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Sample records for anemia disease locus

  1. Targeted resequencing and analysis of the Diamond-Blackfan anemia disease locus RPS19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Martinez Barrio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ribosomal protein S19 gene locus (RPS19 has been linked to two kinds of red cell aplasia, Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA and Transient Erythroblastopenia in Childhood (TEC. Mutations in RPS19 coding sequences have been found in 25% of DBA patients, but not in TEC patients. It has been suggested that non-coding RPS19 sequence variants contribute to the considerable clinical variability in red cell aplasia. We therefore aimed at identifying non-coding variations associated with DBA or TEC phenotypes.We targeted a region of 19'980 bp encompassing the RPS19 gene in a cohort of 89 DBA and TEC patients for resequencing. We provide here a catalog of the considerable, previously unrecognized degree of variation in this region. We identified 73 variations (65 SNPs, 8 indels that all are located outside of the RPS19 open reading frame, and of which 67.1% are classified as novel. We hypothesize that specific alleles in non-coding regions of RPS19 could alter the binding of regulatory proteins or transcription factors. Therefore, we carried out an extensive analysis to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS. A series of putative interaction sites coincide with detected variants. Sixteen of the corresponding transcription factors are of particular interest, as they are housekeeping genes or show a direct link to hematopoiesis, tumorigenesis or leukemia (e.g. GATA-1/2, PU.1, MZF-1.Specific alleles at predicted TFBSs may alter the expression of RPS19, modify an important interaction between transcription factors with overlapping TFBS or remove an important stimulus for hematopoiesis. We suggest that the detected interactions are of importance for hematopoiesis and could provide new insights into individual response to treatment.

  2. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000565.htm Anemia of chronic disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... body tissues. There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is anemia that is found in people ...

  3. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  4. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is anemia of inflammation and chronic disease (AI/ACD)? Anemia of inflammation and chronic disease is a ... after iron-deficiency anemia. 1 Who gets AI/ACD? While AI/ACD can affect people at any ...

  5. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  6. Anemia

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    ... reason for blood cell counts to be low. Anemia of Chronic Disease Anemia of chronic disease is a result of chronic inflammation caused by ... benign or malignant tumors, or a variety of chronic medical conditions. Pernicious Anemia ... © 2018 Health ...

  7. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  8. [ANEMIA IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukmir, L; Fišić, M; Diminić-Lisica, I; Ljubotina, A

    2016-12-01

    Renal anemia develops secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its incidence increases with the progression of CKD. The aim is to inform family physicians about the latest developments and ways of approaching the issue, in accordance with national guidelines. The PubMed and Cochrane systematic reviews databases were searched for the 1996-2015 period using the following key words: anemia, chronic renal failure, erythropoietin, and primary health care. In addition, all relevant articles and textbooks available were manually searched to suggest the following conclusions. The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) slows down the progression of CKD, reduces the need for blood transfusions and improves the patient quality of life. Target hemoglobin (Hb) concentration to be permanently maintained is 110-120 g/L. Higher Hb levels are associated with higher mortality and major cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. Target hemoglobin level should be strictly individualized depending on CKD stage (both non-dialyzed and dialyzed population), age, other risks, initial and maintenance treatment. Early recognition and appropriate correction of anemia using ESA is of utmost importance in CKD patients. Systematic primary and secondary prevention measures along with education and professional implementation of national guidelines in daily work of family practitioners can improve medical care of patients with CKD.

  9. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  10. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited.

  11. ANEMIA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE MORE THAN AN EXTRAINTESTINAL COMPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Pop, Corina Silvia; Calagiu, Dorina; Dobrin, Denisa; Chetroiu, Diana; Jantea, Petruta; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2016-01-01

    The most common hematologic complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease is anemia. Anemia in patients with IBD may be a result of iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency; anemia of chronic disease and hemolytic anemia are other causes in these patients. Factors contributing to the development of anemia include chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, vitamin B12 malabsorption secondary to terminal ileitis, folate deficiency as a result of sulfasalazine therapy. Approximately 30% of patients with IBD have hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dl. The risk of developing anemia relates to disease activity, given that blood loss and inflammatory anemia are triggered by intestinal inflammation. In the management strategy of IBD patients with anemia it is important to distinguish between the different types of anemia in order to decide an appropriate manner of treatment.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

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    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  13. Anemia: monosymptomatic celiac disease. A report of 3 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depla, A. C.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Mulder, C. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with monosymptomatic celiac disease (CD) can escape diagnosis for a long period. Anemia is a common finding in CD, although anemia as the sole symptom is relatively unknown. We report on three patients who presented with iron deficiency anemia and no other symptom, in whom CD was considered

  14. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACD is the second most common form of anemia, after iron-deficiency anemia. 1 1 Agarwal N, Prchal JT. Anemia of ... advances. Therefore, most people with kidney failure have anemia. Kidney ... develop iron deficiency due to blood loss during hemodialysis, a type ...

  15. Anemia and digestive diseases: An update for the clinician

    OpenAIRE

    Gomollón, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

    2009-01-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are so common in digestive diseases that often are underestimated and undertreated. Our goal is to review from classification to treatment of the diverse types of anemias in different digestive diseases to update our knowledge on diagnosis and treatment. With the goal of improving the prognosis and quality of life of digestive diseases patients, we will review current transfusion, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin roles in the treatment of anemia.

  16. Anemia and digestive diseases: an update for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomollón, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

    2009-10-07

    Anemia and iron deficiency are so common in digestive diseases that often are underestimated and undertreated. Our goal is to review from classification to treatment of the diverse types of anemias in different digestive diseases to update our knowledge on diagnosis and treatment. With the goal of improving the prognosis and quality of life of digestive diseases patients, we will review current transfusion, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin roles in the treatment of anemia.

  17. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shortage of iron. This condition is called iron deficiency anemia. There are a few other types of anemia, ... Try to avoid these foods if you have iron deficiency anemia. Foods high in vitamin B12 include: meat and ...

  18. The prevention of the anemia development during malignant diseases therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Priesolová, Denisa

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of this work explains the importance of aknowledging the process of diagnostics and a treatment of the cases with an anemia during malignant diseases. The predictive factors of the anemia development and the general condition negative effects are presented. The chapter two brings the definition of an anemia, how to evaluate the blood count and the biochemical examination, tells the compensational mechanisms of the organism and describes the clinical features of the developed ...

  19. The Value of Erythrocyte Indices and Red Cell Volume Distribution Width in Differential Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Anemia of Chronic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Altıntaş

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of chronic disease are the most commonly confused anemias. We investigate the diagnostic value of erythrocyte indices, red cell volume distribution width, and serum ferritin levels to make differential diagnosis of anemia in controls and anemic patients.Iron deficiency anemia (44 patients), anemia of chronic disease (41), IDA with anemia of chronic disease (17) and control (50) groups were compared. We performed serum ferritin, CBC, and sedimentation ra...

  20. Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Anemia and risk for cognitive decline in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Vittinghoff, Eric; Yang, Jingrong; Go, Alan S; Seliger, Stephen L; Kusek, John W; Lash, James; Cohen, Debbie L; Simon, James; Batuman, Vecihi; Ordonez, Juan; Makos, Gail; Yaffe, Kristine

    2016-01-28

    Anemia is common among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) but its health consequences are poorly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between anemia and cognitive decline in older adults with CKD. We studied a subgroup of 762 adults age ≥55 years with CKD participating in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Anemia was defined according to the World Health Organization criteria (hemoglobin anemia and baseline cognitive impairment on each test, defined as a cognitive score more than one standard deviation from the mean, and mixed effects models to determine the relation between anemia and change in cognitive function during follow-up after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. Of 762 participants with mean estimated glomerular filtration rate of 42.7 ± 16.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), 349 (46 %) had anemia. Anemia was not independently associated with baseline cognitive impairment on any test after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. Over a median 2.9 (IQR 2.6-3.0) years of follow-up, there was no independent association between anemia and change in cognitive function on any of the six cognitive tests. Among older adults with CKD, anemia was not independently associated with baseline cognitive function or decline.

  2. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement...... available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library......, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia...

  3. Pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease in rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Aessopos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rare anemias encompass a large and markedly heterogeneous group of nearly 90 different conditions, mostly congenital or genetically determined, that, according to the definition of the European Commission, have a global prevalence of less than 5 per 10,000 individuals. However, the geographical distribution of several of those anemias varies considerably and thus their local prevalence may be significantly higher in certain regions...

  4. Incidence rate of anemia in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuğ, Özlen; Kani, Haluk Tarık; Banzragch, Munkhtsetseg; İmeryüz, Neşe; Akın, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    To determine the incidence rate and distribution of anemia types over time from an Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patient cohort spanning 18 years. Between January 1995 and November 2013, the University Hospital digital databases as well as hard copies of patients' files were reviewed retrospectively. IBD patients with at least one complete blood count (CBC) report were included in this study. We obtained 941 IBD patients' records; 375 (39.9%) patients were diagnosed with Crohn's disease (CD), and 566 (60.1%) patients had ulcerative colitis (UC). Anemia was detected in 548 (58.2%) patients. Female patients were more frequently anemic than male patients (68.4% vs. 49.7%, p=0.001). The frequency of anemia was slightly higher in patients with CD (62.1%) than in patients with UC (55.7%) (p=0.04). The incidence rate of anemia for the entire IBD patient cohort was calculated as 103.45 per 1,000 patient-years. The correlation between the age of the IBD disease and the presence of anemia exhibited a high correlation coefficient of Pearson's r=0.702. This is the first study to report the incidence rate of anemia (103.45 per 1,000 patient-years) in a long-term cohort of IBD patients.

  5. Severe late anemia of hemolytic disease of the newborn

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    Mitchell, Simon; James, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Late anemia is a well-recognized complication of Rhesus hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The incidence of Rhesus HDN is declining, with a tendency for more severely affected pregnancies to be managed in specialist centres. Consequently, many paediatric departments may see relatively few affected infants with comparatively mild disease, and the risk of late anemia in such cases may not always be appreciated. Two cases of infants born with evidence of Rhesus isoimmunization noted at birth and encountering no immediate problems other than mild hyperbilirubinemia are described. After an uneventful early neonatal course, both infants were discharged without follow-up and presented in the second to third weeks of life with severe, life-threatening anemia, leading to neurological sequelae in one case. The importance of close surveillance, including hemoglobin measurements, in all infants with Rhesus hemolytic disease, irrespective of initial severity, is reiterated. PMID:20212966

  6. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  7. Anemia of chronic disease: illness or adaptive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Županić-Krmek; Sučić, Mirna; Bekić, Dinko

    2014-09-01

    The anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is the most prevalent anemia after iron deficiency anemia. It is associated with infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disease. ACD is a medical condition caused by the release of cytokines which mediate inflammatory and immune response (tumor necrosis factor, interleukins 1 and 6, and interferon). Abnormal iron metabolism with iron trapping in reticuloendothelial cells is primarily the cause of this condition, making iron unavailable for erythropoiesis although iron tissue reserves are elevated. Disorder in erythropoietin secretion and shortening of red cell life span also play a role in the pathogenesis of ACD. The main therapy is treatment of the underlying disorder and red cell transfusions in severe anemia. In more severe (protracted) anemias that lead to impaired quality of life and have an impact on the mortality and survival rate, erythropoiesis stimulating agents are used. Recently, new possibilities are being evaluated in terms of therapy for ACD in defined conditions, such as chelating agents, as well as hepcidin antagonist and other erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg ND

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neil D Goldberg Emeritus Chief of Gastroenterology, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, MD, USA Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. Keywords: anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, intravenous iron, iron deficiency, oral iron, therapy

  9. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to hemolytic anemia in a fetus or newborn. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and symptoms of hemolytic anemia will depend on the type and severity of the disease. People who have mild hemolytic anemia often have ...

  11. Characterization and pathogenesis of anemia in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David Q; Carreras, Caroline T; Fiske, Laurie M; Austin, Stephanie; Boree, Danielle; Kishnani, Priya S; Weinstein, David A

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the frequency and causes of anemia in glycogen storage disease type I. Hematologic data and iron studies were available from 202 subjects (163 with glycogen storage disease Ia and 39 with glycogen storage disease Ib). Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentrations less than the 5th percentile for age and gender; severe anemia was defined as presence of a hemoglobin glycogen storage disease Ia, 68/163 patients were anemic at their last follow-up. Preadolescent patients tended to have milder anemia secondary to iron deficiency, but anemia of chronic disease predominated in adults. Severe anemia was present in 8/163 patients, of whom 75% had hepatic adenomas. The anemia improved or resolved in all 10 subjects who underwent resection of liver lesions. Anemia was present in 72% of patients with glycogen storage disease Ib, and severe anemia occurred in 16/39 patients. Anemia in patients with glycogen storage disease Ib was associated with exacerbations of glycogen storage disease enterocolitis, and there was a significant correlation between C-reactive protein and hemoglobin levels (P = 0.036). Anemia is a common manifestation of both glycogen storage disease Ia and Ib, although the pathophysiology appears to be different between these conditions. Those with severe anemia and glycogen storage disease Ia likely have hepatic adenomas, whereas glycogen storage disease enterocolitis should be considered in those with glycogen storage disease Ib.

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Child with Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Alqoaer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia (SCA is a chronic haemoglobinopathy that can affect many organs in the body including gastrointestinal tract. However, colonic involvement is very rare and usually in the form of ischemic colitis. We are reporting an 11-year-old Saudi girl with SCA who presented with persistent diarrhea and was found to have inflammaftory bowel disease.

  13. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia in chronic celiac disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel'mer, S V; Mitina, E V; Karpina, L M; Smetanina, N S

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in celiac disease (CD) may be associated with deficiency of iron, vitamins, macro- and micronutrients. It is also possible the development of chronic disease anemia (CDA), associated with activation of proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of this work is to optimize the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children on the basis of study of iron metabolism disorders heterogeneity, including the role of CDA. We observed 34 children with CD aged 1.5 to 17 years, 27 of them children were observed both in the active stage of the disease and in remission. The control group included 25 children aged 1.2 to 17 years who were previously excluded for any chronic (including autoimmune) disease: these children were observed with chronic functional gastrointestinal motility disorders. Special methods of examination were study of iron metabolism, including the determination of the serum hepcidin level, as well as the determination of the serum proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] -α, interleukin [IL] -2, IL-6, IL-10). In active CD in 14.71% of children anemia of varying severity (mild or moderate) were diagnosed. Among these children we observed mild decrease of serum iron in the range 2.2-8.0 g/ml in 15 of 34 children (44%) and a marked reduction in serum ferritin level in 59% of children. In the active celiac disease in the majority of children there is a decrease in the serum hepcidin, but approximately in 20% of children serum hepcidin level was increased. This indicates the development of CDA in these children. During the active stage the average values of IL-2 was significantly increased (p iron metabolism disorders in celiac disease is a result of immunopathological process which results in a reduction in iron absorption in the gut due to the intestinal mucosa villous atrophy and to improve the hepcidin production by liver cells and iron depot blocking with the CDA development in 20% of children.

  14. Sickle Cell Anemia Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Disease KidsHealth / For Kids / Sickle Cell Disease What's ... to stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is an inherited (say: ...

