects of compressibility, these transonic data are compared to available incompressible and supersonic results. Based on some simplifying assumptions, estimates of the rms density fluctuations are made for which error bounds are given. In addition to these fluctuation data, the compressible mean velocity data obtained with the laser velocimeter are presented and compared to pitot tube results. The investigation was conducted in the Ames 6- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.6 and 0.8 for a unit Reynolds number of about 10,000,000 per meter.

  2. Review and Analysis of Hot-wire/film Anemometry for Hypersonic Airflow Measurement%高超声速热线/热膜风速仪研究综述及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦青燕; 张天宏

    2012-01-01

    In terms of the requirements for hot - wire/film anemometry in hypersonic airflow measurement, the recent research and development of hot - wire/film anemometry are summarized. The key problems and technical features are discussed for hypersonic hot-wire/film anemometry based on probe manufacture, control circuit design and probe calibration. The effects on thermal testing system are analyzed form hot-wire/film material, geometry and control-circuit mode, and several calibration methods are compared. Finally, some approaches have been proposed as reference to the research of hypersonic anemometry in China.%针对高超声速流场测量对热线/热膜风速仪的需求,对近年来国内外热线/热膜风速仪研制现状进行了归纳.重点从探头制备、控制电路设计及探头校准三个方面,阐述了热线/热膜测试系统应用于高超声速流场测量必须解决的关键问题及各种方案的特点;分析了探头材料、构型及控制电路模式对高超声速流场中热线/热膜测试系统性能的影响,并对热线/热膜探头校准的几种方法进行了对比,总结出可供发展我国自主知识产权高超声速热线/热膜技术的意见.

  3. Constant Resistance Is Not Constant Termperature Anemometry - A Lesson From the PWM-CTA Simulation and Its Impact on All CTA Frequency Responce Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Scott; Foss, John

    1998-11-01

    The transient response of a hot-wire sensor has been simulated numerically ala Perry(Perry, A., (1982), Hotwire Anemometry, Oxford Press.). The recently developed Pulse-Width-Modulated Constant Temperature Anemometer (PWM-CTA(J.F.Foss,D.G. Bohl, and T.J. Hicks (1996) ``The Pulse Width Modulated-Constant Temperature Anemometer,'' Meas. Sci. and Tech., vol. 7, pp. 1388-1395.)) was the power source for the sensor. The simplicity of this electrical circuit has permitted the simulation to reveal a distinctive feature of the sensor's response. A typical sensor was "calibrated" in the model for 3t_0) = 25m/sec. The indicated velocity did not equal the established Q(t>t_o) value albeit the proper overheat resistance was achieved in one time step. The discrepancy is a result of transient effects in the temperature distribution: T(z) and the non-linear coupling between the velocity and the heat transfer. This effect will be present in all CTA operations. The ``effective frequency response'' will be discussed.

  4. Comparison between Doppler echocardiography and hot-film anemometry in measuring the turbulent shear stress downstream of artificial mitral valves: a methodological study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yi; LI Rui-jie; LI Gan-niu; LI Bin; WANG Yu; MA Run-wei; YANG Bai-hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Turbulent shear stress (TSS) plays an important role in the research of fluid dynamics of heart valves.This study aimed to perform a quantitative study of TSS downstream of porcine artificial mitral valves in order to verify the correlation of hot-film anemometry (HFA) and Doppler echocardiography combined with computer-aided image analysis for the detection of TSS.Methods A porcine model of mitral valve replacement was established.HFA and Doppler ultrasound techniques were used to directly and indirectly measure TSS-relevant parameters of the artificial mitral valve following different mitral valve replacements:different approaches were used to reserve the subvalvular apparatus of the mitral valve.A correlation analysis was then carried out.Results There was a significant correlation between the HFA and Doppler ultrasound combined with computer-aided image analysis of the TSS at the same time and at the same site.No significant difference was found in the TSS measured by the two methods.Conclusions Compared with HFA,Doppler echocardiography combined with computer-aided image analysis is a safe,non-invasive,and real-time method that enables accurate and quantitative detection of TSS downstream in vivo,objectively reflecting the flow field downstream of the artificial mitral valve.Doppler ultrasound combined with computeraided image analysis can be employed for quantitatively evaluating the downstream hemodynamic performance of the mitral valve.

  5. Laser light sheet technique and laser anemometry for the visualisation and measurement of three-dimensional flow structures in turbomachines. Final report; Lichtschnittechnik und Laser-Messtechnik zur Sichtbarmachung und Erfassung dreidimensionaler Stroemungsstrukturen in Turbomaschinen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W.; Lehmann, I.; Sauer, H.; Seidel, G.

    1998-02-01

    For the turbomachines in all fields of application possibilities of further improvement are relatively small, but ecologically most important and with the multiplicity of cases of application and operational variants economically worthwhile. In order to exhaust this, it is necessary to penetrate even more deeply into the refinement of the current in turbomachines and to improve the understanding of fundamental phenomena. The application of the laser measuring technique can contribute greatly to this. By applying the non-intrusive measurement principle it will become possible to enter the flow genuinely and to carry out measurements in rotating cascades of turbomachines. In the current report the conception and the selection of the laser measuring technique as well as their main application in stationary and rotating cascades are described. With the help of laser anemometry, the three-dimensional flow field is quantitatively measured and visualized by the laser light sheet technique to understand the flow structures. On the basis of measurement results from different experiments the efficiency of the assigned laser measuring technique is shown. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fuer die Turbomaschinen in allen Einsatzgebieten sind die noch moeglichen Verbesserungen relativ gering, aber oekologisch hoechst bedeutsam und bei der Vielzahl der Einsatzfaelle und Einsatzvarianten wirtschaftlich lohnend. Sie auszuschoepfen erfordert, noch tiefer in die Feinheiten der Stroemung in Turbomaschinen einzudringen und Verstaendnis fuer die grundlegenden Phaenomene zu gewinnen. Der Einsatz der Laser-Messtechnik kann dazu einen grossen Beitrag leisten. Durch das beruehrungslose Messprinzip wird es moeglich, die Stroemung unverfaelscht zu erfassen und in rotierenden Schaufelkanaelen von Turbomaschinen Messungen durchzufuehren. Im vorliegenden Bericht wird die Konzeption und die Auswahl der Laser-Messtechnik sowie deren hauptsaechlicher Einsatz in stehenden und rotierenden Schaufelkanaelen

  6. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  7. Hot-wire anemometry for superfluid turbulent coflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durı, Davide; Baudet, Christophe; Moro, Jean-Paul; Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel; Diribarne, Pantxo

    2015-02-01

    We report the first evidence of an enhancement of the heat transfer from a heated wire to an external turbulent coflow of superfluid helium. We used a standard Pt-Rh hot-wire anemometer and overheat it up to 21 K in a pressurized liquid helium turbulent round jet at temperatures between 1.9 K and 2.12 K. The null-velocity response of the sensor can be satisfactorily modeled by the counterflow mechanism, while the extra cooling produced by the forced convection is found to scale similarly as the corresponding extra cooling in classical fluids. We propose a preliminary analysis of the response of the sensor and show that—contrary to a common assumption—such sensor can be used to probe local velocity in turbulent superfluid helium.

  8. Hot-wire anemometry for superfluid turbulent coflows

    OpenAIRE

    Durì, Davide; Baudet, Christophe; Moro, Jean-Paul; Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel; Diribarne, Pantxo

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We report the first evidence of an enhancement of the heat transfer from a heated wire to an external turbulent coflow of superfluid helium. We used a standard Pt-Rh hot-wire anemometer and overheat it up to 21 K in a pressurized liquid helium turbulent round jet at temperatures between 1.9 K and 2.12 K. The null-velocity response of the sensor can be satisfactorily modeled by the counterflow mechanism, while the extra cooling produced by the forced convection is found...

  9. Accuracy Of Hot-Wire Anemometry In Supersonic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Pamela; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Bershader, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of hot-wire probe compared to laser-induced-florescence measurements. Report discusses factors affecting readings of hot-wire anemometer in turbulent supersonic boundary layer. Presents theoretical analysis of responses of hot-wire probe to changes in flow; also compares measurements by hot-wire probe with measurements of same flows by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Because LIF provides spatially and temporally resolved data on temperature, density, and pressure, provides independent means to determine responses of hot-wire anemometers to these quantities.

  10. Improvement of Wind Farm Performance by Means of Spinner Anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Pedersen, Troels; Demurtas, Giorgio; Gottschall, Julia

    powerful microprocessor and heating was added to the sonic sensor arms plus a range of smaller redesigns. Software was revised with an improved internal calibration procedure. The improved system was tested on a 2MW wind turbine at Tjæreborg wind farm. Measurements on this turbine includes calibration of K...

  11. Capacitive transducer development for ultrasonic anemometry on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard-Pugh, E. W. K.; Wilson, C. F.; Calcutt, S. B.; Davis, L. A. J.

    2011-10-01

    Ultrasonic wind sensors are widely used on Earth due to their full-range accuracy and high measurement frequency. This poster will look at the operation of such sensors and the developments necessary to operate the devices under Martian conditions.

  12. Hot-wire anemometry for superfluid turbulent coflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durì, Davide; Baudet, Christophe; Moro, Jean-Paul; Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel; Diribarne, Pantxo

    2015-02-01

    We report the first evidence of an enhancement of the heat transfer from a heated wire to an external turbulent coflow of superfluid helium. We used a standard Pt-Rh hot-wire anemometer and overheat it up to 21 K in a pressurized liquid helium turbulent round jet at temperatures between 1.9 K and 2.12 K. The null-velocity response of the sensor can be satisfactorily modeled by the counterflow mechanism, while the extra cooling produced by the forced convection is found to scale similarly as the corresponding extra cooling in classical fluids. We propose a preliminary analysis of the response of the sensor and show that-contrary to a common assumption-such sensor can be used to probe local velocity in turbulent superfluid helium.

  13. Computerized hot-wire anemometry--principles of calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, A; Stigsby, B

    1980-04-01

    Principles of calculation of respiratory parameters based on a hot-wire anemometer with special reference to computer monitoring were evaluated. Flow-rate, gas-pressure, and flow-direction signals were recorded simultaneously on magnetic tape. Subsequent quantitative analyses were performed on a general purpose digital minicomputer. An analysis epoch of 256 s was selected from the 3 channels. After identification of one cycle baseline values of flow-rate and pressure were determined. Different time-lags in one respiratory cycle (inspiratory time, pause time and expiratory time) could be determined. Inspiratory and expiratory volumes were obtained by integration. Peak of the thoracic cage and the lungs were calculated using the above mentioned parameters. Finally, the respiratory frequency was calculated.

  14. Hot wire anemometry. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Citations include principles; calibrating; circuit diagrams; flow measurement; hypersonic, supersonic, transonic, and subsonic characteristics; boundary layer studies; turbulence; jet, pipe, and tunnel flow; mathematical models; wind tunnel model tests, airport structure simulation; mass transfer and flow stability; probe modifications; flow about geometric forms; flow patterns; and related topics. This updated bibliography contains 249 citations, 28 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  15. Hot film anemometry. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The principles of hot film anemometer operation are summarized; wind tunnel and laboratory tests are described; flow field dynamics are discussed involving turbulence, boundary layers, separation, shock waves, and stresses; mathematical models and analysis are presented; computer techniques are outlined; and a number of applications are given. This updated bibliography contains 58 citations, 3 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  16. Flow tilt angles near forest edges - Part 2: Lidar anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Mann, Jakob; Bingöl, Ferhat

    2010-01-01

    ) a fetch-limited beech forest site taken at 48–175 m a.g.l. (above ground level), (2) a reference site in flat agricultural terrain and (3) a second reference site in complex terrain are presented. The method to derive flow tilt angles and mean vertical velocities from lidar has several advantages compared...... vertical velocity, whereas the error due to flow inhomogeneity on the horizontal mean wind speed is independent of the lidar beam angle. For the presented measurements over forest, it is evaluated that the systematic error due to the inhomogeneity of the flow is less than 0.2°. The results of the vertical...... conical scans were promising, and yielded positive flow angles for a sector where the forest is fetch-limited. However, more data and analysis are needed for a complete evaluation of the lidar technique....

  17. Flow tilt angles near forest edges - Part 1: Sonic anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Mann, Jakob; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg

    2010-01-01

    -sets. These features of the investigated sonic anemometers make them unsuitable for measuring vertical velocities over highly turbulent forested terrain. By comparing the sonic anemometer results to that of a conically scanning Doppler lidar (Dellwik et al., 2010b), sonic anemometer accuracy for measuring mean flow...... distortion and vertical alignment, it was only possible to a limited extent to relate sonic anemometer flow tilt angles to upwind forest edges, but the results by the lidar indicated that an internal boundary layer affect flow tilt angles at 21m above the forest. This is in accordance with earlier studies......An analysis of flow tilt angles from a fetch-limited beech forest site with clearings is presented in the context of vertical advection of carbon dioxide. Flow angles and vertical velocities from two sonic anemometers by different manufacturers were analyzed. Instead of using rotations, where zero...

  18. Statistical calibration via Gaussianization in hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluzman, Igal; Cohen, Jacob; Oshman, Yaakov

    2017-03-01

    A statistical method is introduced, that is based on Gaussianization to estimate the nonlinear calibration curve of a hot-wire probe, relating the input flow velocity to the output (measured) voltage. The method uses as input a measured sequence of voltage samples, corresponding to different unknown flow velocities in the desired operational range, and only two measured voltages along with their known (calibrated) flow velocities. The method relies on the conditions that (1) the velocity signal is Gaussian distributed (or has another known distribution), and (2) the measured signal covers the desired velocity range over which the sensor is to be calibrated. The novel calibration method is validated against standard calibration methods using data acquired by hot-wire probes in wind-tunnel experiments. In these experiments, a hot-wire probe is placed at a certain region downstream of a cube-shaped body in a freestream of air flow, properly selected, so that the central limit theorem, when applied to the random velocity increments composing the instantaneous velocity in the wake, roughly holds, and renders the measured signal nearly Gaussian distributed. The statistical distribution of the velocity field in the wake is validated by mapping the first four statistical moments of the measured signals in different regions of the wake and comparing them with corresponding moments of the Gaussian distribution. The experimental data are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the method to the distribution of the measured signal, and the method is demonstrated to possess some robustness with respect to deviations from the Gaussian distribution.

  19. Dead time effects in laser Doppler anemometry measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Buchhave, Preben; George, William K.

    2014-01-01

    We present velocity power spectra computed by the so-called direct method from burst-type laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) data, both measured in a turbulent round jet and generated in a computer. Using today’s powerful computers, we have been able to study more properties of the computed spectra...... frequency range, starting around the cutoff frequency due to the finite size of the MV. Using computer-generated data mimicking the LDA data, these effects have previously been shown to appear due to the effect of dead time, i.e., the finite time during which the system is not able to acquire new...... measurements. These dead times can be traced back to the fact that the burst-mode LDA cannot measure more than one signal burst at a time. Since the dead time is approximately equal to the residence time for a particle traversing a measurement volume, we are dealing with widely varying dead times, which...

  20. Sphere anemometer - a faster alternative solution to cup anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölling, M.; Schulte, B.; Barth, S.; Peinke, J.

    2007-07-01

    We present an anemometer technique characterized by an instrument in a sealed enclosure without moving parts. Measurements taken with our improved sphere anemometer in comparison to cup anemometer and hot-wire anemometer data subjected to wind gusts are discussed. The hot-wire anemometer serves as a reference with high temporal and spacial resolution. A manually driven "gust generator" produced gusts at low frequencies of about 1Hz. All measurements were carried out in the wind tunnel at the University of Oldenburg.

  1. Cup anemometry in wind engineering, struggle for improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, A.; Klug, H.; Westermann, D. [DEWI, Wilhelmshaven (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Large deviations between measurements with cup anemometers of different types in turbulent air flow have recently been identified. The key problem resulting for the wind industry is that wind speed measurements performed with different anemometer types are not directly comparable. Solutions for this problem are believed to be found in a classification of cup anemometers or a correction among different cup anemometer types, while the focus must not necessarily lie on the determination of the true wind speed. The investigated cup anemometers fall roughly into two groups, namely the Risoee P2445b, the Vector A100 and the Metone 010C-1 anemometers tend to measure less wind speed in turbulent flow than the Thies 4.3303.22.X, the Friedrichs 4033.1100X and the Thies Compact anemometers. Measurements with a calibrated ultra sonic anemometer of type Gill Windmaster were closer to the first group at high wind speeds and to the latter group at lower wind speeds. Up to now all simple classification schemes oriented on basic physical properties of the cup anemometers, like the shape of the cups, the shape of the body or the size of the cups, were not successful. Also a classification of the cup anemometers according to their static response to vertically inclined air flow as measured in wind tunnels turned out to be inappropriate. A correction between the different groups of cup anemometers requires the knowledge which meteorological parameters have to be considered for the determination of the correction. From the existing measurements it is clear that such a correction is site specific and must account for the turbulence intensity. However, some cases appeared where at different sites with comparable turbulence intensity different deviations between the same pair of cup anemometers occurred which indicates that other flow parameters than the turbulence intensity also play an important role. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen von Forschungsaktivitaeten unter Beteiligung des DEWI wurden grosse Abweichungen in Windgeschwindigkeitsmessungen von Schalensternanemometern unterschiedlicher Typen im Freifeld festgestellt. Fuer die Windenergieindustrie folgt hieraus das Problem, dass Windmessungen mit verschiedenen Anemometertypen nicht miteinander vergleichbar sind. Loesungsansaetze koennten in einer Klassierung der Schalensternanemometer und einer Korrektur zwischen den verschiedenen Schalensternanemometern bestehen. Die untersuchten Schalensternanemometer fallen in zwei Gruppen. Schalensternanemometer der Typen Risoee P2445b, Vector A100 und Metone 010C-1 tendieren im Freifeld zu deutlich kleineren Windgeschwindigkeitsmesswerten als Schalensternanemometer der Typen Thies 4.3303.22.X, Friedrichs 4033.1100X und Thies Compact. Ein kalibriertes Ultraschallanemometer vom Typ Gill Windmaster stimmt bei hoher Windgeschwindigkeit tendenziell eher mit der ersten Gruppe und bei niedrigerer Windgeschwindigkeit eher mit der zweiten Gruppe ueberein. Bisher haben sich alle einfachen Klassifizierungsschemata fuer Schalensternanemometer z.B. anhand der Geometrie der Anemometer oder anhand des statischen Schraeganstroemungsverhaltens der Anemometer nicht als praktikabel erwiesen. Eine Korrektur der Windgeschwindigkeitsmesswerte zwischen den Anemometergruppen erfordert die Kenntnis, von welchen Stroemungsparametern die Anemometerabweichungen abhaengen. Die Windgeschwindigkeitskorrektur muss standortbezogen erfolgen. Welche standortspezifischen Stroemungsparameter dabei neben der Turbulenzintensitaet beruecksichtigt werden muessen ist noch unklar. (orig.)

  2. Capture of instantaneous temperature in oscillating flows: use of constant-voltage anemometry to correct the thermal lag of cold wires operated by constant-current anemometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaëlle; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for the instantaneous correction of the thermal inertia of cold wires operated by a constant-current anemometer is proposed for oscillating flows. The thermal inertia of cold wires depends both on the wire properties and on the instantaneous incident flow velocity. Its correction is challenging in oscillating flows because no relationship between flow velocity and heat transfer around the wire is available near flow reversal. The present correction procedure requires neither calibration data for velocity nor thermophysical or geometrical properties of the wires. The method relies on the splitting of the time lag of cold wires into two factors, which are obtained using a constant-voltage anemometer in the heated mode. The first factor, which is intrinsic to the wire, is deduced from time-constant measurements performed in a low-turbulence flow. The second factor, which depends on the instantaneous flow velocity, is acquired in situ. In oscillating flows, data acquisition can be synchronized with a reference signal so that the same wire is alternatively operated in the cold mode by a constant-current anemometer and in the heated mode by a constant-voltage anemometer. Validation experiments are conducted in an acoustic standing-wave resonator, for which the fluctuating temperature field along the resonator axis is known independently from acoustic pressure measurements, so that comparisons can be made with cold-wire measurements. It is shown that despite the fact that the wire experiences flow reversal, the new procedure recovers accurately the instantaneous temperature of the flow.

  3. A strategy to eliminate all nonlinear effects in constant-voltage hot-wire anemometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2009-04-01

    A constant-voltage anemometer is subject to nonlinear effects when the operating hot wire is exposed to large velocity fluctuations in the incident flow. This results in the generation of undesirable higher harmonics, just as in the two classic systems, constant-current and constant-temperature anemometers, for which no attempts are normally made to correct the nonlinearities. The present investigation shows that these undesirable higher harmonics can be suppressed in the case of a constant-voltage anemometer. A new approach to process experimental data is proposed. It is based on three explicit equations established and solved with all terms included, i.e., without linearization. These are (1) the first-order differential equation that describes the electronic circuit of a constant-voltage anemometer-this equation permits to deduce the instantaneous resistance of the hot wire from the output voltage of the anemometer; (2) the first-order differential equation that expresses the thermal lag behavior of the hot wire when used in a constant-voltage mode-this equation permits to restore the instantaneous resistance that an ideal wire would have without thermal inertia in the same flow conditions; and (3) the algebraic relation that expresses the heat-transfer law of an ideal wire, according to King's law, a look-up table, or a polynomial fit-this relation permits to deduce the instantaneous flow velocity from the instantaneous resistance of the ideal wire. The proposed method is easily implemented on a personal computer and permits odd turbulence moments, such as skewness factors, to be obtained satisfactorily.

  4. A detailed procedure for measuring turbulent velocity fluctuations using constant-voltage anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Taifour, Abdelouahab; Weiss, Julien; Sadeghi, Atabak; Vétel, Jérôme; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2015-09-01

    A detailed procedure to use a constant-voltage anemometer (CVA) for the accurate measurement of turbulent flows is proposed. The procedure is based on the usual small-perturbation analysis of hot-wire signals. It consists in three steps: (1) the calibration of internal elements, required to estimate the two main electrical parameters of the CVA circuitry that are needed in the data analysis, (2) a flow calibration to relate the CVA output voltage and the hot-wire time constant to the flow velocity, and (3) a data-processing algorithm to recover the fluctuating flow quantities from the output voltage. The procedure is tested in two classical turbulent flows: a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer and a round jet. In both cases, the CVA results are shown to be essentially indistinguishable from the results obtained with a research-grade constant-temperature anemometer.

  5. Experimental study of thermal mixing layer using variable temperature hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodjavi, Kodjovi; Carlier, Johan

    2013-10-01

    The buoyancy effects on the development of the thermal mixing layer downstream from a horizontal separating plate were studied by comparing stable and unstable counter-gradient configurations. In this study, the novel experimental technique called parameterizable constant temperature anemometer, proposed by Ndoye et al. (Meas Sci Technol 21(7):075401, 2010), was improved to make possible the simultaneous measurement of temperature and two velocity components with an x-wire probe. The buoyancy effects on the flow are discussed through the transport equations of turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance. In view of the low Richardson numbers at stake ( Ri f < 0.03), the buoyancy forces appeared logically to be quantitatively negligible compared to the main driving forces, but such a low-energy forcing mechanism was in fact sufficient in unstable configurations to increase the shear stress and the expansion rate of the mixing layer significantly, both phenomena being associated with enhanced production of turbulence.

  6. Development of a three dimensional compressible flow calibration facility for thermal anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Evan Samson Sprung

    Measurements of unsteady, three-dimensional turbomachinery flowfields are needed to improve the computational models in predictive tools used in the design process of new turbomachines. Hot-wire anemometers, which offer a high frequency response for a relatively low cost, are one of the most common methods for investigating turbulent flows. Triple-wire sensors provide a means of obtaining simultaneous measurements of all three velocity components but require a significantly more complicated calibration scheme than single-wire sensors. In addition, the heat transfer from a hot-wire is dependent not only on the flow velocity but also the temperature and density, which must be accounted for through calibration and correction factors. To enable triple-wire hot-wire measurements in the Purdue 3-Stage Axial Compressor Facility, a new compressible flow calibration facility has been developed which can position the probe through a range of pitch and yaw angles and provide a means to derive temperature and density correction factors specific to each probe. A lookup table method is used to convert the voltage signals back to velocities and angles. The calibration facility can reach velocities in excess of 500 ft/s, temperatures up to 155°F and densities up to 0.090 lbm/ft3. The velocity is accurate to within 3.5 ft/s, temperature control accurate to within 1°F and density to within 5.5x10-5 lbm/ft3. A triple-wire fiber-film probe was used to validate the calibration method, and was able to resolve the three-dimensional flowfield downstream of a rotor.

  7. Use of hot-wire anemometry for turbulence measurements in shock induced flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, L. C.; Duffy, R. E.; Troller, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A research program is currently being conducted with the aim to investigate the operating environment of future gas turbines. The present paper provides a description of the experimental methods which have been employed in performing turbulence intensity measurements in shock-induced flows. In a discussion of the instrumentation, attention is given to the employed low pressure shock tube, the hot-wire probe, the anemometer, the test facility, the experimental setup, the Kistler pressure transducer, and silicon piezoresistive gages. Aspects of instrumentation calibration are considered along with data corrections, experimental data, and data processing.

  8. Novel method and experimental validation of statistical calibration via Gaussianization in hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluzman, Igal; Cohen, Jacob; Oshman, Yaakov

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a statistical method based on Gaussianization to estimate the nonlinear calibration curve of a hot-wire probe, that relates the input flow velocity to the output (measured) voltage. The method uses as input a measured sequence of voltage samples, corresponding to different unknown flow velocities in the desired operational range, and only two measured voltages along with their known (calibrated) flow velocities. The novel method is validated against standard calibration methods using data acquired by hot-wire probes using wind-tunnel experiments. We demonstrate our new calibration technique by placing the hot-wire probe at certain region downstream of a cube-shaped body in a free stream of air flow. For testing our calibration method we rely on flow statistics that exist, among others, in a certain region of a turbulent wake formed downstream of the cube-shaped body. The specific properties are: first, the velocity signal in the wake should be as close to Gaussian as possible. Second, the signal should cover the desired velocity range that should be calibrated. The appropriate region to place our probe is determined via computation of the first four statistical moments of the measured signals in different regions of the wake.

  9. Distributed hot-wire anemometry based on Brillouin optical time-domain analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Michael T V; Brown, Anthony W; Colpitts, Bruce G

    2012-07-02

    A distributed hot-wire anemometer based on Brillouin optical time-domain analysis is presented. The anemometer is created by passing a current through a stainless steel tube fibre bundle and monitoring Brillouin frequency changes in the presence of airflow. A wind tunnel is used to provide laminar airflow while the device response is calibrated against theoretical models. The sensitivity equation for this anemometer is derived and discussed. Airspeeds from 0 m/s to 10 m/s are examined, and the results show that a Brillouin scattering based distributed hot-wire anemometer is feasible.

  10. Fluctuation diagrams for hot-wire anemometry in subsonic compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Nagabushana, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of using 'fluctuation diagrams' for describing basic fluctuations in compressible flows was reported by Kovasznay in the 1950's. The application of this technique, for the most part, was restricted to supersonic flows. Recently, Zinovev and Lebiga published reports where they considered the fluctuation diagrams in subsonic compressible flows. For the above studies, the velocity and density sensitivities of the heated wires were equal. However, there are considerable data, much taken in the 1950's, which indicate that under some conditions the velocity and density sensitivities are not equal in subsonic compressible flows. Therefore, possible fluctuation diagrams are described for the cases where the velocity and density sensitivities are equal and the more general cases where they are unequal.

  11. The use of hot-wire anemometry in transonic periodic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodapati, S.; Lee, C.-S.

    1984-01-01

    The unsteady wake profiles of an airfoil with an oscillating flap were measured in the NASA Ames 11 x 11-foot transonic wind tunnel. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and holography techniques were used in limited region where optical accessability is available. X-hot-film wire was used to measure the wake profiles in the complete region to obtain magnitude and direction of the flow. A thorough calibration was carried out to determine the sensitivity coefficients of the hot-wire in three different tunnels at transonic speeds. A calculation procedure is established to resolve the hot-wire signals at transonic speeds and applied in the measurements of steady and periodic wake profiles. The effect of flow incidence on the hot-wire signals is evaluated and incorporated in the analyses. Typical hot-wire results are compared with the results of LDV, holography and pitot-static tube embedded with Kulite transducers.

  12. A strategy to eliminate all nonlinear effects in constant-voltage hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2009-04-01

    A constant-voltage anemometer is subject to nonlinear effects when the operating hot wire is exposed to large velocity fluctuations in the incident flow. This results in the generation of undesirable higher harmonics, just as in the two classic systems, constant-current and constant-temperature anemometers, for which no attempts are normally made to correct the nonlinearities. The present investigation shows that these undesirable higher harmonics can be suppressed in the case of a constant-voltage anemometer. A new approach to process experimental data is proposed. It is based on three explicit equations established and solved with all terms included, i.e., without linearization. These are (1) the first-order differential equation that describes the electronic circuit of a constant-voltage anemometer—this equation permits to deduce the instantaneous resistance of the hot wire from the output voltage of the anemometer; (2) the first-order differential equation that expresses the thermal lag behavior of the hot wire when used in a constant-voltage mode—this equation permits to restore the instantaneous resistance that an ideal wire would have without thermal inertia in the same flow conditions; and (3) the algebraic relation that expresses the heat-transfer law of an ideal wire, according to King's law, a look-up table, or a polynomial fit—this relation permits to deduce the instantaneous flow velocity from the instantaneous resistance of the ideal wire. The proposed method is easily implemented on a personal computer and permits odd turbulence moments, such as skewness factors, to be obtained satisfactorily.

  13. Quantitative measurement of blood flow dynamics in chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo using laser Doppler anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borozdova, M. A.; Stiukhina, E. S.; Sdobnov, A. A.; Fedosov, I. V.; Postnov, D. E.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results on in ovo application of developed Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) device. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 9-13 days chicken embryos was used as a biological model that allows an easy access to both arterial and venous vessels of different size. The key point of our study was to find out how the periodic and aperiodic pulsations of blood flow (which are inevitable in living organism) will affect the LDA functions and measuring capability. Specifically, we (i) developed the technique to extract and refine the pulse rhythm from the signal received from a vessel, and (ii) analyzed the changes in power spectra of LDA signal that are caused by heart beating and considerably complicate the reliable measurement of Doppler shift. Our main conclusion is that the algorithm of LDA data processing need to be improved, and this possibly can be done by counting the information on current phase of cardiac cycle.

  14. Large scale flow visualization and anemometry applied to lab on chip models of porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Paiola, Johan; Bodiguel, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    The following is a report on an experimental technique allowing to quantify and map the velocity field with a very high resolution and a simple equipment in large 2D devices. A simple Shlieren technique is proposed to reinforce the contrast in the images and allow you to detect seeded particles that are pixel-sized or even inferior to it. The velocimetry technique that we have reported on is based on auto-correlation functions of the pixel intensity, which we have shown are directly related to the magnitude of the local average velocity. The characteristic time involved in the decorrelation of the signal is proportional to the tracer size and inversely proportional to the average velocity. We have reported on a detailed discussion about the optimization of relevant involved parameters, the spatial resolution and the accuracy of the method. The technique is then applied to a model porous media made of a random channel network. We show that it is highly efficient to determine the magnitude of the flow in each o...

  15. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad, S. M.; Lundström, T. S.; Andersson, A. G.; Hellström, J. G. I.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  16. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  17. Variable temperature hot wire anemometry applied to the joint analysis of the velocity and temperature fluctuations in a mixing layer

    OpenAIRE

    Ndoye, M.; Delville, J.; Dorignac, E.; Arroyo, G.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Our study provides a detailed description of the thermal mixing process in an anisothermal mixing layer. Velocity and temperature are simultaneously measured at the same point by using a new hot wire anemometer. This anemometer implements the multiple overheat principle, associated with a non linear Levenberg-Marquardt signal processing. These simultaneous measurements allowed an analysis based on conditional Probability Density Functions (PDFs), joint PDFs and a quadr...

  18. Application of low-coherence optical fiber Doppler anemometry to fluid-flow measurement: optical system considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, William J. O.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Palmer, Andrew W.; Meggitt, B. T.

    1991-08-01

    A fiber optic Doppler anemometric (FODA) sensor using an optical delay cavity technique and having the advantage of detecting velocity rather than simple speed is outlined. In this sensor the delay in a sensor cavity formed from light back-reflected from a fiber tip (Fresnel reflection) and light back-reflected from particles flowing in a fluid is balanced by the optical delay when light from this sensor cavity passes through a reference cavity formed by a combination of the zero and first diffraction orders produced by a Bragg cell inserted into the optical arrangement. The performance of an experimental sensor based on this scheme is investigated, and velocity measurements using the Doppler shift data from moving objects are presented. The sensitivity of the scheme is discussed, with reference to the other techniques of fluid flow measurement.

  19. Measurements of mass flux and concentration in supersonic air/helium mixing by hot-wire anemometry

    OpenAIRE

    KONDO, Akira; Sakaue, Shoji; Arai, Takakage; 近藤 暁; 坂上 昇史; 新井 隆景

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we made efforts to realize a measurement method of mass flux and concentration in supersonic air/helium flow in order to clarify the mixing process. The measuring equipment, which was used for measuring the fluctuations of mass flux and concentration, is consisted of a double-hot-wire probe and CVA (Constant Voltage Anemometer) circuit with 500 kHz bandwidth. The distance between two wires of double-hot-wire probe was 0.16 mm. By using the same material as the hot wire, t...

  20. Three-dimensional ray tracing through curvilinear interfaces with application to laser Doppler anemometry in a blood analogue fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Allen H; Bertram, Christopher D

    2010-02-01

    Prediction of the effects of refractive index (RI) mismatch on laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements within a curvilinear cavity (an artificial ventricle) was achieved by developing a general technique for modelling the paths of the convergent beams of the LDA system using 3D vector geometry. Validated by ray tracing through CAD drawings, the predicted maximum tolerance in RI between the solid model and the working fluid was +/- 0.0005, equivalent to focusing errors commensurate with the geometric and alignment uncertainties associated with the flow model and the LDA arrangement. This technique supports predictions of the effects of refraction within a complex geometry. Where the RI mismatch is unavoidable but known, it is possible not only to calculate the true position of the measuring volume (using the probe location and model geometry), but also to estimate degradation in signal quality arising from differential displacement and refraction of the laser beams.

  1. Universal miniaturized signal evaluation for laser doppler anemometers; Universelle Miniatur-Signalauswertung fuer die Laser Doppler Anemometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wnuck, J. von; Strunck, V.; Dopheide, D.

    1994-01-01

    A laser doppler anemometer (LDA) is a contactless optical sensor for flow rate measurement. Interference of two laser beams generates a measuring volume with interference lines in the point of intersection. A particle moving through the measuring volume with a current scatters light modulated wiith the doppler frequency, which is received by a detector. The frequency of the doppler-modulated light is proportional to the velocity of the particle. The report describes the technical details of an electronic evaluation system for laser doppler signals in the time range using programmable gate arrays by Xilinix. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) ist ein beruehrungsloser optischer Sensor, der Stroemungsgeschwindigkeiten misst. Die Ueberlagerung zweier Laserstrahlen erzeugt im Schnittpunkt ein Messvolumen mit Inferenzstreifen. Ein Teilchen, das sich mit einer Stroemung durch das Messvolumen bewegt, streut mit der Doppelfrequenz des Doppler moduliertes Licht, das von einem Detektor empfangen wird. Die Frequenz des Doppler-modulierten Lichts ist der Geschwindigkeit des Teilchens proportional. Hier wird die technische Realisierung einer Auswerteelektronik fuer Laser Doppler Signale im Zeitbereich mit programmierbaren Gate-Arrays von Xilinx beschrieben. (orig.)

  2. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce...

  3. Large scale flow visualization and anemometry applied to lab-on-a-chip models of porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiola, Johan; Auradou, Harold; Bodiguel, Hugues

    2016-08-01

    The following is a report on an experimental technique that allows one to quantify and map the velocity field with very high resolution and simple equipment in large 2D devices. Illumination through a grid is proposed to reinforce the contrast in the images and allow one to detect seeded particles that are pixel-sized or even smaller. The velocimetry technique that we have reported is based on the auto-correlation functions of the pixel intensity, which we have shown are directly related to the magnitude of the local average velocity. The characteristic time involved in the decorrelation of the signal is proportional to the tracer size and inversely proportional to the average velocity. We have reported on a detailed discussion about the optimization of relevant involved parameters, the spatial resolution and the accuracy of the method. The technique is then applied to a model porous medium made of a random channel network. We show that it is highly efficient to determine the magnitude of the flow in each of the channels of the network, opening the door to the fundamental study of the flows of complex fluids. The latter is illustrated with a yield stress fluid, in which the flow becomes highly heterogeneous at small flow rates.

  4. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive to stationary such as powering telecom back-up units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste...... heat. One critical technical problem of these fuel cells is still the water management: the proton exchange membrane in the center of these fuel cells has to be hydrated in order to stay proton-conductive while excessive liquid water can lead to cell flooding and increased degradation rates. Clearly...

  5. A FORTRAN code for the calculation of probe volume geometry changes in a laser anemometry system caused by window refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Albert K.

    1987-01-01

    A computer code was written which utilizes ray tracing techniques to predict the changes in position and geometry of a laser Doppler velocimeter probe volume resulting from refraction effects. The code predicts the position change, changes in beam crossing angle, and the amount of uncrossing that occur when the beams traverse a region with a changed index of refraction, such as a glass window. The code calculates the changes for flat plate, cylinder, general axisymmetric and general surface windows and is currently operational on a VAX 8600 computer system.

  6. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance in a Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Hussain, Nabeel; Berning, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) remains a critical problem for their durability, cost, and performance. Because the anode side of this fuel cell has the tendency to become dehydrated, measuring the water balance can be an important diagnosis tool during fuel cell...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work, experimental ex-situ results are presented and the elegance and usefulness of this method is demonstrated....

  7. L2F Anemometry Measurements of the Inter-Row Flow Field Within a Transonic Axial Compressor Provided with Curved Windows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    When measurements are performed in high speed,small-scale compressors,the use of curved glass windows is required in order to avoid any mismatch between the measurement window and the casing.However,the glass curvature leads to optical distortions,which hinder acceptable measurements and can even prevent the acquisition of any data.Thus,an original optical assembly,which consists in inserting a simple and inexpensive corrective window between the frontal lens of the anemometer and the shroud window,is proposed.The way of determining the geometric characteristics and the position of this corrective window,which restores very acceptable foci,is presented in the paper.The reliability of this corrective optical assembly is highlighted by comparative measurements in a test case .Using such an optical setting,L2F measurements were realised along a section,downstream of the inlet guide vane(IGV) of a transonic compressor stage.The spatial resolution leads to a good description of the interaction of the wake with the oblique shock emanating from the leading edge of the rotor.A phenomenological study of the wake/shock interaction with a change of frame is realised using the streamwise equation of the transport of vorticity.

  8. L2F anemometry measurements of the inter-row flow field within a transonic axial compressor provided with curved windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottavy, Xavier; Trébinjac, Isabelle; Vouillarmet, André

    1999-09-01

    When measurements are performed in high speed, small-scale compressors, the use of curved glass windows is required in order to avoid any mismatch between the measurement window and the casing. However, the glass curvature leads to optical distortions, which hinder acceptable measurements and can even prevent the acquisition of any data. Thus, an original optical assembly, which consists in inserting a simple and inexpensive corrective window between the frontal lens of the anemometer and the shroud window, is proposed. The way of determining the geometric characteristics and the position of this corrective window, which restores very acceptable foci, is presented in the paper. The reliability of this corrective optical assembly is highlighted by comparative measurements in a test case. Using such an optical setting, L2F measurements were realised along a section, downstream of the inlet guide vane (IGV) of a transonic compressor stage. The spatial resolution leads to a good description of the interaction of the wake with the oblique shock emanating from the leading edge of the rotor. A phenomenological study of the wake/shock interaction with a change of frame is realised using the streamwise equation of the transport of vorticity.

  9. Development of a "Digital Bridge" Thermal Anemometer for Turbulence Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal anemometry (a.k.a. hot-wire anemometry) has been a key experimental technique in fluid mechanics for many decades. Due to the small physical size and high...

  10. Velocity Profile Characterization for the 5-CM Agent Fate Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    tunnel validation) and the HD on sand test phases of the Agent Fate Program. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hot wire anemometry Boundary layer Evaporation Agent...TSI Hot Wire Probe ........................................................................ 31 21. TSI IFA 300 Thermal Anemometry Systems...Characterization Instrumentation 5.2.1 Hot Wire Anemometers 5.2.1.1 Overview Hot Wire Anemometry Several techniques were considered to measure the velocity

  11. Application of laser anemometry to flow measurement inside of gas turbine combustor%LDA在燃气轮机燃烧室流场测量中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕燕; 王代骄; 金大祥; 邹介棠

    2002-01-01

    介绍了激光多普勒测速技术在燃气轮机燃烧室内部流场测试的应用,阐述了LDA的基本原理和模型燃烧室内光学路径的实现方法.同时作者利用双相位多普勒分析仪DualPDA(Dual Phase Doppler Anemometer)对模型燃烧室内部流场进行了二维冷态测试,获得了大量的原始数据,为深入研究燃烧室内部气流特性提供了实验基础.

  12. Simulation of bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling Lagrangian and Eulerian models with 3D random walks models: validation with experimental data using multi-sensor conductivity probes and laser doppler anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L. [Univ. Politecnica de Valencia, Inst. de Ingenieria Energetica, Valencia (Spain); Chiva, S. [Univ. Jaume I, Dept. of Mechnical Engineering and Construction, Castellon (Spain); Abd El Aziz Essa, M. [Univ. Politecnica de Valencia, Inst. de Ingenieria Energetica, Valencia (Spain); Mendes, S. [Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    A set of air-water experiments have been performed under isothermal upward concurrent flow in a vertical column. The interfacial velocity, interfacial area of the bubbles and the void fraction distributions was obtained. Numerical validation of these results for bubbly flow conditions were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code which tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles, with an Eulerian one. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian calculations were performed in parallel and iterative self-consistent method was developed. The bubbles-induced turbulence is an important issue considered, to obtain good predictions of experimental results. (author)

  13. Simulation of bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling Lagrangian and Eulerian models with 3D random walks models: Validation with experimental data using multi-sensor conductivity probes and Laser Doppler Anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, Jose L., E-mail: jlcobos@iqn.upv.es [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Chiva, Sergio [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain); Essa, Mohamed Ali Abd El Aziz [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Mendes, Santos [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have simulated bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling a Lagrangian model to an Eulerian one, and to a 3D random walk model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A set of experiments in a vertical column with isothermal co-current two phase flow have been performed and used to validate the previous model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated the influence of the turbulence induced by the bubbles on the results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of experimental and computed results has been performed for different boundary conditions. - Abstract: A set of two phase flow experiments for different conditions ranging from bubbly flow to cap/slug flow have been performed under isothermal concurrent upward air-water flow conditions in a vertical column of 3 m height. Special attention in these experiments was devoted to the transition from bubbly to cap/slug flow. The interfacial velocity of the bubbles and the void fraction distribution was obtained using 2 and 4 sensors conductivity probes. Numerical simulations of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code with an Eulerian one. The first one tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates (r, {phi}, z) inside the fluid field under the action of the following forces: buoyancy, drag, lift, wall lubrication. Also we have incorporated a 3D stochastic differential equation model to account for the random motion of the individual bubbles in the turbulent velocity field of the carrier liquid. Also we have considered the deformations undergone by the bubbles when they touch the walls of the pipe and are compressed until they rebound. The velocity and turbulence fields of the liquid phase were computed by solving the time dependent conservation equations in its Reynolds Averaged Transport Equation form (RANS). The turbulent kinetic energy k, and the dissipation rate {epsilon} transport equations were simultaneously solved using the k, epsilon model in a (r, z) grid by the finite volume method and the SIMPLER algorithm. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian calculations were performed in parallel and an iterative self-consistent method was developed. The turbulence induced by the bubbles is an important issue considered in this paper, in order to obtain good predictions of the void fraction distribution and the interfacial velocity at different gas and liquid flow conditions.

