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Sample records for anemia iron-deficiency

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart- ... infections Motor or cognitive development delays in ... with chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  17. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also can cause internal bleeding. Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heavy blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells ... cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... explain tests and procedures that your doctor may use to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science ... deficiency anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who ... heavy menstrual flow, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help reduce your monthly blood flow. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to get the ... iron-deficiency anemia, red blood cells will be small in size with an MCV of less than ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special measures can help prevent the condition in these groups. ... is a complete blood count (CBC). The CBC measures many parts of your blood. This test checks ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... test called a complete blood count (CBC) to see if you have lower than normal red blood ... iron-deficiency anemia: Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting less than the recommended daily ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend to prevent your iron- ... colon under sedation to view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... people who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This urge to move often occurs with strange ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ... flow. In some cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... size of your liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding ... bleeding in the stomach, upper intestines, colon, or pelvic organs. Treatment Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen ... mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help your doctor screen for iron-deficiency ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron- ... deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mouth Pale skin Swelling or soreness of the tongue Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest ... Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of your eyelids are ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can cause complications and may be life-threatening. Signs and Symptoms Common signs of iron-deficiency anemia ... abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... to iron-deficiency anemia. We are interested in studying in more detail how iron levels are regulated ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you curious about how ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... disease also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you ...

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  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another condition. Finally, the CBC looks at mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV). MCV is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. The results may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... woman's risk for a premature or low-birth-weight baby. Adults Who Have Internal Bleeding Adults who have internal bleeding, such as intestinal bleeding, can develop iron-deficiency anemia due to blood loss. Certain conditions, such as colon cancer and bleeding ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Taking ...

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  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia ... iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

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    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or advise you to eat more iron-rich foods. This not only will help you avoid iron-deficiency anemia, but also may lower your risk of having a low-birth-weight baby. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and ...

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    Full Text Available ... may ask whether you might be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of iron-deficiency anemia. ... liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and ...

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron added). If you don't eat these foods regularly, or if you don't take an iron supplement, you're more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

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    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

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  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... body. People with severe iron-deficiency anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other ... poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat diet over a ...

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  3. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... National Institute of Health Department of Health and Human Services OIG USA.gov

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    Full Text Available ... Grants & Training Grants and Training Home Policies and Guidelines Funding Opportunities and Contacts Training and Career Development ... Study - Red Blood Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get enough iron ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing age ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View more ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children who have lead in their blood from ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially harmful donations and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , we are committed ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... proof packages for supplements can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency ... within months. Supplements come in pill form or in drops for children. Large amounts of iron can be harmful, so ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as if you are following a ... unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of developing iron-deficiency ... to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for and strategies ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [ ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition in which ... to grow and develop. The iron that full-term infants have stored in their bodies is used ...

  2. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... items, such as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or ... Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even ... More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual ... Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1.54MB] Cardiovascular Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ... and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all infants for anemia at 1 ... heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . In infants and young children, signs of anemia ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated ... Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your ...

  12. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney ...

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that have strong potential ...

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    Full Text Available ... issues. For more information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... iron as they grow and begin to eat solid foods. Talk with your child's doctor about a ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood ... remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of blood loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron- ... Pediatrics recommends testing all infants for anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that ... our Hematology Branch , performs research on anemia. We fund research. Our Division of Blood Diseases and Resources ( ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also are at increased risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk ... infants for anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less ... deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. Fresh and frozen ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may ... of other nutrients in your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Many tests and procedures are used ... cells usually are smaller than normal. Other Blood Tests If the CBC results confirm you have anemia, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

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    Full Text Available ... heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . In infants and young children, signs of anemia ... Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and ...

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    Full Text Available ... about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless ... Get Email Alerts Receive automatic alerts about NHLBI related news and highlights from across the Institute. Learn ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... Serum ferritin. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. A measure of this ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... eating lead in paint or soil, or drinking water that contains lead. Teens Teens are at risk ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if ... months. Tell your doctor if you have any new symptoms or if your symptoms get worse. Participate ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... When signs and symptoms do occur, they can range from mild to severe. Many of the signs ... hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The normal range of these levels varies in certain racial and ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of vitamin C are vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People ... make it hard to find the energy to do normal activities. Headache Irregular heartbeat. This is a ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health) Building 31 31 Center ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegetables. During some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get ... prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, your doctor ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin ... resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... levels of red blood cells, hemoglobin, and iron. Dietary Changes and Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements to build ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron ... anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  9. An Approach to Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Rasul, Imran; Kandel, Gabor P

    2001-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is a common reason for referral to a gastroenterologist. In adult men and postmenopausal women, gastrointestinal tract pathology is often the cause of iron-deficiency anemia, so patients are frequently referred for endoscopic evaluation. Endoscopy may be costly and at times difficult for the patient. Therefore, physicians need to know what lesions can be identified reliably and, more importantly, the importance of ruling out life-threatening conditions such as occult ma...

  10. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  11. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad Mahmoud; Jaberian Sara; Pazouki Abdolreza; Riazi Sajedeh; Rangraz Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber Somayyeh

    2017-01-01

    Background. The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population.

  13. Iron deficiency anemia refractory to iron preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with iron deficiency anemia are treated effectively with oral iron preparations. However, a small number of these patients are refractory to such treatments, even when the pathologic condition underlying the anemia is concurrently treated. The pathological basis for this refractoriness can be explained by several factors, including malabsorption of iron, e.g. atrophic gastritis, deficiency of other hematopoietic vitamins or minerals, e.g. vitamin B12 or zinc, other undiagnosed anemic disorders, e.g. renal anemia or hematopoietic diseases, as well as certain hereditary disorders of iron metabolism, e.g. iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) caused by genetic mutation of the TMPRSS6 gene. This review focuses on the diagnosis and pathoetiology of iron deficiency anemia that is refractory to conventional oral iron preparations.

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochinok T.V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.

  15. Risk factors associated with anemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in rural Nepali pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Zeina; Taren, Douglas; Duncan, Burris; Pandey, Pooja; Thomson, Cynthia; Winzerling, Joy; Muramoto, Myra; Shrestha, Ram

    2012-05-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study to investigate risk factors associated with severe anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) anemia and the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) was measured among a subsample of 479 women. The iron status categories were: 1) normal (Hb> or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR anemia without iron deficiency (Hbanemia (Hb > or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR>8.5 mg/l); and 4) iron deficiency anemia (IDA): (Hb8.5 mg/l). Factors associated with severe anemia and poor iron status were determined using logistic regression. Hookworm infection increased the risk for developing severe anemia [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 4.26; 95% CI 1.67-10.89; panemia. Intake of iron supplements as tablets and/or tonic was protective against severe anemia, anemia without iron deficiency and IDA. Dietary heme iron was significantly associated with iron deficiency without anemia (RRR: 0.1; 95% CI 0.02-0.47; pclassification and multiple approaches are needed to reduce anemia and associated nutrient deficiencies.

  16. Current approaches to diagnosing iron-deficiency anemia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Balashova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-deficiency anemia is a common and, despite the available wide range of iron preparations, unsolved problem in pediatric practice. This is often associated with inadequate diagnosis in primary health care, which is due to both objective problems and underestimation of the seriousness of sequels of iron deficiency. This review gives data on the epidemiology of iron-deficiency anemia in the Russian Federation and worldwide, existing approaches to denning concepts, such as anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia in children, and possible diagnostic methods from the simplest to high-tech.

  17. Iron deficiency anemia in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S. Tarasova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on incidence, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA, principles of its diagnostics and treatment in children and adolescents. Author gives a description of iron drugs for oral and parenteral treatment that are frequently used in Russia, their advantages and shortcomings; principles of the control of their efficacy are described as well. Different types of prophylaxis are described: on population level (fortification, in the risk groups of IDA (supplementation, primary and secondary prophylaxis. The recommendation of American Academy of Pediatrics on prophylaxis of IDA in the most vulnerable group — infants and young children — is presented.Key words: children, adolescents, iron deficiency anemia, diagnostics, treatment, iron drugs, prophylaxis.

  18. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  19. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F.; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  1. Urinary Schistosomiasis And Iron Deficiency Anemia Among Malian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, unlike malaria and hookworm infections, little is known on the role of urinary schistosomiasis in iron deficiency anemia. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia and the effect of iron supplementation on hemoglobin (Hb) and serum ferritin (SF) levels among school children ...

  2. Anemia and iron deficiency before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Wilson; Modotti, Caue; Nonino, Carla Barbosa; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are changes often associated with obesity. Bariatric surgery is responsible for increasing the iron loss and reducing its absorption. The objective of this study was to evaluate anemia and iron deficiency before and after bariatric surgery and to relate them to possible predisposing factors. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients submitted to open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, in which clinical and laboratory data were obtained up to 48 months postoperatively. Patients were divided into groups according to the presence or absence of anemia and to the presence or absence of iron deficiency (even without anemia), and all data were compared between these groups. Preoperatively, 21.5% of patients had anemia and 20% had iron deficiency. The number of patients with anemia did not vary through the 4 years of the study, but ferritin levels significantly decreased with time (Pdeficiency. Anemia and iron deficiency are frequent in obese patients and must be treated before surgery. Medical and nutritional surveillance is important in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery. Management of each condition must be directed at correcting the 2 major sources of iron deficiency and anemia: food intolerance (mostly meat intolerance) and losses (frequently due to menstruation). These are the factors more related to iron deficient anemia. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron deficiency anemia: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan F

    2009-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) still remains universally problematic worldwide. The primary focus of this review is to critique articles published over the past 18 months that describe strategies for the diagnosis and management of this prevalent condition. The medical community continues to lack consensus when identifying the optimal approach for the diagnosis and management of IDA. Current diagnostic recommendations revolve around the validity and practicality of current biomarkers such as soluble transferrin-receptor concentrations and others, and cause-based diagnostics that potentially include endoscopy. Management of IDA is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment. Advances in oral and parenteral low-molecular-weight iron preparations has expanded and improved treatment modalities for IDA. Since the introduction of low versus high-molecular-weight intravenous iron administration, there have been fewer serious adverse events associated with parenteral iron preparations. Best practice guidelines for diagnosing and managing IDA should include the design of an algorithm that is inclusive of multiple biomarkers and cause-based diagnostics, which will provide direction in managing IDA, and distinguish between IDA from the anemia of chronic disease.

  4. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement...... available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library......, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia...

  5. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  6. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Intellectual Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the differences, if any, in the intellectual performance scores of children who have iron deficiency anemia and those who are neither anemic nor iron-deficient in New Kashmir Model. School, Islamabad, Pakistan. Methods: A total of 108 primary New Kashmir Model School children of Islamabad, Pakistan ...

  7. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Intellectual Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the differences, if any, in the intellectual performance scores of children who have iron deficiency anemia and those who are neither anemic nor iron-deficient in New Kashmir Model School, Islamabad, Pakistan. Methods: A total of 108 primary New Kashmir Model School children of Islamabad, Pakistan ...

  8. Ferrotherapy of iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Berezhniy V.V.; Korneva V.V.

    2016-01-01

    Present article devoted to the steps for implementation unified clinical protocol of the primary, secondary (specialized) medical care «Iron deficiency» to the practical activities of pediatricians, family physicians. The features of ferrotherapy in children of different age groups and the issues of prevention of iron deficiency states are highlighted.

  9. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  10. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg ND

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neil D Goldberg Emeritus Chief of Gastroenterology, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, MD, USA Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. Keywords: anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, intravenous iron, iron deficiency, oral iron, therapy

  12. Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Distance Runner

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, D. B.; Taunton, J. E.; Poskitt, Kenneth

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses a case study of a 19-year-old male student who engaged in daily long distance running and presented with complaints of fatigue and dizziness. Laboratory test revealed a hemoglobin of 7.7 g/dl and a bone marrow negative for iron. After a complete evaluation no source of blood loss was identified. His iron deficient state may be caused by his exposure to long distance running for some years. Recent work from Sweden reports iron deficiency in eight runners, demonstrated by b...

  13. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in a distance runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, D B; Taunton, J E; Poskitt, K

    1982-05-01

    This paper discusses a case study of a 19-year-old male student who engaged in daily long distance running and presented with complaints of fatigue and dizziness. Laboratory test revealed a hemoglobin of 7.7 g/dl and a bone marrow negative for iron. After a complete evaluation no source of blood loss was identified. His iron deficient state may be caused by his exposure to long distance running for some years. Recent work from Sweden reports iron deficiency in eight runners, demonstrated by bone marrow examination. Further work in West Germany shows low ferritin values in runners. Source of iron loss may be from hemoglobinuria and/or excessive sweating. Hemoglobin and ferritin values should be monitored in runners every six to 12 months.

  15. [The characteristics of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorkalova, E V; Aznabaeva, L F; Nikulicheva, V I; Safuanova, G Sh; Chepurnaia, A N

    2011-07-01

    The study investigated the issues of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia and dependencies of production of IL-1? and sICAM-1 immunoinflammatory markers from degree of severity and duration of anemia. The study data indicates that under iron-deficiency anemia lactoferrin and sICAM-1 are the negative regulators of hemopoiesis. The inhibition of transferrin expression by the proinflammatory cytokines is one of the causes of inefficient hemopoiesis under chronic disorders anemia.

  16. Triad of Iron Deficiency Anemia, Severe Thrombocytopenia and Menorrhagia—A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Ramy; Khan, Areej; Raza, Shahzad; Kafeel, Muhammad; Dabas, Ridhima; Haynes, Elizabeth; Gandhi, Anjula; Majumder, Omran L.; Zaman, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Thrombocytosis is a common disorder in patients diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia. The decreased platelet counts commonly found iron deficiency anemia is rarely reported in clinical practice. The exact mechanism of the occurrence of thrombocytopenia in iron deficiency anemia remains unclear. In this case report we discuss a triad of symptoms seen in the African American population: Iron deficiency anemia, menorrhagia and thrombocytopenia. Case presentation A 40 year old multi...

  17. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis mimicking iron deficiency anemia: a delayed diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Aydin Koker

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH is an uncommon chronic disorder in children. It is characterized by recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage and may result in hemoptysis and pulmonary insufficiency. The most common hematologic manifestation of IPH is iron deficiency anemia. The etiology of IPH is not known and its diagnosis may be difficult due to the variable clinical courses. The most helpful signs for identifying IPH are iron deficiency anemia and recurrent or chronic cough, hemoptysis, dyspnea, wheezing. We report here 5 pediatric cases of IPH presenting with iron deficiency anemia and without pulmonary symptoms. Mean corpuscular volume was low in all patients; iron was low in 4 out of 5 cases; total iron binding capacity was high in all of them; ferritin was low in 3 patients. At follow up, none of them had responded successfully to the iron therapy. Although they didn’t present with pulmonary symptoms, chest radiographs incidentally revealed diffuse reticulonoduler shadows in all of them. Computed tomography revealed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, increased density. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of hemosiderinladen macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and gastric aspirate. If patients with iron deficiency anemia don’t respond to iron therapy, they should be examined for IPH. Chest radiographs should be taken even in absence of pulmonary symptoms. Early diagnosis is important for a timely management of IPH.

  18. Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis Mimicking Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Delayed Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koker, Sultan Aydin; Gözmen, Salih; Oymak, Yeşim; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Can, Demet; Genç, Sinan; Vergin, Raziye Canan

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is an uncommon chronic disorder in children. It is characterized by recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage and may result in hemoptysis and pulmonary insufficiency. The most common hematologic manifestation of IPH is iron deficiency anemia. The etiology of IPH is not known and its diagnosis may be difficult due to the variable clinical courses. The most helpful signs for identifying IPH are iron deficiency anemia and recurrent or chronic cough, hemoptysis, dyspnea, wheezing. We report here 5 pediatric cases of IPH presenting with iron deficiency anemia and without pulmonary symptoms. Mean corpuscular volume was low in all patients; iron was low in 4 out of 5 cases; total iron binding capacity was high in all of them; ferritin was low in 3 patients. At follow up, none of them had responded successfully to the iron therapy. Although they didn’t present with pulmonary symptoms, chest radiographs incidentally revealed diffuse reticulonoduler shadows in all of them. Computed tomography revealed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, increased density. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of hemosiderin-laden macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and gastric aspirate. If patients with iron deficiency anemia don’t respond to iron therapy, they should be examined for IPH. Chest radiographs should be taken even in absence of pulmonary symptoms. Early diagnosis is important for a timely management of IPH. PMID:28670434

  19. HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF THE KIDNEYS IN IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghavamian

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available In 6 patients with iron deficiency anemia the proliferation of epi, thelial cells of glomeruli were prominent associated with edema and adherence of Bowman's capsule in kidney biopsy, the cause of proliferation is not known.

  20. The triad of Iron deficiency anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A triad of iron deficiency anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and growth retardation occurring in tandem with zinc deficiency has been reported in the past as components of either Prasad's syndrome or hypopituitarism. There are no documented cases of such triad occurring in the presence of normal serum zinc levels. We report ...

  1. The triad of Iron deficiency anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... A triad of iron deficiency anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and growth retardation occurring in tandem with zinc deficiency has been reported in the past as components of either Prasad's syndrome or hypopituitarism. There are no documented cases of such triad occurring in the presence of normal serum zinc ...

  2. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia in children of Northeast Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Antonio Geraldo Cidrão; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral de; Barros, Maria de Fátima Alcântara; Aléssio, Maria Luiza Martins; Lima, Marília de Carvalho; Carbonneau, Marie Annette; Berger, Jacques; Léger, Claude Louis

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To diagnose iron deficiency anemia in children. METHODS: The study was conducted with a sample of 301 children aged six to 30 months attending public daycare centers in the city of Recife, Northeast Brazil, in 2004. The diagnoses of anemia were based on a combination of different hematological and biochemical parameters: hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin, C-reactive protein, transferrin saturation and transferrin receptor. The chi-square test and ANOVA were used in the ...

  3. Caregiver perceptions of iron deficiency anemia and iron replacement therapies in young children with nutritional iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., approximately 3% of young children develop iron deficiency anemia (IDA), with Hispanic/Latino children disproportionately affected. IDA is associated with inferior neurodevelopmental outcomes. Treatment with oral iron mitigates its consequences yet non-adherence often results in treatme...

  4. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issues. For more information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources ...

  5. Reticulocyte parameters in hemoglobinopathies and iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortellazzi Laura C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric reticulocyte analysis allows the evaluation of reticulocyte maturity. New reticulocyte parameters have been used in the diagnosis and management of anemias, in the bone marrow transplant setting and in the monitoring of iron replacement or erythropoiet in therapy. Reticulocyte numbers and maturation levels have been studied in different hemoglobinopathies and the results have been correlated with the degree of ineffective erythropoiesis. In order to verify differences in reticulocyte parameters in various types of anemias and to test the absolute number of immature reticulocytes as a possible discriminating factor among various types of anemias, reticulocyte counts were performed on 219 samples from patients with sickle cell anemia (SS (n= 62, hemoglobin S trait (n=9, Sbeta thalassemia (n=7, hemoglobin SC disease (n=11, beta thalassemia trait (n=33 and iron deficiency anemia (n= 47, and non-anemic individuals (n= 50. Mean fluorescence index (MFI was defined as representative of the degree of reticulocyte immaturity and it was evaluated as a percentage and in absolute values. Reticulocyte counts and MFI values were significantly higher in SS, Sbeta thalassemic and SC groups when compared to controls, but not different among the three anemia groups. Patients with hemoglobin S trait, iron deficiency anemia and beta thalassemia trait showed reticulocyte parameters similar to the non-anemic group. There was no difference between the b thalassemic trait and iron deficiency anemia in relation to any parameters. MFI in absolute numbers were significantly higher in anemias that develop with the hemolytic process, although this was not evident in MFI percentage values. Our results showed that the erythoid expansion in sickle cell diseases (SS, SC and Sb thalassemia leads to an enhanced immature reticulocyte release from bone marrow and that the phenomena is more evident by the MFI counting in absolute figures than in percentages. We

  6. Fluorescence spectral classification of iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Mohamad Saleh, AlSalhi; Ravikumar, Mani; Perinbam, Kantharaj; Prasad, Saradh; Abbas, H Al-Saeed; Palled, Siddanna R; Jeyaprakash, Karuppaiah; Masilamani, Vadivel

    2014-02-01

    Thalassemia (Thal), sickle cell anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most common blood disorders in many parts of the world, particularly in developing countries like India and Bangladesh. The well-established diagnostic procedure for them is the complete blood count (CBC); however, there is substantial confusion in discrimination between Thal and IDA blood samples based on such CBC. We propose a new spectral technique for reliable classification between the above two anemias. This is based on the identification and quantification of a certain set of fluorescent metabolites found in the blood samples of patients of Thal and IDA.

  7. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-09-21

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice.

  8. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure : mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Macdougall, Iain C.

    Anemia and iron deficiency are common in patients with heart failure (HF), and are associated with worse symptoms and adverse outcomes in this population. Although the two can occur together, anemia in HF is often not caused by iron deficiency, and iron deficiency can be present without causing

  9. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of anemia and thrombocytopenia as a result of uterine fibroid and adenomyosis, complicated by immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP. Symptoms were presented as menorrhagia and metrorrhagia in a 34-year-old African American woman, who was later treated with blood and platelet transfusion and iron therapy with steroids. Uterine fibroids are commonly found to cause hematologic disturbances such as anemia and reactive thrombocytosis and, less commonly, thrombocytopenia. Moreover, such hematologic disturbances are secondary to heavy and irregular uterine bleeding, which is typically presented. A previous uterine fibroid diagnosis was made and reconfirmed by pelvic and transvaginal ultrasound to exclude other locoregional pathologies. ITP was suggested by Coombs test and several other serologies, leading to confirmation via bone marrow biopsy. In a previous case study, we reported positive responses in hemotecrit and platelet count after the introduction of iron therapy to an iron-depleted middle-aged female presenting severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. 1

  10. Iron Deficiency and Anemia Predict Mortality in Patients with Tuberculosis123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanaka, Sheila; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Urassa, Willy; Willett, Walter C.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Villamor, Eduardo; Spiegelman, Donna; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have documented a high prevalence of anemia among tuberculosis (TB) patients and anemia at TB diagnosis has been associated with an increased risk of death. However, little is known about the factors contributing to the development of TB-associated anemia and their importance in TB disease progression. Data from a randomized clinical trial of micronutrient supplementation in patients with pulmonary TB in Tanzania were analyzed. Repeated measures of anemia with iron deficiency, anemia without iron deficiency, and iron deficiency without anemia were assessed as risk factors for treatment failure, TB recurrence, and mortality. The prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin iron deficiency (mean corpuscular volume , 80 fL). We found no evidence of an association between anemia (with or without iron deficiency) or iron deficiency without anemia at baseline and the risk of treatment failure at 1 mo after initiation. Anemia without iron deficiency was associated with an independent, 4-fold increased risk of TB recurrence [adjusted RR = 4.10 (95% CI = 1.88, 8.91); P Iron deficiency and anemia (with and without iron deficiency) were associated with a 2- to nearly 3-fold independent increase in the risk of death [adjusted RR for iron deficiency without anemia = 2.89 (95% CI = 1.53, 5.47); P = 0.001; anemia without iron deficiency = 2.72 (95% CI = 1.50, 4.93); P = 0.001; iron deficiency anemia = 2.13 (95% CI = 1.10, 4.11); P = 0.02]. Efforts to identify and address the conditions contributing to TB-associated anemia, including iron deficiency, could play an important role in reducing morbidity and mortality in areas heavily affected by TB. PMID:22190024

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in an urban slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumante, N M; Kanvinde, S; Sanwalka, N J; Vaidya, M V; Khadilkar, A V

    2008-04-01

    Of this pilot study was to assess the iron status and dietary intake of 1-3 year-old apparently healthy toddlers of the lower socio-economic class, and the effect of eight weeks intervention with liquid oral iron in an urban slum in Pune, India. 50 toddlers (M= 25, F= 25) with mean age of 2.4 years (SD 0.82) were evaluated. Anthropometry, Food Frequency Questionnaire, a hemogram and ferritin were measured. Twenty mg of elemental iron was given to all toddlers. After 8 weeks clinical examination, anthropometry, hemoglobin (HGB) and Ferritin were measured. Prevalence of anemia was 66% (HGB fight against anemia and prescribe iron to all toddlers when they are seen for minor ailments.

  12. [Cow's milk consumption and iron deficiency anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria A A; Osório, Mônica M

    2005-01-01

    To thoroughly investigate the association between the consumption of cow's milk and anemia in childhood. The information was gathered from papers catalogued in Lilacs and MEDLINE and published during the last two decades, and also from textbooks and publications by international organizations. Iron deficiency anemia is a severe public health problem in developing countries. Breast milk contains adequate iron for full term babies in the first 6 months. Thereafter, an additional iron-rich diet becomes essential. In recognition of the importance of the diet in triggering anemia, this paper discusses the relationship in children between a high intake of cow's milk and iron deficiency anemia. Gastrointestinal and allergic problems may be caused by early introduction of cow's milk or by its substitution for breast milk. Furthermore, cow's milk has decreased iron density and bioavailability, excess protein and minerals, notably calcium, and thus interferes in the absorption of iron from other foods, and is also linked to small intestinal hemorrhage in young children. The use of cow's milk in lieu of other foods rich in bioavailable iron was shown to be a risk factor for anemia. Exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life, discretionary weaning only after the 24th month, and a complementary diet rich in iron are highly important to avoid anemia and its consequences.

  13. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yılmaz Keskin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Demir, oksijenin taşınması, DNA sentezi ve hücre çoğalması gibi çeşitli biyolojik reaksiyonlar için vazgeçilmez olduğundan, yaşam için zorunludur. Demir metabolizması ve bu elementin düzenlenmesiyle ilgili bilgilerimiz, son yıllarda belirgin şekilde değişmiştir. Demir metabolizması ile ilgili yeni bozukluklar tanımlanmış ve demirin başka bozuklukların kofaktörü olduğu anlaşılmaya başlamıştır. Hemokromatozis ve demir tedavisine dirençli demir eksikliği anemisi (IRIDA; “iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia” gibi genetik durumlar üzerinde yapılan çalışmalar, vücuttaki demir dengesini kontrol eden moleküler mekanizmalar ile ilgili önemli ipuçları sunmuştur. Bu ilerlemeler, gelecekte, hem genetik hem de kazanılmış demir bozukluklarının daha etkili şekilde tedavi edilmesi amacıyla kullanılabilir. IRIDA, demir eksikliği ile giden durumlarda, hepsidin üretimini baskılayan matriptaz-2’yi kodlayan TMPRSS6 genindeki mutasyonlardan kaynaklanmaktadır. Hastalığın tipik özellikleri, hipokrom, mikrositer anemi, çok düşük ortalama eritrosit hacmi, oral demir tedavisine yanıtsızlık (veya yetersiz yanıt ve parenteral demire kısmi yanıttır. Klasik demir eksikliği anemisinin aksine, serum ferritin değeri genellikle hafif düşük ya da normal aralıkta; serum ve idrar hepsidin değerleri ise, aneminin derecesi ile orantısız şekilde yüksek bulunur. Şimdiye kadar literatürde bildirilmiş olguların sayısı 100’ü geçmediği halde, IRIDA’nın, “atipik” mikrositik anemilerin en sık nedeni olduğu düşünülmektedir. Bu derlemenin amacı, IRIDA hakkındaki güncel bilgileri araştırıcılar ile paylaşmak ve bu alandaki farkındalıklarını arttırmaktır.

  14. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND IRON-DEFICIENT ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Melnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 62 chronic heart failure (CHF patients with iron-deficient anemia (IDA were studied. Standard CHF therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides was accompanied with the correction of iron deficiency by intravenous injection of Venofer and subsequent Ferro-Folgamma prescription (average daily dose of iron 137,75±5mg. After treatment serum iron level increased by 95,5% and hemoglobin level – by 9,8%. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 32,2% and physical activity tolerance – by 47,6%. Before treatment 32 CHF patients with IDA (51,6% had III functional class (FC of CHF according to NYHA and 16 patients (25,8% – IV FC. After treatment I FC was observed in 18 CHF patients (29%, II FC – in 26 patients and only 18 patients demonstrated III FC of CHF.

  15. Peculiarities of pregnancy results and parturitions of women with iron deficiency anemia in the Semipalatinsk region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajlyubaeva, G.Zh.; Al'seitova, M.Zh.; Ibragimova, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of research is study of factor influence on the frequency and the heaviness of iron deficiency anemia during natal, possibilities of woman rehabilitation with anemia in the post-natal period, peculiarities of pregnancy course, parturition results for both a mother and foetus by iron deficiency anemia

  16. Effects of Nutritional variables in children with iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghasemi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iron deficiency (ID is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA is about 9% in toddlers, 9-11% in adolescent girls and less than 1% in teenage boys. IDA presents when there is not sufficient iron for haemoglobin synthesis. In particular it has negative effects on the behavior, cognitive performance, immune system and physical growth of infants, preschool and school age children. Material and Methods: Blood samples of 337 randomly selected children (6-59 months living in the Ahwaz, Khuzestan province, were taken. Serum ferritin, Complete Blood Cell (CBC and hematological indices were measured Results and Discussion: In this study 61.1% of the children had serum ferritin less than 12mcg/dl. Prevalence of IDA were 29.1 %. The results showed that most children with IDA were at 12-23 months. Families with more than 6 children had 4.49 times greater chance of IDA. The mean of breast-feeding in non-IDA children was higher than IDA children (17.6 and 16.3 months respectively, P>0.05. In this study families who gave tea to their children for 1-11 months had the highest prevalence of IDA. Conclusion: There are several main risk factors for ID & IDA in the children. Parent's illiteracy, family income and using cow's milk before 12 months are among most important risk factors for iron deficiency for children.

  17. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure — Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mester András

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency and anemia affect approximately half of the chronic heart failure patients and they are associated with increased hospitalization rate, lower functional capacity, lower quality of life, and higher mortality. The exact mechanism of iron deficiency in heart failure patients is still not fully understood. Current guidelines recommend ferritin as the most accurate serum biomarker for the diagnosis of iron deficiency. The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents is no longer recommended because of the lack of improvement on mortality or hospital readmission rate, and it was associated with a higher rate of thromboembolic events. Intravenous iron replacement therapy is safe and generally well tolerated, with fewer side effects compared to oral administration. Large randomized studies with ferric carboxymaltose demonstrated its effectiveness and superiority to oral administration, and it was associated with a decreased rate of hospitalization rate and worsening heart failure, and improvement of functional capacity and quality of life. Intravenous iron supplementation for chronic heart failure is strongly recommended by European guidelines. Further studies are needed for a better knowledge of this complex pathology and determination of the long-term safety and effectiveness of iron administration in chronic heart failure patients. .

  18. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Children With Potential Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Marleena; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Huhtala, Heini; Laurila, Kaija; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Active screening for celiac disease frequently detects seropositive children with normal villous morphology (potential celiac disease). It remains unclear whether these subjects should be treated. We here investigated the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with potential and mucosal atrophy celiac disease. The prospective study involved 19 children with potential disease, 67 with partial or subtotal villous atrophy (P/SVA), and 16 with total villous atrophy (TVA). Twenty-three healthy children comprised the control group. The groups were compared for various clinical, histological, and laboratory parameters and hepcidin. The prevalence of abnormal parameters was as follows (controls, potential celiac disease, P/SVA, and TVA, respectively): anemia 0%, 15%, 22%, and 63%; low iron 5%, 0%, 14%, and 50%; increased transferrin receptor 1 5%, 16%, 20%, and 47%; low ferritin 0%, 21%, 35%, and 87%; and low transferrin saturation 10%, 11%, 41%, and 71%. One subject had low folate and none had low vitamin B12. The median values for hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower and transferrin receptor 1 values higher in TVA group compared with other groups. After a median of 7 months on a gluten-free diet hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and albumin in children with P/SVA exceeded the baseline values in the potential celiac disease group. The development of anemia and iron deficiency in celiac disease is a continuum and may already be present in children with normal villous morphology, advocating an early diagnosis and possible dietary treatment of these patients.

  19. Iron Deficiency Anemia, Not Iron Deficiency, Is Associated with Reduced Attention in Healthy Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Rebecca L; O'Dwyer, Nicholas J; Parker, Helen M; Donges, Cheyne E; Cheng, Hoi Lun; Steinbeck, Katharine S; Cox, Eka P; Franklin, Janet L; Garg, Manohar L; Rooney, Kieron B; O'Connor, Helen T

    2017-11-05

    Women of reproductive age are at increased risk for iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA), with both implicated in decreased cognitive function (CF). Obesity may complicate this association via inflammatory-mediated ferritin elevation. This cross-sectional study examined the association between hematological iron status (iron replete (IR), ID or IDA) and CF in healthy, young (18-35 years) women of normal-weight (NW: BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m²) or obese-weight (OB: BMI >30 kg/m²). Participants completed a validated, computer-based cognition assessment evaluating impulsivity, attention, information processing, memory and executive function; CF reported as z -scores (mean ± SD). Iron status and CF were compared between groups via ANOVA, with adjustment for potential confounders (BMI, physical activity, C-reactive protein) via ANCOVA. A total of 157 NW and 142 OB women (25.8 ± 5.1 years) participated. Prevalence of ID and IDA were 14% and 6% respectively, with no significant difference between NW and OB groups. Women with IDA scored significantly lower on attention (although within normal range; ±1 z -score), compared to ID (IDA: -0.75 ± 1.89; ID: 0.53 ± 1.37; p = 0.004) but not IR (0.03 ± 1.33, p = 0.21) groups; there were no significant differences between ID and IR groups ( p = 0.34). Adjustment for confounders did not significantly alter these results. In conclusion, women with IDA showed significantly reduced attention compared to women with ID.