  15. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Children With Potential Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Marleena; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Huhtala, Heini; Laurila, Kaija; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Active screening for celiac disease frequently detects seropositive children with normal villous morphology (potential celiac disease). It remains unclear whether these subjects should be treated. We here investigated the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with potential and mucosal atrophy celiac disease. The prospective study involved 19 children with potential disease, 67 with partial or subtotal villous atrophy (P/SVA), and 16 with total villous atrophy (TVA). Twenty-three healthy children comprised the control group. The groups were compared for various clinical, histological, and laboratory parameters and hepcidin. The prevalence of abnormal parameters was as follows (controls, potential celiac disease, P/SVA, and TVA, respectively): anemia 0%, 15%, 22%, and 63%; low iron 5%, 0%, 14%, and 50%; increased transferrin receptor 1 5%, 16%, 20%, and 47%; low ferritin 0%, 21%, 35%, and 87%; and low transferrin saturation 10%, 11%, 41%, and 71%. One subject had low folate and none had low vitamin B12. The median values for hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower and transferrin receptor 1 values higher in TVA group compared with other groups. After a median of 7 months on a gluten-free diet hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and albumin in children with P/SVA exceeded the baseline values in the potential celiac disease group. The development of anemia and iron deficiency in celiac disease is a continuum and may already be present in children with normal villous morphology, advocating an early diagnosis and possible dietary treatment of these patients.

  16. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known...

  17. Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease in geriatric hospitalized patients: How frequent are comorbidities as an additional explanation for the anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Etienne; Lioen, Pieter

    2015-08-01

    Anemia is an important clinical problem in older patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether comorbidities as an additional explanation for the severity of the anemia are frequent, and might help to explain the anemia severity in older patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the anemia of chronic disease (ACD). In the present prospective study, 191 consecutive hospitalized older patients with IDA and the ACD were investigated. A peripheral blood count, C-reactive protein, standard iron parameters, serum vitamin B12 and folate, and renal and thyroidal function tests were analyzed. The attending geriatrician was responsible for the medical diagnosis and follow up. A total of 56 patients with IDA and 135 with the ACD were investigated. Just 24 patients with IDA had normal serum folate, vitamin B12 and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels without laboratory evidence of inflammation or chronic renal failure, but one of these patients was diagnosed with hemolytic anemia. Hence, 23 patients (41%) were diagnosed with "IDA only". "ACD only" was diagnosed in 104 patients (77%), and 22 patients (16%) with ACD had chronic renal failure. A myelodysplastic syndrome was found in two patients. Additional etiologies are often diagnosed in anemic older patients, but it remains unknown to what extent these diseases might influence the pathogenesis of the anemia. Individual and clinical judgment remain crucial to evaluating and treating older anemic patients. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: prevalence, differential diagnosis and association with clinical and laboratory variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Andrade Alves

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES:Anemia is the most frequent extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease. This study aimed to: 1 determine the prevalence of anemia among patients with inflammatory bowel disease; 2 investigate whether routine laboratory markers are useful for diagnosing anemia; and 3 evaluate whether any association exists between anemia and clinical/laboratory variables.DESIGN AND SETTING:Cross-sectional at a federal university.METHODS:44 outpatients with Crohn's disease and 55 with ulcerative colitis were evaluated. Clinical variables (disease activity index, location of disease and pharmacological treatment and laboratory variables (blood count, iron laboratory, vitamin B12 and folic acid were investigated.RESULTS:Anemia and/or iron laboratory disorders were present in 75% of the patients with Crohn's disease and in 78.2% with ulcerative colitis. Anemia was observed in 20.5% of the patients with Crohn's disease and in 23.6% with ulcerative colitis. Iron-deficiency anemia was highly prevalent in patients with Crohn's disease (69.6% and ulcerative colitis (76.7%. Anemia of chronic disease in combination with iron deficiency anemia was present in 3% of the patients with Crohn's disease and in 7% of the patients with ulcerative colitis. There was no association between anemia and disease location. In ulcerative colitis, anemia was associated with the disease activity index.CONCLUSIONS:Most patients present iron laboratory disorders, with or without anemia, mainly due to iron deficiency. The differential diagnosis between the two most prevalent types of anemia was made based on clinical data and routine laboratory tests. In ulcerative colitis, anemia was associated with the disease activity index.

  19. Anemia management in cancer patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Andras T; Troppan, Katharina; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-12-01

    Anemia is a common complication of cancer and chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with decreased physical performance as well as poor prognosis for life expectancy. Renal and cancer-induced anemia share common features regarding pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies. It is typically treated with iron substitution, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) and in refractory cases with red blood cell transfusions. However, studies of the past few years unveiled numerous setbacks in the use of ESAs. These included a higher risk of cerebrovascular events and increased mortality without the improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD. Moreover, particularly negative results were observed in patients with previous cancer history under ESA therapy. These unfavorable findings have forced the clinicians to reevaluate the management of renal anemia. This led to decrease of ESA usage, while iron substitution and alternative therapeutic options gained more significance. Iron supplementation is also accompanied with certain risks ranging from gastrointestinal complications to severe allergic reactions and increased rate of infections. Furthermore, the evaluation of the long-term safety of excessive iron therapy is still lacking, especially in CKD patients with cancer. In the absence of these clinical studies, this review aims to summarize the currently available therapeutic strategies in anemia management of CKD patients with concomitant cancer. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Brainstem: neglected locus in neurodegenerative diseases

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    Lea T Grinberg

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with protein TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP. Neuropathologically, NDs are characterized by abnormal intracellular and extracellular protein deposits and by disease-specific neuronal death. Practically all terminal stages of NDs are clinically associated with dementia. Therefore, major attention was directed to protein deposits and neuron loss in supratentorial (telencephalic brain regions in the course of NDs. This was also true for PD, although the pathological hallmark of PD is degeneration of pigmented neurons of the brainstem’s substantia nigra. However, PD pathophysiology was explained by dopamine depletion in the telencephalic basal ganglia due to insufficiency and degeneration of the projection neurons located in substantia nigra. In a similar line of argumentation AD- and FTLD-related clinical deficits were exclusively explained by supratentorial allo- and neocortical laminar neuronal necrosis. Recent comprehensive studies in AD and PD early stages found considerable and unexpected involvement of brainstem nuclei, which could have the potential to profoundly change our present concepts on origin, spread, and early clinical diagnosis of these diseases. In contrast with PD and AD, few studies addressed brainstem involvement in the course of the different types of FTLD-TDP. Some of the results, including ours, disclosed a higher and more widespread pathology than anticipated. The present review will focus mainly on the impact of brainstem changes during the course of the most frequent NDs including PD, AD, and FTLD-TDP, with special emphasis on the need for more comprehensive research on FTLDs.

  1. Ferric carboxymaltose prevents recurrence of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evstatiev, Rayko; Alexeeva, Olga; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common systemic complication of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Iron-deficiency anemia recurs frequently and rapidly after iron-replacement therapy in patients with IBD. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if administration...... of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) prevents anemia in patients with IBD and low levels of serum ferritin....

  2. Hepcidin and iron parameters in children with anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Gunjan; Sharma, Sunita; Chandra, Jagdish; Nangia, Anita

    2017-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the two most prevalent forms of anemia having interrelated characteristics. Hepcidin, a newly introduced biomarker for assessment of iron status, is a homeostatic regulator of iron metabolism. We investigated the role of hepcidin and other conventional iron parameters to assess iron status among children with ACD and IDA. We also identified children with ACD who developed iron deficiency (ID). The study was undertaken in anemic children with 30 cases each of ACD and IDA along with 30 age and sex-matched controls. The ACD cases were subdivided into pure ACD and ACD with coexistent ID. All cases were subjected to following tests: complete blood count with peripheral smear, serum C-reactive protein, serum interleukin-6, iron studies, serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and serum hepcidin. The mean serum hepcidin concentration was significantly increased in pure ACD patients (143.85±42.76 ng/mL) as compared to those in IDA patients (6.01±2.83 ng/mL, P ACD patients [normal sTfR levels (ACD patients with ID [high sTfR levels (≥3 µg/mL)] with a mean of 10.0±2.97 ng/mL. Hepcidin measurement can provide a useful tool for differentiating ACD from IDA and also help to identify an iron deficiency in ACD patients. This might aid in the appropriate selection of therapy for these patients.

  3. The Value of Erythrocyte Indices and Red Cell Volume Distribution Width in Differential Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Anemia of Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Altıntaş

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA and anemia of chronic disease are the most commonly confused anemias. We investigate the diagnostic value of erythrocyte indices, red cell volume distribution width, and serum ferritin levels to make differential diagnosis of anemia in controls and anemic patients.Iron deficiency anemia (44 patients, anemia of chronic disease (41, IDA with anemia of chronic disease (17 and control (50 groups were compared. We performed serum ferritin, CBC, and sedimentation rate in all patientsand bone marrow aspiration in patients with anemia of chronic disease.Although mean cell volume (MCV and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH are low in IDA and anemia of chronic disease, it is much striking in the former one (p<0.001, p<0.001. Only 7.3% of patients with anemia of chronic disease had a MCV<70 fL and MCH<24 pg, 90.0% of patients with IDA were below that cut-off point. Serum ferritin means were in patients with IDA and anemia of chronic disease were 4.6±3.3 and 489.6 ±519.9 ng/ml, respectively.The probability of IDA is low when RDW is normal in microcytic anemias. RDW is high in half of patients with anemia of chronic disease. Reference values for ferritin must be changed in patients with anemia of chronic disease and IDA. If serum ferritin is 57.6-146.4 ng/ml anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency must ruled out by other diagnostic tests.

  4. [Causes, diagnostics and course of disease in 194 cats with anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Nina; Weingart, Christiane; Kohn, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common hematological alteration in cats. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of different types of anemia and the course of disease in cats with a hematocrit (hct) anemia groups based on history, physical examination and laboratory parameters. Most cats had acute blood loss anemia (BA; 75/194; 38.7%). Frequent causes were trauma (39/75), hematuria (13/75) and hemostatic disorders (9/75). Anemia of inflammatory and neoplastic disease (AID) occurred in 22.2% (43/194) and hemolytic anemia (HA) in 18% (35/194). Half of those were presumptively immune-mediated (IHA). Four cats were diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma infection. Rare causes of anemia included anemia of renal disease (ARD; 18/194; 9.3%) and intramedullary non-regenerative anemia (INR; 13/194; 6.7%). The latter either had retroviral infection (6/13) or neoplasia (6/13). In cats with HA and INR anemia was often severe and very severe (Hct anemia was detected for the first time. Cats with HA had the highest survival rate.

  5. Treatment of Anemia of Chronic Disease with True Iron Deficiency in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Amstad Bencaiova, Gabriela; Krafft, Alexander; Zimmermann, Roland; Burkhardt, Tilo

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We assess and compare the efficacy of anemia treatment in pregnant women with anemia of chronic disease with true iron deficiency and in women with iron deficiency anemia. Study Design. Fifty patients with moderate anemia (hemoglobin 8.0–9.9 g/dl) and iron deficiency (ferritin < 15 μg/l) were treated in the Anemia Clinic at the Department of Obstetrics. Results. All patients showed stimulation of erythropoiesis as evidenced by an increase in reticulocyte count at day eight of thera...

  6. 'Locus of control', health-related quality of life, emotional distress and disability in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, Federica; Gison, Annalisa; Bonassi, Stefano; Dall'Armi, Valentina; Tonto, Francesca; Giaquinto, Salvatore

    2017-06-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated locus of control and its subscales in Parkinson's disease. A total of 50 consecutive Parkinson's disease participants and 50 healthy volunteers (control group) were enrolled. External locus of control was significantly higher in Parkinson's disease participants, whereas internal locus of control had no significant differences. External locus of control and internal locus of control were correlated in control group, but not in Parkinson's disease. In Parkinson's disease participants, external locus of control was negatively associated with health-related quality of life as well as positively associated with emotional distress and disease severity (but not with disability). After adjusting to confound variables, the associations remained. On the other hand, internal locus of control was negatively associated with depression.

  7. Coexistence of Pernicious Anemia and Myasthenia Gravis—A Rare Combination of Autoimmune Diseases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available About 5-10% of patients with myasthenia gravis concomitantly have other autoimmune diseases. However, the coexistence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia is rare. Here, we report a 73-year-old Taiwanese woman who developed myasthenia gravis 5 months after the onset of pernicious anemia. Her myasthenic and pernicious anemia symptoms markedly improved after pyridostigmine, prednisolone and hydroxo-cobalamine treatment. It is important to recognize concurrence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia in the same patient because the therapeutic results for both diseases are rewarding.

  8. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Lasa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. Aim: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Materials and methods: Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. Results: A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55, P=.001. Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Conclusions: Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Resumen: Introducción: Existe una extensa heterogeneidad en los reportes de la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en el contexto de la anemia ferropénica. Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en pacientes con anemia ferropénica. Materiales y métodos: Pacientes adultos con anemia ferropénica fueron reclutados para realizarse una endoscopia digestiva alta con biopsia duodenal. Se reclutaron asimismo voluntarios de la comunidad como controles. Resultados: Se reclutó a 135 pacientes con anemia y 133 controles. La prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca fue mayor en el grupo de anemia (11.11% vs. 1.51%, OR 8.18 [1.83-36.55], p = 0.001; el 73.3% de los celíacos en el grupo de anémicos presentaron algún signo endoscópico de atrofia vellositaria, mientras que el 100% de los celíacos en el grupo control presentaron por lo menos un signo endoscópico. Conclusión: Los pacientes

  9. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-03-03

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman.

  10. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: A neglected issue with relevant effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

  11. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron isotopic composition of blood serum in anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoshkina, Yulia; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Speeckaert, Marijn; Van Biesen, Wim; Delanghe, Joris; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2017-05-24

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a general term for disorders that affect the structure and function of the kidneys. Iron deficiency (ID) and anemia occur in the vast majority of CKD patients, most of whom are elderly. However, establishing the cause of anemia in CKD, and therefore making an informed decision concerning the corresponding therapeutic treatment, is still a challenge. High-precision Fe isotopic analysis of blood serum samples of CKD patients with and without ID/anemia was performed via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) for such a purpose. Patients with CKD and/or iron disorders showed a heavier serum Fe isotopic composition than controls. Many clinical parameters used for the diagnosis and follow-up of anemia correlated significantly with the serum Fe isotopic composition. In contrast, no relation was observed between the serum Fe isotopic composition and the estimated glomerular filtration rate as a measure of kidney function. Among the CKD patients, the serum Fe isotopic composition was substantially heavier in the occurrence of ID anemia, while erythropoietin-related anemia did not exert this effect. The Fe isotopic composition can thus be useful for distinguishing these different types of anemias in CKD patients, i.e. ID anemia vs. erythropoietin-related anemia.

  13. [Pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroid diseases in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde-Mayol, Cristina; de la Hoz-García, Benito; del Cañizo-Fernández-Roldán, Carlos; Hernández-López, Alba Marina; Loza-Candia, Isabel; Cardona-Hernández, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD), and pernicious anemia (PA) in particular, are common in elderly people. The relationship between both of these is currently being discussed. The objective of this study is to determine the correlation between ATD and PA in elderly people, and if there are other associated factors affecting this relationship. The factors studied to analyse this association were social-health variables, autoimmune comorbidity (type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases), the taking of drugs that alter vitamin B12 levels (Metformin and protein bomb inhibitors), and the chronological order in which both diseases appear in this population. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine which of the described variables could have an on both diseases. The prevalence was 8.2% for ATD and 3.3% for PA, with a progressive increase in the annual incidence in the past 10 years from 7.1 to 12.7 cases per 1,000 persons>65 years for ATI, and from 1.6 to 7.4 cases for PA. PA was found in 18.6% of the patients with ATD, and the 45% of PA presented with ATD, mainly in women (RR=6.0). The average time in diagnosing the second disease was about 8 years. When there was a third autoimmune disease the likelihood of ATD and PA increased fourfold. Patients with ATD and consuming drugs which were affecting the absorption of vitamin B12 had double the probability of developing a PA compared with those who were not taking medications. The results of this study confirm the association between ATI and AP among people 65 or older, also a progressive increase in the incidence of these diseases. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves? disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Packer, Clifford D

    2009-01-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves? disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves? disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert?s disease presented with a one month history of jaund...