  14. A New Eddy-Based Model for Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-11

    results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. 15...results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. The...Carry out hot - wire anemometry experiments covering a large Reynolds number range. This involves the use of the High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer

  15. Deconstructing Hub Drag. Part 2. Computational Development and Anaysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Because the hot - wire anemometry locations were not known until after the experiment, these runs were continued, without user intervention, until...adaptations or simulation length may be needed in the computations. Recent experiments with hot - wire anemometry were analyzed, raising additional questions...The hot - wire anemometry data were provided in the form of velocities of the form V^ as well as perturbations of this velocity.2 The quantity V/, is

  16. Fluidic Actuation and Control of Munition Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-31

    compute the vorticity and turbulent kinetic energy. Hot wire anemometry measurements were taken in the wake of the model, for the model with control at...constructed of strain gages. A temperature compensation algorithm, much like the temperature compensation procedure for hot - wire anemometry , is...is characterized by the PIV and hot - wire anemometry . IV.1 Actuation by a Single Jet The variation of the magnitude of the normal force coefficient

  17. A Comparison of Fluidic and Physical Obstacles for Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    Bruun, H. H., Hot - Wire Anemometry , Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1995. 13. Naples, A., Yu, S.T.J., Hoke, J., Busby, K., Schauer, F., “Pressure...downstream of both obstacles with hot -film anemometry during non-reacting steady flow, show a conservative trend that a fluidic obstacle produces...downstream of both obstacles with hot -film anemometry during non-reacting steady flow, show a conservative trend that a fluidic obstacle produces

  18. Measurements in Film Cooling Flows with Periodic Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold- wire ) anemometry . Hot - wire anemometry was used for velocity measurements. The local film cooling...and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity, respectively. Boundary layer probes with 1.27 m...jet velocity and temperature were documented by Coulthard et al. 26 by traversing the constant current and hot - wire probes over the hole exit plane

  19. Understanding and Modeling Vortical Flows to Improve the Technology Readiness Level for Military Aircraft (Comprehension et Modelisation des Flux de Vortex Pour Ameliorer le Niveau de Maturite Technologique au Profit des Avions Militaires)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Edges (Medium Radius) for M = 0.07, Rmac = 1 x 106 and α = 13° at Two Stations in the Section x/cr = 0.6 from the Hot - Wire Anemometry at TU...display HSCT High Speed Civil Transport HSR High Speed Research HWA Hot Wire Anemometry IR Infra Red (technique) ITAR International Traffic in...unsteady surface pressure measurements, stereo particle image velocimetry and hot - wire anemometry . The results are presented as distributions of mean

  20. Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Flow Quality Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA/CTA) System..................................17 a. Cable Length, S3...transducers. 5. Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA/CTA) System A Dantec Constant Temperature Anemometer (CTA) system comprised of three 56C01 CTA modules...component hot wire (CTA), the wall boundary layer characteristics consisting of the velocity profile, streamwise turbulence intensity, and spectral energy

  1. Instability and Transition on the HIFiRE-5 in a Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    relation [96]: Nu = C +D ·Rend (9.2) The Nusselt number Nu is related to the convection of heat away from the hot wire : Nu = q̇ πlk(Twire − Trec... anemometry in compressible flows. AGARDograph 24, AGARD, November 1956. [94] P. C. Stainback and K. A. Nagabushana. Review of hot - wire anemometry ...pressure probe. AIAA Paper 72-1003, September 1972. [96] A. J. Smits, H. Hayakawa, and K. C. Muck. Constant-temperature hot - wire anemometry practice in

  2. Experimental investigation of temperature fields in a synthetic jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dančová Petra

    2014-01-01

    experiment presents several challenges; therefore, to ensure the best precision possible, two experimental methods were used – digital holographic interferometry (DHI and thermo-anemometry in constant current mode as an auxiliary method to verify DHI.

  3. Experimental Characterization of Turbulent Flow Around Cylinder Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Hot - wire CTA Hot - wire Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) can be used to gather mean velocity data in fluid flow...Likewise, the probe is sensitive to directional alignment. The hot - wires rely on the principles of convective heat transfer to operate. Convective heat...wind tunnel test section. 3.3 Instrumentation A Constant Temperature Anemometry , CTA, hot - wire and a pressure trans- ducer were used to take data

  4. Laminar Instability and Transition on the X-51A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    at high speeds for various freestream conditions and models. Stetson [1] used hot - wire anemometry to measure the second mode instability at Mach 8...discuss the use of hot - wire anemometry to measure the excited instability waves. 1.3 Hypersonic Wind Tunnels Conventional supersonic and hypersonic wind...approximate convection speed of the disturbances, this means that a disturbance created at the glow location, x =8.8 mm (3.45 in.), reaches the hot wire

  5. Combined Effects of Wakes and Jet Pulsing on Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    water as a refer- ence. Constant current cold- wire and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity...Temperature measurements were made using an infrared camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold wire ) anemometry . The local film cooling effectiveness...and heat transfer coefficient were de- termined from the measured temperatures. Phase locked flow temperature fields were determined from cold- wire

  6. Integrated Computational/Experimental Study of Turbulence Modification and Mixing Enhancement in Swirling Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-07

    needed. In addition, most existing measurement efforts have used hot - wire anemometry rather than LDA. Since LDA is the most appropriate tech- nique...swirling jets that included turbulence measurements are listed in table 1. Most of these measurements used hot wires that are no longer the best... Anemometry (I.DA) measurements have been carried out for swirling jets of various strengths and swirl distributions. Radial profiles of velocity have been

  7. Measurements and Modeling of the Mean and Turbulent Flow Structure in High-Speed Rough-Wall Non-Equilibrium Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    transverse velocity and density fluctuations ( /v uρ ρ′ ′ ), directly measured by combining the response from hot - wire anemometry with laser Doppler...R., “Combined Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Cross- Wire Anemometry Analysis for Supersonic Turbulent Flow,” AIAA Journal, Vol. 34, 1996, pp. 2269...Mechanics Reviews, Vol. 44, Jan. 1991, pp. 1-25. Robinson, S., Seegmiller, H., and Kussoy, M., “ Hot - Wire and Laser Doppler Anemometer Measurements

  8. Fundamental Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Active Control of 3-D Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    on hot - wire anemometry and therefore, it was noted that understanding 3-D flow structures in detail was difficult. Nevertheless, prominent features...S.G., Reizes, J.A., Hong, G. and Westbury, P.S., 2004, “Analysis of Hot - wire Anemometry Data Obtained in a Synthetic Jet Flow”, Experimental Thermal...Measurements were made using three different techniques, namely, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), and hot - wire

  9. Boundary Layer Measurements in the Trisonic Gas-dynamics Facility Using Particle Image Velocimetery with CO2 Seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    tunnel of turbulent boundary layers over a 12 foot long plate using hot - wire anemometry [16], and the representation of his data offers a...Klebanoff used hot wire anemometry to determine the profiles. As shown in Figure 2.7, he found that the maximum streamwise turbulence was approximately 11...disadvantages which must be taken into consideration prior to the execution of each experiment. For instance, single-point methods like hot - wire

  10. Continuing Experiments on the Receptivity of Transient Disturbances to Surface Roughness and Freestream Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-28

    Bruun, H. H. (1995). Hot - Wire Anemometry Principles and Signal Analysis. Oxford University Press. Butler, K. and B. Farrell (1992). Three-dimensional... anemometry . Data resulting from an independent direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the experiment is also used as inputs to the biorthogonal...measurements are obtained using straight- wire probes and are decomposed into a spanwise-invariant basic state, a stationary disturbance and an unsteady

  11. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of High Speed High-Temperature Jet Interaction Flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    appearance of a "Karman-vortex-street"[Perry et al (1993)]. Yasuhiro and Isaac [Kamotani et al (1972)] used hot - wire anemometry to map the velocity...et al (1993)] studied the entrainment and mixing processes of a low-speed jet in a cross flow. The results from the flying hot - wire and flow...34Combined Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Cross- Wire Anemometry Analysis for Supersonic Turbulent Flow," AIAA Journal, Vol. 34, No. 11, November 1996, pp. 2269

  12. Development of a Windbreak Dust Predictive Model and Mitigation Planning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    University of Utah portable hot - wire calibration test facility before each experiment. Data were sampled at 25kHz using an AN-1003 Anemometry system...porous shelter fence, J. Ind. Aerod., 15, 145-156. Bruun, H.H., 1995. Hot - wire anemometry : principles of signal analysis. Oxford University Press... Hot - wire Turbulence Quantification Experiments 11 3.2 QUIC Model Development 13 3.2.1 Improved Mean Wind and Turbulence Modeling for

  13. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  14. Miniature instrumentation for laser light scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert G. W.

    1989-01-01

    Traditional optical systems for photon correlation spectroscopy and laser anemometry have relied upon physically large and fairly expensive lasers, bulk-optics such as lenses of a few inches diameter, large mechanical mounts and carefully selected, fragile and bulky photon counting photomultiplier detectors. In some cases, experimental fluid dynamics at a desired position in a flow, perhaps deep inside complex machinery, is physically impossible or very difficult. Similar problems exist with photon correlation spectroscopy, e.g., remote and heterodyne experiments. Various optical and electro optical components were investigated and characterized with the aim of replacing existing photon correlation laser spectroscopy and anemometry techniques in miniaturized form, and with significant cost reduction. Very recently, a range of miniature, modular light scattering systems were constructed from little solid state optical and electro optical components, and experimentally verified measurement performance comparable to standard lab photon correlation spectroscopy and laser anemometry equipment.

  15. A 4-spot time-of-flight anemometer for small centrifugal compressor velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry techniques in turbomachinery facilities is a challenging dilemma requiring an anemometer system with special qualities. Here, we describe the use of a novel laser anemometry technique applied to a small 4.5 kg/s, 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor. Sample velocity profiles across the blade pitch are presented for a single location along the rotor. The results of the intra-blade passage velocity measurements will ultimately be used to verify CFD 3-D viscous code predictions.

  16. Power curve measurement with Spinner Anemometer according to IEC 61400-12-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demurtas, Giorgio

    of drawbacks that makes use of the standard with respect to nacelle anemometry difficult to apply in the field [3] [4]. An option in the standard is to use spinner anemometry, a type of wind sensor that measures wind speed on the spinner in front of the rotor. The report is based on spinner anemometer...... measurements from two adjacent wind turbines and a met-mast. Due to the site layout, it is possible with the met-mast to measure the power curve of both turbines. The report also presents a method for evaluation of uncertainty related to the spinner anemometer....

  17. Determination of the turbulent viscosity inside a strongly heated rectangular jet: experimental and numerical studies; Determination de la viscosite turbulente dans un jet rectangulaire fortement chauffe: etudes experimentale et numerique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarh, B.; Gokalp, I.; Sanders, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the studies carried out by the LCSR on variable density flows and diffusion turbulent flames, this paper deals with the study of the influence of density variation on the characteristics of a heated rectangular turbulent jet emerging in a stagnant surrounding atmosphere and more particularly on the determination of turbulent viscosity. The dynamical field is measured using laser-Doppler anemometry while the thermal field is measured using cold wire anemometry. A numerical predetermination of the characteristics of this jet, based on a k-{epsilon} modeling, is carried out. (J.S.) 6 refs.

  18. Novel Bio-inspired Aquatic Flow Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    hot - wire elements to detect changes in flow [19- 21]. Specifically, these thermal flow sensors work by using thermal anemometry , which...correlates the convective heat transfer from the hot wire to the flow rate. As a result of this property, they can also be utilized as temperature sensors...A.  E.  Perry  and  P.  A.  Libby,  " Hot -­‐ Wire   Anemometry ,"  Journal  of  Applied  Mechanics,   vol.  50,

  19. Some influences of approximate values for velocity, density and total temperature sensitivities on hot wire anemometer results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in hot wire anemometry at transonic speeds. Recent results were published which indicate that at transonic speeds a heated wire is sensitive only to mass flow and total temperature, results similar to those obtained for supersonic flows. Other results were obtained to show that the sensitivity is a function of velocity, density, and total temperature, results in agreement with many of those obtained in the 1950s. An analysis of anemometry results was made to evaluate possible errors when various assumptions were made concerning the sensitivity of a heated wire to fluid flow variables.

  20. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  1. Small-scale motions in turbulent boundary-free shear flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-01-01

    The present work is an experimental and numerical investigation of the small-scale motions in turbulent free-shear flows. In the far-field turbulence of a jet at high Reynolds number (Reλ = 350) hot-wire anemometry (HWA) is applied to measure time series of flow velocity. By filtering these time ser

  2. Experimental and numerical study of wave-induced backfilling beneath submarine pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayraktar, Deniz; Ahmad, Joseph; Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of complementary experimental and numerical studies involving wave-induced backfilling of current-generated scour holes beneath submarine pipelines. The laboratory experiments are conducted in a wave-plus-current flume, utilizing Laser Doppler Anemometry to measure...

  3. Features of the development of round jets for different initial conditions and in the presence of obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. V.; Litvinenko, M. V.; Litvinenko, Yu. A.; Kozlov, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work is an experimental study of the influence of the initial conditions (nozzle configuration, mean velocity profile at the nozzle exit, surface roughness, and jet diameter) on the flow structure in a round jet by various methods: hot-wire anemometry, smoke visualization, and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  4. Measurement of heat transfer coefficient using termoanemometry methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dančová P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a measurement of heat transfer from a heated flat plate on which a synthetic jet impacts perpendicularly. Measurement of a heat transfer coefficient (HTC is carried out using the hot wire anemometry method with glue film probe Dantec 55M47. The paper brings also results of velocity profiles measurements and turbulence intensity calculations.

  5. Hwa measurement of turbulent diffusion of a scalar quantity

    OpenAIRE

    Antoš Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with simultaneous measurement of the velocity and the scalar quantity by means of hot-wire anemometry. Statistical moments of the scalar quantity fluctuations can be obtained employing a dual hot-wire probe. An evaluation procedure of the quantity mean values and fluctuations is described. Results from the molar concentration measurement in binary-gas mixture are shown.

  6. West Closure Complex Pump Intake Model, New Orleans, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), ERDC/CHL TR-13-1 63 hot - wire anemometry , miniature propeller meter, and using a differential pressure cell with a...of a hot - wire anemometer. The minia- ture propeller meter has been used by some investigators and was discussed in Sweeney and Rockwell (1982). Use

  7. Rotorcraft Brownout: Advanced Understanding, Control and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-31

    sediment bed. Evaluation of the spatial structure of an impinging flow of known source intensity is achieved with a 3D hot - wire anemometer. Following...iv) Purchase of equipment to upgrade the wind-tunnel anemometry system, v) Purchase of materials (particles) for use in wind tunnel

  8. Three-dimensional Effects of Turburlent Flow in an In-Line Tube Bundle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik

    1998-01-01

    Velocities have been measured with laser Doppler anemometry between tubes in cross-flow in a small in-line tube bundle with longitudinal to transverse pitches of 1.5Dx1.8D and a Reynolds number based on mean velocity in minimum flow section of Re=30000. At most locations a single recirculation zone...

  9. Flow pattern in reverse-flow centrifugal separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, W; Hoffmann, AC; Boot, PJAJ; Udding, A; Dries, HWA; Ekker, A; Kater, J

    2002-01-01

    Experimental flow patterns, determined by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) for two types of reverse-flow centrifugal separators, are presented. The flow patterns in (a) a conventional cylinder-on-cone cyclone with tangential inlet and (b) a swirl tube with vane-generated swirl and a cylindrical body a

  10. Boundary layer eruption behind the bridge pillar model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecka, K.; Kudela, H.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental quantitative (local velocity measurements by Laser Doppler Anemometry) and qualitative researches (visualization by dye marker) of flow around a bridge pillar model for the Reynolds number Re D in the range of 40 up to 350 (for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow) were conducted. Re D was the Reynolds number referred to the diameter of the model (cylinder), D = 14.65 mm.

  11. A study of dilute to dense flow in a circulating fluidized bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Claus Hübbe; Solberg, Tron; Hjertager, Bjørn H.

    2001-01-01

    This work concerns a experimental and numerical study on how the amount of particles influences the flow in the CFB. Experiments are performed with a 1D Laser and Phase doppler anemometry, whereby data of axial velocity, RMS velocity and particle diameter is obtained. The numerical simulations ar...

  12. Wind measurements for wind energy applications. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.G.

    1994-01-01

    A review is given of the error sources and uncertainties in cup and sonic anemometry. In both cases the effects of the tower, boom and other mounting arrangements, as well as the siting of the anemometer, should be considered carefully. Cup anemometer measurements are inherently biased due to the...

  13. LDA-PIV Diagnostics and 3D Simulation of Oscillating Swirl Flow in a Closed Cylindrical Container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, Igor; Okulov, V. L.; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2003-01-01

    Results on unsteady vortex breakdown are obained simultaneously using two diagnostics methods: a) determination of velocity fields by particle tracks (Particle Image Velocimeter - PIV), b) determination of velocity fields by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), are presented.The experiments data are i...

  14. Validation of Boundary Conditions for CFD Simulations on Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Pedersen, D.N.;

    2001-01-01

    of full-scale experiments in a room ventilated by the mixing principle have been performed for validation of the models. The experimental results include measurements of temperature as well as measurements of velocity and turbulence by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA). A simple model of the complex inlet...

  15. Enhancement of compact heat exchanger fins: numerical and experimental study; Optimisation des echangeurs compacts a ailettes: etude numerique et experimentale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, F.

    2003-10-01

    This work concerns plate fins compact heat exchangers. These compact devices (C > 700 m2/m3) reduce bulk and weight due to large surfaces for heat transfer. These exchangers, widely used in automotive systems, cryogenics and aeronautics, are currently studied with empirical correlations. So, this limits the evolution of fins in compact heat exchangers. We propose a numerical methodology for designing and enhancing Offset Strip Fin (OSF) geometries. Numerical models and methods have been validated to correctly predict thermohydraulics in Offset Strip Fin heat exchangers. We have validated simulations with data from the literature but also with two experimental devices made for this thesis. Local and global temperature and velocity measurements have been realised in geometries near Offset Strip Fins. Hot wire and cold wire anemometry and Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) have been used to obtained validation data. Finally, the validated numerical simulations have been used to enhance geometries of fins and to give innovating geometries. (author)

  16. Aerodynamic Design and Experimental Investigation of the Sailplane Wing Tip Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anderle

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental set-up for the investigation of wing tip devices developed as part of a study into the velocity and vorticity distributions in the flow field behind winglets, using hot-wire anemometry. In this study, effort was focused on gaining a greater understanding of what happens in the region where the winglet joins the wing. The measurements were performed in the Handley-Page wind tunnel of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Glasgow. In order to carry out measurements with the hot-wire anemometry system, a new traverse mechanism was designed and manufactured. This traverse mechanism was integrated with the other test instrumentation to create a complete measurement chain. The complete system allows fully automated hot wire measurements to be made over a defined area using programmable test parameters.

  17. Spray dispersion in a generic premix module for aeroengine combustors; Spray-Dispersion in einem generischen Vormischmodul fuer Flugtriebwerks-Brennkammern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.

    2004-08-01

    The liquid fuel placement and fuel spray dispersion in an annular, swirling flow is investigated experimentally. The liquid fuel is injected into the annular airflow in the radial direction by means of plain jet nozzles in the center body. Optical measurement techniques are applied at near-realistic aeroengine operating conditions, particularly at elevated values of air pressure. An investigation of the liquid plain jet in crossflow concerning penetration, break-up and atomization using visualization techniques and phase-Doppler anemometry is followed by the actual investigation of spray dispersion. This includes detailed measurements of the airflow by laser-Doppler anemometry, yielding turbulence data such as velocity fluctuations and length scales. The Stokes number is employed to analyze and interpret the data and transfer the results to a full power operating condition that cannot be investigated experimentally. (orig.)

  18. Biofluid mechanical studies in models of blood vessels and some applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D.

    1996-05-01

    Lasers are used in a wide variety of medical applications. While laser catheters have beem developed for highly accurate velocity measurement, these are invasive; noninvasive techniques are more desirable but not as precise. The laser is, however, a great tool for in vitro measurements. Several groups internationally are using the laser in the study of local velocity distribution in microscopic areas of specially constructed models. Laser Doppler anemometry is widely used to measure the local, time-dependent velocities, while phase Doppler anemometry has been developed to measure particle size, distribution and velocity. Most recently, laser analyzer techniques have been developed for analyzing the particle size of two phase flow systems. It has become increasingly important for physicians to visualize blood flow. In addition to the techniques mentioned above, several laser sheet techniques have been developed for precise measurements. This paper presents a short review of laser techniques and shows some applications especially for the laser-Doppler anemometer.

  19. Results and Analysis of a L2F Flow Field Investigation within a High-Speed High-Pressure Centrifugal Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes experimental results obtained using a laser two-focus anemometry technique in a high-speed,high-pressure ratio unshrouded centrifugal compressor.Measurements in such a small impeller are extremely difficult as the flow is restricted to marrow passages and as the temperature rise is very high.Even if the working principle of laser anemometry is well documented in literature,some specialities of our LA system are discussed.A description and an analysis of the inlet flow field.based on integral methods,are propsed.Some passage velocity contours are presented.Whereas a potential flow structure exists up to the high meridional curvature region,the throughflow patterm is largely distorted in the radial part of the impeller.Noticeable differences in flow pattern between both channels are found,particularyly through the low momentum fluid zone.A qualitative study of the vortical mechanisms ascribes them to the tip clearance effects.

  20. Offshore and onshore wind turbine wake meandering studied in an ABL wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Buckingham, Sophia; Glabeke, Gertjan;

    2015-01-01

    diameter downstream. The results show an earlier wake recovery for the onshore case. The effect of inflow conditions and the wind turbine’s working conditions on wake meandering was investigated. Wake meandering was detected by hot wire anemometry through a low frequency peak in the turbulent power......Scaled wind turbine models have been installed in the VKI L1-B atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel at offshore and onshore conditions. Time-resolved measurements were carried out with three component hot wire anemometry and stereo-PIV in the middle vertical plane of the wake up to eleven turbine...... spectrum, present in the entire wake mainly for offshore inflow condition. It was found that the Strouhal number, based on the rotor diameter and the wind velocity at hub height, was in the order of 0.25. Below the meandering frequency, turbulence power spectrum decreased, whereas above it increased. Wake...

  1. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  2. Dynamic Flight Maneuvering Using Virtual Control Surfaces Generated by Trapped Vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    actuation, respectively). The actuators were calibrated using hot wire anemometry and, as shown in Figure III-2b, the RMS jet exit velocity scales...forces. It was demonstrated that flow control actuation effects aerodynamic forces and moments on time scales commensurate with the convective time...for wiring and pressure tubes) and is rotated by AC servo motor (that is carried by the vertical stage) on one end, while at the opposite end the

  3. Computational Study of the Effect of Slot Orientation on Synthetic Jet-Based Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    the 3D flow structures was limited due to the hot - wire anemometry technique that was employed in this study. The experiments of Milanobic & Zaman [22...domain, an outflow boundary condition is prescribed which allows the vortex structures to convect out of the domain with minimal reflections. A no...incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on Cartesian grids [35]. The solver employs a second-order Adams-Bashforth scheme for the convective terms and

  4. Active Control of Jet Engine Inlet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-31

    investigation was performed with no pressure applied across the fan. To measure the high-frequency, unsteady jet velocity, an IFA 300 hot - wire anemometry ...flow at the engine face. Recommendations for the measurement devices include hot -film or hot - wire sensors and wall-mounted, high frequency pressure...the blade and creates flow instabilities that convect through the later compressor stages. This report presents a study performed to gain an

  5. Experimental Analysis of the Vorticity and Turbulent Flow Dynamics of a Pitching Airfoil at Realistic Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-31

    increasing Re, while the angle for maximum lift increases with increasing Re. Hot - wire anemometry data indicated the occurrence of a short bubble...then convects downstream near the airfoil surface, which causes an increase in lift and strong pitching- moments due to suction created by the vortex...always forms and 14 convects over the airfoil upper surface at approximately 0.3 times the freestream velocity for all cases studied. The

  6. Combustion Oscillations,Extinction and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    counterflow jets using a combination of hot - wire anemometry and laser Doppler velocimetry. The single frequency oscillations will be created by a...slightly heated and using pairs of parallel cold wires of 0.5 micron in diameter. Bulk strain rate and frequency and amplitude of the imposed periodic...characterised by short residence times. The model was first formulated to account for molecular diffusion and turbulent convection and its ability to

  7. Experiments in Transient Growth and Roughness-Induced Bypass Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    a localized disturbance in a laminar boundary layer. Part 1. Weak disturbances. J. Fluid Mech. 220, 569-594. Bruun, H. H. (1995). Hot - Wire Anemometry ...layer, wires are affected both by natural convection and by conduction to the surface. Even if these problems did not make measure- ments near a surface...December). Hot - wire investigations of smoke patterns caused by a spherical roughness element. Nat. Sci. Report, Ochanomizu Univ. 12(2), 87-101. Morkovin, M

  8. Basic characteristics of array of pulsatile jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vestfálová Magda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper shows the results of measurement of basic characteristics of array of pulsatile jets which are used to enhance the efficiency of ejectors. Four pulsatile jets forms cross like structure where perpendicular couples are operating in two basic modes (a in phase and (b in antiphase. Paper presents phase averaged velocity profiles and velocity fields. All of the presented experiments are realized using hot wire anemometry method.

  9. An experimental study on the near flow field characteristics of non-circular jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Subsonic turbulent free jet, issuing from a lobed contoured nozzle in to quiescent air is investigated experimentally. Results are compared with a cir ular jet from a nozzle of the same exit area and same contraction profile. Mean flow characteristics, turbulence intensities and Reynolds shear stresses in the near field region are investigated by using Hot-wire Anemometry. An overall decrease in turbulence intensities and enhanced flow entrainment in the near field of lobed nozzle are observed.

  10. Hwa measurement of turbulent diffusion of a scalar quantity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoš Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with simultaneous measurement of the velocity and the scalar quantity by means of hot-wire anemometry. Statistical moments of the scalar quantity fluctuations can be obtained employing a dual hot-wire probe. An evaluation procedure of the quantity mean values and fluctuations is described. Results from the molar concentration measurement in binary-gas mixture are shown.

  11. Project Themis Supercritical Cold Flow Facility, Experiment Design and Modeling for the Study of Fluid Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    capture the mean flow field temperatures. Figure 10. Hot - wire Anemometry Probes Baselined for Instrumentation Rake 12 American Institute of...instrumentation as seen in Figure 8. The hollow stinger houses the hot - wire probe cabling. The rake stinger passes through a Swagelok sealed port on a...pressure transducers, thermocouples, and an instrumentation rake of hot - wire anemometer sensors. The layout of the externally 11 American Institute

  12. Comparison of Experimentally Measured and Computed Second-Mode Disturbances in Hypersonic Boundary-Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Stetson and Kimmel3 which used hot - wire anemometry to measure second-mode disturbances in a conventional wind tunnel. Additionally, measurements of...second- mode waves have been carried out in the past with hot wires in both noisy and quiet flow.4 Since these measurements are very difficult due to...the limited mechanical strength of small hot wires with sufficiently high frequency response, an appropriate non-intrusive measurement technique is

  13. Turbulent Coolant Dispersion in the Wake of a Turbine Vane Trailing Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    dimensional time-averaged data set for both velocity and scalar mix- ing. Traditional velocity measurements include pitot probes, thermal anemometry ( hot wire ...necessary to gather three-dimensional data at a high spatial resolution limits the effectiveness of these methods. Probe techniques such as hot wire ...externally cooled to withstand the hot gas environment. The external film cooling is generally fed by discrete holes 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE

  14. Novel instantaneous laser Doppler velocimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidor, J M

    1974-02-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter capable of directly measuring instantaneous velocities is described. The new LDV uses a novel detection technique based on the utilization of a static slightly defocused spherical Fabry-Perot interferometer used in conjunction with a special mask for the detection of instantaneous Doppler frequency shifts. The essential characteristics of this LDV are discussed, and such a system recently developed is described. Results of turbulent flow measurements show good agreement with data obtained using hot wire anemometry.

  15. Transition to Turbulence in the Separated Shear Layers of Yawed Circular Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    where her hot - wire anemometer measurements found their streamwise appearance (after separation) to be inversely proportional to the cylinder Reynolds...Smith (1986) conducted hot - wire anemometer measurements where they reported expo- nents b = 0.87 and b = 0.773, respectively, for the Bloor power- law...measured when using anemometry . Prasad and Wil- liamson (1996) compiled their anemometer measurements along with those of Bloor as well as Wei and

  16. Thermal and Mechanical Non-equilibrium Effects on Turbulent Flows Fundamental Studies of Energy Exchanges Through Direct Numerical Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-21

    with LIA. Diagnostics included hot - wire anemometry and laser Doppler velocimetry. Andreopoulos et al. (2000) presented concerns with this study: 1) the...that has passed through the generator. Measurement techniques generally utilize hot - wires and fast-response pressure probes. For blowdown wind tunnels...number ranged from 0.32 to 0.62, interacted with reflected shock waves of varying strengths. Hot - wires , pressure transducers, and Rayleigh scattering

  17. Studies of Real Roughness Effects for Improved Modeling and Control of Practical Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-22

    While the aforementioned studies regarding VLSM’s employed hot - wire anemometry to study very large spatial scales from single-point velocity measurements...temporal hot - wire data. In addition, Flack et al. (2005) indicated that the rough-wall flow of Krogstad & Antonia (1994) may not satisfy the criteria...and in some cases multiple (10) points simultaneously with multiple hot - wire probes), time-resolved PIV allows one to measure velocities at many

  18. Adaptive Positive Position Feedback Control of Flexible Aircraft Structures Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    provided expert engineering analysis for the test build, fought to get electrical power to run the wind tunnel, and conducted the hot wire anemometry ...AOA angle of attack HW hot wire NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration LANTIRN Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night...BAMF system. 4.2.1 HW Flow Field Analysis. AFRL conducted hot wire (HW) experiments to gain high fidelity data on the vortices shed by all four pods

  19. The near-neutral atmospheric surface layer: turbulence and non-stationarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, M; McKeon, B J; Holmes, H

    2007-03-15

    The neutrally stable atmospheric surface layer is used as a physical model of a very high Reynolds number, canonical turbulent boundary layer. Challenges and limitations with this model are addressed in detail, including the inherent thermal stratification, surface roughness and non-stationarity of the atmosphere. Concurrent hot-wire and sonic anemometry data acquired in Utah's western desert provide insight to Reynolds number trends in the axial velocity statistics and spectra.

  20. Unsteady Aerodynamics for Micro Air Vehicles (Aerodynamique instable pour micro-vehicules aeriens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    section. The measured velocity variations in the core flow are below 1%. The turbulence level was measured by means of the hot wire anemometry . The...level (>3%). So the results presented here are only obtained in towing- tank mode. Tests with hot wires in the water show that the residual...free- stream velocity was controlled via closed-loop control, with the tunnel speed input obtained from a hot - wire anemometer (Dantec Dynamics A/S

  1. Dual Mode Thin Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators (FBARs) Based on AlN, ZnO and GaN Films with Tilted c-Axis Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    vol. 40, pp. 473– 481, 2006. [4] C. G. Lomas, Fundamentals of Hot Wire Anemometry . New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986. [5] D. S. Ballantine, Jr...Additionally, the widely used thermal anemometers such as hot - wire anemometer, can measure the flow in a precise location and has extremely high... wires were bonded to the resonator electrodes through sil- ver paste, which provides electrical connection for reso- nator impedance measurement. The

  2. Flow Control Application on a Submerged Inlet Characterized by Three-Component LDV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The probe type obtaining the streamwise velocity measurements was a Dantec model 55p11. The hotwire has a 2.5 µm platinum plated tungsten wire with a...with the LDV beams above the submerged inlet for freestream measurements. from the measurement region. Particle temperatures that were too hot or cold...plane. 4.1 Schlieren and Hotwire Examination Schlieren photography and one-component hotwire anemometry obtained some general characteristics of the

  3. Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-18

    configuration due to the large amounts of turning in the test section geometry and measurement techniques such as hot wire anemometry or temperature probe...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade The...reviewed journals: Final Report: Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade Report Title Magnetic resonance

  4. Mixing Under Transcritical Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Raynal et al. [3] studied variable-density jets using hot - wire anemometry . They used their power spectral results to find that flow stability was not...affected by the presence of the hot - wire one jet diameter downstream the exit of the flow at several density ratios. They did find that as the probe...of the spectral level, which reflects the spatial amplification of the perturbations as the hot - wire was moved downstream. The power spectra also

  5. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-07

    developed a new Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP), with a sensing wire over an order of magnitude smaller than current commercial hot - wires ...concern is the accuracy of our hot wire measurements. In this respect, the primary issues are the temporal and spatial response of the probes. The...is the local mean velocity and/is the frequency in Hz. In each case, the range of wavenumbers corresponding to the hot wire length lw is shown as

  6. Air-Sea Interaction Spar Buoy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    properties and local slope and pressure above the waves are key to understanding the wave generation problem on the ocean. Ocean Turbulence: Hot wire ...staff wires in storm-forced sea states. APPROACH We are building on the previous success of the ASIS buoy and better state-of-the-art...film anemometry has a special place in fluid dynamics research, but they cannot be easily deployed in open ocean conditions. On the other hand

  7. Turbulent wakes of fractal objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Adrian; Mazzi, Biagio; Vassilicos, J C; van de Water, Willem

    2003-06-01

    Turbulence of a windtunnel flow is stirred using objects that have a fractal structure. The strong turbulent wakes resulting from three such objects which have different fractal dimensions are probed using multiprobe hot-wire anemometry in various configurations. Statistical turbulent quantities are studied within inertial and dissipative range scales in an attempt to relate changes in their self-similar behavior to the scaling of the fractal objects.

  8. Wall Climbing Micro Ground Vehicle (MGV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Optimization In the Rotor of Centrifugal Fan Using Combined Laser Doppler Anemometry and CFD Modeling. World Appl. Sci. J. 2012, 17, 10. 2. Clarage...Scroll Sizing of Squirrel Cage Fans Using Alternative non-Dimensional Head and Flow Rate Coefficients, Ph.D. thesis, Amirkabir University of Technology...Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Eight Different Volutes with the Same Impeller in a Squirrel -Cage Fan. Amirkabir University of Technology

  9. Surface Excrescence Transition Study Delivery Order 0053

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Preston tube measurements were made with a 0.042 inch outside diameter hypodermic needle protruding -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45...18 4.1.1 Design and Analysis Using Computational Fluid...202 7.5.6 Review of Linear Stability Theory ....................................................................... 204 7.5.7 Hot-wire Anemometry

  10. Rôle des diagnostics optiques en temps réel dans le contrôle d'une colonne d'extraction liquide-liquide type pulsée - comparaison expérience / modèle

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The design of a liquid-liquid extraction column is based on energy transfer phenomenon leading to a fragmentation of the light phase in droplets allowing the mass transfer with the heavy phase. However, this mechanism suggests a recurring coalescence of the drops followed by a fragmentation to each plate. The process studied in this Thesis is based on the use of a pulsated column attached by optical techniques (analyzes images and Anemometry Doppler Laser) in order to investigate the processe...

  11. LDA Characterization of the Velocity Field around a Growing and Rising Bubble in Shear-thinning Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) has been employed to quantify the liquid velocity field around a single bubble in its generating and accelerating stage in carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) aqueous solution. The instantanoues velocities were treated by Reynolds time-averaged method, and mean velocities and its contours in both axial and radial directions were investigated. The results show that in vertical direction, the flow field characteristics of the liquids around the bubble are determined by b...

  12. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006 is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  13. Applications of laser based measurements to combustion related fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingmann, J.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with laser based techniques for the measurement of fluid dynamical properties and their application to combusting flow fields or flow fields related to combustion. As an introduction, the theory of turbulent flow and combustion is shortly presented. An overview of laser based measuring techniques is given. Next, seven papers are included. The main topic of papers 1 and 2 is the measurements of swirling pipe flows with sudden axi-symmetric expansions. These flow fields are related to the flow fields of gas turbine combustors. Measurements and computations using commercial software are compared. Papers 3 and 7 deal with a laser Doppler anemometry based method for the measurement of the turbulent dissipation rate and its application to an axi-symmetric free jet, respectively. The measurements rely on two-point measurements with high spatial resolution. Also three-component one-point measurements are used to obtain the triple velocity correlations. Together these measurements are sufficient to present the energy balance, if pressure effects are neglected. Papers 4, 5 and 6 are concerned with the turbulent flame speed under premixed conditions. Papers 4 and 5 present flame speed measurements from a stationary burner using methane and Danish natural gas. Particle image velocimetry and one- and two-point Laser Doppler anemometry is used to measure flame speed and turbulent quantities, including integral length scales. Paper 7 presents measurements of flame speed and turbulence parameters in a spark ignition engine. Here heat release analyses from pressure measurements are combined with one- and two-point laser Doppler anemometry to analyze influence of turbulence on flame propagation 50 refs, 25 figs

  14. Sound propagation over screened ground under upwind conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1996-01-01

    in the frequency domain. The meteorological data representing the wind conditions have been determined by means of hot-wire anemometry in positions on both sides of the screen as well as directly over the screen. The theoretical model used for comparison is a hybrid approach. The sound field without a barrier......A screen on an absorbing ground is investigated experimentally and theoretically under upwind conditions. The experimental data are the result of scale model experiments in a 1:25 scale model. The sound propagation is measured using a triggered spark source with signal spectrum averaging...

  15. Proceedings of a Workshop on V/STOL Aircraft Aerodynamics. Volume I. Held at Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 16-18 May 1979,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-18

    CILOP A IOT T v LaN^ - LANO SSI SHIPS NAVAL. AIR PAAT~AION. AIR CAPAIILI COMMER"CIAL &Se" 369MI OF v SAA LAIIO AIR PLATMORMS - - ~ WEAPONS 0...79-0338 , January, 1979. 7. Smart , A.E. and Moore, C.J., "Aero-Enginer Applications of Laser Anemometry," AIAA Journal, Vol 14, No. 3, March 1976, pp...CLASS VEHICLE 1/80 SCALE (D = 1.0 IN.) +.04 /80 CAL (D P = 1.0 16. INTERFERENCE FORCE 0 E F FoT) PROJECT TESTS AT FARMING DALE OF 698-309 1/40 SCALE

  16. Estudio del sistema de estiraje para hilatura neumática de alta velocidad

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Empleando un sistema de anemometría láser, se han determinado las velocidades del flujo de aire arrastrado por el cilindro productor. Se trata de hallar la posible correlación entre la geometría, las condiciones de funcionamiento del conjunto de cilindros mencionados, la calidad y velocidad de producción. The velocities of the air flow have been determined using a system of laser anemometry. This flow is crawled by the producing cylinder. It is to find the possible correlation among the g...

  17. Aperiodicity Correction for Rotor Tip Vortex Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Wire Anemometry (HWA), see, e.g., Refs. 1–5. Further- more, for such point measurement techniques...components along x- and y-axis, ms−1 uc, vc Vortex convection velocities, ms−1 Vθ Swirl velocity, ms−1 x, y, z Measurement coordinate system, mm xc, yc...techniques such LDV and Hot - 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is

  18. Contribution to advanced hot wire wind sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    La consulta íntegra de la tesi, inclos l'article no comunicat públicament per drets d'autor, es pot realitzar prèvia petició a l'Arxiu de la UPC The thermal anemometry is a method which allows to estimate wind magnitude be the mean of measuring heat transfer to the ambient in a forced convection process. For Earth's atmosphere condition, this method is typically applied to the hot wires made of temperature dependent electrical conductor, typically platinum or tungsten, which working with o...

  19. Fluidic Control of Virtual Aerosurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    streamwise velocity measured using hot wire anemometry near the upper and lower edges of the wake (Figures IV.6a and b, respectively) at a distance of...is shown in black, continuous downstream actuation in red convective time constant of the coupled airfoil/flow system (e.g., Amitay and Glezer 2002...1.0.106 (time is scaled by the convective time scale of the airfoil, t* = t/r, where r = c/U,, and the circulation is scaled by U.c/2). Continuous

  20. The Development and Control of Axial Vortices over Swept Wings

    OpenAIRE

    Klute, Sandra M.

    1999-01-01

    The natural unsteadiness in the post-breakdown flowfield of a 75° sweep delta wing at 40° angle of attack was studied with dual and single point hot-wire anemometry in the Engineering Science and Mechanics (ESM) Wind Tunnel at a Reynolds number Re = 210,000. Data were taken in five crossflow planes surrounding the wing's trailing edge. Results showed a dominant narrowband Strouhal frequency of St = 1.5 covering approximately 80% of the area with lower-intensity broadband secondary freque...

  1. Influence of humidity on the convective heat transfer from small cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, M.; Venzke, H.; Durst, F.; Melling, A.

    The convective heat transfer from a cylinder to a humid air stream flowing normal to the cylinder was investigated experimentally at atmospheric pressure over a range of variables which is relevant to the use of hot-wire anemometry: air temperatures between 30°C and 70°C and velocities between 12 and 37 m/s. For molar fractions of water vapour up to 0.27, the heat transfer increased with increasing humidity. The ratio of heat transfer rates in humid air and dry air is a unique function of the molar fraction of water vapour, independent of the air temperature and flow velocity.

  2. Turbulent correlation measurements in a two-stream mixing layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. G.; Planchon, H. P.; Hammersley, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Two point space-time measurements of the axial component of fluctuating velocity were made using linearized hot-wire anemometry. Space scales, convected frame correlations and time scales, and convection velocities in the shear layer were evaluated. Both filtered narrow and broad band convected frame autocorrelations were determined. Differences between axial broad band convection velocities and both mean turbulence and mean entrained fluid velocities were observed. Scaled broad band convection velocities for the mixing layer and simple round jets were found to collapse to a common curve. Axial narrow band convection velocities showed strong frequency and transverse position dependence.

  3. Identification and control of large-scale structures in highly turbulent shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadow, K. C.; Wilson, K. J.; Gutmark, E.

    Unforced and forced subsonic jets were studied using hot-wire anemometry. It is found that highly coherent flow structure can be generated in the initial region of ducted flow by applying forcing to the flow innstability frequencies. Flow visualization experiments in water showed that the coherent structures had relatively high azimuthal coherence and were periodic in time and space. The convection velocity of the structures was about 60 percent of the mean flow velocity. Mixing of the shear layer with the surrounding recirculation zone and the inside core was enhanced by the forcing and reduced their size accordingly. Photographs from the flow visualization tests are provided.

  4. Small-scale motions in turbulent boundary-free shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-01-01

    The present work is an experimental and numerical investigation of the small-scale motions in turbulent free-shear flows. In the far-field turbulence of a jet at high Reynolds number (Reλ = 350) hot-wire anemometry (HWA) is applied to measure time series of flow velocity. By filtering these time series, large- and small-scale velocity fluctuations are obtained. Both the amplitude and the frequency of the small-scale signals are locally stronger (weaker) for positive (negative) fluctuations of...

  5. Secondary flow, turbulent diffusion and mixing in axial-flow compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisler, D. C.; Bauer, R. C.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1987-05-01

    The relative importance of convection by secondary flows and diffusion by turbulence as mechanisms responsible for mixing in multistage, axial-flow compressors has been investigated by using the ethylene tracer-gas technique and hot wire anemometry. The tests were conducted at two loading levels in a large, low-speed, four-stage compressor. The experimental results show that considerable cross-passage and spanwise fluid motion can occur and that both secondary flow and turbulent diffusion can play important roles in the mixing process, depending upon location in the compressor and loading level.

  6. A study on the influence of triggering pipe flow regarding mean and higher order statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, F.; Zanoun, E.-S.; Egbers, C.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of statistical pipe flow quantities, such as the turbulence intensity, the skewness and the flatness, are investigated to clarify, hich development length is needed, until the state of fully developed turbulence is achieved. This observations take place in a relatively large pipe test facility with an inner pipe diameter of Di = 0.19 m and a total length of L = 27 m. The reached Reynolds number range is 1.5 · 105 temperature hot-wire anemometry is applied. Through these intensive centerline measurements we observe a development length of L = 70 D, to ensure a fully developed turbulent flow state.