  20. Iron Deficiency Anemia, Not Iron Deficiency, Is Associated with Reduced Attention in Healthy Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Cook

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Women of reproductive age are at increased risk for iron deficiency (ID and iron deficiency anemia (IDA, with both implicated in decreased cognitive function (CF. Obesity may complicate this association via inflammatory-mediated ferritin elevation. This cross-sectional study examined the association between hematological iron status (iron replete (IR, ID or IDA and CF in healthy, young (18–35 years women of normal-weight (NW: BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2 or obese-weight (OB: BMI >30 kg/m2. Participants completed a validated, computer-based cognition assessment evaluating impulsivity, attention, information processing, memory and executive function; CF reported as z-scores (mean ± SD. Iron status and CF were compared between groups via ANOVA, with adjustment for potential confounders (BMI, physical activity, C-reactive protein via ANCOVA. A total of 157 NW and 142 OB women (25.8 ± 5.1 years participated. Prevalence of ID and IDA were 14% and 6% respectively, with no significant difference between NW and OB groups. Women with IDA scored significantly lower on attention (although within normal range; ±1 z-score, compared to ID (IDA: −0.75 ± 1.89; ID: 0.53 ± 1.37; p = 0.004 but not IR (0.03 ± 1.33, p = 0.21 groups; there were no significant differences between ID and IR groups (p = 0.34. Adjustment for confounders did not significantly alter these results. In conclusion, women with IDA showed significantly reduced attention compared to women with ID.

  1. The Relationship between Anthropometric Factors and Iron Deficiency Anemia Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Jamshidi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron deficiency is often observed in obese individuals. The prevalence of obesity has increased at an epidemic rate. A few small studies have noted a possible association between iron deficiency and obesity. The purpose of the study has been determined relationship between anthropometric including body mass index and the size of abdomen and iron-shortage anemia.Materials and Methods: Descriptive, analytical, and cross sectional methods of research have been applied in the study. The instruments used to collect the data were a set of organized items in the questionnaire and a checklist contained the measurement of abdominal obesity, height, weight, BMI, the results of ferritin levels, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and TIBC and MCV. The tools were validated via content validity and test-retest. The participants were the staff (n=300 of Hamadan branch, Islamic Azad university, Iran, who were selected via census sampling technique. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics and inferential statistics, that is, chi-square, Pearson correlation coefficient, and ANOVA were run using SPSS software.Results: 48.4% had overweight and 43.9% had various degrees of general obesity. 45.7% of women and 1.9% of men suffered from abdominal obesity. 3.2% of men had ferritin levels less than 20ng/dl and 79.2% of them had high levels of TIBC, while 31.5% of women had ferritin serum less than 12ng per dl and 73.9% of them had high TIBC. There was a significant relationship between abdominal obesity and TIBC, HB, HCT, and ferritin serum (p<0.0005.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the high prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity and their relationship with iron deficiency anemia. These are non-communicable disease, which are directly related to the lifestyle.

  2. Studies on pathogenesis in iron deficiency anemia Part 2. Anemia induced by administration of puromycin aminonucleoside

    OpenAIRE

    中西,徳彦

    1991-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia results from various factors, such as blood loss, malabsorption, and increased demand for iron due to pregnancy or growth. However, iron hyper-excretion has not been reported except in the cases of bleeding. Previously, we found increased iron excretion in the urine in patients with iron-losing anemia, such as idiopathic hypochromic anemia. To examine the relationship between iron excretion and anemia, puromycin aminonucleoside (PA) was administered in rats to induce an...

  3. Breastfeeding exclusively and iron deficiency anemia during the first 6 months of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa F.S.V. Marques

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among exclusively breastfed infants from one to six months of life and to identify associated risk factors. Methods This is a cohort study of the hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels of 102 healthy full-term infants, weighing more than 2500 grams (5.5 pounds at birth, evaluated for growth development and supported to promote exclusive breastfeeding. Hemoglobin and ferritin levels were measured in the first, fourth, and sixth months of life. The hemoglobin and ferritin levels of the mothers were also measured in the first month postpartum. Results At four months, 5.7% presented iron deficiency and 3.4% had iron deficiency anemia. At six months, the percentage of children with iron deficiency increased more than four times, reaching 26.1%, while iron deficiency anemia was present in 23.9% of the infants studied. Iron deficiency at six months of age was significantly correlated to growth velocity. Conclusion According to the results of this study, exclusive breastfeeding protects infants from iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia for the first four months of life. After this age, in accordance with the literature, the findings of this study demonstrated an increase in anemia and iron deficiency rates, adding to evidence that supports the monitoring of iron levels in exclusively breastfed children presenting higher weight gains beginning at four months of age.

  4. The association of pagophagia with Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan; Serin, Ender

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between pagophagia (compulsive ice eating) and H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. We identified H. pylori infection using the (13)C-urea breath test in 45 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (group 1) and 55 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia (group 2). Subgroups for testing oral intestinal iron absorption were randomly assigned from both groups. These subgroups consisted of (a) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, (b) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia, (c) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, pagophagia, and H. pylori infection before the eradication of H. pylori and (d) subgroup c after eradication therapy. There was no difference in the rate of H. pylori infection in the iron-deficiency anemia groups, with or without pagophagia. Furthermore, oral intestinal iron absorption was not influenced by pagophagia and/or H. pylori infection. Pagophagia did not increase the risk of H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Pagophagia and H. pylori infection do not synergistically affect the development of intestinal iron absorption abnormalities.

  5. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy on Child Mental Development in Rural China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, S.; Zeng, L.M.; Brouwer, I.D.; Kok, F.J.; Yan, H.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, the brain growth spurt begins in the last trimester of pregnancy and extends through the first 2 years of life. Studies show poor cognitive and motor development among children who have iron deficiency anemia in infancy. Prenatal iron deficiency anemia in the third trimester affects child

  6. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-11-14

    To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed

  7. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. METHODS: A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). RESULTS: We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological

  8. Treatment of Anemia of Chronic Disease with True Iron Deficiency in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Amstad Bencaiova, Gabriela; Krafft, Alexander; Zimmermann, Roland; Burkhardt, Tilo

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We assess and compare the efficacy of anemia treatment in pregnant women with anemia of chronic disease with true iron deficiency and in women with iron deficiency anemia. Study Design. Fifty patients with moderate anemia (hemoglobin 8.0–9.9 g/dl) and iron deficiency (ferritin < 15 μg/l) were treated in the Anemia Clinic at the Department of Obstetrics. Results. All patients showed stimulation of erythropoiesis as evidenced by an increase in reticulocyte count at day eight of thera...

  9. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  10. Pagophagia improves neuropsychological processing speed in iron-deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Melissa G; Belfer, Samuel; Atuahene, Brittany

    2014-10-01

    Pagophagia (compulsive ice chewing) has long been associated with iron deficiency anemia, but prior attempts to account for this craving have been unsatisfactory. We hypothesize that chewing ice triggers vascular changes that lead to preferential or increased perfusion of the brain. This would result in increased alertness and processing speed in anemic patients, but not in healthy controls who are already at ceiling, and would explain why anemic individuals crave ice. Preliminary support for this hypothesis was found in two studies. In Study 1, non-anemic subjects reported very low rates of pagophagia (only 4%) while anemic subjects reported significantly higher rates (56%). In Study 2, chewing ice dramatically improved response time on a neuropsychological test, but only for anemic individuals. In a small randomized controlled trial, iron deficient anemic subjects and healthy controls were assigned to chew ice or drink tepid water and then took a continuous performance test that measures response time, response time variability, errors of impulsivity and errors of inattention. In the water condition, anemic subjects performed significantly worse than healthy controls. Chewing ice had no effect on the performance of healthy controls, but significantly improved the performance of anemic patients. Potential explanations include activation of the dive reflex, which would lead to peripheral vasoconstriction and preferential perfusion of the brain or, alternatively, sympathetic nervous system activation, which would also increase blood-flow to the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy and the postpartum period: Iron deficiency anemia working group consensus report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Api, Olus; Breyman, Christian; Çetiner, Mustafa; Demir, Cansun; Ecder, Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is the most common disease, affecting >1.5 billion people worldwide. Furthermore, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) accounts for 50% of cases of anemia. IDA is common during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and can lead to serious maternal and fetal complications. The aim of this report was to present the experiences of a multidisciplinary expert group, and to establish reference guidelines for the optimal diagnosis and treatment of IDA during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Studies and guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of IDA published in Turkish and international journals were reviewed. Conclusive recommendations were made by an expert panel aiming for a scientific consensus. Measurement of serum ferritin has the highest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of IDA unless there is a concurrent inflammatory condition. The lower threshold value for hemoglobin (Hb) in pregnant women is anemia. Oral iron therapy is given as the first-line treatment for IDA. Although current data are limited, intravenous (IV) iron therapy is an alternative therapeutic option in patients who do not respond to oral iron therapy, have adverse reactions, do not comply with oral iron treatment, have a very low Hb concentration, and require rapid iron repletion. IV iron preparations can be safely used for the treatment of IDA during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and are more beneficial than oral iron preparations in specific indications. PMID:28913064

  12. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ahmet; Cengiz, Murad; Ozdemir, Zeynep Canan; Celik, Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Paraoxonase-1 is an esterase enzyme and it has 3 types of activity, namely paraoxonase, arylesterase, and diazoxonase. It has been reported that paraoxonase-1 deficiency is related to increased susceptibility to development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. Thirty children with iron deficiency anemia, 30 children with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia, and 40 healthy children aged 6 months to 6 years were enrolled in this study. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured with a spectrophotometer by using commercially available kits. Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia group (103 ± 73 and 102 ± 41 U/L, respectively) were significantly lower than mean activities of control group (188 ± 100 and 147 ± 34 U/L, respectively; P .05). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment with vitamin B(12) in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia; however, there were no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes after iron treatment in iron deficiency anemia group. Important correlations were found between vitamin B(12) levels and both paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (r = .367, P paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and after vitamin B(12) therapy the activities of these enzymes returned to near-normal levels.

  14. Serum zinc levels in patients with iron deficiency anemia and its association with symptoms of iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkitli, Engin; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Aslan, Nevin Alayvaz; Kilic-Baygutalp, Nurcan; Bayraktutan, Zafer; Kurt, Nezahat; Bakan, Nuri; Bakan, Ebubekir

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major public health problem especially in underdeveloped and developing countries. Zinc is the co-factor of several enzymes and plays a role in iron metabolism, so zinc deficiency is associated with IDA. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the relationship of symptoms of IDA and zinc deficiency in adult IDA patients. The study included 43 IDA patients and 43 healthy control subjects. All patients were asked to provide a detailed history and were subjected to a physical examination. The hematological parameters evaluated included hemoglobin (Hb); hematocrit (Ht); red blood cell (erythrocyte) count (RBC); and red cell indices mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (МСН), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (МСНС), and red cell distribution width (RDW). Anemia was defined according to the criteria defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Serum zinc levels were measured in the flame unit of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Symptoms attributed to iron deficiency or depletion, defined as fatigue, cardiopulmonary symptoms, mental manifestations, epithelial manifestations, and neuromuscular symptoms, were also recorded and categorized. Serum zinc levels were lower in anemic patients (103.51 ± 34.64 μ/dL) than in the control subjects (256.92 ± 88.54 μ/dL; mental manifestations (p  100 μ/dL. When the serum zinc level was compared with pica, no statistically significant correlation was found (p = 0.742). Zinc is a trace element that functions in several processes in the body, and zinc deficiency aggravates IDA symptoms. Measurement of zinc levels and supplementation if necessary should be considered for IDA patients.

  15. Severe iron-deficiency anemia still an issue in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Gabrielle; Bogen, Debra L; Ritchey, A Kim

    2014-12-01

    Chronic, severe iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in the first years of life increases the risk of irreversibly compromised cognitive, affective, and motor development. While IDA in infants has decreased because of dietary changes (iron-fortified formula and delaying cow's milk), toddlers (13-36 months) are equally vulnerable to the adverse effects of IDA. We aimed to show that despite public health efforts, severe IDA remains a problem in toddlers and is associated with excess milk consumption. Retrospective chart review of children 6 to 36 months admitted to or evaluated by hematology at a children's hospital from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010 with a severe microcytic anemia (hemoglobin [Hb] skin while 77% of physicians recorded it on physical exam. Daily cow's milk consumption surpassed 24 ounces for 47 of 48 children with reported intake; 11 consumed more than 64 ounces per day. Despite current screening recommendations, severe IDA continues to be a problem in toddlers and strongly correlates with excess cow's milk consumption. This reiterates the importance of screening for IDA into routine toddler care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. [Anemia caused by iron deficiency and pagophagia. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjadj, M L; Martin, F; Fichet, D

    1990-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 17 year old young man, who entered our hospital for a severe iron lack anemia reported to ice cubes ingestion (Pagophagia). Such cases are reported in the literature. Usually, Pagophagia is a compulsive eating (Pica) caused by iron deficiency. Pagophagia could improve non hematologic symptoms of iron deficiency such as stomatitis and glossitis.

  17. Polymorphisms and mutations of human TMPRSS6 in iron deficiency anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beutler, E.; Geet, C. Van; Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Gelbart, T.; Crain, K.; Truksa, J.; Lee, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    Male subjects with iron deficiency from the general population were examined for polymorphisms or sporadic mutations in TMPRSS6 to identify genetic risk factors for iron deficiency anemia. Three uncommon non-synonymous polymorphisms were identified, G228D, R446W, and V795I (allele frequencies

  18. Red cell distribution width in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adil, M.M.; Junaid, A.; Zaman, I.; Ishtiaque, Z.B.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic importance of Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW) in differentiating iron deficiency anemia from Thalassemia trait. A total of 100 cases aged 5 months to 50 years of either sex with diagnosed iron deficiency anemia or thalassemia trait were compared with respect to their RDW value. RDW value in iron deficiency anemia was between 36.2% to 55.2% (Mean 44.1%). The range of RDW in Thalassemia trait was 14.7% to 24.9% (Mean 19.8%). Conclusions The very high range of RDW in iron deficiency anemia as compared to slight elevation of the value in thalassemia trait in our study suggests that RDW value obtained from simple Complete Blood Counts (CBC) can help in differentiating the two pathologies. (author)

  19. Effect of iron deficiency anemia on the biodistribution of 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmanovici, Gabriela P.; Salgueiro, Maria J.; Janjetic, Mariana A.; Leonardi, Natalia M.; Boccio, Jose R.; Zubillaga, Marcela B.

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of colloids and labeled cells in organs is influenced by their intrinsic properties and by the state of the investigated subject. Iron deficiency remains an unsolved nutritional problem all over the world; one of its severe consequences is anemia. Because iron metabolism principally takes place in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skeletal muscle and blood, we studied the effect of iron deficiency anemia on the biodistribution of 99m Tc phytate, 99m Tc gelatin colloid and 99m Tc RBC (red blood cells labeled with 99m Tc). Our results show that iron deficiency anemia modifies the pattern of biodistribution of the two colloids assayed. However, this behavior is different for both of them. This work contributes to studies that kinetically and statistically establish that iron deficiency anemia induces a significant inversion in the spleen-liver activity relationship when centellographic studies are performed with colloids such as 99m Tc phytate

  20. Managing iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease. The results of the "Gestiona hierro-EII" survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas Jordá, Francesc; Vera Mendoza, Isabel; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Vázquez Morón, Juan María; López Román, Javier; Júdez Gutiérrez, Javier

    2018-03-01

    iron deficiency anemia is a common and very relevant manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although clinical practice guidelines have been published and updated on this subject, the management in the daily practice of this complication is far from optimal. to determine the actual management, needs and limitations of anemia in IBD by means of a survey of gastroenterology specialists. a self-administered telematic survey was carried out between April and May 2017 and was sent to SEPD members. The survey included four sections: participant demographics, monitoring, treatment and limitations/needs. a total of 122 evaluable surveys were received from all Spanish autonomous communities. Iron deficiency anemia is considered as a frequent manifestation of IBD and is monitored in all patients via the measurement of hemoglobin and ferritin. In the case of anemia, the survey respondents found it necessary to rule out the presence of IBD activity. However, only 14.8% prescribed intravenous iron when IBD was active. The required dose of intravenous iron is mainly calculated according to patient needs but only 33.1% of clinicians infused doses of 1 g or more. the "Gestiona Hierro EII" survey on the management of anemia in IBD demonstrated a high quality of care, even though some aspects need to be improved. These included the prescription of intravenous iron for patients with disease activity, the use of high-dose intravenous iron and the implementation of algorithms into clinical practice.

  1. Diagnostic Value of the Cobalt ({sup 58}Co) Excretion Test in Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihn, Hyun Chung; Hong, Kee Suck; Cho, Kyung Sam; Song, In Kyung; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1976-03-15

    The diagnosis of iron deficiency rests upon the correct evaluation of body iron stores. Morphological interpretation of blood film and the red cell indices are not reliable and often absent in mild iron deficiency. Serum iron levels and iron-binding capacity are more sensitive indices of iron deficiency, but they are often normal in iron depletion and mild iron deficiency anemia. They are also subject ro many variables which may introduce substantial errors and influenced by many pathologic and physiologic states. Examination of the bone marrow aspirate for stainable iron has been regarded as one of the most sensitive and reliable diagnostic method for detecting iron deficiency, but this also has limitations. Thus, there is still need for a more practical, but sensitive and reliable substitute as a screening test of iron deficiency. Pollack et al. (1965) observed that the intestinal absorption of cobalt was raised in iron, deficient rats and Valberg et al. (1969) found that cobalt absorption was elevated in patients with iron deficiency. A direct correlation was demonstrated between the amounts of radioiron and radiocobalt absorbed. Unlike iron, excess cobalt was excreted by the kidney, the percentage of radioactivity in the urine being directly related to the percentage absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract. Recently a test based on the urinary excretion of an oral dose of {sup 57}Co has been proposed as a method for detecting iron deficiency. To assess the diagnostic value of urinary cobalt excretion test cobaltous chloride labelled with 1 muCi of {sup 58}Co was given by mouth and the percentage of the test dose excreted in the urine was measured by a gamma counter. The mean 24 hour urinary cobalt excretion in control subjects with normal iron stores was 6.1%(1.9-15.2%). Cobalt excretion was markedly increased in patients with iron deficiency and excreted more than 29% of the dose. In contrast, patients with anemia due to causes other than iron deficiency

  2. Diagnostic Value of the Cobalt (58Co) Excretion Test in Iron Deficiency Anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihn, Hyun Chung; Hong, Kee Suck; Cho, Kyung Sam; Song, In Kyung; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1976-01-01

    The diagnosis of iron deficiency rests upon the correct evaluation of body iron stores. Morphological interpretation of blood film and the red cell indices are not reliable and often absent in mild iron deficiency. Serum iron levels and iron-binding capacity are more sensitive indices of iron deficiency, but they are often normal in iron depletion and mild iron deficiency anemia. They are also subject ro many variables which may introduce substantial errors and influenced by many pathologic and physiologic states. Examination of the bone marrow aspirate for stainable iron has been regarded as one of the most sensitive and reliable diagnostic method for detecting iron deficiency, but this also has limitations. Thus, there is still need for a more practical, but sensitive and reliable substitute as a screening test of iron deficiency. Pollack et al. (1965) observed that the intestinal absorption of cobalt was raised in iron, deficient rats and Valberg et al. (1969) found that cobalt absorption was elevated in patients with iron deficiency. A direct correlation was demonstrated between the amounts of radioiron and radiocobalt absorbed. Unlike iron, excess cobalt was excreted by the kidney, the percentage of radioactivity in the urine being directly related to the percentage absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract. Recently a test based on the urinary excretion of an oral dose of 57 Co has been proposed as a method for detecting iron deficiency. To assess the diagnostic value of urinary cobalt excretion test cobaltous chloride labelled with 1 μCi of 58 Co was given by mouth and the percentage of the test dose excreted in the urine was measured by a gamma counter. The mean 24 hour urinary cobalt excretion in control subjects with normal iron stores was 6.1%(1.9-15.2%). Cobalt excretion was markedly increased in patients with iron deficiency and excreted more than 29% of the dose. In contrast, patients with anemia due to causes other than iron deficiency excreted less

  3. The significance of soluble transferrin receptors in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijanić Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years, determination of soluble transferrin receptor levels has been emerging as a test that can reliably indicate iron deficiency in various states, and that is non-invasive and easy to use. The aim of this study was: to determine reference values of soluble transferrin receptor concentrations in serums in our population, to examine the reliability of this method in the diagnosis of anemia due to iron deficiency and associated iron deficiency in anemia accompanying malignant hemopathies, and to identify possible limitations of the test in certain conditions.

  4. Iron deficiency anemia in late-preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Hülya; Akman, Ipek; Demirel, Utku; Coşkun, Senay; Bilgen, Hülya; Ozek, Eren

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common problem in newborn infants. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends iron prophylaxis at 4 months of age for term infants. There is no specific recommendation for iron prophylaxis in late-preterm infants. We aimed to establish the optimum time for iron prophylaxis in late-preterm infants. Thirty-eight late-preterm (Group 1) and 38 term (Group 2) infants born on the same day were enrolled in the study. Hemoglobin, ferritin and reticulocyte values at birth, 2nd month and 4th month were assessed. The cord ferritin, hemoglobin and reticulocyte levels did not differ significantly between groups. However, at the 2nd month, median ferritin and hemoglobin values were lower in late-preterm infants than term infants (145 mg/dl vs. 195 mg/dl, p=0.001 and 10.1 g/dl vs. 11.6 g/dl, pinfants than term infants, but this difference was not significant after exclusion of three late- preterm infants who required iron therapy (49 mg/dl vs. 62 mg/dl, p=0.2). There was a tendency of higher frequency of anemia in late-preterm infants at 4 months (42.8% vs. 21.1%), but this was statistically insignificant (p=0.07). At the 2nd month of age, the median ferritin and hemoglobin levels of late-preterm infants were lower than those of term infants. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the need for earlier supplementation of iron in late-preterm infants.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infancy and Social Emotional Development in Preschool-Aged Chinese Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, S.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Brouwer, I.D.; Kok, F.J.; Lozoff, B.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to compare affect and behavior of 3 groups of nonanemic 4-year-old children: children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy whose anemia was not corrected before 24 months (chronic IDA) (n = 27); children with IDA in infancy whose anemia was corrected before 24 months

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius

    2015-01-01

    gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended......A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper...... for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius

    2015-01-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper...... gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended...... for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women

  8. [Prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; González-Galilea, Ángel; Gisbert, Javier P; Cucala, Mercedes; Ponce, Julio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases. An epidemiological, multicenter, mixed design study (retrospective review of randomized clinical records and prospective visits) conducted between February 2010 and March 2011 in 22 Spanish gastroenterology departments. Severe anemia was defined as Hb < 10g/dL, mild/moderate as Hb ≥ 10g/dL, and iron deficiency as ferritin < 30ng/ml or transferrin saturation < 16%. We included 379 patients. The mean±SD age was 57±19 years and 47% were men. The prevalence of anemia at admission was 60% (95% CI 55 to 65), and anemia was severe (Hb <10g/dl) in half the patients. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 54% of evaluable patients (95% CI 47 to 61). Gastrointestinal bleeding at admission was found in 39% of the patients, of whom 83% (121/146) were anemic. At discharge, the proportion of anemic patients was unchanged (from 60% at admission to 58% at discharge) (95% CI 53 to 63) and iron deficiency was found in 41% (95% CI 32 to 50): anemia was severe in 17% and mild/moderate in 41%. During follow-up, at 3-6 months after admission, 44% (95% CI 39 to 50) of evaluable patients continued to have iron deficiency and 28% (95% CI 23 to 32) were still anemic: 5% severe and 23% mild/moderate. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 44% (95% CI: 39-50). During admission, 50% of patients with anemia did not receive treatment. At discharge, 55% were untreated. The prevalence of anemia in patients hospitalized for gastroenterological diseases was very high. Anemia persisted in over a quarter of patients at the follow-up visit. Only half of hospitalized patients received treatment for anemia, even when the anemia was severe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  9. Iron deficiency anemia among kindergarten children living in the marginalized areas of Gaza Strip, Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohammed Sirdah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of nutritional anemia; it has been recognized as an important health problem in Palestine. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and to identify possible risk factors of iron deficiency anemia among kindergarten children living in the marginalized areas of the Gaza Strip and to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementing oral iron formula in the anemic children. Methods: the study included 735 (384 male and 351 female kindergarten children. Data was collected by questionnaire interviews, anthropometric measurements, and complete blood count analysis. All iron deficient anemic children were treated using an oral iron formula (50 mg ferrous carbonate + 100 mg vitamin C /5 mL and the complete blood count was reassessed after three months. A univariate analysis and a multiple logistic regression model were constructed; crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR, and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated. Results: the overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 33.5% with no significant differences between boys and girls. Significantly different prevalences of iron deficiency anemia were reported between different governorates of the Gaza Strip. Governorate, low education level of the parents and smoking are significant risk factors for children developing anemia. Significantly lower complete blood count parameters, except for WBC, were reported in anemic children. The oral iron treatment significantly improved hemoglobin concentrations, and normalized the iron deficiency marker. Conclusions: iron deficiency anemia is a serious health problem among children living in the marginalized areas of the Gaza Strip, which justifies the necessity for national intervention programs to improve the health status for the less fortunate development areas.

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in sports and preventive dietetic and nutrition interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritz Urdampilleta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia in athletes is a very common condition that leads to reduced physical performance. Athletes are susceptible of falling iron deposits, mainly by an increase in its use, by its loss, or by insufficient intake. The present review aims to establish the basis of current knowledge environment: sports-athletes who have increased risk of anemia, etiology of iron deficiency anemia in the sporting group, providing dietary and nutritional guidelines for its prevention. The databases searched were Pubmed, Scirus and Scielo, as well as the official pages of prestigious organizations, recovering items by keywords: “iron-deficiency anemia”, “sports”, “athletic performance”, “iron intake “or Spanish counterparts. Iron deficiency anemia affects mainly endurance athletes (especially women and marathon and the members of team sports with high impact (volleyball and handball. Usually secondary anemias from hemolysis and oxidative stress resulting from the practice of sport, but it cases have also been documented by increased iron losses associated with exercise. Dietary and nutritional practices to prevent iron deficiency anemia in athletes should aim to ensure: carbohydrate intake between 60-65% of total energy daily minimum intake of 1.4 g of protein per day and a consumption of 20-40 mg iron daily, separating the intake of the main absorption inhibitors (phytate, tanetos and calcium. You need assessed by analytical iron status of the athlete every 2-3 months.

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency, with or without anemia, before and after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jericó, Carlos; Bretón, Irene; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; de Oliveira, Ana Carla; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Tinahones, Francisco J; Vidal, Josep; Vilarrasa, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) is an increasingly used therapeutic option for severe obesity which allows patients to achieve sustained weight loss over time and resolution or improvement in most associated pathological conditions. Major mid- and long-term complications of BS include iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia, which may occur in up to 50% of cases and significantly impair patient quality of life. These changes may be present before surgery. The aim of this review was to prepare schemes for diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia before and after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Lasa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. Aim: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Materials and methods: Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. Results: A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55, P=.001. Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Conclusions: Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Resumen: Introducción: Existe una extensa heterogeneidad en los reportes de la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en el contexto de la anemia ferropénica. Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en pacientes con anemia ferropénica. Materiales y métodos: Pacientes adultos con anemia ferropénica fueron reclutados para realizarse una endoscopia digestiva alta con biopsia duodenal. Se reclutaron asimismo voluntarios de la comunidad como controles. Resultados: Se reclutó a 135 pacientes con anemia y 133 controles. La prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca fue mayor en el grupo de anemia (11.11% vs. 1.51%, OR 8.18 [1.83-36.55], p = 0.001; el 73.3% de los celíacos en el grupo de anémicos presentaron algún signo endoscópico de atrofia vellositaria, mientras que el 100% de los celíacos en el grupo control presentaron por lo menos un signo endoscópico. Conclusión: Los pacientes

  13. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  14. Cholangiocarcinoma presenting as hemobilia and recurrent iron-deficiency anemia: a case report

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    Hariraj Radhakrishnan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Iron-deficiency anemia is a relatively common presenting feature of several gastrointestinal malignancies. However, cholangiocarcinoma has rarely been reported as an underlying cause. The association of cholangiocarcinoma with the rare clinical finding of hemobilia is also highly unusual. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of cholangiocarcinoma presenting with acute hemobilia and chronic iron-deficiency anemia. Case presentation We report the case of a Caucasian, 84-year-old woman presenting with recurrent, severe iron-deficiency anemia who was eventually diagnosed with intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma, following an acute episode of hemobilia. A right hepatectomy was subsequently performed with curative intent, and our patient has now fully recovered. Conclusion This is a rare example of hemobilia and chronic iron-deficiency anemia in association with cholangiocarcinoma. We suggest that a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma should be considered in patients who present with iron-deficiency anemia of unknown cause, particularly in the presence of abnormal liver function.

  15. Urinary catecholamines in iron deficiency anemia: effects of environmental temperature

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    Smith, S.M.; Beard, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Iron deficiency (ID) is associated with increased levels of norepinephrine (NE) in plasma and urine. They investigated the effect of 5-7 days exposure to three different environmental temperatures (10/sup 0/C, 24/sup 0/C, 30/sup 0/C) on urinary catecholamine levels to test the hypothesis that increased thermogenic activity is causal to this increased excretion in iron deficiency. Catecholamines were analyzed from acidified urine by HPLC-EC. The mean Hb in ID animals was 3.1 +/- .5 versus controls of 12.8 +/- 9. These data demonstrate that contrary to previous reports NE excretion is not normalized at a thermoneutral temperature and suggests a basic abnormality in peripheral SNS activity and NE metabolism in iron deficiency that is independent of environmental drive from thermogenesis.

  16. A new index to discriminate between iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait

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    Januária F. Matos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The most common microcytic and hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait. Several indices to discriminate iron deficiency anemia from thalassemia trait have been proposed as simple diagnostic tools. However, some of the best discriminative indices use parameters in the formulas that are only measured in modern counters and are not always available in small laboratories. The development of an index with good diagnostic accuracy based only on parameters derived from the blood cell count obtained using simple counters would be useful in the clinical routine. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop and validate a discriminative index to differentiate iron deficiency anemia from thalassemia trait. METHODS: To develop and to validate the new formula, blood count data from 106 (thalassemia trait: 23 and iron deficiency: 83 and 185 patients (thalassemia trait: 30 and iron deficiency: 155 were used, respectively. Iron deficiency, ß-thalassemia trait and a-thalassemia trait were confirmed by gold standard tests (low serum ferritin for iron deficiency anemia, HbA2 > 3.5% for ß-thalassemia trait and using molecular biology for the a-thalassemia trait. RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity, efficiency, Youden's Index, area under receiver operating characteristic curve and Kappa coefficient of the new formula, called the Matos & Carvalho Index were 99.3%, 76.7%, 95.7%, 76.0, 0.95 and 0.83, respectively. CONCLUSION: The performance of this index was excellent with the advantage of being solely dependent on the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and red blood cell count obtained from simple automatic counters and thus may be of great value in underdeveloped and developing countries.