  15. [The prevalence and characteristics of anemia in Crohn's disease in the Chinese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rui-han; Chao, Kang; Zhang, Sheng-hong; Chen, Bai-li; He, Yao; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Zhi-rong; Hu, Pin-jin; Chen, Min-hu

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of anemia among patients with Crohn's disease (CD) in Chinese population and identify the possible risk factors. A cross-sectional study was performed in 441 patients with CD enrolled from the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University between January 2003 and May 2012. The prevalence, severity, type of anemia in these patients was assessed when diagnosis was confirmed. A multivariate logistic regression including 122 patients was performed to screen risk factors of anemia. The prevalence of anemia was 64.4% (284/441) with 69.0% (196/284) mild anemia, 28.9% (82/284) moderate anemia and 2.1% (6/284) severe anemia. The most common morphological classification was hypochromic microcytic anemia (43.7%, 124/284). Multivariate logistic regression showed the predictive factors for anemia were higher levels of modified Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) (OR = 1.007, 95% CI 1.002-1.013), platelet count (OR = 1.007, 95% CI 1.001-1.012), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (OR = 1.024, 95% CI 1.000-1.048), penetrating behavior (OR = 16.952, 95% CI 2.626-108.626), structuring behavior (OR = 6.717, 95% CI 1.583-28.507), older age at diagnosis (OR = 1.065, 95% CI 1.012-1.121),and lower body mass index (BMI) (OR = 0.769, 95% CI 0.633-0.935). Anemia is a common complication in patients with CD among Chinese population. Activity of the underlying disease, older age at diagnosis, penetrating or structuring disease behavior and low BMI are the risk factors.

  16. Monogenic diabetes syndromes: Locus-specific databases for Alström, Wolfram, and Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Dewi; Sabir, Ataf; Fulton, Piers; Zatyka, Malgorzata; Williams, Denise; Hardy, Carol; Milan, Gabriella; Favaretto, Francesca; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Rohayem, Julia; López de Heredia, Miguel; Hershey, Tamara; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Chen, Jian-Hua; Chaussenot, Annabel; Nunes, Virginia; Marshall, Bess; McAfferty, Susan; Tillmann, Vallo; Maffei, Pietro; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Geberhiwot, Tarekign; Mlynarski, Wojciech; Parkinson, Kay; Picard, Virginie; Bueno, Gema Esteban; Dias, Renuka; Arnold, Amy; Richens, Caitlin; Paisey, Richard; Urano, Fumihiko; Semple, Robert; Sinnott, Richard; Barrett, Timothy G

    2017-07-01

    We developed a variant database for diabetes syndrome genes, using the Leiden Open Variation Database platform, containing observed phenotypes matched to the genetic variations. We populated it with 628 published disease-associated variants (December 2016) for: WFS1 (n = 309), CISD2 (n = 3), ALMS1 (n = 268), and SLC19A2 (n = 48) for Wolfram type 1, Wolfram type 2, Alström, and Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndromes, respectively; and included 23 previously unpublished novel germline variants in WFS1 and 17 variants in ALMS1. We then investigated genotype-phenotype relations for the WFS1 gene. The presence of biallelic loss-of-function variants predicted Wolfram syndrome defined by insulin-dependent diabetes and optic atrophy, with a sensitivity of 79% (95% CI 75%-83%) and specificity of 92% (83%-97%). The presence of minor loss-of-function variants in WFS1 predicted isolated diabetes, isolated deafness, or isolated congenital cataracts without development of the full syndrome (sensitivity 100% [93%-100%]; specificity 78% [73%-82%]). The ability to provide a prognostic prediction based on genotype will lead to improvements in patient care and counseling. The development of the database as a repository for monogenic diabetes gene variants will allow prognostic predictions for other diabetes syndromes as next-generation sequencing expands the repertoire of genotypes and phenotypes. The database is publicly available online at https://lovd.euro-wabb.org. © 2017 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julia G.; Friedman, Jennifer F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed. PMID:21738863

  18. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia G. Shaw

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed.

  19. Prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in Chinese patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Shi, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming; Peng, Ai; Jiang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Ni, Zhao-Hui; He, Li-Qun; Niu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Nian-Song; Mei, Chang-Lin; Xu, Xu-Dong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Yan, Hai-Dong; Deng, Yue-Yi; Yu, Chen; Cen, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This was the first multicenter, cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of anemia, patient awareness, and treatment status in China. Data of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; age, 18–75 years; both out- and inpatients) from 25 hospitals in Shanghai, seeking medical treatment at the nephrology department, were collected between July 1, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD (ND-CKD) were assessed. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. A total of 2420 patients with ND-CKD were included. Anemia was established in 1246 (51.5%) patients: 639 (51.3%) men and 607 (48.7%) women. The prevalence of anemia increased with advancing CKD stage (χ2trend = 675.14, P Anemia was more prevalent in patients with diabetic nephropathy (68.0%) than in patients with hypertensive renal damage (56.6%) or chronic glomerulonephritis (46.1%, both P anemia patients, only 7.5% received more effective and recommended intravenous supplementation. Anemia is highly prevalent in patients with ND-CKD in China, with a low target-achieving rate and poor treatment patterns. The study highlights the need to improve multiple aspects of CKD management to delay the progression of renal failure. PMID:27310973

  20. [Prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; González-Galilea, Ángel; Gisbert, Javier P; Cucala, Mercedes; Ponce, Julio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases. An epidemiological, multicenter, mixed design study (retrospective review of randomized clinical records and prospective visits) conducted between February 2010 and March 2011 in 22 Spanish gastroenterology departments. Severe anemia was defined as Hb < 10g/dL, mild/moderate as Hb ≥ 10g/dL, and iron deficiency as ferritin < 30ng/ml or transferrin saturation < 16%. We included 379 patients. The mean±SD age was 57±19 years and 47% were men. The prevalence of anemia at admission was 60% (95% CI 55 to 65), and anemia was severe (Hb <10g/dl) in half the patients. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 54% of evaluable patients (95% CI 47 to 61). Gastrointestinal bleeding at admission was found in 39% of the patients, of whom 83% (121/146) were anemic. At discharge, the proportion of anemic patients was unchanged (from 60% at admission to 58% at discharge) (95% CI 53 to 63) and iron deficiency was found in 41% (95% CI 32 to 50): anemia was severe in 17% and mild/moderate in 41%. During follow-up, at 3-6 months after admission, 44% (95% CI 39 to 50) of evaluable patients continued to have iron deficiency and 28% (95% CI 23 to 32) were still anemic: 5% severe and 23% mild/moderate. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 44% (95% CI: 39-50). During admission, 50% of patients with anemia did not receive treatment. At discharge, 55% were untreated. The prevalence of anemia in patients hospitalized for gastroenterological diseases was very high. Anemia persisted in over a quarter of patients at the follow-up visit. Only half of hospitalized patients received treatment for anemia, even when the anemia was severe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Masters of Erythropoiesis: Hypoxia Inducible Factors and Recent Advances in Anemia of Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Cetiner, Mustafa; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Tarim, Kayhan; Afsar, Baris; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Anemia seen in patients with chronic kidney disease is a particular form of 'anemia of chronic disease'. Although multifactorial in origin, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and adjuvant iron therapy represent the primary treatment for anemia in chronic kidney disease. Subsequent clinical observations revealed that these ESA hyporesponsive patients often had increased systemic inflammation as a consequence of their comorbidities. Use of high ESA doses to overcome this ESA hyporesponsiveness posed some concerns regarding associated adverse events of therapy and increased mortality in this special patient population. Recognizing the pivotal roles of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) in orchestrating elements of erythropoiesis opened new avenues in the management of renal anemia. Several phase 1 and 2 studies confirmed the results of early experimental studies supporting the beneficial role of augmenting HIFs for erythropoiesis. In this review, we describe the physiologic functions of HIF in erythropoiesis with special emphasis on interactions with iron and hepcidin metabolism and inflammation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Fine mapping of the NRG1 Hirschsprung's disease locus.

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    Clara Sze-Man Tang

    Full Text Available The primary pathology of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR, colon aganglionosis is the absence of ganglia in variable lengths of the hindgut, resulting in functional obstruction. HSCR is attributed to a failure of migration of the enteric ganglion precursors along the developing gut. RET is a key regulator of the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS and the major HSCR-causing gene. Yet the reduced penetrance of RET DNA HSCR-associated variants together with the phenotypic variability suggest the involvement of additional genes in the disease. Through a genome-wide association study, we uncovered a ∼350 kb HSCR-associated region encompassing part of the neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1. To identify the causal NRG1 variants contributing to HSCR, we genotyped 243 SNPs variants on 343 ethnic Chinese HSCR patients and 359 controls. Genotype analysis coupled with imputation narrowed down the HSCR-associated region to 21 kb, with four of the most associated SNPs (rs10088313, rs10094655, rs4624987, and rs3884552 mapping to the NRG1 promoter. We investigated whether there was correlation between the genotype at the rs10088313 locus and the amount of NRG1 expressed in human gut tissues (40 patients and 21 controls and found differences in expression as a function of genotype. We also found significant differences in NRG1 expression levels between diseased and control individuals bearing the same rs10088313 risk genotype. This indicates that the effects of NRG1 common variants are likely to depend on other alleles or epigenetic factors present in the patients and would account for the variability in the genetic predisposition to HSCR.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [ ...

  4. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  5. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaney, Katherine E.; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard

    2017-01-01

    Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD) risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601) lies within a "gene desert." The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s) and gene(s) involved. Methods. A phenome scan was perf...

  6. Anemia or low hemoglobin levels preceding Parkinson disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savica, R; Grossardt, B R; Carlin, J M; Icen, M; Bower, J H; Ahlskog, J E; Maraganore, D M; Steensma, D P; Rocca, W A

    2009-10-27

    It has been suggested that anemia may be a risk factor for dementia, for restless legs syndrome, and for Parkinson disease (PD). Thus, we investigated the association of anemia with the subsequent risk of PD using a case-control study design. We used the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify 196 subjects who developed PD in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1976 through 1995. Each incident case was matched by age (+/-1 year) and sex to a general population control. We reviewed the complete medical records of cases and controls in the system to detect anemia defined using the World Health Organization criteria. Anemia was more common in the history of cases than of controls (odds ratio 2.00, 95% confidence interval 1.31-3.06, p = 0.001). The association remained significant after adjustment for cigarette smoking, exposure to pesticides, or hysterectomy (in women). The association was not significantly different between men and women, or between PD patients with or without rest tremor. Analyses stratified by time of onset of anemia showed a greater association for anemia that started 20 to 29 years before the onset of PD. Hemoglobin levels were slightly but consistently lower in cases than in controls across all ages. Our results support an association between anemia experienced early in life and the later development of Parkinson disease. The interpretation of this association remains uncertain.

  7. Prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia among the UAE adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities.

  8. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inf...

  9. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia as an initial manifestation of Hodgkin’s Disease: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Urrego-Díaz

    2016-07-01

    Through this paper, the authors intend to remind the medical community about the importance of a prompt and deep study of all autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases found in pediatric patients, without overlooking possible malignant causes related to this condition such as a lymphoproliferative disorder. Thus, before diagnosing a hemolytic anemia as idiopathic, the practitioner must be certain that the condition is not a clinical manifestation of an underlying disease.

  10. Anemia in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh

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    Naser Ahmed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is usually associated with polycythemia. It is assumed that systemic inflammatory components of COPD can interfere with erythropoietin and can result in anemia of chronic disease which will impair the functional capacity of these patients and also increase morbidity and mortality. Objective: To evaluate anemia status in COPD patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in clinically stable 50 COPD patients in the outpatient department of Medicine in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU, Dhaka during the period of July to December 2011. The demographic characteristics, smoking habit, duration of disease, types and severity of anemia, BMI and results of 6-minute walk test were recorded. Results: Out of 50 COPD patients, 76% were male and 24% were female. Among them 32% patients were anemic, 20% were polycythemic and 48% patients had normal hemoglobin. Among the anemic patients with COPD, 87% were male and 13% were female,75% were mildly anemic and 4% moderately anemic, 62.5% had normocytic and 37.5% had microcytic anemia. Conclusion: Anemia in COPD patients is often overlooked and underestimated. Clinicians should be aware of the presence of anemia in patients with COPD so that appropriate treatment could be initiated to improve the quality of life and prognosis

  11. Role of Anemia in Home Oxygen Therapy in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Fulambarker, Ashok; Molnar, Janos; Nadeem, Rashid; McCormack, Charles; Ganesh, Aarthi; Kheir, Fayez; Hamon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a known comorbidity found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Hypoxemia is common and basically due to ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch in COPD. Anemia, by decreasing arterial oxygen content, may be a contributing factor for decreased delivery of oxygen to tissues. The objective of this study is to determine if anemia is a factor in qualifying COPD patients for home oxygen therapy. The study was designed as a retrospective, cross-sectional, observational chart review. Patients who were referred for home oxygen therapy evaluation were selected from the computerized patient record system. Demographic data, oxygen saturation at rest and during exercise, pulmonary function test results, hemoglobin level, medications, reason for anemia, comorbid diseases, and smoking status were recorded. The χ tests, independent sample t tests, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Only 356 of total 478 patient referrals had a diagnosis of COPD over a 2-year period. Although 39 of them were excluded, 317 patients were included in the study. The overall rate of anemia was 38% in all COPD patients. Anemia was found significantly more frequent in COPD patients on home oxygen therapy (46%) than those not on home oxygen therapy (18.5%) (P Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease class, smoking status, hemoglobin level, hematocrit, percent of forced expiratory volume in first second, forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity, residual volume/total lung volume, percent of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity were significantly different between home oxygen therapy and those not on home oxygen therapy (P anemia remained a strong predictor for long-term oxygen therapy use in COPD patients after adjusting for other significant parameters. Anemic COPD patients are more hypoxic especially during exercise than those who are not anemic. We conclude that anemia is a contributing factor in qualifying COPD patients for home oxygen

  12. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

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    Ana Beatriz Barbosa Torino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency.Methods:Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42, anemia of chronic disease (n = 28, anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22, and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25. The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia.Results:There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%. The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8.Conclusion:The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease.

  13. Management of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: a challenge in everyday clinical practice

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    Edyta Tulewicz-Marti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is the most common extraintestinal manifestation and complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Its etiology is multifactorial and mostly is a combination of iron deficiency anemia (IDA and chronic anemia (ACD. Because of its high incidence in patients with IBD and its influence on their quality of life, regular screening is recommended. In case of IDA type of medication and route of administration should be determined by many factors such as general condition of the patient, IBD activity or anemia severity. Intravenous iron supplementation is the preferred route but may be associated with phosphate drop or even severe hypophosphatemia (HP. The mechanism of HP related to the intravenous iron infusions is not clearly known yet, but it might be related to the change of FGF-23 levels. What more not all parenteral forms of iron are equal and some may have a higher risk of HP than others.

  14. [The role of renal anemia and cardiovascular disease in the progression of chronic glomerulonephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murkamilov, I T; Gordeev, I G; Kaliev, R R

    To study the rate of chronic glomerulonephritis progression when added by anemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD). 231 patients (133 men and 98 women) with predialysis chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) were examined. The patients' mean age of was 35.8±11.8 years; the disease duration was 1 to 17 years. The disease onset was the date when urinalysis showed evidence of persistent proteinuria and (or) hematuria. Besides, the time when anemia developed and the clinical and instrumental signs of CVD appeared was taken as the initial reference point; the time when end-stage renal failure was diagnosed was taken to be the endpoint. Red blood cell counts with the inclusion of its indices, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit values, daily proteinuria values, and glomerular filtration rate were analyzed. The biochemical parameters included the concentrations of electrolytes, creatinine, fibrinogen, iron, cholesterol, total protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). Electrocardiography and echocardiography, bicycle ergometry and 24-hour ECG monitoring were used to detect CVD. The presence of anemia and CVD in patients with predialysis CGN versus those without anemia and CVD was associated with an increase in the concentrations of CRP [36.2 and 12.6%; respectively; (p<0.05)], creatinine [123.0 (83.2-217.0) and 86.5 (72.0-128.5) µmol/L; (p<0.05)] and a decrease in GFR [65.4 (30.8-95.5) and 92.7 (64.5-122.3) ml/min; (p<0.05)]. The 8-year survival of patients with CGN concurrent with CVD was noted to be 58% whereas the renal survival in patients with CGN + CVD + anemia was shorter and the 6-year survival in this case was as high as 52%. Anemia and CVD in patients with CGN serve as additional independent factors for the progression of the underlying disease. The concurrence of CGN, anemia, and CVD substantially reduces the predialysis period.