  7. Digital holografic interferometry used for identification of 2D temperature field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lédl, Vít; Vít, Tomáš; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel

    2012-04-01

    The presented paper shows the possibility of digital holographic interferometry application in measurement of unsteady 2D temperature field generated by pulsatile flow which is impinging heated surface. Special holographic setup with double sensitivity was developed instead of the commonly used MachZehnder type of holographic interferometer in order to attain the parameters sufficient for the studied case. This setup is not light efficient like the MachZehnder type but has double sensitivity. The results from the digital holographic interferometry experiments are perfected by measurement of the velocity field achieved by methods of hot-wire anemometry.

  8. Digital holografic interferometry used for identification of 2D temperature field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psota Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper shows the possibility of digital holographic interferometry application in measurement of unsteady 2D temperature field generated by pulsatile flow which is impinging heated surface. Special holographic setup with double sensitivity was developed instead of the commonly used MachZehnder type of holographic interferometer in order to attain the parameters sufficient for the studied case. This setup is not light efficient like the MachZehnder type but has double sensitivity. The results from the digital holographic interferometry experiments are perfected by measurement of the velocity field achieved by methods of hot-wire anemometry.

  9. Atmospheric tides on Venus. IV - Topographic winds and sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1993-01-01

    A novel theory is presented for the Venus boundary layer which encompasses the effects of topography and uses the mixing-length hypothesis to preclude the unknown eddy viscosity. The maps of mass-flux and erosion/deposition rate presented are based on Pioneer Venus orbiter relief measurements. The typically 19 cm/sec friction speeds associated with the present theory are several times greater than those estimated on the basis of Venera 9 and 10 anemometry, and mean aeolian transport is generally away from the equator, contrary to Magellan orbiter windstreak directions.

  10. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Mankbadi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tip vortex flow from a NACA0012 airfoil, pitched periodically at various frequencies, is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel. Initially, data for stationary airfoil held fixed at various angles-of-attack are gathered. Flow visualization pictures as well as detailed cross-sectional properties areobtained at various streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as various turbulent stresses. Preliminary data are also acquired for periodically pitched airfoil. These results are briefly presented in this extended abstract.

  11. Jet flow and premixed jet flame control by plasma swirler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Jiang, Xi; Zhao, Yujun; Liu, Cunxi; Chen, Qi; Xu, Gang; Liu, Fuqiang

    2017-04-01

    A swirler based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is designed and its effectiveness in both jet flow and premixed jet flame control is demonstrated. In contrast to traditional spanwise-oriented actuators, plasma actuators are placed along the axial direction of the injector to induce a circumferential velocity to the main flow and create a swirl flow without any insertion or moving part. In the DBD plasma swirl injector, the discharge does not ignite the mixture nor does it induce flashback. Flame visualization is obtained by cameras while velocity profiles are obtained by Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements. The results obtained indicate the effectiveness of the new design.

  12. A method of measuring the three-dimensional mean flow and turbulence quantities inside a rotating turbo-machinery passage. [by hot-wire anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, C. A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1975-01-01

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional components of mean velocity and turbulence quantities within a rotating turbomachinery passage is developed through the use of hot wire anemometry techniques. Equations are derived which, when solved simultaneously and in conjunction with the data obtained from the hot wire anemometer measurements, will provide values for the radial, axial and tangential components of mean velocity, turbulence intensity and turbulence stress within the rotating turbomachinery passage. A three-bladed rocket pump inducer model, operating in air, was used in the experimentation. The method is very accurate and provides very useful information on the characteristics of the flow inside rotor passages hitherto unexplored.

  13. Development of an Advanced Fluid Mechanics Measurement Facility for Flame Studies of Neat Fuels, Jet Fuels, and their Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-26

    through the use of hot - wire anemometry . Implementing a DPIV system in flames and achieving the level of accuracy of LDV is a challenge, particularly...temperature at the hot boundary for a given strain rate and fuel concentration in the fuel jet. Law and coworkers (e.g., Law et al. 1986; Law 1988... wired into a single USB LaVision PTU timing box to share a single LaVision acquisition license through partitioning of the dongle with a USB switch

  14. An experimental study on flow noise in a 180 degree circular tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Tae Hyun; Lee, Sang Bae [Daegu Technical University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    During the past three or four decades, the characteristics of turbulent swirling flow have been studied extensively because of their scientific and academic importance. This research deal with the periodic flow oscillation with and without swirling flow in a 180 degree circular tube using hot wire anemometry, microphone and accelerometer. The frequency regions are observed through the structured oscillation from spectrum. This work carried out to measure the sound level for each Reynolds number, 6x104, 8x104 and 1x105 respectively at the entry of the test tube without swirl flow.

  15. Visualization of synthetic jets at higher Stokes numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trávníček Zdeněk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of synthetic jets at higher Stokes numbers (S = 90 and 127 by the phase-locked smoke-wire technique is presented and discussed. The working fluid is air. The Reynolds numbers are quantified using hot-wire anemometry. Although our method of visualization essentially provides only qualitative results, the present study also demonstrates some quantitative results, namely the behavior of the zero-net-mass-flux jet near its critical stage. Visualization of the sub-critical stage is also shown.

  16. The turbulent flow generated by inhomogeneous multiscale grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shaokai; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Graham, J. Michael R.; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2015-11-01

    A group of inhomogeneous multiscale grids have been designed and tested in a low speed wind tunnel in an attempt to generate bespoke turbulent shear flows. Cross-wire anemometry measurements were performed in different planes parallel to the grid and at various streamwise locations to study turbulence development behind each of the different geometry grids. Two spatially separated single hot wires were also used to measure transverse integral length scale at selected locations. Results are compared to previous studies of shearless mixing layer grids and fractal grids, including mean flow profiles and turbulence statistics.

  17. Finite mixture model applied in the analysis of a turbulent bistable flow on two parallel circular cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Paula, A.V.; Moeller, S.V., E-mail: vagtinski@mecanica.ufrgs.br, E-mail: svmoller@ufrgs.br [UFRGS - Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, PROMEC - Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a study of the bistable phenomenon which occurs in the turbulent flow impinging on circular cylinders placed side-by-side. Time series of axial and transversal velocity obtained with the constant temperature hot wire anemometry technique in an aerodynamic channel are used as input data in a finite mixture model, to classify the observed data according to a family of probability density functions. Wavelet transforms are applied to analyze the unsteady turbulent signals. Results of flow visualization show a predominantly two-dimensional behavior. A double-well energy model is suggested to describe the behavior of the bistable phenomenon in this case. (author)

  18. CFD modeling of pharmaceutical isolators with experimental verification of airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, N; Akay, H U; Walsh, M R; Bell, W V; Troyer, G L; Dukes, R E; Mohan, P

    2007-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been developed to predict the airflow in a transfer isolator using a commercial CFD code. In order to assess the ability of the CFD approach in predicting the flow inside an isolator, hot wire anemometry measurements and a novel experimental flow visualization technique consisting of helium-filled glycerin bubbles were used. The results obtained have been shown to agree well with the experiments and show that CFD can be used to model barrier systems and isolators with practical fidelity. This indicates that CFD can and should be used to support the design, testing, and operation of barrier systems and isolators.

  19. Comparison of CFD simulations and measurements of flow affected by coanda effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental research and numerical simulations of specific phenomena in fluid flows called Coanda effect (CE, which has numerous important engineering applications. Although many researchers have concerned with wall jets, the physics of this flow still remains not well understood. This study is focused on analysis of behaviour of jet flow close to the wall and influence of its inclination. The flow has been visualized using smoke and velocity was measured by means of Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA. CFD simulations have been performed on the same geometry and compared with experiments in order to find a tool for correct prediction of the CE.

  20. Advancements in Wind Energy Metrology - UPWIND 1A2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Troels F.; Wagner, R.

    2011-02-15

    enough for inclusion in the IEC standard. In relation to the coming IEC standard on performance verification with the use of nacelle anemometry, IEC61400-12-2-CD, nacelle anemometry has been studied, both with experiments and in theory. An alternative to nacelle anemometry has been developed, the socalled spinner anemometer. This type of sensor measures yaw-error with high absolute accuracy, and avoids the draw-backs of nacelle anemometry because the spinner anemometer is positioned in front of the rotor. Advances in classic mast measurement technologies have also been made. A mast flow distortion correction method has been developed to improve classical state of the art mast measurements. Finally, an optical method for measurements of turbine vibrations is considered. (Author)

  1. Inlet Turbulence and Length Scale Measurements in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Douglas; Flegel, Ashlie; Giel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Constant temperature hotwire anemometry data were acquired to determine the inlet turbulence conditions of a transonic turbine blade linear cascade. Flow conditions and angles were investigated that corresponded to the take-off and cruise conditions of the Variable Speed Power Turbine (VSPT) project and to an Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) scaled rotor blade tip section. Mean and turbulent flowfield measurements including intensity, length scale, turbulence decay, and power spectra were determined for high and low turbulence intensity flows at various Reynolds numbers and spanwise locations. The experimental data will be useful for establishing the inlet boundary conditions needed to validate turbulence models in CFD codes.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a research atomizer/combustion chamber configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassa, C.; Bluemcke, E.; Brandt, M.; Eickoff, H.

    1992-06-01

    A mathematical model of two-phase flows in gas turbine combustors is presently validated in light of an experimental airblast atomizer/combustion chamber configuration. Inlet boundary conditions were measured within the nozzle by laser two-focus velocimetry, and the starting velocities and mass fluxes for the spray's droplet sizes were determined by phase-Doppler anemometry. The spray exhibits the structure of an axial acceleration of all drop sizes, as well as a subsequent dispersion of the droplets and radial separation by centrifugal force according to size.

  3. A - a view in the invisible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Slavica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow visualization is an important topic in, experimental and computational fluid dynamics and has been the subject of research for many years. This paper presents an overview of flow visualization techniques. The physical basis and applications of different visualization methods for subsonic, transonic and supersonic flow in wind and water tunnels are described: direct injection methods, (smoke, dye, fog and different small particles, gas and hydrogen bubbles, , flow visualization by tufts, oil, liquid crystals, pressure and temperature sensitive paints, shadow, schlieren, interferometry, Laser Doppler Anemometry, Particle Image Velocimetry and other special techniques. Almost all presented photos have been recorded during tests in laboratories of MTI Belgrade.

  4. Processor operated correlator with applications to laser Doppler signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, C.; Johnsen, B.; Hassager, Ole

    1984-01-01

    A 64-channel correlator is designed with application to the processing of laser Doppler anemometry signals in the range 200 Hz to 250 kHz. The correlator is processor operated to enable the consecutive sampling of 448 correlation functions at a rate up to 500 Hz. Software is described to identify...... a Doppler frequency from each correlation and the system is especially designed for transient flow signals. Doppler frequencies are determined with an accuracy of about 0.1%. Review of Scientific Instruments is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  5. Experimental Observation of Differences in the Dynamic Response of Newtonian and Viscoelastic Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Castrejon-Pita, J R; Castrejon-Pita, A A; Huelsz, G

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental study of the dynamic responses of a Newtonian fluid and a Maxwellian fluid under an oscillating pressure gradient. We use laser Doppler anemometry in order to determine the velocity of each fluid inside a cylindrical tube. In the case of the Newtonian fluid, the dissipative nature is observed and the response obeys the Zhou and Sheng universality (PRB 39, 12027 (1989)). In the dynamic response of the Maxwellian fluid an enhancement at the frequencies predicted by the corresponding theory (PRE 39, 12027 (1989)) is observed.

  6. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  7. A Landau-Squire Nanojet

    CERN Document Server

    Laohakunakorn, Nadanai; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Dullens, Roel P A; Ghosal, Sandip; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-01-01

    Fluid jets are found in nature at all length scales, from microscopic to cosmological. Here we report on an electroosmotically driven jet from a single glass nanopore about 75 nm in radius with a maximum flow rate ~15 pL/s. A novel anemometry technique allows us to map out the vorticity and velocity fields that show excellent agreement with the classical Landau-Squire solution of the Navier Stokes equations for a point jet. We observe a phenomenon that we call flow rectification: an asymmetry in the flow rate with respect to voltage reversal. Such a nanojet could potentially find applications in micromanipulation, nanopatterning, and as a diode in microfluidic circuits.

  8. Connection between full-lifetime and breakdown of puffs in transitional pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Mina; Ertunç, Özgür; Delgado, Antonio

    Puff splitting was studied by direct measurement of the full-lifetime (LT full ) of transitional structures (puffs) in low Reynolds number pipe flows. During the investigations, a fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with pre-defined amplitude and lapse time and the evolution of puffs was monitored by the transients of pressure drop along the pipe and the hot wire anemometry at the pipe exit. Those complementary measurements showed that a single puff favors to breakdown into two or more (splitting) puffs and later into slug-like puffs at Re ≈ 2300, where they are expected to have infinite LT full .

  9. Measurement of the air boundary layer on the periphery of a rotating grinding wheel using LDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H [AMTReL, GERI, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Lin, B [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Cai, R [AMTReL, GERI, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Morgan, M N [AMTReL, GERI, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    In this paper, the velocity profile of the air boundary layer around a rotating grinding wheel was measured using the Laser Doppler Anemometry technique. Experimental results show that the tangential velocity of the air decreases greatly with increasing distance from the wheel surface. The distribution of the tangential velocity is also found to be almost uniform near to the centre of the wheel width, and decreases greatly as the wheel edge is approached. Generally, the radial velocity of air in the area close to the wheel surface is small, and then increases with the increasing distance from wheel surface.

  10. On the peculiarities of LDA method in two-phase flows with high concentrations of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplavski, S. V.; Boiko, V. M.; Nesterov, A. U.

    2016-10-01

    Popular applications of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) in gas dynamics are reviewed. It is shown that the most popular method cannot be used in supersonic flows and two-phase flows with high concentrations of particles. A new approach to implementation of the known LDA method based on direct spectral analysis, which offers better prospects for such problems, is presented. It is demonstrated that the method is suitable for gas-liquid jets. Owing to the progress in laser engineering, digital recording of spectra, and computer processing of data, the method is implemented at a higher technical level and provides new prospects of diagnostics of high-velocity dense two-phase flows.

  11. Formation of uniform fringe pattern free from diffraction noise at LDA measurement volume using holographic imaging configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have proposed a technique for improving fringe quality at laser Doppler anemometry measurement volume in real time using single hololens imaging configuration over conventional imaging configuration with Gaussian beam optics. In order to remove interference fringe gradients as well as higher order diffraction noise formed at measurement volume in the former approach, a combined hololens imaging system has also been proposed. For qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of fringes formed at measurement volume, atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis has been performed.

  12. ULTRAPLATE 24 month report and cost statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    observations have been made using this technique, which are presently undergoing review for further patent applications. A sulphamate based nickel electrolyte as used extensively in the micro-electroforming of high precision stamper tools for e.g. CD/DVD production and optical microconnectors has been used...... as a model system for the investigation of the effects of low frequency (25 kHz) ultrasound. Analysis techniques used so far in the iterative studies (WP2) include Laser-Doppler Anemometry measurements, X-ray fluorescence analysis, light optical microscopy (LOM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM...

  13. A supersonic gas injection system for fuelling and probing fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, Scott [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Howard, John [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Blackwell, Boyd [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Carlsson, Peter [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteburg (Sweden); Abelsson, Mattias [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteburg (Sweden); Powell, Ben [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2006-11-01

    The large gas reservoir surrounding the H-1NF plasma leads to difficulties in achieving the density control required to maximize the plasma temperature. We have designed and tested an alternative fuelling system which uses a double conical nozzle to generate a directed flow of particles into the plasma without adding to the gas inventory in the rest of the vacuum vessel. By using a closed plenum at a programmable pressure and a piezo-electric valve, the particle flux can be dynamically changed in a controlled and quantitative manner. Measurements of the gas jet using constant temperature hot wire anemometry show that, for plenum pressures between 500 and 1000 Torr, the particle injection rate (helium) ranges between 2 x 10{sup 20} and 4 x 10{sup 20} s{sup -1} with half-cone angles between 5 deg. and 20 deg. The system has been installed on the H-1NF device and first plasma results indicate localized gas injection consistent with test tank anemometry measurements.

  14. Laminar vortex shedding behind a cooled circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Wang, An-Bang; Tu, Wen-Yun

    2014-02-01

    This paper addresses the functional demonstration of a hot air flow generator driven by convective heat transfer and the airflow behind a cooled circular cylinder in cross flow in the low velocity range. The wake flow was investigated experimentally using flow visualization, hot-wire anemometry, and laser Doppler anemometry. An evaluation of the free-stream velocity from the vortex shedding frequency was derived for the isothermal and non-isothermal cases and demonstrated using simple stroboscope measurements. The results confirm that cylinder cooling destabilizes the wake flow in air, i.e., the laminar steady regime can be changed into the vortex shedding regime, and the vortex shedding frequency increases as the cylinder temperature decreases. This thermal effect of cylinder cooling is consistent with its counterpart, the known effect of flow stabilization by cylinder heating. The effective temperature and effective Reynolds number concept have been further quantitatively evaluated, and the extension of their validity to the case of cooled cylinders has been confirmed.

  15. Introducing a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Fu, Matthew; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry is commonly used for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly because of its continuous signal and high bandwidth. However, measuring two components of velocity in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has proven to be quite challenging with conventional crossed hot-wires, especially close to the wall, due to insufficient resolution and obstruction from the probe. The Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) is a miniature hot-wire that drastically increased the spatial and temporal resolutions for single-component measurements by using a nano-scale platinum wire. Applying a novel combining method and reconfiguration of the NSTAP design, we created a sensor (x-NSTAP) that is capable of two-component velocity measurements with a sensing volume of approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, providing spatial and temporal resolutions similar to the single component NSTAP. The x-NSTAP is deployed in the Superpipe facility for accurate measurements of the Reynolds stresses at very high Reynolds numbers. Supported under NSF Grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  16. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  17. Wind velocity measurements under turbulent conditions using a sphere anemometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Hoelling, Michael; Schulte, Bianca; Peinke, Joachim [Institute of Physics, University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    A well known problem of cup anemometry is the so-called overspeeding due to its momentum of inertia. As in nature turbulent flow conditions are predominant, cup anemometry leads to a wrong estimation of wind speeds. While cup anemometers do not provide the necessary time resolution to measure high frequency wind fluctuations, hot-wire anemometers are easily damaged under rough weather conditions. Therefore a robust, fast responding sphere anemometer was developed. The anemometer uses the thrust generated by the drag force on a sphere mounted on a flexible rod to detect wind velocities in two dimensions. The deflection of the rod is proportional to the drag force and can be measured either by means of a light pointer or by use of strain gauges. The two different measurement techniques were compared. The dynamic behaviour of the thrust anemometer was studied under laboratory conditions using a wind gust generator. The characteristics of different sphere-types and different rod materials were evaluated in order to optimize the setup. Results of open air measurements with hot-wire anemometer, sonic anemometer and sphere anemometer were compared by statistical methods.

  18. Finite mixture model applied in the analysis of a turbulent bistable flow on two parallel circular cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, A.V. de, E-mail: vagtinski@mecanica.ufrgs.br [PROMEC – Programa de Pós Graduação em Engenharia Mecânica, UFRGS – Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Möller, S.V., E-mail: svmoller@ufrgs.br [PROMEC – Programa de Pós Graduação em Engenharia Mecânica, UFRGS – Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    This paper presents a study of the bistable phenomenon which occurs in the turbulent flow impinging on circular cylinders placed side-by-side. Time series of axial and transversal velocity obtained with the constant temperature hot wire anemometry technique in an aerodynamic channel are used as input data in a finite mixture model, to classify the observed data according to a family of probability density functions. Wavelet transforms are applied to analyze the unsteady turbulent signals. Results of flow visualization show that the flow is predominantly two-dimensional. A double-well energy model is suggested to describe the behavior of the bistable phenomenon in this case. -- Highlights: ► Bistable flow on two parallel cylinders is studied with hot wire anemometry as a first step for the application on the analysis to tube bank flow. ► The method of maximum likelihood estimation is applied to hot wire experimental series to classify the data according to PDF functions in a mixture model approach. ► Results show no evident correlation between the changes of flow modes with time. ► An energy model suggests the presence of more than two flow modes.

  19. Experimental in situ investigations of turbulence under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwonyul; Al-Salaymeh, Ahmed; Jovanovic, Jovan; Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    In tube injection systems applied in high-pressure processing of packed biomaterials and foods, the pressure-transmitting medium is injected into the vessel to increase the pressure up to 1000 MPa, generating a submerged liquid-free jet. The presence of a turbulent-free jet during the pressurization phase and its positive influence on the homogeneity of the product treatment has already been examined by computational fluid dynamics investigations. However, no experimental data have supported the existence and properties of turbulent flow under high-pressure (HP) conditions up to 400 MPa. This contribution presents the development of two experimental setups: HP-laser Doppler anemometry and HP-hot wire anemometry. For the first time the time-averaged velocity profiles of a free jet during pressurization up to 300 MPa at different Reynolds numbers (Re) have been obtained. In this article, the dependence of the velocity profiles on the Re is discussed in detail. Moreover, the relaminarization phenomenon of the turbulent pipe flow most likely caused by the compressibility effects and viscosity changes of the pressure-transmitting medium is examined.

  20. An Experimental and Computational Study of Multiphase Flow Behaviour in Circulating Fluidized Beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathiesen, Vidar

    1997-12-31

    Gas/solid flows have been studied extensively, mainly because they are important in nuclear, chemical and petroleum industries. This thesis describes an experiment done at two different circulating fluidized bed systems. Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) were used to measure mean and fluctuating velocity, diameter and solids concentration. A typical core-annulus flow was obtained in both cases. The measurements show a relative mean velocity as well as a relative fluctuating velocity between different particle sizes. An axial segregation by size and its variation with the superficial gas velocity are demonstrated. Significant radial segregation is found in both risers. A three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics model was developed based on Eulerian description of the phases where the kinetic theory of granular flow is the basis of the turbulence modelling in the solid phases. There are one gas phase and any number of solid phases. Simulations of flow behaviour in two- and three-dimensions agree well with experiments and the model is able to handle axial segregation by size for different superficial gas velocities and particle size distributions. 107 refs., 79 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Observations of the evening transition processes on opposing slopes of a north-south oriented mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardyjak, E.

    2014-12-01

    The MATERHORN (Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observation) Program is a multiuniversity, multidisciplinary research initiative designed to improve numerical weather prediction in complex terrain and to better understand the physics of complex terrain flow phenomena across a wide range of scales. As part of MATERHORN, field campaigns were conducted at Dugway, UT, USA in Autumn 2012 and Spring 2013. A subset of the campaigns included dense observations along the East Slope of Granite Peak (40.096° N, -113.253° W), as well as additional observations on the opposing west facing slope. East Slope observations included five multi-sonic anemometer eddy covariance towers (two with full energy budget stations), eleven small energy budget stations, fifteen automated weather stations, a distributed temperature sensing (DTS) system, hot-film anemometry, infrared camera surface temperature observations and up to three Doppler lidars. West Slope operations were less intense with three main towers, two of which included sonic anemometry and one, which included full surface energy balance observations. For this presentation, our analysis will focus on characterizing and contrasting the response of mean wind circulations and thermodynamics variables, as well as turbulence quantities during the evening transitions on both the East Slope and West Slope when solar irradiation differences of the slope surfaces is extremely large.

  2. Time-Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is being used to characterize the decay of turbulence in jet flows a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A TR-PIV system, developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 10 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number.

  3. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  4. Fibre-linked miniature laser transit anemometer for complex flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Sohail

    Laser anemometry has been shown to be a very successful optical measurement device. The non-intrusive nature of this technique made it possible to map the flow between the blade rows of a rotating machine which was previously impracticable. The initial designs of the laser anemometry systems have undergone much development and practical problems during the use of these systems still provide room for further development. Some of these problems were identified and solved by designing a miniaturized laser transit system. Miniaturization of the system was achieved by separating the optical head from the bulky and sensitive laser source and detectors. Keeping in view the measurement volume geometry of conventional systems, the optical parameters for the new system were selected. Emphasis was given to the use of optical components which were commercially available in the market. Regarding the arrangement of the optical components inside the system, different models were suggested. A compromise between the optical quality has to be made for practical limitations of cost and ease of operation. The operation of the probe was confirmed by measuring the flow in a simple duct and the blade rows of a rotating axial fan. The comparison of these results with those obtained using a commercial system show that the new probe is working with high accuracy. During near wall applications, some problems were revealed and the probe's performance was not found up to that standard as was expected. Suggestions were made which may improve the systems performance.

  5. Three measuring techniques for assessing the mean wall skin friction in wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoun, E.-S.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper aims at evaluating the mean wall skin friction data in laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows obtained from two optical and one thermal measuring techniques, namely, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), oil-film interferometry (OFI), and surface hot-film anemometry (SHFA), respectively. A comparison among the three techniques is presented, indicating close agreement in the mean wall skin friction data obtained, directly, from both the OFI and the LDA near-wall mean velocity profiles. On the other hand, the SHFA, markedly, over estimates the mean wall skin friction by 3.5-11.7% when compared with both the LDA and the OFI data, depending on the thermal conductivity of the substrate and glue material, probe calibration, probe contamination, temperature drift and Reynolds number. Satisfactory agreement, however, is observed among all three measuring techniques at higher Reynolds numbers, Re x >106, and within ±5% with empirical relations extracted from the literature. In addition, accurate velocity data within the inertial sublayer obtained using the LDA supports the applicability of the Clauser method to evaluate the wall skin friction when appropriate values for the constants of the logarithmic line are utilized.

  6. Non-intrusive measurement and hydrodynamics characterization of gas-solid fluidized beds: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyuan; Yan, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Gas-solid fluidization is a well-established technique to suspend or transport particles and has been applied in a variety of industrial processes. Nevertheless, our knowledge of fluidization hydrodynamics is still limited for the design, scale-up and operation optimization of fluidized bed reactors. It is, therefore, essential to characterize the two-phase flow behaviours in gas-solid fluidized beds and monitor the fluidization processes for control and optimization. A range of non-intrusive techniques have been developed or proposed for measuring the fluidization dynamic parameters and monitoring the flow status without disturbing or distorting the flow fields. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the non-intrusive measurement techniques and the current state of knowledge and experience in the characterization and monitoring of gas-solid fluidized beds. These techniques are classified into six main categories as per sensing principles, electrostatic, acoustic emission and vibration, visualization, particle tracking, laser Doppler anemometry and phase Doppler anemometry as well as pressure-fluctuation methods. Trends and future developments in this field are also discussed.

  7. The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

    2012-12-31

    ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational

  8. Optical diagnostics of intermittent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, V.L.; Naumov, I.V.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of combined use of different optical techniques for flow diagnostics is demonstrated with the practically important case of intense swirling flows. It is shown that, when applied separately, commonly used optical measuring techniques, such as laser Doppler anemometry and particle...... image velocimetry, frequently give erroneous results, especially for the transition flow and developed nonstationary flow. However, their combined use in diagnostics of unsteady (intermittent) flows significantly improves both the temporal and spatial resolution of measurements. Such a complex approach...... is for the first time applied for diagnostics of the flow pattern in a closed cylinder with a rotating end face with the aim of studying the changeover from the steady axisymmetric to unsteady asymmetric flow over a wide range of flow parameters. It is found that such a transition is notable for azimuthal...

  9. Experimental and numerical results on three-dimensional instabilities in a rotating disk-tall cylinder flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Gelfgat, A. Yu; Naumov, I. V.;

    2009-01-01

    The three-dimensional axisymmetry-breaking instability of axisymmetric flow between a rotating lid and a stationary cylinder is analyzed both numerically and experimentally for the case of tall cylinders with the height/radius aspect ratio between 3.3 and 5.5. A complete stability diagram...... for each mode. The onset of three-dimensional flow behavior is measured by combining the high spatial resolution of particle image velocimetry and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The results are compared to the numerical stability analysis. The measured onset of three dimensionality...... is in a good agreement with the numerical results. Disagreements observed in supercritical regimes can be explained by secondary bifurcations that are not accounted for by linear stability analysis of the primary base flow. ©2009 American Institute of Physics...

  10. Measurements and predictions for nonevaporating sprays in a quiescent environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Shuen, J.-S.; Faeth, G. M.; Zhang, Q.-F.

    1983-01-01

    Yule et al. (1982) have conducted a study of vaporizing sprays with the aid of laser techniques. The present investigation has the objective to supplement the measurements performed by Yule et al., by considering the limiting case of a spray in a stagnant environment. Mean and fluctuating velocities of the continuous phase are measured by means of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) techniques, while Fraunhofer diffraction and slide impaction methods are employed to determine drop sizes. Liquid fluxes in the spray are found by making use of an isokinetic sampling probe. The obtained data are used as a basis for the evaluation of three models of the process, including a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, and a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. It is found that the LHF and DSF models do not provide very satisfactory predictions for the test sprays, while the SSF model does provide reasonably good predictions of the observed structure.

  11. Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

    2007-07-01

    There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

  12. Three-dimensional visualization of axial velocity profiles downstream of six different mechanical aortic valve prostheses, measured with a hot-film anemometer in a steady state flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkam, J M; Westphal, D; Reul, H; Gormsen, J; Giersiepen, M; Stodkilde-Jorgensen, H; Paulsen, P K

    1987-01-01

    Hot-film anemometry was used for in vitro steady-state measurements downstream of six mechanical aortic valve prostheses at flow rates 10, 20 and 30 l.min-1. Three-dimensional visualizations of velocity profiles at two downstream levels were made with the valves rotated 0 and 60 degrees in relation to the sinuses of valsalvae. The velocity fields downstream of the disc valves were generally skew with increasing velocity gradients and laminar shear stresses with increasing flow rates. Furthermore, increased skewness of the velocity profiles was noticed when the major orifices of the disc valves were towards the commissure than when approaching a sinus of valsalvae. The velocity profiles downstream of the ball valve were generally flat but with considerably more disturbed flow, consistent with the findings in turbulent flow.

  13. Development of Streamwise Counter-Rotating Vortices in Flat Plate Boundary Layer Pre-set by Leading Edge Patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S.M.

    2017-04-03

    Development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices induced by leading edge patterns with different pattern shape is investigated using hot-wire anemometry in the boundary layer of a flat plate. A triangular, sinusoidal and notched patterns with the same pattern wavelength λ of 15mm and the same pattern amplitude A of 7.5mm were examined for free-stream velocity of 3m/s. The results show a good agreement with earlier studies. The inflection point on the velocity profile downstream of the trough of the patterns at the beginning of the vortex formation indicates that the vortices non-linearly propagate downstream. An additional vortex structure was also observed between the troughs of the notched pattern.

  14. Discrete surface roughness effects on a blunt hypersonic cone in a quiet tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nicole; White, Edward

    2013-11-01

    The mechanisms by which surface roughness creates boundary-layer disturbances in hypersonic flow are little understood. Work by Reshotko (AIAA 2008-4294) and others suggests that transient growth, resulting from the superposition of decaying non-orthogonal modes, may be responsible. The present study examines transient growth experimentally using a smooth 5-degree half-angle conic frustum paired with blunted nosetips with and without an azimuthal array of discrete roughness elements. A combination of hotwire anemometry and Pitot measurements in the low-disturbance Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel are used for boundary layer profiles downstream of the ring of roughness elements as well as azimuthal measurements to examine the high- and low-speed streaks characteristic of transient growth of stationary roughness-induced disturbances.

  15. Experimental measurements of large-scale temperature fluctuation structures in a heated incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.

    1993-03-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements over a heated flat plate are made for three different temperature difference cases of 10, 15, and 20 C. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime are determined from which mean convection velocities, mean inclination angles, extent in space, and coherence characteristics of T-prime large-scale structure are calculated. The T-prime mean convection velocity is found as a function of y(+). The T-prime structure inclination angle is 30 deg. The T-prime structure is limited to the viscous defect length in the normal and spanwise directions. However, in the streamwise direction, the structure is mildly dependent on the temperature difference.

  16. Review of fluid flow and convective heat transfer within rotating disk cavities with impinging jet

    CERN Document Server

    Harmand, Souad; Poncet, Sébastien; Shevchuk, Igor V; 10.1016/j.ijthermalsci.2012.11.009

    2013-01-01

    Fluid flow and convective heat transfer in rotor-stator configurations, which are of great importance in different engineering applications, are treated in details in this review. The review focuses on convective heat transfer in predominantly outward air flow in the rotor-stator geometries with and without impinging jets and incorporates two main parts, namely, experimental/theoretical methodologies and geometries/results. Experimental methodologies include naphthalene sublimation techniques, steady state (thin layer) and transient (thermochromic liquid crystals) thermal measurements, thermocouples and infra-red cameras, hot-wire anemometry, laser Doppler and particle image velocimetry, laser plane and smoke generator. Theoretical approaches incorporate modern CFD computational tools (DNS, LES, RANS etc). Geometries and results part being mentioned starting from simple to complex elucidates cases of a free rotating disk, a single disk in the crossflow, single jets impinging onto stationary and rotating disk,...

  17. Experiments on the formation of a recirculation zone in swirling coaxial jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, F. H.; Kromat, S.

    The near flow field of coaxial air jets, with swirl in the outer one, was studied using flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry. The flow is sensitive to both the swirl number and the mass flow ratio between the outer and inner jets. A necessary condition for the formation of an internal recirculation zone (IRZ) is that the swirl number must exceed a minimum value which depends on the mass flow ratio. Spectral analysis of the velocity fluctuations indicates that the formation of an IRZ in the present flow does not appear to be related to the growth of convective flow instabilities. Analysis of the flow visualization and X-wire data indicates that the vorticity dynamics model for vortex breakdown proposed by Brown and Lopez [J Fluid Mech (1990) 222: 553] provides a plausible mechanism for the formation of an IRZ in this flow.

  18. Coherent Structures near Narrow Gaps in Channel Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guellouz, M. S.; Tavoularis, S.

    1996-11-01

    Flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry were used to investigate the velocity field in axial flow within a rectangular channel containing a single cylindrical rod, parallel to the channel's axis and positioned at different distances from the wall. The formation of a street of three-dimensional, quasi-periodic, counter-rotating vortices in the vicinity of the gap has been observed, even for relatively large gaps. The Strouhal number, convection speed and streamwise spacing of these vortices have been determined as functions of the gap size and the flow parameters. A useful feature of these vortices is the large-scale transport of fluid across the gap, which enhances momentum, heat and mass transfer.

  19. Aeroacoustic properties of supersonic elliptic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-09-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic properties of supersonic elliptic and circular jets are experimentally investigated. The jets are perfectly expanded with an exit Mach number of approximately 1.5 and are operated in the Reynolds number range of 25 000 to 50 000. The reduced Reynolds number facilitates the use of conventional hot-wire anemometry and a glow discharge excitation technique which preferentially excites the varicose or flapping modes in the jets. In order to simulate the high-velocity and low-density effects of heated jets, helium is mixed with the air jets. This allows the large-scale structures in the jet shear layer to achieve a high enough convective velocity to radiate noise through the Mach wave emission process.

  20. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. J.; Thakur, D. B.; Van der Meer, T. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon nano structures is achieved using thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition process (TCCVD) on a 50 μm pure nickel (Ni270) wire. The micro wire samples covered with CNF layers were subjected to a uniform flow from a nozzle. Heat transfer measurement was achieved by a controlled heat dissipation through the micro wire to attain a constant temperature during the flow. This measurement technique is adopted from hot wire anemometry calibration method. Synthesis of carbon nano structures, heat transfer surface characterization and measurement technique are evaluated. Preliminary results indicate that an average enhancement in Nusselt Number of 17% is achieved.

  1. Turbulent kinetic energy balance measurements in the wake of a low-pressure turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideridis, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Yakinthos, K., E-mail: kyros@eng.auth.g [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Goulas, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    The turbulent kinetic energy budget in the wake generated by a high lift, low-pressure two-dimensional blade cascade of the T106 profile was investigated experimentally using hot-wire anemometry. The purpose of this study is to examine the transport mechanism of the turbulent kinetic energy and provide validation data for turbulence modeling. Point measurements were conducted on a high spatial resolution, two-dimensional grid that allowed precise derivative calculations. Positioning of the probe was achieved using a high accuracy traversing mechanism. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) convection, production, viscous diffusion and turbulent diffusion were all obtained directly from experimental measurements. Dissipation and pressure diffusion were calculated indirectly using techniques presented and validated by previous investigators. Results for all terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget are presented and discussed in detail in the present work.

  2. Turbulent Prandtl number and space-time temperature correlation measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Strataridakis, Constantine J.; White, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary laeyr flow over a heated flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using an x-probe and temperature fluctuation probe. The experiments resulted in direct measurement of the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of height through the boundary layer for three temperature difference cases. Also, space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime were obtained with a pair of temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities of the T-prime large-scale structure are presented for the three temperature difference cases. The mean convection velocity of the T-prime structure is a function of position y(+) and is found to be independent of the temperature difference for the cases considered.

  3. Experiments with vortex rings in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, R. H.; Cibert, B.; Béchet, C.

    2006-09-01

    We report quantitative experimental measurements of the instability of vortex rings generated in air. Vortex rings are created by pushing air through the circular orifice of a cylindrical cavity with a flat piston driven by a loudspeaker. Hot-wire anemometry provides accurate measurements of the velocity profile at all stages of the ring formation including stable and unstable rings. Flow visualization using a laser light sheet shows that the initially undisturbed vortex ring is progressively deformed in the azimuthal direction giving rise to a wavy azimuthal and periodic pattern in the circumference of the ring. The wavy pattern is steady, i.e., it does not rotate or translate during the ring's motion. However as the vortex motion progresses in the axial direction, the displaced portions of the ring are convected away from the initial undisturbed position and the wavy pattern grows with local Reynolds number.

  4. Experimental measurements of large scale structures in an incompressible turbulent boundary layer using correlated X-probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strataridakis, Constantine J.; White, Bruce R.; Robinson, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate, at zero pressure gradient were made using two X-probes simultaneously. The over seven meters long flat plate installed within the wind tunnel generated an approximately 20-cm thick boundary layer, and R(theta) of about 4,000. The mean velocity and turbulence intensity data very close to the wall were measured with a single-wire. Space-time velocity fluctuation and shear-product correlation measurements enabled the calculation of large-scale structure convection velocity, inclination-angle to the wall, and spatial extent in space. The shear-product correlation results are reported for the first time.

  5. Small Scale Forcing in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Thomas; Rathnasingham, Ruben; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1996-11-01

    In order to understand the effect of small scale forcing on turbulent flows and its implications on control, an experimental investigation is made into the forcing of the inertial scales in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. A wall-mounted resonant actuator is used to produce a local vortical structure in the streamwise direction which is convected downstream by the boundary layer flow. The frequency associated with this structure is governed by the resonant frequency of the device and falls in the range of the inertial scales at the Reynolds number of the experiment (Re_θ = 2000). Hot-wire anemometry is used to map the velocity field at several stations downstream of the actuator. The signals are also conditioned to identify the effect of the actuator on different scales in the flow. Amplitude and modulation effects are also discussed. ^*Supported by ONR Grant N00014-92-J-1910.

  6. Experimental Investigation of a Synthetic Jet Array in a Laminar Channel Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trávníček Z.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an impinging synthetic jet, namely on the case of a synthetic jet array interacting with a laminar channel flow. This arrangement can be useful in many micro-scale applications, such as cooling of micro-electronics. The flow regime in micro-scale is usually laminar with very small Reynolds numbers; therefore synthetic jet array can be used for the profile disturbance and heat transfer enhancement. The paper focuses on the low Reynolds number (in order 102. The working fluid is water and a piezoceramic transducer is used as a moving membrane in the synthetic jet actuator. Experiments are performed with four experimental methods (tin ion visualization, hot wire anemometry in constant temperature mode, laser Doppler vibrometry and particle image velocimetry in three laboratories (at the Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands, at the Institute of Thermodynamics CAS, v.v.i. and Technical University of Liberec, both Czech Republic.

  7. Phase-averaged waveforms of Reynolds stress in wall turbulence during the burst events of coherent structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; LIU Wei; LIU JianHua; TIAN Yan

    2008-01-01

    The time sequence signals of instantaneous longitudinal and normal velocity components at different vertical locations in the turbulent boundary layer over a smooth flat plate have been finely measured by constant temperature anemometry of model IFA-300 and X-shaped hot-wire sensor probe in a wind tunnel. The longitudinal and normal velocity components have been decomposed into multi-scales by wavelet transform. The upward eject and downward sweep motions in a burst process of coherent structure have been detected by the maximum energy criterion of identifying burst event in wall turbulence through wavelet analysis. The relationships of phase-averaged waveforms among longitudinal velocity component, normal velocity component and Reynolds stress component have been studied through a correlation function method. The dynamics course of coherent structures and their effects on statistical characteristics of turbulent flows are analyzed.

  8. Fiber-optic flow sensors for high-temperature environment operation up to 800°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongzhang; Yan, Aidong; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Kevin P

    2014-07-01

    This Letter presents an all-optical high-temperature flow sensor based on hot-wire anemometry. High-attenuation fibers (HAFs) were used as the heating elements. High-temperature-stable regenerated fiber Bragg gratings were inscribed in HAFs and in standard telecom fibers as temperature sensors. Using in-fiber light as both the heating power source and the interrogation light source, regenerative fiber Bragg grating sensors were used to gauge the heat transfer from an optically powered heating element induced by the gas flow. Reliable gas flow measurements were demonstrated between 0.066  m/s and 0.66  m/s from the room temperature to 800°C. This Letter presents a compact, low-cost, and multiflexible approach to measure gas flow for high-temperature harsh environments.

  9. Three Kinds of Velocity Structure Function in Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; JIANG Nan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the local multi-scale eddy structures in turbulent flows, we elucidate the essential difference between the real turbulent field with a finite Reynolds number and the Kolmogorov fully developed random field. The motion of fluid particles in the real turbulent field is not fully random. There exist multi-scale structures due to the effect of viscosity. Actually the movements of fluid particles in the turbulent field are restricted by such eddy structures. Furthermore, concept of the locally averaged velocity structure function is put forward to describe the relative strain distortion of two adjacent turbulent eddy structures at a certain scale. The time sequence of the longitudinal velocity component at different vertical locations in turbulent boundary layer has been elaborately measured by the constant temperature anemometry of model IFA-300 in a wind tunnel. The experiment proves that the locally averaged velocity structure function is in agreement with the wavelet-coefficient structure function.

  10. A method for the ad hoc and real-time determination of the water balance in a PEMFC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for the ad hoc and real-time determination of the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is presented. The method requires the anode side of the fuel cell to be operated in open-ended mode and to use dry, pure hydrogen as is typical for vehicular applications...... anemometry, and this method provides a voltage signal that can be fed to the board computer of a fuel cell vehicle for PEMFC diagnosis. It is also shown that the nitrogen cross-over from cathode to anode has only a small effect on the anode outlet velocity. In addition to detecting the velocity, the relative...... humidity may be measured which is shown to be independent of the current density, but measurement techniques suffer fromlower accuracy. It is argued that this method can also be applied to quantify fuel cell degradation. Finally, it is fundamentally shown that when operating the fuel cell in steady state...

  11. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  12. Investigations into the attenuation by screens under the influence of wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten bo

    1996-01-01

    A simple hard screen on an absorbing ground is investigated experimentally and theoretically under upwind conditions. The experimental data are the result of model experiments in a 1:25 scale model within a wind tunnel. The sound propagation is measured using a triggered spark source and averaging...... on power basis in the frequency domain. The meteorological data representing the wind conditions have been determined by means of hot-wire anemometry in positions on both sides of the screen as well as directly over the screen. The theoretical model used for comparison is a hybrid approach. The sound field...... without a barrier is determined by means of numerical integration of a Hankel transform solution for a stratified atmosphere. This solution is used for propagation from source to screen and from screen onwards. The screen is taken into account by means of diffraction theory. Comparison of theoretical...