  17. Diagnosis of thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia using confocal and atomic force microscopy

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    Tariq, Saira; Bilal, Muhammad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Firdous, Shamaraz; Aziz, Uzma; Ahmed, Mushtaq

    2017-11-01

    Anemia is the most prevalent blood disorder, categorized into thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia. In anemia, the morphology of erythrocytes is disturbed, thus leading to abnormal functioning of the erythrocytes. Globally, thalassemia affects 1.3% of individuals and is one of the most widespread monogenic disorders in Pakistan. All over the World, women and children are most frequently affected by a type of nutritional deficiency known as iron deficiency anemia. The morphological changes that occur in erythrocytes due to these diseases are investigated in this study at the nano-scale level. Fifty samples of blood from individuals suffering from thalassemia or iron deficiency anemia were obtained from different hospitals in Rawalpindi and Islamabad. The blood samples were scanned using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to check the morphological changes in both types of anemia. According to the present study, thalassemia is most prevalent in females in the age group between 5 and 15 years old, and iron deficiency is most prevalent in females in the age groups of 16-25 and 36-45 years old. Erythrocyte morphology is the significant determinant for diagnosing and discriminating between these two types of diseases. The study reports deformed erythrocytes in anemic patients, which were different from the ones that existed in the control. Thalassemia erythrocytes showed a crenated shape, iron deficiency anemia erythrocytes showed an elliptocyte shape and healthy erythrocytes showed a biconcave disk shape when using AFM and LSCM. These techniques seem to be very promising, cheap and less time consuming in determining the structure-function relationship of erythrocytes of thalassemic and iron deficiency anemic patients. The results of LSCM and AFM are quite useful in determining the morphological changes in erythrocytes and to study the disease at the molecular level within short period of time. Hence, we encourage employing

  18. Assessment of Iron Deficiency and Anemia in Pregnant Women: An Observational French Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Thierry; Zkik, Asmaa; Auges, Marie; Clavel, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We explored the prevalence and management of iron deficiency and anemia among pregnant women in France. Patients & methods: In this prospective, observational, multicenter registry study, randomly selected investigators (gynecologists/obstetricians/midwives registered in the CEGEDIM® database) assessed pregnant women presenting for a consultation. Participants completed a questionnaire at study inclusion. Results: A total of 1506 patients were enrolled by 95 investigators. Overall, investigators estimated a moderate or significant risk of iron deficiency in almost 60% of women. The overall prevalence of anemia (15.8%) increased with longer pregnancy duration. Medication (mainly iron-based) was prescribed to 57.3% of patients. Conclusion: In French clinical practice, the estimated risk of iron deficiency and prevalence of anemia during pregnancy align with expectations and are managed according to national/international recommendations. PMID:26693881

  19. Hepcidin and iron parameters in children with anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Gunjan; Sharma, Sunita; Chandra, Jagdish; Nangia, Anita

    2017-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the two most prevalent forms of anemia having interrelated characteristics. Hepcidin, a newly introduced biomarker for assessment of iron status, is a homeostatic regulator of iron metabolism. We investigated the role of hepcidin and other conventional iron parameters to assess iron status among children with ACD and IDA. We also identified children with ACD who developed iron deficiency (ID). The study was undertaken in anemic children with 30 cases each of ACD and IDA along with 30 age and sex-matched controls. The ACD cases were subdivided into pure ACD and ACD with coexistent ID. All cases were subjected to following tests: complete blood count with peripheral smear, serum C-reactive protein, serum interleukin-6, iron studies, serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and serum hepcidin. The mean serum hepcidin concentration was significantly increased in pure ACD patients (143.85±42.76 ng/mL) as compared to those in IDA patients (6.01±2.83 ng/mL, P ACD patients [normal sTfR levels (ACD patients with ID [high sTfR levels (≥3 µg/mL)] with a mean of 10.0±2.97 ng/mL. Hepcidin measurement can provide a useful tool for differentiating ACD from IDA and also help to identify an iron deficiency in ACD patients. This might aid in the appropriate selection of therapy for these patients.

  20. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders.

  1. [Effect of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in the first two years of life on cognitive and mental development during childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Yael; Bilenko, Natalya

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia among infants and children over the world ranges between 2%-22.5%. Iron is essential for intact development of the body, and especiaLLy for the development of the central nervous system in the first two years of Life. To examine, through a review of the literature, if there is any relation between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and cognitive and mental development in the first two years of life. A review of 10 longitudinal and clinical trials from the last 16 years, in which this correlation was examined. According to recent studies, the relation between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia to cognitive and mental development in childhood is stiLL unclear. Followup studies found poorer cognitive scores on measures of mental and cognitive functioning in the long run. Intervention trials in which iron supplementation was administered to infants with IDA, found an improvement in Language and mental deveLopmental test scores. However, micronutrient intervention, or zinc and iron combined or alone, did not improve performance on mental tests. The studies differed in the characteristics of the study population, definition of exposure, type of treatment and confounders. It is difficult to assess a causal relationship between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, and cognitive and mental development in childhood, mainly due to methodoLogical and ethical reasons. However, most studies from recent years support a negative association. The Ministry of Health in israel recommends iron as a preventive action for iron deficiency in infants.

  2. The Value of Erythrocyte Indices and Red Cell Volume Distribution Width in Differential Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Anemia of Chronic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Altıntaş

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of chronic disease are the most commonly confused anemias. We investigate the diagnostic value of erythrocyte indices, red cell volume distribution width, and serum ferritin levels to make differential diagnosis of anemia in controls and anemic patients.Iron deficiency anemia (44 patients), anemia of chronic disease (41), IDA with anemia of chronic disease (17) and control (50) groups were compared. We performed serum ferritin, CBC, and sedimentation ra...

  3. Studies on the pathogenesis in iron deficiency anemia Part 1. Urinary iron excretion in iron deficiency anemia patients and rats in various iron states

    OpenAIRE

    中西,徳彦

    1991-01-01

    In the "iron excretion test" , urinary iron excretion after injection of saccharated iron oxide has been reported to be accelerated in relapsing idiopathic iron deficiency anemia. To determine the relevance of urinary iron excretion to clinical factors other than iron metabolism, 15 clinical parameters were evaluated. The serum creatinine level was positively and the serum albumin level was negatively correlated with urinary iron excretion, showing coefficients of r=0.97,-0.86 respectively, a...

  4. [THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN EVALUATION OF IRON-DEFICIENT CONDITION UNDER ANEMIAS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrikhina, G N; Blindar, V N; Matveeva, I I

    2016-03-01

    The article presents data concerning differential diagnostic possibilities of evaluation of genuine iron-deficient anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. The variety of mechanisms of development of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated, including effect of humoral inhibitors of erythropoiesis, disorder of iron metabolism at the expense of its redistribution into cells of macrophage system, suppression of erythropoiesis resulted in redistributed or functional iron deficiency. The data is presented concerning significance in diagnostic of anemia of chronic diseases of such factors as content of ferritin, dissolving receptors of transferrin and role of hepcidin protein in pathogenesis of anemia of chronic diseases. The analysis of scientific publications demonstrated that hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron metabolism. Under iron-deficient anemia its level in blood decreases that contribute to extensive absorption of iron in gastrointestinal tract. On the contrary, under anemia of chronic diseases its content drastically increases and results in blocking of iron transport everywhere, including internal epithelium, macrophages, placenta and other types of cells. The hyper-production of hepcidin during infection and inflammation is responsible for anemia of chronic diseases. The perspectives of development of pharmaceuticals decreasing level of hepcidin for treatment of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated.

  5. Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia as a Risk Factor for the Development of Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Alper I; Demiryürek, Seniz; Aksoy, Sefika Nur; Perk, Peren; Saygili, Oguzhan; Güngör, Kivanc

    2015-08-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a proliferative vascular disease affecting premature newborns and occurs during vessel development and maturation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maternal iron deficiency anemia as possible risk factors associated with the development of retinopathy of prematurity among premature or very low birth weight infants. In this study, mothers of 254 infants with retinopathy of prematurity were analyzed retrospectively, and their laboratory results of medical records during pregnancy were reviewed for possible iron deficiency anemia. In a cohort of 254 mothers of premature infants with retinopathy of prematurity, 187 (73.6%) had iron deficiency, while the remaining 67 (26.4%) mothers had no deficiency. Babies born to mothers with iron deficiency anemia with markedly decreased hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, serum iron, and ferritin levels were more likely to develop retinopathy of prematurity. Our results are the first to suggest that maternal iron deficiency is a risk factor for the development of retinopathy of prematurity. Our data suggest that maternal iron supplementation therapy during pregnancy might lower the risk of retinopathy of prematurity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

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    Ana Beatriz Barbosa Torino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency.Methods:Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42, anemia of chronic disease (n = 28, anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22, and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25. The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia.Results:There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%. The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8.Conclusion:The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease.

  7. Absolute and Functional Iron Deficiency Anemia among Different Tumors in Cancer Patients in South Part of Iran, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Ebrahimi, Maryam; Allahyari, Abolghasem

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a common problem in cancer patients. This study aimed to investigate the frequency rate of absolute and functional iron deficiency anemia among different tumors and its distribution in different stages of cancer in solid tumors. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 597 patients with cancer referred to Ali-Ebne-Abitaleb Hospital in Zahedan. Laboratory tests included serum iron, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and complete blood count (CBC). The malignancy type and stages were recorded. Data were analysed using SPSS statistics software (Ver.19). Results: Four hundred and fifty-seven patients (76.5 %) diagnosed with solid tumors and 140 (23.5%) suffered from hematologic malignancies. Among patients with solid tumors, functional iron deficiency had the highest rate (300 patients had anemia and 243 (53.2%) of whom were functionally iron deficient), but in hematologic malignancies most of patients had not iron deficiency (66 patients had not iron deficiency against 12 patients had absolute iron deficiency and 62 patients had functional iron deficiency anemia) (P-value=0.021). No significant differences were observed among the various stages of cancers in terms of degrees of iron deficiency (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results of the study showed that solid tumors had a higher rate of absolute and functional iron deficiency anemia, compared to hematologic malignancies. But there was no difference between the different stages of the disease. PMID:28989585

  8. Distinguishing effects of anemia and muscle iron deficiency on exercise bioenergetics in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, K.J.A.; Donovan, C.M.; Refino, C.J.; Brooks, G.A.; Packer, L.; Dallman, P.R.

    1984-06-01

    Three weeks of dietary iron deficiency in weanling rats resulted in anemia (Hb, 39 vs 14.2 g/dl in controls) and decreased oxidative capacities of skeletal muscle (as much as 90% below control values). Whole-animal maximal O/sub 2/ consumption V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max//, measured in a brief treadmill run of progressively increasing work load, was approx.50% lower for iron-deficient rats than for controls, and maximal endurance capacity (time to exhaustion in a separate treadmill run at a constant, sub- V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// work load) was 90% lower from iron-deficient rats than for controls. Exchange transfusion with packed erythrocytes or plasma, was used to adjust Hb to an intermediate concentration of approximately 9.5 g/dl in both iron-deficient and control rats. This procedure corrected the V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// of iron-deficient rats to within 15% of control values, whereas endurance capacity showed no improvement. Our experimental dissociation of V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max/// and endurance capacity provides further evidence that V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// is not the sole determinant of endurance. We propose that defects in V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// during iron deficiency result primarily from diminished O/sub 2/ delivery, whereas decreased endurance capacity reflects impaired muscle mitochondrial function.

  9. Critical appraisal of discriminant formulas for distinguishing thalassemia from iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrechaga, Eloísa; Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2017-08-28

    Many discriminant formulas have been reported for distinguishing thalassemia trait from iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia. Independent verification of several discriminant formulas is deficient or even lacking. Therefore, we have retrospectively investigated discriminant formulas in a large, well-characterized patient population. The investigational population consisted of 2664 patients with microcytic anemia: 1259 had iron deficiency, 1196 'pure' thalassemia trait (877 β- and 319 α-thalassemia), 150 had thalassemia trait with concomitant iron deficiency or anemia of chronic disease, and 36 had other diseases. We investigated 25 discriminant formulas that only use hematologic parameters available on all analyzers; formulas with more advanced parameters were disregarded. The diagnostic performance was investigated using ROC analysis. The three best performing formulas were the Jayabose (RDW index), Janel (11T), and Green and King formulas. The differences between them were not statistically significant (p>0.333), but each of them had significantly higher area under the ROC curve than any other formula. The Jayabose and Green and King formulas had the highest sensitivities: 0.917 both. The highest specificity, 0.925, was found for the Janel formula, which is a composite score of 11 other formulas. All investigated formulas performed significantly better in distinguishing β- than α-thalassemia from iron deficiency. In our patient population, the Jayabose RDW index, the Green and King formula and the Janel 11T score are superior to all other formulas examined for distinguishing between thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia. We confirmed that all formulas perform much better in β- than in α-thalassemia carriers and also that they incorrectly classify approximately 30% of thalassemia carriers with concomitant other anemia as not having thalassemia. The diagnostic performance of even the best formulas is not high enough for making a final

  10. Low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia between 1981 and 2010 in Chilean women of childbearing age.

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    Israel Ríos-Castillo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence of anemia and iron status among Chilean women of childbearing age between 1981 and 2010. Materials and methods. Calculation of the prevalence of anemia and iron status was based on multiple cross-sectional iron absorption studies performed in 888 women during this period of time. All studies included measurements of hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, zinc protoporphyrin, percentage of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin. Data were grouped by decade (1981-1990,1991-2000, and 2001-2010. Results. Prevalence of anemia for these decades was 9, 6 and 10%, respectively (p=NS. Iron deficiency anemia was the main cause of anemia in all periods (55, 85 and 75%, respectively; p=NS. A high prevalence of women with normal iron status was observed for all periods (64, 69, and 67, respectively; p=NS. Prevalence of iron deficiency without anemia in 1981-1990, 1991-2000 and 2001-2010 was 7, 20 and 12%, respectively (p menor que 0.05. Finally, prevalence of iron depleted stores was 20, 6 and 10%, respectively (p menor que 0.05. Conclusions. Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Chilean women of childbearing age was mild between 1981 and 2010. More than 60% of childbearing age women presented normal iron status in all periods. However, prevalence of iron depleted stores was moderate during 1981-1990, and was mild during 1991-2000 and 2001-2010.

  11. Effects of maternal education on diet, anemia, and iron deficiency in Korean school-aged children

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    Choi Hyeon-Jeong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the relationship among socioeconomic status factors, the risk of anemia, and iron deficiency among school-aged children in Korea. Methods The sample consisted of fourth-grade students aged 10 y recruited from nine elementary schools in Korean urban areas in 2008 (n = 717. Anthropometric and blood biochemistry data were obtained for this cross-sectional observational study. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels lower than 11.5 g/dl. Iron deficiency was defined as serum iron levels lower than 40 ug/dl. We also obtained data on parental education from questionnaires and on children's diets from 3-day food diaries. Parental education was categorized as low or high, with the latter representing an educational level beyond high school. Results Children with more educated mothers were less likely to develop anemia (P = 0.0324 and iron deficiency (P = 0.0577 than were those with less educated mothers. This group consumed more protein (P = 0.0004 and iron (P = 0.0012 from animal sources than did the children of less educated mothers, as reflected by their greater consumption of meat, poultry, and derivatives (P Conclusions As a contributor to socioeconomic status, maternal education is important in reducing the risk of anemia and iron deficiency and in increasing children's consumption of animal food sources.

  12. Effect of iron deficiency anemia on the biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmanovici, Gabriela P. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salgueiro, Maria J. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Janjetic, Mariana A. [Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Leonardi, Natalia M. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Boccio, Jose R. [Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zubillaga, Marcela B. [Radioisotopes Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Junin 956 - 1113, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: mzubi@ffyb.uba.ar

    2006-05-15

    The distribution of colloids and labeled cells in organs is influenced by their intrinsic properties and by the state of the investigated subject. Iron deficiency remains an unsolved nutritional problem all over the world; one of its severe consequences is anemia. Because iron metabolism principally takes place in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skeletal muscle and blood, we studied the effect of iron deficiency anemia on the biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc phytate, {sup 99m}Tc gelatin colloid and {sup 99m}Tc RBC (red blood cells labeled with {sup 99m}Tc). Our results show that iron deficiency anemia modifies the pattern of biodistribution of the two colloids assayed. However, this behavior is different for both of them. This work contributes to studies that kinetically and statistically establish that iron deficiency anemia induces a significant inversion in the spleen-liver activity relationship when centellographic studies are performed with colloids such as {sup 99m}Tc phytate.

  13. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julia G.; Friedman, Jennifer F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed. PMID:21738863

  14. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia G. Shaw

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed.

  15. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in School Children, Adolescents, and Adults: A Community-Based Study in Rural Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcelo U.; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Bertolino, Carla N.; Malafronte, Rosely S.; Muniz, Pascoal T.; Cardoso, Marly A.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of anemia and iron deficiency in 398 rural Amazonians aged 5–90 years in Acre, Brazil. Anemia and iron deficiency were diagnosed in 16% and 19% of the population, respectively. Anemia was likely to have multiple causes; although nearly half of anemic school children and women had altered iron status indicators, only 19.7% of overall anemia was attributable to iron deficiency. Geo-helminth infection and a recent malaria episode were additional factors affecting iron status indicators in this population. PMID:17194861

  16. Prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in older Portuguese adults: An EMPIRE substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robalo Nunes, António; Fonseca, Cândida; Marques, Filipa; Belo, Aurora; Brilhante, Dialina; Cortez, José

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in older Portuguese adults, and to compare it with the prevalence in younger individuals. A population-based, cross-sectional study (EMPIRE study) enrolling a representative sample of 6267 adults aged Portuguese adults, particularly among those aged ≥80 years. Better diagnosis, prevention and treatment strategies should be implemented taking into account the outstanding role of iron deficiency in older Portuguese adults, the differences between regions and the intrinsic characteristics of this population. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1814-1822. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. The 57Co excretion and resorption test in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekier, A.; Holdener, E.; Kantonsspital Sankt Gallen

    1976-01-01

    1971 Sorbie et al. described a simple 57 Co-excretion test (16) as an aid in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia. The authors found that renal excretion of a tracer dosis of 0,5 μCi 57 CoCl 2 was significantly elevated in patients with iron deficiency anemia (31% of the adminstered dose in 24 hours' urine) as compared with the controls (18%). Between 1972-1974 we performed the 57 Co-excretion test in 29 patients with different kind of anemia and in 10 healthy volunteers. The test was modified by measurement of the serum activity 1, 2, 3, 7, 11 and 24 hours after the oral administration of the test dosis. In all anemias as well as in the control group we found the maximum of serum activity three hours after the oral administration of the tracer. The three hours serum activity was elevated in patients with iron deficiency anemia (5.53%/l serum) as compared with the control group (1.92%/l) and renal, tumor and infectious anemia (1.20%/l) p 57 Co excretion was moderately elevated in most of the patients with iron deficiency anemia (average 31.5% 57 Co-activity in 24 hours' urine) in comparison to the healthy controls (average 25.30%). Contrary to the results obtained by Sorbie et al. we found a wide range of fluctuation of the Co-excretion test in each group of patients with a poor statistical significance of p > 0.05. (orig.) [de

  18. Breastfeeding, Mixed, or Formula Feeding at 9 Months of Age and the Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Two Cohorts of Infants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Katy M; Li, Ming; Zhu, Bingquan; Liang, Furong; Shao, Jie; Zhang, Yueyang; Ji, Chai; Zhao, Zhengyan; Kaciroti, Niko; Lozoff, Betsy

    2017-02-01

    To assess associations between breastfeeding and iron status at 9 months of age in 2 samples of Chinese infants. Associations between feeding at 9 months of age (breastfed as sole milk source, mixed fed, or formula fed) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA), iron deficiency, and iron sufficiency were determined in infants from Zhejiang (n = 142) and Hebei (n= 813) provinces. Iron deficiency was defined as body iron infants had IDA compared with 0% of formula-fed infants. The odds of iron deficiency/IDA were increased in breastfed and mixed-fed infants compared with formula-fed infants: breastfed vs formula-fed OR, 28.8 (95% CI, 3.7-226.4) and mixed-fed vs formula-fed OR, 11.0 (95% CI, 1.2-103.2). In Hebei, 44.0% of breastfed infants had IDA compared with 2.8% of formula-fed infants. With covariable adjustment, odds of IDA were increased in breastfed and mixed-fed groups: breastfed vs formula-fed OR, 78.8 (95% CI, 27.2-228.1) and mixed-fed vs formula-fed OR, 21.0 (95% CI, 7.3-60.9). In both cohorts, the odds of iron deficiency/IDA at 9 months of age were increased in breastfed and mixed-fed infants, and iron deficiency/IDA was common. Although the benefits of breastfeeding are indisputable, these findings add to the evidence that breastfeeding in later infancy identifies infants at risk for iron deficiency/IDA in many settings. Protocols for detecting and preventing iron deficiency/IDA in breastfed infants are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00642863 and NCT00613717. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in Helicobacter pylori infection: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Li Yumin; Yang Kehu; Ma Bin; Guan Quanlin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Lijuan

    2010-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and iron deficiency anemia are prevalent in disadvantaged populations worldwide. The benefit of H. pylori eradiation for iron deficiency anemia has been extensively studied, but data are still equivocal. A search in The Cochrane Library, PUBMED, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, Science Citation Index Expanded, and CMB (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database) was performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing anti-H. pylori plus oral iron to oral iron alone for the iron deficiency patients in whom H. pylori was positive were selected for meta-analysis. Reviev Manager 5.0 software was used for the performance of meta-analysis. Sixteen randomized controlled trials totaling 956 patients were included. The meta-analysis showed that the difference from baseline to endpoint of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron (SI), and serum ferritin (SF) was statistically significantly different between anti-H. pylori treatment plus oral iron and oral iron alone (SMD, Hb 1.48; 95% CI, 0.96, 2.00; p infection could be effective in improving anemia and iron statue in IDA patients infected by H. pylori, particularly in patients with moderate or severe anemia.

  20. Efficacy of gluten-free diet alone on recovery from iron deficiency anemia in adult celiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibale, B; Severi, C; Chistolini, A; Antonelli, G; Lahner, E; Marcheggiano, A; Iannoni, C; Monarca, B; Delle Fave, G

    2001-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia has been reported as the most frequent extraintestinal symptom in adult celiac disease. Prospective studies on the effect of gluten-free diet on recovery from iron deficiency anemia are lacking. The aim of this study was to verify in adult patients with celiac disease the efficacy of and the time course of recovery from iron deficiency anemia by a gluten-free diet alone. We studied 190 consecutive adult patients with iron deficiency anemia, screened for celiac disease by duodenal biopsies. New diagnosed celiac patients were invited to follow a gluten-free diet alone without iron supplementation. After 6 months of diet, duodenal biopsies were performed and hematological tests were repeated at 6, 12, and 24 months. Celiac disease was diagnosed in 26 (24 women, 2 men; 13.7%) adult patients. After 6 months of gluten-free diet 14 of 18 (77.8%) female patients recovered from anemia, but only 5 of 18 (27.8%) reversed from iron deficiency. At 12-month control all but one patient (94.4%) recovered from anemia and 9 patients (50%) from iron deficiency. After 24 months of diet, only the patient who did not recover from anemia at 12-month control was still anemic, whereas 10 patients (55.5%) reversed from iron deficiency. A significant inverse correlation (r = -0.7141, p = 0.0003) between increase of Hb concentrations and decrease of individual histological scores of duodenitis was observed. A screening for celiac disease should be carried out in adult patients with iron deficiency anemia. Recovery from anemia occurs between 6 and 12 months on a gluten-free diet alone as a consequence of normalization of histological alterations of the intestinal mucosa.

  1. Craving for ice and iron-deficiency anemia: a case series from Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Youssef M; Wali, Yasser A; Osman, Osman M

    2005-03-01

    Pagophagia, or the practice of consuming ice, is a particular expression of the more general phenomenon of pica. Pagophagia is a complex behavioral phenomenon arising from the interplay of biochemical, hematological, psychological, and cultural factors. This compulsive dietary aberration is observed in many children and pregnant women worldwide. The authors report 3 cases of severe iron deficiency anemia with a serum ferritin level of 2-3 ng/mL, in which the patients were consuming 2 trays and many bags of ice per day. Following treatment with iron therapy, pagophagia spontaneously resolved within 2 weeks. It is a commonly missed problem. Pediatricians should be alert to this phenomena and its association with iron-deficiency anemia.

  2. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment.

  3. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: a rare cause of iron-deficiency anemia in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Vincenzo; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Menna, Francesco; Menna, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a chronic, rare disorder confined to the lung, which is commonly characterized by the triad of recurrent hemoptysis, diffuse parenchyma infiltrates on chest radiography, and iron-deficiency anemia. Diagnosis may be difficult and the clinical course may be widely variable. Here, we describe an 8-year-old boy whose isolated symptom on presentation was iron-deficiency anemia. Presence of hemoptysis and bilateral alveolar infiltrates on chest x-ray led to the diagnosis of pulmonary hemosiderosis, subsequently confirmed by the finding of hemosiderin-laden macrophages by bronchoalveolar lavage. The patient was started on prednisolone 2 mg/kg/d and no further bleeding episodes were noted after the onset of therapy.

  4. Iron deficiency anemia in an athlete associated with Campylobacter pylori-negative chronic gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, D.; Sherman, P. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    A 14-year-old athletic boy with a 1-year history of decreased exercise tolerance presented with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. Panendoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract were normal. However, persistent uptake of radionuclide using a {sup 99m}technetium-sucralfate scan suggested inflammation localized to the stomach. Mucosal biopsies demonstrated acute and chronic gastritis that was not associated with the presence of Campylobacter pylori.

  5. Electrophysiological changes of Papillary Muscles in Guinea Pigs with iron deficiency anemia and heart failure

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    Ling Fan1

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the changes of left ventricular papillary muscle action potentials in guinea pigs with iron deficiency anemia and heart failure. Methods: A total of 20 cases of iron deficiency anemia with heart failure were treated with experimental group and 10 normal guinea pigs as control group. Blood samples were collected to determine hemoglobin content, red blood cell number and whole blood iron index, and the changes of cardiac function and hemodynamics were detected by 6 240 biological signal collection system to determine whether the model was successful or not, Intracellular microelectrode technique was used to determine the action potentials of the papillary muscles in the model group and the control group. the potential amplitudes (APA, overshoot values (APA, maximum depolarization rate (Vmax, 20 % of repolarization, 50 % and 90 % of repolarization (APD20, APD50 and APD90 and the average velocity of repolarization were measured. Compare statistical difference between the model group and the control group. Results: 14 cases of model group survived completely, compared with control group, APD50 and APD90 prolonged, and the average velocity decreased. Conclusions: the action potential repolarization duration in the guinea pig papillary muscle of iron deficiency anemia with heart failure is prolonged, and the average repolarization velocity is slow.

  6. The relationship between iron deficiency anemia and simple febrile convulsion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Eghbali, Aziz; Rafeie, Mohammad; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Zolfi, Mohaddeseh; Firouzifar, Mohammadreza

    2014-05-01

    Simple febrile convulsion is the most common disease of the nervous system in children. There are hypotheses that iron deficiency may affect febrile convulsion and the threshold of neuron excitation. This study was conducted with the objective of finding the effects of iron deficiency anemia on simple febrile convulsion episodes. The study was conducted at AmirKabir Hospital of Arak Medical Sciences University, Arak, Iran. This is a case-control study. In this study, 382 children who were selected according to our inclusion and exclusion factors, were divided into two groups of case (febrile convulsion) and control (other factors causing fever) by their cause of hospitalization. After fever subsided, 5 ml blood sample was taken from each child and complete blood count and iron profile tests were performed. The results were interpreted using descriptive statistics and independent t-test. The prevalence of anemia in the group with febrile convulsion was significantly less than that in the control group: 22.5% of the children in the group with febrile convulsion and 34% in the control group exhibited anemia (P < 0.001). Moreover, the group with febrile convulsion had significantly higher blood indices, such as Hb, Hct, MCV, MCH, and MCHC, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Iron deficiency can prevent febrile convulsion in children and probably increases the threshold of neuron excitation in fever.

  7. Effects of heme iron enriched peptide on iron deficiency anemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Chen, Le-qun; Zhuang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate whether a daily intake of heme iron enriched peptide obtained from bovine hemoglobin is effective in alleviating iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: a control group, an anemic group not treated, and anemic groups treated with FeSO4 or with the heme iron enriched peptide at low, moderate or high doses. The rats in the anemic groups were fed on a low-iron diet to establish the iron deficiency anemia model. After the model had been established, different doses of heme iron enriched peptide were given to the rats once a day via intragastric administration. After the iron supplement administration, it was observed that heme iron enriched peptide had effective restorative action returning the hemoglobin, red blood cells, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and serum iron in IDA animals to normal values or better. In addition, compared with FeSO4, higher Fe bioavailability and fewer side effects were observed. The rats in the moderate dose group had the highest apparent Fe absorption. Moreover, in vivo antioxidant activity was also observed, enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and reduced malondialdehyde levels in IDA rats. Furthermore, the heme iron enriched peptide also exhibited strong in vitro antioxidant activities. In conclusion, heme iron enriched peptide significantly alleviated iron deficiency anemia, and exhibited strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. This suggests that heme iron enriched peptide might be exploited as a safe, efficient new iron supplement.

  8. Tratamento da anemia ferropriva com ferro por via parenteral Iron deficiency anemia treatment with parenteral iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Cançado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Embora o ferro por via oral seja considerado a primeira opção de tratamento da deficiência de ferro, em algumas situações específicas, a administração de ferro por via parenteral é uma opção terapêutica que deve ser considerada. Diferentemente do ferro dextran de alto peso molecular utilizado na década de 80 e lembrado como um composto associado ao alto risco de reação anafilática e morte, o desenvolvimento e comercialização de novos compostos com ferro para uso parenteral, sobretudo por via endovenosa - como o ferro sacarato, ferro gluconato e, mais recentemente, a carboximaltose férrica - , tem se tornado cada vez mais uma alternativa terapêutica segura e efetiva, e tem possibilitado ampliar o leque de indicações desta modalidade de tratamento além da nefrologia, como obstetrícia e ginecologia, cirurgia, pediatria, gastroenterologia, hematologia e hemoterapia. Os autores revisam as principais indicações do tratamento com ferro por via parenteral, analisam as principais drogas disponíveis para a correção da anemia ferropriva por via endovenosa e propõem uma estratégia de investigação diagnóstica, tratamento e seguimento laboratorial dos pacientes com indicação desta opção terapêutica.Although oral iron is generally considered the first choice in the treatment of iron deficiency, in some specific situations, parenteral iron administration is a therapeutic option that should be considered. Different to the high-molecular-weight iron dextran utilized in the eighties and remembered as a compound associated with a high risk of anaphylaxis and death, the development and marketing of newer preparations for parenteral, in particular endovenous, administration, such as iron sucrose, ferric gluconate and more recently ferric carboxymaltose, are becoming a more effective and safe therapeutic alternative, that have extended the range of indications beyond nephrology to obstetrics and gynecology, surgery, pediatrics

  9. Impact of multiple micronutrient supplementation ("sprinkles") on iron deficiency anemia in Bedouin Arab and Jewish infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilenko, Natalya; Fraser, Drora; Vardy, Hillel; Belmaker, Ilana

    2014-07-01

    A high prevalence of iron deficiency anemia persists in Bedouin Arab and Jewish pediatric populations in southern Israel. To compare the effect of daily use of the micronutrient supplementation (MMS), "Sprinkles," a powdered formulation of iron, vitamins A and C, folic acid and zinc, with liquid iron and vitamins A and D on iron deficiency at 12 months of age. The 621 eligible Bedouin and Jewish infants in the study were assigned to the MMS and control arms and received supplementations from age 6 to 12 months. We examined the change in hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean cell volume, red blood cell distribution, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. In addition, we used the high Iron Deficiency Index (IDI) if two or more of the above six parameters showed abnormal levels. Rates of anemia decreased significantly over the 6 month period, from 58.8% to 40.6% among Bedouin infants (P = 0.037) and from 40.6 to 15.8% among Jewish infants (P = 0.017). In Bedouin infants the prevalence of high IDI decreased significantly from 79.2% to 67.4% (P = 0.010) in the MMS group, but there was no change in the controls. Among Jewish infants, the high IDI prevalence decreased from 67% to 55.6% with no statistically significant difference in the two study arms. In the multivariate analysis in Bedouin infants MMS use was associated with a reduced risk of 67% in high IDI at age 12 months as compared to controls (P = 0.001). Fewer side effects in the intervention groups in both ethnic populations were reported. MMS fortification of home food can be recommended as an effective and safe method for preventing iron deficiency anemia at 12 months of age.

  10. Iron Supplementation, Response in Iron-Deficiency Anemia: Analysis of Five Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okam, Maureen M; Koch, Todd A; Tran, Minh-Ha

    2017-08-01

    Oral iron-replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment for iron-deficiency anemia, but it is often poorly tolerated or ineffective. Hemoglobin response at day 14 of oral iron may be useful in assessing whether and when to transition patients from oral to intravenous (IV) iron. Pooled data from 5 randomized trials were analyzed to compare oral and IV iron-replacement therapy for iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment criteria and assignment to oral versus IV iron were defined per protocol; this analysis included only subjects receiving oral iron. Responders were subjects with ≥1.0-g/dL increases in hemoglobin at day 14, and nonresponders were those with smaller increases. Demographic and clinical characteristics were evaluated for association with hemoglobin response at multiple timepoints. Most subjects (72.8%) were classified as responders. The proportion of subjects with hemoglobin increases ≥1.0, ≥2.0, and ≥3.0 g/dL was greatest among those with postpartum anemia, intermediate among those with heavy uterine bleeding or gastrointestinal-related causes of anemia, and lowest among those with other causes; this proportion was also significantly greater among responders than nonresponders. A ≥1.0-g/dL increase in hemoglobin on day 14 most accurately predicted satisfactory overall hemoglobin response to oral iron on day 42/56 (sensitivity 90.1%; specificity 79.3%; positive and negative predictive values of 92.9% and 72.7%, respectively). Iron-replacement therapy improved quality of life and reduced fatigue. Hemoglobin responses <1.0 g/dL at day 14 of oral iron identify subjects with iron-deficiency anemia who should be transitioned to IV iron supplementation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Association between Iron Deficiency Anemia and Febrile Seizure: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Nasehi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizure is the most common convulsive disorder in children and different studies reported controversial results about the association between this disorder and iron deficiency. In some studies, iron level in children with febrile seizure is higher than control and in some reports it is less than the control group. So, we systematically reviewed all the studies in this field and analyzed their findings using meta-analysis methods. This review and meta-analysis was conducted by iron and fever keywords on articles published in the databases PubMed, Google Scholar and Federated search of medical digital library that includes a variety of international databases. All articles dated at the end of March 2012 were studied. Case-control studies were selected and quality assessment of studies were surveyed by STROB criteria and information requirements, including the status of iron deficiency anemia, iron levels and ferritin level of eligible studies were extracted and analyzed by Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Version 2.0 software and the Forest and Funnel chart was drawn. Finally 11 studies included 1357 children with febrile seizure and 1347 children in the control group were evaluated. The odds ratio of iron deficiency anemia in children with febrile seizure in comparison to the control group was 1.27 (OR = 1.27, CI95%: 1.03 -1.56. Ferritin level was not significant between the two groups (p=0.08, but the iron level in the two groups was significant (p=0.000. Iron deficiency is considered as a risk factor in the incidence of febrile seizure and interventional studies can be helpful to confirm this hypothesis.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in Tarahumara women of reproductive-age in Northern Mexico

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    Monárrez-Espino Joel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA among Tarahumara women of reproductive age. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a representative sample of 481 women aged 12-49 years, residents of Guachochi Municipality, Chihuahua, from June to September 1998. The hemoglobin (Hb level was measured in capillary blood using the Hemocue technique, and the serum ferritin level in capillary serum spotted on filter paper, in a sub-sample of women. Central tendency and dispersion measures were estimated; the Chisquared test was used to test differences in proportions and ANOVA and Bonferroni's test for differences in means. Results. Prevalence of anemia (mean Hb±S.D. was 16.1% (140±16 g/l and 25.7% (129±12 g/l for non-pregnant and pregnant women, respectively. Pregnant women in the 3rd trimester and those who were breast-feeding their children during the first 6 months after delivery had the highest prevalence of anemia (38.5% and 42.9%, respectively. Iron deficiency was responsible for most of the anemia found in this sample. Conclusions. This study provides relevant information for the development of intervention programs to treat and prevent IDA in this ethnic group. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in Tarahumara women of reproductive-age in northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monárrez-Espino, J; Martínez, H; Greiner, T

    2001-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among Tarahumara women of reproductive age. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a representative sample of 481 women aged 12-49 years, residents of Guachochi Municipality, Chihuahua, from June to September 1998. The hemoglobin (Hb) level was measured in capillary blood using the Hemocue technique, and the serum ferritin level in capillary serum spotted on filter paper, in a sub-sample of women. Central tendency and dispersion measures were estimated; the Chi-squared test was used to test differences in proportions and ANOVA and Bonferroni's test for differences in means. Prevalence of anemia (mean Hb +/- S.D.) was 16.1% (140 +/- 16 g/l) and 25.7% (129 +/- 12 g/l) for non-pregnant and pregnant women, respectively. Pregnant women in the 3rd trimester and those who were breast-feeding their children during the first 6 months after delivery had the highest prevalence of anemia (38.5% and 42.9%, respectively). Iron deficiency was responsible for most of the anemia found in this sample. This study provides relevant information for the development of intervention programs to treat and prevent IDA in this ethnic group.