  15. Health locus of control in patients with graves-basedow disease and hashimoto disease and their acceptance of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinska, Malgorzata Anna; Andruszkiewicz, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to a chronic somatic disease depends on a variety of factors, including belief in health locus of control. Correlation between health locus of control and illness acceptance in patients with Graves-Basedow and Hashimoto diseases as well as correlation between health locus of control, illness acceptance, sex, and age. THREE METHODS WERE APPLIED: Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale by K.A. Wallston, B.S. Wallston and R. DeVellis; the Acceptance of Illness Scale by B.J. Felton, T.A. Revenson, and G.A. Hinrichsena; and a personal questionnaire. Two groups were subject to the research: 68 patients with Graves-Basedow disease and 54 patients with Hashimoto disease. Patients with Graves-Basedow disease, women above all, have their health locus of control in other persons (P = 0,001) and are less inclined to accept their illness (P = 0,005) when compared to patients with Hashimoto disease. A statistically significant correlation occurred between the age of patients and external (i.e., in other persons) health locus of control. Beliefs in health locus of control and type of illness in female patient group are predictors of illness acceptance (P = 0,0009).

  16. Targeting Hypoxia-Inducible Factors for the Treatment of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Francesco; Fishbane, Steven; Block, Geoffrey A; Macdougall, Iain C

    2017-01-01

    Anemia, a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD), has previously been attributed primarily to decreased production of erythropoietin. More recently, it has become apparent that the etiology of anemia involves several other factors, most notably dysfunctional iron metabolism, mediated via increased hepcidin activity and reduced clearance. Current management of anemia in patients with advanced CKD is based on erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and iron supplementation, along with red blood cell transfusions when necessary; however, safety considerations associated with these therapies highlight the need to pursue alternative treatment options targeting other mechanisms such as hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that act as central regulators of erythropoiesis by coordinating a series of graded hypoxic responses. This review discusses the discovery of the HIF pathway and its regulation via HIF prolyl hydroxylase enzymes in the context of erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. The rationale for targeting this pathway and the clinical development of HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors are reviewed, with a commentary on the potential implications of this class of agents in CKD anemia management. Key Messages: Pharmacologic activation of the HIF pathway results in a transient pseudo-hypoxic state that stimulates erythropoiesis in CKD patients with anemia. Results from clinical studies of a number of HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors are increasingly available and provide support for the continued evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of this novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of anemia in CKD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. [Hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchscherer, A; Chemnitz, J

    2015-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia can be caused by various hereditary or acquired diseases. Classification is usually based on corpuscular or extracorpuscular defects. Beside the anemia, laboratory testing indicates increased lactate dehydrogenase, unconjugated bilirubin and reticulocytes as well as reduced or absent plasma haptoglobin. Knowledge of further diagnostic procedures (e.g., Coombs test, schistocytes, hemoglobin electrophoresis or flow cytometric analysis) leads in many cases to an underlying disease with differentiated therapeutic options. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is often associated with diseases as HIV, connective tissue disease, lymphomas or malignant tumors and the hemolytic process is preexisting in many cases. Thrombotic microvascular diseases (e.g., thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) are further important causes of hemolytic anemia which need immediate diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Approach to Anemia in Hospitalized Patients with Infectious Diseases; Is it Appropriate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari-Maleki, Taher; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Jafari, Sirous

    2015-01-01

    Anemia of chronic diseases (ACD) is a common problem in patients with infectious diseases and can influence the quality of life and patients' survival. Despite the clinical importance of ACD, data are still lacking regarding this problem in the infectious diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence, related factors, outcome and approaches to anemia in the infectious diseases ward. This retrospective study was performed to review the medical records of patients admitted to the infectious diseases department of Imam Khomeini hospital during a two-year period between 2009 and 2011. A standard protocol was developed to evaluate anemia. Patients' demographic data approaches to manage anemia and routine laboratory tests were recorded and compared with the protocol. Totally, 1,120 medical records were reviewed. ACD was recognized in 705 patients (63%). Only 5.1% of diagnostic and 8.7% of treatment approaches was based on the protocol. The majority of patients (89.4%) were received inappropriate treatment regarding. Mortality rate of patients with ACD was 3.4%. Moreover, a significant correlation between anemia and mortality was detected (r = 0.131; p = 0.026). A statistically significant correlation was also identified between patients' Hgb and ESR, CRP, reasons of admission, number of medications, and underlying diseases. In conclusion, results of this study suggested that ACD is a common problem in infectious diseases patients and significantly associated with patients' mortality. Moreover, the majority of studied patients were not received an appropriate diagnostic and treatment approach which arises more concerns regarding the management of ACD in infectious diseases setting.

  19. Approach to Anemia in Hospitalized Patients with Infectious Diseases; Is it Appropriate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari-Maleki, Taher; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Jafari, Sirous

    2015-01-01

    Anemia of chronic diseases (ACD) is a common problem in patients with infectious diseases and can influence the quality of life and patients' survival. Despite the clinical importance of ACD, data are still lacking regarding this problem in the infectious diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence, related factors, outcome and approaches to anemia in the infectious diseases ward. This retrospective study was performed to review the medical records of patients admitted to the infectious diseases department of Imam Khomeini hospital during a two-year period between 2009 and 2011. A standard protocol was developed to evaluate anemia. Patients’ demographic data approaches to manage anemia and routine laboratory tests were recorded and compared with the protocol. Totally, 1,120 medical records were reviewed. ACD was recognized in 705 patients (63%). Only 5.1% of diagnostic and 8.7% of treatment approaches was based on the protocol. The majority of patients (89.4%) were received inappropriate treatment regarding. Mortality rate of patients with ACD was 3.4%. Moreover, a significant correlation between anemia and mortality was detected (r = 0.131; p = 0.026). A statistically significant correlation was also identified between patients’ Hgb and ESR, CRP, reasons of admission, number of medications, and underlying diseases. In conclusion, results of this study suggested that ACD is a common problem in infectious diseases patients and significantly associated with patients’ mortality. Moreover, the majority of studied patients were not received an appropriate diagnostic and treatment approach which arises more concerns regarding the management of ACD in infectious diseases setting. PMID:25901156

  20. Individualized drug dosing using RBF-Galerkin method: Case of anemia management in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirinejad, Hossein; Gaweda, Adam E; Brier, Michael E; Zurada, Jacek M; Inanc, Tamer

    2017-09-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is frequently associated with decreased physical component of quality of life, as well as adverse cardiovascular events. Current treatment methods for renal anemia are mostly population-based approaches treating individual patients with a one-size-fits-all model. However, FDA recommendations stipulate individualized anemia treatment with precise control of the hemoglobin concentration and minimal drug utilization. In accordance with these recommendations, this work presents an individualized drug dosing approach to anemia management by leveraging the theory of optimal control. A Multiple Receding Horizon Control (MRHC) approach based on the RBF-Galerkin optimization method is proposed for individualized anemia management in CKD patients. Recently developed by the authors, the RBF-Galerkin method uses the radial basis function approximation along with the Galerkin error projection to solve constrained optimal control problems numerically. The proposed approach is applied to generate optimal dosing recommendations for individual patients. Performance of the proposed approach (MRHC) is compared in silico to that of a population-based anemia management protocol and an individualized multiple model predictive control method for two case scenarios: hemoglobin measurement with and without observational errors. In silico comparison indicates that hemoglobin concentration with MRHC method has less variation among the methods, especially in presence of measurement errors. In addition, the average achieved hemoglobin level from the MRHC is significantly closer to the target hemoglobin than that of the other two methods, according to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical test. Furthermore, drug dosages recommended by the MRHC are more stable and accurate and reach the steady-state value notably faster than those generated by the other two methods. The proposed method is highly efficient for

  1. Role of Hepcidin-25 in Chronic Kidney Disease: Anemia and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Norishi; Takasawa, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for all living organisms, but produces toxic oxidants. Thus, iron homeostasis is tightly regulated in mammals. Hepcidin-25 (hepcidin) has emerged as a molecule that regulates iron metabolism. Binding of hepcidin to its receptor, ferroportin, inhibits intestinal iron absorption and iron efflux from hepatocytes and macrophages. Decreased hepcidin enhances iron absorption and efflux. Hepcidin could be predictive of iron status and the response to iron supplementation or erythropoietin-stimulating agents. Monitoring hepcidin is helpful for the management of anemia. Thus, it is urgent to obtain normal reference values in a large population of healthy subjects and to standardize various hepcidin assays, which enables to compare the data measured by different methods. Anemia is an important and common problem associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is caused by erythropoietin deficiency, iron-restricted erythropoiesis, inflammation, hypoxia, vitamin D deficiency, hyperparathyroidism, and obesity. Anemia causes poor quality of life, progression of CKD, increased risk of cardiovascular events, and mortality. Besides its role in anemia, recent evidence suggests that hepcidin-25 plays a role in the pathogenesis and progression of kidney injury via modulation of iron-mediated oxidant injury. Despite accumulating experimental data, information about clinical significance of hepcidin-25 for anemia and kidney injury in CKD patients is scarce, especially in children. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the role of hepcidin-25 in the regulation of anemia and kidney injury in children and adults with CKD. Strategy for modulating hepcidin-25 to prevent anemia and kidney injury associated with CKD is also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Heart failure with anemia: novel findings on the roles of renal disease, interleukins, and specific left ventricular remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Eileen; Rouleau, Jean L; White, Michel; Roy, Karine; Blondeau, Lucie; Ducharme, Anique; Neagoe, Paul-Eduard; Sirois, Martin G; Lavoie, Joël; Racine, Normand; Liszkowski, Mark; Madore, François; Tardif, Jean-Claude; de Denus, Simon

    2014-09-01

    Anemia is a highly prevalent and strong independent prognostic marker in heart failure (HF), yet this association is not completely understood. Whether anemia is simply a marker of disease severity and concomitant chronic kidney disease or represents the activation of other detrimental pathways remains uncertain. We sought to determine which pathophysiological pathways are exacerbated in patients with HF, reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and anemia in comparison with those without anemia. In a prospective study involving 151 patients, selected biomarkers were analyzed, each representing proposed contributive mechanisms in the pathophysiology of anemia in HF. We compared clinical, echocardiographic, and circulating biomarkers profiles among patients with HFrEF and anemia (group 1), HFrEF without anemia (group 2), and chronic kidney disease with preserved EF, without established HF (chronic kidney disease control group 3). We demonstrate here that many processes other than those related to chronic kidney disease are involved in the anemia-HF relationship. These are linked to the pathophysiological mechanisms pertaining to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and remodeling, systemic inflammation and volume overload. We found that levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10, specific markers of cardiac remodeling (procollagen type III N-terminal peptide, matrix metalloproteinase-2, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1, left atrial volume), myocardial stretch (NT-proBNP [N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide]), and myocyte death (troponin T) are related to anemia in HFrEF. Anemia is strongly associated not only with markers of more advanced and active heart disease but also with the level of renal dysfunction in HFrEF. Increased myocardial remodeling, inflammation, and volume overload are the hallmarks of patients with anemia and HF. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00834691. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Relationship between Anemia and Serum Concentrations of Calcium and Phosphorus in Advanced Non-Dialysis-Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Mauro; Santana, Ángelo; Bosch, Elvira; Lorenzo, Dionisio; Riaño, Marta; García-Cantón, César

    2017-01-01

    Different biochemical abnormalities of metabolic bone disease have been associated with anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD), mainly in hemodialysis patients. However, all of these abnormalities are closely inter-related and their individual effect on the development of anemia is uncertain. This study was aimed to assess the relationship between anemia and a set of metabolic bone disease biomarkers in a cohort of adult patients with advanced non-dialysis-dependent CKD. The sample consisted of 382 patients submitted to a Nephrology Unit for evaluation of advanced CKD in a tertiary hospital from Gran Canaria during 3 years. Associations between anemia and serum levels of calcium (albumin-corrected), phosphorus, PTH, 25-hydroxivitamin D (25(OH)D3) and alkaline phosphatase were analyzed by using logistic regression models with adjustment for other demographic, clinical and biochemical covariates potentially related to anemia and to bone mineral metabolism. Serum levels of calcium and 25(OH)D3 (negatively) and phosphorus (positively) were significantly associated with anemia in an unadjusted logistic regression model. In a fully adjusted multivariable model, the OR for anemia was 0.29 (95% CI 0.16-0.49; p anemia. The inclusion of albumin in the adjusted model displaced the significance of 25(OH)D3. Circulating levels of calcium and phosphorus are strongly linked to anemia in patients with advanced non-dialysis CKD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson?s disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson?s disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n?=?86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic...

  5. Serum phosphorus and association with anemia among a large diverse population with and without chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lac; Batech, Michael; Rhee, Connie M; Streja, Elani; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Jacobsen, Steven J; Sim, John J

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that phosphorus has an effect on anemia in both normal kidney function and early chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine whether higher phosphorus levels are associated with anemia in a large diverse population without CKD and early CKD. This study is a historical population-based study within the Kaiser Permanente Southern California health system (1 January 1998 to 31 December 2013) among individuals aged 18 years and older with estimated glomerular filtration rate >30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and measurements of serum phosphorus, creatinine and hemoglobin. Individuals were excluded if they had secondary causes of anemia. Odds ratio (OR) estimated for moderate anemia defined as hemoglobin anemia was defined as anemia and 12.9% had mild anemia. Serum phosphorus levels ≥3.5 mg/dL were associated with both mild and moderate anemia. Moderate anemia OR (95% confidence interval) was 1.16 (1.04-1.29) for every 0.5 mg/dL phosphorus increase and 1.26 (1.07-1.48) in the highest versus middle phosphorus tertile. Additional independent anemia risk factors, including female sex, Asian race, diabetes, low albumin and low iron saturation, were observed, but did not alter the anemia-phosphorus association. Higher phosphorus levels were associated with a greater likelihood for anemia in a population with early CKD and normal kidney function. Phosphorus may be a biomarker for anemia and may affect aspects of hematopoiesis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  6. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn (See ... faster. Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn NOTE: ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  8. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  9. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  10. Serum prohepcidin and other iron metabolism parameters in elderly patients with anemia of chronic disease and with iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewska, Justyna; Żekanowska, Ewa; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Boinska, Joanna; Cichon, Roman; Porzych, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in the context of the anemia of chronic disease (ACD) in elderly patients is often difficult due to the existence of many disorders. Recent studies have shown that hepcidin measurement (combined with the existing diagnostic methods) may possibly help in the differential diagnosis of IDA and ACD. The aim of the study was to evaluate the differential diagnostic value of serum prohepcidin in elderly patients with IDA and ACD. The study included 65 individuals aged 65 years or more: 26 patients with ACD, 13 patients with IDA, and 26 age-matched controls. Prohepcidin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, erythropoietin, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were measured using the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Complete blood count, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and iron, transferrin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were assayed using the standard laboratory methods. Prohepcidin concentrations were similar in patients with ACD (196.59 ng/ml) compared with those with IDA (230.16 ng/ml) (P = 0.35). Patients with ACD had significantly lower levels of TIBC compared with those with IDA (P <0.0001). Serum ferritin concentration in patients with ACD was almost 20-fold higher compared with those observed in patients with IDA (P <0.0001). CRP and IL-6 concentrations in patients with ACD were significantly higher compared with those with IDA. The results of the study indicate that serum prohepcidin has limited value in the differential diagnosis of IDA and ACD in elderly patients.