  13. Spatial Resolution Correction for Electrochemical Wall-shear Stress Measurements using Rectangular Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fethi Aloui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is mainly motivated by the growing needs for highly resolved measurements for wall-bounded turbulent flows and aims to proposes a spatial correction coefficient in order to increase the wall-shear stress sensors accuracy. As it well known for the hot wire anemometry, the fluctuating streamwise velocity measurement attenuation is mainly due to the spatial resolution and the frequency response of the sensing element. The present work agrees well with this conclusion and expands it to the wall-shear stress fluctuations measurements using electrochemical sensors and suggested a correction method based on the spanwise correlation coefficient to take into account the spatial filtering effects on unresolved wall-shear stress measurements due to too large sensor spanwise size.

  14. New expressions for the surface roughness length and displacement height in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Jian-Zhong; Li Hui-Jun; Zhang Kai

    2007-01-01

    An alternative model for the prediction of surface roughness length is developed. In the model a new factor is introduced to compensate for the effects of wake diffusion and interactions between the wake and roughness obstacles.The experiments are carried out by the use of the hot wire anemometry in the simulated atmospheric boundary layer in a wind tunnel. Based on the experimental data, a new expression for the zero-plane displacement height is proposed for the square arrays of roughness elements, which highlights the influence of free-stream speed on the roughness length. It appears that the displacement height increases with the wind speed while the surface roughness length decreases with Reynolds number increasing. It is shown that the calculation results based on the new expressions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Energy transfer and dissipation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Valente, Pedro C

    2013-01-01

    The nonequilibrium dissipation behaviour discovered for decaying fractal square grid-generated turbulence is experimentally investigated using hot-wire anemometry in a wind tunnel. The previous results are consolidated and benchmarked with turbulence generated by regular square-mesh grids, designed to retain certain geometrical parameters of the fractal square grid. This comparison shows that the nonequilibrium behaviour is manifested in both fractal square grid- and regular square-mesh grid-generated turbulence for a downstream region during the turbulence decay up to the first few multiples of the wake interaction distance. For one of the regular grids it is shown that beyond this region there is a transition to the classical dissipation behaviour if the local turbulent Reynolds number is sufficiently high. A sharp conclusion can thus be drawn that this behaviour is more general than initially thought and therefore of much greater scientific and engineering significance. The nonequilibrium dissipation pheno...

  16. Turbulent boundary layer over flexible plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Parand; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2016-11-01

    This research describes the structure of a turbulent boundary layer flow with a zero pressure gradient over elastic plates. The elastic plates made of a thin aluminum sheets with thickness between 50 and 500 microns were placed on the floor of a subsonic wind tunnel and exposed to a turbulent boundary layer flow with a free stream velocity between 20m/s and 100m/s. The ceiling of the test section of the wind tunnel is adjustable so that a nearly zero pressure gradient is obtained in the test section. Hot-wire anemometry was used to measure the velocity components. Mean, fluctuating velocities and Reynolds stresses will be presented and compared with the values of a rigid plate.

  17. Near Wall Turbulence: an experimental view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislas, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this presentation is to summarize the understanding of the near wall turbulence phenomena obtained at Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille using both hot wire anemometry and PIV. A wind tunnel was built in 1993 specifically designed for these two measurement techniques and aimed at large Reynolds numbers. Several experiments were performed since then in the frame of different PhDs and European projects, all aimed at evidencing turbulence organization in this region. These have fully benefited of the extraordinary development of PIV in that time frame, which has allowed entering visually and quantitatively inside the complex spatial and temporal structure of near wall turbulence. The presentation will try to emphasize the benefit of this approach in terms of understanding and modelling, illustrated by some representative results obtained. M. Stanislas particularly acknowledges the financial support of Region Nord Pas de Calais, unmissing during 25 years.

  18. Active control of the jet in coaxial arrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šafařík P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An axisymmetric jet flow, issuing as a fully developed flow from a long straight pipe at Re = 1600 and 5500, was actively controlled by an annular synthetic jet. The Pitot tube, hot-wire anemometry (CTA and flow visualization were used for an experimental investigation of the flow control. The working fluid was air. The effect of varying Strouhal number (St = (0.18÷1.94 on a width and entrainment of the main jet flow was studied. It was found that the main jet is the most sensitive to the actuation at St = 0.28÷0.60 and St = 0.18, for Re = 1600 and Re = 5500, respectively.

  19. Vortices induced in a stagnation region by wakes - Their incipient formation and effects on heat transfer from cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagib, H. M.; Hodson, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Horseshoe-like vortices, induced by wakes in the stagnation region of bluff bodies, are proposed as an efficient mechanism for augmentation of convective heat transfer. The vortex 'flow module' induced by single or multiple wakes, which had not been observed previously, was first documented and the resulting flow field was studied using various visualization techniques and hot-wire anemometry. In an attempt to understand the driving force behind this flow module, the conditions at which incipient formation of the vortices occurs were investigated. Existence of such a threshold is essential and was hitherto an open question in analytical studies of stability of flow in stagnation region. Finally, effects of the flow module on heat transfer from a cylinder were measured.

  20. Heat transfer from cylinders in subsonic slip flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Stainback, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer in heated wires was measured using a constant temperature anemometer over a Mach number range from 0.05 to 0.4 and pressures from 0.5 to 8.0 atmospheres. The total temperature ranged from 80 to 120 F and the wire diameters were 0.00015, 0.00032, and 0.00050 inch. The heat transfer data is presented in the form of a corrected Nusselt number. Based on suggested criteria, much of the data was obtained in the slip flow regime. Therefore, the data is compared with data having comparable flow conditions. The possible application of the heat transfer data to hot wire anemometry is discussed. To this end, the sensitivity of the wires to velocity, density, and total temperature is computed and compared using two different types of correlations.

  1. Reynolds number invariance of the structure inclination angle in wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusic, Ivan; Heuer, Weston D C

    2007-09-14

    Cross correlations of the fluctuating wall-shear stress and the streamwise velocity in the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers are reported over 3 orders of magnitude change in Reynolds number. These results are obtained using hot-film and hot-wire anemometry in a wind tunnel facility, and sonic anemometers and a purpose-built wall-shear stress sensor in the near-neutral atmospheric surface layer on the salt flats of Utah's western desert. The direct measurement of fluctuating wall-shear stress in the atmospheric surface layer has not been available before. Structure inclination angles are inferred from the cross correlation results and are found to be invariant over the large range of Reynolds number. The findings justify the prior use of low Reynolds number experiments for obtaining structure angles for near-wall models in the large-eddy simulation of atmospheric surface layer flows.

  2. Three-dimensional finite-element simulation of a turbulent push-pull ventilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, M R; Ahn, K; Miller, C T

    1995-10-01

    A finite-element formulation with penalty approach to enforce continuity is employed here to simulate the three-dimensional velocity field resulting from a simple push-pull ventilation configuration. An analytic expression for the length scale and a transport equation for turbulent kinetic energy are coupled with the momentum equations. A coaxial square hood and jet are arranged with cross-draught perpendicular to the common centreline. Numerical predictions of the velocity and turbulence kinetic energy fields are evaluated in the plane of symmetry with hot film anemometry, and smoke-wire flow visualizations. The agreement of the simulated jet trajectories with flow visualizations is reasonable, as are velocities. Predictions of turbulence kinetic energy are not as good, particularly near the hood face. Despite the limitations the numerical approach is useful in assessing the impact of cross-draughts on the push-pull arrangement.

  3. Errors in mean and fluctuating velocity due to PIV bias and precision uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.; Smith, B.L. [Utah State Univ., Utah (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry is a powerful fluid velocity measurement tool that has recently become important for CFD validation experiments. Knowledge of experimental uncertainty is important to CFD validation, but the uncertainty of PIV is very complex and not well understood. Previous work has shown that PIV measurements can become 'noisy' in regions of high shear as well as regions of small displacement. This paper aims to demonstrate the impact of these effects on validation data by comparing PIV data to data acquired using hot-wire anemometry, which does not suffer from the same issues. It is confirmed that shear and insufficient particle displacements can result in elevated measurements of turbulence levels. (author)

  4. Temporally optimized spanwise vorticity sensor measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.; Baidya, R.; Marusic, I.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element hot-wire anemometry was used to measure spanwise vorticity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. Smooth wall boundary layer profiles, with very good spatial and temporal resolution, were acquired over a Kármán number range of 2000-12,700 at the Melbourne Wind Tunnel at the University of Melbourne and the University of New Hampshire's Flow Physics Facility. A custom hot-wire probe was necessary to simultaneously obtain velocity and spanwise vorticity measurements centered at a fixed point in space. A custom calibration/processing scheme was developed to utilize single-wall-parallel wires to optimize the accuracy of the measured wall-normal velocity fluctuations derived from the sensor's ×-array.

  5. Relaminarization of wall turbulence by high-pressure ramps at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Kwonyul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transition from the turbulent towards the laminar flow regime was investigated experimentally by progressively increasing the pressure up to 400 MPa in a fully developed pipe flow operated with silicone oil as the working fluid. Using hot-wire anemometry, it is shown indirectly that at low Reynolds numbers a rapid increase in pressure modifies the turbulence dynamics owing to the processes which induce the effects caused by fluid compressibility in the region very close to the wall. The experimental results confirm that under such circumstances, the traditional mechanism responsible for self-maintenance of turbulence in wall-bounded flows is altered in such a way as to lead towards a state in which turbulence cannot persist any longer.

  6. The steady expiratory pressure-flow relation in a model pulmonary bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J M; Shapiro, A H; Kimmel, E; Kamm, R D

    1993-08-01

    Experiments were conducted over a range of Reynolds numbers from 50 to 8000 to study the pressure-flow relationship for a single bifurcation in a multi-generation model during steady expiratory flow. Using the energy equation, the measured static pressure drop was decomposed into separate components due to fluid acceleration and viscous energy dissipation. The frictional pressure drop was found to closely approximate that for an equivalent length of curved tube with the same curvature ratio as in the model bifurcation. The sensitivity of these results to changes in airway cross-sectional shape, non-planar configuration, and flow regime (laminar-turbulent) was investigated. In separate experiments using dye visualization and hot-wire anemometry, a transition to turbulent flow was observed at Reynolds numbers between 1000 and 1500. Transition had very little effect on the pressure-flow relation.

  7. Ceramic hot film sensor for exhaust gas mass flow measurements in automotive applications; Keramischer Heissfilmsensor zur Abgasmassenstrommessung in automotiven Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dismon, Heinrich; Grimm, Karsten; Toennesmann, Andres; Nigrin, Sven [Pierburg GmbH, Neuss (Germany); Wienand, Karlheinz; Muziol, Matthias [Heraeus Sensor Technology GmbH, Kleinostheim (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Due to increasingly stringent emission standards, a number of internal measures as well as exhaust gas aftertreatment systems have become state-of-the-art technology for passenger car and heavy duty engines. However, the full potential of these measures, for example the cooled external exhaust gas recirculation, can only be utilized if the engine control is adapted adequately well in all engine states. Thus, the requirements for future engine controls become more demanding and consequently the standards for sensors used in the control loop will increase. In this context this article introduces a new exhaust gas mass flow sensor based or the principle of hot film anemometry. The sensor comprising a ceramic sensor element is developed especially for the use in engine exhaust gases providing the exhaust gas mass flow as a direct measurement and control variable. Next to the sensor technology first results of engine tests are presented in this paper. (orig.)

  8. The effect of slot jet size on the confined transverse slot jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, K.A.; Moody, J.K.; Forliti, D.J. [State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The current study explored the flowfield characteristics of an induced recirculation zone resulting from a transverse slot jet issuing in a cross flow. The slot jet spanned 95% of the full channel spanwise dimension which resulted in a highly three-dimensional mean flowfield. Experimental investigations were carried out at various jet momentums for two different transverse slot jet thicknesses. Velocity field data were gathered using digital particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry. The momentum ratio of the jet to the channel was found to be the leading parameter for scaling the dimensions of the mean recirculation zone. The jet thickness demonstrated an influence on the level of three-dimensionality, turbulence levels, and integral length scales. (orig.)

  9. Influence of localized unsteady ejection on the scaling laws and intermittency in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H.; Huang, Q. M.; Liu, P. Q.; Feng, T.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of localized unsteady ejection by synthetic jet with slot-type exit on a turbulent boundary layer at zero pressure gradient conditions were investigated downstream of the slot using hot-wire anemometry. This work is to investigate the influence of unsteady disturbance on turbulent structures at small scales, i.e., in the isotropy recovery range (IRR) and the shear-dominated range (SDR). In the near-slot region, our results show that IRR is extended and SDR is shortened for the perturbed flow in the near-wall region, which contributes to the decrease in anisotropy and intermittency. For the perturbed flow, only one scaling behavior of the longitudinal structure functions similar to the classical Kolmogorov-like scaling is observed in IRR.

  10. Evaluation of travelling vortex speed by means of vortex tracking and dynamic mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the analysis of unsteady periodic flow field related to synthetic jet creation. The analyses are based on the data obtained using ANSYS Fluent solver. Numerical results are validated by hot wire anemometry data measured along the jet centerline. The speed of travelling vortex ring is evaluated by using vortex tracking method and by using dynamic mode decomposition method. Vortex identification is based on residual vorticity which allows identifying regions in the flow field where fluid particles perform the rotational motion. The regime of the synthetic jet with Re = 329 and S = 19.7 is chosen. Both the vortex tracking and the dynamic mode decomposition based vortex speed evaluation indicate an increase in the vortex speed close to the orifice and then decrease with maximum reaching almost one and half of orifice centerline velocity. The article contains extended version the article presented at the conference AEaNMiFMaE 2016.

  11. A study on the influence of triggering pipe flow regarding mean and higher order statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, F; Egbers, C [Department of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus (Germany); Zanoun, E-S [Mechanical Engineering Department, British University in Egypt (BUE), Al-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-12-22

    The evolution of statistical pipe flow quantities, such as the turbulence intensity, the skewness and the flatness, are investigated to clarify, hich development length is needed, until the state of fully developed turbulence is achieved. This observations take place in a relatively large pipe test facility with an inner pipe diameter of D{sub i} = 0.19 m and a total length of L = 27 m. The reached Reynolds number range is 1.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 5} {<=} Re{sub m} {<=} 8.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 5}. To quantify the mean and fluctuating velocity as well as the depending statistical quantities, the constant temperature hot-wire anemometry is applied. Through these intensive centerline measurements we observe a development length of L = 70 D, to ensure a fully developed turbulent flow state.

  12. [Noninvasive, continuous monitoring of artificial respiration in premature and newborn infants by the constant measurement of respiratory minute volume, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide release].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidig, E; Noller, F; Mentzel, H

    1986-01-01

    A system of instrumentation for the continuous measurement of the respiratory gases during assisted ventilation of neonates and premature infants based upon "breath-by-breath-method" is described. The four respiratory parameters flow (V), ventilation pressure (p), oxygen-concentration and carbon dioxide-concentration are measured. These datas are processed by a computer to generate a continuous display of the respiratory minute volume, the tidal volume, the breath rate, the oxygen consumption and the carbon dioxide production. All parameters are stored and can be displayed or plotted as trends. The flow-measurement is performed using hot-wire-anemometry. The very small flow sensor is adapted directly to the tube. Next to this sensor, the respiratory gas for the analysis of the O2- and CO2- concentration is suctioned off continuously. First clinical experience in mechanically ventilated newborns is characterized.

  13. Turbulent boundary-layer control with spanwise travelling waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalley, Richard D; Choi, Kwing-So, E-mail: Richard.Whalley@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Kwing-So.Choi@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-22

    It has been demonstrated through numerical simulations using Lorentz forcing that spanwise travelling waves on turbulent wall flows can lead to a skin-friction drag reduction on the order of 30%. As an aeronautical application of this innovative flow control technique, we have investigated into the use of Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to generate spanwise travelling waves in air. The near-wall structures modified by the spanwise travelling waves were studied using the PIV technique in a wind tunnel, while the associated turbulence statistics were carefully documented using hot-wire anemometry. We observed the spreading of low-speed fluid by the spanwise travelling streamwise vortices, which seems to have greatly attenuated the turbulence production process. This is very much in line with the finding of DNS studies, where wide low-speed ribbons replaced the low-speed streaks.

  14. Large-scale Flow Pulsation in Tight Square Arrayed Rod Bundles of Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hyung Hee [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chang Hwan; In, Wang Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As a major component of modern nuclear reactor, the nuclear fuel rod bundles with liquid coolant have been studied by a lot of researchers to understand the flow structure between the fuel rods. Recently, rod arrays with much small pitch-to-diameter ratio have been being tried to increase performance of the nuclear reactor. The liquid coolant flowing axially through these small spaces between the rods is known to show some peculiar phenomena including large-scale, quasi-periodic flow pulsation. These flow pulsation phenomena dominate mixing process in the subchannels. Thus, precise understating of the flow structure is essential to predict thermal-hydraulic phenomena in nuclear rod bundles. In this present paper, the turbulent flow in tight square arrayed rod bundles is investigated with Hot-wire anemometry. Then, the measured velocity data are analyzed by using Fast Fourier Transform analysis to find characteristic frequency of the pulsation

  15. Estimation of turbulent shear stress in free jets: application to valvular regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winoto, S H; Shah, D A; Liu, H

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to better assess the severity of valvular regurgitation, an in-vitro experiment has been conducted to estimate turbulent shear stress levels within free jets issuing from different orifice shapes and sizes by means of hot-wire anemometry. On the basis of the measured mean velocities and the jet profiles, the distributions of the normalized kinematic turbulent shear stress (uv/Um2) were estimated for different jets by using an equation available for self-preserving circular jet. The results indicate that the equation can estimate the distributions of uv/Um2 independent of the orifice shape and Reynolds number of the jet. For the range of Reynolds numbers considered, the estimation of maximum turbulent shear stress inferred from these distributions suggests that the critical shear stress level of approximately 200 N/m2, corresponding to destruction of blood cells, is exceeded for typical blood flow velocity of 5 m/s at the valvular lesion.

  16. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  17. Conditional sampling technique to test the applicability of the Taylor hypothesis for the large-scale coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of the distributions of large scale structures in turbulent flow with distributions based on time dependent signals from stationary probes and the Taylor hypothesis are presented. The study investigated an area in the near field of a 7.62 cm circular air jet at a Re of 32,000, specifically having coherent structures through small-amplitude controlled excitation and stable vortex pairing in the jet column mode. Hot-wire and X-wire anemometry were employed to establish phase averaged spatial distributions of longitudinal and lateral velocities, coherent Reynolds stress and vorticity, background turbulent intensities, streamlines and pseudo-stream functions. The Taylor hypothesis was used to calculate spatial distributions of the phase-averaged properties, with results indicating that the usage of the local time-average velocity or streamwise velocity produces large distortions.

  18. Effects of high free-flow turbulence, intensive cooling, and wake on the external heat transfer of a gas turbine blade with external heat transfer. Zum Einfluss hoher Freistromturbulenz, intensiver Kuehlung und einer Nachlaufstroemung auf den aeusseren Waermeuebergang einer konvektiv gekuehlten Gasturbinenschaufel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, A.V.

    1986-04-18

    The effects of free flow turbulence on the heat transfer characteristics of a gas turbine blade with convective cooling are investigated in hot-gas conditions, making a rigid distribution between isotropic turbulence and the free laminar turbulence of a wake flow. The influence of different Reynolds numbers of the grid flow and of different degrees of surface cooling is determined by means of heat transfer experiments with isotropic turbulence generated by quadratic grids. Experimental heat transfer data are compared with the results of a difference boundary layer calculation. The free flow turbulence is determined by laser doppler anemometry while the temperature field is calculated by a finite element method with experimentally determined boundary conditions. Another factor investigated was the effect of a wake on the heat transfer along the blade surface. A turbulent wake was simulated and discussed. (HAG).

  19. Experimental investigation of the fluid dynamic efficiency of a high performance multi-valve internal combustion engine during the intake phase: Influence of valve-valve interference phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algieri Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is the analysis of the fluid dynamic behavior of a high performance internal combustion engine during the intake phase. In particular, a four-valve spark-ignition engine has been characterized at the steady flow rig. Dimensionless discharge coefficients have been used to define the global fluid dynamic efficiency of the intake system, while the Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA technique has been employed to evaluate the mean flow in the valve curtain area and to characterise the interference phenomena between the two intake valves. The investigation has shown the significant influence of the valve lift on the volumetric efficiency of the intake apparatus. Moreover, the experimental analysis has highlighted that the valve-valve interference phenomena have a relevant impact on the head breathability, on the flow development within the combustion chamber and on the velocity standard deviations.

  20. Prediction of flow in mix-proof valve by use of CFD - Validation by LDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    was done on a spherical shaped mix-proof valve (MPV). Flow were predicted by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and validated by data obtained from experiments using laser sheet visualization and laser Doppler anemometry. Correction of the measured velocities and probe location was required as refraction...... of laser beams through the curved surfaces of the valve house changes both intersection angle and intersection location. CFD simulations were performed by use of both the standard wall function and the two-layer model of Norris and Reynolds for near-wall description. The importance of resolving the near......-wall region is shown. Fully 3D flow patterns were identified and valuable information was obtained for further investigations concerning prediction of cleanability in the MPV based on knowledge of the hydrodynamics herein....

  1. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  2. Full-Volume, Three-Dimensional, Transient Measurements of Bubbly Flows Using Particle Tracking Velocimetry and Shadow Image Velocimetry Coupled with Pattern Recognition Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassin Hassan

    2001-11-30

    Develop a state-of-the-art non-intrusive diagnostic tool to perform simultaneous measurements of both the temporal and three-dimensional spatial velocity of the two phases of a bubbly flow. These measurements are required to provide a foundation for studying the constitutive closure relations needed in computational fluid dynamics and best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes employed in nuclear reactor safety analysis and severe accident simulation. Such kinds of full-field measurements are not achievable through the commonly used point-measurement techniques, such as hot wire, conductance probe, laser Doppler anemometry, etc. The results can also be used in several other applications, such as the dynamic transport of pollutants in water or studies of the dispersion of hazardous waste.

  3. A regular Strouhal number for large-scale instability in the far wake of a rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Naumov, Igor V.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    The flow behind a model of a wind turbine rotor is investigated experimentally in a water flume using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). The study performed involves a three-bladed wind turbine rotor designed using the optimization technique of Glauert (Aerodynam...... visualizations and a reconstruction of the flow field using LDA and PIV measurements it is found that the wake dynamics is associated with a precession (rotation) of the helical vortex core....... Theory, vol. IV, 1935, pp. 169–360). The wake properties are studied for different tip speed ratios and free stream speeds. The data for the various rotor regimes show the existence of a regular Strouhal number associated with the development of an instability in the far wake of the rotor. From...

  4. ACCUWIND - Accurate wind speed measurements in wind energy - Summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Pedersen, Troels; Dahlberg, J.-Å.; Cuerva, A.;

    2006-01-01

    been used by meteorologists for turbulencemeasurements, but have also found a role on wind turbine nacelles for wind speed and yaw control purposes. The report on cup and sonic anemometry deals with establishment of robustness in assessment and classification by focus on methods and proceduresfor......The cup anemometer is at present the standard instrument used for mean wind speed measurement in wind energy. It is being applied in high numbers around the world for wind energy assessments. It is also applied exclusively for accredited power performancemeasurements for certification...... and CLASSCUP from which the proposed classification method for cup anemometers was developed for the IEC standard. While cup anemometers at present are the standardanemometer being used for average wind speed measurements, sonic anemometers have been developed significantly over the last years, and prices have...

  5. Shock Wave Observation in Narrow Tubes for a Parametric Study on Micro Wave Rotor Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji Okamoto; Mikiya Araki

    2008-01-01

    Wave rotor is expected to improve the performance of micro gas turbines drastically. In the wave rotor design, the rotor speed is determined principally by the tube length. Therefore, a longer tube is preferable for miniaturized wave rotors to avoid the difficulty in bearings and lubrication system, while it may yield thicker wall boundary layer, shock wave dissipation and so on. In the present study, an experimental apparatus was built to visualize the wave rotor internal flow dynamics in a narrow tube by schlieren method and Laser Doppler Anemometry. In addition, different lengths of the tube were adopted and compared to investigate the effect of wall friction. Finally, 2D numerical simulation was performed and the results were compared with those of experiments.

  6. Measurement of Turbulence Modulation by Non-Spherical Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    The change in the turbulence intensity of an air jet resulting from the addition of particles to the flow is measured using Laser Doppler Anemometry. Three distinct shapes are considered: the prolate spheroid, the disk and the sphere. Measurements of the carrier phase and particle phase velocities...... at the centerline of the jet are carried out for mass loadings of 0.5, 1, 1.6 and particle sizes 880μm, 1350μm, 1820μm for spherical particles. For each non-spherical shape only a single size and loading are considered. The turbulence modulation of the carrier phase is found to highly dependent on the turbulence...

  7. Laser Doppler Imaging of Microflow

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Michel; Leng, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    We report a pilot study with a wide-field laser Doppler detection scheme used to perform laser Doppler anemometry and imaging of particle seeded microflow. The optical field carrying the local scatterers (particles) dynamic state, as a consequence of momentum transfer at each scattering event, is analyzed in the temporal frequencies domain. The setup is based on heterodyne digital holography, which is used to map the scattered field in the object plane at a tunable frequency with a multipixel detector. We show that wide-field heterodyne laser Doppler imaging can be used for quantitative microflow diagnosis; in the presented study, maps of the first-order moment of the Doppler frequency shift are used as a quantitative and directional estimator of the Doppler signature of particles velocity.

  8. Temperature, Pressure and Velocity measurements on the Ranque-Hilsch Vortex Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michałek, W. R.

    2012-11-01

    Temperatures, pressures and velocities were measured in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube. Results show that the cooling power is larger than the heating power due to a heat loss to the surroundings. This heat loss became the more dominant thermodynamic process at large cold fractions (the ratio of cold mass flow over total mass flow). The velocities were obtained by means of Laser Doppler Anemometry. By this method, the three dimensional velocities of the gas and their standard deviations in the vortex tube are revealed by an non-intrusive measurement method. The turbulent fluctuations, characterized by the standard deviations, show that the turbulence is isotropic in the core region of the vortex tube.

  9. Experimental investigation of late time Rayleigh-Taylor mixing at high Atwood number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchandra, Prasoon; Mikhaeil, Mark; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of late time, high Reynolds number (Re >20000) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing is studied using statistically steady experiments performed in a multi-layer gas tunnel. The density ratio of air and air-Helium mixture used in the present experiment results in an Atwood number 0.73. Three types of diagnostics - back-lit visualization, hot-wire anemometry and stereo particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) - are employed to obtain mixing width, velocity and density fields, with S-PIV employed for the first time for such experimental conditions. Velocity and density statistics, and their correlations (u', v', w',ρ' ,ρ'v') are presented. Calculations of probability density functions (p.d.f.s) and energy spectra are made to provide further insight into the flow physics. Energy budget of the flow is also discussed.

  10. Measurement and calculations of laminar flow in a ninety degree bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D; Moravec, S; Rastogi, A K; Vlachos, N S

    1982-01-01

    Measurements and numericaL calculations of laminar flow in a plane 90 degrees bifurcation are presented. The corresponding two-dimensional steady flow Navier-Stokes equations solved by a finite-difference procedure employing pressure and velocity as dependent variables. The influence of Reynolds number and mass flow ratio on the velocity field, streamlines, local shear stress and pressure drop are quantified and shown to be substantial. The circulation patterns and shear stresses are examined in view of available data regarding the formation of atherotic plaques in the human circulatory system. The calculated velocity profiles are compared with measurements obtained with laser Doppler anemometry and the agreement is shown to be satisfactory. Calculations outside the range of measurements which are of value to biomechanics are also presented.

  11. The influence of spill-line geometry on a spray generated by a pressure-swirl atomizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malý Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of characteristics of spray generated by a pressure-swirl atomizer (spill-return type was performed using shadowgraphy and Phase-Doppler Anemometry (PDA. Several different geometries of the spill-return orifice were tested in terms of a spray stability and quality on a cold test bench. PDA measurement yields a drop-size distribution and velocity data while the shadowgraphy unveils a break-up process in detail. Performed measurements reveal significant differences in spray characteristics as well as differences in spray stability. The results suggest that the air core, formed inside the swirl chamber, passes through the spill orifice, which causes instability of the inner flow. These instabilities lead to a chaotic state of sheet breakup resulting in shortening of breakup distance. Obtained findings are used to propose possible changes in the atomizer design for improvement of its performance.

  12. High-Resolution Digital Two-Color PIV for Turbomachinery Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, W.; Gogineni, S.; Goss, L.

    1996-11-01

    Turbomachinery flows are inherently unsteady. However, steady design methods are currently used to develop turbomachinery, with the lack of basic understanding of unsteady effects being compensated by use of extensive empirical correlations. Conventional laser anemometry provides quantitative evidence of unsteady effects in turbomachinery but is limited in fully exploring this phenomenon. The PIV technique holds great promise for elucidating unsteady flow mechanisms in turbomachinery if obstacles to its application in a transonic turbomachine can be overcome. Implementation involves critical issues such as tracer seeding and optical access for transmitter and receiver. Initially, an 18-in.-dia. axial fan is used to explore these issues. One optical configuration considered is the fiber-optic fanning light sheet in conjunction with high-power pulsed lasers. Instantaneous velocity measurements are made between blades at different spanwise locations.

  13. LES of turbulent jet in cross-flow: Part 1 – A numerical validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of a LES based numerical simulation of the turbulent jet-in-cross-flow (JICF) flowfield, with Reynolds number based on cross-flow velocity and jet diameter Re=2400 and jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio of R=3.3. The JICF flow case has been investigated in great detail......, involving conduction of two independent precursor simulations, prior to the main JICF simulation, as the considered case has turbulent inflow conditions on both jet and cross-stream side. The LES results are directly compared to pointwise Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) measurements, showing a very good...... agreement on the level of various statistical quantities in all flow regions but the immediate jet-to-cross-flow exhaustion zone. Several LES computations involving grids of up to 15million grid points have been conducted, showing no improvement in the agreement between numerical results and measurements...

  14. LES of turbulent jet in cross flow: Part 2 – POD analysis and identification of coherent structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) investigation of the LES based numerical simulation of the jet-in-crossflow (JICF) flowfield with Reynolds number based on the cross flow velocity and jet diameter Re=2400 and the velocity ratio of R=3.3. LES results...... are validated against pointwise time averaged Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) measurements in PART1 of this study. In PART2 of the presented study – a planar (2D) LES based snapshot POD analysis is first conducted on two mutually perpendicular planes located in the jet-to-crossflow entrance zone. The obtained...... between the counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP), the hanging vortex and the wake vortices. POD reconstruction shows that the CVP originates from the hanging vortex formed at the lateral sides of the jet. It also shows that the shedding process involving oscillation of the jet core is responsible...

  15. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Shallcross

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from cyclic perfluorocarbon tracer experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study dispersion over a large vertical gradient. These gradients are then compared with classical Gaussian profiles of the relevant stability classes over a range of distances as well as interpretation of data with reference to both anemometry and LIDAR measurements made. Data are then compared with an operational model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign looking at dosage compared with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analysis illustrates the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  16. Forced convective heat transfer in curved diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, J.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity characteristics of the flows in two curved diffusers of rectangular cross section with C and S-shaped centerlines are presented and related to measurements of wall heat transfer coefficients along the heated flat walls of the ducts. The velocity results were obtained by laser-Doppler anemometry in a water tunnel and the heat transfer results by liquid crystal thermography in a wind tunnel. The thermographic technique allowed the rapid and inexpensive measurement of wall heat transfer coefficients along flat walls of arbitrary boundary shapes with an accuracy of about 5 percent. The results show that an increase in secondary flow velocities near the heated wall causes an increase in the local wall heat transfer coefficient, and quantify the variation for maximum secondary-flow velocities in a range from 1.5 to 17 percent of the bulk flow velocity.

  17. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  18. Unsteady velocity measurements in a realistic intracranial aneurysm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugron, Ádám; Farinas, Marie-Isabelle; Kiss, László; Paál, György

    2012-01-01

    The initiation, growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms are intensively studied by computational fluid dynamics. To gain confidence in the results of numerical simulations, validation of the results is necessary. To this end the unsteady flow was measured in a silicone phantom of a realistic intracranial aneurysm. A flow circuit was built with a novel unsteady flow rate generating method, used to model the idealised shape of the heartbeat. This allowed the measurement of the complex three-dimensional velocity distribution by means of laser-optical methods such as laser doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements, available with high temporal and spatial distribution, were found to have good agreement with the control LDA measurements. Furthermore, excellent agreement was found with the numerical results.

  19. Phase-locked stereoscopic PIV measurements of the turbulent swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    turbulence models. In the present work, the flow in a dynamic scale model of a uniflow-scavenged cylinder is investigated experimentally. The model has a transparent cylinder and a movable piston driven by a linear motor. The flow is investigated using phase-locked stereoscopic particle image velocimetry......It is desirable to use computational fluid dynamics for the optimization of in-cylinder processes in large two-stroke low-speed uniflowscavenged marine diesel engines. However, the complex nature of the turbulent swirling in-cylinder flow necessitates experimental data for validation of the used...... (PIV) and time resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Radial profiles of the phase-averaged mean velocities are computed from the velocity fields recorded with PIV and the validity of the obtained profiles is demonstrated by comparison with reference LDA measurements. Radial profiles are measured...

  20. Passive Control of Turbulent Jet Flow with Wedged Nozzle%加齿被动控制自由湍射流多尺度涡结构的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘欣; 姜楠

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent flow field of the free jet with circular nozzle and wedged nozzles is measured using hot wire anemometry with resolution higher than the smallest turbulence time scale. Wavelet analysis is employed to perform multi-scale decomposition of instantaneous turbulence fluctuating velocity signals, and the energy distribution of the turbulent multi-scale eddy structures over scales is studied using wavelet coefficients. Investigation of the multi-scale eddy structures of circular jet and various wedged jets reveals the transport of the energy of these wedged jets in the space from the axis to the side of the jet, as compared with the circular jet. Furthermore, not only the eddy structures at the wedge tines in the near field are crashed, but also the interactions such as eddy structure union and entrainment take place at different longitudinal and normal locations along with the development of the jets because of the existence of wedges.

  1. Modification of premixed combustion in shear layers by grid turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Kejin; WANG Yue; ZHANG Zhedian; NIE Chaoqun

    2007-01-01

    The influence of grid turbulence on the shear layer of a jet and the premixed flames embedded in it was investigated in the present study. The velocity field of the jet was measured by using hot-wire anemometry. It was found that grid turbulence reduced turbulence intensities in the shear layer and suppressed low frcquency fluctuation. Moreover, the energy contained in small-scale fluctuation was increased and turbulence became homogeneous. The results indicate that grid turbulence inhibits the formation of a large-scale coherent structure in the shear layer. Flame temperature was measured by using a compensated free-wire thermocouple. It was found that grid turbulence reduced low frequency fluctuation of thc flame fronts, increased the small-scale wrinkles and elevated the mean temperature of the flame zone. The results show that grid turbulence can enhance and stabilize premixed flames in shear flow.

  2. Experimental Studies on Turbulence Kinetic Energy in Confined Vortex Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Yan; G.H.Vatistas; 等

    2000-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energies in confined vortex flows have been studied.The studies were based on the experiments performed in a vortex chamber,In the experiments,a Laser Doppler Anemometry(LDA) was used to perform flow measurements inside the vortex chamber,which provided the data for the kinetic energy analysis.The studies concentrated on the influences of the contraction ratio and the inlet air flow rate on the kinetic energy,and analyzed the characteristics of the kinetic energy in the confined vortex flows,including the distributions of the tangential component,radial component and total turbulence kinetic energy,In the paper,both the experimental techniques and the experimental results were presented.Based on a similarity analyis and the experimental data,an empirical scaling formula was proposed so that the tangential component of the turbulence kinetic energy was dependent only on the parameter of the contraction ratio.

  3. Wind turbine performance: Methods and criteria for reliability of measured power curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D.A. [Advanced Wind Turbines Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In order to evaluate the performance of prototype turbines, and to quantify incremental changes in performance through field testing, Advanced Wind Turbines (AWT) has been developing methods and requirements for power curve measurement. In this paper, field test data is used to illustrate several issues and trends which have resulted from this work. Averaging and binning processes, data hours per wind-speed bin, wind turbulence levels, and anemometry methods are all shown to have significant impacts on the resulting power curves. Criteria are given by which the AWT power curves show a high degree of repeatability, and these criteria are compared and contrasted with current published standards for power curve measurement. 6 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. European wind turbine testing procedure developments. Task 1: Measurement method to verify wind turbine performance characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, R.; Friis Pedersen, T.; Dunbabin, P.; Antoniou, I.; Frandsen, S.; Klug, H.; Albers, A.; Lee, W.K.

    2001-01-01

    There is currently significant standardisation work ongoing in the context of wind farm energy yield warranty assessment and wind turbine power performance testing. A standards maintenance team is revising the current IEC (EN) 61400-12 Ed 1 standard for wind turbine power performance testing. The standard is being divided into four documents. Two of them are drafted for evaluation and verification of complete wind farms and of individual wind turbines within wind farms. This document, and the project it describes, has been designed to help provide a solid technical foundation for this revised standard. The work was wide ranging and addressed 'grey' areas of knowledge, regarding existing methodologies or to carry out basic research in support of fundamentally new procedures. The work has given rise to recommendations in all areas of the work, including site calibration procedures, nacelle anemometry, multi-variate regression analysis and density normalisation. (au)

  5. Contaminant dispersal in bounded turbulent shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.M.; Bernard, P.S.; Chiang, K.F.; Ong, L. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The dispersion of smoke downstream of a line source at the wall and at y{sup +} = 30 in a turbulent boundary layer has been predicted with a non-local model of the scalar fluxes {bar u}c and {bar v}c. The predicted plume from the wall source has been compared to high Schmidt number experimental measurements using a combination of hot-wire anemometry to obtain velocity component data synchronously with concentration data obtained optically. The predicted plumes from the source at y{sup +} = 30 and at the wall also have been compared to a low Schmidt number direct numerical simulation. Near the source, the non-local flux models give considerably better predictions than models which account solely for mean gradient transport. At a sufficient distance downstream the gradient models gives reasonably good predictions.

  6. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanic research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  7. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanics research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  8. Fluid Dynamics Prize Otto Laporte Lecture:Turbulence and Aeroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte-Bellot, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    Some significant advances obtained over the years for two closely related fields, Turbulence and Aeroacoustics, are presented. Particular focus is placed on experimental results and on physical mechanisms. For example, for a 2D channel flow, skewness factors of velocity fluctuations are discussed. The study of isotropic turbulence generated by grids in the «Velvet wind tunnel» of Stanley Corrsin, constitutes a masterpiece. Of particular note are the Eulerian memory times, analysed for all wavenumbers. Concerning hot-wire anemometry, the potential of the new constant voltage technique is presented. Some results obtained with Particule Image Velocimetry are also reported. Two flow control examples are illustrated: lift generation for a circular cylinder, and noise reduction for a high speed jet. Finally, the propagation of acoustic waves through turbulence is considered. Experimental data are here completed by numerical simulations showing the possible occurrence of caustics.

  9. Refined Turbulence Modeling for Swirl Velocity in Turbomachinery Seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhyo Kim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized new form of the rotation-sensitive source term coefficient previously proposed by Bardina and colleagues as an extension of the standard k-ε turbulence model was developed. The proposal made by Bardina and colleagues focused on rotating flows without significant turbulence generation, and the result was a negative-valued constant coefficient. The new functional form developed here for the coefficient has global as well as local dependence. The new model predictions of laser Doppler anemometry measurements of swirling flows in labyrinth seals were compared with the swirl distribution measurements and with the standard k-ε model (i.e., no rotation source term predictions. It was found that for the labyrinth seal cases for which detailed measurements are available, the standard k-ε model gives unsatisfactory predictions, whereas the new model gives significantly improved predictions.

  10. The fluid mechanics of a sac-type ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C; Jin, W; Glaser, A

    1990-12-01

    Flow visualisation and velocity measurement studies have been carried out on the liquid side of a sac-type VAD. The objectives have been to identify both good (e.g. short residence times) and bad (e.g. high turbulence levels) flow characteristics. The flow was visualised using polystyrene micro-spheres illuminated with white light on selected transverse planes across the pumping chamber and its inlet and outlet connections. These results then served as a guide for velocity measurements using laser-Doppler anemometry. Flow tests were run using water or a water/glycerol mixture. Operating conditions were determined from the appropriate fluid mechanics modelling laws to ensure dynamical similarity. Initially, steady flow behaviour was investigated including the effects of removal and insertion of the tilting-disc inlet and outlet valves. In subsequent full pumping tests, using a pneumatic driver, regions of high shear, separation, and high turbulence intensity have been identified.

  11. Recommendations for European solar collector test methods (Liquid heating collectors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, A.; Gillett, W. B.

    Standardized testing formats, equipment, conditions, and tests defined as part of the solar flat plate collector testing program performed by the Commission of the European Communities are detailed. The work is a product of efforts at 20 laboratories, and alternative methods have been characterized for tailoring tests to particular locations and climatic conditions. The testing methods are intended for collectors using a liquid as the heat transfer medium. Procedures have been defined for examining steady state and transient performance, heat loss, thermal capacity, pressure drop, and anemometry. Instrumentation types and accuracies have been defined, and a standardized format for presentation of results has been developed. The tests are tailored for determining the durability of the flat plate systems under simulated solar radiation conditions.

  12. An experimental investigation of the interaction between a Karman vortex street and a premixed laminar flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namer, I.

    1980-12-01

    The interaction of a premixed C2H4-air flame with a Karman vortex street was studied. Laser Doppler anemometry was used for velocity measurements and Rayleigh scattering was used to measure total gas density. A reference hot wire was used to enable phase-locked ensemble averaging to be performed on the data. The velocity measurements for vortex shedding cylinder Reynolds numbers indicated that the vortex street and, hence, the flow field upstream of the flame is deflected by the flame. This is due to the pressure drop across the flame which is necessary to accelerate the flow behind the flame. The vortices were not observed behind the flame. The combination of dilation and increased dissipation consumed the vortices. Density statistics obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements were compared with predictions by the Bray-Moss-Libby (B-M-L) model which neglects intermediate states. Density fluctuations were overpredicted by the B-M-L model by a small amount.

  13. Deconvolution as a means of correcting turbulence power spectra measured by LDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of turbulence power spectra by means of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) has proven to be a difficult task. Among the problems affecting the shape of the spectrum are noise in the signal and changes in the sample rate caused by unintentional effects in the measuring apparatus or even in the mathematical algorithms used to evaluate the spectrum. We analyze the effect of various causes of bias in the sample rate and show that the effect is a convolution of the true spectrum with various spectral functions. We show that these spectral functions can be measured with the available data from a standard LDA processor and we use this knowledge to correct the measured spectrum by deconvolution. We present results supported by realistic computer generated data using two different spectral estimators, the so-called slotted autocovariance method and the so-called direct method.

  14. Determination of the stagnation point in pulverized coal swirl flames by detailed analysis of laser velocity measurements; Staupunktbestimmung in Kohlenstaub-Drallflammen mittels detaillierter Analyse von LDA-Daten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohliger, A.; Stadler, H.; Foerster, M.; Kneer, R. [RWTH Aachen University (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Waerme- und Stoffuebertragung

    2009-07-01

    When Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) is used for experimental investigation of flow fields in pulverised coal flames, the measured coal particle velocities are usually averaged in order to determine the gas velocity. This paper shows that this approach can lead to a misinterpretation of the data. In the burner vicinity of the investigated flame, where high accelerations in the gas phase occur, a discrepancy appears between the measured velocity distribution and the expected normal distribution. Thus, a detailed analysis of the measured particle data is conducted and compared to conventional averaging. The difference can be attributed to large particles from the inner recirculation zone of the flame, which do not follow the gas flow properly. (orig.)

  15. Autonomous spatially adaptive sampling in experiments based on curvature, statistical error and sample spacing with applications in LDA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Raf; Kadosh, Jesse S.; Allen, Christian B.