  14. Iron-deficiency anemia in infancy and social emotional development in preschool-aged Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Suying; Wang, Li; Wang, Yuying; Brouwer, Inge D; Kok, Frans J; Lozoff, Betsy; Chen, Chunming

    2011-04-01

    We aimed to compare affect and behavior of 3 groups of nonanemic 4-year-old children: children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy whose anemia was not corrected before 24 months (chronic IDA) (n = 27); children with IDA in infancy whose anemia was corrected before 24 months (corrected IDA) (n = 70); and children who were nonanemic in infancy and at 24 months (n = 64). Mother and child dyads were invited to a local clinic room. Children's social referencing, wariness, frustration-tolerance behavior, and affect were observed during a set of situations encountered in the laboratory, including free play, stranger approach, novel toy, and delay of gratification. The whole procedure was videotaped. The children's affective and behavioral displays were coded by using a time-sampling (5-second segments) code scheme. Iron status of children was determined on the basis of hemoglobin concentration measured with the cyanomethemoglobin method in blood samples obtained by fingerstick in infancy and at the ages of 24 months and 4 years. Children who had chronic IDA in infancy displayed less positive affect, less frustration tolerance, more passive behavior, and more physical self-soothing in the stranger approach and delay of gratification. In contrast, the behavior and affect of children whose anemia was corrected before the age of 24 months were comparable to those of children who were nonanemic throughout infancy. The results point to the potential benefits of preventing iron deficiency in infancy and treating it before it becomes chronic or severe.

  15. Vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and anemia among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palafox, Neal A; Gamble, Mary V; Dancheck, Barbara; Ricks, Michelle O; Briand, Kennar; Semba, Richard D

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the co-occurrence of vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and anemia among young children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Hemoglobin, serum retinol, and serum ferritin were assessed in the Republic of the Marshall Islands Vitamin A Deficiency Study, a community-based survey that involved 919 children ages 1 to 5 y. The proportion of children with vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol concentrations Marshall Islands, ages 1 to 5 y, are at high risk of anemia, vitamin A deficiency, and iron deficiency, and one-third of these children had the co-occurrence of vitamin A and iron deficiencies. Further investigation is needed to identify risk factors and evaluate interventions to address vitamin A and iron deficiencies among children.

  16. Anemias beyond B12 and iron deficiency: the buzz about other B's, elementary, and nonelementary problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The term "unexplained anemia" appears frequently in a request for a hematology consultation. Although most anemia consultations are fairly routine, they occasionally represent challenging problems that require an amalgam of experience, insight, and a modicum of "out-of-the-box" thinking. Problem anemia cases and pitfalls in their recognition can arise for one of several reasons that are discussed in the cases presented herein. "Anemias beyond B12 and iron deficiency" covers a vast domain of everything that lies beyond the commonly encountered anemias caused by simple deficiencies of 2 currently major hematologically relevant micronutrients. However, even these deficiencies may be obscured when they coexist or are not considered because of misleading distractions. They may also be mistakenly identified when other less common nutrient deficiencies occur. I present herein case examples of such situations: a young patient with pancytopenia and schistocytes who was responsive to plasmapheresis, but in whom pernicious anemia was not suspected because of ethnicity and age; a bicytopenic patient with anemia and myelodysplastic features caused by copper deficiency after gastric reduction surgery; and a patient with BM hypoplasia and a dimorphic blood smear who was found to have paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. These "pearls" represent but 3 examples of the many varieties of problems in anemia diagnosis and are used to illustrate potential pitfalls and how to avoid them.

  17. Association between iron deficiency anemia and blood level in egyptian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, E.M.; Moawad, A.T.; Abd Alla, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between iron deficiency and blood lead levels was investigated in a cross-sectional study of 200 children of both sexes, aged 6-12 years with mean of 7.8 +- 2.6 years. They were randomly selected from governmental primary school located near a highly contaminated industrial area. Blood samples were collected for measuring blood lead levels, serum iron serum ferritin, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and other hematological indices. According to iron status, children were classified into non-anemic healthy controls(n=37),iron depleted children(n=58)and children with iron deficiency anemia (n=105).Iron deficiency is defined when MCV 10 / dl were significantly lower than those for children with blood lead levels < 10 /dl. Comparison of blood lead concentrations between boys and girls revealed highly significant increase in blood lead level in boys than girls. A strong negative correlation was detected between blood lead levels and serum iron in all subjects. However, such correlation vanished between blood lead concentration and serum ferritin,so, it could be concluded from the present study that the blood lead levels were changed according to changes in iron status. Improving iron status, along with reducing exposure to environmental contamination with lead, may help in reducing blood lead levels among most children especially those living in contaminated environment

  18. Intravenous Iron Repletion Does Not Significantly Decrease Platelet Counts in CKD Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Neville R. Dossabhoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We sought to investigate the effect of IV iron repletion on platelet (PLT counts in CKD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA. Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review, including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran total dose infusion (TDI between 2002 and 2007. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin (Hgb, iron stores and PLT were recorded pre- and post-dose. Results. 153 patients received a total of 251 doses of TDI (mean ± SD = 971 ± 175 mg; age years and Creatinine  mg/dL. All CKD stages were represented (stage 4 commonest. Hgb and Fe stores improved post-TDI (. There was a very mild decrease in PLT (pre-TDI 255 versus post-TDI 244, . The mild reduction in PLT after TDI remained non-significant ( when data was stratified by molecular weight (MW of iron dextran used (low versus high, as well as by dose administered (<1000 versus ≥1000 mg. Linear regression analysis between pre-dose PLT and Tsat and Fe showed R2 of 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Correction of iron deficiency did not significantly lower PLT in CKD patients, regardless of MW or dose used. Correlation of PLT to severity of iron deficiency was very weak.

  19. Severity of iron deficiency anemia and its relationship to growth and morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarda, N.; Pollitt, E.; Viteri, F.

    1986-03-01

    The relationships between severity of iron deficiency anemia, response to iron treatment, respiratory and gastrointestinal illness and weight changes were assessed before (T1) and after (T2) iron therapy. Seventy-five pre-school children from rural Guatemala received daily oral iron (ferrous sulfate 5 mg/kg/day) for eleven weeks, and were classified into one of three groups: (1) severe iron deficient (Hgb < 9.25 g/dl at T1 and > 1g/dl Hgb response (T2-T1) to Fe Rx; (2) moderately iron deficient (Hgb 9.25 g/dl to 11.5 g/dl and T2-T1 > 1g/dl); (3) normal controls (Hgb > 11.5 g/dl and T2-T1 < 1g/dl). When both severely and moderately anemic children were pooled together, there was a statistical significant difference between the number of days ill with gastrointestinal symptoms of these children and those in the control group. Children with T1 Hgb > 11.5 had more days ill than those classified as severely or moderately anemic. There was no other statistically significant associations between initial Hgb levels and morbidity. On the other hand, there was a statistically significant negative correlation between delta (T2-T1) Hgb and number of days ill with gastrointestinal symptoms. All other covariates accounted for the percentage of days ill from gastrointestinal sorbidity, decreased approximately 1% for each 1% increase in delta Hgb.

  20. A Case of Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Associated with Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Use

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    David N. Dado, DO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases has evolved over recent years. Initially intended for short-term use, PPIs are increasingly being used, often inappropriately, as long-term maintenance medications. The mechanism of action of PPIs is suppression of gastric basal and stimulated acid secretion by inhibiting the parietal cell H+/K+ ATP pump with a resultant increase in gastric pH and hypo- or achlorhydria. Although short-term use is related to few adverse effects, long-term use is associated with numerous complications. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with severe iron deficiency anemia due to malabsorption suspected to be caused by long-term PPI use. An extensive medical work up failed to reveal any definitive source of bleeding. An iron malabsorption test confirmed that iron was not being absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale and the Horn and Hansten Drug Interaction Probability Scale are suggestive of an association between long-term PPI use and the observed iron deficiency anemia. However, the patient’s death and lack of an autopsy prevented confirmatory follow-up data from being obtained to connect long-term PPI use as the culprit. Although there are currently no recommendations regarding screening for iron deficiency and/or anemia in patients on long-term PPI therapy, physicians should be aware of this potential side effect and consider monitoring in high-risk patients.

  1. Using of health belief model to promote preventive behaviors against iron deficiency anemia among pregnant women

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    Khadije Baharzadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional problems during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of education based on health belief model to promote preventive behaviors against iron deficiency anemia among pregnant women. The study was performed on 80 pregnant women that were randomized equally into the experimental and control groups. A self-administered questionnaire based on health belief model constructs was applied to gather data. The experimental group received two educational sessions. The mean age of women was 27.96±5.6 years and mean gestational age was 16.6±1 weeks. Before the intervention, no significant differences in terms of demographic characteristics and health belief model constructs were found between the groups, while after the intervention, the scores of health belief model were different significantly between the control and experimental groups . Since the results of the study indicated the applicability of health belief model to promote nutritional behavior in regard to anemia in pregnancy, implementing health belief model based educational sessions in health centers is suggested to reduce complications of this problem.

  2. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: Median arcuate ligament syndrome

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    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kiyasrttin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  3. Woman presenting with chronic iron deficiency anemia associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a case report

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    Stross P

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Paul StrossDepartment of Haematology, St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, United KingdomBackground: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with frequent nose bleeds that can be troublesome and difficult to contain. A further manifestation is telangiectasia, which may develop in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. The associated blood loss can be chronic, resulting in iron deficiency anemia which, when severe, has historically been treated by blood transfusions. Further pulmonary, neurologic, and hepatic complications may appear in later life, and are well documented. Administering blood transfusions requires provision, storage, and serological testing to select suitable units. Recognition of the inherent potential risks of donated blood, the expense, and the concerns regarding blood supply, has resulted in a national policy for conservation and appropriate use of blood. For an individual patient, there may be development of alloantibodies which complicates future cross-matching for transfusions.Case report: SG is a 66-year-old Caucasian woman who first presented to our hematology department in 2003, having just moved to the area. She had suffered with nose bleeds since her teenage years and presented with a low hemoglobin level and symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. Medical and nonmedical interventions failed to arrest the blood loss, which had not been massive or associated with hypovolemic shock. Pursuant to conserving blood supplies, and based on experience of patients with other causes of iron deficiency anemia, a regimen of high-dose iron supplementation was adopted. The aim was to sustain iron stores as a substrate for erythropoiesis and thereby achieve adequate hemoglobin levels whilst minimizing the need for blood transfusion.Discussion: This approach has maintained the patient's hemoglobin levels at 6.4–11.6 g/dL over a period of 9 years. Until the time of writing in 2011, the

  4. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: Median arcuate ligament syndrome

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    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kiyasrttin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli [Dept. of Radiology, Sakarya University Medical Faculty, Sakarya (Turkmenistan)

    2014-08-15

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  5. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: median arcuate ligament syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kıyasettin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Tatlı Ayhan, Laçin

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  6. Optimal management of iron deficiency anemia due to poor dietary intake

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    García-López S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Kattalin Aspuru1, Carlos Villa2, Fernando Bermejo2, Pilar Herrero3, Santiago García López1 1Digestive Department, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet (Miguel Servet University Hospital, Zaragoza, 2Digestive Department, Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada (Fuenlabrada University Hospital, Madrid, 3Professional College of Nutritionists and Dietitians of Aragon, Zaragoza, Spain Abstract: Iron is necessary for the normal development of multiple vital processes. Iron deficiency (ID may be caused by several diseases, even by physiological situations that increase requirements for this mineral. One of its possible causes is a poor dietary iron intake, which is infrequent in developed countries, but quite common in developing areas. In these countries, dietary ID is highly prevalent and comprises a real public health problem and a challenge for health authorities. ID, with or without anemia, can cause important symptoms that are not only physical, but can also include a decreased intellectual performance. All this, together with a high prevalence, can even have negative implications for a community’s economic and social development. Treatment consists of iron supplements. Prevention of ID obviously lies in increasing the dietary intake of iron, which can be difficult in developing countries. In these regions, foods with greater iron content are scarce, and attempts are made to compensate this by fortifying staple foods with iron. The effectiveness of this strategy is endorsed by multiple studies. On the other hand, in developed countries, ID with or without anemia is nearly always associated with diseases that trigger a negative balance between iron absorption and loss. Its management will be based on the treatment of underlying diseases, as well as on oral iron supplements, although these latter are limited by their tolerance and low potency, which on occasions may compel a change to intravenous administration. Iron deficiency has a series of

  7. Disaccharidase levels in normal epithelium of the small intestine of rats with iron-deficiency anemia

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    M.I.M. Fernandes

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron-deficiency anemia is the nutritional deficiency most frequently occurring throughout the world, which manifests as a complex systemic disease involving all cells, affecting enzyme activities and modifying protein synthesis. In view of these considerations, the objective of the present study was to determine the effects of iron-deficiency anemia on disaccharidases and on the epithelial morphokinetics of the jejunal mucosa. Newly weaned male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 10 animals each: C6w received a standard ration containing 36 mg elemental iron per kg ration for 6 weeks; E6w received an iron-poor ration (5-8 mg/kg ration for 6 weeks; C10w received an iron-rich ration (36 mg/kg ration for 10 weeks; E10w received an iron-poor ration for 6 weeks and then an iron-rich ration (36 mg/kg for an additional 4 weeks. Jejunal fragments were used to measure disaccharidase content and to study cell proliferation. The following results were obtained: 1 a significant reduction (P<0.001 of animal weight, hemoglobin (Hb, serum iron and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC in group E6w as compared to C6w; reversal of the alterations in Hb, serum iron and TIBC with iron repletion (E10w = C10w; animal weights continued to be significantly different in groups E10w and C10w. 2 Sucrase and maltase levels were unchanged; total and specific lactase levels were significantly lower in group E6w and this reduction was reversed by iron repletion (E10w = C10w. 3 The cell proliferation parameters did not differ between groups. On the basis of these results, we conclude that lactase production was influenced by iron deficiency and that this fact was not related to changes in cell population and proliferation in the intestinal mucosa

  8. Anemia and iron deficiency in Mexican elderly population. Results from the Ensanut 2012

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    Alejandra Contreras-Manzano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe de prevalence of iron deficiency (ID and anemia in a sample of Mexican elderly population from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (Ensanut 2012. Materials and methods. 1 920 subjects ≥60 years of age were included. Hemoglobin, serum concentrations of ferritin and CRP were measured. The risk for ID and anemia adjusted for potential confounders was assessed in logistic regression models. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia was 13.9%, 15.2% in males and 12.8% females. For ID,overall it was 4.2%, males 4.0% and females 4.3%. The greatest prevalence of ID was found in males and females over 80 years old (6.9 and 7.0%, respectively. ID was present in 1.5 of 10 Mexican elders with anemia. Conclusion. The prevalence of anemia was high in the elderly, however the prevalence of ID was low; there is a need to further investigate the causes of anemia in this age group.

  9. Anemia and iron deficiency in Mexican elderly population: Results from the Ensanut 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Manzano, Alejandra; Cruz, Vanessa de la; Villalpando, Salvador; Rebollar, Rosario; Shamah-Levy, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    To describe de prevalence of iron deficiency (ID) and anemia in a sample of Mexican elderly population from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (Ensanut) 2012. 1 920 subjects ≥60 years of age were included. Hemoglobin, serum concentrations of ferritin and CRP were measured. The risk for ID and anemia adjusted for potential confounders was assessed in logistic regression models. The overall prevalence of anemia was 13.9%, 15.2% in males and 12.8% females. For ID, overall it was 4.2%, males 4.0% and females 4.3%. The greatest prevalence of ID was found in males and females over 80 years old (6.9 and 7.0%, respectively). ID was present in 1.5 of 10 Mexican elders with anemia. The prevalence of anemia was high in the elderly, however the prevalence of ID was low; there is a need to further investigate the causes of anemia in this age group.

  10. Clinical case of the month. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis presenting as a rare cause of iron deficiency anemia in a toddler--a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Shah, Kinjal; Maddox, Kevin; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Scott, L Keith

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common cause of anemia in all age groups. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is an extremely rare etiology of iron deficiency anemia seen predominantly in the pediatric population. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is characterized by the triad of symptoms consisting of iron deficiency anemia, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates, and hemoptysis. The clinical presentation is extremely variable, and all three symptoms may not always be seen. Due to the rarity of the disease and the variability in clinical presentation, diagnosis is usually delayed. Early diagnosis and treatment with corticosteroids prevents further episodes of recurrent alveolar hemorrhage and improves the clinical outcome. Hence, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of this condition in young patients presenting with severe iron deficiency anemia and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. We report a toddler with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis whose initial clinical presentation was severe iron deficiency anemia.

  11. A child with severe iron-deficiency anemia and a complex TMPRSS6 genotype.

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    Capra, Anna Paola; Ferro, Elisa; Cannavò, Laura; La Rosa, Maria Angela; Zirilli, Giuseppina

    2017-10-01

    We report a case of a 7-year-old girl with severe hypochromic microcytic anemia, who was unresponsive to classical iron supplements. We suspected IRIDA, iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia, a genetic iron metabolism disorder, caused by TMPRSS6 variations. TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a negative regulator of hepcidin, and its pathological variants are related to normal to high levels of hepcidin. We analyzed the TMPRSS6 gene and we improved clinical management of the patient, selecting the appropriate supplementation therapy. Intervention & Technique: The parenteral iron therapy was started, but the patient was only partially responsive and the anemia persisted. To confirm the diagnosis, the TMPRSS6 gene sequence was analyzed by DNA sequencing and other relevant biochemical parameters were evaluated. The TMPRSS6 sequence analysis showed a complex genotype with a rare heterozygous missense variant, in addition to other common polymorphisms. The serum hepcidin value was normal. We unexpectedly observed a normalization of patient's hemoglobin (Hb) levels only after liposomal iron treatment. The proband was symptomatic for IRIDA during a critical phase of growth and development, but we did not find a clearly causative genotype. A long-term result, improving stably patient's Hb levels, was obtained only after liposomal iron supplementation. Children may be at greater risk for iron deficiency and the degree of anemia as well as the response to the iron supplements varies markedly patient to patient. Here, we show the importance of comprehensive study of these patients in order to collect useful information about genotype-phenotype association of genes involved in iron metabolism.

  12. Use of iron supplements in children aged 1-2 years with iron deficiency anemia: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Sezik, Handan Atsiz; Can, Huseyin; Kurnaz, Mehmet Ali; Tuna, Mine; Ay, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common nutritional problem in the world and is the most common cause of childhood anemia. In this study, our aim was to find out about the state of usage of iron preparation, which is distributed free of charge by the Ministry of Health, for the infants between 4-12 months in our country, as well as detecting the awareness degree of families those who are informed about iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), prophylaxis of the drug and to determine the drug...

  13. Homocysteine and vitamin B 12 status and iron deficiency anemia in female university students from Gaza Strip, Palestine

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    Mahmoud Mohammed Sirdah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nutritional deficiencies are very significant to the overall health of humans at all ages and for both genders, yet in infants, children and women of childbearing age these deficiencies can seriously affect growth and development. The present work is aimed to assess homocysteine and vitamin B12 status in females with iron deficiency anemia from the Gaza Strip.METHODS: Venous blood samples were randomly collected from 240 female university students (18-22 years old and parameters of the complete blood count, serum ferritin, homocysteine and vitamin B12 were measured. Statistical analysis included the t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA using the IBM SPSS software (version 18. Statistical significance was set for p-values <0.05.RESULTS: The results revealed that 20.4% of the students have iron deficiency anemia. The mean serum vitamin B12 level in females with iron deficiency anemia (212.9 ± 62.8 pg/mL was significantly lower than in normal controls (286.9 ± 57.1 pg/mL and subjects with microcytic anemia and normal ferritin (256.7 ± 71.1 pg/mL. Significantly higher serum homocysteine levels were reported in the iron deficiency anemia group (27.0 ± 4.6 µmol/L compared to normal controls (15.5 ± 2.9 µmol/L and in subjects with microcytic anemia and normal ferritin (18.1 ± 2.7 µmol/L. Statistically significant negative correlations were reported for serum homocysteine with serum ferritin, vitamin B12, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels.CONCLUSION: Important associations were found between serum homocysteine and markers of iron deficiency. Monitoring homocysteine levels might be essential to understand the development of different clinical conditions including anemia. It seems necessary to conduct prospective trials to determine whether treating anemia ameliorates homocysteine levels.

  14. The prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency is more common in breastfed infants than their mothers in Bhaktapur, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandyo, R K; Henjum, S; Ulak, M; Thorne-Lyman, A L; Ulvik, R J; Shrestha, P S; Locks, L; Fawzi, W; Strand, T A

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a widespread public health problem, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Maternal iron status around and during pregnancy may influence infant iron status. We examined multiple biomarkers to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia among breastfed infants and explored its relationship with maternal and infant characteristics in Bhaktapur, Nepal. In a cross-sectional survey, we randomly selected 500 mother-infant pairs from Bhaktapur municipality. Blood was analyzed for hemoglobin, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin receptors and C-reactive protein. The altitude-adjusted prevalence of anemia was 49% among infants 2-6-month-old (hemaglobin (Hb) infants 7-12-month-old (Hb anemia, defined as anemia and serum ferritin infants of these same age groups. Twenty percent of mothers had anemia (Hb infant iron status and anemia were infant age, sex and duration of exclusive breastfeeding and maternal ferritin concentrations. Our findings suggest that iron supplementation in pregnancy is likely to have resulted in a low prevalence of postpartum anemia. The higher prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among breastfed infants compared with their mothers suggests calls for intervention targeting newborns and infants.

  15. Deformabilidade eritrocitária na anemia ferropriva Erythrocyte deformability in iron deficiency

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    Giuseppina M. Patavino

    2006-12-01

    respect to iron deficiency anemia, conclusions are controversial. The present study evaluates erythrocyte deformability in 21 patients with documented iron deficiency, using ectacytometry. Results obtained from deformability Index demonstrate diminished erythrocyte deformability in individuals with iron deficiency anemia, when compared to a control group (p< 0.0007. The present study suggests that the factor responsible for diminished erythrocyte deformability in iron deficiency is microcytosis. Recently, this anemia has been associated to thrombotic phenomenon, which has raised interest in the study of erythrocyte deformability, in order to understand these cases.

  16. Pica: its frequency and significance in patients with iron-deficiency anemia due to chronic gastrointestinal blood loss.

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    Rector, W G

    1989-01-01

    Pica, particularly ice-eating (pagophagia), is a recognized symptom of iron deficiency. The value of pica as a clue to the etiology of blood loss has never been studied. Fifty-five unselected patients with iron-deficiency anemia due to gastrointestinal blood loss evaluated by a gastroenterology referral service at a city hospital. The patients' mean hematocrit was 26 +/- 15% (SD). Thirty two (58%) had pica, and in 28 (88%) it manifested as pagophagia. Pica was present significantly more often in women (19/32, 68%) than in men (9/23, 39%, p less than 0.05). Pica occurred less frequently in patients with malignancy (2/9 vs. 30/46), but this difference was not significant. Pica, a frequent symptom in patients with iron-deficiency anemia due to gastrointestinal blood loss, particularly women, is not of value in predicting the cause of bleeding.

  17. Correlation between iron deficiency anemia and intestinal parasitic infection in school-age children in Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlan, D. M.; Ananda, F. R.; Sari, M. I.; Arrasyid, N. K.; Sari, D. I.

    2018-03-01

    Anemia is an abnormal hemoglobin concentration in blood that impacts almost 40% school-age children in developing countries. Intestinal parasitic infection, along with malnutrition are contributed to influence absorption, transportation, and metabolism of iron which is the most common etiology of anemia in school-age children. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and parasitic intestinal infection generally and protozoa infection particularly among school-age children in Medan. This was a cross-sectional study conducted from May until October 2016 in primaryschool in Medan and Hamparan Perak, Deli Serdang. Consecutive sampling was used with total 132 samples obtained. Univariate analysis and Bivariate analysis were performed.This study showed the prevalence of IDA was 7.6%, and proportion of parasitic intestinal infection was 26.5% with 19.8% protozoa infection. The correlation between IDA and intestinal parasitic infection was not significant in Chi-Square Test (p-value: 0.089), neither was between IDA and protozoa infection (p-value: 0.287). There was a correlation between MCV, MCH, and anemia with p-value0.05).

  18. Clinical Significance of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content in the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Mustafa Karagülle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA and to compare it with other conventional iron parameters. METHODS: A total of 32 female patients with IDA (serum hemoglobin 120 g/L and serum ferritin <20 ng/mL were enrolled. RESULTS: CHr was 24.95±3.92 pg in female patients with IDA and 29.93±2.96 pg in female patients with iron deficiency. CHr showed a significant positive correlation with hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, serum iron, and transferrin saturation and a significant negative correlation with transferrin and total iron-binding capacity. The cut-off value of CHr for detecting IDA was 29 pg. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CHr is a useful parameter that can be confidently used in the diagnosis of IDA, and a CHr cut-off value of 29 pg predicts IDA.

  19. H. pylori May Not Be Associated with Iron Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Normal Gastrointestinal Tract Endoscopy Results

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    Tayyibe Saler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between iron deficiency anemia and H. pylori in patients with normal gastrointestinal tract endoscopy results. Materials and Methods. A total of 117 male patients with normal gastrointestinal tract endoscopy results were included in this retrospective study. The study and control groups included 69 and 48 patients with and without iron deficiency anemia, respectively. The prevalence of H. pylori, the number of RBCs, and the levels of HGB, HTC, MCV, iron, and ferritin were calculated and compared. Results. There was no statistically significant difference found between the groups according to the prevalence of H. pylori (65.2% versus 64.6%, P=0.896. Additionally, the levels of RBCs, HGB, HTC, MCV, iron, and ferritin in the patients in the study group were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05. Finally, there was no association between iron deficiency anemia and H. pylori (OR 1.02, Cl 95% 0.47–2.22, and P=0.943. Conclusion. H. pylori is not associated with iron deficiency anemia in male patients with normal gastrointestinal tract endoscopy results.

  20. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Relation to Respiratory Disease and Social Behaviors In Low-Income Infants in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1993-01-01

    Examined a sample of 177 infants (age 9 through 12 months) with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from low-income French, African, and North African Muslim families in Paris. Found a higher than normal incidence of otitis media and respiratory diseases such as bronchitis among the infants. Also examined the relationship between infant IDA and child…

  1. Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with low retinol levels in children aged 1 to 5 years

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    Bárbara C.A. Saraiva

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Anemia and iron deficiency were associated with low levels of serum retinol in children aged 1 to 5 years, and a positive correlation was verified between serum retinol and serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. These results indicate the importance of initiatives encouraging the development of new treatments and further research regarding retinol deficiency.

  2. Preschool-Aged Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia Show Altered Affect and Behavior1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoff, Betsy; Corapci, Feyza; Burden, Matthew J.; Kaciroti, Niko; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa; Sazawal, Sunil; Black, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    This study compared social looking and response to novelty in preschool-aged children (47–68 mo) with or without iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Iron status of the participants from a low-income community in New Delhi, India, was based on venous hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and red cell distribution width. Children’s social looking toward adults, affect, and wary or hesitant behavior in response to novelty were assessed in a semistructured paradigm during an in-home play observation. Affect and behavior were compared as a function of iron status: IDA (n = 74) vs. nonanemic (n = 164). Compared with nonanemic preschoolers, preschoolers with IDA displayed less social looking toward their mothers, moved close to their mothers more quickly, and were slower to display positive affect and touch novel toys for the first time. These results indicate that IDA in the preschool period has affective and behavioral effects similar to those reported for IDA in infancy. PMID:17311960

  3. Paediatric Stroke: A Rare Presentation of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Four Year Old Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, K; Koirala, S; Basnet, R; Poudel, A

    Paediatric stroke is an uncommon syndrome with even lesser annual incidence rates of arterial ischemic stroke in infants and children. In children the diagnosis of stroke is frequently delayed or missed. This is due to subtle and nonspecific clinical presentations, a complicated differential diagnosis and a lack of awareness by physicians and also delay in the seeking of medical attention as in our case. We report you a rare case of a four year old child from remote Nepal who presented to our Out Patient Department after a long gap of around four months after the sudden onset of loss of consciousness and decreased movement of right limbs who after detailed history examination and lab investigations and imaging revealed ischemic stroke due to iron deficiency anemia.

  4. Parenteral Iron Therapy in the Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Pregnancy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, N.; Ayub, R.; Khan, W. U.; Ijaz, S.; Alam, A. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare the efficacy and safety profile of total dose infusion of low molecular weight iron dextran with divided doses of intravenous iron sucrose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, over a period of two years from January 2008 to December 2009. Methodology: Pregnant women at gestational age more than 12 weeks with the confirmed diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) were divided into two groups. In the group-A, intravenous iron sucrose was given in divided doses while in the group-B, total daily intake of Low Molecular Weight (LMW) of iron dextran was given. Post-infusion Hemoglobin (Hb) was checked at 4 weeks and at the time of delivery for both groups. Paired sample t-test is applied and comparison (in terms of rise in hemoglobin from pre to post) of both groups was not found to be significant. Results: In the group-A (iron sucrose group), mean pre-infusion Hb levels was 9.09 ± 0.83 gm/dl. Mean increase in Hemoglobin (Hb) was 10.75 ± 1.097 gm/dl after 4 weeks of infusion and 11.06 ± 0.866 gm/dl at delivery (p < 0.001). In group-B (iron dextran group) pre-infusion haemoglobin was 8.735 ± 0.956 gm/dl and the mean increase in hemoglobin was 10.613 ± 1.22 gm/dl at 4-week while mean increase of 10.859 ± 1.11 gm/dl at the time of delivery (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Both LMW iron dextran, as well as iron sucrose are equally effective in treatment of IDA during pregnancy, however, LMW iron dextran has the advantage of single visit treatment. (author)

  5. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6-59-Month-Old Children in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice; Tzogiou, Christina; Eichler, Klaus; Brügger, Urs; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in 6-59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses. We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6-23 and 24-59-months), 2 geographical areas (urban and rural), 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe). Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature. IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6-23-month-old and 39.9% in 24-58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6-59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA. Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood.

  6. Can routine screening and iron supplementation for iron deficiency anemia in nonsymptomatic pregnant women improve maternal and infant health outcomes?

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    Moin, Anoosh; Lassi, Zohra S

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant women have an increased need for iron that might not be met with diet alone. Due to physiologic anemia and population differences, no set criteria for defining iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are available globally. Serum ferritin and transferrin levels are often used to guide therapy by clinicians. Studies have reported an association between poor iron status and negative health outcomes such as low birth weight, premature birth, and perinatal death for women and their infants, although the evidence is weak.

  7. Can routine screening and iron supplementation for iron deficiency anemia in nonsymptomatic pregnant women improve maternal and infant health outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoosh Moin

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant women have an increased need for iron that might not be met with diet alone. Due to physiologic anemia and population differences, no set criteria for defining iron deficiency anemia (IDA are available globally. Serum ferritin and transferrin levels are often used to guide therapy by clinicians. Studies have reported an association between poor iron status and negative health outcomes such as low birth weight, premature birth, and perinatal death for women and their infants, although the evidence is weak.