  11. High burden of iron deficiency and different types of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease outpatients in Scandinavia: a longitudinal 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bager, Palle; Befrits, Ragnar; Wikman, Ola; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Bjørn; Hjortswang, Henrik; Dahlerup, Jens F

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been broadly described. The recurrence, type and burden of anemia remain unenlightened. The primary objective was to describe this. The secondary objective was to evaluate the implementation of European guidelines. This longitudinal follow-up study included 300 IBD outpatients from six centers in Scandinavia. Patients were enrolled in a research cohort, in which each center included 5% of their IBD cohort. The study was prospectively planned, while data were retrospectively collected. The burden of anemia was calculated as number of months with anemia. A Markov model was used to calculate the probabilities of transitioning between stages. The European guidelines were used as the standard for anemia management. Anemia affected > 50% of IBD outpatients during the 2-year observation period. Totally, 20% of the total observation time was spent in anemia. Over the 7200 months of observation, anemia was found in 1410 months. The most frequent type was combined anemia (63%). Combined anemia covers both anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Pure ACD was present in 21% of burden time, while pure IDA was present in 16% of burden time. The European guidelines have mainly been implemented. Anemia affected a majority of the IBD outpatients. One in five months, the patients were anemic. Anemia related to inflammation dominated the different types of anemia. Pure IDA was found in for 16%. These findings, despite a fair implementation of guidelines.

  12. A novel approach to adenine-induced chronic kidney disease associated anemia in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadur Rahman

    Full Text Available To date, good experimental animal models of renal anemia are not available. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish a novel approach to induce chronic kidney disease (CKD with severe anemia by oral administration of adenine in rodents. Adenine was administered to 6-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (25 and 50 mg/kg body weight by oral gavage daily for 28 days. Serum creatinine and BUN as well as hematocrit, hemoglobin (Hb and plasma erythropoietin (EPO levels were monitored to assess renal function and anemia, respectively. Adenine at 25 mg/kg for 28 days slightly increased plasma creatinine levels, but did not induce anemia. In contrast, 50 mg/kg of adenine daily for 28 days showed severe renal dysfunction (plasma creatinine 1.9 ± 0.10 mg/dL and anemia (hematocrit 36.5 ± 1.0% and EPO 28 ± 2.4 pg/mL as compared with vehicle-treated mice (0.4 ± 0.02 mg/dL, 49.6 ± 1.6% and 61 ± 4.0 pg/mL, respectively. At the end of experiment, level of Hb also significantly reduced in 50 mg/kg adenine administration group. Remarkable histological changes of kidney tissues characterized by interstitial fibrosis and cystic appearance in tubules were observed in 50 mg/kg of adenine treatment group. These results have demonstrated that oral dosing with adenine at 50 mg/kg for 28 days is suitable to induce a stable anemia associated with CKD in mice.

  13. A novel approach to adenine-induced chronic kidney disease associated anemia in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Asadur; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Sufiun, Abu; Kitada, Kento; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira

    2018-01-01

    To date, good experimental animal models of renal anemia are not available. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish a novel approach to induce chronic kidney disease (CKD) with severe anemia by oral administration of adenine in rodents. Adenine was administered to 6-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (25 and 50 mg/kg body weight) by oral gavage daily for 28 days. Serum creatinine and BUN as well as hematocrit, hemoglobin (Hb) and plasma erythropoietin (EPO) levels were monitored to assess renal function and anemia, respectively. Adenine at 25 mg/kg for 28 days slightly increased plasma creatinine levels, but did not induce anemia. In contrast, 50 mg/kg of adenine daily for 28 days showed severe renal dysfunction (plasma creatinine 1.9 ± 0.10 mg/dL) and anemia (hematocrit 36.5 ± 1.0% and EPO 28 ± 2.4 pg/mL) as compared with vehicle-treated mice (0.4 ± 0.02 mg/dL, 49.6 ± 1.6% and 61 ± 4.0 pg/mL, respectively). At the end of experiment, level of Hb also significantly reduced in 50 mg/kg adenine administration group. Remarkable histological changes of kidney tissues characterized by interstitial fibrosis and cystic appearance in tubules were observed in 50 mg/kg of adenine treatment group. These results have demonstrated that oral dosing with adenine at 50 mg/kg for 28 days is suitable to induce a stable anemia associated with CKD in mice.

  14. Serum phosphorus and association with anemia among a large diverse population with and without chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lac; Batech, Michael; Rhee, Connie M.; Streja, Elani; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Sim, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that phosphorus has an effect on anemia in both normal kidney function and early chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine whether higher phosphorus levels are associated with anemia in a large diverse population without CKD and early CKD. Methods This study is a historical population-based study within the Kaiser Permanente Southern California health system (1 January 1998 to 31 December 2013) among individuals aged 18 years and older with estimated glomerular filtration rate >30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and measurements of serum phosphorus, creatinine and hemoglobin. Individuals were excluded if they had secondary causes of anemia. Odds ratio (OR) estimated for moderate anemia defined as hemoglobin phosphorus levels ≥3.5 mg/dL were associated with both mild and moderate anemia. Moderate anemia OR (95% confidence interval) was 1.16 (1.04–1.29) for every 0.5 mg/dL phosphorus increase and 1.26 (1.07–1.48) in the highest versus middle phosphorus tertile. Additional independent anemia risk factors, including female sex, Asian race, diabetes, low albumin and low iron saturation, were observed, but did not alter the anemia–phosphorus association. Conclusions Higher phosphorus levels were associated with a greater likelihood for anemia in a population with early CKD and normal kidney function. Phosphorus may be a biomarker for anemia and may affect aspects of hematopoiesis. PMID:26254460

  15. Diabetes, renal dysfunction, inflammation, and anemia: the deadly quartet in peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mislav Vrsalović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the burden of peripheral artery disease (PAD and its association with diabetes, renal dysfunction, inflammation, and anemia. PAD is a marker of advanced atherosclerotic disease and is associated with a poor quality of life, ischemic events, and mortality. Polyvascular involvement is often observed in PAD patients (pts, and contributes to the greater risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Diabetes is a major risk factor for PAD, and the presence of PAD in diabetic pts is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes. In comparison to nondiabetic PAD pts, diabetic pts often have severe forms of PAD such as foot ulcers and gangrene, and more often have involvement of the distal extremities. Diabetes is often accompanied by anemia, particularly in the presence of impaired renal function. Chronic kidney disease and PAD share some common risk factors and frequently coexist. In PAD pts, renal dysfunction has been associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality. Anemia is quite prevalent in PAD pts, especially in those with critical limb ischemia. The severity of anemia has been identified as an independent predictor of limb loss and mortality. C-reactive protein (CRP is associated with the development of PAD and diabetes. Increased levels of CRP in diabetic pts intensify the risk for PAD development. Data regarding the prognostic role of CRP in PAD pts suggest that CRP is a better prognostic marker for short-term rather than long-term mortality. Considering the close relationship between diabetes, renal dysfunction, inflammation, and anemia in PAD pts, a multidisciplinary approach is needed in order to improve quality of life and prevent ischemic events and fatal outcomes.

  16. Research Article. Comparative Analysis of Hepcidin-25 and Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease with and without Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Căldăraru Carmen Denise

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepcidin is a regulatory protein in iron metabolism; we do not know the role in chronic kidney disease anemia. Methods: 22 patients with CKD anemia and 15 patients with CKD without anemia were investigated. CKD anemia-inclusion criteria: over 18 years, hemoglobin ≤12 g/dl for women and ≤13 g/dl for men, no treatment for anemia 6 months before enrollment, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and stable creatinine three months before enrollment. Exclusion criteria: infection, bleeding, malignancy, systemic or liver disease, immunosuppression, renal replacement therapy. CKD without anemia-inclusion criteria: over 18 years, no anemia or treatment for anemia, CKD with stable creatinine values three months before enrollment. Exclusion criteria: medical conditions known to have a role in the development of polycythemia. Hepcidin-25 and ferritin were measured by ELISA method. Erythropoietin (EPO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 were evaluated using chemiluminescent enzyme immunometric assays. Unpaired T test, Pearson correlation and multiple regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: Hemoglobin values were significantly lower in anemia group. There were no differences in terms of eGFR, age, body mass index, serum hepcidin, erythropoietin, fibrinogen, IL-6, and TNF-α between CKD patients with and without anemia. Serum hepcidin correlated positively with ferritin (r=0.45 p<0.05, TNF-α (r=0.54, p<0.05 and negatively with erythropoietin (r=-0.51, p<0.05. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that TNF-α is an independent predictor of serum hepcidin in our patients (p=0.003, R=0.71. Conclusion: We found no differences in serum hepcidin, erythropoietin and inflammatory markers in non-dialysis CKD patients with and without anemia.

  17. The MHC locus and genetic susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matzaraki, Vasiliki; Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    In the past 50 years, variants in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, also known as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), have been reported as major risk factors for complex diseases. Recent advances, including large genetic screens, imputation, and analyses of non-additive and epistatic

  18. Association study of the IL18RAP locus in three European populations with coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Dukes, Emma; Heap, Graham A. R.; Dubois, Patrick; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Ziberna, Fabiana; Vatta, Serena; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro; Sistonen, Pertti; Adany, Roza; Pocsai, Zsuzsa; Szeles, Gyoergy; Maki, Markku; Kere, Juha; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.; Saavalainen, Paivi

    2009-01-01

    Coeliac disease is caused by dietary gluten, triggering a chronic inflammation of the small intestine in genetically predisposed individuals. Recently, a risk locus on chromosome 2q11-q12, harbouring interleukin 18 receptor accessory protein (IL18RAP) and three other genes, was suggested for coeliac

  19. The mechanism of anemia in 4 patients with Hodgkin's disease: a study simultaneously using radioiron and radiochromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditu Mpandamadi

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of anemias during the course of Hodgkin's disease, a study utilizing blood labeled simultaneously with radioiron (Fe 59 ) and radiochromium (Cr 51 ) was undertaken in 4 patients: 1 male and 3 females 18, 18, 29, 33 years old. The results obtained in this study were compared with those of the relevant literature. It is concluded that the mechanism of anemias, in patients suffering from Hodgkin's disease, combines and increased rate of red cell destruction with abnormalities of iron metabolism. This investigation shows the interest of evaluating the pathogenesis of anemias with an isotope technique simultaneously utilizing Fe 59 and Cr 51

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... items, such as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or ... Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual ... Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1.54MB] Cardiovascular Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  4. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Biliary Atresia Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Andrew W. Walter, MS ... for the Professional Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated ... Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your ...

  6. Hypoproduction of erythropoietin contributes to anemia in chronic cadmium intoxication: clinical study on Itai-itai disease in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiguchi, Hyogo (Dept. of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)); Teranishi, Hidetoyo (Dept. of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)); Niiya, Kenji (Dept. of Clinical Lab. Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)); Aoshima, Keiko (Dept. of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)); Katoh, Terutaka (Dept. of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)); Sakuragawa, Nobuo (Dept. of Clinical Lab. Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)); Kasuya, Minoru (Dept. of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan))

    1994-10-01

    Itai-itai disease is a condition caused by longterm exposure of the inhabitants of Toyama prefecture, Japan, to cadmium intoxication. The characteristic clinical features of this disease include renal tubular dysfunction, osteomalacia, and anemia. In order to clarify the pathogenesis of the anemia, the red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level, serum erythropoietin level, creatinine clearance, fractional excretion of [beta][sub 2]-microglobulin, and bone marrow morphology were determined in ten patients with Itai-itai disease. Low serum iron or ferritin levels were not observed, and bone marrow aspiration did not reveal any specific hematological disorders. A close relationship was observed between the decrease in the hemoglobin level and the progression of renal dysfunction. Low serum erythropoietin levels were detected despite the presence of severe anemia. These results suggest an important role of renal damage in the anemia which develops in Itai-itai disease. (orig.)

  7. Anti-M Antibody Induced Prolonged Anemia Following Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Erythropoietic Suppression in 2 Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Atsushi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Negishi, Yutaka; Tsuiki, Hideki; Arakawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Uchimura, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Toru; Ohashi, Wataru; Takamoto, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) arising from MNSs incompatibility is rare, with few reports of prolonged anemia and reticulocytopenia following HDN. We report the younger of 2 male siblings, both of whom had anti-M-induced HDN and anemia persisting for over a month. Peripheral reticulocytes remained inappropriately low for the degree of anemia, and they needed multiple red cell transfusions. Viral infections were ruled out. Corticosteroids were given for suspected pure red cell aplasia. Anemia and reticulocytopenia subsequently improved. Colony-forming unit erythroid assay revealed erythropoietic suppression of M antigen-positive erythroid precursor cells cultured with maternal or infant sera containing anti-M. In conclusion, maternal anti-M caused HDN and prolonged anemia by erythropoietic suppression in 2 siblings.

  8. Prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in Chinese patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease: First multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Shi, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming; Peng, Ai; Jiang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Ni, Zhao-Hui; He, Li-Qun; Niu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Nian-Song; Mei, Chang-Lin; Xu, Xu-Dong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Yan, Hai-Dong; Deng, Yue-Yi; Yu, Chen; Cen, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Nan

    2016-06-01

    This was the first multicenter, cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of anemia, patient awareness, and treatment status in China. Data of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; age, 18-75 years; both out- and inpatients) from 25 hospitals in Shanghai, seeking medical treatment at the nephrology department, were collected between July 1, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD (ND-CKD) were assessed. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. A total of 2420 patients with ND-CKD were included. Anemia was established in 1246 (51.5%) patients: 639 (51.3%) men and 607 (48.7%) women. The prevalence of anemia increased with advancing CKD stage (χtrend = 675.14, P Anemia was more prevalent in patients with diabetic nephropathy (68.0%) than in patients with hypertensive renal damage (56.6%) or chronic glomerulonephritis (46.1%, both P anemia patients, only 7.5% received more effective and recommended intravenous supplementation. Anemia is highly prevalent in patients with ND-CKD in China, with a low target-achieving rate and poor treatment patterns. The study highlights the need to improve multiple aspects of CKD management to delay the progression of renal failure.

  9. Circulating thrombopoietin levels in normal healthy blood donors and in aplastic anemia patients in relation to disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thrombopoietin (TPO is the key hematopoietic growth factor regulating the production of platelets from bone marrow megakaryocytes and maintaining platelet hemostasis. This study was done to find any relationship between the levels of thrombopoietin and the severity of disease in patients with aplastic anemia. Materials and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 52 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of aplastic anemia and 45 normal healthy blood donors of both sexes over a period of 2 years, and TPO was estimated by using commercially available TPO-specific-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The median TPO level of 1190 pg/ml (range 625-7651 pg/ml in aplastic anemia patients was significantly higher than the median TPO level of 121.1 pg/ml (81.25-237.7 pg/ml in normal healthy blood donors (P = 0.000. No significant difference was observed in TPO levels of male and female patients (P = 0.453. The median TPO concentrations observed in very severe aplastic anemia, severe aplastic anemia, and nonsevere aplastic anemia were 2765 pg/ml (range 625-6451 pg/ml, 1190 pg/ml (range 672.1-7651 pg/ml, and 1111.5 pg/ml (range 761.1-2289.2 pg/ml, respectively. TPO in patients of very severe aplastic anemia was significantly higher than patients of nonsevere aplastic anemia (P = 0.043, with no significant relation among rest of the groups. Discussion: TPO levels in aplastic anemia patients were significantly higher than in healthy blood donors; however, in aplastic anemia patients TPO levels were significantly higher only in patients with very severe disease.