    2015-06-01

    Spatially varying signals are typically sampled by collecting uniformly spaced samples irrespective of the signal content. For signals with inhomogeneous information content, this leads to unnecessarily dense sampling in regions of low interest or insufficient sample density at important features, or both. A new adaptive sampling technique is presented directing sample collection in proportion to local information content, capturing adequately the short-period features while sparsely sampling less dynamic regions. The proposed method incorporates a data-adapted sampling strategy on the basis of signal curvature, sample space-filling, variable experimental uncertainty and iterative improvement. Numerical assessment has indicated a reduction in the number of samples required to achieve a predefined uncertainty level overall while improving local accuracy for important features. The potential of the proposed method has been further demonstrated on the basis of Laser Doppler Anemometry experiments examining the wake behind a NACA0012 airfoil and the boundary layer characterisation of a flat plate.

  16. An improved sample-and-hold reconstruction procedure for estimation of power spectra from LDA data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Laurent [Laboratoire d' Acoustique de l' Universite du Maine, UMR-CNRS 6613, Avenue Messiaen, 72085, Le Mans (France); Fitzpatrick, John [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2004-08-01

    Techniques for deriving the auto or power spectrum (PSD) of turbulence from laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements are reviewed briefly. The low pass filter and step noise errors associated with the sample-and-hold process are considered and a discrete version of the low pass filter for the resampled signal is derived. This is then used to develop a procedure by which the PSD estimates obtained from sample and hold measurements can be corrected. The application of the procedures is examined using simulated data and the results show that the frequency range of the analysis can be extended beyond the Nyquist frequency based on the mean sample rate. The results are shown to be comparable to those obtained using the method of Nobach et al. (1998) but the new procedures are more straightforward to implement. The technique is then used to determine the PSD of real LDA data and the results are compared with those from a hot wire anemometer. (orig.)

  17. Micro analysis of fringe field formed inside LDA measuring volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we propose a technique for micro analysis of fringe field formed inside laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measuring volume. Detailed knowledge of the fringe field obtained by this technique allows beam quality, alignment and fringe uniformity to be evaluated with greater precision and may be helpful for selection of an appropriate optical element for LDA system operation. A complete characterization of fringes formed at the measurement volume using conventional, as well as holographic optical elements, is presented. Results indicate the qualitative, as well as quantitative, improvement of fringes formed at the measurement volume by holographic optical elements. Hence, use of holographic optical elements in LDA systems may be advantageous for improving accuracy in the measurement.

  18. Wind speed and direction measurements using the sphere anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Hoelling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2009-11-01

    In times of growing energy demand, the importance of wind energy is rapidly increasing and so is the need for accurate wind speed and direction measurements. The widely spread cup anemometers show significant over-speeding under turbulent wind conditions as inherent in atmospherical flows while being solely capable of detecting the wind speed. Therefore, we propose the newly developed sphere anemometer as a simple an robust sensor for direction and velocity measurements. The sphere anemometer exploits the velocity-dependent deflection of a tube, which is the order of μm and can be detected by means of a light pointer as used in atomic force microscopes. In comparative measurements under laboratory conditions the sphere anemometer showed a significantly higher temporal resolution then cup anemometers while it does not exhibit any over-speeding. Additionally, results of atmospherical wind measurements with the sphere anemometer and state-of-the-art cup anemometry are presented.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of cream incorporated with silver nanoparticles biosynthesized from Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marslin, Gregory; Selvakesavan, Rajendran K; Franklin, Gregory; Sarmento, Bruno; Dias, Alberto C P

    2015-01-01

    We report on the antimicrobial activity of a cream formulation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), biosynthesized using Withania somnifera extract. Aqueous extracts of leaves promoted efficient green synthesis of AgNPs compared to fruits and root extracts of W. somnifera. Biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized for their size and shape by physical-chemical techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After confirming the antimicrobial potential of AgNPs, they were incorporated into a cream. Cream formulations of AgNPs and AgNO3 were prepared and compared for their antimicrobial activity against human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans) and a plant pathogen (Agrobacterium tumefaciens). Our results show that AgNP creams possess significantly higher antimicrobial activity against the tested organisms.

  20. Turbulence characteristics in grassland canopies and implications for tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In-canopy turbulence is a required input to study pollutant cycling and chemistry within plant canopies and to link concentrations and sources. Despite the importance of grasslands worldwide, most previous work has focused on forests and crops. Here, turbulence parameters in a mature agricultural grassland canopy were measured with a combination of a small ultrasonic anemometer, hotwire anemometry and a radon (Rn tracer technique, as part of a measurement to study ammonia (NH3 exchange with grassland. The measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of basic turbulent parameters, for quadrant-hole analysis of the two-parametric frequency distributions of u'−w' and to derive in-canopy eddy diffusivities as input for models of in-canopy tracer transport. The results are in line with previous measurements on taller canopies, but shows increased decoupling between in-canopy flow and above-canopy turbulence. The comparison of sonic anemometry and Rn measurements implies that Lagrangian time-scales must decrease sharply at the ground, with important implications for estimating the magnitude of ground-level and soil emissions from concentration measurements. Atmospheric stability above and within the canopy has little influence on the standard deviation of vertical wind component inside the canopy. Use of the turbulence parameters in an analytical Lagrangian framework, which is here validated for heat transfer, suggests that measured in-canopy profiles of NH3 are consistent with a ground-level source, presumably from senescent plant parts, which is recaptured by the overlying canopy.

  1. Turbulence characteristics in grassland canopies and implications for tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In-canopy turbulence is a required input to study pollutant cycling and chemistry within plant canopies and to link concentrations and sources. Despite the importance of grasslands worldwide, most previous work has focused on forests and crops. Here, turbulence parameters in a mature agricultural grassland canopy were measured with a combination of a small ultrasonic anemometer, hotwire anemometry and a radon (Rn tracer technique, as part of a measurement to study ammonia (NH3 exchange with grassland. The measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of basic turbulent parameters, for quadrant-hole analysis of the two-parametric frequency distributions of u'−w' and to derive in-canopy eddy diffusivities as input for models of in-canopy tracer transport. The results are in line with previous measurements on taller canopies, but shows increased decoupling between in-canopy flow and above-canopy turbulence. The comparison of sonic anemometry and Rn measurements implies that Lagrangian time-scales must decrease sharply at the ground, with important implications for estimating the magnitude of ground-level and soil emissions from concentration measurements. Atmospheric stability above and within the canopy has little influence on the standard deviation of vertical wind component inside the canopy. Use of the turbulence parameters in an analytical Lagrangian framework, which is here validated for heat transfer, suggests that measured in-canopy profiles of NH3 are consistent with a ground-level source, presumably from senescent plant parts, which is recaptured by the overlying canopy.

  2. Characterization of Unsteady Flow Structures Around Tandem Cylinders for Component Interaction Studies in Airframe Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2005-01-01

    A joint computational and experimental study has been performed at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate the unsteady flow generated by the components of an aircraft landing gear system. Because the flow field surrounding a full landing gear is so complex, the study was conducted on a simplified geometry consisting of two cylinders in tandem arrangement to isolate and characterize the pertinent flow phenomena. This paper focuses on the experimental effort where surface pressures, 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry, and hot-wire anemometry were used to document the flow interaction around the two cylinders at a Reynolds Number of 1.66 x 10(exp 5), based on cylinder diameter, and cylinder spacing-todiameter ratios, L/D, of 1.435 and 3.70. Transition strips were applied to the forward cylinder to produce a turbulent boundary layer upstream of the flow separation. For these flow conditions and L/D ratios, surface pressures on both the forward and rear cylinders show the effects of L/D on flow symmetry, base pressure, and the location of flow separation and attachment. Mean velocities and instantaneous vorticity obtained from the PIV data are used to examine the flow structure between and aft of the cylinders. Shedding frequencies and spectra obtained using hot-wire anemometry are presented. These results are compared with unsteady, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations for the same configuration in a companion paper by Khorrami, Choudhari, Jenkins, and McGinley (2005). The experimental dataset produced in this study provides information to better understand the mechanisms associated with component interaction noise, develop and validate time-accurate computer methods used to calculate the unsteady flow field, and assist in modeling of the radiated noise from landing gears.

  3. Development of a new wire probe Dedicated to velocity and temperature measurement In mixed convection gas flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Paul Moro; Eric Hervieu [CEA/Grenoble - DER/SSTH/LIEX - 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The aim of the COPPEC experimental program, performed at Atomic Energy Commission (CEA-Grenoble), is to build a reliable data base for improving and assessing single-phase Large Eddy Simulation thermal-hydraulic codes, in the field of turbulent flows with buoyancy forces. Experiments are carried out in an upward turbulent air flow established between vertical parallel plates maintained at different wall temperatures. The investigation concentrates on mixed convection flows, with Reynolds number ranging from 10{sup 3} to 6.10{sup 4} and Richardson number ranging from 10{sup -4} to 1. Hot wire anemometry and cold wire thermometry are used to measure respectively local velocity and temperature. Moreover, since both hot and cold wires are implemented on the same probe, Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux can also be quantified. High bandwidth anemometry and thermometry require wires with a diameter of 1,2 {mu}m. Measurements of average and fluctuating flow quantities are performed in the vicinity of the heated wall, as close as 10 {mu}m corresponding to y{sup +} {approx} 0,1. At such a distance from the heated wall, the temperature gradient can reach 104 deg. C/m which, combined with the high temperature level, induces unwanted effects such as heat conduction in the prongs and thermoelectric effects at the junctions, leading to strong measurement bias. As a consequence, an original probe has been specifically developed, with insulating ceramic prongs and metallic coating. Moreover, because of very low velocities in the test section ({<=} 2 m/s), a particular calibration procedure had to be implemented, on a dedicated wind tunnel. At this moment, this new type of probe has been validated and we should obtain convincing results for measuring turbulence characteristics. (authors)

  4. High-resolution hot-film measurement of surface heat flux to an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, T. S.; Persoons, T.; Murray, D. B.

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the complex coupling between surface heat transfer and local fluid velocity in convective heat transfer, advanced techniques are required to measure the surface heat flux at high spatial and temporal resolution. Several established flow velocity techniques such as laser Doppler anemometry, particle image velocimetry and hot wire anemometry can measure fluid velocities at high spatial resolution (µm) and have a high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) characteristic. Equivalent advanced surface heat transfer measurement techniques, however, are not available; even the latest advances in high speed thermal imaging do not offer equivalent data capture rates. The current research presents a method of measuring point surface heat flux with a hot film that is flush mounted on a heated flat surface. The film works in conjunction with a constant temperature anemometer which has a bandwidth of 100 kHz. The bandwidth of this technique therefore is likely to be in excess of more established surface heat flux measurement techniques. Although the frequency response of the sensor is not reported here, it is expected to be significantly less than 100 kHz due to its physical size and capacitance. To demonstrate the efficacy of the technique, a cooling impinging air jet is directed at the heated surface, and the power required to maintain the hot-film temperature is related to the local heat flux to the fluid air flow. The technique is validated experimentally using a more established surface heat flux measurement technique. The thermal performance of the sensor is also investigated numerically. It has been shown that, with some limitations, the measurement technique accurately measures the surface heat transfer to an impinging air jet with improved spatial resolution for a wide range of experimental parameters.

  5. Hydraulic testing of helium cooled irradiation rigs of the IFMIF High Flux Test Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Christine, E-mail: Christine.Klein@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, INR, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Arbeiter, Frederik; Jackowski, Thomas; Martin, Thomas; Schlindwein, Georg [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, INR, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uniform perfusion of the multiple parallel minichannels of the rig model B by helium gas, which is of importance to obtain uniform and predictable temperatures, could be verified by measuring the mean velocity profiles of the rectangular jets are measured using hot-wire anemometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pressure drop in the test section with rig model B was measured and delivers data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach for application in the IFMIF High Flux Test Module. The pressure drop depends significantly on the pressure level; acceleration resulting from the volumetric expansion of helium gas has to be modeled carefully in simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements with strain gage show the pressure depending deformation of the compartment container without the rig. The results agree well with simulations and approximation calculations. - Abstract: The hydraulic testing of a single 1:1 irradiation rig inside a mock-up container is part of the validation activities which support the engineering design of the High Flux Test Module. Uniform perfusion of the multiple parallel minichannels of the irradiation rigs by helium gas is of importance to obtain uniform and predictable temperatures. To evaluate the uniform distribution to the different parallel minichannels, the mean velocity profiles of the rectangular jets are measured using hot-wire anemometry. The velocity profiles show a symmetric and constant distribution of the mass flow to the parallel minichannels. The pressure drop in the test section with one of the candidate rig shapes is measured. The pressure drop depends significantly on the entrance pressure level; acceleration resulting from the volumetric expansion of helium gas has to be taken into account in simulations. Measurements with strain gage show the pressure depending deformation of the compartment container without the rig. The results agree

  6. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  7. Time Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is the newest and most exciting tool recently developed to support our continuing efforts to characterize and improve our understanding of the decay of turbulence in jet flows -- a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A new TR-PIV system has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center which is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 25 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number

  8. Application of laser-optical diagnostics for the support of direct-injection gasoline combustion process development; Einsatz laseroptischer Messverfahren zur Unterstuetzung der Entwicklung von Brennverfahren mit Benzin-Direkteinspritzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschel, W.; Meyer, H.; Stiebels, B. [Volkswagenwerk AG, Wolfsburg (Germany). Abt. Forschung und Entwicklung

    2000-07-01

    The development of direct-injection gasoline engines at Volkswagen was supported strictly from the beginning by the means of optical diagnostics and CFD-simulations. Basic phenomena, such as the formation of the in-cylinder flow field, the penetration of the spray formed by a hollow-cone swirl-type injector at high fuel pressure, the interaction of spray and flow and the formation of an ignitable mixture were analysed in details. The paper describes the laser-optical techniques-particle-image-velocimetry, laser-Doppler-anemometry, videostroboscopy, high-speed cinematography and laser-induced fluorescence - which were used during the development of the DI gasoline combustion process. Examples taken from engines with optical access to the combustion chamber demonstrate the capability of the techniques and pinpoint where the design of the combustion process benefits from experimental and simulation investigations. (orig.) [German] Die Entwicklung von Ottomotoren mit Benzin-Direkteinspritzung wurde bei Volkswagen von Beginn an konsequent durch den Einsatz optischer Messverfahren und CFD-Simulationen unterstuetzt. Damit konnten grundlegende Phaenomene, wie die Ausbildung des Stroemungsfeldes im Motorbrennraum, die Ausbreitung des durch einen Hohlkegel-Drallinjektor unter hohem Druck eingespritzten Kraftstoffs sowie die Wechselwirkung der Luftstroemung im Zylinder mit den Einspritzstrahlen und die Bildung einer zuendfaehigen Ladungswolke detailliert untersucht werden. Das Paper beschreibt die laseroptischen Messverfahren - Particle-Image-Velocimetry, Laser-Doppler-Anemometry, Video-Stroboskopie, Hochgeschwindikgkeits-Kinematographie und Laserinduzierte Fluoreszenz - die bei der Brennverfahrensentwicklung eingesetzt werden und zeigt anhand einer Reihe von konkreten Beispielen, wo Antworten auf Grundsatzfragen zur Auslegung des Brennverfahrens durch Messergebnisse an optisch zugaenglichen Motoren und durch CFD-Simulationen erarbeitet werden koennen. (orig.)

  9. A laser-based study of kerosine evaporation and -mixing for lean prevaporized combustion at elevated pressure; Lasermesstechnische Untersuchung der Kerosinverdampfung und -mischung fuer die magere Vormischverbrennung unter erhoehtem Druck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, M.

    1999-05-01

    The evaporation and mixing of a kerosine spray in the turbulent airstream of a prevaporizer is investigated at conditions prevailing in the combustion chamber of gas turbines. An experiment is described that allows to study an evaporating fuel spray downstream a prefilming airblast atomizer with Phase-Doppler anemometry, laser-induced fluorescence and an infrared light absorption technique. At an air pressure of 9 bars, an air temperature of 750 K, a mean air velocity of 120 m/s and a fuel flow rate of 1 g/s the kerosine spray evaporates completely without autoignition. At this operating condition the parameters air pressure, air temperature and air turbulence are varied. The influence of these parametric variations on the dropsize distribution, the evaporation rate and the concentration profiles of liquid and evaporated fuel is presented and discussed. (orig.) [German] Die Verdampfung und Vermischung eines Kerosinsprays in der turbulenten Luftstroemung eines Vorverdampfers wird unter Bedingungen untersucht, die in Brennkammern fuer Gasturbinen vorherrschen. Ein Experiment wird vorgestellt, welches es erlaubt, ein verdampfendes Kraftstoffspray stromab eines ebenen Luftstromzerstaeubers mit Filmleger mittels der Phasen-Doppler-Anemometrie, Laser-induzierter Fluoreszenz und einer Infrarotabsorptionsmesstechnik zu untersuchen. Bei einem Luftdruck von 9 bar, einer Vorwaermetemperatur der Luft von 750 K, einer mittleren Luftgeschwindigkeit von 120 m/s und einem Kraftstoffmassenstrom von 1 g/s verdampft das Kerosinspray vollstaendig, ohne die Selbstzuendungszeit zu erreichen. Bei dieser Betriebsbedingung werden die Parameter Luftdruck, Lufttemperatur und Turbulenzgrad variiert. Der Einfluss dieser Parameter auf das Tropfengroessenspektrum, den Verdampfungsgrad und die Konzentrationsprofile des fluessigen sowie des verdampften Kraftstoffs wird dargestellt und diskutiert. (orig.)

  10. Localisation of flow separation and transition over a pitching NACA0012 airfoil at transitional Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, Daniel

    Previous research at RMC has cataloged the occurrence of limit cycle oscillations at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers for an elastically mounted aeroelastic airfoil. These oscillations were attributed to boundary layer separation and the formation of a laminar separation bubble. For this thesis, an instrumented and motor-driven oscillating airfoil rig was designed and fabricated for the purpose of investigating the boundary layer of a NACA-0012 airfoil. The oscillating airfoil was driven by a servo motor to mimic the observed aeroelastic pitching with a sinusoid of matched amplitude and frequency. Hot-wire anemometry was used to investigate the near wake of the new motor-driven airfoil and compare it with the aeroelastic experiment. A chord-wise array of hot-film sensors captured the boundary layer state during the airfoil pitching oscillation. A novel analysis technique is introduced; A sliding window (in time) cross-correlation of adjacent sensors was used to detect dynamic laminar separation. Wind tunnel tests were performed at static angles-of-attack, for quasi-static very low frequency sweeps to verify the technique, and for selected cases of oscillations obtained with the aeroelastic rig. The new detection method was verified against the existing static techniques of phase reversal signature detection and signal cross-correlation by comparing quasi-static and static results. A map of the laminar separation bubble was produced for fixed angles of attack as well as for the pitching airfoil. The presence of a laminar separation was linked to the occurrence and characteristics of the limit cycle oscillations. Keywords: laminar separation, NACA0012, hot-film, hot-wire, anemometry, transitional flow, aeroelasticity.

  11. Proceedings of the XXII A.I.VE.LA. National Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    A.I.VE.LA. - the Italian Association of Laser Velocimetry and non-invasive diagnostics - is a non-profit cultural association whose objective is to promote and support research in the field of non-contact or minimally invasive measurement techniques, particularly electromagnetic-based techniques and optical techniques. Through its Annual Meeting, AIVELA aims to create an active and stimulating forum where current research results and technical advances can be exchanged and the development of new systems for laboratory use, field testing and industrial application can be promoted. The techniques covered include Laser Doppler Anemometry - LDA, Phase Doppler Anemometry - PDA, Image Velocimetry - PIV, Flow visualization techniques, Spectroscopic measurement techniques (LIF, Raman, etc.), Laser Doppler Vibrometry - LDV, Speckle Pattern Interferometry - ESPI, Holographic techniques, Shearography, Digital Image Correlation - DIC, Moiré techniques, Structured light techniques, Infrared imaging, Photoelasticity, Image based measurement techniques, Ultrasonic sensing, Acoustic and Aeroacoustic measurements, etc. The first Annual Meeting was held back in October 1992 and since then there has been a large consensus among the research and scientific communities that the papers presented at the event are of a high scientific interest. The XXII AIVELA Annual Meeting was held at the Faculty of Engineering of University of Rome Tor Vergata on 15-16 December 2014 and was organised in collaboration with the International Master Courses in "Protection Against CBRNe Events". This volume contains a selection of the papers presented at the event. The detailed Programme of the Meeting can be found at: http://www.aivela.org/XXII_Convegno/index.html Trusting our Association and its initiatives will meet your interest, I wish to thank you in advance for your kind attention and hope to meet you soon at one of our events.

  12. Mean velocity and moments of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the wake of a model ship propulsor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pego, J.P. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM, Erlangen, Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik, Erlangen (Germany); Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Lienhart, H.; Durst, F. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM, Erlangen, Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik, Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen fuer Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  13. Mean velocity and moments of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the wake of a model ship propulsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pêgo, J. P.; Lienhart, H.; Durst, F.

    2007-08-01

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen für Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  14. Lithosphere formation in the central Slave Craton (Canada): plume subcretion or lithosphere accretion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulbach, Sonja; Griffin, William L.; Pearson, Norman J.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Doyle, Buddy J.

    2007-08-01

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen für Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  15. Generation and Growth of Single Hairpin Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Haidari, Ahmad

    The behavior of selectively generated single hairpin vortices are examined within a laminar boundary layer environment over a range of Reynolds numbers, the hairpin vortices are experimentally generated by means of controlled fluid injection from a streamwise slot. Flow visualization using both dye and hydrogen bubble wire is employed in conjunction with hot film anemometry to investigate the growth characteristics and evolution of these single hairpin vortices. Qualitatively, it is established that hairpin vortices form by local destabilization at the interface between the low-speed fluid introduced through the slot and the higher speed boundary layer flow. Kinematical considerations of the hairpin vortex are established. It is observed that a hairpin vortex generally displays visualization and velocity signatures characteristic of those observed for a turbulent boundary layer. Hydrogen-bubble wire visualization results specifically indicate that hairpin vortices generate two purely turbulent-like flow patterns. The first is a low-speed streak pattern developing immediately adjacent to the surface due to surface interaction by the counter -rotating legs of the hairpin vortex; the second pattern is a turbulent pocket-like pattern farther removed from the surface. It is determined from the visualization data that hairpin vortices manifest the necessary flow characteristics which give rise to the regenerative and sustained process required for maintenance of turbulence. The regeneration and the growth process takes place through the formation of similar hairpin-like vortices by one of two means. The first is an inviscid lateral propagation of the initial disturbance which gives rise to outboard (subsidiary), vortices which cause the lateral spreading of the structure. A more complicated and eruptive process occurs by means of viscous-inviscid interactions which give rise to trailing vortices (secondary), which cause the streamwise elongation of the disturbance. A

  16. Measurements of entropy-layer instabilities over cone-ogive-cylinders at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Roger T.

    Predicting the onset of boundary layer transition is critical in hypersonic flight. To improve transition prediction methods, it is necessary to understand the underlying instability mechanisms that cause transition. Entropy-layer instabilities are of particular interest in the design of blunt reentry vehicles and other blunt supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. Entropy-layer instabilities from outside the boundary layer may enter the boundary layer and have a significant effect on transition. There is little experimental data for entropy-layer instabilities. Experimental measurements of what appear to be entropy-layer instabilities have been made in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) using surface pressure transducers and hot-wire anemometry. A long cone-ogive-cylinder model with interchangeable cone-ogive noses was used to generate the shock curvature that resulted in an entropy layer conducive to instability growth. The nosetip angles of the cone-ogive range from 25 to 40 degrees, with a majority of the measurements taken with the sharp 30 to 35-degree nosetips. Surface measurements of the entropy-layer instabilities using the 30 to 35-degree configurations show disturbances between 15 and 50 kHz. As the nosetip angle increases, the frequency of the instability decreases slightly. Results also show that the instability magnitude as measured on the model surface increases with downstream distance, then decreases, before starting to increase again. The decrease is likely due to stabilization that occurs during the entropy-layer swallowing process. Off-surface measurements using hot wires have also been made for each of the cone-ogive-cylinder configurations. These measurements show the location, frequency, and relative magnitude of the entropy-layer instability. As the instability progresses downstream, it grows inside the entropy layer, then at a certain distance downstream, the instability approaches the model surface and enters the boundary layer

  17. Turbulent decay in the near field of multi-scale and conventional grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Per-Aage, E-mail: per.a.krogstad@ntnu.no [Dept. Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decay of turbulence behind a conventional grid and two mulit-scale grids is studied experimentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large scale facility having a test section of about 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 Multiplication-Sign 12 m, gave very good spatial resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Covers the near field decay of turbulence from x = 0.5M to x = 75M, where M is the mesh size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grids were designed to produce the same integral lengths to make direct comparisons possible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After initial development where jets and wakes interact, the grids produce the same turbulent energy levels and decay rates. - Abstract: Wind tunnel turbulence generated by a conventional and two multi-scale grids has been investigate. The grids were all designed to produce turbulence with the same integral scale, so that a direct comparison could be made between the flows, both in physical and scaled space. It has been suggested in the literature (e.g.) that for a particular class of multi fractal grids, the turbulence decay depends exponentially on the distance from the grid. After a short distance where the flow is highly dependent of the geometry, it was found that the exponential decay is not unique to a particular geometry, but may be found over the same streamwise distances also behind the multi-scale grids, as well as for the conventional grid. By comparing the probability density functions measured using laser Doppler and hot wire anemometry it is shown that hot wire measurements may contain severe errors if taken too close to the grid. It is shown that negative streamwise velocity components may occasionally be found as far as 10 times the mesh widths downstream of the grid. Since hot wire anemometry is not able to measure the sign of the velocity vector, this leads to a folding of the data which artificially increases the derived mean velocity and, more seriously, reduces the

  18. Advanced Laser-Based Techniques for Gas-Phase Diagnostics in Combustion and Aerospace Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Andreas; Zhu, Jiajian; Li, Xuesong; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Gaining information of species, temperature, and velocity distributions in turbulent combustion and high-speed reactive flows is challenging, particularly for conducting measurements without influencing the experimental object itself. The use of optical and spectroscopic techniques, and in particular laser-based diagnostics, has shown outstanding abilities for performing non-intrusive in situ diagnostics. The development of instrumentation, such as robust lasers with high pulse energy, ultra-short pulse duration, and high repetition rate along with digitized cameras exhibiting high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and frame rates on the order of MHz, has opened up for temporally and spatially resolved volumetric measurements of extreme dynamics and complexities. The aim of this article is to present selected important laser-based techniques for gas-phase diagnostics focusing on their applications in combustion and aerospace engineering. Applicable laser-based techniques for investigations of turbulent flows and combustion such as planar laser-induced fluorescence, Raman and Rayleigh scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, laser-induced grating scattering, particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler anemometry, and tomographic imaging are reviewed and described with some background physics. In addition, demands on instrumentation are further discussed to give insight in the possibilities that are offered by laser flow diagnostics.

  19. Velocity field measurements in the wake of a propeller model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, R.; Kumar, A. Chandan

    2016-10-01

    Turboprop configurations are being revisited for the modern-day regional transport aircrafts for their fuel efficiency. The use of laminar flow wings is an effort in this direction. One way to further improve their efficiency is by optimizing the flow over the wing in the propeller wake. Previous studies have focused on improving the gross aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. It is known that the propeller slipstream causes early transition of the boundary layer on the wing. However, an optimized design of the propeller and wing combination could delay this transition and decrease the skin friction drag. Such a wing design would require the detailed knowledge of the development of the slipstream in isolated conditions. There are very few studies in the literature addressing the requirements of transport aircraft having six-bladed propeller and cruising at a high propeller advance ratio. Low-speed wind tunnel experiments have been conducted on a powered propeller model in isolated conditions, measuring the velocity field in the vertical plane behind the propeller using two-component hot-wire anemometry. The data obtained clearly resolved the mean velocity, the turbulence, the ensemble phase averages and the structure and development of the tip vortex. The turbulence in the slipstream showed that transition could be close to the leading edge of the wing, making it a fine case for optimization. The development of the wake with distance shows some interesting flow features, and the data are valuable for flow computation and optimization.

  20. Boron nitride nanotubes coated with organic hydrophilic agents: Stability and cytocompatibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Tiago Hilário; Soares, Daniel Crístian Ferreira; Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ornelas da Silva, Paulo Roberto [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Gouvêa dos Santos, Raquel [Laboratório de Radiobiologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CNEN/CDTN, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Barros de Sousa, Edésia Martins, E-mail: sousaem@cdtn.br [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents constituted by glucosamine (GA), polyethylene glycol (PEG){sub 1000}, and chitosan (CH) forming new singular systems. Their size, distribution, and homogeneity were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, while their surface charge was determined by laser Doppler anemometry. The morphology and structural organization were evaluated by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The functionalization was evaluated by Thermogravimetry analysis and Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy. The results showed that BNNTs were successfully obtained and functionalized, reaching a mean size and dispersity deemed adequate for in vitro studies. The in vitro stability tests also revealed a good adhesion of functionalized agents on BNNT surfaces. Finally, the in vitro cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs against MCR-5 cells was evaluated, and the results revealed that none of the different functionalization agents disturbed the propagation of normal cells up to the concentration of 50 μg/mL. Furthermore, in this concentration, no significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations or increase in ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) could be observed. Thus, findings from the present study reveal an important stability and cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs as new potential drugs or radioisotope nanocarriers to be applied in therapeutic procedures. - Highlights: • BNNTs were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents. • Hydrophilic molecules do not alter the biocompatibility profile of BNNTs. • No significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations in ROS could be observed.

  1. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  2. Development of Pre-set Counter-rotating Streamwise Vortices in Wavy Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Budiman, A.C.

    2015-10-23

    Development of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in a rectangular channel with one-sided wavy surface has been experimentally quantified using hot-wire anemometry. The wavy surface has fixed amplitude of 3.75 mm. The counter-rotating vortices are pre-set by means of a sawtooth pattern cut at the leading edge of the wavy surface. Variations of the central streamwise velocity Uc with a channel gap H = 35 mm and 50 mm (corresponding to a Reynolds number from 1600 to 4400) change the instability of the flow which can be distinguished from the velocity contours at a certain spanwise plane. The streamwise velocity contours and turbulence intensity for Reynolds number Re = 3100 and H = 35 mm show the disappearance of the mushroom-like vortices prior to turbulence near the second peak of the wavy surface, while for higher Re, this phenomenon occurs earlier. Under certain conditions, for example, for Re = 4400 and H = 50 mm, the splitting of the vortices can also be observed.

  3. Laser Doppler anemometer measurements of pulsatile flow in a model carotid bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, D N; Giddens, D P

    1987-01-01

    Hemodynamics at the human carotid bifurcation is important to the understanding of atherosclerotic plaque initiation and progression as well as to the diagnosis of clinically important disease. Laser Doppler anemometry was performed in a large scale model of an average human carotid. Pulsatile waveforms and physiologic flow divisions were incorporated. Disturbance levels and shear stresses were computed from ensemble averages of the velocity waveform measurements. Flow in the common carotid was laminar and symmetric. Flow patterns in the sinus, however, were complex and varied considerably during the cycle. Strong helical patterns and outer wall flow separation waxed and waned during each systole. The changing flow patterns resulted in an oscillatory shear stress at the outer wall ranging from -13 to 9 dyn cm-2 during systole with a time-averaged mean of only -0.5 dyn cm-2. This contrasts markedly with an inner wall shear stress range of 17-50, (mean 26) dyn cm-2. The region of transient separation was confined to the carotid sinus outer wall with no reverse velocities detected in the distal internal carotid. Notable disturbance velocities were also time-dependent, occurring only during the deceleration phase of systole and the beginning of diastole. The present pulsatile flow studies have aided in identifying hemodynamic conditions which correlate with early intimal thickening and predict the physiologic level of flow disturbances in the bulb of undiseased internal carotid arteries.

  4. Three-dimensional visualization of velocity profiles in the ascending aorta in dogs, measured with a hot-film anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, P K; Hasenkam, J M

    1983-01-01

    Three-dimensional blood velocity profiles were registered in the ascending aorta of dogs approximately 2 and 5 cm above the aortic valves by means of constant temperature hot-film anemometry. The velocity was measured at 41 predetermined points of measurement evenly distributed over the cross-sectional area. Later data analyses using a three-dimensional plotting system, visualized velocity profiles at 200 time intervals during one mean heart cycle. The overall appearance of the profiles was that of a flat transitional flow with a slight skewness. The highest velocity was found nearer to the posterior and left vessel wall. The skewness started during top systole and persisted to the beginning of diastole. Furthermore, many small velocity fluctuations were seen during top systole, but they might also be caused by secondary rotational flow phenomena. This new three-dimensional and dynamic method for visualizing velocity profiles seems to offer advantages, as it demonstrates the total velocity profile all over the cross-sectional area.

  5. A new transducer for respiratory monitoring. A description of a hot-wire anemometer and a test procedure for general use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, T; Hald, A; Jørgensen, F E

    1979-08-01

    A respiratory transducer based on the constant temperature anemometry principle has been developed for respiratory monitoring, and as a tool for bedside evaluation of pulmonary function. The transducer is characterized by a dynamic range from 0-2.5 1/s and an upper limiting frequency of 50 Hz. It is designed with a view to a low pressure drop of 2.5 mbar/1/s and a minimum dead space of 5 ml. The transducer has been tested using a generally applicable procedure which includes both static and dynamic test set-ups. The influence of variation in gas composition, temperature and pressure, together with variations in tidal volume and respiration rate, have been investigated. The results show that the transducer registers the immediate value of gas flow-rate with a mean error less than 5-10% in all situations which are predictable in clinical use. The mean error can be reduced to less than 5% when systematic errors are eliminated.

  6. Flush mounted hot film anemometer measurement of wall shear stress distal to a tri-leaflet valve for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood analog fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, S; Tarbell, J M

    1987-01-01

    Wall shear stress has been measured by flush-mounted hot film anemometry distal to an Ionescu-Shiley tri-leaflet valve under pulsatile flow conditions. Both Newtonian (aqueous glycerol) and non-Newtonian (aqueous polyacrylamide) blood analog fluids were investigated. Significant differences in the axial distribution of wall shear stress between the two fluids are apparent in flows having nearly identical Reynolds numbers. The Newtonian fluid exhibits a (peak) wall shear rate which is maximized near the valve seat (30 mm) and then decays to a fully developed flow value (by 106 mm). In contrast, the shear rate of the non-Newtonian fluid at 30 mm is less than half that of the Newtonian fluid and at 106 mm is more than twice that of the Newtonian fluid. It is suggested that non-Newtonian rheology influences valve flow patterns either through alterations in valve opening associated with low shear separation zones behind valve leaflets, or because of variations in the rate of jet spreading. More detailed studies are required to clarify the mechanisms. The Newtonian wall shear stresses for this valve are low. The highest value observed anywhere in the aortic chamber was 2.85 N/m2 at a peak Reynolds number of 3694.

  7. Study of Pumping Capacity of Pitched Blade Impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Fořt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was made of the pumping capacity of pitched blade impellers in a cylindrical pilot plant vessel with four standard radial baffles at the wall under a turbulent regime of flow. The pumping capacity was calculated from the radial profile of the axial flow, under the assumption of axial symmetry of the discharge flow. The mean velocity was measured using laser Doppler anemometry in a transparent vessel of diameter T = 400 mm, provided with a standard dished bottom. Three and six blade pitched blade impellers (the pitch angle varied within the interval a Îá24°; 45°ń of impeller/vessel diameter ratio D/T = 0.36, as well as a three blade pitched blade impeller with folded blades of the same diameter, were tested. The calculated results were compared with the results of experiments mentioned in the literature, above all in cylindrical vessels with a flat bottom. Both arrangements of the agitated system were described by the impeller energetic efficiency, i.e, a criterion including in dimensionless form both the impeller energy consumption (impeller power input and the impeller pumping effect (impeller pumping capacity. It follows from the results obtained with various geometrical configurations that the energetic efficiency of pitched blade impellers is significantly lower for configurations suitable for mixing solid-liquid suspensions (low impeller off bottom clearances than for blending miscible liquids in mixing (higher impeller off bottom clearances.

  8. Removal of pedestals and directional ambiguity of optical anemometer signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, F; Zaré, M

    1974-11-01

    Laser Doppler anemometry permits, in principle, the measurement of both magnitude and direction of components of a particle's velocity vector. Most exiting anemometers, however, permit measurements only with a directional ambiguity of 180 degrees , resulting in errors in certain flow fields. Available methods of eliminating the directional ambiguity of Laser Doppler anemometers are reviewed, covering frequency shifting of the incident and scattered light beams, the use of beams with different polarization properties, and employment of multicolor laser beams. The advantages and disadvantages of existing methods are summarized, and suggestions for alterations are made. Different techniques used to remove the pedestal of laser Doppler anemometer signals are also reviewed. Optical techniques should be employed in any advanced optical anemometer system to avoid dynamic range limitations by electronic bandpass filters. Suggestions are made for advanced optical anemometers employing multielement avalanche photodiodes that can be used for simultaneous measurements of two velocity components. These anemometers incorporate devices to sense the direction of the velocity components and to eliminate optically the pedestal of laser Doppler signals.

  9. Verification and validation studies of the time-averaged velocity field in the very near-wake of a finite elliptical cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael R.; Eisner, Alfred D.

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents verification and validation results for the time-averaged, three-dimensional velocity field immediately downstream of a finite elliptic cylinder at a Reynolds number of 1.35 × 10 4. Numerical simulations were performed with the finite element package, Fidap, using the steady state, standard k-epsilon model. The ratio of the cylinder height to the major axis of the elliptical cross section is 5.0; the aspect ratio of the cross section is 0.5625. This particular geometry is selected as a crude surrogate for the human form in consideration of further applied occupational and environmental health studies. Predictions of the velocity and turbulence kinetic energy fields in the very near-wake are compared to measurements taken in a wind tunnel using laser Doppler anemometry. Results show that at all locations where a reliable grid convergence index can be calculated there is not a demonstrable difference between simulated and measured values. The overall topology of the time-averaged flow field is reasonably well predicted, although the simulated near-wake is narrower than the measured one.

  10. Analysis of transient flows in gasoline direct injection systems: effects on unsteady air entrainment by the spray; Analyse des ecoulements transitoires dans les systemes d'injection directe essence: effets sur l'entrainement d'air instationnaire du spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delay, G.

    2005-03-15

    The aim of this study is to determine instantaneous liquid flow rate oscillations effect on non stationary air entrainment of an injector conical spray (Gasoline Direct Injection). The tools we use are either experimental or numerical ones. An instantaneous flow rate determination method is used. It is based on pulsated flows physics and only requires the velocity at the centerline of a pipe mounted just before the injector. So, it is possible to 'rebuild' the instantaneous velocity distributions and then to get the instantaneous liquid flow rate (Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements). A mechanical and hydraulics modeling software (AMESim) is necessary to get injector outlet flow rate. Simulations are validated by both 'rebuilding' method results and common rail pressure measurements. Fluorescent Particle Image Velocimetry (FPIV), suited to dense two -phase flows, is used to measure air flow around and inside the conical spray. Velocity measurements close to the spray frontier are used to compute instantaneous air entrainment. Considering droplets momentum exchange with air and thanks to droplets diameters and liquid velocities measurements at the nozzle exit, a transient air entrainment model is proposed according to FPIV measurements. (author)

  11. Antimicrobial activity of cream incorporated with silver nanoparticles biosynthesized from Withania somnifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marslin G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Marslin,1 Rajendran K Selvakesavan,1 Gregory Franklin,1 Bruno Sarmento,2,3 Alberto CP Dias11Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environment and Biological Sciences (CITAB-UM, AgroBioPlant Group, Department of Biology, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal; 2Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 3CESPU, Instituto Universitário de Ciências da Saúde, Gandra, PortugalAbstract: We report on the antimicrobial activity of a cream formulation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, biosynthesized using Withania somnifera extract. Aqueous extracts of leaves promoted efficient green synthesis of AgNPs compared to fruits and root extracts of W. somnifera. Biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized for their size and shape by physical-chemical techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After confirming the antimicrobial potential of AgNPs, they were incorporated into a cream. Cream formulations of AgNPs and AgNO3 were prepared and compared for their antimicrobial activity against human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans and a plant pathogen (Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Our results show that AgNP creams possess significantly higher antimicrobial activity against the tested organisms.Keywords: Withania somnifera, green synthesis, silver nanoparticles cream, antimicrobial activity

  12. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION OF FLOW AROUND CYLINDER ARRAYS AT A SUBCRITICAL REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Lin; LIN Yu-feng; LAM Kit

    2008-01-01

    The complex three-dimensional turbulent flows around a cylinder array with four cylinders in an in-line square configuration at a subcritical Reynolds number of 1.5 ×104 with the spacing ratio at and 3.5 were investigated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The full field vorticity and velocity distributions as well as turbulent quantities were calculated in detail and the near wake structures were presented. The results show that the bi-stable flow nature was observed at and distinct vortex shedding of the upstream cylinders occurred at at . The techniques of Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) are also employed to validate the present LES method. The results show that the numerical predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Therefore, the full field instantaneous and mean quantities of the flow field, velocity field and vorticity field can be extracted from the LES results for further study of the complex flow characteristics.

  13. Surface roughness effects on a blunt hypersonic cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nicole; Hofferth, Jerrod; White, Edward

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms through which distributed surface roughness produces boundary-layer disturbances in hypersonic flow are poorly understood. Previous work by Reshotko (AIAA 2008-4294) suggests that transient growth, resulting from the superposition of decaying non-orthogonal modes, may be responsible. The present study examines transient growth experimentally using a smooth 5-degree half-angle conic frustum paired with blunted nosetips with and without quasi-random distributed roughness. Hotwire anemometry in the low-disturbance Texas A&M Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel shows a slight growth of fluctuations as well as vertical offset due to surface roughness at a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Spectral measurements indicate that the model is subcritical with respect to second mode growth, and azimuthal measurements are used to examine the high- and low-speed streaks characteristic of transient growth of stationary disturbances. Support from the AFOSR/NASA National Center for Hypersonic Research in Laminar-Turbulent Transition through Grant FA9550-09-1-0341 is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Foraging at the edge of the world: low-altitude, high-speed manoeuvering in barn swallows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Douglas R; Hedrick, Tyson L; Biewener, Andrew A; Crandell, Kristen E; Tobalske, Bret W

    2016-09-26

    While prior studies of swallow manoeuvering have focused on slow-speed flight and obstacle avoidance in still air, swallows survive by foraging at high speeds in windy environments. Recent advances in field-portable, high-speed video systems, coupled with precise anemometry, permit measures of high-speed aerial performance of birds in a natural state. We undertook the present study to test: (i) the manner in which barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) may exploit wind dynamics and ground effect while foraging and (ii) the relative importance of flapping versus gliding for accomplishing high-speed manoeuvers. Using multi-camera videography synchronized with wind-velocity measurements, we tracked coursing manoeuvers in pursuit of prey. Wind speed averaged 1.3-2.0 m s(-1) across the atmospheric boundary layer, exhibiting a shear gradient greater than expected, with instantaneous speeds of 0.02-6.1 m s(-1) While barn swallows tended to flap throughout turns, they exhibited reduced wingbeat frequency, relying on glides and partial bounds during maximal manoeuvers. Further, the birds capitalized on the near-earth wind speed gradient to gain kinetic and potential energy during both flapping and gliding turns; providing evidence that such behaviour is not limited to large, fixed-wing soaring seabirds and that exploitation of wind gradients by small aerial insectivores may be a significant aspect of their aeroecology.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'.