  8. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

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    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  9. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adolescents Who Present with Heavy Menstrual Bleeding.

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    Cooke, Amanda G; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R; Powers, Jacquelyn M

    2017-04-01

    To assess the clinical severity and initial treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in female adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) in our center. Retrospective cohort study of electronic medical records via search of administrative records using International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision codes for IDA or unspecified anemia and disorders of menstruation. Children's Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. One hundred seven patients with HMB and concomitant IDA (median age, 14.4 years) who presented to the outpatient, emergency department, and/or inpatient settings. The median initial hemoglobin concentration for all patients (n = 107) was 7.4 g/dL, and most (74%, n = 79) presented to the emergency department or via inpatient transfer. Symptomatic IDA was treated with blood transfusion in 46 (43%, n = 46). Ferrous sulfate was the most commonly prescribed oral iron therapy. Seven patients received intravenous iron therapy either initially or after oral iron treatment failure. Combined oral contraceptives were commonly prescribed for abnormal uterine bleeding, yet 10% of patients (n = 11) received no hormonal therapy during their initial management. Evaluation for underlying bleeding disorders was inconsistent. Severe anemia because of IDA and HMB resulting in urgent medical care, including hospitalization and blood transfusion, is a common but underemphasized problem in adolescent girls. In addition to prevention and early diagnosis, meaningful efforts to improve initial management of adolescents with severe HMB and IDA are necessary. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anemia and iron deficiency in children: association with red meat and poultry consumption.

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    Moshe, Galit; Amitai, Yona; Korchia, Gerard; Korchia, Levana; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Rosenblum, Joseph; Schechter, Avi

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to study the relative contribution of dietary sources of iron in children with high prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID). A cross-sectional study in 263 healthy, 1.5- to 6-year-old children in the Jewish sector of Jerusalem, Israel. Venous blood samples and a qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaire on iron-rich foods were obtained. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin meat consumption (seldom) had 4-fold higher rates of ID than those who consumed ≥2 times per week (odds ratio 3.98; 95% confidence interval 1.21-13.03; P = 0.023), whereas poultry consumption was not associated with ID. Soy consumption was inversely associated with ferritin (marginally significant, r = -0.134, P = 0.057). The high prevalence of anemia and ID found in this study, mainly in children 1.5 to 3 years old, is related to low red meat consumption. The characteristically high poultry consumption in the Israeli population was not protective. The shift toward reduced red meat consumption and higher poultry consumption in developed countries may result in increasing the risk of ID.

  11. Helicobacter pylori, anemia, iron deficiency and thrombocytopenia among pregnant women at Khartoum, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Nahla; Gasim, Gasim I; Khalafalla, Khalifa E; Ali, Naj I; Adam, Ishag

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common gut pathogen that is linked to many complications of pregnancy such as iron deficiency anemia, pre-eclampsia and thrombocytopenia. There are no published data on H. pylori in Sudan. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the period May-June 2012 at the antenatal care unit of Khartoum Hospital, Sudan, to investigate prevalence of H. pylori and its association, if any, with anemia and thrombocytopenia. Obstetric and medical histories were gathered using questionnaires. Hemoglobin and serum ferritin were measured and H. pylori antibodies (IgA and IgG) investigated using ELISA. Among 179 women, rates of positivity for specific IgG formed against H. pylori were 69.8% (125/179), 94.0% (168/179) and 5.6% (10/179) for IgA, IgG and both IgG and IgA, respectively. There was no association between the expected risk factors (age, parity, education) and H. pylori seropositivity. Of these women, 42/179 (24.3%), 50/179 (28.9%) and 19/179 (11%), respectively, were anemic (hemoglobin Sudan, and it is not associated with anemia or thrombocytopenia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Emergence of pica (ingestion of non-food substances) accompanying iron deficiency anemia after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F; Shanta Retelny, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Pica, the compulsive ingestion of non-food substances, is a common, yet less well known symptom of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Ice eating or pagophagia is one of the most common forms of pica associated with iron deficiency and IDA, and has only recently been identified among patients who had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). This article presents additional cases of pagophagia in women which emerged after RYGBP and resolved with iron treatment. These cases, added to the literature, lead to further discussion of how healthcare providers can subtly probe patients for the presence of pica.

  13. Prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia among the UAE adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities.

  14. Severe Respiratory Distress in a Child with Pulmonary Idiopathic Hemosiderosis Initially Presenting with Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    A. Potalivo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage in children but should be considered in children with anemia of unknown origin who develop respiratory complications. It is commonly characterized by the triad of recurrent hemoptysis, diffuse parenchymal infiltrates, and iron-deficiency anemia. Pathogenesis is unclear and diagnosis may be difficult along with a variable clinical course. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with a severe iron-deficiency anemia, but he later developed severe acute respiratory failure and hemoptysis requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The suspicion of IPH led to the use of immunosuppressive therapy with high dose of corticosteroids with rapid improvement in clinical condition and discharge from hospital.

  15. High Prevalence but Insufficient Treatment of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results of a Population-Based Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Claudia; Liebold, Anne; Takses, Angela; Strauch, Ulrike G.; Obermeier, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background. Iron-deficiency anemia is described to be a common problem in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is frequently associated with a reduced quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in a population-based cohort at time of first diagnosis and during the early course of the disease. Methods. As far as available, lab values of patients registered in the population-based “Oberpfalz cohort” were screened. In anemic patients, we further investigated all laboratory results to differentiate between iron deficiency and other reasons for anemia. All patients with any kind of anemia were interviewed separately according to symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia and administration of iron. Results. In total, we evaluated hemoglobin values of 279 patients (183 Crohn's disease, 90 ulcerative colitis, and 6 indeterminate colitis). Lab data which allowed further differentiation of the type of anemia were available in 70% of anemic patients, in 34.4% values of iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation had been measured. At time of first diagnosis, an iron-deficiency anemia was diagnosed in 26 of 68 patients with anemia (38.2%, 20 CD, 4 UC, and 2 IC patients), but only 9 patients (34.6%) received subsequent iron therapy. After one year, 27 patients were identified to have an iron-deficiency anemia (19 CD, 8 UC), 20 of them were treated with iron (71.4%). Of 9 patients with proven iron-deficiency anemia at time of first diagnosis and subsequent administration of iron, 5 (55.5%) had iron-deficiency anemia despite permanent treatment after one year. In total, 38 patients (54.3%) did not receive any iron substitution at all despite of proven iron-deficiency anemia, and only 13 patients of 74 patients were treated with intravenous iron (17.6%). Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia at different points during the early course of disease in this population-based cohort of

  16. Ayurvedic preparations for the management of Iron Deficiency Anemia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a global public health crisis, so also in India. As per the World Health Organization's report, half of the total anemia is IDA. Ayurveda offers several formulations for the management of IDA. Given in this context, a systematic review was carried out to understand the role of Ayurvedic formulations for the management of IDA. For this purpose, articles were obtained from PubMed and through hand search process. Of the 37 articles identified, 10 articles were finally selected for the review. Of the 10 studies identified, 3 studies were ( n = 10) exclusively focused on pregnant women, 2 studies ( n = 10) were exclusively focused on pediatric age group, 1 study ( n = 10) was exclusively focused on geriatric anemia and 4 studies ( n = 10) were focused on general population. The response of most of the Ayurvedic formulations was better than Allopathic formulations and there was no untoward effect as observed with iron salts. Statistically significant results were obtained in favor of most of the Ayurvedic formulations in subjective and hematological parameters. Among six different formulations, Sarva-Jvara-Hara Lauha is suggested as the drug of choice for IDA as the Hb regeneration with this drug is highest- 0.16 g/dl/day, as reported by one of the studies. In addition, Punarnavadi Mandura is currently used as an anemia correcting agent at the community level promoted by the National Rural Health Mission and is included in the Accredited Social Health Activist's drugs kit. As most of these Ayurvedic formulations are found effective against IDA, their usage should be fostered at all level in addition to modern allopathic medicines.

  17. ASSOCIATION OF POTENTIAL CELIAC DISEASE AND REFRACTORY IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Honar, Naser; Yousefi, Ali; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy caused by dietary gluten. The combination of serologic, genetic and histologic data has led to description of other categories of this disease. There are a number of patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) that do not respond to iron treatment and may be repeated for many times, Therefore, we aimed to investigate celiac disease in this group. In this cross sectional transverse prospective study from August 2011 to February 2013, in a Pediatric care clinic affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 184 children including 92 IDA patients who responded to treatment using iron supplement, 45 non-responding iron deficient patients, and 47 healthy individuals, with the maximum age of 18 years, with written consent from their parents, participated in serologic screening (with Anti-TTG antibody and anti-Endomysial antibody) for celiac disease. Patients with at least one positive serology test underwent multiple mucosal biopsy from bulb and duodenum. Among 184 participants, 19 (10.3%) subjects had positive serologic test for celiac disease, including 13 (28.9%) patients in the group with refractory IDA, 5 (5.4%) patients in the group with treated IDA, and 1 patient in the healthy group. The frequency of positive serologic test in the group with IDA resistant to treatment was prominently higher than the other two groups (Pceliac test who underwent endoscopy and biopsy, no histologic evidence of celiac disease was seen. They were diagnosed as potential celiac disease. Frequency of potential celiac disease in patients with refractory IDA was higher than control the subjects. Therefore, we recommend serologic screening for early detection and minimizing the complications of celiac disease and repeated iron therapy for this group.

  18. Effects of Fe-YM1504 on iron deficiency anemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Guo; Wei, Guo-Xing; Wang, Wen-Na; Ma, Guo-Di; Tang, Peng; Chen, Xiao-Qian

    2016-07-13

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most serious forms of malnutrition. It is possible that some strains present in the natural environment possess a higher tolerance to inorganic iron and a higher ability to convert and accumulate iron compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type strain. In the present study, the strain no. YM1504, able to grow in an iron-rich environment, was used as a potential organic iron supplement, and its efficacy in alleviating IDA in rats was investigated. Sixty female weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a normal control group fed with a standard diet and a model group fed with an iron-deficient diet to create the IDA model. After the model was established, IDA rats were further randomly divided into five subgroups: the IDA group, the ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) group and Fe-YM1504 low-, medium- or high-dose groups receiving different concentrations of Fe-YM1504 supplements. Our results showed that Fe-YM1504 has an effective restorative function by returning the hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), serum ferritin (SF), etc. in IDA animals to the normal level. Moreover, malondialdehyde and the enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in both plasma and liver homogenate were improved. Finally, compared with the FeSO4 group, the Fe-YM1504 middle-dose was more effective in alleviating IDA and fewer side effects were observed. The present study indicated that iron-enriched strain no. YM1504 might play a significant role in ameliorating IDA rats and might be exploited as a new iron supplement.

  19. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys

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    Nicolai Petry

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0 and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0, respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age, and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia.

  20. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Olofin, Ibironke; Hurrell, Richard F.; Boy, Erick; Wirth, James P.; Moursi, Mourad; Donahue Angel, Moira; Rohner, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0) and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0), respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age), and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age). Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia. PMID:27827838

  1. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Amber C.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.; Washington, M. Kay; Algood, Holly M. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA. PMID:27620719

  2. Hematological Indices for Differential Diagnosis of Beta Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Aysel Vehapoglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The two most frequent types of microcytic anemia are beta thalassemia trait (β-TT and iron deficiency anemia (IDA. We retrospectively evaluated the reliability of various indices for differential diagnosis of microcytosis and β-TT in the same patient groups. Methods. A total of 290 carefully selected children aged 1.1–16 years were evaluated. We calculated 12 discrimination indices in all patients with hemoglobin (Hb values of 8.7–11.4 g/dL. None of the subjects had a combined case of IDA and β-TT. All children with IDA received oral iron for 16 weeks, and HbA2 screening was performed after iron therapy. The patient groups were evaluated according to red blood cell (RBC count; red blood distribution width index; the Mentzer, Shine and Lal, England and Fraser, Srivastava and Bevington, Green and King, Ricerca, Sirdah, and Ehsani indices; mean density of hemoglobin/liter of blood; and mean cell density of hemoglobin. Results. The Mentzer index was the most reliable index, as it had the highest sensitivity (98.7%, specificity (82.3%, and Youden’s index (81% for detecting β-TT; this was followed by the Ehsani index (94.8%, 73.5%, and 68.3%, resp. and RBC count (94.8%, 70.5%, and 65.3%. Conclusion. The Mentzer index provided the highest reliabilities for differentiating β-TT from IDA.

  3. Ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron is as effective as ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron in the prophylaxis of iron deficiency and anemia during pregnancy in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Jønsson, Lisbeth; Dyre, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of oral ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron/day vs. ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron/day in the prevention of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in pregnant women. Design: Randomized, double-blind, intention-to-treat study. Setting: Antenatal care clinic...

  4. Hemoglobin correction factors for estimating the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women residing at high altitudes in Bolivia

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    Jennifer Hadary Cohen

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This study had two primary objectives: 1 to derive a method to determine hemoglobin cutoffs that could be used to better estimate the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy at high altitudes and 2 to estimate the prevalence of anemia in a sample of pregnant women residing in two cities in Bolivia, La Paz (3 600 meters and El Alto (4 000 meters. We derived a hemoglobin-altitude curve from previously published data on the mean hemoglobin concentrations of nonanemic women of childbearing age at various altitudes. In addition, we abstracted data on hemoglobin concentration during pregnancy from medical records of women from La Paz and El Alto who had given birth at a maternity hospital in La Paz between January and June of 1996. Using our approach and two other previously published, currently used methods, we calculated and compared prevalences of iron deficiency anemia in this population using hemoglobin cutoffs determined from a hemoglobin-altitude curve corrected for pregnancy. The hemoglobin-altitude curve derived in this study provided a better fit to data for women of childbearing age than the two other models. Those models used cutoffs based on non-iron-replete populations of children or men, both of which were residing below 4 000 m, and then extrapolated to women and higher altitudes. The estimated prevalences of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy using the hemoglobin cutoffs determined in this study were higher than those estimated by the two other approaches.

  5. Treatment effect of iron tablets on women in productive age with iron deficiency anemia and vascular headaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasami, K.; Faraji, F.; Mohammadbeigi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Migraine is classified into two groups of vascular headaches. Also, iron anemia is the most common type of anemia among women who are in the productive age in the world. This study was done to investigate the relationship between the vascular headaches and the iron deficiency anemia and to see the effect of iron deficiency tablets administration on the treatment of these headaches in women who are in the productive age. Methodology: In this quasi-control clinical trial study, 50 women in the productive age - who had iron deficiency anemia and vascular headaches and were referred to the neurological clinic of Vali-e-Asr hospital, Arak, Iran were included. The patients were treated with ferrous sulfate tablets for three months. For verifying the treatment, the patients' hemoglobin was monitored after one month, and in the case of and significant increase in this value, the patients were excluded from study. The number of headache attacks and the number of analgesic use before, through, and three month after the beginning of the administration of ferrous sulfate were needed for all the patients. Results: The mean number of the headaches attacks one month before the treatment, during the treatment and three months after the treatment were 19.6 +- 28, 14.2 +- 11.2 and 13.3 +- 16.1, respectively (p < 0.0001). In addition, the mean number of used analgesics before the treatment, during the treatment, and three months after the treatment were 30.1 +- 14.1, 14.3 +- 11.2. and 13.1 +- 16.1 respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: It seems that using iron tablets can be useful in treatment of vascular headaches. Moreover, it has a beneficent effect on patients suffering from iron deficiency anemia with headaches. (author)

  6. The Value of Erythrocyte Indices and Red Cell Volume Distribution Width in Differential Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Anemia of Chronic Disease

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    Abdullah Altıntaş

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA and anemia of chronic disease are the most commonly confused anemias. We investigate the diagnostic value of erythrocyte indices, red cell volume distribution width, and serum ferritin levels to make differential diagnosis of anemia in controls and anemic patients.Iron deficiency anemia (44 patients, anemia of chronic disease (41, IDA with anemia of chronic disease (17 and control (50 groups were compared. We performed serum ferritin, CBC, and sedimentation rate in all patientsand bone marrow aspiration in patients with anemia of chronic disease.Although mean cell volume (MCV and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH are low in IDA and anemia of chronic disease, it is much striking in the former one (p<0.001, p<0.001. Only 7.3% of patients with anemia of chronic disease had a MCV<70 fL and MCH<24 pg, 90.0% of patients with IDA were below that cut-off point. Serum ferritin means were in patients with IDA and anemia of chronic disease were 4.6±3.3 and 489.6 ±519.9 ng/ml, respectively.The probability of IDA is low when RDW is normal in microcytic anemias. RDW is high in half of patients with anemia of chronic disease. Reference values for ferritin must be changed in patients with anemia of chronic disease and IDA. If serum ferritin is 57.6-146.4 ng/ml anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency must ruled out by other diagnostic tests.

  7. Better differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia from beta-thalassemia trait

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    Fakher Rahim

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA and beta-thalassemia trait (ß-TT are the most common forms of microcytic anemia. This study was conducted to compare the validity of various discrimination indices in differentiating β-TT from IDA by calculating their sensitivity, specificity and Youden's index.Methods: Totally 323 subjects (173 children and 150 adults with microcytic anemia were involved in this study. We calculated 10 discrimination indices in all patients with IDA and β-TT. We divided the patients into two different groups as younger or older than 10 years. Results: None of the indices showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% in the patients older than 10 years, and in the patients younger than 10 years, only Shine & Lal index showed sensitivity close to 90% and specificity of 100%. The most accurate discriminative index for patients younger than 10 years was Shine & Lal and for those older than 10 years it was RDW index. According to Youden's index, Shine & Lal and RBC count showed the greatest diagnostic value in patients younger than 10 years and RDW and RBC count indices in those older than 10 years. Conclusion: None of the indices was completely sensitive and specific in differentiation between β-TT and IDA. Mean and median mean cell Hb density (MCHD were very close to normal values in both IDA and β-TT patients, but in the case of mean density of Hb/liter (MDHL, we found that the mean and median were significantly higher than normal values in β-TT and lower than normal values in IDA patients. In our study, Youden's index of RBC and Shine & Lal were the highest and most reliable indices in differentiating β-TT from IDA in the patients younger than 10 years. For patients older than 10 years, the most reliable discrimination indices were RBC and RDW.

  8. Assessing the costs and benefits of perioperative iron deficiency anemia management with ferric carboxymaltose in Germany

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    Froessler B

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bernd Froessler,1,2 Alexandra M Rueger,3,4 Mark P Connolly5,6 1Department of Anesthesia, Lyell McEwin Hospital, Elizabeth Vale, SA, Australia; 2Discipline of Acute Care Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Vifor Pharma, Munich, Germany; 4Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Kardiologie Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany; 5Unit of PharmacoEpidemiology and PharmacoEconomics, Department of Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 6Global Market Access Solutions Sàrl, St-Prex, Switzerland Background: Perioperative administration of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM was previously shown to reduce both the need for transfusions and the hospital length of stay in patients with preoperative iron deficiency anemia (IDA. In this study, we estimated the economic consequences of perioperative administration using FCM vs usual care in patients with IDA from the perspective of a German hospital using decision-analytic modeling.Materials and methods: The model was populated with clinical inputs (transfusion rates, blood units transfused, hospital length of stay from a previously reported randomized trial comparing FCM vs usual care for managing IDA patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery. We applied a hospital perspective to all costs, excluding surgery-related costs in both treatment arms. One-way sensitivity analyses were undertaken to evaluate key drivers of cost analysis.Results: The average costs per case treated using FCM compared to usual care were €2,461 and €3,246, respectively, for resource expenses paid by hospital per case. This would suggest potential savings achieved with preoperative intravenous iron treatment per patient of €786 per case. A sensitivity analysis varying the key input parameters indicated the cost analysis is most sensitive to changes in the length of stay and the cost of hospitalization per day.Conclusion: Perioperative administration

  9. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6-59-Month-Old Children in India.

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    Rafael Plessow

    Full Text Available Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA in 6-59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses.We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6-23 and 24-59-months, 2 geographical areas (urban and rural, 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe. Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature.IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6-23-month-old and 39.9% in 24-58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6-59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA.Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood.

  10. Miraxanthin-V, Liriodenin and Chitranone are Hepcidin Antagonist In silico for Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Yotriana, S.; Suselo, YH; Muthmainah; Indarto, D.

    2018-03-01

    Anemia is one of the greatest nutrition problem in the world that is commonly found in children, pregnant women and reproductive women. This disorder is predominantly caused by iron deficiency. Hepcidin, a hepatic hormone, regulates iron metabolism and high serum levels of this hormone are detected in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Anticalin is a sintetic compound which is able to interacts with hepcidin leading to inhibition of ferroportin-hepcidin binding complexes but its therapeutic effects are still under investigation. Indonesia has various herbal plants which are potentially developed to treat some human diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify phytochemicals derived from Indonesian plants that is able to inhibit hepcidin-ferroportin interaction. A bioinformatics study with molecular docking method was used in this study. Three-dimensional structures of human hepcidin and anticalin were obtained from the Protein Data Bank (ID: 1M4F and 4QAE respectively). Because their molecular size was big, each molecule was cut into 2 parts of its binding sites. All phytochemicals structures were obtained from HerbalDB and PubChem NCBI database. Truncated anticalin/phytochemicals were molecularly docked with truncated hepcidin by using AutoDock Vina 1.1.2. and their interactions were visualized using PyMol 1.3. Truncated Anticalin had -4.6 and -4.2 kcal/mol binding affinity to truncated human hepcidin. Truncated anticalin 1 was bound to Cys13, Cys14, Arg16 and Ser17 residues in truncated hepcidin 1 while truncated anticalin 2 was at Cy23 and Lys24 residues in truncated hepcidin 2. Miraxanthine-V, Liriodenin and Chitranone had lower binding affinity (-4.8±0.77, -4.7±0.33 and -5.01±0.30 kcal/mol respectively) than that of anticalin and occupied binding sites as same as anticalin did. There are three phytochemicals that potentially become hepcidin antagonists in silico. In vitro assays are required for verification of the antagonist

  11. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6–59-Month-Old Children in India

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    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice; Tzogiou, Christina; Eichler, Klaus; Brügger, Urs; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in 6–59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses. Materials and Methods We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6–23 and 24–59-months), 2 geographical areas (urban and rural), 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe). Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature. Results IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6–23-month-old and 39.9% in 24–58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6–59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA. Conclusion Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood. PMID:26313356

  12. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Sandra Stella Lazarte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA and β-thalassemia trait (BTT, in which oxidative stress (OxS has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT in patients with IDA (10 or BTT (21, to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β0 or β+ and to compare it with normal subjects (67. Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21 of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10 of those with IDA. No significant difference (p=0,245 was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p=0,000. In β0 and β+ groups, no significant difference (p=0,359 was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types.

  13. Iron deficiency anemia as initial presentation of a non-small cell lung carcinoma: A case report

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    Philip V.M. Linsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal metastases secondary to lung cancer are very rare and most of the time asymptomatic. When symptomatic they usually present with bowel obstruction or perforation. We here describe the case of a 68 year-old man with a solitary metastasis in the duodenum from a non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. The patient presented with reduced exercise tolerance and iron deficiency anemia without clinical gastrointestinal blood loss. Further investigation showed a tumor in the left upper lung lobe and a duodenal metastasis for which he received chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of iron deficiency anemia as initial presentation of a duodenal metastasis from a NSCLC.

  14. A Combination of Fecal Immunochemical Test Results and Iron Deficiency Anemia for Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia in Asymptomatic Men

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    Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Mi Yeon; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Sohn, Chong Il; Choi, Kyuyong; Jung, Yoon Suk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A substantial proportion of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) present with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and fecal immunochemical test (FIT) has proven to be an effective method for detecting the majority of CRC cases. A combination strategy of FIT results and IDA may be useful for risk stratification for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACRN). We compared the prevalence of ACRN among four groups stratified by FIT results and the presence of IDA. Materials and Methods A cr...

  15. The role of discriminant functions in screening beta thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia among laboratory samples

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    Ashwani Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: MI was the most efficient in discriminating BTT from iron deficiency anemia (IDA. RDWI stands to be the most accurate. S and L could at best be used as screening tool rather than DF. No study except one agreed with us because convenient sampling used in other studies generated bias in their results. Statistically, this study bears far more relevance than other studies because the sample distribution reflects the prevalence of IDA and BTT in the community.

  16. Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with low retinol levels in children aged 1 to 5 years.

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    Saraiva, Bárbara C A; Soares, Michele C C; Santos, Luana C dos; Pereira, Simone C L; Horta, Paula M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the occurrence of anemia and iron deficiency in children aged 1 to 5 years and the association of these events and retinol deficiency. This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study conducted in Vitoria, ES, Brazil, between April and August of 2008, with healthy children aged 1 to 5 years (n=692) that lived in areas covered by primary healthcare services. Sociodemographic and economic conditions, dietary intake (energy, protein, iron, and vitamin A ingestion), anthropometric data (body mass index-for-age and height-for-age), and biochemical parameters (ferritin, hemoglobin, and retinol serum) were collected. The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and retinol deficiency was 15.7%, 28.1%, and 24.7%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a higher prevalence of anemia (PR: 4.62, 95% CI: 3.36, 6.34, p<0.001) and iron deficiency (PR: 4.51, 95% CI: 3.30, 6.17, p<0.001) among children with retinol deficiency. The same results were obtained after adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic conditions, dietary intake, and anthropometric variables. There was a positive association between ferritin vs. retinol serum (r=0.597; p<0.001) and hemoglobin vs. retinol serum (r=0.770; p<0.001). Anemia and iron deficiency were associated with low levels of serum retinol in children aged 1 to 5 years, and a positive correlation was verified between serum retinol and serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. These results indicate the importance of initiatives encouraging the development of new treatments and further research regarding retinol deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with low retinol levels in children aged 1 to 5 years

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    Bárbara C.A. Saraiva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of anemia and iron deficiency in children aged 1 to 5 years and the association of these events and retinol deficiency. METHODS: This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study conducted in Vitoria, ES, Brazil, between April and August of 2008, with healthy children aged 1 to 5 years (n = 692 that lived in areas covered by primary healthcare services. Sociodemographic and economic conditions, dietary intake (energy, protein, iron, and vitamin A ingestion, anthropometric data (body mass index-for-age and height-for-age, and biochemical parameters (ferritin, hemoglobin, and retinol serum were collected. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and retinol deficiency was 15.7%, 28.1%, and 24.7%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a higher prevalence of anemia (PR: 4.62, 95% CI: 3.36, 6.34, p < 0.001 and iron deficiency (PR: 4.51, 95% CI: 3.30, 6.17, p < 0.001 among children with retinol deficiency. The same results were obtained after adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic conditions, dietary intake, and anthropometric variables. There was a positive association between ferritin vs. retinol serum (r = 0.597; p < 0.001 and hemoglobin vs. retinol serum (r = 0.770; p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Anemia and iron deficiency were associated with low levels of serum retinol in children aged 1 to 5 years, and a positive correlation was verified between serum retinol and serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. These results indicate the importance of initiatives encouraging the development of new treatments and further research regarding retinol deficiency.

  18. Kidney injury in infants and children with iron-deficiency anemia before and after iron treatment.

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    Hassan, Rasha H; Kandil, Shaimaa M; Zeid, Mayada S; Zaki, Maysaa E; Fouda, Ashraf E

    2017-10-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on renal tubular functions before and after iron treatment for infants and children with IDA. We measured urinary levels of two kidney injury markers: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Thirty-six infants and children with IDA and 20 matched healthy controls were included. We assessed different laboratory parameters, estimated glomerular filtration rate, urinary levels of NGAL, and L-FABP. Urinary kidney injury markers were measured in IDA patients before and after 3 months of oral iron therapy. IDA patients had significantly higher urinary NGAL and L-FABP levels compared to their healthy controls. After 3 months of oral iron treatment, there was a significant improvement (decrease) in urinary NGAL and L-FABP in infants and children with IDA. Urinary markers returned to normal levels (healthy control levels) in children with IDA, but not for infants with IDA compared to their healthy controls. Subclinical kidney injury was found in infants and children with IDA. This injury was completely reversible in older children with IDA and partially reversible in infants with IDA after iron therapy. Higher urinary levels of kidney injury molecules in IDA infants after iron treatment are suggestive of more sensitivity of these infants to oxidative stress caused by iron therapy or may be due to the immaturity of the kidney and more damage caused by IDA which may require more time to recover.

  19. Red blood cell distribution width and iron deficiency anemia among pregnant Sudanese women

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    Abdelrahman Esam G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is a major health problem during pregnancy and it has adverse effects on the mother and the newborn. Red cell distribution width (RDW, which is a quantitative measure for red cell size variation (anisocytosis, is a predictor of IDA. Little is known regarding RDW and IDA during pregnancy. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at the antenatal clinic of Khartoum Hospital, Sudan, to determine the performance of RDW in the diagnosis of IDA using serum ferritin as a gold standard. Results Among 194 pregnant women with a gestational period of 21.4 ± 6.5 weeks, 57 (29.4% had IDA according to serum ferritin levels (14.5. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of RDW where serum ferritin was the gold standard were 43.8% (95% CI: 31.4–57.0%, 73.7% (95% CI: 65.8–80.5%, 41.0% (95% CI: 29.2–53.6%, and 76.0% (95% CI: 68.1–82.6%, respectively. Conclusions In this study, we found that RDW has a poor performance in diagnosing IDA among pregnant women compared with serum ferritin as the gold standard. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1721072967826303

  20. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Iron Deficiency Anemia, and Reactive Hypoglycemia

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    Füsun Mayda Domaç

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG may occur in association with other organ- specific or nonspecific autoimmune diseases. In our study, we present a patient with ocular myasthenia, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and iron deficiency anemia who later developed reactive hypoglycemia. A 25-year-old woman with complaints of fluctuating extraocular muscle weakness, ptosis, and diplopia was examined. MG, type I (ocular MG, was confirmed by an elevated titer of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in serum (7 nmol/l, normal <0.6 and positive edrophonium test. Nerve conduction studies, needle electromyography, repetitive stimulation tests, and mediasten MRI were normal. The coexistence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed by the presence of a diffuse thyroid enlargement, elevated titers of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (211.8 IU/ml, normal 0-115, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (356.4 IU/ml, normal 0-34, thyroid stimulating hormone (8.21 uIU/ml, normal 0.27-4.2, and a decreased titer of free-T4 (1.03ng/dl normal 1.8-4.6. Diplopia and ptosis have regressed with 180 mg/day pyridostigmine bromide. On her follow-up period, 8 months later, reactive hypoglycemia has been diagnosed. The coexistence of myastenia gravis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and reactive hypoglycemia was not found in the literature. We should take into consideration the association and the importance of recognizing and treating these pathologies in myastenia gravis. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 31-3

  1. Intravenous Iron Therapy in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia: Dosing Considerations

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    Todd A. Koch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for iron therapy dosing in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA, we conducted a study examining the benefits of a higher cumulative dose of intravenous (IV iron than what is typically administered. Methods. We first individually analyzed 5 clinical studies, averaging the total iron deficit across all patients utilizing a modified Ganzoni formula; we then similarly analyzed 2 larger clinical studies. For the second of the larger studies (Study 7, we also compared the efficacy and retreatment requirements of a cumulative dose of 1500 mg ferric carboxymaltose (FCM to 1000 mg iron sucrose (IS. Results. The average iron deficit was calculated to be 1531 mg for patients in Studies 1–5 and 1392 mg for patients in Studies 6-7. The percentage of patients who were retreated with IV iron between Days 56 and 90 was significantly (p<0.001 lower (5.6% in the 1500 mg group, compared to the 1000 mg group (11.1%. Conclusions. Our data suggests that a total cumulative dose of 1000 mg of IV iron may be insufficient for iron repletion in a majority of patients with IDA and a dose of 1500 mg is closer to the actual iron deficit in these patients.

  2. The safety of available treatment options for iron-deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Bhandari, Sunil

    2018-02-01

    Iron deficiency (ID), with or without anemia, is highly prevalent worldwide and has clinical consequences. The prevention and treatment of ID is a major public health goal. Accurate diagnosis, selection of the appropriate iron replacement therapy and addressing the underlying cause, remain as the main challenges in ID management. Areas covered: This review aims to provide a narrative review of current available evidence on iron supplementation options regularly used to treat ID, including oral and intravenous (IV) iron formulations, with emphasis on safety issues. Analyzed safety concerns include gastrointestinal side effects (oral iron) and risks of hypotension, anaphylaxis, infection, hypophosphatemia, oxidative stress and mortality (IV iron). Expert opinion: Low-to-moderate doses of oral iron supplementation remains as first line therapy for uncomplicated ID, but it has been scarcely discussed in the setting of inflammation. Confirmatory studies on the efficacy of newer oral iron formulations in this setting are needed. Compared with oral iron, short-term IV iron administration is more efficacious in ID correction, without significant safety concerns. However, long-term safety of IV iron maintenance therapy, head to head comparisons of IV iron preparations, pharmacological modulation of hepcidin and HIF, and extra-erythropoietic effects of iron are among the important areas of research.

  3. Screening for iron deficiency anemia in at risk children in the pediatric emergency department: a survey of Canadian pediatric emergency department physicians.