  10. The Cost-Effectiveness of Anemia Treatment for Persons with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin O Yarnoff

    Full Text Available Although major guidelines uniformly recommend iron supplementation and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs for managing chronic anemia in persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD, there are differences in the recommended hemoglobin (Hb treatment target and no guidelines consider the costs or cost-effectiveness of treatment. In this study, we explored the most cost-effective Hb target for anemia treatment in persons with CKD stages 3-4.The CKD Health Policy Model was populated with a synthetic cohort of persons over age 30 with prevalent CKD stages 3-4 (i.e., not on dialysis and anemia created from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs, computed as incremental cost divided by incremental quality adjusted life years (QALYs, were assessed for Hb targets of 10 g/dl to 13 g/dl at 0.5 g/dl increments. Targeting a Hb of 10 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,111 compared with no treatment and targeting a Hb of 10.5 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,475 compared with a Hb target of 10 g/dl. QALYs increased to 4.63 for a Hb target of 10 g/dl and to 4.75 for a target of 10.5 g/dl or 11 g/dl. Any treatment target above 11 g/dl increased medical costs and decreased QALYs.In persons over age 30 with CKD stages 3-4, anemia treatment is most cost-effective when targeting a Hb level of 10.5 g/dl. This study provides important information for framing guidelines related to treatment of anemia in persons with CKD.

  11. The Cost-Effectiveness of Anemia Treatment for Persons with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnoff, Benjamin O; Hoerger, Thomas J; Simpson, Siobhan A; Pavkov, Meda E; Burrows, Nilka R; Shrestha, Sundar S; Williams, Desmond E; Zhuo, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Although major guidelines uniformly recommend iron supplementation and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) for managing chronic anemia in persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD), there are differences in the recommended hemoglobin (Hb) treatment target and no guidelines consider the costs or cost-effectiveness of treatment. In this study, we explored the most cost-effective Hb target for anemia treatment in persons with CKD stages 3-4. The CKD Health Policy Model was populated with a synthetic cohort of persons over age 30 with prevalent CKD stages 3-4 (i.e., not on dialysis) and anemia created from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), computed as incremental cost divided by incremental quality adjusted life years (QALYs), were assessed for Hb targets of 10 g/dl to 13 g/dl at 0.5 g/dl increments. Targeting a Hb of 10 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,111 compared with no treatment and targeting a Hb of 10.5 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,475 compared with a Hb target of 10 g/dl. QALYs increased to 4.63 for a Hb target of 10 g/dl and to 4.75 for a target of 10.5 g/dl or 11 g/dl. Any treatment target above 11 g/dl increased medical costs and decreased QALYs. In persons over age 30 with CKD stages 3-4, anemia treatment is most cost-effective when targeting a Hb level of 10.5 g/dl. This study provides important information for framing guidelines related to treatment of anemia in persons with CKD.

  12. A Hirschsprung disease locus at 22q11?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstjens-Frederikse, WS; Hofstra, RMW; van Essen, AJ; Meijers, JHC; Buys, CHCM

    We report a boy with truncus arteriosus, dysmorphic features, developmental delay, passing hypotonia, short segment Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), and paroxysmal hypoventilation. FISH analysis showed an interstitial deletion in chromosome band 22q11.2 coinciding with the deletions found in DiGeorge

  13. Fine mapping of the 9q31 Hirschsprung's disease locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C. S.; Sribudiani, Y.; Miao, X. P.; de Vries, A. R.; Burzynski, G.; So, M. T.; Leon, Y. Y.; Yip, B. H.; Osinga, J.; Hui, K. J. W. S.; Verheij, J. B. G. M.; Cherny, S. S.; Tam, P. K. H.; Sham, P. C.; Hofstra, R. M. W.; Garcia-Barcelo, M. M.

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a congenital disorder characterised by the absence of ganglia along variable lengths of the intestine. The RET gene is the major HSCR gene. Reduced penetrance of RET mutations and phenotypic variability suggest the involvement of additional modifying genes in the

  14. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson's disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-07-14

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n = 86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic patients on the basis of the demographics and pre-existing medical conditions, was also included. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate PD risk in anemic patients compared with that in their matched controls. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PD risk in the anemic patients was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-1.52, p anemia (IDA) patients tended to exhibit a higher PD risk (aHR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24-1.79, p anemia increases PD risk.

  15. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  16. Characterization of the anemia of inflammatory disease in cats with abscesses, pyothorax, or fat necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenjann, Mareike; Weingart, Christiane; Arndt, Gisela; Kohn, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the anemia of inflammatory disease (AID) in cats with naturally-occurring inflammatory diseases, such as abscesses (n = 12), pyothorax (n = 6), and fat necrosis (n = 3). Exclusion criteria were positive FeLV/FIV tests, neoplasia, nephro-, hepato- or endocrinopathies, and blood loss anemia. CBC, clinical biochemistry, measurements of serum erythropoietin, iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin, acute phase proteins, erythrocytic osmotic fragility (OF), and Coombs' tests were performed. A decrease in hematocrit of 1-28% (median, 10%) occurred within 3-16 days (median, 8 days). The anemia was mild (n = 11), moderate (n = 8), or severe (n = 2). In most cases it was normocytic normochromic, non-regenerative (n = 18), or mildly regenerative (n = 3). Sixteen cats had leukocytosis and 5 mild hyperbilirubinemia. The Coombs' test results were negative for 8 cats and positive for 1 cat. OF was increased in 2 out of 14 cats. Hypoalbuminemia (n = 18) and hyperglobulinemia (n = 16) resulted in a lowered albumin/globulin-ratio in 19 cats. Iron and TIBC were low in 2/19 and 6 /19 cats, respectively. The ferritin concentrations were normal in 7 cats and increased in 12 cats. The acute phase proteins alpha1-acid-glycoprotein and haptoglobin were increased in 14/14 and 13/14 cats, respectively. Erythropoietin was normal (n = 4), mildly increased (n = 7) or severely increased (1). Two cats were euthanized due to their underlying disease, 3 cats needed blood transfusions. AID in cats is usually mild to moderate, non-regenerative, and normocytic normochromic. It can be clinically relevant causing severe and transfusion-dependent anemia. AID seems to be multifactorial with evidence of iron sequestration, decreased RBC survival, and insufficient erythropoietin production and bone marrow response. Specific and supportive therapy, including transfusions, can reverse these processes.

  17. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašalić, Ante; Strinović, Mateja; Perić, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Miroševć, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS.

  18. [Anemia and hemoglobin diseases in patients with migration background].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, S; Dickerhoff, R

    2014-02-01

    Among the German population with migration background there are probably 150 000-200 000 carriers of thalassemia (α und β) and sickle cell disease, respectively, who have no or little symptoms. Compared to neighboring countries the number of sickle cell (1000-1500) and thalassemia patients (500-600) in Germany is rather low. This may explain the fact that hemoglobin diseases are not yet considered a public health problem in Germany. With optimal care 85-90 % of children with sickle cell disease and 100 % of children with thalassemia reach adulthood. In order to increase awareness for patients with hemoglobin diseases we discuss the most pertinent disease manifestations of adult patients and point out possibilities to obtain information. Specialists in regional centers should be addressed for acute management problems. Up to now it is difficult for many adult sickle cell and thalassemia patients to find a physician well enough informed and experienced to take over the care of their complex disease. Many adult patients are still taken care of by pediatricians. Urgently needed are reference centers with experience in management of hemoglobin diseases who are qualified for training hematologists and who can assure the transition of these patients from pediatrics to adult medical care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Primary hyperparathyroidism and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falko, J M; Guy, J T; Smith, R E; Mazzaferri, E L

    1976-08-01

    The frequency of anemia associated with primary hyperparathyroidism is uncertain. When anemia does occur, its mechanisms are obscure. Two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and moderate normochromic, normocytic, reticulocytopenic anemia were studied in detail. Both had results of ferrokinetic studies that were consistent with the anemia of chronic disease; one had low serum iron concentrations and reduced normoblastic iron incorporation. Anemia in both patients resolved after parathyroidectomy. Clinical records of 100 nonuremic patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed and three other anemic patients were found. The cause of anemia in two of these individuals was bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal system, and the third had folate deficiency attributable to chronic alchoholism.

  20. Prognostic implications of preoperative chronic kidney disease and anemia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, Takuya; Matsue, Yuya; Kawasumi, Ryo; Tanabe, Hiroaki

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia are independent preoperative risk factors for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We evaluated the implications of the coexistence of these two factors and their associated prognosis for CABG surgery. We analyzed, retrospectively, consecutive patients who underwent elective CABG surgery between 2004 and 2014. The patients were classified into four groups depending on the presence or absence of preoperative CKD and anemia. We assessed the major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE), defined as composite outcomes of cardio- and cerebrovascular death, revascularization through surgery or percutaneous intervention, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, and cerebral infarction. The study population consisted of 510 patients (73 % male; median age 71 years old), followed up for a median period of 2.8 years. Multivariate analysis indicated that neither the CKD/no-anemia group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.39-2.51, P = 0.973] nor the no-CKD/anemia group (HR 1.20, 95 % CI 0.69-2.09, P = 0.512) had significantly poorer prognoses than the no-CKD/no-anemia group. However, the CKD/anemia group had a significantly higher risk of a MACCE (HR 2.01, 95 % CI 1.01-3.98, P = 0.046). The presence of both CKD and anemia in patients undergoing CABG for coronary artery disease is synergistically associated with a worse outcome.

  1. Epidemiology and treatment of relative anemia in children with sickle cell disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Manga, Halima; DeBaun, Michael R; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy in the world, with the majority of cases in sub-Saharan Africa. Concomitant nutritional deficiencies, infections or exposure to environmental toxins exacerbate chronic anemia in children with SCD. The resulting relative anemia is associated with increased risk of strokes, poor cognitive function and impaired growth. It may also attenuate optimal response to hydroxyurea therapy, the only effective and practical treatment option for SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will focus on the epidemiology, clinical sequelae, and treatment of relative anemia in children with SCD living in low and middle-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Areas covered: The causes and treatment of relative anemia in children with SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. The MEDLINE database was searched using medical subject headings (MeSH) and keywords for articles regarding relative anemia in children with SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. Expert commentary: Anemia due to nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases such as helminthiasis and malaria are prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. Their co-existence in children with SCD increases morbidity and mortality. Therefore, preventing, diagnosing and treating the underlying cause of this relative anemia will improve SCD-related outcomes in children in sub-Saharan Africa.

  2. [Treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease--position statement of the Croatian Society for Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation and review of the KDIGO and ERPB guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rački, Sanjin; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar; Ljutić, Dragan; Lovčić, Vesna; Prkačin, Ingrid; Radić, Josipa; Vujičić, Božidar; Bubić, Ivan; Jakić, Marko; Belavić, Žarko; Sefer, Siniša; Pehai, Mario; Klarić, Dragan; Gulin, Marijana

    2014-04-01

    Renal anemia is the result of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and deteriorates with disease progression. Anemia may be the first sign of kidney disease. In all patients with anemia and CKD, diagnostic evaluation is required. Prior to diagnosing renal anemia, it is necessary to eliminate the other possible causes. Direct correlation between the concentration of hemoglobin and the stage of renal failure is well known. Early development of anemia is common in diabetic patients. Correction of anemia may slow the progression of CKD. Anemia is an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD. Treatment of anemia in patients with CKD is based on current guidelines. Recently, the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group has produced comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia in CKD patients and ERBP (European Renal Best Practice) group its position statement and comments on the KDIGO guidelines. The Croatian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation (HDNDT) has already published its own guidelines based on the recommendations and positive experience of European and international professional societies, as well as on own experience. The latest version of Croatian guidelines was published in 2008. Since then, on the basis of research and clinical practice, there have been numerous changes in the modern understanding of the treatment of anemia in CKD. Consequently, HDNDT hereby publishes a review of the recent recommendations of international professional societies, expressing the attitude about treating anemia in CKD as a basis for new guidelines tailored to the present time.

  3. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  4. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2 had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  5. Caregiver's Health Locus of Control and Medication Adherence in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kusum; Swaminathan, Neeraja; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy; Lakkaraja, Madhavi

    2015-03-01

    The authors would like to thank Dr. Morisky for giving us permission to use the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale To explore caregivers' Health Locus of Control's relationship to self-reported adherence to penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). A questionnaire-based study was conducted of caregivers of children with SCD who visited a comprehensive sickle cell center in an inner city hospital, who were either on penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea or both. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC) and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) questionnaires were used for the study. Caregivers of 43 children (27 on penicillin prophylaxis, 13 on hydroxyurea, and 3 on both) completed the MHLC and the MMAS-8. There was no significant difference in adherence between the penicillin and the hydroxyurea groups. The mean Powerful Others score of caregivers of the hydroxyurea only group (25.5+5.6) was higher than that of the penicillin only group (21.2+6.1, p=0.043). Regression analysis revealed an inverse relationship of Chance Locus of Control to adherence in the entire group (Beta = -0.306, R2=0.093, F[1,40]=4.12, p=0.049). Chance Locus of control may identify caregivers of children with SCD at risk for non-adherence to treatment. © 2015 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae in invasive disease reveals lack of the capsule locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lâm, T-T; Claus, H; Frosch, M; Vogel, U

    2016-01-01

    Among invasive Haemophilus influenzae, unencapsulated strains have largely surpassed the previously predominant serotype b (Hib) because of Hib vaccination. Isolates without the genomic capsule (cap) locus are designated non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi). They are different from capsule-deficient variants that show deletion of the capsule transport gene bexA within the cap locus. The frequency of capsule-deficient variants in invasive disease is unknown. We analysed 783 unencapsulated invasive isolates collected over 5 years in Germany and found no single capsule-deficient isolate. Invasive unencapsulated strains in Germany were exclusively NTHi. A negative serotyping result by slide agglutination was therefore highly predictive for NTHi. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  8. Blood type gene locus has no influence on ACE association with Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Braae, Anne; Medway, Christopher; Carrasquillo, Minerva; Younkin, Steven; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Morgan, Kevin; Alzheimer's Research UK

    2015-01-01

    The ABO blood group locus was recently found to contribute independently as well as via interactions with ACE gene variation to plasma levels of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Variation in ACE has also previously been implicated as conferring susceptibility for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but has also been proposed to confer risk via interactions with other as yet unknown genes. More recently, larger studies have not supported ACE as a risk factor for AD, while the role of ACE pathway in ...

  9. [Blue wing disease and chicken anemia agent in broilers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunius, W W

    1988-04-15

    Cases of typical dermatitis were observed on nineteen broiler farms in the province of Gelderland, the Netherlands, ever since 1984. These bloody inflammations occasionally caused a large number of rejects, particularly during the second and third weeks of life. A relationship with Gumboro disease was identified in a number of cases. The causative agent probably is a virus originating from birds of the broiler-breeding poultry flocks. This may possibly be the Chicken Anaemia Agent virus.

  10. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Treatment at NIH "The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation is helping patients like me cope with bone marrow failure disease." Diseases Aplastic Anemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) Related Diseases Treatments ...

  11. Pulse pressure is not an independent predictor of outcome in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Claggett, B; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with inconsistent findings. We clarified the prognostic value in patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa) Therapy. In 4038......, CKD and anemia, PP did not independently predict cardiovascular events or ESRD. This may reflect confounding by aggressive antihypertensive treatment, or PP may be too rough a risk marker in these high-risk patients....