  15. Forced and self-excited oscillations in a natural gas fired lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daesik; Park, Sung Wook

    2010-11-15

    An experimental study of the flame response in a premixed gas turbine combustor has been conducted at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure inlet conditions using natural gas. The fuel is premixed with the air upstream of a choked inlet to avoid equivalence ratio fluctuations. Therefore the observed flame response is only the result of the imposed velocity fluctuations, which are produced using a variable-speed siren. Also, a variable length combustor is designed for investigating characteristics of self-excited instabilities. Measurements are made of the velocity fluctuation in the mixing section using hot wire anemometry and of the heat release fluctuation in the combustor using chemiluminescence emission. The results are analyzed to determine the phase and gain of the flame transfer function. The results show that the gain of flame transfer function is closely associated both with inlet flow forcing conditions such as frequency and amplitude of modulation as well as the operating conditions such as equivalence ratio. In order to predict the operating conditions where the combustor goes stable or unstable at given combustor and nozzle designs, time-lag analysis was tried using convection time delay measured from the phase information of the transfer function. The model prediction was in very good agreement with the self-excited instability measurement. However, spatial heat release distribution became more significant in long flames than in short flames and also had an important influence on the system damping procedure. (author)

  16. The structure of the velocity and passive scalar fields in high Reynolds number and high Peclet number grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlarski, Laurent Bernard

    1998-10-01

    Turbulence theories are generally posed for isotropic turbulence in the limit of infinite turbulent Reynolds and Peclet numbers. Until now, it has been impossible to satisfy these constraints simultaneously in either experiments or simulations. By use of an active grid, devised by Makita, nearly isotropic turbulence with large turbulent Reynolds and Peclet numbers is generated. Turbulent Reynolds numbers based on the Taylor microscale, Rλ, in excess of 700 are achieved. The evolution of the velocity and passive scalar fields from low to high Reynolds and Peclet numbers is studied by generating turbulent fields in wind tunnels. The measurements are made by hot-wire anemometry and cold- wire thermometry. The passive scalar (generated by a mean scalar gradient) is temperature in air. The velocity field shows significant variation with Reynolds number. The slope of the inertial subrange is a function of Reynolds number and is noticeably below the Kolmogorov value of 5/3 for Rλconvective scaling range for the scalar (with slope close to 5/3) is observed for all Peclet numbers. The effects of the internal intermittency of the scalar are present at all Peclet numbers. The scalar field exhibits some (Peclet-number- independent) violations of local isotropy in the direction of the imposed gradient for odd-ordered statistics. The understanding of the 'ramp-cliff' structures (to which this anisotropy is attributed) is extended by describing it in terms of three-point statistics-the most fundamental order at which the odd- ordered statistics can be examined.

  17. In-situ shear stress indicator using heated strain gages at the flow boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chi-An; Yang, Fuling

    2011-11-01

    This work borrows the concept of hot-wire anemometry and sketch a technique that uses local heat transfer to infer the flow field and the corresponding stress. Conventional strain gages were mounted at the flow solid boundary as the heat source and acrylic boundary was chosen for its low thermal conductivity ensuring heat accumulation when a gage is energized. The gage would now work in slightly overheated state and its self-heating leads to an additional thermal strain. When exposed to a flow field, heat is brought away by local forced convection, resulting in deviations in gage signal from that developed in quiescent liquid. We have developed a facility to achieve synchronous gage measurements at different locations on a solid boundary. Three steady flow motions were considered: circular Couette flow, rectilinear uniform flow, and rectilinear oscillating flow. Preliminary tests show the gage reading does respond to the imposed flow through thermal effects and greater deviation was measured in flows of higher shear strain rates. The correlation between the gage signals and the imposed flow field is further examined by theoretical analysis. We also introduced a second solid boundary to the vicinity of the gage in the two rectilinear flows. The gage readings demonstrate rises in its magnitudes indicating wall amplification effect on the local shear strain, agreeing to the drag augmentation by a second solid boundary reported in many multiphase flow literatures.

  18. Streamwise Evolution of Statistical Events in a Model Wind-Turbine Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viestenz, Kyle; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-02-01

    Hot-wire anemometry data, obtained from a wind-tunnel experiment containing a 3 × 3 model wind-turbine array, are used to conditionally average the Reynolds stresses. Nine profiles at the centreline behind the array are analyzed to characterize the turbulent velocity statistics of the wake flow. Quadrant analysis yields statistical events occurring in the wake of the wind farm where quadrants 2 and 4 produce ejections and sweeps, respectively. The scaled difference between these two events is expressed via the Δ R0 parameter and is based on the Δ S0 quantity as introduced by M. R. Raupach (J Fluid Mech 108:363-382, 1981). Δ R0 attains a maximum value at hub height and changes sign near the top of the rotor. The ratio of quadrant events of upward momentum flux to those of the downward flux, known as the exuberance, is examined and reveals the effect of root vortices persisting to eight rotor diameters downstream. These events are then associated with the triple correlation term present in the turbulent kinetic energy equation of the fluctuations where it is found that ejections play the dual role of entraining mean kinetic energy while convecting turbulent kinetic energy out of the turbine canopy. The development of these various quantities possesses significance in closure models, and is assessed in light of wake remediation, energy transport and power fluctuations, where it is found that the maximum fluctuation is about 30% of the mean power produced.

  19. The influence of velocity and density ratio on the dynamics of spatially developing mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Niccum, D. L.

    1992-04-01

    The dynamics of countercurrent mixing is examined in the shear layer of an axisymmetric jet. Experiments were designed to establish conditions of absolute instability in a spatially developing shear layer and to document how the instability influences the jet development. By applying suction around the jet periphery, shear-layer velocity ratios R greater than 1 could be studied. Here, R=(U1-U2)/(U1+U2), where U1 is the velocity of the forward jet stream and U2 is the velocity of the counterflowing stream created by suction. The density ratio S=ρ1/ρ2 of the mixing layer was also varied to determine the stability boundary in the S-R plane. The density of the forward stream ρ1 was increased by adding sulfur hexafluoride to the air jet, which provided density ratios between 1 and 5.1. Hot-wire anemometry and flow visualization revealed that a global transition occurs when conditions of absolute instability are established in the jet shear layers. One consequence of this transition is an abrupt decrease in the jet spread rate. The experimentally determined transition between globally stable and globally unstable flow regimes in the S-R plane agrees quite well with predictions of the convective/absolute instability boundary based on the linear stability theory [Pavithran and Redekopp, Phys. Fluids A 1, 1736 (1989)].

  20. Wake interaction effects on the transition process on turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, R. W.; Lagraff, J. E.

    1987-10-01

    The characterization of the nozzle guide vane inlet and exit conditions in the Oxford University Isentropic Light Piston Tunnel fully 3-D annular rotating stage has been undertaken. Measurements included hot wire anemometry and pressure/Mach number distributions. Preparations for the rotor heat transfer instrumentation/data acquisition hardware and software are also in progress. Further development of a numerical model to predict the effects of wake passing and transition is reported. The convection of the wake through the passage is predicted, allowing for estimations of the expected times for which the boundary layer is disturbed by the wake fluid. The new model for the random generation and subsequent growth and convection of the turbulent spots produces a time-resolved prediction of the intermittent heat transfer signals by use of a time-marching procedure. By superimposing the two numerical models it is possible to simulate the measured instantaneous heat transfer characteristics and to estimate the effective average intermittency along the blade surface and compare the results to the measured intermittency values.

  1. Aerodynamic drag characterization and deposition studies of irregular particles. Part 3: Analysis of flow and temperature field inside the Combustion Deposition Entrained Reactor (CDER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, I.; Katragadda, S.; Nagarajan, R.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental and numerical analysis was performed of the temperature and flow field involved in co-axial, confined, non-reacting heated jets in a drop tube reactor. An electrically heated 2-inch (50.8 mm) diameter drop tube reactor was utilized to study the jet characteristics. Profiles of gas temperature, typically in the range of 800 to 1600 K were measured in the mixing zone of the jet with a K-Type thermocouple. Measured temperatures were corrected for conduction, convection, and radiation heat losses. Because of limited access to the mixing zone, characterization of the flow field at high temperatures with laser Doppler or hot wire anemometry were impractical. A computer program which solves the full equations of motion and energy was employed to simulate the temperature and flow fields. The location of the recirculation region, the flow regimes, and the mixing phenomena were studied. The wall heating, laminar and turbulent flow regimes were considered in the simulations. The predictions are in fairly good agreement with the corrected temperature measurements provided that the flow is turbulent. The results of this study demonstrate how a numerical method and measurement can be used together to analyze the flow conditions inside a reactor which has limited access because of very high temperatures.

  2. Observation of supersonic turbulent wakes by laser Fourier densitometry (LFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresillon, D.; Cabrit, B.; Bonnet, J. P.; Gemaux, G.

    Laser Fourier Densitometry (LFD) is an optical method appropriate for turbulent flow observations. It uses the collective scattering of coherent light, by optical index inhomogeneities. The principle of this method is described. It provides a signal proportional to the space Fourier transform amplitude of index distribution for a wavevector k defined by the optical arrangement. For a fluctuating flow, this amplitude is a function of time, and its frequency spectrum can be observed. The spectrum shape provides elementary parameters of the flow, such as: direction, modulus of mean velocity, and local temperature. It also provides means to distinguish different kinds of density fluctuations, such as convected inhomogeneities, or acoustic waves. The respective level of these different fluctuations types can be measured, as well as their power scale-law and absolute level. A compact optical bench has been set on a nozzle flow. The results of measurements performed in two supersonic wake configurations are presented, for Mach numbers of 1.6 and 4.2. These include density fluctuation spectra in supersonic flows, acoustic waves, variations with position, and comparison with hot wire anemometry.

  3. Unsteady characteristics of near-wall turbulence using high repetition stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucaut, J. M.; Coudert, S.; Stanislas, M.

    2009-07-01

    This study is part of a project that is aimed at building dynamic boundary conditions near a solid wall, in order to reduce the large eddy simulation spatial resolution that is necessary in this region. The objective is to build a low-order dynamical system in a plane parallel to the wall, which will mimic the unsteady behaviour of turbulence. This dynamical system should be derived from a POD decomposition of the velocity field. The POD decomposition is to be applied on an experimental database of time-resolved velocity fields. In order to obtain the experimental database, a specific experiment of high-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been performed. This experiment was carried out in the turbulent boundary layer of the LML wind tunnel. The plane under study was parallel to the wall located at 100 wall units. This database is validated via comparison with hot-wire anemometry (HWA). Despite some peak locking observed on the streamwise velocity component, the PDF and the power spectra are in very good agreement with the HWA results. The two-point spatial correlations are also in good agreement with the results from the literature. As the flow is time-resolved, space-time correlations are also computed. The convection of the flow structure is observed to be the most important effect at this wall distance. The next step is to compute the dynamical system and to couple it to a large eddy simulation.

  4. Flowfield measurements in a separated and reattached flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, William P.

    1987-03-01

    The separation and reattachment of a large-scale, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at low subsonic speed on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. The separation bubble was 55 cm long and had a maximum bubble thickness, measured to the height of the mean dividing streamline, of 17 cm, which was twice the thickness of the inlet boundary layer. A combination of laser velocimetry, hot-wire anemometry, pneumatic probing techniques, and flow visualization were used as diagnostics. Principal findings were that an outer inviscid rotational flow was defined which essentially convected over the blockage associated with the inner, viscously dominated bubble recirculation region. A strong backflow region in which the flow moved upstream 100 percent of the time was measured near the test surface over the central 35 percent of the bubble. A laminar backflow boundary layer having pseudo-turbulent characteristics including a log-linear velocity profile was generated under the highly turbulent backflow. Velocity profile shapes in the reversed flow region matched a previously developed universal backflow profile at the upstream edge of the separation region but not in the steady backflow region downstream. A smoke flow visualization movie and hot-film measurements revealed low frequency nonperiodic flapping at reattachment. However, forward flow fraction data at reattachment and mean velocity profiles in the redeveloping boundary layer downstream of reattachment correlated with backward-facing step data when the axial dimension was scaled by the distance from the maximum bubble thickness to reattachment.

  5. Study and development of an instantaneous equivalence air/fuel ratio measurement probe; Etude et developpement d'une sonde de mesure de richesse instantanee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutar, Z.

    2002-06-15

    The objective of this study was to continue the development of a sampling probe intended for the measurement of instantaneous equivalence air/fuel ratio. The developed device must satisfy the schedule of conditions integrating an easy use, a reliable and reproducible measurement and finally to be usable on any type of spark ignition engine without particular arrangement. After a bibliographical study, it was proved that the catalytic hot wire measurement technique has the awaited qualities. This technique is based on hot wire anemometry. It consists in maintaining a wire of 15 {mu}m of diameter, at a constant temperature and sufficiently high in order to carry out on its surface a heterogeneous catalysis reaction of combustion. The purpose of the catalytic reaction is to considerably increase the probe sensitivity to the fuel concentration. Work showed that, to have a precise equivalence air/fuel ratio calculation, it is necessary to know the instantaneous flow characteristics at wire location; those are pressure, temperature and velocity. So, we developed a three hot wires and discontinuous sampling probe. One of the three hot wires functions at the same time as a microcalorimeter and as a catalyst, the two others wires function as micro-calorimeters and are used to determine the flow temperature and velocity. We show how to control the experimental conditions in order to obtain a catalytic reaction on a wire after a calibration procedure of the measure. Tests on a spark ignition engine proved the reliability of the three hot wire probe. (author)

  6. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer by focusing schlieren deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S.; Settles, G. S.

    Some novel, non-intrusive, high-frequency, localized optical measurements of turbulence in compressible flows are described. The technique is based upon focusing schlieren optics coupled with high-speed quantitative measurement of light intensity fluctuations in the schlieren image. Measurements of density gradient fluctuations confined to a thin slice of the flowfield are thus obtained. The new instrument was used to investigate the structure of a two-dimensional, adiabatic, wind tunnel wall boundary layer at a Mach number of 3. The measurements were compared to data obtained using hot-wire anemometry and good agreement was found between the two. Distributions of broadband convection velocity of large-scale structures through the boundary later were also measured. In marked contrast to earlier results, it is shown here that the convection velocity is essentially identical to the local mean velocity. Further, results obtained using the VITA conditional sampling technique shed new light on the turbulent boundary layer structure. Overall, the data presented herein serve to validate the new measurement technique.

  7. Structure, Mixing, and Stability of Flush and Elevated Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, Levon; Getsinger, Daniel; Peng, Terry Wen Yu; Smith, Owen; Karagozian, Ann

    2013-11-01

    The present experiments explore the characteristics of equidensity and variable density transverse jets using acetone PLIF, stereo PIV, and hot wire anemometry. Jets composed of mixtures of helium and nitrogen are injected normally from different types of nozzles (flush and elevated with respect to the wind tunnel wall, and converging as well as straight shapes) into an air crossflow. A range of jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J and density ratios S is examined, within which previous studies have identified conditions for upstream shear layer transition from convective to absolute instability. The present study examines the relationships among transverse jet structure, including vortical rollup and cross-sectional symmetry/asymmetry, jet mixing characteristics, and shear layer stability characteristics. The role of the crossflow boundary layer as well as jet injection systems for structure, mixing, and stability is evaluated and related to prior observations on vorticity evolution for jets in crossflow. Supported by NSF grant CBET-1133015 & AFOSR grant FA9550-11-1-0128 (A001768901).

  8. Experiments on the global instability of confined axisymmetric dense wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Larry; Juniper, Matthew

    2007-11-01

    Recent theoretical studies [M. Juniper, J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006); M. Juniper and S. Candel, J. Fluid Mech. 482, 257-269 (2003)] predict that confinement increases the hydrodynamic instability of wakes by causing the transition from convective to absolute instability to occur at lower values of shear. Experimental evidence supporting this prediction is presented here for a confined, axisymmetric wake at density ratios, S ≡ ρ1 /ρ2> 1 (i.e. dense wake). The wake was produced by a pair of convergent nozzles mounted concentrically, one within the other, in a low-turbulence wind tunnel facility. Variations in S were achieved by employing two high density gases (S = 1.53 and 5.11) in the inner flow with air in the outer flow. For a fixed S, there existed a critical value of shear above which dominant peaks appeared abruptly in the near-wake velocity spectra, as quantified by hot-wire anemometry. Corresponding high-speed video sequences revealed large-scale, sinuous wake motions. Results on the confined wake's response to externally-applied, acoustic forcing are also presented. The presence of discrete spectral peaks and coordinated instability oscillations suggests the emergence of a self-sustained, global mode.

  9. Experimental study of crossflow instability on a Mach 6 yawed cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Stuart; Saric, William

    2014-11-01

    Boundary-layer stability and transition represents a key challenge for the designer of hypersonic vehicles, which typically feature highly-swept and conical features inclined to the free stream. The transition process on each of these geometries is typically dominated by the three-dimensional crossflow instability. In order to advance the goal of a physics-based transition prediction method, crossflow experiments were undertaken in the Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel at Texas A&M University. Detailed boundary-layer measurements were performed on a 7-degree cone at a 6-degree angle of incidence using constant-temperature hot-wire anemometry (CTA) to produce boundary-layer contours at constant axial location. These contours illustrate the characteristic streamwise vortex pattern and mean-flow distortion characteristic of crossflow-dominated flows. Additionally, the high frequency response of the CTA system allows for analysis of the spectral content of the flow. These measurements show a high degree of qualitative agreement with analogous studies performed in low-speed flows.

  10. Experimental characterization of transition region in rotating-disk boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, M. E.; Mukund, V.; Scott, J.; Pier, B.

    2013-03-01

    The three-dimensional boundary layer due to a disk rotating in otherwise still fluid is well known for its sudden transition from a laminar to a turbulent regime, the location of which closely coincides with the onset of local absolute instability. The present experimental investigation focuses on the region around transition and analyses in detail the features that lead from the unperturbed boundary layer to a fully turbulent flow. Mean velocity profiles and high-resolution spectra are obtained by constant-temperature hot-wire anemometry. By carefully analysing these measurements, regions in the flow are identified that correspond to linear, weakly nonlinear, or turbulent dynamics. The frequency that dominates the flow prior to transition is explained in terms of spatial growth rates, derived from the exact linear dispersion relation. In the weakly nonlinear region, up to six clearly identifiable harmonic peaks are found. High-resolution spectra reveal the existence of discrete frequency components that are deemed to correspond to fluctuations stationary with respect to the disk surface. These discrete components are only found in the weakly nonlinear region. By systematically acquiring low- and high-resolution spectra over a range of narrowly spaced radial and axial positions, it is shown that while the transition from laminar to turbulent regimes occurs sharply at some distance from the disk surface, a complex weakly nonlinear region of considerable radial extent continues to prevail close to the disk surface.

  11. Understanding the impact of initial condition on low Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor driven flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchibhatla, Sarat Chandra; Ranjan, Devesh

    2012-11-01

    Experimental investigation of the effects of initial conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor instability was performed using the Water Channel facility at Texas A&M University. Hot and cold water (with a temperature difference of ~7-8 degrees C) selected as working fluids were unstably stratified using a splitter plate resulting in a low Atwood number of ~0.0015. Using a servo controlled flapper system the effect of initial conditions is studied using different diagnostics such as optical imaging, thermocouples and hot-wire anemometry. A parametric study comprising of up to 10 modes of the initial condition was performed by varying the number of modes as well as modal composition (i . e . ratio of wavenumbers and phase differences). Variation of density, temperature and velocity field in the linear and non-linear stages of RT growth was recorded and analyzed. At non-dimensional time, t* = t (At g /H)0.5= 1.3, where t is the time, H is the width of the Channel, and g is the acceleration due to gravity, power spectra of the non-dimensional density showed fine-scale components that are dependent upon the initial condition. Plots of scalar dissipation and mixing rate indicate greater dissipation rate at early times that tends to asymptote to the order of kinematic viscosity at late times.

  12. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  13. Wind tunnel experiments: cold-air pooling and atmospheric decoupling above a melting snow patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Rebecca; Paterna, Enrico; Horender, Stefan; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The longevity of perennial snowfields is not fully understood, but it is known that strong atmospheric stability and thus boundary-layer decoupling limit the amount of (sensible and latent) heat that can be transmitted from the atmosphere to the snow surface. The strong stability is typically caused by two factors, (i) the temperature difference between the (melting) snow surface and the near-surface atmosphere and (ii) cold-air pooling in topographic depressions. These factors are almost always a prerequisite for perennial snowfields to exist. For the first time, this contribution investigates the relative importance of the two factors in a controlled wind tunnel environment. Vertical profiles of sensible heat and momentum fluxes are measured using two-component hot-wire and one-component cold-wire anemometry directly over the melting snow patch. The comparison between a flat snow surface and one that has a depression shows that atmospheric decoupling is strongly increased in the case of topographic sheltering but only for low to moderate wind speeds. For those conditions, the near-surface suppression of turbulent mixing was observed to be strongest, and the ambient flow was decoupled from the surface, enhancing near-surface atmospheric stability over the single snow patch.

  14. Wind tunnel experiments: cold-air pooling and atmospheric decoupling above a melting snow patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mott

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of perennial snow fields is not fully understood but it is known that strong atmospheric stability and thus boundary layer decoupling limits the amount of (sensible and latent heat that can be transmitted to the snow surface. The strong stability is typically caused by two factors, (i the temperature difference between the (melting snow surface and the near-surface atmosphere and (ii cold-air pooling in topographic depressions. These factors are almost always a prerequisite for perennial snow fields to exist. For the first time, this contribution investigates the relative importance of the two factors in a controlled wind tunnel environment. Vertical profiles of sensible heat fluxes are measured using two-component hot wire and one-component cold-wire anemometry directly over the melting snow patch. The comparison between a flat snow surface and one that has a depression shows that atmospheric decoupling is strongly increased in the case of topographic sheltering but only for low to moderate wind speeds. For those conditions, the near-surface suppression of turbulent mixing was observed to be strongest and drainage flows were decoupled from the surface enhancing atmospheric stability and promoting the cold-air pooling over the single snow patch. Further work is required to systematically and quantitatively describe the flux distribution for varying terrain geometry, wind speeds and air temperatures.

  15. Studies of wall shear and mass transfer in a large scale model of neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, W J; Gerjarusek, S; Scherer, P W

    1990-01-01

    The problem of endotracheal erosion associated with neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) is investigated through measurement of air velocity profiles in a scaled up model of the system. Fluid mechanical scaling principles are applied in order to construct a model within which velocity profiles are measured by hot-wire anemometry. The effects of two different jet geometries are investigated. Velocity gradients measured near the tracheal wall are used to measure the shear stresses caused by the jet flow on the wall. The Chilton-Colburn analogy between the transport of momentum and mass is applied to investigate tracheal drying caused by the high shear flow. Shear forces are seen to be more than two times higher for jets located near the endotracheal tube wall than for those located axisymmetrically in the center of the tube. Since water vapor fluxes are dependent on these shears, they are also higher for the asymmetric case. Fluxes are shown to be greatly dependent on the temperature and relative humidity of the inspired gas. Water from the tracheal surface may be depleted within one second if inspired gases are inadequately heated and humidified. It is recommended that the design of neonatal HFJV devices include delivery of heated (near body temperature), humidified (as close to 100% humidity as possible) gases through an axisymmetric jet to best avoid the problem of endotracheal erosion.

  16. Turbulent axisymmetric swirling wake: equilibrium similarity solution and experiments with a wind turbine as wake generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, Martin; Dufresne, Nathaniel

    2013-11-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of the turbulent axisymmetric swirling wake was carried out. An equilibrium similarity theory was derived that obtained scaling functions from conditions for similarity from the equations of motion, leading to a new scaling function for the decay of the swirling velocity component. Axial and azimuthal (swirl) velocity fields were measured in the wake of a single 3-bladed model wind turbine with rotor diameter of 0.91 m, up to 20 diameters downstream, using X-wire constant temperature hot-wire anemometry. The turbine was positioned in the free stream, near the entrance of the UNH Flow Physics Facility, which has a test section of 6m × 2.7m cross section and 72m length. Measurements were conducted at different rotor loading conditions with blade tip-speed ratios up to 2.8. At U∞ = 7 m/s, the Reynolds number based on turbine diameter was approximately 5 ×105 . Both mean velocity deficit and mean swirl were found to persist beyond 20 diameters downstream. First evidence for a new scaling function for the mean swirl, Wmax ~Uo3 / 2 ~x-1 was found. The similarity solution thus predicts that in the axisymmetric swirling wake mean swirl decays faster with x-1 than mean velocity deficit with x - 2 / 3.

  17. Evaluation and accuracy of the local velocity data measurements in an agitated vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kysela Bohuš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Velocity measurements of the flow field in an agitated vessel are necessary for the improvement and better understanding of the mixing processes. The obtained results are used for the calculations of the impeller pumping capacity, comparison of the power consumption etc. We performed various measurements of the local velocities in an agitated vessel final results of which should be processed for several purposes so it was necessary to make an analysis of the obtained data suitability and their quality. Analysed velocity data were obtained from the LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry measurements performed on a standard equipment where the flat bottomed vessel with four baffles was agitated by the six-blade Rushton turbine. The results from both used methods were compared. The frequency analyses were examined as well as the dependency of the data rates, time series lengths etc. The demands for the data processed in the form of the ensemble-averaged results were also established.

  18. Concept for a cyclonic spray scrubber as a fission product removal system for filtered containment venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebel, Luke S., E-mail: Luke.Lebel@cnl.ca; Piro, Markus H., E-mail: Markus.Piro@cnl.ca; MacCoy, Reilly, E-mail: Reilly.MacCoy@cnl.ca; Clouthier, Anthony, E-mail: Tony.Clouthier@cnl.ca; Chin, Yu-Shan, E-mail: Sammy.Chin@cnl.ca

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new cyclonic spray scrubber concept for filtered containment venting is presented. • Mechanistic particle removal model paired with discrete particle CFD simulations. • Calculations predict that very high decontamination factors can be achieved. - Abstract: The application of a cyclonic spray scrubber as a technology for filtered containment venting is proposed in this paper. This study has paired a mechanistic model for the kinetic particle coagulation of with Euler–Lagrange discrete particle simulations in order to predict particle decontamination factors. The continuous phase behavior has been investigated using computational fluid dynamics simulations together with phase Doppler anemometry measurements. Calculations show that spray scrubbing of radionuclide-bearing aerosols could be very effective, and predict that decontamination factors can be in excess of 10{sup 6} for micron sized particles and excess of 10{sup 3} for submicron particles. In the wake of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, filtered containment venting is being viewed as an increasingly important severe accident mitigation technology. Cyclonic spray scrubbing could be implemented as a passive technology for decontaminating containment gases in an emergency prior to their discharge to the atmosphere, and is a novel approach for this application.

  19. Research of transport and deposition of aerosol in human airway replica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mravec Filip

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern about knowledge of aerosol transport in human lungs is caused by great potential of use of inhaled pharmaceuticals. Second substantial motive for the research is an effort to minimize adverse effects of particular matter emitted by traffic and industry on human health. We created model geometry of human lungs to 7th generation of branching. This model geometry was used for fabrication of two physical models. The first one is made from thin walled transparent silicone and it allows a measurement of velocity and size of aerosol particles by Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA. The second one is fabricated by stereolithographic method and it is designed for aerosol deposition measurements. We provided a series of measurements of aerosol transport in the transparent model and we ascertained remarkable phenomena linked with lung flow. The results are presented in brief. To gather how this phenomena affects aerosol deposition in human lungs we used the second model and we developed a technique for deposition fraction and deposition efficiency assessment. The results confirmed that non-symmetric and complicated shape of human airways essentially affects transport and deposition of aerosol. The research will now focus on deeper insight in aerosol deposition.

  20. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  1. Recommendations for the design of interference probes for the simultaneous measurement of turbulent concentration and velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Alaïs; Mydlarski, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The present work focuses on the design and optimization of a thermal-anemometry-based interference probe used to simultaneously measure concentration and velocity at relatively high temporal and spatial resolutions in turbulent flows. Although a small number of similar measurements have been successfully performed, little work has been undertaken to investigate the design of such specialized probes, in which one hot-wire sensor is operated downstream of, and micrometers from, a second one. To this end, experiments performed in the non-buoyant region of a helium-air jet were undertaken to study the effects of overheat ratios, wire separation distances, wire diameters, and wire materials on the performance of interference probes. They revealed that accurate concentration and velocity measurements require that an interference probe have two wires of differing diameters with a small separation, of about 10 μm, between the wires. Furthermore, the upstream wire should be operated at a high overheat ratio and the downstream wire at a low one. An optimal design for an interference probe is presented, and measurements made in a turbulent jet are used to benchmark its accuracy. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (Grant 217184).

  2. Design and characteristics of electric supercharger for diesel engine acceleration by additional rapid air injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Chun-de; ZHOU Hong-xiu

    2006-01-01

    The ES (electric supercharger) driven by a high-speed brushless motor was developed to solve the problem of smoke caused by the turbocharger's sluggish response during acceleration.Its rotation speed was from 6 000 r/min to 24 000 r/min,and the maximum flux was 0.1 kg/s.The structural design of the electric supercharger is novel,which makes it easier to set the lubricating installation and to assemble.The velocity distribution at the outlet of the electric supercharger is determined by hot-wire anemometry under various rotation speeds in steady state.Furthermore,the trends of the flux and charge rate with various speeds were analyzed.In addition,the transient response was detected from the motor setup to smooth running within 10 s,15 s,20 s and 25 s respectively,and the characteristic of the transient flux is under pilot study.Research results indicate that the electric supercharger can respond rapidly with the great flux,and it is independent of the operating conditions of a diesel engine.Therefore,it is a feasible way to reduce smoke emission and improve the acceleration performance.

  3. Experimental determination of tunnel ventilation axial ducted fan performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šekularac Milan B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate traffic tunnel ventilation flows, a scaled model of a traffic tunnel with longitudinal ventilation system based on ducted fans is used. Flows in tunnels are influenced by tunnel geometry, fan characteristics, ventilation operation scenario, vehicle traffic, atmospheric factors, etc. To analyze flow fields of tunnels in detail, knowledge of tunnel jet-fan properties and turbulent flow characteristics at the fan exit are required, and can be used as input data for CFD boundary conditions of tunnel flow computation. For this purpose experimental measurements were done using the hot wire anemometry technique. The obtained results, trough ensemble-averaged and time averaged profiles of all velocity components, turbulence intensity, turbulent kinetic energy, integral flow length scales, available Reynolds stresses, Turbulent kinetic energy production rates and the fan thrust performance, are presented. These data allow us to analyze in more detail the influence of fan flow on energy and pollutant removal efficiencies of the tunnel ventilation and to evaluate accuracy of CFD studies on fan improvements.

  4. HOT WIRE MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER ON A FILM COOLING PLATE WITH DIFFUSION HOLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This study experimentally investigated the film cooling flowfield of a single row of diffusion holes, from which the secondary air flow was injected into a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient on a flat plate. Circular-shaped holes were also tested as a basis for comparison. All the holes were inclined downstream at 35° with respect to the surface and the lateral spacing between the holes was 3 diameters of the hole. The mainstream velocity was maintained at 17 m/s and the Reynolds number based on the injection hole diameter was almost 11000. The density ratio of the jet to mainstream was 1.0, and the jet-to-mainstream velocity ratios M were 0.5 and 1.5. Normal-type and X-type hot wire anemometries were used to measure the streamwise mean velocity and its components, the normal and shear turbulent Reynolds stress components at the locations from the backward edge of the injection hole to 25 diameters downstream.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamics of membrane wings with adaptive compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Jillian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings are known to provide superior aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers (Re =104 -105), primarily due to passive shape adaptation to flow conditions. In addition to this passive deformation, active control of the fluid-structure interaction and resultant aerodynamic properties can be achieved through the use of dielectric elastomer actuators as the wing membrane material. When actuated, membrane pretension is decreased and wing camber increases. Additionally, actuation at resonance frequencies allows additional control over wing camber. We present results using synchronized (i) time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) to resolve the flow field, (ii) 3D direct linear transformation (DLT) to recover membrane shape, (iii) lift/drag/torque measurements and (iv) near-wake hot wire anemometry measurements to characterize the fluid-structure interactions. Particular attention is paid to cases in which the vortex shedding frequency, the membrane resonance, and the actuation frequency coincide. In quantitatively examining both flow field and membrane shape at a range of actuation frequencies and vortex shedding frequencies, this work seeks to find actuation parameters that allow for active control of boundary layer separation over a range of flow conditions. Also at Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport.

  6. The CoLaPipe--the new Cottbus large pipe test facility at Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Franziska; Zanoun, El-Sayed; Öngüner, Emir; Egbers, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    The CoLaPipe is a novel test facility at the Department of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg (BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg), set up to investigate fully developed pipe flow at high Reynolds numbers (Re(m) ⩽ 1.5 × 10(6)). The design of the CoLaPipe is closed-return with two available test sections providing a length-to-diameter ratio of L/D = 148 and L/D = 79. Within this work, we introduce the CoLaPipe and describe the various components in detail, i.e., the settling chamber, the inlet contraction, the blower, bends, and diffusers as well as the cooling system. A special feature is the numerically optimized contraction design. The applications of different measuring techniques such as hot-wire anemometry and static pressure measurements to quantitatively evaluate the mean flow characteristics and turbulence statistics are discussed as well. In addition, capabilities and limitations of available and new pipe flow facilities are presented and reconsidered based on their length-to-diameter ratio, the achieved Reynolds numbers, and the resulting spatial resolution. Here, the focus is on the facility design, the presentation of some basic characteristics, and its contribution to a reviewed list of specific questions still arising, e.g., scaling and structural behavior of turbulent pipe flow as well as the influence of the development length on turbulence investigations.

  7. Study on the generation of turbulent boundary layer in wind tunnel and the effect of aspect ratio of a rectangular obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hee Chang; Jeong, Tae Yoon [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    We investigate the flow characteristics around a series of rectangular bodies (40{sup d}x80{sup w}x80{sup h}, 80{sup d}x80{sup w}x80{sup h} and 160{sup d}x80{sup w}x80{sup h}) placed in a deep turbulent boundary layer. The study is aiming to understand the surface pressure distribution around the bodies such as the suction pressure in the leading edge, when the flow is normal, which is responsible for producing extreme suction pressures on the roof. The experiment includes wind tunnel work by using HWA (Hot-Wire Anemometry) and pressure transducers. The experiments are carried out at three different Reynolds numbers, based on the velocity U at the body height h, of 2.4x10{sup 4}, 4.6x10{sup 4} and 6.7x10{sup 4}, and large enough that the mean flow is effectively Reynolds number independent. The results include the measurements of the growth of the turbulent boundary layer in the wind tunnel and the surface pressure around the bodies.

  8. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20

  9. Arrangement of scale-interaction and large-scale modulation in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between small- and large-scale motions are inherent in the near-wall dynamics of wall-bounded flows. We here examine the scale-interaction embedded within the streamwise velocity component. Data were acquired using hot-wire anemometry in ZPG turbulent boundary layers, for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ≡ δUτ / ν ~ 2800 to 22800. After first decomposing velocity signals into contributions from small- and large-scales, we then represent the time-varying small-scale energy with time series of its instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency, via a wavelet-based method. Features of the scale-interaction are inferred from isocorrelation maps, formed by correlating the large-scale velocity with its concurrent small-scale amplitude and frequency. Below the onset of the log-region, the physics constitutes aspects of amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Time shifts, associated with the correlation extrema--representing the lead/lag of the small-scale signatures relative to the large-scales--are shown to be governed by inner-scaling. Wall-normal trends of time shifts are explained by considering the arrangement of scales in the log- and intermittent-regions, and how they relate to stochastic top-down and bottom-up processes.

  10. Design and characterization of a linear Hencken-type burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M F; Bohlin, G A; Schrader, P E; Bambha, R P; Kliewer, C J; Johansson, K O; Michelsen, H A

    2016-11-01

    We have designed and constructed a Hencken-type burner that produces a 38-mm-long linear laminar partially premixed co-flow diffusion flame. This burner was designed to produce a linear flame for studies of soot chemistry, combining the benefit of the conventional Hencken burner's laminar flames with the advantage of the slot burner's geometry for optical measurements requiring a long interaction distance. It is suitable for measurements using optical imaging diagnostics, line-of-sight optical techniques, or off-axis optical-scattering methods requiring either a long or short path length through the flame. This paper presents details of the design and operation of this new burner. We also provide characterization information for flames produced by this burner, including relative flow-field velocities obtained using hot-wire anemometry, temperatures along the centerline extracted using direct one-dimensional coherent Raman imaging, soot volume fractions along the centerline obtained using laser-induced incandescence and laser extinction, and transmission electron microscopy images of soot thermophoretically sampled from the flame.

  11. Experimental and modeling study of the flow over a skewed bump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, David S.; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional separated flows can be very sensitive to geometry and inlet conditions, such that a small change in the geometry or the upstream boundary layer could cause the flow structure to change drastically. This study examines the geometric sensitivity of a skewed bump with axis ratio 4/3 by changing the angle of the bump with respect to the flow. The three-dimensional, three-component mean velocity field was acquired using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) for several bump angles. The flow is dominated by large coherent vortices in the wake. For a symmetric case, two counter-rotating vortices exist in the wake, but when the bump is skewed relative to the oncoming flow one vortex structure is much stronger and overwhelms the other vortex. A comparison to RANS simulations found that the RANS simulations predict the velocity fields with reasonable accuracy within the separation bubble, but are very inaccurate downstream of reattachment. Using a time-resolved MRV sequence, the shedding frequency of the wake was determined for two bump angles. Hot-wire anemometry confirmed the shedding frequencies found from the MRV data and observed that the shedding frequency is sensitive to the bump angle at low bump angles, but is insensitive at high bump angles. Funding provided by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. On the Effects of an Installed Propeller Slipstream on Wing Aerodynamic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Catalano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an experimental study of the effect of an installed propeller slipstream on a wing boundary layer. The main objective was to analyse through wind tunnel experiments the effect of the propeller slipstream on the wing boundary layer characteristics such as: laminar flow extension and transition, laminar separation bubbles and reattachment and turbulent separation. Two propeller/wing configurations were studied: pusher and tractor. Experimental work was performed using two different models: a two-dimensional wing with a central cylindrical nacelle for the tractor configuration, and a simple two-dimensional wing with a downstream propeller for the pusher tests. The relative position between propeller and wing could be changed in the pusher model, and a total of 7 positions were analysed. For the tractor tests the relative propeller/wing was fixed, but three different propellers: two, three and four bladed were tested. Measurements included pressure distribution, hot wire anemometry and boundary layer characteristics by flow visualisation. The results showed that the pusher propeller inflow affects the wing characteristics by changing the lift, drag, and also delays the boundary layer transition and separation. These effects are highly dependent on the relative position of the wing/propeller. On the other hand, the tractor propeller slipstream induces transition and its effect is dependent on the number of blades.

  13. [Intraoperative monitoring in artificial respiration of premature and newborn infants. I. Monitoring of respiratory parameters and alveolar ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, G; Heipertz, W; Leidig, E; Madee, S

    1986-06-01

    Monitoring of ventilation serves to ensure adequate alveolar ventilation and arterial oxygenation, and to avoid pulmonary damage due to mechanical ventilation. Basic clinical monitoring, i.e., inspection, auscultation (including precordial or oesophageal stethoscope) and monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure, is mandatory. Mechanical ventilation is monitored by ventilation pressures (peak pressure, plateau pressure and endexpiratory pressure), ventilation volumes (measured at the in/expiratory valve of the respirator and by hot-wire anemometry at the tube connector), ventilation rate, and inspiratory oxygen concentration (FiO2). Alveolar ventilation should be continuously and indirectly recorded by capnometry (pECO2) and by measurement of transcutaneous pCO2 (tcpCO2), whereas oxygenation is determined via measurement of transcutaneous pO2 (tcpO2). Invasive monitoring of gas exchange is essential in prolonged or intrathoracic interventions as well as in neonates with cardiopulmonary problems. paCO2 may be estimated by capillary or venous blood gas analysis; arterial blood gas analysis is required for exact determination of paCO2 as well as arteriocutaneous pCO2 (atcDCO2) and arterio-end-expiratory (aEDCO2) gradients.

  14. Glass-on-Glass Fabrication of Bottle-Shaped Tunable Microlasers and their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan M.; Yang, Yong; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-04-01

    We describe a novel method for making microbottle-shaped lasers by using a CO2 laser to melt Er:Yb glass onto silica microcapillaries or fibres. This is realised by the fact that the two glasses have different melting points. The CO2 laser power is controlled to flow the doped glass around the silica cylinder. In the case of a capillary, the resulting geometry is a hollow, microbottle-shaped resonator. This is a simple method for fabricating a number of glass whispering gallery mode (WGM) lasers with a wide range of sizes on a single, micron-scale structure. The Er:Yb doped glass outer layer is pumped at 980 nm via a tapered optical fibre and WGM lasing is recorded around 1535 nm. This structure facilitates a new way to thermo-optically tune the microlaser modes by passing gas through the capillary. The cooling effect of the gas flow shifts the WGMs towards shorter wavelengths and thermal tuning of the lasing modes over 70 GHz is achieved. Results are fitted using the theory of hot wire anemometry, allowing the flow rate to be calibrated with a flow sensitivity as high as 72 GHz/sccm. Strain tuning of the microlaser modes by up to 60 GHz is also demonstrated.

  15. Homogeneous Turbulence Generated by Multi-scale Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Per-Age [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Davidson, Peter, E-mail: per.a.krogstad@ntnu.no [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-22

    We investigate wind tunnel turbulence generated by a conventional and two multi-scale grids. The conventional and multi-scale grids were all designed to produce turbulence with the same integral scale, so that a direct comparison could be made between the different flows. The decay of the turbulent energy was mapped in detail from a distance from the grid less than one mesh width, down to distances of the order of 200 meshes using a combination of laser doppler and hot wire anemometry tools. The turbulent decay rate behind our multi-scale grids was found to be virtually identical to that behind the equivalent conventional grid after the initial transition had been completed. In particular, all flows exhibit a power-law decay of energy, u{sup 2} {approx} t{sup -n}, where n is very close to the classical Saffman exponent of n = 6/5 in the far field. Our results are at odds with some other experiments performed on multi-scale grids, where significantly higher energy decay exponents have been reported.

  16. Acoustic reconstruction of the velocity field in a furnace using a characteristic flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqin; Zhou, Huaichun; Chen, Shiying; Zhang, Yindi; Wei, Xinli; Zhao, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic method can provide a noninvasive, efficient and full-field reconstruction of aerodynamic fields in a furnace. A simple yet reasonable model is devised for reconstruction of a velocity field in a cross section of a tangential furnace from acoustic measurements based on typical physical characteristics of the field. The solenoidal component of the velocity field is modeled by a curved surface, derived by rotating a curve of Gaussian distribution, determined by six characteristic parameters, while the nonrotational component is governed by a priori knowledge. Thus the inverse problem is translated into determination of the characteristic parameters using a set of acoustic projection data. First numerical experiments were undertaken to simulate the acoustic measurement, so as to preliminarily validate the effectiveness of the model. Based on this, physical experiments under different operating conditions were performed in a pilot-scale setup to provide a further test. Hot-wire anemometry and strip floating were applied to compare with acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements provided satisfactory consistency with both of these approaches. Nevertheless, for a field with a relatively large magnitude of air velocities, the acoustic measurement can give more reliable reconstructions. Extension of the model to measurements of hot tangential furnaces is also discussed.

  17. Experimental investigation of the effect of a singly-periodic perturbation on a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jonathan; McKeon, Beverley

    2016-11-01

    A 3D printed surface which is singly periodic in the streamwise and spanwise directions was placed in a turbulent boundary layer facility. The zero-pressure gradient boundary layer which developed over this singly periodic roughness was characterized with hot-wire anemometry. Compared to a canonical smooth-wall flow, the periodic roughness introduces through its boundary condition a static, singly-periodic fluctuation in mean velocity. From this linear introduction of a single-mode perturbation into the flow, the nonlinear effects of the perturbation on travelling modes can be tracked through statistics, spectra, and mean flow quantities to establish a link between roughness geometry and flow physics. Variation of the velocity power spectrum within the rough boundary layer as well as variation between smooth- and rough-wall boundary layers show the effect of the roughness to be concentrated at wavenumbers which correspond to the roughness wavelength. The effects of the roughness ultimately manifest nonlinearly as an altered Reynolds-stress field which changes the mean velocity profile of the boundary layer. Implications for more general roughness are discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Office of Naval Research, Grant N000141310739.