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    Berard, Roberta; Matsui, Doreen; Lynch, Tim

    2007-05-01

    To determine the attitudes and reported practices of physicians regarding screening for iron deficiency anemia in at-risk children in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) across Canada. A standardized survey was mailed to 183 PED physicians at 10 tertiary care PED across Canada. The practices and attitudes regarding screening for iron deficiency anemia were collected via a questionnaire consisting of single select closed-ended items and items which required ranking in order of importance. Sixty-one percent (111/183) of physicians responded to the survey. Ninety-six percent of respondents do not routinely screen for iron deficiency anemia. One third of respondents believed that screening for iron deficiency anemia in the PED is possible. The remaining stated lack of time, difficulty with follow-up, it not being an emergent issue and cost as prohibitive factors. One third of participants stated that 21% to 40% of the pediatric patients seen in their PED did not have a primary care physician. The main considerations in deciding on whom to perform venipuncture were based on dietary history and physical examination with a history of consumption of milk greater than 24 ounces per day (94%) and conjunctival or skin pallor (97%, 94%, respectively) selected as the most important items. The results of this study indicate that Canadian PED physicians are not routinely screening for iron deficiency anemia, although they demonstrate knowledge of the risk factors for iron deficiency anemia and recognize the importance of diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term morbidity.

  4. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shortage of iron. This condition is called iron deficiency anemia. There are a few other types of anemia, ... Try to avoid these foods if you have iron deficiency anemia. Foods high in vitamin B12 include: meat and ...

  5. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The use of multiplexed MRM for the discovery of biomarkers to differentiate iron-deficiency anemia from anemia of inflammation.

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    Domanski, Dominik; Cohen Freue, Gabriela V; Sojo, Luis; Kuzyk, Michael A; Ratkay, Leslie; Parker, Carol E; Goldberg, Y Paul; Borchers, Christoph H

    2012-06-27

    In this study we demonstrate the use of a multiplexed MRM-based assay to distinguish among normal (NL) and iron-metabolism disorder mouse models, particularly, iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), inflammation (INFL), and inflammation and anemia (INFL+IDA). Our initial panel of potential biomarkers was based on the analysis of 14 proteins expressed by candidate genes involved in iron transport and metabolism. Based on this study, we were able to identify a panel of 8 biomarker proteins: apolipoprotein A4 (APO4), transferrin, transferrin receptor 1, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, lactoferrin, hemopexin, and matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP8) that clearly distinguish among the normal and disease models. Within this set of proteins, transferrin showed the best individual classification accuracy over all samples (72%) and within the NL group (94%). Compared to the best single-protein biomarker, transferrin, the use of the composite 8-protein biomarker panel improved the classification accuracy from 94% to 100% in the NL group, from 50% to 72% in the INFL group, from 66% to 96% in the IDA group, and from 79% to 83% in the INFL+IDA group. Based on these findings, validation of the utility of this potentially important biomarker panel in human samples in an effort to differentiate IDA, inflammation, and combinations thereof, is now warranted. This article is part of a Special Section entitled: Understanding genome regulation and genetic diversity by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content on Diagnosis for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Chinese Adults

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    Jie Cai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to evaluate the cut-off value and efficiency of using reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a marker to diagnose iron deficiency anemia in Chinese adults. 140 adults who needed bone marrow aspiration for diagnosis at the hematology department of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled according to the inclusive and exclusive criteria. Venous blood samples were collected to detect complete blood count, including hemoglobin, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, hematocrit, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin; iron indexes of serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity; and inflammation markers of C-reactive protein and α-acid glycoprotein. Bone marrow samples were obtained for the bone marrow iron staining, which was used as the standard for the evaluation of iron status in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups according to hemoglobin levels and bone marrow iron staining results: the IDA (iron deficiency anemia group, the NIDA (non-iron deficiency anemia group, and the control group. The differences of the above-mentioned indexes were compared among the three groups and the effect of inflammation was also considered. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content was determined by receiver operation curves. The IDA group (n = 56 had significantly lower reticulocyte hemoglobin content, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, and serum ferritin; and higher free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum transferrin receptor (p < 0.05 compared with the NIDA group (n = 38 and control group (n = 46. Hematocrit, serum ferritin, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity were significantly affected by inflammation while reticulocyte hemoglobin content and other parameters were not. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content for

  8. Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content on Diagnosis for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Chinese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Wu, Meng; Ren, Jie; Du, Yali; Long, Zhangbiao; Li, Guoxun; Han, Bing; Yang, Lichen

    2017-05-02

    Our aim was to evaluate the cut-off value and efficiency of using reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a marker to diagnose iron deficiency anemia in Chinese adults. 140 adults who needed bone marrow aspiration for diagnosis at the hematology department of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled according to the inclusive and exclusive criteria. Venous blood samples were collected to detect complete blood count, including hemoglobin, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, hematocrit, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin; iron indexes of serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity; and inflammation markers of C-reactive protein and α-acid glycoprotein. Bone marrow samples were obtained for the bone marrow iron staining, which was used as the standard for the evaluation of iron status in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups according to hemoglobin levels and bone marrow iron staining results: the IDA (iron deficiency anemia) group, the NIDA (non-iron deficiency anemia) group, and the control group. The differences of the above-mentioned indexes were compared among the three groups and the effect of inflammation was also considered. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content was determined by receiver operation curves. The IDA group ( n = 56) had significantly lower reticulocyte hemoglobin content, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, and serum ferritin; and higher free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum transferrin receptor ( p Hematocrit, serum ferritin, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity were significantly affected by inflammation while reticulocyte hemoglobin content and other parameters were not. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content for diagnosing iron deficiency anemia was 27.2 pg, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a

  9. α-Thalassemia frequency and mutations in children with hypochromic microcytic anemias and relation with β-thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia.

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    Gulen, Huseyin; Hanimeli, Ozlem; Karaca, Ozlem; Taneli, Fatma

    2012-04-01

    The majority of the anemias during childhood are hypochromic and microcytic. The aim of the present study was to determine the status of α-thalassemia mutations and its association with other etiologies, such as iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait, that are frequently seen hypochromic microcytic anemias in children. Children with hypochromic microcytic anemias were included in the study. Serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin levels, and hemoglobin electrophoresis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method were analyzed. Reverse hybridization of biotinylated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product method was used for detection of α-globin gene mutations. Of the 46 patients involved in the study, 54.3% (n = 25) were boys, and 45.7% (n = 21) were girls. Iron deficiency anemia and β-thalassemia trait were diagnosed in 67.4% (n = 31) and 19.5% (n = 9), respectively. In 17.4% there were α-thalassemia mutations (in 10.9% 3.7 single-gene heterozygote mutation, in 4.3% 20.5-kb double-gene deletion mutation, and in 2.2% α-2 poly-A-1 heterozygote mutation was detected). In 2 patients (4.3%) no etiology was determined. In 2 patients (4.3%) association between iron deficiency anemia and α-thalassemia, in 1 patient (2.2%) association between β and α-thalassemia was detected. In conclusion, α-thalassemia carrier status and its association with other etiologies are frequently seen in Manisa. So, α-thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypochromic microcytic anemias, especially in cases without iron deficiency (ID) and β-thalassemia carrier state.

  10. Dietary hemoglobin rescues young piglets from severe iron deficiency anemia: Duodenal expression profile of genes involved in heme iron absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Staroń

    Full Text Available Heme is an efficient source of iron in the diet, and heme preparations are used to prevent and cure iron deficiency anemia in humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for heme absorption remain only partially characterized. Here, we employed young iron-deficient piglets as a convenient animal model to determine the efficacy of oral heme iron supplementation and investigate the pathways of heme iron absorption. The use of bovine hemoglobin as a dietary source of heme iron was found to efficiently counteract the development of iron deficiency anemia in piglets, although it did not fully rebalance their iron status. Our results revealed a concerted increase in the expression of genes responsible for apical and basolateral heme transport in the duodenum of piglets fed a heme-enriched diet. In these animals the catalytic activity of heme oxygenase 1 contributed to the release of elemental iron from the protoporphyrin ring of heme within enterocytes, which may then be transported by the strongly expressed ferroportin across the basolateral membrane to the circulation. We hypothesize that the well-recognized high bioavailability of heme iron may depend on a split pathway mediating the transport of heme-derived elemental iron and intact heme from the interior of duodenal enterocytes to the bloodstream.

  11. A new valid formula in differentiating iron deficiency Anemia from beta-thalassemia trait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keikhaei, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the validity of a new index (Hb X RDW X 100/ (RBC)/sup 2/ X MCHC) with twelve discriminating functions (DFs) to differentiate iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and beta-thalassemia trait (beta-TT). Methodology: A total of 823 patients (317 IDA and 506 beta-TT) aged 15 to 35 year old were enrolled in this study. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and other validity parameters were calculated to assess the diagnostic reliability of the novel index [Keikhaei index (KI)] vis-a-vis the other published DFs [Mentzer Index (MI), Green and King Index (G and KI), red cell distribution width index (RDWI), England and Fraser Index (E and FI), Bessman and Feinstein index (B and FI), Telmissani et al index (TI), Srivastava and Bevington index (S and BI), Shine and Lal index (S and LI), Ricerca et al index (RI), Ehsani et al index (EI), Sirdah et al index (SI), and Red Blood Cell Count(RBC)] were calculated in all patients. Results: All thirteen DFs did not have the sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The KI, RDWI, Gand KI and E and FI showed the most sensitivity and specificity for both IDA and TT; moreover, the lowest reliable indices belonged to B and FI, SandLI and RI. Conclusion: According to Youden's index (YI), DFs in the order of highest to lowest were KI > G and KI > RDWI > E and FI > RBC> M I> EI > TI > SI > S and BI > RI> SandLI >B and FI. (author)

  12. [Diagnostic yield of video capsule endoscopy in premenopausal women with iron-deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Durán, Carmen; Iyo Miyashiro, Eduardo; Páez Cumpa, Claudia; Khorrami Minaei, Sam; Erimeiku Barahona, Alicia; Llompart Rigo, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend video capsule endoscopy (VCE) studies in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) after conventional upper and lower endoscopies but there is a need for studies demonstrating the diagnostic yield, clinical impact, and cost in some patient subgroups. 1.To determine the diagnostic yield of VCE in premenopausal women with IDA compared with that in men and postmenopausal women. 2. To identify the presence of VCE predictors in premenopausal women. 3. To estimate the cost-clinical impact relationship associated with VCE in this indication. We retrospectively analyzed 408 patients who underwent VCE. Patients with IDA were enrolled (premenopausal, postmenopausal women, and men), with previous normal work-up by conventional endoscopies. A total of 249 patients were enrolled: 131 women (52.6%), of which 51 were premenopausal and 80 were post-menopausal, and 118 men. The mean age was 60.7±16 years. The diagnostic yield of VCE for the diagnosis of IDA was 44.6% (95% CI 39.9 - 50.8). Diagnostic yield was 50.8% vs 38.9% in men vs women (p=0.05) and was 55% vs 13.7% in postmenopausal vs premenopausal women (p<0.001). No predictors of small bowel lesions were found in premenopausal women. The most common findings in the postmenopausal group were angioectasias (70.5%) and erosions (57.1%) in the premenopausal group. The cost in premenopausal women was 44.727€ and 86.3% of the procedures had no clinical impact. The diagnostic yield of VCE is low in the etiological study of IDA in premenopausal women and there is no cost-effectiveness in relation to clinical impact. No predictors of small bowel lesions were found in this group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia using density-based fractionation of red blood cells.

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    Hennek, Jonathan W; Kumar, Ashok A; Wiltschko, Alex B; Patton, Matthew R; Lee, Si Yi Ryan; Brugnara, Carlo; Adams, Ryan P; Whitesides, George M

    2016-10-05

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a nutritional disorder that impacts over one billion people worldwide; it may cause permanent cognitive impairment in children, fatigue in adults, and suboptimal outcomes in pregnancy. IDA can be diagnosed by detection of red blood cells (RBCs) that are characteristically small (microcytic) and deficient in hemoglobin (hypochromic), typically by examining the results of a complete blood count performed by a hematology analyzer. These instruments are expensive, not portable, and require trained personnel; they are, therefore, unavailable in many low-resource settings. This paper describes a low-cost and rapid method to diagnose IDA using aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS)-thermodynamically stable mixtures of biocompatible polymers and salt that spontaneously form discrete layers having sharp steps in density. AMPS are preloaded into a microhematocrit tube and used with a drop of blood from a fingerstick. After only two minutes in a low-cost centrifuge, the tests (n = 152) were read by eye with a sensitivity of 84% (72-93%) and a specificity of 78% (68-86%), corresponding to an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.89. The AMPS test outperforms diagnosis by hemoglobin alone (AUC = 0.73) and is comparable to methods used in clinics like reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration (AUC = 0.91). Standard machine learning tools were used to analyze images of the resulting tests captured by a standard desktop scanner to 1) slightly improve diagnosis of IDA-sensitivity of 90% (83-96%) and a specificity of 77% (64-87%), and 2) predict several important red blood cell parameters, such as mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. These results suggest that the use of AMPS combined with machine learning provides an approach to developing point-of-care hematology.

  14. A prospective evaluation of adult men with iron-deficiency anemia in Korea.

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    Yun, Gak Won; Yang, Young Joon; Song, Ik Chan; Park, Keon Uk; Baek, Seung-Woo; Yun, Hwan Jung; Kim, Samyong; Jo, Deog Yeon; Lee, Hyo Jin

    2011-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide. However, the information concerning various causes of IDA in adult men is still insufficient. The aim of our study was to evaluate adult men with IDA. We prospectively studied 206 adult men with IDA. All subjects had a direct history taken and underwent a physical examination. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in most patients, and colonoscopy was conducted if no lesion causing IDA was found or the fecal occult blood test was positive. The history of prior gastrectomy and blood-letting cupping therapy that probably had caused IDA were reported in 24 (11.7%) and 11 (5.3%) patients, respectively. In terms of potential causes of IDA, 68 (33.0%) patients were found to have upper gastrointestinal disorders (34 peptic ulcers, 17 erosive gastritis, 16 gastric cancers, and one gastrointestinal stromal tumor). Colonoscopy showed 42 (20.4%) clinically relevant lesions that probably caused IDA: colon cancer (five patients), colon polyps (14 patients), ulcerative colitis (one patient), and hemorrhoids (22 patients). One small bowel tumor was detected at small bowel series. Concerning malignant lesions that were responsible for IDA, 22 malignant lesions were found in patients of 50 years or older, accounting for 16.8% (22 of 131 patients), while only one (1.3%) early gastric cancer was found in the younger patients. This study demonstrated that gastrointestinal blood loss is the main cause of IDA in adult men, and that there is a high rate of malignancy in men older than 50 years, emphasizing the need for a complete, rigorous gastrointestinal examination in this group of patients. Considering blood-letting cupping therapy, there is a need to consider culture-specific procedures as a possible cause of IDA.

  15. Effect of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy on child mental development in rural China.

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    Chang, Suying; Zeng, Lingxia; Brouwer, Inge D; Kok, Frans J; Yan, Hong

    2013-03-01

    To determine the impact of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in pregnancy on young child development. A 2-year follow-up of 850 children born to women who participated in a double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial of prenatal micronutrient supplementation in western rural China. These women were randomly assigned to receive either daily folic acid, iron/folic acid (60 mg iron), or multiple micronutrients (with 30 mg iron) during pregnancy. Children were categorized into the prenatal-IDA and prenatal-non-IDA groups based on the mother's hemoglobin in the third trimester. Each group contained 3 subgroups based on mother's treatment: folic acid, iron/folic acid, and multiple micronutrients. Bayley scales of infant development were administered to the children to assess their development at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. Compared with the prenatal-non-IDA group, the prenatal-IDA group showed a significantly lower mental development index at 12, 18, and 24 months of age. The adjusted mean difference was 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-10.5), 5.1 (95% CI, 1.2-9.0), and 5.3 (95% CI, 0.9-9.7), respectively. Further analysis showed that the mental development indexes in the prenatal-IDA group and prenatal-non-IDA group were similar with supplementation of iron/folic acid but were significantly lower in the prenatal-IDA group with supplementation of folic acid or multiple micronutrients. Prenatal IDA in the third trimester is associated with mental development of the child. However, prenatal supplementation with sufficient iron protects child development even when the woman's IDA was not properly corrected in pregnancy.

  16. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia in chronic celiac disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel'mer, S V; Mitina, E V; Karpina, L M; Smetanina, N S

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in celiac disease (CD) may be associated with deficiency of iron, vitamins, macro- and micronutrients. It is also possible the development of chronic disease anemia (CDA), associated with activation of proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of this work is to optimize the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children on the basis of study of iron metabolism disorders heterogeneity, including the role of CDA. We observed 34 children with CD aged 1.5 to 17 years, 27 of them children were observed both in the active stage of the disease and in remission. The control group included 25 children aged 1.2 to 17 years who were previously excluded for any chronic (including autoimmune) disease: these children were observed with chronic functional gastrointestinal motility disorders. Special methods of examination were study of iron metabolism, including the determination of the serum hepcidin level, as well as the determination of the serum proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] -α, interleukin [IL] -2, IL-6, IL-10). In active CD in 14.71% of children anemia of varying severity (mild or moderate) were diagnosed. Among these children we observed mild decrease of serum iron in the range 2.2-8.0 g/ml in 15 of 34 children (44%) and a marked reduction in serum ferritin level in 59% of children. In the active celiac disease in the majority of children there is a decrease in the serum hepcidin, but approximately in 20% of children serum hepcidin level was increased. This indicates the development of CDA in these children. During the active stage the average values of IL-2 was significantly increased (p iron metabolism disorders in celiac disease is a result of immunopathological process which results in a reduction in iron absorption in the gut due to the intestinal mucosa villous atrophy and to improve the hepcidin production by liver cells and iron depot blocking with the CDA development in 20% of children.

  17. Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease in geriatric hospitalized patients: How frequent are comorbidities as an additional explanation for the anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Etienne; Lioen, Pieter

    2015-08-01

    Anemia is an important clinical problem in older patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether comorbidities as an additional explanation for the severity of the anemia are frequent, and might help to explain the anemia severity in older patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the anemia of chronic disease (ACD). In the present prospective study, 191 consecutive hospitalized older patients with IDA and the ACD were investigated. A peripheral blood count, C-reactive protein, standard iron parameters, serum vitamin B12 and folate, and renal and thyroidal function tests were analyzed. The attending geriatrician was responsible for the medical diagnosis and follow up. A total of 56 patients with IDA and 135 with the ACD were investigated. Just 24 patients with IDA had normal serum folate, vitamin B12 and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels without laboratory evidence of inflammation or chronic renal failure, but one of these patients was diagnosed with hemolytic anemia. Hence, 23 patients (41%) were diagnosed with "IDA only". "ACD only" was diagnosed in 104 patients (77%), and 22 patients (16%) with ACD had chronic renal failure. A myelodysplastic syndrome was found in two patients. Additional etiologies are often diagnosed in anemic older patients, but it remains unknown to what extent these diseases might influence the pathogenesis of the anemia. Individual and clinical judgment remain crucial to evaluating and treating older anemic patients. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  19. Serum prohepcidin and other iron metabolism parameters in elderly patients with anemia of chronic disease and with iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewska, Justyna; Żekanowska, Ewa; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Boinska, Joanna; Cichon, Roman; Porzych, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in the context of the anemia of chronic disease (ACD) in elderly patients is often difficult due to the existence of many disorders. Recent studies have shown that hepcidin measurement (combined with the existing diagnostic methods) may possibly help in the differential diagnosis of IDA and ACD. The aim of the study was to evaluate the differential diagnostic value of serum prohepcidin in elderly patients with IDA and ACD. The study included 65 individuals aged 65 years or more: 26 patients with ACD, 13 patients with IDA, and 26 age-matched controls. Prohepcidin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, erythropoietin, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were measured using the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Complete blood count, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and iron, transferrin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were assayed using the standard laboratory methods. Prohepcidin concentrations were similar in patients with ACD (196.59 ng/ml) compared with those with IDA (230.16 ng/ml) (P = 0.35). Patients with ACD had significantly lower levels of TIBC compared with those with IDA (P <0.0001). Serum ferritin concentration in patients with ACD was almost 20-fold higher compared with those observed in patients with IDA (P <0.0001). CRP and IL-6 concentrations in patients with ACD were significantly higher compared with those with IDA. The results of the study indicate that serum prohepcidin has limited value in the differential diagnosis of IDA and ACD in elderly patients.

  20. Study on the cause of iron-deficiency anemia in adolescent athletes by INAA with enriched stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Q.F.; Wu, S.Q.; Tian, J.B.; Huo, Z.P.; Chen, J.D.; Li, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is still one of the most common nutritional deficiency diseases throughout the world. The incidence of iron deficiency is high especially in children, adolescent, and endurance athletes. The authors studied the iron absorption rate and iron balance in six child football players during training and non-training periods. The neutron activation method with enriched stable isotope 58Fe has been adopted. The results show that the rate of iron absorption in athletes during the training period (9.1 + 2.9%) was significantly lower than that during the non-training period (11.9 + 4.7%); the iron balance was negative and the sweat iron loss increased during training. Hair is one of the metabolism excretory organs. The physiological changes of body would influence the trace element contents in hair. The hairs collected from four athletes were measured by Synchrotron-induced X-ray Fluorescence analysis, so as to get the trace element contents. Preliminary results show that the changes of iron content in the hairs are in accordance with the athlete's physical activity. There are no perceptible changes for Zn and Ca. It is verified that exercise is one of the causes of iron deficiency in athletes. It is necessary to increase iron supply in an athletes' nutritional intake to ensure optimal performance ability

  1. Delayed erythropoiesis in irradiated rats grafted with syngeneic marrow: effects of cytotoxic drugs and iron-deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodday, P.; Bennett, M.; Vitalle, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Erythropoiesis in spleens of lethally irradiated Lewis rats grafted with 4-35 x 10 6 syngeneic marrow cells was inhibited or delayed during the test period of 5 days; this was in marked contrast to observations in irradiated mice. The mechanism of this inhibition was the subject of this study. Pretreatment of recipients 9 days prior to irradiation with the cytotoxic drugs cyclophosphamide (CY), busulfan (BUS), or dimethylmyleran (DMM), or the induction of iron deficiency with anemia in recipients reversed this delayed erythropoiesis. However, neither iron-deficiency anemia nor pretreatment with BUS or DMM affected the ability of irradiated recipients to reject 20 to 50 x 10 6 allogeneic marrow cells. The administration of commercial preparations of erythropoietin to hosts stimulated erythropoiesis moderately. However, proliferation of syngeneic marrow cells was not enhanced when infused into lethally irradiated spontaneous hypertensive (SH) inbred-strain rats which have high levels of endogenous erythropoietin. Finally, plasma from irradiated rats treated with phenylhydrazine to produce severe anemia was rich in erythropoietin but failed to stimulate erythropoiesis in the cell transfer system. Two hypotheses are considered

  2. Egg Yolk Protein Delays Recovery while Ovalbumin Is Useful in Recovery from Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Kobayashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein is a main nutrient involved in overall iron metabolism in vivo. In order to assess the prevention of iron deficiency anemia (IDA by diet, it is necessary to confirm the influence of dietary protein, which coexists with iron, on iron bioavailability. We investigated the usefulness of the egg structural protein in recovery from IDA. Thirty-one female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a control group (n = 6 fed a casein diet (4.0 mg Fe/100 g for 42 days and an IDA model group (n = 25 created by feeding a low-iron casein diet (LI, 0.4 mg Fe/100 g for 21 days and these IDA rats were fed normal iron diet with different proteins from eggs for another 21 days. The IDA rats were further divided into four subgroups depending on the proteins fed during the last 21 days, which were those with an egg white diet (LI-W, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6, those with an ovalbumin diet (LI-A, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 7, those with an egg yolk-supplemented diet (LI-Y, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6, and the rest with a casein diet (LI-C, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6. In the LI-Y group, recovery of the hematocrit, hemoglobin, transferrin saturation level and the hepatic iron content were delayed compared to the other groups (p < 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively, resulting in no recovery from IDA at the end of the experimental period. There were no significant differences in blood parameters in the LI-W and LI-A groups compared to the control group. The hepatic iron content of the LI-W and LI-A groups was higher than that of the LI-C group (p < 0.05. We found that egg white protein was useful for recovery from IDA and one of the efficacious components was ovalbumin, while egg yolk protein delayed recovery of IDA. This study demonstrates, therefore, that bioavailability of dietary iron varies depending on the source of dietary protein.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants at 1 year of corrected age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Cláudia; Procianoy, Renato S; Silveira, Rita C

    2014-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia and iron deficiency at 1 year of corrected age (CA) in preterm very-low-birth-weight infants, and to identify risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia. A cohort of infants with birth weight Anemia diagnosis was based on hemoglobin infant formula); hospitalizations during the first year and weight, head circumference, body mass index and length at 12 months' CA were analyzed. Prevalence of anemia in 310 participants was 26.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 21.8-31.6%] and of iron deficiency was 48% (95% CI 39.0-56.9%). Increased consumption of cow's milk at 6 months [relative risk (RR) 1.687; 95% CI 1.146-2.483], lower maternal age (RR 0.953; 95% CI 0.923-0.983), high number of pregnancies (RR 1.256; 95% CI 1.122-1.406) and being born small for gestational age (RR 1.578; 95% CI 1.068-2.331) were independently associated with anemia after adjustments. Prevalence of anemia is high at 1 year of CA. Dietary and environmental education strategies may help prevent anemia after discharge.

  4. Appropriateness of the study of iron deficiency anemia prior to referral for small bowel evaluation at a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jaime Pereira; Pinho, Rolando; Silva, Joana; Ponte, Ana; Sousa, Mafalda; Silva, João Carlos; Carvalho, João

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the adequacy of the study of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in real life practice prior to referral to a gastroenterology department for small bowel evaluation. All consecutive patients referred to a gastroenterology department for small bowel investigation due to iron deficiency anemia, between January 2013 and December 2015 were included. Both patients referred from general practitioners or directly from different hospital departments were selected. Relevant clinical information regarding prior anemia workup was retrospectively collected from medical records. An appropriate pre-referral study was considered the execution of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) investigation, colonoscopy with quality standards (recent, total and with adequate preparation) and celiac disease (CD) screening (through serologic testing and/or histopathological investigation). A total of 77 patients (58.4% female, mean age 67.1 ± 16.7 years) were included. Most (53.2%) patients were referred from general practitioners, 41.6% from other hospital specialties and 5.2% directly from the emergency department. The mean pre-referral hemoglobin concentration was 8.8 ± 2.0 g/dL and the majority of anemias had microcytic (71.4%) and hypochromic (72.7%) characteristics. 77.9% of patients presented with an incomplete pre-referral study: EGD in 97.4%, with H. pylori investigation in 58.3%, colonoscopy with quality criteria in 63.6%, and CD screening in 24.7%. Patients with an appropriate study at the time of referral were younger (48.7 ± 17.7 vs 72.3 ± 12.3 years, P anemia prior to referral to gastroenterology department is unsatisfactory. Only approximately a quarter of patients presented with an appropriate study.

  5. High prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in infants attending a well-baby clinic in northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hawsawi, Zakaria M; Al-Rehali, Sami A; Mahros, Amani M; Al-Sisi, Ali M; Al-Harbi, Khalid D; Yousef, Ahmed M

    2015-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infants aged 6-24 months attending the well-baby clinic in primary health care centers (PHCCs).    This cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in the Northwestern region of Saudi Arabia from April 2013 to January 2014 in 5 randomly selected PHCCs. The sample size comprised 500 infants, with 100 infants screened from each PHCC. Blood samples were obtained for estimation of hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels.  Out of 500 infants, 246 (49%) cases had IDA with a mean age of 15.4 ± 6.5 months,  with 130 (53%) males, and 116 (47%) females (p=0367). Out of 274 Saudi infants, 126 (51%) cases were diagnosed as IDA.   Iron deficiency anemia is very common in Saudi infants aged 6-24 months. A national program directed for primary prevention and early discovery of IDA in Saudi infants is recommended at PHCCs  system. Iron supplementation is to be given at early infancy with universal screening of hemoglobin and ferritin estimation to all infants at 12 months of age.

  6. Diagnóstico laboratorial da deficiência de ferro Laboratory diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Z. W. Grotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de ferro é a causa mais comum de anemia e, em geral, o diagnóstico laboratorial é feito sem grandes dificuldades, usando-se testes simples e rotineiramente disponíveis pelos laboratórios em geral. A interpretação dos resultados, no entanto, deve ser feita cuidadosamente, tendo em mente as limitações e interferentes de cada reação. Nessa revisão serão apresentados os testes que auxiliam na investigação da deprivação de ferro, com algumas noções técnicas e comentários sobre a interpretação dos mesmos.Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and, in general, the diagnosis is easily established by simple tests that are routinely available in general laboratories. The interpretation of results, however, must be carefully carried out keeping in mind the limitations and interference in each reaction. This review presents the tests that assist in the investigation of iron deficiency, with some technical aspects and comments on their interpretation.

  7. [Prevalence and determinants of anemia in young children in French-speaking Africa. Role of iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, S; Folquet, M; Mbofung, K; Ndiaye, O; Brou, K; Dupont, C; N'dri, D; Vuillerod, M; Azaïs-Braesco, V; Tetanye, E

    2015-11-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are major public health issues worldwide and particularly in Africa. Reliable information about their prevalence and associated factors is required to allow for effective actions. In this study, we used data from recent (2006-2012) large population health surveys, carried out in 11 French-speaking African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo Brazzaville, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Senegal). Hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed and demographic and health-related parameters were obtained from nation-representative samples of children aged 6-59 months. Anemia (Hbaffected by location (75.5% in rural areas versus 67.3% in towns), income (79.8% in lower quintile of income versus 62.3% in higher quintile), or maternal education (74.1% in children from non-educated mothers versus 62.4% in children whose mothers had secondary education). Nearly 50% of women of child-bearing age had anemia. In the countries that report this information, less than 50% (17-65%) of children consumed iron-rich foods regularly and only 12% (7.4-20.5%) received iron supplementation. Infection and parasitism are known to affect some markers of iron status, because of the inflammatory reaction, thereby making the diagnosis of iron deficiency difficult. In the study countries, acute respiratory diseases and diarrhea affected 6.2 and 15.6% of children aged between 6 and 59 months, respectively; their distribution according to age and location is very different from the one of anemia, which is also the case for the distribution of malaria. It is thus likely that a large part of the anemia observed in young children is due to iron deficiency, although further research is needed to confirm this. This fully justifies the nationwide programs of iron fortification of flour, currently undergoing in most countries of French-speaking Africa. Their formal evaluation is still pending but the initial data suggest some efficacy, although

  8. Implications of iron deficiency/anemia on the classification of diabetes using HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, S M; Herring, A H; Wang, H; Howard, A-G; Thompson, A L; Adair, L S; Mayer-Davis, E J; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2015-06-22

    Nonglycemic factors like iron deficiency (ID) or anemia may interfere with classification of diabetes and prediabetes using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). However, few population-based studies of diabetes in areas with endemic ID/anemia have been conducted. We aimed to determine how mutually exclusive categories of ID alone, anemia alone and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) were each associated with prediabetes and diabetes prevalence using fasting blood glucose (FBG) versus HbA1c in a population-based study of adults with endemic ID/anemia. We used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, a longitudinal, population-based study across 228 communities within nine provinces of China. This analysis included 7308 adults seen in the 2009 survey aged 18-75 years. We used descriptive and covariate-adjusted models to examine relative risk of prediabetes and diabetes using FBG alone, HbA1c alone, HbA1c and FBG, or neither (normoglycemia) by anemia alone, ID alone, IDA or normal iron/hemoglobin. Approximately 65% of individuals with diabetes in our sample were concordantly classified with diabetes using both FBG and HbA1c, while 35% had a discordant diabetes classification: they were classified using either FBG or HbA1c, but not both. Fewer participants with ID alone versus normal iron/hemoglobin were classified with diabetes using HbA1c only. From covariate-adjusted, multinomial regression analyses, the adjusted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 22% for men with anemia alone, but 13% for men with normal iron/hemoglobin. In contrast, the predicted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 8% for women with ID alone, compared with 13% for women with normal iron/hemoglobin. These findings suggest potential misclassification of diabetes using HbA1c in areas of endemic ID/anemia. Estimating diabetes prevalence using HbA1c may result in under-diagnosis in women with ID and over-diagnosis in men with anemia.