  12. [Risk factors for anemia in the early stages of chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, Yu S; Kozlovskaya, L V; Milovanova, L Yu; Markina, M M; Kozlov, V V; Taranova, M V; Fomin, V V

    To identify the early markers of anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) and glomerulonephritis (GN) in systemic diseases. Seventy-nine patients with some male preponderance who were aged 21 to 65 years (45.3±11.1 years) and had CKD (CGN and GN) in systemic diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener's granulomatosis) in the early stages (Stages I-II) of CKD were examined. GN was diagnosed by a lifetime renal biopsy. Systemic diseases were diagnosed according to the criteria for each nosological entity. The stages of CKD were defined according to the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria; the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using the CKD EPI equation (2012). According to the presence or absence of anemia, all the patients included in the study were divided into 2 groups: 1) 43 (54.4%) anemic patients; 2) 36 (45.6%) non-anemic patients (a control group). In addition to general clinical examination adopted for a nephrology department, special studies, such as determination of the serum levels of hepcidin, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), soluble Klotho protein (s-Klotho), as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation (TSAT) ratio, were performed to solve the set tasks. Forty-three anemic patients who had a hemoglobin level of 110 (100; 119) g/l and 36 control patients who had the similar values were noted to have statistically significantly (panemia were also found to have a statistically significantly (panemia, its detection rate in the presence of systemic diseases was 3.2 times higher than that in CGN patients (41.7 and 12.7%). ROC analysis revealed that in the CKD patients with CGN and GN, the serum hepcidin level ≥ 25 ng/ml, with the sensitivity and specificity being of 89.7% and 74%, respectively (p > 0.001), was associated with the development of anemia. Moreover, the hemoglobin level ofdiseases, elevated serum hepcidin levels should be regarded as a predictor

  13. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-12-25

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy.

  14. Prevention of hypoxic fetal complications in pregnant women with congenital heart disease and anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iu. Davydova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is — to develop a strategy of prevention of hypoxic fetal abnormalities in pregnant women with congenital heart disease, heart failure and iron deficiency anemia. Materials and methods. The study included 86 pregnant women with CHD and NYHA II–III. 68 women in the third trimester of pregnancy is diagnosed anemia (group I, 18 pregnant women with CHD, NYHA II–III without anemia (II group, the control group consisted of 24 pregnant women without cardiac disease, with physiological pregnancy. All pregnant with information registration consent studied the concentration of ferritin, hemoglobin level, morphological study of the placenta. All pregnant women were assigned to iron supplements, oral iron (III hydroxide polymaltose complex (Maltofer when hemoglobin levels above 95 g/l and the expected delivery date more than 40 days of starting treatment. When the hemoglobin level below 95 g/l of intravenously administered iron (III hydroxide sucrose complex (Venofer followed by transfer to oral iron (III. Results. In groups of pregnant I and II did not have perinatal losses, births in gestation less than 28 weeks, with a score Apgar at birth of less than 4 points. Pregnant women with cyanotic heart defects and the need for early delivery in less than 37 weeks are not included in the study. Also, there is a correlation between the degree of severity of anemia in women with CHD with HF and prematurity, and the presence of IUGR child birth asphyxia able to varying degrees (respectively, r=0.8, r=0.75 and r=0.85. Conclusions. Formation of fetoplacental unit in women with CHD on a background of heart failure occurs with complications associated with the presence of tissue hypoxia, as well as the possible impact on the process of oxidative stress. The development of iron deficiency anemia in this group is an additional risk factor for placental dysfunction, which is confirmed by morphometric and morphological studies of placentas

  15. TREATMENT OF ANEMIA AND IMPROVEMENT OF QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG PATIENTS WITH CROHN'S DISEASE: experience using ferric carboxymaltose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Walter SOBRADO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives - Anemia is the most common hematological alteration in patients with Crohn's disease, and is frequently related to intestinal inflammatory activity. Its cause is multifactorial and mostly associated with absolute iron deficiency (iron deficiency anemia and/or functional iron deficiency (inflammation anemia or anemia of chronic disease. It may also be identified through other causes, such as folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency and secondary to adverse effects from medications (salicylic derivatives and immunosuppressive drugs. In the present study, patients with active Crohn's disease and anemia were evaluated and treated with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose. We discuss the therapeutic schemes (doses, safety, results and improvement of quality of life. Methods - In the present prospective study, 10 consecutive patients with Crohn's disease, with moderate to severe activity, with anemia (Hb: 6.7 to 10 g/dL, who were attended between March 2014 and March 2015, were evaluated. Six (60% were men and four were women, all with moderate or severe anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL. They were treated with a maximum of three intravenous infusions of 1000 mg of ferric carboxymaltose, of at least 15 minutes in duration. It was also sought to correlate the inflammatory Crohn's disease activity degree (measured using the Crohn's Disease Activity Index, CDAI and C-reactive protein level with the severity of anemia. The primary outcome was an increase in Hb of ≥2 g/dL and the secondary outcome was the normalization of anemia (Hb ≥12 g/dL for women and ≥13 g/dL for men and the improvement in quality of life seen 12 weeks after the last application of carboxymaltose. Results - Among the 10 patients studied, parenteral iron supplementation was administered in three cases during hospitalization and the others received this on an outpatient basis. The total iron dose ranged from 1,000 to 2,000 mg, with an average of 1,650 mg. Crohn's disease activity

  16. The preferred retinal locus in macular disease: toward a consensus definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Michael D; Engel, Stephen A; Legge, Gordon E

    2011-11-01

    Eccentric viewing in macular disease has been described for half a century. However, a clear definition of eccentric viewing and preferred retinal locus (PRL) does not exist. Here, we determine how the PRL in macular disease is defined by researchers active in this field and, based on the responses received, propose a standardized definition of the preferred retinal locus. A literature review of articles describing the PRL or eccentric viewing was performed. The first and senior authors of all identified publications were contacted and were asked to define the preferred retinal locus. Themes of responses were identified using inductive qualitative research techniques. Frequently recurring themes related to the definition of the PRL included 1) it is a retinal area used for fixation, 2) it is task specific, 3) more than one PRL can be used, 4) it is a well-defined region of retina, and 5) the same PRL is used on repeated testing. Based on the responses received, a consensus definition of the PRL is proposed. It is suggested that researchers define the PRL carefully in experimental reports and an instrument that images the retina is used to define the location of the PRL.

  17. Real-World Impact of Cardiovascular Disease and Anemia on Quality of Life and Productivity in Patients with Non-Dialysis-Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covic, Adrian; Jackson, James; Hadfield, Anna; Pike, James; Siriopol, Dimitrie

    2017-07-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of comorbid conditions, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Anemia is prevalent in the CKD population and worsens as kidney function declines, resulting in a diminished quality of life and increased morbidity/mortality. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to determine the real-world prevalence of CVD among patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD (NDD-CKD), with and without comorbid anemia, and to assess the impact of these conditions on quality of life (QoL) and work productivity. Data were drawn from the Adelphi CKD Disease-Specific Programme, conducted in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK (2012). Anonymized data were collected via patient record forms and patient-completed questionnaires. Patient data were stratified by anemic status and the presence of CVD comorbidity. Data were collected by physicians for 1993 patients, of whom 867 completed a patient-completed questionnaire. A total of 61.4% of patients had anemia, and the prevalence of anemia increased with CKD stage. Patients with anemia had a higher mean number of cardiovascular comorbidities than non-anemic patients (1.27 vs 0.95, respectively; P anemia in this cohort of NDD-CKD patients was high. The presence of concomitant cardiovascular conditions was more common in NDD-CKD patients with comorbid anemia, and was associated with reduced QoL and work productivity outcomes.

  18. The development of anemia is associated to poor prognosis in NKF/KDOQI stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Anemia is a common condition in CKD that has been identified as a cardiovascular (CV) risk factor in end-stage renal disease, constituting a predictor of low survival. The aim of this study was to define the onset of anemia of renal origin and its association with the evolution of kidney disease and clinical outcomes in stage 3 CKD (CKD-3). Methods This epidemiological, prospective, multicenter, 3-year study included 439 CKD-3 patients. The origin of nephropathy and comorbidity (Charlson score: 3.2) were recorded. The clinical characteristics of patients that developed anemia according to EBPG guidelines were compared with those that did not, followed by multivariate logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier curves and ROC curves to investigate factors associated with the development of renal anemia. Results During the 36-month follow-up period, 50% reached CKD-4 or 5, and approximately 35% were diagnosed with anemia (85% of renal origin). The probability of developing renal anemia was 0.12, 0.20 and 0.25 at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. Patients that developed anemia were mainly men (72% anemic vs. 69% non-anemic). The mean age was 68 vs. 65.5 years and baseline proteinuria was 0.94 vs. 0.62 g/24h (anemic vs. non anemic, respectively). Baseline MDRD values were 36 vs. 40 mL/min and albumin 4.1 vs. 4.3 g/dL; reduction in MDRD was greater in those that developed anemia (6.8 vs. 1.6 mL/min/1.73 m2/3 years). These patients progressed earlier to CKD-4 or 5 (18 vs. 28 months), with a higher proportion of hospitalizations (31 vs. 16%), major CV events (16 vs. 7%), and higher mortality (10 vs. 6.6%) than those without anemia. Multivariate logistic regression indicated a significant association between baseline hemoglobin (OR=0.35; 95% CI: 0.24-0.28), glomerular filtration rate (OR=0.96; 95% CI: 0.93-0.99), female (OR=0.19; 95% CI: 0.10-0.40) and the development of renal anemia. Conclusions Renal anemia is associated with a more rapid evolution to CKD-4, and a higher

  19. Retinopathy and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Natalie A; Pfeffer, Marc A; Skali, Hicham; McGill, Janet B; Rossert, Jerome; Olson, Kurt A; Weinrauch, Larry; Cooper, Mark E; de Zeeuw, Dick; Rossing, Peter; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Retinopathy is an established microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but its independent relationship with macrovascular and other microvascular complications is less well defined across the spectrum of kidney disease in T2DM. We examined the prognostic value of retinopathy in assessing the risk of developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular morbidity or death among patients in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Therapy (TREAT). Design TREAT enrolled 4038 patients with T2DM, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and moderate anemia. Patients were grouped by baseline history of retinopathy. Proportional hazards regression models were utilized to assess the association between retinopathy and subsequent ESRD, cardiovascular morbidity or death over an average of 2.4 years. Results Although younger, the 1895 (47%) patients with retinopathy had longer duration of diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, more proteinuria, and more microvascular complications. In univariate analysis, retinopathy was associated with a higher rate of ESRD, but not with cardiovascular events or mortality. After adjustment, retinopathy was no longer statistically significant for the prediction of ESRD or any clinical endpoint. Conclusions In a large cohort of patients with T2DM, CKD, and anemia, retinopathy was common but not independently associated with a higher risk of renal or cardiovascular morbidity or death. Trial registration number NCT00093015 PMID:25452859

  20. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Beaney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601 lies within a “gene desert.” The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s and gene(s involved. Methods. A phenome scan was performed with UCLEB Consortium data. Allele-specific protein binding was studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Dual-reporter luciferase assays were used to assess the impact of genetic variation on expression. Expression quantitative trait analysis was performed with Advanced Study of Aortic Pathology (ASAP and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx consortium data. Results. A suggestive association between QT interval and the locus was observed (rs9982601  p=0.04. One variant at the locus, rs28451064, showed allele-specific protein binding and its minor allele showed 12% higher luciferase expression (p = 4.82 × 10−3 compared to the common allele. The minor allele of rs9982601 was associated with higher expression of the closest upstream genes (SLC5A3 1.30-fold increase p = 3.98 × 10−5; MRPS6 1.15-fold increase p = 9.60 × 10−4 in aortic intima media in ASAP. Both rs9982601 and rs28451064 showed a suggestive association with MRPS6 expression in relevant tissues in the GTEx data. Conclusions. A candidate functional variant, rs28451064, was identified. Future work should focus on identifying the pathway(s involved.

  1. Predictors of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J V; Uno, Hajime; Jarolim, Petr

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine predictors of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with the triad of diabetes, CKD, and anemia represent a significant proportion of patients with cardiovascular disease and are at particularly high risk for a...

  2. Effect of iron therapy on platelet counts in patients with inflammatory bowel disease-associated anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Evstatiev, Rayko; Dejaco, Clemens; Gasche, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Secondary thrombocytosis is a clinical feature of unknown significance. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), thrombocytosis is considered a marker of active disease; however, iron deficiency itself may trigger platelet generation. In this study we tested the effect of iron therapy on platelet counts in patients with IBD-associated anemia. Platelet counts were analyzed before and after iron therapy from four prospective clinical trials. Further, changes in hemoglobin, transferrin saturation, ferritin, C-reactive protein, and leukocyte counts, before and after iron therapy were compared. In a subgroup the effect of erythropoietin treatment was tested. The results were confirmed in a large independent cohort (FERGIcor). A total of 308 patient records were available for the initial analysis. A dose-depended drop in platelet counts (mean 425 G/L to 320 G/L; pcounts, C-reactive protein) had no effect on the change in platelet counts. This effect of iron therapy on platelets was confirmed in the FERGIcor study cohort (n=448, mean platelet counts before iron therapy: 383 G/L, after: 310 G/L, pcounts in patients with IBD-associated anemia. Thus, iron deficiency is an important pathogenetic mechanism of secondary thrombocytosis in IBD.

  3. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  4. Severe iron overload and hyporegenerative anemia in a case with rhesus hemolytic disease: therapeutic approach to rare complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Demircioğlu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 33 weeks’ gestation, a baby with rhesus hemolytic disease (RHD, who had received intrauterine transfusions twice, developed cholestatic hepatic disease and late hyporegenerative anemia. Her serum ferritin and bilirubin levels increased to 8842 ng/ml and 17.9 mg/dl, respectively. Liver biopsy showed cholestasis and severe iron overload. Treatment with recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO decreased the transfusion need, and intravenous deferoxamine resulted in a marked decreased in serum ferritin levels and normalization of liver function. In patients who have undergone intrauterine transfusions due to RHD, hyperferritinemia and late hyporegenerative anemia should be kept in mind. Chelation therapy in cases with symptomatic hyperferritinemia and rHuEPO treatment in cases with severe hyporegenerative anemia should be considered.

  5. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  6. Managing iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease. The results of the "Gestiona hierro-EII" survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas Jordá, Francesc; Vera Mendoza, Isabel; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Vázquez Morón, Juan María; López Román, Javier; Júdez Gutiérrez, Javier

    2018-03-01

    iron deficiency anemia is a common and very relevant manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although clinical practice guidelines have been published and updated on this subject, the management in the daily practice of this complication is far from optimal. to determine the actual management, needs and limitations of anemia in IBD by means of a survey of gastroenterology specialists. a self-administered telematic survey was carried out between April and May 2017 and was sent to SEPD members. The survey included four sections: participant demographics, monitoring, treatment and limitations/needs. a total of 122 evaluable surveys were received from all Spanish autonomous communities. Iron deficiency anemia is considered as a frequent manifestation of IBD and is monitored in all patients via the measurement of hemoglobin and ferritin. In the case of anemia, the survey respondents found it necessary to rule out the presence of IBD activity. However, only 14.8% prescribed intravenous iron when IBD was active. The required dose of intravenous iron is mainly calculated according to patient needs but only 33.1% of clinicians infused doses of 1 g or more. the "Gestiona Hierro EII" survey on the management of anemia in IBD demonstrated a high quality of care, even though some aspects need to be improved. These included the prescription of intravenous iron for patients with disease activity, the use of high-dose intravenous iron and the implementation of algorithms into clinical practice.