  18. Glass-on-Glass Fabrication of Bottle-Shaped Tunable Microlasers and their Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan M; Yang, Yong; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-04-28

    We describe a novel method for making microbottle-shaped lasers by using a CO2 laser to melt Er:Yb glass onto silica microcapillaries or fibres. This is realised by the fact that the two glasses have different melting points. The CO2 laser power is controlled to flow the doped glass around the silica cylinder. In the case of a capillary, the resulting geometry is a hollow, microbottle-shaped resonator. This is a simple method for fabricating a number of glass whispering gallery mode (WGM) lasers with a wide range of sizes on a single, micron-scale structure. The Er:Yb doped glass outer layer is pumped at 980 nm via a tapered optical fibre and WGM lasing is recorded around 1535 nm. This structure facilitates a new way to thermo-optically tune the microlaser modes by passing gas through the capillary. The cooling effect of the gas flow shifts the WGMs towards shorter wavelengths and thermal tuning of the lasing modes over 70 GHz is achieved. Results are fitted using the theory of hot wire anemometry, allowing the flow rate to be calibrated with a flow sensitivity as high as 72 GHz/sccm. Strain tuning of the microlaser modes by up to 60 GHz is also demonstrated.

  19. An in vitro comparative study of intracanal fluid motion and wall shear stress induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files in a simulated root canal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software.

  20. Flow sensor using a hollow whispering gallery mode microlaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan M.; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle N.

    2016-03-01

    Flow sensing using the concept of a hot whispering gallery microlaser is presented. Silica microcapillaries or microbubbles, coated with a layer of erbium:ytterbium (Er:Yb) doped phosphate laser glass, result in a hollow, microbottle-shaped laser geometry. The Er:Yb doped glass outer layer is pumped at 980 nm via a tapered optical fiber and whispering gallery mode (WGM) lasing is recorded at 1535 nm. When gas passes through the capillary, the WGMs shift toward shorter wavelengths due to the cooling effect of the fluid flow. In this way, thermal tuning of the lasing modes over 70 GHz can be achieved. The output end of the capillary is connected to a mass flow sensor and the WGM shift rate as a function of flow rate and pump laser power is measured, with the results fitted using hot wire anemometry theory. Flow sensing can also be realized when the cavity is passively probed at 780 nm, with the estimated Q-factor of the WGMs being in excess of 105.

  1. Development of a balloon volume sensor for pulsating balloon catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Timothy D C; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2004-01-01

    Helium pulsed balloons are integral components of several cardiovascular devices, including intraaortic balloon pumps (IABP) and a novel intravenous respiratory support catheter. Effective use of these devices clinically requires full inflation and deflation of the balloon, and improper operating conditions that lead to balloon under-inflation can potentially reduce respiratory or cardiac support provided to the patient. The goal of the present study was to extend basic spirographic techniques to develop a system to dynamically measure balloon volumes suitable for use in rapidly pulsating balloon catheters. The dynamic balloon volume sensor system (DBVSS) developed here used hot wire anemometry to measure helium flow in the drive line from console to catheter and integrated the flow to determine the volume delivered in each balloon pulsation. An important component of the DBVSS was an algorithm to automatically detect and adjust flow signals and measured balloon volumes in the presence of gas composition changes that arise from helium leaks occurring in these systems. The DBVSS was capable of measuring balloon volumes within 5-10% of actual balloon volumes over a broad range of operating conditions relevant to IABP and the respiratory support catheter. This includes variations in helium concentration from 70-100%, pulsation frequencies from 120-480 beats per minute, and simulated clinical conditions of reduced balloon filling caused by constricted vessels, increased driveline, or catheter resistance.

  2. Control of Trapped Vorticity in an Offset Diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Travis J.; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Vorticity concentrations trapped within in a recessed section in the moldline of an offset diffuser are manipulated using fluidic actuation to alter the flow evolution within the diffuser. Trapped vorticity is engendered by deliberate local flow separation owing to the aggressive moldline curvature. The strength and scale of the trapped vortex and its interaction with the cross flow are controlled by a spanwise array of streamwise, surface-integrated fluidic actuators that are placed just upstream of the recessed moldline. The local and global characteristics of the diffuser flow in the absence and presence of the actuation are investigated at Mach numbers up to M = 0 . 7 , using static pressure distributions, hot-wire anemometry, and particle image velocimetry. It is shown that flow distortion as measured by cross sectional variations of the total pressure distribution within the diffuser can be significantly modified by manipulation of the trapped vorticity, and is reduced (by over 50%) with increasing momentum of the actuation jets. The mitigation of flow distortion by trapped vorticity actuation is associated with manipulation of the evolution of streamwise secondary vortices within the diffuser. Supported by ONR.

  3. Experimental thermo-aerodynamic characterisation of a jet in crossflow, impacting or not, in channel turbulence; Caracterisation experimentale thermo-aeraulique d'un jet transverse impactant ou non, en turbulence de conduite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fougairolle, P.

    2009-07-15

    This work consists in the experimental study of a jet in crossflow in a closed wind tunnel. Depending on the value of the velocity ratio (r U{sub j}/U{infinity}), this confined rectangular jet can interact or impact with the opposite wall from the one it issues. The jet is slightly heated ({approx}10 C) in order to stay in the passive scalar case. An improvement of the experimental facility has been done to obtain thermal boundary conditions compatible with the measurements of slight differences of temperature, imposed by the passive scalar. Concerning the metrology, hot and cold wire anemometry and thermometry are used, and all the anemometric devices are developed and built in the lab. Probes made with Wollaston wire (Pt-Rh) of 0.35{mu}m diameter are coupled with an anemometer and a thermometer optimized to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The results are obtained both thanks to visualizations by fast camera shots for several velocity ratios (r between 3 and 12), and thanks to local hot and cold wire measurements, in the particular case of two velocity ratios (r = 3.3 and 9.4). Mixing properties of the scalar are studied by the plot of statistical values of velocity and temperature in different plans, perpendicularly to the three axis. The analysis of spectral densities of the signals on several typical locations emphasizes some features of the dynamic behaviour of the jet. (author)

  4. Non-linear interactions in a boundary layer developing over an array of cubes using stochastic estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Karin; Perret, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, a boundary layer developing over a rough-wall consisting of staggered cubes with a plan area packing density, λp = 25%, is studied within a wind tunnel using combined particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry to investigate the non-linear interactions between large-scale momentum regions and small-scale structures induced by the presence of the roughness. Due to the highly turbulent nature of the roughness sub-layer and measurement equipment limitations, temporally resolved flow measurements are not feasible, making the conventional filtering methods used for triple decomposition unsuitable for the present work. Thus, multi-time delay linear stochastic estimation is used to decompose the flow into large-scales and small-scales. Analysis of the scale-decomposed skewness of the turbulent velocity (u') shows a significant contribution of the non-linear term uL ' uS ' 2 ¯ , which represents the influence of the large-scales ( uL ' ) onto the small-scales ( uS ' ). It is shown that this non-linear influence of the large-scale momentum regions occurs with all three components of velocity in a similar manner. Finally, through two-point spatio-temporal correlation analysis, it is shown quantitatively that large-scale momentum regions influence small-scale structures throughout the boundary layer through a non-linear top-down mechanism.

  5. Focused-based multifractal analysis of the wake in a wind turbine array utilizing proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadum, Hawwa; Ali, Naseem; Cal, Raúl

    2016-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements have been performed on a 3 x 3 wind turbine array to study the multifractality of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipations. A multifractal spectrum and Hurst exponents are determined at nine locations downstream of the hub height, and bottom and top tips. Higher multifractality is found at 0.5D and 1D downstream of the bottom tip and hub height. The second order of the Hurst exponent and combination factor show an ability to predict the flow state in terms of its development. Snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition is used to identify the coherent and incoherent structures and to reconstruct the stochastic velocity using a specific number of the POD eigenfunctions. The accumulation of the turbulent kinetic energy in top tip location exhibits fast convergence compared to the bottom tip and hub height locations. The dissipation of the large and small scales are determined using the reconstructed stochastic velocities. The higher multifractality is shown in the dissipation of the large scale compared to small-scale dissipation showing consistency with the behavior of the original signals.

  6. Drag of a turbulent boundary layer with transverse 2D circular rods on the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Md; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.; Talluru, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a turbulent boundary layer developing over a rod-roughened wall with a spacing of ( is the spacing between two adjacent roughness elements, and is the rod diameter). Static pressure measurements are taken around a single roughness element to accurately determine the friction velocity, and the error in the origin, , which are the two prominent issues that surround rough-wall boundary layers. In addition, velocity measurements are taken at several streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry to obtain from the momentum integral equation. Results showed that both methods give consistent values for , indicating that the contribution of the viscous drag over this rough wall is negligible. This supports the results of Perry et al. (J Fluid Mech 177:437-466, 1969) and Antonia and Luxton (J Fluid Mech 48(04):721-761, 1971) in a boundary layer and of Leonardi et al. (2003) in a channel flow but does not agree with those of Furuya et al. (J Fluids Eng 98(4):635-643, 1976). The results show that both and can be unambiguously measured on this particular rough wall. This paves the way for a proper comparison between the boundary layer developing over this wall and the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer.

  7. Streak instability and generation of hairpin-vortices by a slotted jet in channel crossflow: Experiments and linear stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jimmy; Karp, Michael; Cohen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Streaks and hairpin-vortices are experimentally generated in a laminar plane Poiseuille crossflow by injecting a continuous jet through a streamwise slot normal to the crossflow, with air as the working media. Small disturbances form stable streaks, however, higher disturbances cause the formation of streaks which undergo instability leading to the generation of hairpin vortices. Particular emphasis is placed on the flow conditions close to the generation of hairpin-vortices. Measurements are carried out in the cases of natural and phase-locked disturbance employing smoke visualisation, particle image velocimetry, and hot-wire anemometry, which include, the dominant frequency, wavelength, and the disturbance shape (or eigenfunctions) associated with the coherent part of the velocity field. A linear stability analysis for both one- and two-dimensional base-flows is carried out to understand the mechanism of instability and good agreement of wavelength and eigenfunctions are obtained when compared to the experimental data, and a slight under-prediction of the growth-rates by the linear stability analysis consistent with the final nonlinear stages in transitional flows. Furthermore, an energy analysis for both the temporal and spatial stability analysis revels the dominance of the symmetric varicose mode, again, in agreement with the experiments, which is found to be governed by the balance of the wallnormal shear and dissipative effects rather than the spanwise shear. In all cases the anti-symmetric sinuous modes governed by the spanwise shear are found to be damped both in analysis and in our experiments.

  8. Performance evaluation and wake study of a micro wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comyn, G.I.; Nobes, D.S.; Fleck, B.A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    A horizontal axis micro wind turbine was tested in a low speed wind tunnel as part of a study on the icing of wind turbine blades. The turbine was monitored in order to measure the rotational speed of the rotor, axial thrust, and power output. A Kiel probe was used to measure the near wake of the turbine in relation to other wind turbines installed in a wind farm. Performance characteristics were calculated and compared with the turbine manufacturer's published data. A modified 1-D axial momentum theory was used to determine the power extracted from the wind by the rotor. Three-dimensional velocity components in the wake were measured with a hot wire anemometry technique. Results of the study were compared to actual outputs. The study showed that the model over-predicted power by 50 percent, but that the basic trend of the turbine was accurately characterized. Further studies will be conducted to determine the impact of ice growth on rotor imbalances. 27 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Interaction of two high Reynolds number axisymmetric turbulent wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obligado, M.; Klein, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With the recent discovery of non-equilibrium high Reynolds number scalings in the wake of axisymmetric plates (Nedic et al., PRL, 2013), it has become of importance to develop an experimental technique that permits to easily discriminate between different wake scalings. We propose an experimental setup that tests the presence of non-equilibrium turbulence using the streamwise variation of velocity fluctuations between two bluff bodies facing a flow. We have studied two different sets of plates (one with regular and another with irregular peripheries) with Hot-Wire Anemometry in a wind tunnel. By acquiring streamwise profiles for different plate separations and identifying the wake interaction length for each separation it is possible to estimate the streamwise evolution of the single wake width. From this evolution it is also possible to deduce the turbulence dissipation scalings. This work generalizes previous studies on the interaction of plane wakes (see Gomes-Fernandes et al., JFM, 2012) to include axisymmetric wakes. We find that the wake interaction length proposed in this cited work and a constant anisotropy assumption can be used to collapse the streamwise developments of the first three moments.

  10. Correlations between flow resistance and geometry in a model of the human nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, S; Sullivan, K J; Ho, C M; Chang, H K

    1993-10-01

    The relationship between the pressure losses within the nasal airways and nasal geometry were studied in a 3:1 scale model. The geometry of the model was based on magnetic resonance images of the skull of a healthy male subject. Pressure measurements, flow visualization, and hot-wire anemometry studies were performed at flow rates that, in vivo, corresponded to flows of between 0.05 and 1.50 l/s. The influence of nasal congestion and the collapse of the external nares were examined by using modeling clay to simulate local constrictions in the cross section. A dimensionless analysis of the pressure losses within three sections of the airway revealed the influence of various anatomic dimensions on nasal resistance. The region of the exterior nose behaves as a contraction-expansion nozzle in which the pressure losses are a function of the smallest cross-sectional area. Losses in the interior nose resemble those associated with channel flow. The nasopharynx is modeled as a sharp bend in a circular duct. Good correspondence was found between the predicted and actual pressure losses in the model under conditions that stimulated local obstructions and congestion.

  11. Endoscopic PIV measurements in a low pressure turbine rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegalj, Martin; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Department of Gas Turbines and Aerospace Propulsion

    2009-10-15

    Particle-Image-Velocimetry (PIV) is a useful way to acquire information about the flow in turbomachinery. Several premises have to be fulfilled to achieve high-quality data, for example, optical access, low vibrations and low reflections. However, not all test facilities comply with these requirements. If there is no optical access to the test area, measurements cannot be performed. The use of borescopic optics is a possible solution to this issue, as the access required is very small. Several different techniques can be used to measure the three components of the velocity vector, one of which is Stereo-PIV. These techniques require either large optical access from several viewing angles or highly complex setups. Orthogonal light sheet orientations in combination with borescopic optics using Planar-PIV can deliver sufficient information about the flow. This study will show the feasibility of such an approach in an enclosed test area, such as the interblade space in a Low-Pressure-Turbine-Rig. The results from PIV will be compared with data collected with conventional techniques, such as the Five-Hole-Probe and the 2-component Hot-Wire-Anemometry. An analysis of time- and phase-averaged data will be performed. (orig.)

  12. Surface obstacles in pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-11-01

    Flows past obstacles mounted on flat surfaces have been widely studied due to their ubiquity in nature and engineering. For nearly all of these studies, the freestream flow over the obstacle was steady, i.e. constant velocity unidirectional flow. Unsteady, pulsatile flows occur frequently in biology, geophysics, biomedical engineering, etc. Our study is aimed at extending the comprehensive knowledge base that exists for steady flows to considerably more complex pulsatile flows. Beyond the important practical applications, characterizing the vortex and wake dynamics of flows around surface obstacles embedded in pulsatile flows can provide insights into the underlying physics in all wake and junction flows. In this study, we experimentally investigated the wake of four canonical surface obstacles: hemisphere, cube, and circular cylinders with aspect ratio of 1:1 and 2:1. Phase-averaged PIV and hot-wire anemometry are used to characterize the dynamics of coherent structures in the wake and at the windward junction of the obstacles. Complex physics occur during the deceleration phase of the pulsatile inflow. We propose a framework for understanding these physics based on self-induced vortex propagation, similar to the phenomena exhibited by vortex rings. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351, and GW Centeor Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  13. Large eddy simulations of the flow field of a radially lobed nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2016-11-01

    Lobed nozzles have been a studied over the past couple of decades due to their enhanced mixing capabilities. Despite experimental (Hu et al., 2000) and numerical studies (Cooper et al., 2005), the nature of the jet is yet to be fully understood. This numerical study intends to carry out a thorough analysis of the flow field within and downstream of a six lobed nozzle. The study aims to confirm vortical interaction mechanisms and establish the role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the mixing process. This was inspired by a prior study by the authors wherein the same flow was studied using hot-wire anemometry. Although this helped obtain a qualitative idea of the flow, the 2D data was incapable of visualizing streamwise structures and the flow within the nozzle. Previous numerical simulations have used RANS and to simulate a single lobe of the nozzle; these results show some deficiencies in predicting the potential core length. Previous simulations done by authors indicated that RANS models qualitatively capture the flow structures but do not accurately represent the values of key parameters in the flow field. The present study aims to perform a 3D LES study of the flow field within and downstream of the nozzle to follow the ensuing free jet and thus analyze various mechanisms.

  14. On the development of turbulent boundary layer with wall transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Marco; Downs, Robert S., III; Fallenius, Bengt E. G.; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the development of the transpired boundary layer in zero pressure gradient is carried out on a 6.4 m long hydrodynamically smooth and perforated plate. The relatively longer development length of the present perforated plate compared to the ones used in previous studies allows us to investigate whether an asymptotic suction boundary layer with constant thickness is achieved for the turbulent state, analogously to what happens in the laminar state. Velocity profiles are obtained via hot-wire anemometry while the wall shear stress is measured at several streamwise locations with hot-film and wall-wire probes as well as with oil-film interferometry. The threshold suction coefficient above which relaminarization starts to occur is examined. The scaling of the mean velocity and of higher order velocity moments is discussed in light of the measured wall shear stress data. Support from the European Research Council of the Advanced Fluid Research On Drag reduction in Turbulence Experiments (AFRODITE) is acknowledged.

  15. Aerodynamic drag reduction of a simplified squareback vehicle using steady blowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlewood, R.P. [LaVisionUK Ltd, Grove, Oxon (United Kingdom); Passmore, M.A. [Loughborough University, Department of Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    A large contribution to the aerodynamic drag of a vehicle arises from the failure to fully recover pressure in the wake region, especially on squareback configurations. A degree of base pressure recovery can be achieved through careful shape optimisation, but the freedom of an automotive aerodynamicist to implement significant shape changes is limited by a variety of additional factors such styling, ergonomics and loading capacity. Active flow control technologies present the potential to create flow field modifications without the need for external shape changes and have received much attention in previous years within the aeronautical industry and, more recently, within the automotive industry. In this work the influence of steady blowing applied at a variety of angles on the roof trailing edge of a simplified 1/4 scale squareback style vehicle has been investigated. Hot-wire anemometry, force balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and PIV have been used to investigate the effects of the steady blowing on the vehicle wake structures and the resulting body forces. The energy consumption of the steady jet is calculated and is used to deduce an aerodynamic drag power change. Results show that overall gains can be achieved; however, the large mass flow rate required restricts the applicability of the technique to road vehicles. Means by which the mass flow rate requirements of the jet may be reduced are discussed and suggestions for further work put forward. (orig.)

  16. Experimental study of the real tangential velocity in the circular pipe with D300mm×2000mm by HWA%D300mm×2000mm圆管内旋转流切向速度特征的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋健斐; 王甜; 徐国; 徐俊; 魏耀东

    2010-01-01

    采用热线风速仪(HWA,Hot Wire Anemometry)测量了D300mm×2000mm圆管内旋转流切向瞬时速度随时间的变化特征.测量结果表明在圆管的中心区域,瞬时切向速度随时间的波动变化较大,而靠近边壁区域瞬时切向速度随时间的波动变化较小,中心区域瞬时切向速度的脉动幅值远大于壁面区域的脉动幅值.通过对瞬时切向速度进行频谱分析可知,瞬时切向速度的波动频率沿径向和轴向基本一致,但在出口区域频率有所增大,圆管内的瞬时切向速度出现低频波动是旋转流的摆动导致的.

  17. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  18. Experimental Analysis of Turbulence Characteristics of Swirling Flow in Cyclone%旋风分离器内旋转流湍流特性的实验分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡香丽; 杨智勇; 马玉苗; 管述哲; 魏耀东

    2015-01-01

    采用热线风速仪(Hot wire anemometry,HWA)测量了φ300 mm×2000 mm旋风分离器内的瞬时切向速度,进而分析旋转流的湍流特性.基于测量的瞬时切向速度计算的湍流强度表明,切向湍流强度是由气流自身湍流脉动产生的湍流强度和气流旋转波动产生的湍流强度两部分构成.在壁面附近,切向湍流强度主要是旋转流自身的湍流脉动作用,旋转流波动对其影响较小;而在几何中心附近,切向湍流强度不仅有旋转流自身的湍流脉动,而且更主要是旋转流摆动的影响.由于旋风分离器内旋转流的旋转中心与几何中心不重合,形成了旋流的摆动,使中心区域的计算切向湍流强度骤增,远大于壁面区域的切向湍流强度.

  19. 旋风分离器内旋进涡核的PIV显示%Visualization of the Precessing Vortex Core in a Cyclone Separator by PIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小林; 时铭显

    2003-01-01

    The precessing vortex core (PVC) in a cyclone separator plays an important role in the separation performance and in further understanding of the general law of periodic unsteady flow therein. In this paper, theunsteady flow field is investigated with particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the instantaneous velocity, vorticity,tangential velocity, and radial velocity are acquired by analyzing the images of instantaneous flow. It is for the first time reported that there is a centrifugal flow region close to the dust discharge zone and its maximum value is higher than the mean radial velocity. This discovery is very important for understanding the principle of separation of particles in the area of dust discharge. Determination of the frequency and amplitude of PVC was conducted in the region where the phenomenon of PVC is remarkable. Results agree well with those obtained by hot wire anemometry. The observations of the center of vortex core and the bimodal distribution of the amplitude of the PVC indicate the vortex core precesses around the geometric axis of the cyclone in its own way.

  20. Flow structure and heat transfer characteristics of an unconfined impinging air jet at high jet Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmen, Y.; Baydar, E. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of an unconfined air jet that is impinged normally onto a heated flat plate have been experimentally investigated for high Reynolds numbers ranging from 30,000 to 70,000 and a nozzle-to-plate spacing range of 1-10. The mean and turbulence velocities by using hot-wire anemometry and impingement surface pressures with pressure transducer are measured. Surface temperature measurements are made by means of an infrared thermal imaging technique. The effects of Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing on the flow structure and heat transfer characteristics are described and compared with similar experiments. It was seen that the locations of the second peaks in Nusselt number distributions slightly vary with Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing. The peaks in distributions of Nusselt numbers and radial turbulence intensity are compatible for spacings up to 3. The stagnation Nusselt number was correlated for the jet Reynolds number and the nozzle-to-plate spacing as Nu{sub st}{proportional_to}Re {sup 0.69}(H/D){sup 0.019}. (orig.)

  1. 用热线测量旋流射流的优化处理方法%Optimizition of Swirl Jet Measurements with Inclined Single-Wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德贵; 陈启峰; 章明川; 范浩杰; 席时桐

    2001-01-01

    研究了单丝斜热线探针多方位旋转测量技术的数据后处理方法。针对 射流流场的速度特征 及单丝斜热线对垂直支杆来流的响应特性,提出了测量数据优化处理方法。结果表明, 优化的方法可以得到更精确的结果。%The aeronautic disturbance of hot-wire anemometry should be considered in turbu lent flow velocity measurements.The multi-position rotating methods with inclin ed single-wire are studied in this paper.In view of the velocity prof ile charac ters of the swirl jet and the response of the inclined single-wire probe perpen dic ular to the main flow,the optimized data process is introduced.The experimental results show that the optimized solution is more exact.

  2. On the influence of free-stream turbulence length scales on boundary-layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Jens; Shahinfar, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    A measurement campaign on the free-stream turbulence (FST) induced boundary layer transition has been carried out in the Minimum-Turbulence-Level wind tunnel at KTH. Previous numerical investigations where the turbulence intensity (Tu) has been kept constant, while the integral length scale (Λx) has been varied, have shown that the transition location is advanced for increasing Λx. The present measurement campaign has been carried out using hot-wire anemometry and consists of 42 unique FST conditions with thorough measurements throughout the transitional region. Unlike other extensive FST induced transition measurements the free-stream velocity was here kept constant for all cases, implying that the boundary layer scale is locked up to transition onset. Our measurements confirm previous results on the advancement of the transition location with increasing Λx for low to moderate Tu levels, but show the opposite effect for higher levels, i.e. a delay in the transition location for larger Λx, which to the knowledge of the present authors so far is unreported. In addition, the common belief that the FST length scales have a negligible effect on the transition location with regards to the Tu level does not seem to be fully true.

  3. Measurements of gap pressure and wall shear stress of a blood pump model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, L P; Akamatsu, T

    2000-04-01

    The centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller has shown its superiority as compared to other artificial hearts. However, there is still insufficient understanding of fluid mechanics related issues in the clearance gap. The design nature of the pump requires sufficient washout in the clearance between the impeller and stationary surfaces. As the gap is only 0.2 mm in width, it is very difficult to conduct measurements with present instrumentation. An enlarged model with 5:1 ratio of the pump has been designed and constructed according to specifications. Dimensionless gap pressure measurements of the model are very close to the prototype. The measurements of wall shear stress of the fluid flow in the clearance gap between the impeller face and inlet casing of a blood pump model were accomplished through hot-wire anemometry and rotating disk apparatus. Regions of relatively high and low shear stresses are identified. These correspond to spots where the likelihood of hemolysis and thrombus formation is high. With the use of dimensional analysis, it is found that the highest wall shear stress is equivalent to 146 Pa which is much lower than the threshold value of 400 Pa for hemolysis reported in the literature.

  4. A novel vented microisolation container for caging animals: microenvironmental comfort in a closed-system filter cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, G F; Neff, D E; Cullen, J F; Welch, S W

    2000-01-01

    We designed a closed-system cage with vent ports that would allow continuous airflow in the occupied cage to ensure adequate ventilation and gas exchange. In this system, the metabolic heat loads of mice generate upward thermal air currents. Heat exits via the exhaust port, and room air enters via the intake port, providing adequate ventilation. Simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) helped us to optimize the cage's design. CFD simulations and smoke visualizations with a feeder-trough assembly illustrated the one-pass air circulation pattern and the lack of air recirculation, turbulence, and dead air space in our system. We used hot-film anemometry and smoke-test methodologies to show that adequate ventilation was provided. In a room with still air (0 air changes per hour [ACH]), a cage fitted with double wire-cloth filters (40 mesh size) and occupied by five mice has at least 12 ACH, whereas the same cage occupied by one mouse has 6 ACH. After five mice had occupied the cage for a week, its average temperature was 0.58C, relative humidity was 34%, and ammonia concentration was 3 ppm higher than that of the room. Our novel vented microisolation cage provides adequate intracage ACH, isolates mice from environmental contaminants, and contains allergenic particles within the cage in an environment appropriate for the species.

  5. Shock train generated turbulence inside a nozzle with a small opening angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzona, A.; Olivier, H. [RWTH Aachen University, Shock Wave Laboratory, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The flow inside an over expanding rectangular nozzle with a small opening angle of 1.6 is investigated by means of high-speed schlieren and shadowgraph photography, pressure probes and hot-wire anemometry on the nozzle centre line in order to measure the turbulent fluctuations generated by the occurring shock wave/boundary layer interaction. Additionally, an optical shock capturing tool is deployed to measure the amplitude and frequency of the shock train oscillation. Varying the back pressure, the pre-shock Mach number is changed between Ma{sub 1} = 1.1 and 2.1. Two different modes of turbulence generation and distribution are detected. For a single normal shock and a normal shock train, the normal Reynolds stress u{sup '2} on the channel axis is only slightly increased compared to the free stream value, whereas for the cases of a lambda foot shock train and an x-type shock train, a strong intensification by forming a turbulent mixing zone can be observed. (orig.)

  6. Two-dimensional energy spectra in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Dileep; Baidya, Rio; Monty, Jason; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The current study measures the two-dimensional (2D) spectra of streamwise velocity component (u) in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer for the first time. A 2D spectra shows the contribution of streamwise (λx) and spanwise (λy) length scales to the streamwise variance at a given wall height (z). 2D spectra could be a better tool to analyse spectral scaling laws as it is devoid of energy aliasing errors that could be present in one-dimensional spectra. A novel method is used to calculate the 2D spectra from the 2D correlation of u which is obtained by measuring velocity time series at various spanwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. At low Reynolds number, the shape of the 2D spectra at a constant energy level shows λy √{ zλx } behaviour at larger scales which is in agreement with the literature. However, at high Reynolds number, it is observed that the square-root relationship gradually transforms into a linear relationship (λy λx) which could be caused by the large packets of eddies whose length grows proportionately to the growth of its width. Additionally, we will show that this linear relationship observed at high Reynolds number is consistent with attached eddy predictions. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Australian Research Council.

  7. Characterization of a hot-film probe for hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheplak, M.; Spina, E.; Mcginley, C.

    1995-01-01

    The critical issues concerning the application of constant-temperature hot-film anemometry to hypersonic flow are reviewed and extended. Mass-flux static calibrations were conducted in a Mach 10 helium flow, while mass-flux and total-temperature static calibrations were made in a Mach 6 air flow. In addition, comparative hot-film/hot-wire turbulence measurements were made in a Mach 11 helium boundary layer to provide insight into the dynamic response of the hot film. The measurements indicate that substrate conduction 'losses' dominate the static response of the hot-film probe, thus resulting in poor sensitivity to mass-flux and total temperature. Furthermore, it has been found that it is not possible to isolate mass-flux fluctuations at high overheat ratios for the current hot-film design. Thus, the sapphire-substrate hot-film anemometer is a robust, high-bandwidth instrument limited to qualitative transition and turbulence measurements. Finally, the extension of this technique to providing quantitative information is dependent upon the development of lower thermal-conductivity substrate materials.

  8. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Xu, M; Pollard, A; Mi, J

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/D(e) < 40, where D(e) denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50,000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number R(λ) varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=m(t)+(lnγ(-0.0173))(1/2), where m(t) denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions.

  9. Visualisation of isothermal large coherent structures in a swirl burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valera-Medina, A.; Syred, N.; Griffiths, A. [School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen' s Building, The Parade, Cardiff, Wales CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Lean premixed combustion using swirl flame stabilisation is widespread amongst gas turbine manufacturers. The use of swirl mixing and flame stabilisation is also prevalent in many other non-premixed systems. Problems that emerge include loss of stabilisation as a function of combustor geometry and thermo-acoustic instabilities. Coherent structures and their relationship with combustion processes have been a concern for decades due to their complex nature. This paper thus adopts an experimental approach to characterise large coherent structures in swirl burners under isothermal conditions so as to reveal the effects of swirl in a number of geometries and cold flow patterns that are relevant in combustion. Aided by techniques such as Hot Wire Anemometry, High Speed Photography and Particle Image Velocimetry, the recognition of several structures was achieved in a 100 kW swirl burner model. Several varied, interacting, structures developed in the field as a consequence of the configurations used. New structures never observed before were identified, the results not only showing the existence of very well defined large structures, but also their dependency on geometrical and flow parameters. The PVC is confirmed to be a semi-helical structure, contrary to previous simulations performed on the system. The appearance of secondary recirculation zones and suppression of the vortical core as a consequence of geometrical constrictions are presented as a mechanism of flow control. The asymmetry of the Central Recirculation Zone in cold flows is observed in all the experiments, with its elongation dependent on Re and swirl number used. (author)

  10. Measurements of wakes originated from 2-bladed and 3-bladed rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Lyu, Shao-Dong; Chen, Bo-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of wakes originated from 2-bladed and 3-bladed rotors were carried out using a hot-wire probe system in an open jet wind tunnel. Hot-wire anemometry was adopted to characterize the spanwise profiles of mean wind speed, turbulence intensity and momentum flux for downwind locations at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 rotor diameters. The results showed that the 2-bladed rotor spun faster than the 3-bladed one, where the ratio of the two blade angular velocities was 1.065:1 under the same inflow condition with a uniform distribution of 5.4 m/s flow velocity. The turbulence flow statistics of the rotor wakes showed that the wake originated from the 3-bladed rotor has larger velocity deficit, streamwise turbulence intensity, momentum flux magnitude, but smaller spanwise turbulence intensity. The velocity spectrum showed peaks associated with the presence of the blade-induced tip vortices in the near wake region (approximately within 3 rotor diameters).

  11. Factors affecting distribution of airflow in a human tracheobronchial cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B S; Sussman, R G; Lippmann, M

    1993-09-01

    Air velocity was measured at end airways of hollow replicate casts of the human tracheobronchial tree in order to determine the flow distribution within casts extending to 3 mm diameter airways. Measurements were made by hot-wire anemometry for constant inspiratory flow rates of 7.5, 15, 30 and 60 L.min-1. Average flow distribution among the lung lobes was as follows: right upper, 18.5%; right middle, 9.2%; right lower, 32.3%; left upper, 15.7%; and left lower, 24.3%. An empirical model derived from the experimental flow distribution data demonstrated the effect of various morphometric parameters of the hollow cast on the distribution of airflow. Airway cross-sectional area, branching angle and total path-length were found to have the greatest influence. As the tracheal flow rate decreased from 60 to 7.5 L.min-1, the influence of branching angle was reduced, while total path-length became more influential. These results provide evidence for the transition of flow regimes within the TB tree within normal physiological flow ranges.

  12. On hot-wire diagnostics in Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Wayne N. [Texas A and M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College Station, TX (United States); Banerjee, Arindam [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rolla, MO (United States); Andrews, Malcolm J. [Texas A and M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College Station, TX (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Two hot-wire flow diagnostics have been developed to measure a variety of turbulence statistics in the buoyancy driven, air-helium Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. The first diagnostic uses a multi-position, multi-overheat (MPMO) single wire technique that is based on evaluating the wire response function to variations in density, velocity and orientation, and gives time-averaged statistics inside the mixing layer. The second diagnostic utilizes the concept of temperature as a fluid marker, and employs a simultaneous three-wire/cold-wire anemometry technique (S3WCA) to measure instantaneous statistics. Both of these diagnostics have been validated in a low Atwood number (A{sub t}{<=} 0.04), small density difference regime, that allowed validation of the diagnostics with similar experiments done in a hot-water/cold-water water channel facility. Good agreement is found for the measured growth parameters for the mixing layer, velocity fluctuation anisotropy, velocity fluctuation p.d.f behavior, and measurements of molecular mixing. We describe in detail the MPMO and S3WCA diagnostics, and the validation measurements in the low Atwood number regime (A{sub t}{<=} 0.04). We also outline the advantages of each technique for measurement of turbulence statistics in fluid mixtures with large density differences. (orig.)

  13. Atmospheric dispersion modelling over complex terrain at small scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, S.; Janour, Z.; Kukacka, L.; Jurcakova, K.; Kellnerova, R.; Gulikova, E.

    2014-03-01

    Previous study concerned of qualitative modelling neutrally stratified flow over open-cut coal mine and important surrounding topography at meso-scale (1:9000) revealed an important area for quantitative modelling of atmospheric dispersion at small-scale (1:3300). The selected area includes a necessary part of the coal mine topography with respect to its future expansion and surrounding populated areas. At this small-scale simultaneous measurement of velocity components and concentrations in specified points of vertical and horizontal planes were performed by two-dimensional Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Fast-Response Flame Ionization Detector (FFID), respectively. The impact of the complex terrain on passive pollutant dispersion with respect to the prevailing wind direction was observed and the prediction of the air quality at populated areas is discussed. The measured data will be used for comparison with another model taking into account the future coal mine transformation. Thus, the impact of coal mine transformation on pollutant dispersion can be observed.

  14. Laminar separation bubbles: Dynamics and control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourabh S Diwan; O N Ramesh

    2007-02-01

    This work is an experimental investigation of the dynamics and control of the laminar separation bubbles which are typically present on the suction surface of an aerofoil at a large angle of attack. A separation bubble is produced on the upper surface of a flat plate by appropriately contouring the top wall of the wind tunnel. First, a basic (unforced) separation bubble is obtained to set a benchmark for further experiments. Parametric study is done where the reference velocity is decreased to quantify its effect on the aspect ratio of the bubble. It is found that with decrease in Reynolds number, the height of the bubble increases at a greater rate than the length. This feature could be useful in characterising separation bubbles especially from the point of view of low Reynolds number aerofoil design. Artificial disturbance is introduced at two different initial amplitudes (infinitesimal and finite) upstream of separation location and hotwire anemometry is used to trace the wave packet as it is advected downstream. The evolution of wave packets is seen to take place in two distinct stages. Finite amplitude forcing causes periodic quenching of the bubble. Interestingly, even an infinitesimally small forcing is seen to modify and thereby control the separation bubble.

  15. The anemodata 1-IIE. Automatic system for wind data acquisition; El anemodata 1-IIE. Sistema automatico para la adquisicion de datos de viento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja, Marco Antonio; Parkman Cuellar, Pablo A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1986-12-31

    Wind is an inexhaustible energy source. To study its behavior in order to develop research projects and apply new technologies connected to its maximum development is one of the activities carried on at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE). As a part of such activities, the equipment Anemodata-1-IIE was designed and built for the wind velocity and direction data acquisition. The Anemodata-1-IIE is the result of the work that the Departamento de Fuentes no Convencionales (Non-Conventional Energy Sources of the Energy Sources Department) carries on regarding the development of electric equipment for the anemometry. [Espanol] Una fuente inagotable de energia es el viento. Estudiar su comportamiento para desarrollar proyectos de investigacion y aplicar nuevas tecnologias vinculadas con su maximo aprovechamiento es una de las actividades que se realizan en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE). Como parte de dichas actividades, se diseno y construyo el equipo Anemodata-1-IIE para la adquisicion de datos de velocidad y direccion del viento. El anemodata-1-IIE es un resultado de los trabajos que el Departamento de Fuentes no Convencionales, de la division de Fuentes de Energia, lleva a cabo en torno al desarrollo de equipo electrico para anemometria.

  16. Effect of near-wall treatments on airflow simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gharbi, Najla El; Benzaoui, Ahmed; Amara, E H

    2010-01-01

    Airflow simulation results depend on a good prediction of near wall turbulence. In this paper a comparative study between different near wall treatments is presented. It is applied to two test cases: (1) the first concerns the fully developed plane channel flow (i.e. the flow between two infinitely large plates). Simulation results are compared to direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of Moser et al. (1999) for $Re\\tau$ = 590 (where $Re\\tau$ denotes the friction Reynolds number defined by friction velocity $u\\tau$, kinematics viscosity $v$ and the channel half-width $\\delta$); (2) the second case is a benchmark test for room air distribution (Nielsen, 1990). Simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with laser-doppler anemometry. Simulations were performed with the aid of the commercial CFD code Fluent (2005). Near wall treatments available in Fluent were tested: Standard Wall Functions, Non Equilibrium Wall Function and Enhanced Wall Treatment. In each case, suitable meshes with adequate...

  17. Investigations of the Gas-Liquid Multiphase System Involving Macro-Instability in a Baffled Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD in gas-liquid multiphase system is of particular interest and the quantification of gas characteristics is still a challenge today. In this contribution, multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations are combined with Population Balance Model (PBM to investigate the bubble SMD in baffled stirred tank reactor (STR. Hereby, special attention is given to the phenomenon known as the fluid macro-instability (MI, which is a large-scale low-frequency fluid velocity variation in baffled STRs, since the fluid MIs have a dominating influence on the bubble breakage and coalescence processes. The simulations, regarding the fluid velocity, are validated with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA experiments, in which the instant radial velocity is analyzed through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT spectrum. The frequency peaks of the fluid MIs are found both in the simulation and in the experiment with a high degree of accuracy. After the validation, quantitative predictions of overall bubble SMD with and without MIs are carried out. Due to the accurate prediction of the fluid field, the influence of the fluid MI to bubble SMD is presented. This result provides more adequate information for engineers working in the field of estimating bubble SMDs in baffled STRs.

  18. CFD simulations of a hydrocyclone in absence of an air core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgadillo J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD is a versatile means to predict the characteristics of flow in fluid mechanics problems under a wide range of design and operating conditions . Applying the CFD in many engineering fields alleviates the problem of the usual engineering design. Recent advance in computational methods and computer technology make CFD an efficient means to study the dynamics of many physical systems. CFD simulations use three dimensional grid and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM to investigate the flow without air core in a 6˝ hydrocyclone have been conducted using FLUENT. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data related to the Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA measurements of velocity. In the experimental study, a new procedure is developed to reorient the laser beams that permit one to measure two velocity components at a single point using LDA. The conclusion developed from these experiments enables one to use the LDA directly in the hydrocyclone wall without recourse to auxiliary attachments such as an enclosing box that usually used to minimize the refraction effects of laser beams which are caused by the curved solid wall of the hydrocyclone and the refractive index of the test medium.

  19. Sauter mean diameter statistics of the starch dispersion atomized with hydraulic nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin, E-mail: yasin603@yahoo.com; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang, E-mail: bambang-ariwahjoedi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar, E-mail: shaharin@petronas.com.my [Department Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    In the reported research work, the microscopic droplet velocity at different axial and radial locations downstream to the nozzle exit was studied by using a non-intrusive Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) techniques. These velocity measurements made in the viscous fluid spray sterams were used to predict the different breakup regimes in the flow. It was noticed that the droplet velocity decreased sharply downstream to the nozzle exit, whereas steady decrease in velocity was seen along the radial directions. For shorter injection time periods, the velocity downstream to the nozzle was not following the general breakup model. However, along the radial direction it exactly followed the discussed model. Along the spray centerline, the velocity was decreasing sharply even at far points from the nozzle exit. It was difficult to identify the core region, transition region and fully developed spray region in the flow. It revealed that the jet breakup was not completed yet and further disintegration was taking place along the spray centerline for shorter injection periods below 250 ms.

  20. Investigation of Vortex Clouds and Droplet Sizes in Heated Water Spray Patterns Generated by Axisymmetric Full Cone Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit. PMID:24307881

  1. Acoustic properties in the low and middle atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi

    2016-08-01

    Generic predictions for acoustic dispersion and absorption in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus are presented. For Mars, Pathfinder and Mars Express ambient data and averaged thermophysical parameters are used as inputs to a preliminary model based on the continuum approximation for Mars' thin atmosphere-the need for Boltzmann-based treatment is discussed in the context of Knudsen numbers. Strong absorption constrains acoustic sensing within the Martian planetary boundary layer. For the dense atmosphere of Venus, the van der Waals equation of state is used. The thermophysical and transport parameters were interpolated at the ambient conditions. Acoustic sensing is discussed at 50 km above Venus' surface, a level where aerostats (e.g., European Space Agency's EVE) and manned airships (e.g., NASA's HAVOC) may be deployed in the future. The salient atmospheric characteristics are described in terms of temperature, pressure, and convective stability profiles, followed by wavenumber predictions, and discussions of low- and high-frequency sensing applications. At low frequencies, emphasis is placed on infrasound. A simple generation mechanism by Martian dust devils is presented, yielding fundamental frequencies between 0.1 and 10 Hz. High-frequency sensing is exemplified by ultrasonic anemometry. Of the two environments, Venus is notably more dispersive in the ultrasonic range.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Spray Evaporation in Turbulent Flow in Countercurrent Humidifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉璋; 刘永文; 翁史烈

    2004-01-01

    The process in the countercurrent humidifier of HAT cycle involves the evaporation of atomized liquids in a turbulent environment. To allow an optimization of such process and provide data for the validation of numerical calculation, the spray evaporation in a countercurrent air stream was studied experimentally. Measurements were taken for different flow parameters, such as airflow rate and liquid flow rate in order to provide reliable data. Phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA) was applied to obtain the spatial change of the droplet size spectrum in the flow field and to measure droplet size-velocity correlations. These local measured profiles of droplet mean velocities, velocity fluctuations and droplet mean diameters were obtained by averaging over all droplet size classes. Moreover, DualPDA signal processing allows accurate determination of the droplet mass flux and local concentration, from which the global evaporation rates could also be determined. These local temperature profiles were measured using the thermocouple and acquired by data acquisition system based on virtual instrument (VI) technology.