  9. Comparison of efficacy of ferrous and iron polymaltose salts in the treatment of childhood iron deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwat, I.U.; Hassan, K.A.; Javed, T.; Chishti, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency of anemia (IDA) is defined as reduced number of red blood cells, and / or reduced concentration hemoglobin (Hb) due to deficiency of iron. Treatment involves dietary modifications and inorganic iron salt supplements like ferrous sulfate (FS) or Iron polymaltose complex (IPC). The decision to select either drug rests on therapeutic efficacy, untoward side effects; cost of complete course, patient's compliance and discretion of physician. Both drugs can be prescribed in oral form. This study aimed at comparing the efficacy of two iron preparations (ferrous sulphate and iron polymaltose complex salts) in childhood iron deficiency anemia. Objective: To compare the efficacy of Ferrous Sulphate and Iron Polymaltose Complex salts in the treatment of childhood Iron Deficiency Anemia. Methodology: This randomized controlled trial was conducted at Department of Pediatric Medicine Unit-II Mayo Hospital, Lahore, for a period of 6 months. One hundred and fifty children aged 6 months to 5 years suffering from iron deficiency anemia were selected and randomly divided into two groups of 75 each (Group A and B prescribed FS and IPC respectively). Results were analyzed in terms of rise in Hb from the baseline after three months. Increase in Hb level 2 gm/dl after three months of treatment was considered as effective. Results were analyzed by SPSS version 17. Efficacy of both the drugs, was compared by chi square test. P value 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results: There were 34 cases (22.7%) in 6-12 months age, 77 cases (51.3%) between 1-3 years age and 39 cases (26%) between 3-5 years age. The number of male and female children was 82 (54.7%) and 68 (45.3%) respectively. The baseline hemoglobin of all study cases was 6.64+-1.08 gm/dl (6.59+-1.13 gm/dl in Group A and 6.69+-1.04 gm/dl in Group B). At completion of therapy, the mean hemoglobin of all study cases was 9.15+-1.21 gm/dl (9.20+9-1.17 gm/dl in Group A and 9.11+-1.25 gm/dl in Group B). The difference

  10. Effectiveness of communication campaign on iron deficiency anemia in Kyzyl-Orda region, Kazakhstan: a pilot study

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    Tsoi Igor

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, wheat flour fortification (WFF with iron was implemented in Kazakhstan as a public health strategy to increase the iron intake of all women of childbearing age and of children. In 2003, before starting the flour fortification program, a communication campaign on health education took place in a region with a high prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA. The present study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency and IDA before and after the campaign. In addition, knowledge about IDA and its prevention, as well as awareness about fortified wheat flour, was assessed. Methods The subjects of the study were women aged 15-49 years and children aged 2-14 years. The study was carried out in urban and rural areas of Kyzyl-Orda region in 2003 before (March and after (December the campaign. Blood samples were collected in order to measure hemoglobin and serum ferritin. In March 80 women and 57 children in the urban area, and 41 women and 41 children in the rural area, participated in the IDA testing. The corresponding participants in December numbered 62, 52, 52, and 57, respectively. The impacts of the communications and information received by participants during the campaign was surveyed with a questionnaire for 195 women in March and 198 women in December including some who participated in the IDA testing. Results In March, the prevalence of anemia was 52.0% among 121 women and 58.1% among 98 children, and those with low iron reserve were 63.6%, 49.1% and IDA 40.5%, 11.0%, respectively. In December, the prevalence of anemia had significantly decreased among rural women (from 65.9% to 48.0%, p Conclusion The study demonstrated that the communication campaign before implementation of WFF program was effectively carried out, giving a biological impact on hematological indices.

  11. Relationship of vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and inflammation to anemia among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, M V; Palafox, N A; Dancheck, B; Ricks, M O; Briand, K; Semba, R D

    2004-10-01

    Although vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and inflammation may contribute to anemia, their relative contribution to anemia has not been well characterized in preschool children in developing countries. To characterize the contributions of vitamin A and iron deficiencies and inflammation to anemia among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. A community-based survey, the Republic of the Marshall Islands Vitamin A Deficiency Study, was conducted among 919 preschool children. The relationship of vitamin A and iron status and markers of inflammation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, alpha1-acid glycoprotein, and interleukin-10, to anemia were studied in a subsample of 367 children. Among the 367 children, the prevalence of anemia was 42.5%. The prevalence of severe vitamin A deficiency (serum vitamin A 2 pg/ml and/or AGP > 1000 mg/l), and severe vitamin A deficiency combined with anemia was 26.7, 35.6, and 7.6%. In multivariate linear regression models that adjusted for age, sex, and inflammation, both iron deficiency (odds ratio (OR) 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.83, P = 0.023) and severe vitamin A deficiency (OR 4.85, 95% CI 2.14-10.9, P < 0.0001) were significantly associated with anemia. Both iron and vitamin A deficiencies were independent risk factors for anemia, but inflammation was not a significant risk factor for anemia among these preschool children.

  12. Anemia e deficiência de ferro em pré-escolares da Amazônia Ocidental brasileira: prevalência e fatores associados Anemia and iron deficiency among schoolchildren in the Western Brazilian Amazon: prevalence and associated factors

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    Teresa Gontijo de Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudo transversal de base populacional que investigou prevalênciasde anemia e fatores associados à anemia, anemia ferropriva e deficiência de ferro entre crianças de 6 a 60 meses da área urbana de dois municípios do Acre, Brasil (N = 624. Dosagens de hemoglobina sanguínea, ferritina e receptor solúvel de transferrina plasmáticas foram realizadas mediante sangue venoso. Condições sócio-econômicas, demográficas e de morbidade foram obtidas por questionário. Razões de prevalências foram calculadas por regressão de Poisson em modelo hierárquico. As prevalências de anemia, anemia ferropriva e deficiência de ferro foram de 30,6%, 20,9% e 43,5%, respectivamente. Menores de 24 meses apresentaram maior risco para anemia, anemia ferropriva e deficiência de ferro. Pertencer ao maior tercil do índice de riqueza conferiu proteção contra anemia ferropriva (RP = 0,62; IC95%: 0,40-0,98. Pertencer ao maior quartil do índice estatura/idade foi protetor contra anemia (0,62; 0,44-0,86 e anemia ferropriva (0,51; 0,33-0,79, e ocorrência recente de diarréia representou risco (anemia: 1,47; 1,12-1,92 e anemia ferropriva: 1,44; 1,03-2,01. A infestação por geohelmintos conferiu risco para anemia, anemia ferropriva e deficiência de ferro.This cross-sectional population-based study investigated prevalence rates and associated factors for anemia, iron deficiency anemia, and iron deficiency among children 6 to 60 months of age in two towns in Acre State, Brazil (N = 624. Hemoglobin, plasma ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor were measured in venous blood samples. Socioeconomic, demographic, and disease data were obtained using a questionnaire. Prevalence ratios were calculated by Poisson regression in a hierarchical model. Prevalence rates for anemia, iron deficiency anemia, and iron deficiency were 30.6%, 20.9%, and 43.5%, respectively. Children younger than 24 months showed higher risk of anemia, iron deficiency anemia, and iron

  13. Age and body mass index-dependent relationship between correction of iron deficiency anemia and insulin resistance in non-diabetic premenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, A.; Sevnic, C.; Selamaet, U.; Kamaci, B.; Atalay, S.

    2007-01-01

    No prospective studies have evaluated the effects of correction of iron deficiency anemia on insulin resistance in non-diabetic premenopausal women with iron deficiency anemia. All patients were treated with oral iron preparations. Insulin resistance was calculated with the Homeostasis Model Assessment formula. All patients were dichotomized by the median for age and BMI to assess how the relationship between iron deficiency anemia and insulin resistance was affected by the age and BMI. Although the fasting glucose levels did not change meaningfully, statistically significant decreases were found in fasting insulin levels following anemia treatment both in the younger age ( = 40 years) and the high BMI (>-27Kg/m) subgroups. Post-treatment fasting insulin levels were positively correlated both with BMI (r=0.386, P=0.004) and post-treatment hemoglobin levels. (r=0.285, P=0.036). Regression analysis revealed that the factors affecting post-treatment insulin levels were BMI (P=0.001) and post-treatment hemoglobin levels (p=0.030). Our results show that following he correction of iron deficiency anemia, insulin levels and HOMA scores decrease in younger and lean non-diabetic premenopausal women. (author)

  14. Diagnostic yield of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the evaluation of iron deficiency anemia in older children and adolescents.

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    Gulen, Huseyin; Kasirga, Erhun; Yildirim, Sule Aslan; Kader, Sebnem; Sahin, Gulseren; Ayhan, Semin

    2011-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is frequent in childhood. Inadequate nutrition and gastrointestinal malabsorption are the frequent causes of IDA in children. But reduced iron absorption and insidious blood loss from the gastrointestinal tract has been identified as the most frequent causes of IDA in older children and adolescents. Therefore the authors evaluated the frequency and etiologies of the upper gastrointestinal system pathologies causing IDA in older pediatric population. Patients with known hematological or chronic diseases, heavy menstrual flow, and obvious blood loss were excluded from the study. Forty-four children between the ages of 9.5 and 17.5 years and diagnosed with IDA were enrolled. They underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy from esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Mean age and hemoglobin (Hb) levels of study group (32 boys, and 12 girls) were 14.6 ± 2.0 years and 7.9 ± 1.8 g/dL, respectively. Only 1 patient had a positive serology testing with anti-tissue transglutaminase and small bowel biopsy correlating with celiac disease. Endoscopy revealed abnormal findings in 25 (56.8%) patients (21 endoscopic antral gastritis, 2 active duodenal ulcers, and 2 duodenal polyps). Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection was identified by using antral histopathological evaluation in 19 of 44 children (43.2%). In 2 of duodenal samples, one patient had celiac disease, and the other one was diagnosed as giardiasis. In conclusion, there are different etiologies resulting in IDA in older children and adolescents. When older children and adolescents are found to have iron deficiency, HP infection and other gastrointestinal pathologies should be ruled out before iron deficiency treatment.

  15. Efficacy and safety of iron isomaltoside (Monofer® in the management of patients with iron deficiency anemia

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    Kalra PA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Philip A Kalra,1 Sunil Bhandari2,31Department of Renal Medicine, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK; 2Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK; 3Hull York Medical School, Hull, UKAbstract: New intravenous (IV iron preparations should ideally be capable of delivering a wide dosing range to allow iron correction in a single or low number of visits, a rapid infusion (doses up to 1,000 mg must be administered over more than 15 minutes and doses exceeding 1,000 mg must be administered over 30 minutes or more, and minimal potential side effects including low catalytic/labile iron release with minimal risk of anaphylaxis. Furthermore, they should be convenient for the patient and health-care professional, and cost effective for the health-care system. The intention behind the development of iron isomaltoside (Monofer® was to fulfill these requirements. Iron isomaltoside has been shown to be effective in treating iron deficiency anemia across multiple therapeutic patient groups and compared to placebo, IV iron sucrose, and oral iron. Iron isomaltoside consists of iron and a carbohydrate moiety where the iron is tightly bound in a matrix structure. It has a low immunogenic potential, a low potential to release labile iron, and does not appear to be associated with clinically significant hypophosphatemia. Due to the structure of iron isomaltoside, it can be administered in high doses with a maximum single dosage of 20 mg/kg body weight. Clinical trials and observational studies of iron isomaltoside show that it is an effective and well-tolerated treatment of anemia across different therapeutic areas with a favorable safety profile.Keywords: iron deficiency anemia, iron isomaltoside, high dose, iron treatment, hypophosphatemia, intact fibroblast growth factor 23

  16. Dietary cellulose has no effect on the regeneration of hemoglobin in growing rats with iron deficiency anemia

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    M. Catani

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of cellulose on intestinal iron absorption in rats during recovery from iron deficiency anemia. Twenty-one-day-old male Wistar-EPM rats were fed an iron-free ration for two weeks to induce anemia. At 5 weeks of age, the rats were divided into two groups (both groups receiving 35 mg of elemental iron per kg diet: cellulose group (N = 12, receiving a diet containing 100 g of cellulose/kg and control (N = 12, receiving a diet containing no cellulose. The fresh weight of the feces collected over a 3-day period between the 15th and 18th day of dietary treatment was 10.7 ± 3.5 g in the group receiving cellulose and 1.9 ± 1.2 g in the control group (P<0.001. Total food intake was higher in the cellulose group (343.4 ± 22.0 g than in the control (322.1 ± 13.1 g, P = 0.009 during the 3 weeks of dietary treatment. No significant difference was observed in weight gain (cellulose group = 132.8 ± 19.2, control = 128.0 ± 16.3 g, hemoglobin increment (cellulose group = 8.0 ± 0.8, control = 8.0 ± 1.0 g/dl, hemoglobin level (cellulose group = 12.3 ± 1.2, control = 12.1 ± 1.3 g/dl or in hepatic iron levels (cellulose group = 333.6 ± 112.4, control = 398.4 ± 168.0 µg/g dry tissue. We conclude that cellulose does not adversely affect the regeneration of hemoglobin, hepatic iron level or the growth of rats during recovery from iron deficiency anemia.

  17. La anemia por deficiencia de hierro: estrategias de la OPS/OMS para combatirla Iron deficiency anemia: PAHO/WHO strategies to fight anemia

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    WILMA B FREIRE

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available La anemia por deficiencia de hierro es uno de los problemas nutricionales de mayor magnitud en el mundo. A pesar de conocer su etiología y tener a disposición el conocimiento de cómo enfrentarla y de saber que las intervenciones son de bajo costo, aún no se ha podido superar este problema. Este documento parte de una estimación de la magnitud del problema y plantea los elementos necesarios para el diseño, la ejecución y la medición del impacto de la suplementación con hierro y la fortificación, como las intervenciones más efectivas para disminuir considerablemente la dimensión de la anemia por falta de hierro. Propone una lista de pasos a seguir previos a la elaboración de un proyecto y recomienda una serie de elementos a considerar en ello. Define, asimismo, los aspectos que se deben incluir en una propuesta de fortificación y en otra de suplementación. El documento concluye con un listado de actividades complementarias que la Organización Panamericana de la Salud/Organización Mundial de la Salud ofrece dentro de su paquete de cooperación técnica.Iron deficiency anemia is among the greatest nutritional problems in the world. Although its etiology is understood and intervention at low cost is available, the problem persists. The present review begins with a general estimate of the dimensions of the problem. It suggests the necessary elements for the design, implementation, and measurement of the impact of iron supplementing and fortification as the most effective forms to intervene and diminish iron deficiency anemia. Several preliminary steps are proposed previous to the preparation of a project and several recomendations are made to be included in a project for fortification and iron supplementing. A list of complementary activities offered by PAHO/WHO as part of the package of technical cooperation is included.

  18. Influence of laser and LED irradiation on mast cells of cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher Rosa, Cristiane; Oliveira Sampaio, Susana C. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Ferreira, Maria F. L.; Zanini, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Jean N.; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    This work aimed to study histologically the effect of Laser or LED phototherapy on mast cells on cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency. 18 rats were used and fed with special peleted iron-free diet. An excisional wound was created on the dorsum of each animal which were divided into: Group I - Control with anemia + no treatment; Group II - Anemia + Laser; Group III - Anemia + LED; Group IV - Healthy + no treatment; Group V - Healthy + Laser; Group VI - Healthy + LED. Irradiation was performed using a diode Laser (λ660nm, 40mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2, 4X2.5J/cm2) or a RED-LED ( λ700nm, 15mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2). Histological specimens were routinely processed, cut and stained with toluidine blue and mast cell counts performed. No significant statistic difference was found between groups as to the number of degranulated, non-degradulated or total mast cells. Greater mean values were found for degranulated mast cells in the Anemia + LED. LED irradiation on healthy specimens resulted in a smaller number of degranulated mast cells. Our results leads to conclude that there are no significant differences in the number of mast cells seven days after irradiation following Laser or LED phototherapy.

  19. Lactoferrin or ferrous salts for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy: A meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Hashim, Hatem; Foda, Osama; Ghayaty, Essam

    2017-12-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of daily oral bovine lactoferrin versus daily oral ferrous iron preparations for treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) during pregnancy. Searches were conducted on PubMed, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov and CENTRAL databases from inception to February 2017 and the bibliographies of retrieved articles were screened. The PRISMA Statement was followed. Published English language randomized trials comparing lactoferrin with oral ferrous iron preparations in pregnant women with iron deficiency anemia were included. Quasi-randomized, non- randomized or studies including other known cause of anemia, gestational or pre-existent maternal diseases were excluded. Accordingly, 4 eligible trials (600 women) were analyzed. Primary outcome was change in hemoglobin level at 4 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes were; change in serum ferritin and iron, rates of gastrointestinal side effects, preterm birth, low birthweight, neonatal death and mean birthweight. Quality assessment was performed by the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Odds ratio and mean difference were used to integrate dichotomous and continuous outcomes respectively. Pooled estimates for change in hemoglobin levels at four weeks favored daily oral lactoferrin over daily oral ferrous sulphate (mean difference 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.04-1.55; P=0.04, 4 trials, 600 women). However, after subgroup analysis (degree of anemia), no significant difference in hemoglobin levels were found between both groups in mild anemia (mean difference 0.80; 95% CI -0.21 to 1.82, 3 trials, 372 women), but a significant increase favoring lactoferrin was reported in moderate anemia (mean difference 0.68; 95% CI 0.53-0.83; P<0.00001, one trial, 228 women). Significantly less gastrointestinal side effects were reported with lactoferrin treatment. No significant differences existed with regard to other outcomes. In conclusion, for pregnant women with IDA

  20. Real-time PCR Demonstrates Ancylostoma duodenale Is a Key Factor in the Etiology of Severe Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Malawian Pre-school Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Femkje A. M.; Calis, Job C. J.; Phiri, Kamija; Brienen, Eric A. T.; Khoffi, Harriet; Brabin, Bernard J.; Verweij, Jaco J.; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; van Lieshout, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hookworm infections are an important cause of (severe) anemia and iron deficiency in children in the tropics. Type of hookworm species (Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus) and infection load are considered associated with disease burden, although these parameters are rarely

  1. Multidimensional approach to iron deficiency anemia in infants younger than two years old in Northeast Argentina. 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falivene, Mariana A; Fattore, Gisel L

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is high among infants younger than two years old, especially in disadvantaged populations. To study certain social and biological determinants associated with IDA in children aged 12 to 23.9 months old in Northeast Argentina in the 2004-2005 period. Cross-sectional design. Explanatory outcome measures were organized in three levels: distal (food assistance, unmet basic needs, and head of household with medical coverage), intermediate (breastfeeding, iron supplementation, and iron intake), and proximal (nutritional status, gestational age, birth weight, age, and sex). The association between selected outcome measures and IDA (Hbchildren. Food assistance programs may have a protective effect against IDA; consumption of fortified foods may improve iron intake in infants younger than two years old. In addition, emphasis is placed on the need to assess the impact of policies on population health. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  2. An updated systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Lauren; Jaraisy, Ameen; Haj, Saeda; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-02-01

    We conducted an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the prevalence of depleted iron stores among persons infected with Helicobacter pylori compared to uninfected ones. We also assessed the impact of anti-H. pylori eradication therapy plus iron therapy on ferritin and hemoglobin levels compared to iron therapy alone. A literature search was conducted using the databases Medline, the Cochrane Library, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, and the Science Citation Index Expanded. Observational studies with methodological quality score of 13 (median score) and above, on a scale of 0-16, and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for the meta-analyses. Pooled point estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using the random effects model. Compared to uninfected persons, H. pylori-infected individuals showed increased likelihood of iron deficiency anemia (14 observational studies); pooled OR 1.72 (95% CI 1.23-2.42); iron deficiency (pooled OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.15-1.54; 30 studies); and anemia (pooled OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.00-1.32; 23 studies). Meta-analyses of seven RCTs showed increased ferritin, standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.53 (95% 0.21-0.85), but not hemoglobin, SMD 0.36 (95% -0.07 to 0.78), Pv=.1, following anti-H. pylori eradication therapy plus iron therapy as compared with iron therapy alone. Significant heterogeneity was found among studies, as well as evidence of publication bias. Current evidence indicates increased likelihood of depleted iron stores in relation to H. pylori infection. H. pylori eradication therapy, added to iron therapy, might be beneficial in increasing ferritin and hemoglobin levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The association between subjective assessment of menstrual bleeding and measures of iron deficiency anemia in premenopausal African-American women: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Lia A; Ghant, Marissa S; Andrade, Carolina; Recht, Hannah; Marsh, Erica E

    2016-08-15

    Both iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common in the United States with a prevalence amongst women of 12 % and 4 % respectively. These numbers are even higher in African-American women (AAW) and are often a result of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). The primary objective of this study was to determine if perceived assessment of menstrual bleeding was associated with objective and subjective measures of anemia in AAW. Quantitative cross-sectional pilot study with surveys and venipuncture. 44 premenopausal AAW (mean age 37.9 years ± 9. 4) participated in the study. Iron deficiency was present in 68.2 % of the participants and 18.2 % were anemic. Almost half of the participants reported that their menses were heavy or very heavy, and there was a relationship between perceived heaviness of menstrual flow and anemia (P = 0.021). Of the individuals who reported that their menses were heavy or very heavy, 35.0 % were anemic. AAW who reported heavy or very heavy menses had significantly lower hemoglobin (P = 0.015), hematocrit (P = 0.003), and ferritin (P = 0.012) levels, as well as more general (P = 0.006) and menses-associated symptoms of anemia (P = 0.015) than those who reported normal or light menses. This pilot study of premenopausal AAW found that a significant percentage of women who report HMB are not only iron deficient, but also anemic. AAW should be educated on the consequences of HMB and counseled to seek care with a women's health provider when they perceive HMB. More importantly, providers should be aware that when AAW report HMB, evaluation for iron deficiency and anemia are essential.

  4. [Risk factors for iron deficiency anemia in infants aged 6 to 12 months and its effects on neuropsychological development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kang; Zhang, Cui-Mei; Huang, Lian-Hong; Fu, Si-Mao; Liu, Yu-Ling; Chen, Ang; Ou, Jun-Bin

    2015-08-01

    To study the risk factors for moderate and severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infants aged 6-12 months, and to preliminarily investigate the effects of IDA on the neuromotor development and temperament characteristics of infants. A total of 326 infants aged 6-12 months with IDA were classified into three groups: mild IDA (n=176), moderate IDA (n=111), and severe IDA (n=39) according to the severity of anemia. The risk factors for moderate or severe IDA were investigated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Three hundred and forty-six infants without IDA who showed matched age, sex, and other backgrounds were selected as the control group. The Gesell Development Diagnosis Scale was used to evaluate children's mental development. The Temperament Scale for infants was used for evaluating children's temperament. The univariate analysis showed that the severity of IDA was associated with sex, birth weight, gestational age, multiple birth, maternal anemia during pregnancy, and mother's lack of knowledge about IDA (Panemia during pregnancy, breast feeding, and mother's lack of knowledge about IDA were the risk factors for severe IDA (OR>1; P1; Panemia during pregnancy and mother's lack of knowledge about IDA in infants aged 6-12 months. Infants with IDA have delayed neuromotor development and most of them have negative temperaments. More attention should be paid to mental and behavior problems for the infants. It is necessary to provide guidance for their parents in feeding and education.

  5. Screening and Treatment for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Women: Results of a Survey of Obstetrician-Gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcewicz, Lauren H; Anderson, Britta L; Byams, Vanessa R; Grant, Althea M; Schulkin, Jay

    2017-08-01

    Objective To better understand the knowledge, attitudes and practices of obstetrician-gynecologists with respect to screening and treatment for iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods A total of 1,200 Fellows and Junior Fellows of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists were invited to participate in a survey on blood disorders. Respondents completed a questionnaire regarding their patient population, screening and treatment practices for IDA, and general knowledge about IDA and its risk factors. Results Overall response rate was 42.4%. Thirty-eight percent of respondents screen non-pregnant patients regularly, based on risk factors; 30.5% screen only when symptoms of anemia are present. For pregnant patients, 50.0% of respondents screen patients at their initial visit, while 46.2% screen every trimester. Sixty-one percent of respondents supplement pregnant patients when there is laboratory evidence of anemia; 31.6% supplement all pregnant patients. Forty-two percent of respondents screen post-partum patients based on their risk factors for IDA. However, when asked to identify risk factors for post-partum anemia, slightly more than half of respondents correctly identified young age and income level as risk factors for post-partum anemia; only 18.9% correctly identified pre-pregnancy obesity as a risk factor. Conclusion There are opportunities for increased education on IDA for obstetrician-gynecologists, specifically with respect to risk factors. There also appears to be substantial practice variance regarding screening and supplementation for IDA, which may correspond to variability in professional guidelines. Increased education on IDA, especially the importance of sociodemographic factors, and further research and effort to standardize guidelines is needed.

  6. Prevalência de anemia ferropriva no Brasil: uma revisão sistemática Prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in Brazil: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Esteves Jordão

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar os estudos de prevalência de anemia no Brasil publicados entre janeiro de 1996 e janeiro de 2007. FONTES DE DADOS: Por meio de revisão sistemática nas bases de dados eletrônicas Medline e Lilacs, foram selecionados títulos científicos publicados no intervalo de onze anos referentes à prevalência de anemia no Brasil em crianças menores de cinco anos de idade. Foram excluídos artigos de revisão, relatos de caso e trabalhos que relacionaram anemia a outras doenças e ao período gestacional. Para a análise comparativa das variáveis categóricas de interesse nos artigos encontrados, realizou-se o teste do qui-quadrado e o teste exato de Fisher, levando-se em conta o nível de significância estatística de 5% (pOBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review on the prevalence of anemia due to iron-deficiency in Brazil from January 1996 to January 2007. DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was conducted in electronic databases (Medline and Lilacs in an eleven-year interval to verify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in children who were less than five years of age in Brazil. Reviews, case reports and studies related to anemia during pregnancy and anemia caused by others diseases were excluded. In order to describe the categorical variables according to the selected articles, the chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used. The significance level adopted was 5% (p<0.05. DATA SYNTHESIS: The median prevalence level of anemia was 53%, which is considered a high prevalence rate by the World Health Organization. Among the 53 analyzed studies, the age of the children was the variable strongly associated with anemia (p=0.012. CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of anemia, mostly in children less than two years of age, was observed in this review. However, most studies were carried out in day care centers or in Basic Health Care Units or were obtained by home interviews, suggesting that future research should focus populational studies.

  7. A structured approach to iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA diagnosis (SAID: The more is “SAID” about iron, the less it is

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    Prateek Bhatia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Our sub-continent is endemic in iron deficiency with nearly 60–70% of children in 2–5 year age group being iron deficient. Hence clinicians tend to prescribe oral iron to all children having anemia and microcytic hypochromic indices and look for a response 2–3 weeks later. However cases with sub-optimal or completely absent oral iron response tend to get neglected due to lack of structured testing approach and reach adolescence or adult age with mild to moderately persistent anemia. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA is a relatively recently described autosomal recessive condition that results from mutations in TMPRSS6 gene. The condition is likely being missed or under-diagnosed in our iron deficient endemic setting due to lack of general awareness amongst physicians in establishing the diagnosing or due to lack of availability of proper genetic testing. The current review is aimed at bridging this gap and highlighting a structured cost-effective approach that can help in establishing a confirmatory diagnosis of this entity.

  8. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adult Onset Still's Disease with a Serum Ferritin of 26,387 μg/L

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    Sheetal Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum ferritin rises in the anemia of chronic inflammation reflecting increased iron storage and other changes mediated by inflammation. When iron deficiency coexists, the ferritin may not always decline into the subnormal range. We describe the rare interaction of iron deficiency with the extreme hyperferritinemia characteristic of adult onset Still's disease. The combination has clinical relevance and allows deductions about the presence of serum ferritin at 26,387 μg/L despite obvious iron depletion. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was delayed and became fully obvious when her Still's disease remitted and serum ferritin decreased to 6.5 μg/L. The coexistence of iron deficiency should be considered when evaluating a patient with anemia of chronic inflammation even when the ferritin level is elevated several hundredfold. Further insights on ferritin metabolism in Still's disease are suggested by the likelihood that the patient's massive hyperferritinemia in the acute phase of Still's disease was almost entirely of the iron-free apoferritin form.

  9. Impact of fortification of flours with iron to reduce the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among schoolchildren in Caracas, Venezuela: a follow-up.

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    Layrisse, Miguel; García-Casal, María Nieves; Méndez-Castellano, Hernán; Jiménez, Maritza; Henry, Olavarría; Chávez, José E; González, Eglis

    2002-12-01

    In Venezuela, a severe economic crisis starting in 1983 provoked a progressive reduction in the quantity and quality of food consumed by people from the low socioeconomic strata of the population. This situation resulted in a continuous increase in the prevalence of iron deficiency in the 1980s and 1990s. In 1993, an iron-fortification program was started, in which precooked corn and white wheat flours were enriched with iron, vitamin A, thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin. White wheat flour was enriched with the same nutrients, except for vitamin A. In 1996 we published the results of the impact of fortification of precooked corn and white wheat flours on the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in the population. A survey carried out in Caracas in 307 children aged 7, 11, and 15 years showed that the prevalence of iron deficiency measured by serum ferritin concentration dropped from 37% in 1992 to 16% in 1994, only one year after the iron-fortification program began. The prevalence of anemia, as measured by the hemoglobin concentration, diminished from 19% to 10% during the same period. This article reports the results of three other surveys carried out in 1997, 1998, and 1999 on children of the same age and socioeconomic groups that were evaluated in 1990, 1992, and 1994. There were no significant differences in anemia or iron deficiency among the last three surveys. The prevalence results from the last seven years seem to indicate that, after a dramatic reduction in 1994, iron deficiency tended to stabilize, while the prevalence of anemia increased to the same level found in 1992, before the fortification program started.

  10. Expert recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of iron-deficiency anemia during pregnancy and the postpartum period in the Asia-Pacific region.

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    Breymann, Christian; Bian, Xu-Ming; Blanco-Capito, Lourdes R; Chong, Christopher; Mahmud, Ghazala; Rehman, Rakhshanda

    2011-03-01

    Anemia during pregnancy and the postpartum period is commonly caused by iron deficiency and is a significant worldwide issue with severe consequences for both mother and developing fetus. From a worldwide perspective, iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) during pregnancy is highest in the Asia-Pacific region; however, there has been little guidance in this region for safe and effective treatment. An expert panel was convened to develop a concise and informative set of recommendations for the treatment of IDA in pregnant and postpartum women in the Asia-Pacific region. This manuscript provides these recommendations and aims to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with IDA in pregnant and postpartum women in the Asia-Pacific region. The consensus recommendations define anemia as a hemoglobin (Hb) level iron, intravenous iron or red blood cell transfusion.

  11. An insight into the relationships between prohepcidin, iron deficiency anemia, and interleukin-6 values in pediatric Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

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    Emiralioglu, Nagehan; Yenicesu, Idil; Sari, Sinan; Egritas, Odul; Poyraz, Aylar; Pasaoglu, Ozge Tugce; Celik, Bulent; Dalgic, Buket

    2015-07-01

    The link between Helicobacter pylori and iron deficiency (ID) or iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has been investigated recently. We suggested that IDA/ID associated with H. pylori infection might be mediated by inflammation-driven hepcidin production. Patients with complaints of recurrent abdominal pain and dyspepsia aged between 7-16 years were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to H. pylori status in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Group I who had H. pylori gastritis (n=50) received triple antibiotic therapy. Group II (n=50) who had H. pylori-negative gastritis only received proton pump inhibitor. Thirty healthy children with the similar age and gender were included in the study as a control group. Complete blood count, serum iron levels, iron-binding capacity, ferritin levels, prohepcidin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) values were evaluated in all children at the first visit. Initial tests were repeated after H. pylori eradication. Initial levels of ferritin (p=0.002), prohepcidin (p=0.003), and IL-6 (p=0.004) were found significantly lower in group I compared to group II and the control group. The mean prohepcidin level was lower in the anemic H. pylori-positive group than in non-anemic H. pylori-positive group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. While significant increases in hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume were observed, no significant difference was found in serum ferritin, prohepcidin, or IL-6 level after eradication treatment in H. pylori-positive group. H. pylori-induced gastritis appears to cause an increase in prohepcidin levels and a decrease in ferritin levels, supporting our hypothesis; but this relationship has not been proven.

  12. Anemia and iron deficiency among school adolescents: burden, severity, and determinant factors in southwest Ethiopia.

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    Tesfaye, Melkam; Yemane, Tilahun; Adisu, Wondimagegn; Asres, Yaregal; Gedefaw, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is the period of most rapid growth second to childhood. The physical and physiological changes that occur in adolescents place a great demand on their nutritional requirements and make them more vulnerable to anemia. Anemia in the adolescence causes reduced physical and mental capacity and diminished concentration in work and educational performance, and also poses a major threat to future safe motherhood in girls. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its associated factors among school adolescents in Bonga Town, southwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 408 school adolescents in Bonga Town, southwest Ethiopia, from March 15, 2014 to May 25, 2014. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic and other data. A total of 7 mL of venous blood and 4 g of stool samples were collected from each study participant. Blood and stool samples were analyzed for hematological and parasitological analyses, respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 20 software for Windows. The overall prevalence of anemia was 15.2% (62/408), of which 83.9% comprised mild anemia. The proportion of microcytic, hypochromic anemia was 53% (33/62). Being female (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =3.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.41-6.57), household size ≥5 (AOR =2.58, 95% CI =1.11-5.96), father's illiteracy (AOR =9.03, 95% CI =4.29-18.87), intestinal parasitic infection (AOR =5.37, 95% CI =2.65-10.87), and low body mass index (AOR =2.54, 95% CI =1.17-5.51) were identified as determinants of anemia among school adolescents. This study showed that anemia was a mild public health problem in this population. School-based interventions on identified associated factors are important to reduce the burden of anemia among school adolescents.

  13. Effect of treatment with single total-dose intravenous iron versus daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose on moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia

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    Iyoke CA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 Fausta Chioma Emegoakor,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,2 Leonard Ogbonna Ajah,1 Jude Anazoeze Madu,3 Hyginus Uzo Ezegwui,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, 3Department of Haematology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, Enugu State University, Enugu, Nigeria Background: Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional cause of anemia in pregnancy and is often responsible for puerperal anemia. Puerperal anemia can impair postpartum maternal and neonatal well-being. Objective: To determine the effect of treatment of moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia using a single intravenous total-dose iron dextran versus daily single dose oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose. Methodology: A randomized controlled study in which postpartum women with moderate iron-deficiency anemia were randomized into treatment with either a single total-dose intravenous iron dextran or with daily single doses of oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets for 6 weeks. Effects on hemoglobin concentration using either method were compared at 6 weeks postpartum. Analysis was per protocol using SPSS version 17 for windows. P-values ≤0.05 were considered significant. Results: Two hundred eighty-four women were recruited for the study: 142 women received single total dose intravenous infusion of iron dextran while 142 received daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets. Approximately 84.0% (237/282 completed the study and were analyzed including 81% (115/142 of those randomized to injectable iron therapy compared to 85.9% (122/142 of those randomized to oral treatment. The proportions of women who had attained hemoglobin concentration of at least 10 g/dL by the 6 weeks postpartum visit did not differ

  14. High burden of iron deficiency and different types of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease outpatients in Scandinavia: a longitudinal 2-year follow-up study.

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    Bager, Palle; Befrits, Ragnar; Wikman, Ola; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Bjørn; Hjortswang, Henrik; Dahlerup, Jens F

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been broadly described. The recurrence, type and burden of anemia remain unenlightened. The primary objective was to describe this. The secondary objective was to evaluate the implementation of European guidelines. This longitudinal follow-up study included 300 IBD outpatients from six centers in Scandinavia. Patients were enrolled in a research cohort, in which each center included 5% of their IBD cohort. The study was prospectively planned, while data were retrospectively collected. The burden of anemia was calculated as number of months with anemia. A Markov model was used to calculate the probabilities of transitioning between stages. The European guidelines were used as the standard for anemia management. Anemia affected > 50% of IBD outpatients during the 2-year observation period. Totally, 20% of the total observation time was spent in anemia. Over the 7200 months of observation, anemia was found in 1410 months. The most frequent type was combined anemia (63%). Combined anemia covers both anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Pure ACD was present in 21% of burden time, while pure IDA was present in 16% of burden time. The European guidelines have mainly been implemented. Anemia affected a majority of the IBD outpatients. One in five months, the patients were anemic. Anemia related to inflammation dominated the different types of anemia. Pure IDA was found in for 16%. These findings, despite a fair implementation of guidelines.

  15. Iron supplementation in suckling piglets: how to correct iron deficiency anemia without affecting plasma hepcidin levels.

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    Starzyński, Rafał R; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Tjalsma, Harold; Swinkels, Dorine W; Pieszka, Marek; Styś, Agnieszka; Mickiewicz, Michał; Lipiński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish an optimized protocol of iron dextran administration to pig neonates, which better meets the iron demand for erythropoiesis. Here, we monitored development of red blood cell indices, plasma iron parameters during a 28-day period after birth (till the weaning), following intramuscular administration of different concentrations of iron dextran to suckling piglets. To better assess the iron status we developed a novel mass spectrometry assay to quantify pig plasma levels of the iron-regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin-25. This hormone is predominantly secreted by the liver and acts as a negative regulator of iron absorption and reutilization. The routinely used protocol with high amount of iron resulted in the recovery of piglets from iron deficiency but also in strongly elevated plasma hepcidin-25 levels. A similar protocol with reduced amounts of iron improved hematological status of piglets to the same level while plasma hepcidin-25 levels remained low. These data show that plasma hepcidin-25 levels can guide optimal dosing of iron treatment and pave the way for mixed supplementation of piglets starting with intramuscular injection of iron dextran followed by dietary supplementation, which could be efficient under condition of very low plasma hepcidin-25 level.

  16. Predictors of gastrointestinal lesions on endoscopy in iron deficiency anemia without gastrointestinal symptoms

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    Wasaya Rozina

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA due to occult gastrointestinal (GI blood loss usually remains unnoticed until patient become symptomatic. There is sparse data in IDA patients without gastrointestinal symptoms. This study was designed to find out the frequency and predictors of endoscopic lesions in IDA without gastrointestinal symptoms. Cross-sectional study performed on a convenience sample of consecutive subjects. Methods Ninety five consecutive patients with laboratory based diagnosis of IDA having no gastrointestinal symptoms were interviewed and their clinical and biochemical variables were recorded. All the study patients underwent esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD and colonoscopy. Endoscopic findings were documented as presence/absence of bleeding related lesion and presence/absence of cause of IDA. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to identify variables significantly related to outcome variables. Results Possible cause of anaemia was found in 71% and bleeding related lesions were found in 53% of patients. Upper gastrointestinal tract lesions were found in 41% of patients with bleeding related lesions. On multivariable logistic regression; advancing age, low mean corpuscular volume (MCV ≤ 60 fl, and positive fecal occult blood test were predictive factors for bleeding related GI lesions and cause of IDA Conclusion Clinical and Biochemical markers can predict gastrointestinal lesions on endoscopy in IDA patients without gastrointestinal symptoms. High proportion of upper gastrointestinal involvement warrants EGD as initial endoscopic procedure however, this needs validation by further studies.

  17. Iron supplementation in suckling piglets: how to correct iron deficiency anemia without affecting plasma hepcidin levels.

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    Rafał R Starzyński

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish an optimized protocol of iron dextran administration to pig neonates, which better meets the iron demand for erythropoiesis. Here, we monitored development of red blood cell indices, plasma iron parameters during a 28-day period after birth (till the weaning, following intramuscular administration of different concentrations of iron dextran to suckling piglets. To better assess the iron status we developed a novel mass spectrometry assay to quantify pig plasma levels of the iron-regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin-25. This hormone is predominantly secreted by the liver and acts as a negative regulator of iron absorption and reutilization. The routinely used protocol with high amount of iron resulted in the recovery of piglets from iron deficiency but also in strongly elevated plasma hepcidin-25 levels. A similar protocol with reduced amounts of iron improved hematological status of piglets to the same level while plasma hepcidin-25 levels remained low. These data show that plasma hepcidin-25 levels can guide optimal dosing of iron treatment and pave the way for mixed supplementation of piglets starting with intramuscular injection of iron dextran followed by dietary supplementation, which could be efficient under condition of very low plasma hepcidin-25 level.

  18. Vitamin D Status in Children with Iron Deficiency and/or Anemia

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    Esraa Arjumand Qader

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Iron and vitamin D inadequacy are both essential wellbeing issues, an extra advancement has been the vitamin D extra skeletal role. Late collecting proof demonstrates that vitamin D inadequacy is pervasive in people with pallor, we meant to recognize a potential relationship between vitamin D lack and iron insufficiency. Materials and Methods A case control study was done in Erbil, Iraq during April 2015 to April 2016, on 160 children aged 1-5 years who referred to Raparin hospital. Blood test was acquired from every kid for measuring hemoglobin, serum iron and vitamin D level. Results The mean estimation of vitamin D was lower 21.3ng/dl in iron deficiency group in contrast with control group and it was essentially lower in gathering that had hemoglobin of under 11gm/dl (19.7ng/dl in contrast with those with more than 11gm/dl. There was a direct relationship between serum iron, hemoglobin and vitamin D levels (r=0.520, PConclusion There was significant moderate positive correlation between vitamin D and serum iron level.

  19. Anemia and iron deficiency among school adolescents: burden, severity, and determinant factors in southwest Ethiopia

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    Tesfaye M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Melkam Tesfaye,1 Tilahun Yemane,2 Wondimagegn Adisu,2 Yaregal Asres,2 Lealem Gedefaw,21Department of Clinical Laboratory, Bonga Hospital, Bonga, 2Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Pathology, College of Health Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia Background: Adolescence is the period of most rapid growth second to childhood. The physical and physiological changes that occur in adolescents place a great demand on their nutritional requirements and make them more vulnerable to anemia. Anemia in the adolescence causes reduced physical and mental capacity and diminished concentration in work and educational performance, and also poses a major threat to future safe motherhood in girls. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its associated factors among school adolescents in Bonga Town, southwest Ethiopia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 408 school adolescents in Bonga Town, southwest Ethiopia, from March 15, 2014 to May 25, 2014. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic and other data. A total of 7 mL of venous blood and 4 g of stool samples were collected from each study participant. Blood and stool samples were analyzed for hematological and parasitological analyses, respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 20 software for Windows. Results: The overall prevalence of anemia was 15.2% (62/408, of which 83.9% comprised mild anemia. The proportion of microcytic, hypochromic anemia was 53% (33/62. Being female (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =3.04, 95% confidence interval (CI =1.41–6.57, household size ≥5 (AOR =2.58, 95% CI =1.11–5.96, father's illiteracy (AOR =9.03, 95% CI =4.29–18.87, intestinal parasitic infection (AOR =5.37, 95% CI =2.65–10.87, and low body mass index (AOR =2.54, 95% CI =1.17–5.51 were identified as determinants of anemia among school adolescents. Conclusion: This study showed that anemia was a mild public

  20. [Influential factors of iron deficient anemia among infants aged 8 months based on a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao; Yan, Yan; Xiang, Shiting; Li, Hongyan; Tan, Shan; He, Qiong; Sha, Tingting; Liu, Shiping; Zeng, Guangyu; Yan, Qiang

    2017-02-28

    To study the status and influential factors of iron deficient anemia (IDA) among infants aged 8 months in Changsha City.
 Methods: A case-control study was performed in this research. The case group including 105 8-month-old infants definitely diagnosed as IDA based on standardized blood test. Four-times numbers of age- and genger-matched infants without IDA were selected as a control group. Chi-square test and conditional logistic regression was used to analyze the influential factors for IDA.
 Results: The incidence rate of IDA among infants aged 8 months in Changsha City was 14.7%. The risk factors were as follows: mother with anemia in late pregnancy (OR=3.540, 95% CI 1.898 to 6.601), mixed feeding within 6 months old (OR=1.682, 95% CI 1.099 to 2.574), artificial feeding within 6 months old (OR=4.162, 95% CI 1.343 to 12.896), complementary feeding before 6 months old (OR=1.423, 95% CI 1.022 to 1.982), complementary feeding at or after 7 months old (OR=4.415, 95% CI 2.150 to 9.064), recurrent respiratory tract infections within 8 months old (OR=2.878, 95% CI 1.224 to 6.764), and repeated diarrhea within 8 months old (OR=3.710, 95% CI 1.533 to 8.980).
 Conclusion: There is certain incidence rate of IDA among infants aged 8 months in Changsha City. To prevent the IDA among infants, we should treat mothers' anemia during pregnancy, advocate scientific feeding, encourage complete breastfeeding until 6 months old, add complementary food timely and reasonably, treat infants suffering from respiratory or digestive diseases actively.

  1. Can soluble transferrin receptor be used in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia and assessing iron response in infants with moderate acute malnutrition?

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    Büyükkaragöz, Bahar; Akgun, Necat A; Bulus, Ayse D; Durmus Aydogdu, Sultan; Bal, Cengiz

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and evaluating iron response in infants with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Infants with hemoglobin (Hb) levels lower than threshold values for anemia for their ages and hypochromic/ microcytic anemia on peripheral smear were recruited. MAM was defined as weight/height z score infants with MAM and anemia (MA group), 32 infants with anemia without MAM (group A), and healthy controls (n= 30). Following anemia and malnutrition treatment, tests were repeated. Besides hematological indices compatible with IDA, serum iron (Fe) and transferrin saturation (TS) were significantly lower, while transferrin was significantly higher in MA and A groups compared to controls (p 0.05) and significantly higher than controls (p infants with MAM.

  2. Maternal and Cord Blood Hepcidin Concentrations in Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Sriparna Basu

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Even in the presence of low serum iron and ferritin, maternal and cord blood hepcidin concentrations remained high in severe anemia. Failure of this proportional suppression of hepcidin indicates poor systemic bioavailability of iron to the mother and poor placental transport.

  3. Direct Comparison of the Safety and Efficacy of Ferric Carboxymaltose versus Iron Dextran in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Iftikhar Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several intravenous iron complexes are available for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA. Iron dextran (DEX is associated with an elevated risk of potentially serious anaphylactic reactions, whereas others must be administered in several small infusions to avoid labile iron reactions. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM is a nondextran intravenous iron which can be administered in high single doses. A randomized, open label, and multicenter comparison of FCM to DEX in adults with IDA and baseline hemoglobin of ≤11.0 g/dL was conducted. A total of 160 patients were in the safety population (FCM n=82; DEX n=78. Adverse events, including immune system disorders (0% in FCM versus 10.3% in DEX, P=0.003 and skin disorders (7.3% in FCM versus 24.4% in DEX, P=0.004, were less frequently observed in the FCM group. A greater portion of patients in the FCM group experienced a transient, asymptomatic decrease in phosphate compared to patients in the DEX group (8.5% in FCM versus 0% in DEX, P=0.014. In the FCM arm, the change in hemoglobin from baseline to the highest observed level was 2.8 g/dL, whereas the DEX arm displayed a change of 2.4 g/dL (P=0.20. Treatment of IDA with FCM resulted in fewer hypersensitivity-related reactions than DEX.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of laser radiation on fibroblast proliferation in repair of skin wounds of rats with iron deficiency anemia

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    DeCastro, Isabele C. V.; Oliveira-Sampaio, Susana C. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. de C.; Ferreira, Maria de Fátima L.; Cangussu, Maria T.; N. dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low- level laser therapy (LLLT) on fibroblast proliferation on wound repair of rats with Iron deficiency anemia since there is no reports on literature about this subject. Iron deficiency anemia was induced on 36 newborn rats then an excisional wound was created on the dorsum of the animals which were divided into four groups: (I) - non-anemic, (II) - Anemic, (III) - non-anemic + LLLT, (IV) Anemic+ LLLT. The animals in each group were sacrificed at 7, 14 and 21 days. Laser irradiation was performed on each group (λ660nm,40Mw,CW) by contact mode with a dose of 2,5J/ cm2 in four points on the area of the wound and total of 10J/cm2 per session. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Paired t-test. The results showed LLLT was able to stimulate fibroblastic proliferation in rats with iron deficiency anemia at the 21st day while at control group (III) no statistically significant differences was found.

  5. A case of iron deficiency anemia with co-existing Hb Fontainebleau.

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    Abhishek HL Purohit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hb Fontainebleaue is a rare alpha chain variant in the Indian population which generates an unknown peak on hemoglobin HPLC study and does cause diagnostic difficulty to those who are not acquainted with this entity. We present a case of Hb Fontainebleau, an eighteen year old patient who presented with symptoms related to anemia to our department and unknown peak observed in HPLC plots lead us to family study and molecular characterization for this case.

  6. Management of inflammatory bowel disease-related anemia and iron deficiency with specific reference to the role of intravenous iron in current practice.

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    Stein, Jürgen; Aksan, Ayşegül; Farrag, Karima; Dignass, Axel; Radeke, Heinfried H

    2017-11-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, impacting disease prognosis, morbidity, hospitalization rates and time lost from work. While iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic inflammation predominate, combinations of hematimetric and biochemical markers facilitate the diagnosis and targeted therapy of other etiologies according to their underlying pathophysiological causes. Intravenous iron replacement is currently recommended in IBD patients with moderate to severe anemia or intolerance to oral iron. Areas covered: This review examines the impact, pathophysiology and diagnostics of iron deficiency and anemia, compares the characteristics and safety profiles of available oral and intravenous iron preparations, and highlights issues which require consideration in decision making for therapy administration and monitoring. Expert opinion: Modern intravenous iron formulations have been shown to be safe and effective in IBD patients, allowing rapid anemia correction and repletion of iron stores. While traditional oral iron preparations are associated with increased inflammation, negative effects on the microbiome, and poor tolerance and compliance, first clinical trial data indicate that newer oral compounds such as ferric maltol and sucrosomial iron offer improved tolerability and may thus offer a viable alternative for the future.

  7. Consumo de leite de vaca e anemia ferropriva na infância Cow's milk consumption and iron deficiency anemia in children

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    Maria A. A. Oliveira

    2005-10-01

    organizations. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Iron deficiency anemia is a severe public health problem in developing countries. Breast milk contains adequate iron for full term babies in the first 6 months. Thereafter, an additional iron-rich diet becomes essential. In recognition of the importance of the diet in triggering anemia, this paper discusses the relationship in children between a high intake of cow's milk and iron deficiency anemia. Gastrointestinal and allergic problems may be caused by early introduction of cow's milk or by its substitution for breast milk. Furthermore, cow's milk has decreased iron density and bioavailability, excess protein and minerals, notably calcium, and thus interferes in the absorption of iron from other foods, and is also linked to small intestinal hemorrhage in young children. CONCLUSIONS: The use of cow's milk in lieu of other foods rich in bioavailable iron was shown to be a risk factor for anemia. Exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life, discretionary weaning only after the 24th month, and a complementary diet rich in iron are highly important to avoid anemia and its consequences.

  8. Prevalencia de anemia y deficiencia de hierro en escolares jujeños de 12 años Prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in 12 year old school children from Jujuy

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    María C. Buys

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available La deficiencia de hierro es una de las deficiencias de micronutrientes más comunes. Los adolescentes son un grupo vulnerable. Un reconocimiento oportuno puede prevenir una anemia ferropénica, etapa final y grave de dicha deficiencia, insuficientemente conocida en nuestro país. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar los valores hematológicos en adolescentes y conocer las prevalencias de anemia y deficiencia de hierro. Definidas como a anemia: hematocrito (Hto Iron deficiency is highly frequent among adolescents. Its early detection can prevent the development of a ferropenic anemia, a serious condition. The problem has not been well studied in our country. The purpose of this work was to determine the frequency of iron deficiency and anemia in adolescents. The criteria considered were: hematocrit below 38%, b saturation transferrin below 16%, c ferritin below 15 ng/ml. The study was carried out in 2.265 schoolchildren, 12 years old, of both sexes, in urban and periurban areas in the city of San Salvador de Jujuy (1.250 a.s.l.. The following parameters were measured: hematocrit as well as serum iron and total iron binding capacity, both by colorimetric method. Ferritin was measured by ELISA. Anemia was not found. Iron deficiency as estimated by the iron functional component, was found in 25% of girls and 21% of boys and, through iron stores, in 28% of girls and 18% of boys. Iron deficiency stores in both sexes is the more relevant alteration, indicating that the population sample here studied constitutes a highly vulnerable group. The early detection of iron deficiency will help physical and intellectual development so that adequate sanitary policies are necessary for its prevention.

  9. Gastrointestinal Pyogenic Granuloma (Lobular Capillary Hemangioma: An Underrecognized Entity Causing Iron Deficiency Anemia

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    Marshall W. Meeks

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma (PG, more accurately known as lobular capillary hemangioma, is a benign vascular tumor that usually occurs in the skin or oral mucosa. This lesion is rarely reported in the gastrointestinal tract but is known to bleed if not resected. We herein describe a case series with the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic findings of four cases of gastrointestinal PG at our institution. In addition, we provide a review of the literature and summation of all reported cases of PG specific to the gastrointestinal tract. Based on our experience, we suggest that the actual incidence of gastrointestinal PG may in fact be higher than reported because PG can be unrecognized or improperly diagnosed. It is important for the clinician to properly recognize this lesion as a source of anemia and its propensity to bleed during biopsy or resection.

  10. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia

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    Hosny KM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Mohamed Hosny,1,2 Zainy Mohammed Banjar,3 Amani H Hariri,4 Ali Habiballah Hassan5 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni Suef University, Beni Suef, Egypt; 3Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Consultant Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hera Genaral Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world’s children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In

  11. Prophylaxis for iron deficiency anemia using ferrous sulfate among infants followed up at a primary healthcare unit in the municipality of Embu-SP (2003/2004

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    André Fernando Shibukawa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Iron deficiency anemia is an important public health problem in Brazil. In the municipality of Embu, a population study in 1996 found anemia prevalence of 68.5% among children aged one to two years. From these data, prescription of prophylactic ferrous sulfate was instituted in 1998 for children under two years old followed up within the children's healthcare program. After five years of intervention, the prevalence of anemia and associated factors were investigated among children aged 12 to 18 months to whom guidance for prophylactic ferrous sulfate use had been given. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study covering October 2003 to June 2004 at a primary healthcare unit in Embu. METHODS: A randomized sample of children aged 12 to 18 months to whom guidance for prophylactic ferrous sulfate use had been given was obtained. Hemoglobin was measured in capillary blood, using HemoCue® apparatus. Hemoglobin < 11 g/100 dl was taken to indicate anemia. RESULTS: The sample comprised 118 children and anemia was found in 41.5%. There was no statistically significant association between anemia presence and the variables of sex, birth weight, neonatal intercurrences, chronic diseases, breastfeeding or iron supplementation use. There was a statistically significant association (p = 0.03 between anemia presence and per capita income, such that the higher the income was, the lower the prevalence of anemia was. CONCLUSION: The prophylaxis program against iron deficiency anemia did not achieve the expected results. New strategies must be considered in the light of the magnitude of the problem.

  12. Determinants of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Cohort of Children Aged 6-71 Months Living in the Northeast of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Zanin, Francisca Helena Calheiros; da Silva, Camilo Adalton Mariano; Bonomo, Élido; Teixeira, Romero Alves; Pereira, Cíntia Aparecida de Jesus; dos Santos, Karina Benatti; Fausto, Maria Arlene; Negrão-Correa, Deborah Aparecida; Lamounier, Joel Alves; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide. The aim was to identify the prevalence and incidence of anemia in children and to identify predictors of this condition, including intestinal parasites, social, nutritional and environmental factors, and comorbidities. A population-based cohort study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 6–71 months living in Novo Cruzeiro in the Minas Gerais State. Data were collected in 2008 and 2009 by interview and included socio-economic and demographic information about the children and their families. Blood samples were collected for testing of hemoglobin, ferritin and C-reactive protein. Anthropometric measurements and parasitological analyses of fecal samples were performed. To identify risk factors associated with anemia multivariate analyses were performed using the generalized estimating equations (GEE). In 2008 and 2009, respectively, the prevalence rates of anemia were 35.9% (95%CI 31.2–40.8) and 9.8% (95%CI 7.2–12.9), the prevalence rates of iron deficiency were 18.4% (95%CI 14.7–22.6) and 21.8% (95%CI 17.8–26.2), and the incidence rates of anemia and iron deficiency were 3.2% and 21.8%. The following risk factors associated with anemia were: iron deficiency (OR = 3.2; 95%CI 2.0-.5.3), parasitic infections (OR = 1.9; 95%CI 1.2–2.8), being of risk of or being a low length/height-for-age (OR = 2.1; 95%CI 1.4–3.2), and lower retinol intake (OR = 1.7; 95%CI 1.1–2.7), adjusted over time. Nutritional factors, parasitic infections and chronic malnutrition were identified as risk factors for anemia. These factors can be verified in a chronic process and have been classically described as risk factors for these conditions. PMID:26445270

  13. Renal functional and structural integrity in infants with iron deficiency anemia: relation to oxidative stress and response to iron therapy.

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    El-Shimi, Mohamed S; El-Farrash, Rania A; Ismail, Eman A; El-Safty, Ibrahim A; El-Safty, A; Nada, Ahmed S; El-Gamel, Omayma A; Salem, Yomna M; Shoukry, Sara M

    2015-10-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare renal functional and structural integrity in 50 infants with IDA and 50 healthy controls and to assess the relation between IDA and oxidative stress and response to iron therapy. This was a prospective study in which peripheral blood samples were collected from all study subjects and the following laboratory investigations performed: serum iron profile, urinary microalbumin, urinary leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), fractional excretion of sodium (FeNa), serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC), serum malondialdehyde (MDA), serum and urinary trace elements (iron, copper, zinc, calcium and magnesium). All patients received oral iron therapy and were followed-up for 3 months. The levels of baseline urinary markers were higher among the patients with IDA than among the controls (p < 0.05). Patients had a lower pre-therapy TAC and lower serum zinc and magnesium levels than controls as well as higher MDA and serum copper levels (p < 0.05). MDA level was positively correlated to microalbumin and LAP level (p < 0.05). Urinary LAP concentration was positively correlated to urinary trace element concentrations (p < 0.05). A significant decrease in microalbumin, LAP, FeNa, and urinary trace elements was observed post-iron therapy while hemoglobin and ferritin levels were increased (p < 0.05). Among the study subjects, IDA had an adverse influence on renal functional and structural integrity which could be reversed with iron therapy. Oxidative stress played an important role in the pathogenesis of renal injury in IDA.

  14. Anemia e deficiência de ferro em gestantes adolescentes Anemia and iron deficiency in pregnant adolescents

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    Elizabeth FUJIMORI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Por meio de dosagem de ferritina sérica, transferrina sérica, hemoglobina e hematócrito, caracterizou-se o estado nutricional de ferro de 79 gestantes adolescentes de primeira consulta pré-natal (£ 20 semanas de gestação, atendidas na Rede Básica de Saúde de um Município da Grande São Paulo. Todos os valores hematológicos estudados foram menores entre as gestantes do segundo trimestre gestacional em relação às do primeiro, sendo as diferenças estatisticamente significativas (pThe objective of this study was to characterize iron nutritional status of 79 pregnant adolescents, at first prenatal consultation (<= 20 weeks of gestation, in the Primary Health System of a district of Great São Paulo, through the serum ferritin, serum transferrin, hemoglobin and hematocrit determinations. All the hematologic values studied were smaller for the pregnant adolescents in the second gestational trimester than for the ones in the first. Statistically significant differences (p.<.0.05 were found just for hemoglobin. It was verified that 64.3% and 32.1% had, respectively, less than 500.mg and 300.mg of organic iron reservations, and 5.4% presented serious lack of this mineral. By World Health Organization criterion 19.0% of the pregnant women were iron-deficient (Saturation of Transferrin <.16% and 13.9% were anemic (Hemoglobin.<.11 g/dl.

  15. Evaluation of the effect of LED radiation in the repair of skin wounds on the dorsum of rats with iron deficiency anemia

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    de Oliveira, Susana Carla Pires Sampaio; de Carvalho Monteiro, Juliana Santos; dos Santos Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu; DeCastro, Isabele Cardoso V.; Menezes, Diego Silva; de Fátima Lima Ferreira, Maria; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Zanin, Fátima; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz

    2010-05-01

    Iron deficiency anemia causes reduction on the level of hemoglobin and of the number of RBC and affects around 35% of the human population. Laser and LED therapies have been successfully used on wound healing studies. The aim of the present study was to assess histologically the effect of LED Phototherapy on the healing of cutaneous wounds on anemic rats. Fifty one 21 days old male wistar rats weighting around 50 g were kept under iron free die (Sem ferro-AIN93-G) during 15 days in order to induce anemia. Non treated animals acted as controls. A standartized cutaneous wound was created on the dorsum of each animal whom were distributed into four groups: Group I—Anemia+LED, Group II—Non anemic+LED, Group III—Anemia+no treatment, Group IV—No anemic+no-treatment. Irradiation started immediately after surgery and repeated at 48 h intervals during 21 days. Animal death occurred after 7, 14 and 21 days after wounding. The results of the histologic analysis showed that LED Phototherapy stimulated fibroblastic proliferation. It is concluded that LED irradiation improves wound healing on iron deficient anemic animals.

  16. Intestinal Bacterial Flora that Compete on the Haem Precursor Iron Fumarate in Iron Deficiency Anemia Cases

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    Selim, S. A. H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The study focused on finding if there is any possible relation between the intestinal bacterial population quantitative and qualitative and the deficiency of the most important iron compounds as haem precursors. Methodology and Results: Blood complete picture and stool analyses were done to 750 volunteer cases whom were asked for these analyses by their physicians. Analyses proved that 560 cases representing 75.2 % were anemic as the RBC(s based on counts of the total studied cases of less than 263 x 104 and the haemoglobin amount ranged between 7.2 and 11.3 g/dl, while the remainder 24.8 % of the volunteer sample was not anemic. A high male/female ratio ofanemic cases, 1:27 was also documented. Considering that all the studied stool samples should be completely free from any parasites or any other anemia-related diseases was a priority. Bacteriological analysis of stool samples of the anemic cases resulted in the detection of high counts of total viable bacteria, exceeded 42 x 109 cfu/g, while it was never more than 26 x 106 cfu/g and decreased to 4 x 106 cfu/g in many cases in this study. Identifying of the 361 bacterial isolates, were found to belong to 12 genera and 19 species, 6 of them; Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Micrococcus luteus, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus coagulans , were found and in high counts in the stool samples of only anemic cases. The ability of these isolates to compete for iron compounds such as ferrous fumarate alone or with glucose and phytate as activators or inhibitors to these abilities was investigated. Results proved 11 species out of the 19 identified species are capable to use and compete on ferrous fumarate as a haemprecursor. Sensitivity test for the representatives of the 19 species and 6 of the most commonly used antibiotics in the Egyptian pharmacy, using standard disc method, revealed variable susceptibilities of almost all of them to more than one of

  17. Oral versus intravenous iron therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and iron deficiency with and without anemia in Germany – a real-world evidence analysis

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    Stein J

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Stein,1,2 Jennifer Scarlet Haas,3 Siew Hwa Ong,4 Kathrin Borchert,3 Thomas Hardt,5 Elmira Lechat,4 Kerry Nip,5 Douglas Foerster,4 Sebastian Braun,3 Daniel C Baumgart6 1Interdisciplinary Crohn Colitis Center Rhein-Main, Frankfurt/Main, Germany; 2Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, DGD Clinics Sachsenhausen, Teaching Hospital of the J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany; 3Xcenda GmbH, Hannover, Germany; 4Vifor Pharma Ltd., Glattbrugg, Switzerland; 5Vifor Pharma Deutschland GmbH, Munich, Germany; 6Division of Gastroenterology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: Iron-deficiency anemia and iron deficiency are common comorbidities associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD resulting in impaired quality of life and high health care costs. Intravenous iron has shown clinical benefit compared to oral iron therapy. Aim: This study aimed to compare health care outcomes and costs after oral vs intravenous iron treatment for IBD patients with iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia (ID/A in Germany. Methods: IBD patients with ID/A were identified by ICD-10-GM codes and newly commenced iron treatment via ATC codes in 2013 within the InGef (formerly Health Risk Institute research claims database. Propensity score matching was performed to balance both treatment groups. Non-observable covariates were adjusted by applying the difference-in-differences (DID approach. Results: In 2013, 589 IBD patients with ID/A began oral and 442 intravenous iron treatment. After matching, 380 patients in each treatment group were analyzed. The intravenous group had fewer all-cause hospitalizations (37% vs 48% and ID/A-related hospitalizations (5% vs 14% than the oral iron group. The 1-year preobservation period comparison revealed significant health care cost differences between both groups. After adjusting for cost differences by DID method, total health care cost savings in the intravenous iron group were

  18. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  19. Delayed erythropoiesis in irradiated rats grafted with syngeneic marrow: effects of cytotoxic drugs and iron-deficiency anemia. [Gamma radiation; cyclophosphamide; busulfan; dimethylmyleran

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    Rodday, P.; Bennett, M.; Vitalle, J.J.

    1976-09-01

    Erythropoiesis in spleens of lethally irradiated Lewis rats grafted with 4-35 x 10/sup 6/ syngeneic marrow cells was inhibited or delayed during the test period of 5 days; this was in marked contrast to observations in irradiated mice. The mechanism of this inhibition was the subject of this study. Pretreatment of recipients 9 days prior to irradiation with the cytotoxic drugs cyclophosphamide (CY), busulfan (BUS), or dimethylmyleran (DMM), or the induction of iron deficiency with anemia in recipients reversed this delayed erythropoiesis. However, neither iron-deficiency anemia nor pretreatment with BUS or DMM affected the ability of irradiated recipients to reject 20 to 50 x 10/sup 6/ allogeneic marrow cells. The administration of commercial preparations of erythropoietin to hosts stimulated erythropoiesis moderately. However, proliferation of syngeneic marrow cells was not enhanced when infused into lethally irradiated spontaneous hypertensive (SH) inbred-strain rats which have high levels of endogenous erythropoietin. Finally, plasma from irradiated rats treated with phenylhydrazine to produce severe anemia was rich in erythropoietin but failed to stimulate erythropoiesis in the cell transfer system. Two hypotheses are considered.

  20. Iron fortification of whole wheat flour reduces iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia and increases body iron stores in Indian school-aged children.

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    Muthayya, Sumithra; Thankachan, Prashanth; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Amalrajan, Vani; Thomas, Tinku; Lubree, Himangi; Agarwal, Dhiraj; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Hurrell, Richard F; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-11-01

    Wheat is the primary staple food for nearly one-third of the world's population. NaFeEDTA is the only iron (Fe) compound suitable for fortifying high extraction flours. We tested the hypothesis that NaFeEDTA-fortified, whole wheat flour reduces Fe deficiency (ID) and improves body Fe stores (BIS) and cognitive performance in Indian children. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, school feeding trial, 6- to 15-y-old, Fe-depleted children (n = 401) were randomly assigned to either a daily wheat-based lunch meal fortified with 6 mg of Fe as NaFeEDTA or an otherwise identical unfortified control meal. Hemoglobin (Hb) and Fe status were measured at baseline, 3.5 mo, and 7 mo. Cognitive performance was evaluated at baseline and 7 mo in children (n = 170) at one of the study sites. After 7 mo, the prevalence of ID and ID anemia in the treatment group significantly decreased from 62 to 21% and 18 to 9%, respectively. There was a time x treatment interaction for Hb, serum ferritin, transferrin receptor, zinc protoporphyrin, and BIS (all P fortified flour could not be differentiated from unfortified flour. There were no significant differences in cognitive performance tests between the groups. NaFeEDTA-fortified wheat flour markedly improved BIS and reduced ID in Fe-depleted children. It may be recommended for wider use in national school feeding programs.