  3. Measurement of pulsatile turbulent flow downstream of polyurethane heart valve prosthesis using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.K.; Sung, J.Y. [Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Chang, J.K.; Min, B.G.; Yoo, J.Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-11-01

    In-vitro flow characteristics downstream of a polyurethane artificial heart valve under a pulsatile flow condition were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). With a triggering system and a time-delay circuit the velocity field downstream of the valve was evaluated in conjunction with the opening behavior of a flexible valve leaflet during a cardiac cycle.. Reynolds shear stress distribution was calculated from the velocity fields at a peak systolic phase. Direct measurements of the wall shear stress by hot-film anemometry (HFA) were compared with the PIV data. The possibilities of vascular complications, such as the thrombus formation and red blood cell damage, could be estimated from the overall view of the instantaneous velocity and stress fields obtained. A correlation between the flow pattern downstream of the valve and the corresponding opening posture of the polyurethane valve membrane gives useful data necessary for the improved design of the frame structure and leaflet geometry of the valve. (author). 11 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. An experimental investigation into cavitation behaviour and pressure characteristics of alternative blade sections for propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Emin; Atlar, Mehmet; Wang, Dazheng

    2013-03-01

    During the final quarter of the last century considerable efforts have been spent to reduce the hull pressure fluctuations caused by unsteady propeller cavitation. This has resulted in further changes in propeller design characteristics including increased skew, tip unloading and introduction of "New Blade Sections" (NBS) designed on the basis of the so-called Eppler code. An experimental study was carried out to investigate flow characteristics of alternative two-dimensional (2-D) blade sections of rectangular planform, one of which was the New Blade Section (NBS) developed in Newcastle University and other was based on the well-known National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) section. The experiments comprised the cavitation observations and the measurements of the local velocity distribution around the blade sections by using a 2-D Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) system. Analysis of the cavitation tests demonstrated that the two blade sections presented very similar bucket shapes with virtually no width at the bottom but relatively favourable buckets arms at the suction and pressure sides for the NACA section. Similarly, pressure analysis of the sections displayed a slightly larger value for the NBS pressure peak. The comparative overall pressure distributions around the sections suggested that the NBS might be more susceptible to cavitation than the NACA section. This can be closely related to the fundamental shape of the NBS with very fine leading edge. Therefore a further investigation into the modification of the leading edge should be considered to improve the cavitation behaviour of the NBS.

  5. Velocity profile and wall shear stress of saccular aneurysms at the anterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ryuhei; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Haida, Sayaka; Nakazawa, Nobuhiko; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the aspect ratio (dome/neck) of an aneurysm correlates well with intraaneurysmal blood flow. Aneurysms with an aspect ratio larger than 1.6 carry a higher risk of rupture. We examined the effect of aspect ratio (AR) on intra-aneurysmal flow using experimental models. Flow visualization with particle imaging velocimetry and measurement of wall shear stress using laser Doppler anemometry were performed on three different aneurysm models: AR 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Intraaneurysmal flow consists of inflow, circulation, and outflow. Rapid inflow impinged on the distal neck creating a stagnant point. Rapid flow and maximum wall shear stress were observed in the vicinity of the stagnant point. By changing the Reynold's number, the stagnant point moved. By increasing the AR of the aneurysm, vortices inside the aneurysm sac closed and very slow flow was observed, resulting in very low shear stress markedly at a Reynold's number of 250, compatible with the diastolic phase. In the aneurysm model AR 2.0, both rapid flow at the neck and vortices inside the aneurysm are sufficient to activate platelets, making a thrombus that may anchor on the dome where very slow flow takes place. Hemodynamics in aneurysms larger than AR 2.0 definitely contribute to thrombus formation.

  6. Characteristics of a streak disturbance induced by an isolated roughness element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Kyle; Naguib, Ahmed

    2012-11-01

    A detailed description of a streak disturbance introduced in a Blasius boundary layer by an isolated roughness element will be presented. This work is motivated by the desire to understand the dependence of the evolution/instability of streamwise-oriented streaks (which play a key role in bypass transition) on the method by which they are generated. The proper scaling of the streamwise evolution of the streak disturbance energy is examined. This expands upon established Rek2scaling (White et al., Physics of Fluids, 2005) of streak disturbances induced by spanwise-periodic roughness element arrays. Examining different roughness heights, k, and employing a method that accounts for the streamwise growth of the streak's wall-normal and spanwise scales, it is found that the streak energy density scales with Rek7/ 3 , in the case of an isolated roughness element. The data used in the analysis are acquired using hotwire anemometry throughout a three-dimensional domain located downstream of a single cylindrical roughness element. These measurements are complemented by smokewire visualizations, which capture clearly three distinct disturbance states, dependent upon roughness element height; namely, stable streaks, streaks with intermittent turbulent bursts, and turbulent disturbances. Correspondence is established between these states and the streamwise evolution of the streak energy and the cross-stream disturbance profiles. NSF Grant: CMMI 0932546.

  7. Experimental study and numerical simulation of gas-particle flows with radial bias combustion and centrally fuel rich swirl burners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zheng-qi; ZHOU Jue; CHEN Zhi-chao; SUN Rui; QIN Yu-kun

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation is applied to gas-particle flows of the primary and the secondary air ducts and burner region, and of two kinds of swirl burners. The modeling results of Radial Bias Combustion (RBC) burn-er well agreed with the data from the three-dimensional Phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA) experiment by Li, et al. The modeling test conducted in a 1025 t/h boiler was to study the quality of aerodynamics for a Central Fuel Rich (CFR) burner, and the Internal Recirculation Zone (IRZ) was measured. In addition, gas-particle flows with a CFR burner were investigated by numerical simulation, whose results accorded with the test data funda-mentally. By analyzing the distribution of gas velocity and trajectories of particles respectively, it is found that the primary air's rigidity of CFR burner is stronger than that of RBC burner, and the primary air mixes with the secondary air later. Furthermore, high concentration region of pulverized coal exists in the burner's central zone whose atmosphere is reduced, and trajectories of particles in IRZ of CFR burner are longer than that of RBC burner. They are favorable to coal's ignition and the reduction of NOx emission.

  8. Experimental analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xie; Zhibao Dong; Xiaojing Zheng

    2005-01-01

    The probability distributions of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in a wind-blown sand flux play very important roles in the simulation of the wind-blown sand movement. In this paper, the vertical and the horizontal speeds of sand particles located at 1.0 mm above a sand-bed in a wind-blown sand flux are observed with the aid of Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) in a wind tunnel. Based on the experimental data, the probability distributions of not only the vertical lift-off speed but also the lift-off velocity as well as its horizontal component and the incident velocity as well as its vertical and horizontal components can be obtained by the equal distance histogram method. It is found, according to the results of the χ2-test for these probability distributions, that the probability density functions (pdf's) of the sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities as well as their vertical components are described by the Gamma density function with different peak values and shapes and the downwind incident and lift-off horizontal speeds, respectively, can be described by the lognormal and the Gamma density functions. These pdf's depend on not only the sand particle diameter but also the wind speed.

  9. Novel C/T technique in LDA System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chongxiang; Zhang, Yan F.; Liu, Chang W.; Wang, Shikang; Liu, Jie

    2002-06-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) is a most advanced velocity measurement technique in the field of fluid mechanics, combustion, hydraulics, chemical engineering, meteorology, biomedicine engineering and industrial manufactory for its non-contact, high response, and real-time velocity measurement. In LDA technique, optical signal processing is very important and very complex due to complicated flowing properties of fluid. LDA system includes optical section and signal processing section. In conventional LDA system, these two sections are separated and perform their own functions individually. Because optical section has no active control to measured signal, only mechanically indicates the variation of measured signal, the signal processing section was designed complex and costly. The existed signal-processing methods have different problems which limited the application and in turn increasing the difficulty of signal processing to detect the complex fluid. This paper describes and analyzes a new technique, C/T technique which combined optical section and signal processing section together, made the output signal simpler and solved the problems occurred in tradition methods. On the basis of analysis of C/T method, system construction is described.

  10. Design and characterization of a linear Hencken-type burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. F.; Bohlin, G. A.; Schrader, P. E.; Bambha, R. P.; Kliewer, C. J.; Johansson, K. O.; Michelsen, H. A.

    2016-11-01

    We have designed and constructed a Hencken-type burner that produces a 38-mm-long linear laminar partially premixed co-flow diffusion flame. This burner was designed to produce a linear flame for studies of soot chemistry, combining the benefit of the conventional Hencken burner's laminar flames with the advantage of the slot burner's geometry for optical measurements requiring a long interaction distance. It is suitable for measurements using optical imaging diagnostics, line-of-sight optical techniques, or off-axis optical-scattering methods requiring either a long or short path length through the flame. This paper presents details of the design and operation of this new burner. We also provide characterization information for flames produced by this burner, including relative flow-field velocities obtained using hot-wire anemometry, temperatures along the centerline extracted using direct one-dimensional coherent Raman imaging, soot volume fractions along the centerline obtained using laser-induced incandescence and laser extinction, and transmission electron microscopy images of soot thermophoretically sampled from the flame.

  11. Wind-tunnel modelling of the tip-speed ratio influence on the wake evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Victor P.; Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    2016-09-01

    Wind-tunnel measurements on the near-wake evolution of a three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine model (HAWT) in the scale 1:O(350) operating in uniform flow conditions and within a turbulent boundary layer at different tip speed ratios are presented. Operational conditions are chosen to exclude Reynolds number effects regarding the turbulent boundary layer as well as the rotor performance. Triple-wire anemometry is used to measure all three velocity components in the mid-vertical and mid-horizontal plane, covering the range from the near- to the far-wake region. In order to analyse wake properties systematically, power and thrust coefficients of the turbine were measured additionally. It is confirmed that realistic modelling of the wake evolution is not possible in a low-turbulence uniform approach flow. Profiles of mean velocity and turbulence intensity exhibit large deviations between the low-turbulence uniform flow and the turbulent boundary layer, especially in the far-wake region. For nearly constant thrust coefficients differences in the evolution of the near-wake can be identified for tip speed ratios in the range from 6.5 to 10.5. It is shown that with increasing downstream distances mean velocity profiles become indistinguishable whereas for turbulence statistics a subtle dependency on the tip speed ratio is still noticeable in the far-wake region.

  12. Large Scale Organization of a Near Wall Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislas, Michel; Dekou Tiomajou, Raoul Florent; Foucaut, Jean Marc

    2016-11-01

    This study lies in the context of large scale coherent structures investigation in a near wall turbulent boundary layer. An experimental database at high Reynolds numbers (Re θ = 9830 and Re θ = 19660) was obtained in the LML wind tunnel with stereo-PIV at 4 Hz and hot wire anemometry at 30 kHz. A Linear Stochastic Estimation procedure, is used to reconstruct a 3 component field resolved in space and time. Algorithms were developed to extract coherent structures from the reconstructed field. A sample of 3D view of the structures is depicted in Figure 1. Uniform momentum regions are characterized with their mean hydraulic diameter in the YZ plane, their life time and their contribution to Reynolds stresses. The vortical motions are characterized by their position, radius, circulation and vorticity in addition to their life time and their number computed at a fixed position from the wall. The spatial organization of the structures was investigated through a correlation of their respective indicative functions in the spanwise direction. The simplified large scale model that arise is compared to the ones available in the literature. Streamwise low (green) and high (yellow) uniform momentum regions with positive (red) and negative (blue) vortical motions. This work was supported by Campus International pour la Sécurité et l'Intermodalité des Transports.

  13. The effect of shadow fronts on dynamics of the surface layer during evening transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardyjak, E.; Hoch, S. W.; Jensen, D. D.; Gunawardena, N.; Di Sabatino, S.; Whiteman, C. D.; Leo, L.; Hocut, C. M.; Higgins, C. W.; Fernando, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    Two MATERHORN-X (Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observation Program) field campaigns were conducted at Dugway, UT, USA during the last year. An Autumn Campaign from 25 September - 21 October 2012 and a Spring Campaign from 1- 31 May 2013. A subset of the campaigns included dense observations along the East Slope of Granit Peak (40.096° N, -113.253° W). Observations included five multi-sonic anemometer eddy covariance towers (two with full energy budget stations), eleven small energy budget stations, fifteen automated weather stations, a distributed temperature sensing (DTS) system, hot-film anemometry, infrared camera surface temperature observations and up to three Doppler lidars. For this presentation, our analysis will focus on characterizing the response of mean wind and thermodynamics variables, as well as turbulence quantities during the evening transitions on East Slope. Previous observations have indicated that the dynamics of turbulence during evening transitions in steep mountainous terrain rapidly follows surface temperature changes associated with shadows produced by the local topography. The observations of flow transitions over the more moderate East Slope of Granite (~3-8%) indicate that wind shift direction and turbulence decay is not as tightly coupled to the shadow. Details of the transition response will be presented in the context of a new process model.

  14. Effects of Freestream Turbulence in a Model Wind Turbine Wake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Jin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow structure in the wake of a model wind turbine is explored under negligible and high turbulence in the freestream region of a wind tunnel at R e ∼ 7 × 10 4 . Attention is placed on the evolution of the integral scale and the contribution of the large-scale motions from the background flow. Hotwire anemometry was used to obtain the streamwise velocity at various streamwise and spanwise locations. The pre-multiplied spectral difference of the velocity fluctuations between the two cases shows a significant energy contribution from the background turbulence on scales larger than the rotor diameter. The integral scale along the rotor axis is found to grow linearly with distance, independent of the incoming turbulence levels. This scale appears to reach that of the incoming flow in the high turbulence case at x / d ∼ 35–40. The energy contribution from the turbine to the large-scale flow structures in the low turbulence case increases monotonically with distance. Its growth rate is reduced past x / d ∼ 6–7. There, motions larger than the rotor contribute ∼ 50 % of the total energy, suggesting that the population of large-scale motions is more intense in the intermediate field. In contrast, the wake in the high incoming turbulence is quickly populated with large-scale motions and plateau at x / d ∼ 3 .

  15. Which are more accurate, orthogonal or non-orthogonal sonic anemometers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massman, W. J.; Frank, J. M.; Swiatek, E.; Zimmerman, H.; Ewers, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Sonic anemometry is fundamental to all eddy-covariance studies of surface energy, ecosystem carbon, and water balance. Recent studies have shown the potential underestimation of the vertical wind fluctuations among the most commonly encountered anemometer models, but thus far testing has been focused on non-orthogonal sonic anemometer designs. We hypothesize that these underestimates are systematic to the non-orthogonal design and not attributable to a single manufacturer. If so, orthogonal measurements of vertical wind should be more accurate. We tested this by conducting an experiment to measure the relative consistency between vertical and horizontal wind measurements for three sonic anemometer designs: orthogonal, non-orthogonal, and quasi-orthogonal. Both the orthogonal and non-orthogonal models were from a single manufacturer (K-probe and A-probe, Applied Technologies, Inc.) while the quasi-orthogonal design featured non-orthogonal u- and v-axes but with an orthogonal w-axis (CSAT3V, Campbell Scientific, Inc.). We conducted a 12-week experiment, testing four sonic anemometers relative to a control (CSAT3, Campbell Scientific, Inc.), each week randomly selecting at least one of each model from a pool of twelve instruments (three of each model) and randomly locating the test anemometers around the control. Half-way through the week the test anemometers were re-mounted in a horizontal position. Work was done at the GLEES AmeriFlux site (southeastern Wyoming, USA) which experiences large, uni-directional wind and turbulence. Results are discussed.

  16. Is the nacelle mounted anemometer an acceptable option in performance testing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, J.A. [FFA, The Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden); Frandsen, S.; Madsen, H.A; Antoniou, I.; Friis Pedersen, T. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Hunter, R. [RES, Renewable Energy Systems, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Klug, H. [DEWI, Wilhelmshaven (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Although the nacelle anemometer method has been used for power verification purposes for several years, it is only relatively recently that a full understanding of its limitations has emerged. the technique is totally dependent upon the assumption that the nacelle to free wind speed relationship established for a reference turbine in free air can be applied universally to other turbines. Facts emerged from research projects have shown that this assumption is unjustified. In the present paper facts are presented of which some have not been identified nor presented before. E.g. the effect related to wake conditions is novel as a phenomena and the size of the effect can be considerable. The analysis shows that the total error caused by the effects considered in this paper can, in the worst case reach unacceptable high values, 24%, but by taking precautionary measures the errors can be kept at acceptable low levels, 4%. It is found probable that the future use of nacelle anemometry for power performance verification will be subject to strong restrictions. (au)

  17. Small-Scale Morphological Features on a Solid Surface Processed by High-Pressure Abrasive Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Kang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Being subjected to a high-pressure abrasive water jet, solid samples will experience an essential variation of both internal stress and physical characteristics, which is closely associated with the kinetic energy attached to the abrasive particles involved in the jet stream. Here, experiments were performed, with particular emphasis being placed on the kinetic energy attenuation and turbulent features in the jet stream. At jet pressure of 260 MPa, mean velocity and root-mean-square (RMS velocity on two jet-stream sections were acquired by utilizing the phase Doppler anemometry (PDA technique. A jet-cutting experiment was then carried out with Al-Mg alloy samples being cut by an abrasive water jet. Morphological features and roughness on the cut surface were quantitatively examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and optical profiling techniques. The results indicate that the high-pressure water jet is characterized by remarkably high mean flow velocities and distinct velocity fluctuations. Those irregular pits and grooves on the cut surfaces indicate both the energy attenuation and the development of radial velocity components in the jet stream. When the sample is positioned with different distances from the nozzle outlet, the obtained quantitative surface roughness varies accordingly. A descriptive model highlighting the behaviors of abrasive particles in jet-cutting process is established in light of the experimental results and correlation analysis.

  18. What happens inside a fuel cell? Developing an experimental functional map of fuel cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Kucernak, Anthony R; Aguiar, Patricia; Atkins, Stephen C; Brandon, Nigel P; Clague, Ralph; Cohen, Lesley F; Hinds, Gareth; Kalyvas, Christos; Offer, Gregory J; Ladewig, Bradley; Maher, Robert; Marquis, Andrew; Shearing, Paul; Vasileiadis, Nikos; Vesovic, Velisa

    2010-09-10

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due to reactant consumption, water management and the design of fluid-flow plates. It is therefore unlikely that any bulk measurement made on a fuel cell will accurately represent performance at all parts of the cell. The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise performance. This Minireview explores a range of in situ techniques being used to study fuel cells and describes the use of novel experimental techniques that the authors have used to develop an 'experimental functional map' of fuel cell performance. These techniques include the mapping of current density, electrochemical impedance, electrolyte conductivity, contact resistance and CO poisoning distribution within working PEFCs, as well as mapping the flow of reactant in gas channels using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). For the high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), temperature mapping, reference electrode placement and the use of Raman spectroscopy are described along with methods to map the microstructural features of electrodes. The combination of these techniques, applied across a range of fuel cell operating conditions, allows a unique picture of the internal workings of fuel cells to be obtained and have been used to validate both numerical and analytical models.

  19. Boron nitride nanotubes radiolabeled with ⁹⁹mTc: preparation, physicochemical characterization, biodistribution study, and scintigraphic imaging in Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Daniel Crístian Ferreira; Ferreira, Tiago Hilário; Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; de Sousa, Edésia Martins Barros

    2012-02-28

    In the present study, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized from an innovative process and functionalized with a glycol chitosan polymer in CDTN (Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear) laboratories. As a means of studying their in vivo biodistribution behavior, these nanotubes were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc and injected in mice. Their size, distribution, and homogeneity were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), while their zeta potential was determined by laser Doppler anemometry. The morphology and structural organization were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The functionalization in the nanotubes was evaluated by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that BNNTs were obtained and functionalized successfully, reaching a mean size and dispersity deemed adequate for in vivo studies. The BNNTs were also evaluated by ex vivo biodistribution studies and scintigraphic imaging in healthy mice. The results showed that nanostructures, after 24h, having accumulated in the liver, spleen and gut, and eliminated via renal excretion. The findings from this study reveal a potential application of functionalized BNNTs as new potential drugs or radioisotope nanocarriers to be applied in therapeutic procedures.

  20. Investigation of the Viscoelastic Effect on the Metzner and Otto Coefficient Through LDA Velocity Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Metzner and Otto correlation is the single practical method for incorporating non-Newtonian effects in the mixing process. In this article, the Metzner and Otto' s idea, the role of viscoelasticity on the Metzner and Otto coefficient, ks, effects of flow regime on ks and the determination of ks for Rushton turbine impeller have been studied using the direct method of the laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) velocity meusurement for the case of viscoelastic liquids. The normalized mean tangential velocity profiles are independent of Rushton turbine impeller speeds. Contrary to literature findings, it is shown that the variation of local shear rate against the impeller speed is better correlated by the power equation, i.e. γ = ks' * Nb', in the transition region, i.e. ~ 30 < Re <~ 2000.Also, a correlation between improved coefficient, ks', and the elasticity number of viscoelastic liquids is given which is very helpful in designing of the mixing of both viscoelastic and inelastic non-Newtonian fluids through relating rheological properties to kinematical and dynamical parameters of the mixing process.

  1. Active Control of Airfoil Boundary Layer Separation and Wake using Ns-DBD Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durasiewicz, Claudia; Castro Maldonado, Jorge; Little, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators are employed to control boundary layer separation and the wake of a NACA 0012 airfoil having aspect ratio of three. Ns-DBD plasma actuators are known to operate via a thermal mechanism in contrast to ac-DBDs which are momentum-based devices. Nominally 2D forcing is applied to the airfoil leading edge with pulse energy of 0.35 mJ/cm. Experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 0 . 74 ×106 primarily at 18° incidence which is well within the stalled regime. Baseline and controlled flow fields are studied using surface pressure measurements, constant temperature anemometry (CTA) and PIV. Forcing at a dimensionless frequency of F+ = fc /U∞ = 1 . 14 results in reattachment of nominally separated flow to the airfoil surface. Lower frequency forcing is less optimal for separation control, but produces strong fluctuations in the wake which are intended for use in the study of vortex body interaction in the future. Actuation below F+ = 0 . 23 shows behavior consistent with an impulse-like response while forcing in the range 0 . 23

  2. Heat transfer with turbulence incitation at low Reynolds-numbers; Waermeuebergang mit Turbulenzanregung bei niedrigen Reynolds-Zahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauscher, R.

    2000-05-01

    The thermo- and fluiddynamic processes in flow channels with turbulence promotors and tube bundle heat exchangers with non-circular profile tubes have been investigated at the laminar-turbulent transition region. The examinations have been performed using the optical measurement techniques of holographic interferometry and laser-Doppler-velocimetry as well as numerical methods. Parameters such as size, spacing, arrangement and size of the turbulence promotors and tube profiles have been compared. With certain arrangements of the turbulence promotors and the tube profiles respectively, optimum results could be achieved considering the enhancement of heat transfer and the increase in pressure drop. [German] In Stroemungskanaelen mit Turbulenzpromotoren und in Rohrbuendel-Waermeuebertragern mit nichtkreisfoermigen Profilrohren wurden die thermo- und fluiddynamischen Vorgaenge im Bereich des laminar-turbulenten Umschlags untersucht. Zur Untersuchung wurden die optischen Messmethoden der holographischen Interferometrie und Laser-Doppler-Anemometrie sowie numerische Berechnungsmethoden eingesetzt. Parameter wie Groesse, Abstand, Anordnung und Form der Turbulenzpromotoren bzw. der Profilrohre wurden miteinander verglichen. Mit speziell angeordneten Turbulenzpromotoren bzw. lanzettenfoermigen Profilrohren konnten optimale Ergebnisse hinsichtlich der Verbesserung des Waermeuebergangs und der Erhoehung des Druckverlusts erzielt werden.

  3. Water Spray Flow Characteristics Under Synthetic Jet Driven By a Piezoelectric Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchitto, L.; Valentino, G.; Chiatto, M.; de Luca, L.

    2017-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) have been applied to investigate the droplets size and velocity distribution of a water spray, under the control of a piezo-element driven synthetic jet (SJ). Tests were carried out under atmospheric conditions within a chamber test rig equipped with optical accesses at two injection pressures, namely 5 and 10 MPa, exploring the variation of the main spray parameters caused by the synthetic jet perturbations. The SJ orifice has been placed at 45° with respect to the water spray axis; the nozzle body has been moved on its own axis and three different nozzle quotes were tested. PIV measurements have been averaged on 300 trials whereas about 105 samples have been acquired for the PDA tests. For each operative condition, the influence region of the SJ device on the spray has been computed through a T-Test algorithm. The synthetic jet locally interacts with the spray, energizing the region downstream the impact. The effect of the actuator decreases at higher injection pressures and moving the impact region upwards. Droplets coalescence can be detected along the synthetic jet axis, while no significant variations are observed along a direction orthogonal to it.

  4. NOVEL METHODS FOR AXIAL FAN IMPELLER GEOMETRY ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE GENERATED SWIRL TURBULENT FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran D Protić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Geometry analysis of the axial fan impeller, experimentally obtained operating characteristics and experimental investigations of the turbulent swirl flow generated behind the impeller are presented in this paper. Formerly designed and manufactured, axial fan impeller blade geometry (originally designed by Prof. Dr-Ing. Z. Protić† has been digitized using a three-dimensional (3D scanner. In parallel, the same impeller has been modeled by beta version software for modeling axial turbomachines, based on modified classical calculation. These results were compared. Then, the axial fan operating characteristics were measured on the standardized test rig in the Laboratory for Hydraulic Machinery and Energy Systems, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade. Optimum blade impeller position was determined on the basis of these results. Afterwards, the impeller with optimum angle, without outlet vanes, was positioned in a circular pipe. Rotational speed has been varied in the range from 500 till 2500rpm. Reynolds numbers generated in this way, calculated for axial velocity component, were in the range from 0,8·105 till 6·105. LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements and stereo PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry measurements of the 3D velocity field in the swirl turbulent fluid flow behind the axial fan have been performed for each regime. Obtained results point out extraordinary complexity of the structure of generated 3D turbulent velocity fields.

  5. Heat pipe dynamic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issacci, F.; Roche, G. L.; Klein, D. B.; Catton, I.

    1988-01-01

    The vapor flow in a heat pipe was mathematically modeled and the equations governing the transient behavior of the core were solved numerically. The modeled vapor flow is transient, axisymmetric (or two-dimensional) compressible viscous flow in a closed chamber. The two methods of solution are described. The more promising method failed (a mixed Galerkin finite difference method) whereas a more common finite difference method was successful. Preliminary results are presented showing that multi-dimensional flows need to be treated. A model of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe was developed. The model is intended to be coupled to a vapor phase model for the complete solution of the heat pipe problem. The mathematical equations are formulated consistent with physical processes while allowing a computationally efficient solution. The model simulates time dependent characteristics of concern to the liquid phase including input phase change, output heat fluxes, liquid temperatures, container temperatures, liquid velocities, and liquid pressure. Preliminary results were obtained for two heat pipe startup cases. The heat pipe studied used lithium as the working fluid and an annular wick configuration. Recommendations for implementation based on the results obtained are presented. Experimental studies were initiated using a rectangular heat pipe. Both twin beam laser holography and laser Doppler anemometry were investigated. Preliminary experiments were completed and results are reported.

  6. The Measurement of Wall Shear Stress in the Low-Viscosity Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamec J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on quantitative evaluation of the value of the wall shear stress in liquids with low viscosity by means of the method of the hot film anemometry in a laminar and turbulent flow. Two systems for calibration of probes are described in the paper. The first of these uses an innovative method of probe calibration using a known flow in a cylindrical gap between two concentric cylinders where the inner cylinder is rotated and a known velocity profile and shear rate, or shear stress profile, is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations. This method is usable for lower values of the wall shear stress, particularly in the areas of laminar flow. The second method is based on direct calibration of the probes using a floating element. This element, with a size of 120x80 mm, is part of a rectangular channel. This method of calibration enables the probe calibration at higher shear rates and is applicable also to turbulent flow. Values obtained from both calibration methods are also compared with results of measurements of the wall shear stress in a straight smooth channel for a certain range of Reynolds numbers and compared with analytical calculations. The accuracy of the method and the influence of various parasitic phenomena on the accuracy of the measured results were discussed. The paper describes in particular the influence of geometric purity of the probe location, the impact of various transfer phenomena, requirements for the measured liquid and layout of the experiment.

  7. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, KBMQ; Fagan, A. F.; Mankbadi, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a tip vortex from a NACA0012 airfoil is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4x10(exp 4). Initially, data for a stationary airfoil held at various angles-of-attack (alpha) are gathered. Detailed surveys are done for two cases: alpha=10 deg with attached flow and alpha=25 deg with massive flow separation on the upper surface. Distributions of various properties are obtained using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity and turbulent stresses at various streamwise locations. For all cases, the vortex core is seen to involve a mean velocity deficit. The deficit apparently traces to the airfoil wake, part of which gets wrapped by the tip vortex. At small alpha, the vortex is laminar within the measurement domain. The strength of the vortex increases with increasing alpha but undergoes a sudden drop around alpha (is) greater than 16 deg. The drop in peak vorticity level is accompanied by transition and a sharp rise in turbulence within the core. Data are also acquired with the airfoil pitched sinusoidally. All oscillation cases pertain to a mean alpha=15 deg while the amplitude and frequency are varied. An example of phase-averaged data for an amplitude of +/-10 deg and a reduced frequency of k=0.2 is discussed. All results are compared with available data from the literature shedding further light on the complex dynamics of the tip vortex.

  8. The effect of humidity on ionic wind velocity in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, She; Nobelen, J. C. P. Y.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the evolution of portable electronics and LED lightning system, advances in air cooling technologies must also keep pace. Active cooling by ionic wind, which is usually generated by corona discharge, can greatly reduce the noise and lifetime issues compared to the mechanical fans. The wind is induced when a gas discharge is formed, and neutral molecules gain their energy by the momentum transfer of ion-neutral collisions. However, there is few discussion about the effect of gas composition such as humidity on the wind generation and the physical mechanism is not clear. In the experiment, a positive 5-20 kV DC voltage is applied to the needle-cylinder electrodes with separation of 20 mm. The ionic wind velocity is measured by hot wire anemometry. As the relative humidity (RH) in the ambient air increases, the velocity is found to be severely inhibited. The current is also measured between the cylinder electrode and earth. The results show that the DC component of corona current decreases when RH increases. Since both the discharge current and the ion mobility are reduced when RH increases, their combined effects determine the ionic wind velocity. This work is supported by STW project 13651.

  9. ONERA-NASA Cooperative Effort on Liner Impedance Eduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primus, Julien; Piot, Estelle; Simon, Frank; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R

    2013-01-01

    As part of a cooperation between ONERA and NASA, the liner impedance eduction methods developed by the two research centers are compared. The NASA technique relies on an objective function built on acoustic pressure measurements located on the wall opposite the test liner, and the propagation code solves the convected Helmholtz equation in uniform ow using a finite element method that implements a continuous Galerkin discretization. The ONERA method uses an objective function based either on wall acoustic pressure or on acoustic velocity acquired above the liner by Laser Doppler Anemometry, and the propagation code solves the linearized Euler equations by a discontinuous Galerkin discretization. Two acoustic liners are tested in both ONERA and NASA ow ducts and the measured data are treated with the corresponding impedance eduction method. The first liner is a wire mesh facesheet mounted onto a honeycomb core, designed to be linear with respect to incident sound pressure level and to grazing ow velocity. The second one is a conventional, nonlinear, perforate-over-honeycomb single layer liner. Configurations without and with ow are considered. For the nonlinear liner, the comparison of liner impedance educed by NASA and ONERA shows a sensitivity to the experimental conditions, namely to the nature of the source and to the sample width.

  10. Snowflakes as inertial particles in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Filippo; Nemes, Andras; Dasari, Teja; Hong, Jiarong; Guala, Michele

    2016-11-01

    We report on the first direct measurements of trajectories and settling velocity of snow particles in the atmospheric surface layer. During a nocturnal snowfall we deploy an imaging system consisting of a searchlight and high speed cameras to illuminate and track thousands of snowflakes over a 7 m by 4 m vertical plane. We simultaneously characterize their shape and size using digital holography, while recording the air turbulence properties via sonic anemometry. We show that, in the meteorological conditions in object, the snowflake motion exhibits hallmark features identified by fundamental studies of particle-laden turbulence in both the Lagrangian and the Eulerian framework. The acceleration distribution displays stretched exponential tails, and by comparing with previous laboratory and computational studies we infer the Stokes number and aerodynamic response time of the snowflakes. The fall speed is found to be much greater than the expected value in still air, indicating that turbulence enhances settling according to the preferential sweeping mechanism. These observations demonstrate the major role of turbulence in determining the snow fall speed, and create the basis for leveraging results from particle-laden turbulence research towards improved snow precipitation models.

  11. Aerodynamic drag reduction of a simplified squareback vehicle using steady blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, R. P.; Passmore, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    A large contribution to the aerodynamic drag of a vehicle arises from the failure to fully recover pressure in the wake region, especially on squareback configurations. A degree of base pressure recovery can be achieved through careful shape optimisation, but the freedom of an automotive aerodynamicist to implement significant shape changes is limited by a variety of additional factors such styling, ergonomics and loading capacity. Active flow control technologies present the potential to create flow field modifications without the need for external shape changes and have received much attention in previous years within the aeronautical industry and, more recently, within the automotive industry. In this work the influence of steady blowing applied at a variety of angles on the roof trailing edge of a simplified ¼ scale squareback style vehicle has been investigated. Hot-wire anemometry, force balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and PIV have been used to investigate the effects of the steady blowing on the vehicle wake structures and the resulting body forces. The energy consumption of the steady jet is calculated and is used to deduce an aerodynamic drag power change. Results show that overall gains can be achieved; however, the large mass flow rate required restricts the applicability of the technique to road vehicles. Means by which the mass flow rate requirements of the jet may be reduced are discussed and suggestions for further work put forward.

  12. Mean droplet size and local velocity in horizontal isothermal free jets of air and water, respectively, viscous liquid in quiescent ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Rabadi, S.; Friedel, L. [Fluid Mechanics Institute, Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany); Al Salaymeh, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Jordan (Jordan)

    2007-01-15

    Measurements using two-dimensional Phase Doppler Anemometry as well as high speed cinematography in free jets at several nozzle exit pressures and mass flow rates, show that the Sauter mean droplet diameter decreases with increasing air and liquid-phase mass flow ratio due to the increase of the air stream impact on the liquid phase. This leads to substantial liquid fragmentation, respectively primary droplet breakup, and hence, satellite droplet formation with small sizes. This trend is also significant in the case of a liquid viscosity higher than that of water. The increased liquid viscosity stabilizes the droplet formation and breakup by reducing the rate of surface perturbations and consequently droplet distortions, ultimately also leading, in total, to the formation of smaller droplets. The droplet velocity decreases with the nozzle downstream distance, basically due to the continual air entrainment and due to the collisions between the droplets. The droplet collisions may induce further liquid fragmentation and, hence, formation of a number of relatively smaller droplets respectively secondary breakup, or may induce agglomeration to comparatively larger liquid fragments that may rain out of the free jet. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Clinical and objective data on spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of severe Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, B; Perkmann, R; Klingler, P J; Giacomuzzi, S; Kofler, A; Fraedrich, G

    2001-11-01

    Ischemic vascular disease of the upper extremity represents a difficult therapeutic problem wherein medical treatment often fails. Epidural spinal cord stimulation has been shown to be an effective alternative in severe peripheral arterial disease. Although this method has been used for nearly two decades only limited experience exists in Raynaud's phenomenon of the upper limbs. In addition objective parameters to prove therapeutic success are not well defined. Herein we describe a patient with severe primary Raynaud's phenomenon over several years who had significant pain relief and complete healing of ischemic digital ulcerations after spinal cord stimulation. Pain level was evaluated using a visual rating scale before and after surgery. Microcirculatory parameters were assessed before and after spinal cord stimulation by capillary microscopy and laser Doppler anemometry. Significant improvement of red blood cell velocity, capillary density, and capillary permeability was demonstrated. At follow-up 18 months after surgery the patient had no complaints and all ulcerations of her fingertips had healed. Spinal cord stimulation appears to be an effective treatment in severe cases of Raynaud's phenomenon and we recommend its use in the case of failed medical therapy. Pain rating and capillary microscopy enable one to assess and visualize the effects of spinal cord stimulation.

  14. An Assessment of NASA Glenn's Aeroacoustic Experimental and Predictive Capabilities for Installed Cooling Fans. Part 1; Aerodynamic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Koch, L. Danielle; Wernet, Mark P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by the need for low production costs, electronics cooling fans have evolved differently than the bladed components of gas turbine engines which incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Drawing upon NASA Glenn's experience in the measurement and prediction of gas turbine engine aeroacoustic performance, tests have been conducted to determine if these tools and techniques can be extended for application to the aerodynamics and acoustics of electronics cooling fans. An automated fan plenum installed in NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory was used to map the overall aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a spaceflight qualified 80 mm diameter axial cooling fan. In order to more accurately identify noise sources, diagnose performance limiting aerodynamic deficiencies, and validate noise prediction codes, additional aerodynamic measurements were recorded for two operating points: free delivery and a mild stall condition. Non-uniformities in the fan s inlet and exhaust regions captured by Particle Image Velocimetry measurements, and rotor blade wakes characterized by hot wire anemometry measurements provide some assessment of the fan aerodynamic performance. The data can be used to identify fan installation/design changes which could enlarge the stable operating region for the fan and improve its aerodynamic performance and reduce noise emissions.

  15. Rotor-rotor interaction for counter-rotating fans. Part 1: Three-dimensional flowfield measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyoun-Woo; Whitfield, Charlotte E.; Wisler, David C.

    1994-11-01

    The rotor wake/vortex flowfield generated in a scale model simulator of General Electric's counter-rotating unducted fan (UDF) engine was investigated using three-dimensional hot-wire anemometry. The purpose was to obtain a set of benchmark experimental aerodynamic data defining the rotor wake and vortex structure, particularly in the tip region, and to relate this observed flow structure to its acoustic signature. The tests were conducted in a large, freejet anechoic chamber. Measurements of the three components of velocity were made at axial stations upstream and downstream of each rotor for conditions that simulate takeoff, cutback, and approach power. Two different forward blade designs were evaluated. The tip vortices, the axial velocity defect in the vortex core, and differences in the interaction of the wakes and vortices generated by the forward and aft rotor are used to explain differences in noise generated by the two different rotor designs. Part 1 presents the three-dimensional flowfield measurements. Part 2 (aeroacoustic prediction and analysis), which will be presented later, will give an acoustic prediction using the measured data.

  16. Mass flow-rate control unit to calibrate hot-wire sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, F.; Uensal, B. [FMP Technology GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Haddad, K. [FMP Technology GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM-Erlangen, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Erlangen (Germany); Al-Salaymeh, A.; Eid, Shadi [University of Jordan, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Amman (Jordan)

    2008-02-15

    Hot-wire anemometry is a measuring technique that is widely employed in fluid mechanics research to study the velocity fields of gas flows. It is general practice to calibrate hot-wire sensors against velocity. Calibrations are usually carried out under atmospheric pressure conditions and these suggest that the wire is sensitive to the instantaneous local volume flow rate. It is pointed out, however, that hot wires are sensitive to the instantaneous local mass flow rate and, of course, also to the gas heat conductivity. To calibrate hot wires with respect to mass flow rates per unit area, i.e., with respect to ({rho}U), requires special calibration test rigs. Such a device is described and its application is summarized within the ({rho}U) range 0.1-25 kg/m{sup 2} s. Calibrations are shown to yield the same hot-wire response curves for density variations in the range 1-7 kg/m{sup 3}. The application of the calibrated wires to measure pulsating mass flows is demonstrated, and suggestions are made for carrying out extensive calibrations to yield the ({rho}U) wire response as a basis for advanced fluid mechanics research on ({rho}U) data in density-varying flows. (orig.)

  17. Characteristics of droplet motion in effervescent sprays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedelský Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved droplet size and velocity measurement was made using Phase-Doppler anemometry in an effervescent spray at GLR of 6 % and operation pressure drops 21 – 52 kPa. The spray shows a size dependent variation of mean as well as fluctuating axial and radial velocities of droplets similarly for all operation regimes. Particles under 13 μm follow the gas flow, axially decelerated due to gas expansion. Velocity of medium sized particles is positively size correlated and larger particles keep high velocity, given them during discharge. Fluctuating radial velocity of small particles is larger than that of large particles while fluctuating axial velocity increases with size. Small particles thus reach a ratio of radial to axial velocity fluctuations ~ 0.6 but large particles only ~ 0.1, which indicates large transverse dispersion of small particles. Overall fluctuating velocity ratios smaller than 0.5 document an anisotropic character of the liquid mass fluctuations. Power spectral density (PSD of axial velocity fluctuations of large droplets is uniform up to 1 kHz, while PSD of smaller particles drops down with frequency for frequencies > 100 Hz. Large particles thus preserve the fluctuations imposed during discharge while the gas turbulence drops with frequency. Turbulence intensity reaches 14 to 21 % depending on pressure. Such high-turbulence character of the flow probably results from a heterogeneous gas–liquid mixture at the discharge.

  18. Spatially-resolved, three-dimensional spray characterization of impinging jets by digital in-line holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Rodrigues, Neil; Sojka, Paul; Chen, Jun

    2014-11-01

    The impinging jet injector is a preferred method for the atomization of liquid rocket propellants. The majority of experimental studies in literature are not spatially-resolved due to the limitations of widely available point-wise and two-dimensional (2D) diagnostic techniques such as phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), which requires significant experimental repetitions to give spatially-resolved measurements. In the present study, digital in-line holography (DIH) is used to provide spatially-resolved, three-dimensional (3D) characteristics of impinging jet sprays. A double-exposure DIH setup is configured to measure droplet 3D, three-component velocity as well as the size distribution. The particle information is extracted by the hybrid method, which is recently proposed as a particle detection method. To enlarge the detection volume, two parallel, collimated laser beams are used to simultaneously probe the spray at two locations, and two identical cameras are used to record the corresponding holograms. Such a setup has a detection volume of approximately 20 cm by 3.6 cm by 4.8 cm. Sprays of both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids corresponding to regimes at relatively lower jet Reynolds and Weber numbers are investigated. Measurements from DIH are further verified by comparison with experimental data obtained from shadowgraph and PDA. It is revealed that DIH is particularly suitable to provide spatially-resolved, 3D measurements of impinging jet sprays that are not particularly dense.

  19. Design of a high-temperature experiment for evaluating advanced structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Theodore T.; Castro-Cedeno, Mario; Gladden, Herbert J.; Kaufman, Albert

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the design of an experiment for evaluating monolithic and composite material specimens in a high-temperature environment and subject to big thermal gradients. The material specimens will be exposed to aerothermal loads that correspond to thermally similar engine operating conditions. Materials evaluated in this study were monolithic nickel alloys and silicon carbide. In addition, composites such as tungsten/copper were evaluated. A facility to provide the test environment has been assembled in the Engine Research Building at the Lewis Research Center. The test section of the facility will permit both regular and Schlieren photography, thermal imaging, and laser Doppler anemometry. The test environment will be products of hydrogen-air combustion at temperatures from about 1200 F to as high as 4000 F. The test chamber pressure will vary up to 60 psia, and the free-stream flow velocity can reach Mach 0.9. The data collected will be used to validate thermal and stress analysis models of the specimen. This process of modeling, testing, and validation is expected to yield enhancements to existing analysis tools and techniques.

  20. Wind-tunnel experiments of turbulent flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block in a thermally-stratified boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent flows over complex surface topography have been of great interest in the atmospheric science and wind engineering communities. The geometry of the topography, surface roughness and temperature characteristics as well as the atmospheric thermal stability play important roles in determining momentum and scalar flux distribution. Studies of turbulent flow over simplified topography models, under neutrally stratified boundary-layer conditions, have provided insights into fluid dynamics. However, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been considered in laboratory experiments, e.g., wind-tunnel experiments. Series of wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified boundary-layer flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block, in a well-controlled boundary-layer wind tunnel, will be presented. Measurements using high-resolution PIV, x-wire/cold-wire anemometry and surface heat flux sensors were conducted to quantify the turbulent flow properties, including the size of the recirculation zone, coherent vortex structures and the subsequent boundary layer recovery. Results will be shown to address thermal stability effects on momentum and scalar flux distribution in the wake, as well as dominant mechanism of turbulent kinetic energy generation and consumption. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the Swiss National Foundation (Grant 200021-132122), the National Science Foundation (Grant ATM-0854766) and NASA (Grant NNG06GE256).