  7. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  8. Hemolytic anemia repressed hepcidin level without hepatocyte iron overload: lesson from Günther disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, Sarah; Delaby, Constance; Moulouel, Boualem; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Pilard, Nathalie; Ducrot, Nicolas; Ged, Cécile; Lettéron, Philippe; de Franceschi, Lucia; Deybach, Jean Charles; Beaumont, Carole; Gouya, Laurent; De Verneuil, Hubert; Lyoumi, Saïd; Puy, Hervé; Karim, Zoubida

    2017-02-01

    Hemolysis occurring in hematologic diseases is often associated with an iron loading anemia. This iron overload is the result of a massive outflow of hemoglobin into the bloodstream, but the mechanism of hemoglobin handling has not been fully elucidated. Here, in a congenital erythropoietic porphyria mouse model, we evaluate the impact of hemolysis and regenerative anemia on hepcidin synthesis and iron metabolism. Hemolysis was confirmed by a complete drop in haptoglobin, hemopexin and increased plasma lactate dehydrogenase, an increased red blood cell distribution width and osmotic fragility, a reduced half-life of red blood cells, and increased expression of heme oxygenase 1. The erythropoiesis-induced Fam132b was increased, hepcidin mRNA repressed, and transepithelial iron transport in isolated duodenal loops increased. Iron was mostly accumulated in liver and spleen macrophages but transferrin saturation remained within the normal range. The expression levels of hemoglobin-haptoglobin receptor CD163 and hemopexin receptor CD91 were drastically reduced in both liver and spleen, resulting in heme- and hemoglobin-derived iron elimination in urine. In the kidney, the megalin/cubilin endocytic complex, heme oxygenase 1 and the iron exporter ferroportin were induced, which is reminiscent of significant renal handling of hemoglobin-derived iron. Our results highlight ironbound hemoglobin urinary clearance mechanism and strongly suggest that, in addition to the sequestration of iron in macrophages, kidney may play a major role in protecting hepatocytes from iron overload in chronic hemolysis. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  10. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  11. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  12. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Relation to Respiratory Disease and Social Behaviors In Low-Income Infants in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1993-01-01

    Examined a sample of 177 infants (age 9 through 12 months) with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from low-income French, African, and North African Muslim families in Paris. Found a higher than normal incidence of otitis media and respiratory diseases such as bronchitis among the infants. Also examined the relationship between infant IDA and child…

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  14. β-Thalassemia trait association with autoimmune diseases: β-globin locus proximity to the immunity genes or role of hemorphins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinoz, Meric A; Gedikoglu, Gunduz; Deniz, Gunnur

    2012-04-01

    Thalassemia major continues to be a significant health problem for Mediterranean, Afro-Arabic countries, India and South Easth Asia. It was generally assumed that the β-thalassemia heterozygotes do not bear significant medical risks except a mild microcytic anemia. Nonetheless, increasing number of reports associate β-thalassemia trait with autoimmune conditions, nephritis, diabetes, arthritis, fibromyalgia and asthma. Available sparse data indicate reduced incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in β-thalassemia heterozygotes; yet, if two conditions coexist, the SLE manifestations occur much severer. These associations make sense when considering that the hemoglobin β-chain locus at 11p15.5 resides in close proximity to eight genes with profound roles in immune regulation: STIM1, CD151, TC21/RRAS2, SIGIRR/TOLL/IL1R8, pp52/LSP1 (lymphocyte specific protein), TRIM21, toll interacting protein (TOLLIP) and SLEN3. β-Thalassemia trait accompaniment to autoimmune disease may be the result of haplotypal associations between the close proximity genes. An alternative explanation to thalassemia heterozygosity: autoimmune disease association may be the changed concentrations of hemorphins. Hemorphins are endogenous opioid peptides derived via proteolytical cleavage of hemoglobin. They are shown to bind diverse opioid receptors and act anti-inflammatory. Their reduced expression in thalassemia heterozygosity may explain a proinflammatory stage and autoimmunity vulnerability.

  15. Celiac disease manifesting as isolated cobalamin deficiency megaloblastic anemia: Case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sakaleshpur Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It has been identified as one of the most common lifelong disorders on a worldwide basis. Enteropathy in CD is thought to be the final consequence of an abnormal immune reaction, showing features of both an innate and adaptive response to gluten prolamins. The clinical spectrum is wide, including cases with either typical intestinal or atypical extra intestinal features, or silent forms. Anemia has frequently been reported as the only manifestation or the most frequent extra-intestinal symptom of CD. The only available treatment consists in dietary exclusion of grains containing gluten.

  16. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  17. Degree of anemia, indirect markers of hemolysis, and vascular complications of sickle cell disease in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubert, Marie; Elion, Jacques; Tolo, Aissata; Diallo, Dapa Aly; Diop, Saliou; Diagne, Ibrahima; Sanogo, Ibrahima; Belinga, Suzanne; Guifo, Odette; Wamba, Guillaume; Ngo Sack, Françoise; Boidy, Kouakou; Kamara, Ismael; Traore, Youssouf; Diakite, Cheick Oumar; Gbonon, Valérie; Faye, Blaise Felix; Seck, Moussa; Deme Ly, Indou; Chelo, David; N'Guetta, Roland; Diop, Ibrahima Bara; Gaye, Bamba; Jouven, Xavier; Ranque, Brigitte

    2017-11-16

    The hyperhemolysis paradigm that describes overlapping "hyperhemolytic-endothelial dysfunction" and "high hemoglobin-hyperviscous" subphenotypes of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients is based on North American studies. We performed a transversal study nested in the CADRE cohort to analyze the association between steady-state hemolysis and vascular complications of SCD among sub-Saharan African patients. In Mali, Cameroon, and Ivory Coast, 2407 SCD patients (1751 SS or sickle β-zero-thalassemia [Sβ 0 ], 495 SC, and 161 sickle β + -thalassemia [Sβ + ]), aged 3 years old and over, were included at steady state. Relative hemolytic intensity was estimated from a composite index derived from principal component analysis, which included bilirubin levels or clinical icterus, and lactate dehydrogenase levels. We assessed vascular complications (elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity [TRV], microalbuminuria, leg ulcers, priapism, stroke, and osteonecrosis) by clinical examination, laboratory tests, and echocardiography. After adjustment for age, sex, country, and SCD phenotype, a low hemoglobin level was significantly associated with TRV and microalbuminuria in the whole population and with leg ulcers in SS-Sβ 0 adults. A high hemolysis index was associated with microalbuminuria in the whole population and with elevated TRV, microalbuminuria, and leg ulcers in SS-Sβ 0 adults, but these associations were no longer significant after adjustment for hemoglobin level. In conclusion, severe anemia at steady state in SCD patients living in West and Central Africa is associated with elevated TRV, microalbuminuria, and leg ulcers, but these vascular complications are not independently associated with indirect markers of increased hemolysis. Other mechanisms leading to anemia, including malnutrition and infectious diseases, may also play a role in the development of SCD vasculopathy. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. A modifier of Huntington's disease onset at the MLH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Chao, Michael J; Harold, Denise; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2017-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in HTT. Many clinical characteristics of HD such as age at motor onset are determined largely by the size of HTT CAG repeat. However, emerging evidence strongly supports a role for other genetic factors in modifying the disease pathogenesis driven by mutant huntingtin. A recent genome-wide association analysis to discover genetic modifiers of HD onset age provided initial evidence for modifier loci on chromosomes 8 and 15 and suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 3. Here, genotyping of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in a cohort of 3,314 additional HD subjects yields independent confirmation of the former two loci and moves the third to genome-wide significance at MLH1, a locus whose mouse orthologue modifies CAG length-dependent phenotypes in a Htt-knock-in mouse model of HD. Both quantitative and dichotomous association analyses implicate a functional variant on ∼32% of chromosomes with the beneficial modifier effect that delays HD motor onset by 0.7 years/allele. Genomic DNA capture and sequencing of a modifier haplotype localize the functional variation to a 78 kb region spanning the 3'end of MLH1 and the 5'end of the neighboring LRRFIP2, and marked by an isoleucine-valine missense variant in MLH1. Analysis of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) provides modest support for altered regulation of MLH1 and LRRFIP2, raising the possibility that the modifier affects regulation of both genes. Finally, polygenic modification score and heritability analyses suggest the existence of additional genetic modifiers, supporting expanded, comprehensive genetic analysis of larger HD datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. ASSOCIATION OF POTENTIAL CELIAC DISEASE AND REFRACTORY IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Honar, Naser; Yousefi, Ali; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy caused by dietary gluten. The combination of serologic, genetic and histologic data has led to description of other categories of this disease. There are a number of patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) that do not respond to iron treatment and may be repeated for many times, Therefore, we aimed to investigate celiac disease in this group. In this cross sectional transverse prospective study from August 2011 to February 2013, in a Pediatric care clinic affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 184 children including 92 IDA patients who responded to treatment using iron supplement, 45 non-responding iron deficient patients, and 47 healthy individuals, with the maximum age of 18 years, with written consent from their parents, participated in serologic screening (with Anti-TTG antibody and anti-Endomysial antibody) for celiac disease. Patients with at least one positive serology test underwent multiple mucosal biopsy from bulb and duodenum. Among 184 participants, 19 (10.3%) subjects had positive serologic test for celiac disease, including 13 (28.9%) patients in the group with refractory IDA, 5 (5.4%) patients in the group with treated IDA, and 1 patient in the healthy group. The frequency of positive serologic test in the group with IDA resistant to treatment was prominently higher than the other two groups (Pceliac test who underwent endoscopy and biopsy, no histologic evidence of celiac disease was seen. They were diagnosed as potential celiac disease. Frequency of potential celiac disease in patients with refractory IDA was higher than control the subjects. Therefore, we recommend serologic screening for early detection and minimizing the complications of celiac disease and repeated iron therapy for this group.

  20. A mutagenesis-derived broad-spectrum disease resistance locus in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jackie; Zhang, Hongtao; Giroux, Michael J; Feiz, Leila; Jin, Yue; Wang, Meinan; Chen, Xianming; Huang, Li

    2012-07-01

    Wheat leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew caused by the fungal pathogens Puccinia triticina, P. graminis f. sp. tritici, P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, and Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, respectively, are destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. Breeding durable disease resistance cultivars rely largely on continually introgressing new resistance genes, especially the genes with different defense mechanisms, into adapted varieties. Here, we describe a new resistance gene obtained by mutagenesis. The mutant, MNR220 (mutagenesis-derived new resistance), enhances resistance to three rusts and powdery mildew, with the characteristics of delayed disease development at the seedling stage and completed resistance at the adult plant stage. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the resistance in MNR220 is conferred by a single semidominant gene mapped on the short arm of chromosome 2B. Gene expression profiling of several pathogenesis-related genes indicated that MNR220 has an elevated and rapid pathogen-induced response. In addition to its potential use in breeding for resistance to multiple diseases, high-resolution mapping and cloning of the disease resistance locus in MNR220 may lead to a better understanding of the regulation of defense responses in wheat.

  1. High Prevalence but Insufficient Treatment of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results of a Population-Based Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Claudia; Liebold, Anne; Takses, Angela; Strauch, Ulrike G.; Obermeier, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background. Iron-deficiency anemia is described to be a common problem in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is frequently associated with a reduced quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in a population-based cohort at time of first diagnosis and during the early course of the disease. Methods. As far as available, lab values of patients registered in the population-based “Oberpfalz cohort” were screened. In anemic patients, we further investigated all laboratory results to differentiate between iron deficiency and other reasons for anemia. All patients with any kind of anemia were interviewed separately according to symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia and administration of iron. Results. In total, we evaluated hemoglobin values of 279 patients (183 Crohn's disease, 90 ulcerative colitis, and 6 indeterminate colitis). Lab data which allowed further differentiation of the type of anemia were available in 70% of anemic patients, in 34.4% values of iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation had been measured. At time of first diagnosis, an iron-deficiency anemia was diagnosed in 26 of 68 patients with anemia (38.2%, 20 CD, 4 UC, and 2 IC patients), but only 9 patients (34.6%) received subsequent iron therapy. After one year, 27 patients were identified to have an iron-deficiency anemia (19 CD, 8 UC), 20 of them were treated with iron (71.4%). Of 9 patients with proven iron-deficiency anemia at time of first diagnosis and subsequent administration of iron, 5 (55.5%) had iron-deficiency anemia despite permanent treatment after one year. In total, 38 patients (54.3%) did not receive any iron substitution at all despite of proven iron-deficiency anemia, and only 13 patients of 74 patients were treated with intravenous iron (17.6%). Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia at different points during the early course of disease in this population-based cohort of

  2. Equine infectious anemia virus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including pa...

  3. Locus coeruleus: A brain region exhibiting neuronal alterations in Parkinson’s disease rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samah M. Fathy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic insults lead to increased α-synuclein expression in dopaminergic neurons. However, little information is known about α-synuclein alterations in relation to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH changes in locus coeruleus (LC of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP rat model for Parkinson’s disease (PD. Four injections (15 mg/kg each of the neurotoxicant MPTP to rats led to an upregulation of α-synuclein level and increased immunoreactivity with aggregated protein in the MPTP-treated group as revealed by Western blotting and immunohistochemical techniques. Meanwhile, MPTP reduced the level of and caused immunoreactivity toward TH antibody in LC and adjoining noradrenergic neurons. These data indicate that MPTP can induce α-synuclein alterations in other brain regions that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. The findings are also consistent with a pattern that α-synuclein modification influences the TH level.

  4. Blood type gene locus has no influence on ACE association with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braae, Anne; Medway, Christopher; Carrasquillo, Minerva; Younkin, Steven; Kehoe, Patrick G; Morgan, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    The ABO blood group locus was recently found to contribute independently and via interactions with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene variation to plasma levels of ACE. Variation in ACE has previously been not only implicated as individually conferring susceptibility for Alzheimer's disease (AD) but also proposed to confer risk via interactions with other as yet unknown genes. More recently, larger studies have not supported ACE as a risk factor for AD, whereas the role of ACE pathway in AD has come under increased levels of scrutiny with respect to various aspects of AD pathology and possible therapies. We explored the potential combined involvement of ABO and ACE variations in the genetic susceptibility of 2067 AD cases compared with 1376 nondemented elderly. Including the effects of ABO haplotype did not provide any evidence for the genetic association of ACE with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Erythropoiesis-stimulating Agents and Anemia in Patients with Non-dialytic Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Moon; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Though erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have been strongly endorsed in guidelines, it is of particular financial interest. Recently, the reimbursement of ESAs in non-dialytic patients was started by the Korean National Health Insurance System. Thus, we investigated the impact of the reimbursement of ESAs on the anemia care in non-dialytic CKD patients. Medical records of patients with advanced CKD (estimated GFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) were reviewed. Use of ESAs, blood transfusion, and hemoglobin concentrations were analyzed from one year prior to reimbursement to three years following. We used multivariable modified Poisson regression to estimate the utilization prevalence ratio (PRs). A total of 1,791 medical records were analyzed. The proportion of patients receiving ESAs increased from 14.8% before reimbursement to a peak 33.6% in 1 yr after reimbursement; thereafter, ESA use decreased to 22.4% in 3 yr after reimbursement (compared with baseline; PR, 2.19 [95% CI, 1.40-3.42]). In patients with Hb <10 g/dL, the proportion of receiving ESAs increased from 32.1% before reimbursement to 66.7% in 3 yr after reimbursement (compared with baseline; PR, 2.04 [95% CI, 1.25-3.32]). Mean hemoglobin concentrations were 10.06±1.54 g/dL before reimbursement and increased to 10.78±1.51 g/dL in 3 yr after the reimbursement change (P=0.001). However, the requirement of blood transfusion was not changed over time. With the reimbursement of ESAs, the advanced CKD patients were more likely to be treated with ESAs, and the hemoglobin concentrations increased.

  6. Epoetin zeta in the management of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, differential pharmacology and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis-Ajami ML

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mary Lynn Davis-Ajami,1 Jun Wu,2 Katherine Downton,3 Emilie Ludeman,3 Virginia Noxon4 1Organizational Systems and Adult Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Greenville, SC, USA; 3Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Science, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: Epoetin zeta was granted marketing authorization in October 2007 by the European Medicines Agency as a recombinant human erythropoietin erythropoiesis-stimulating agent to treat symptomatic anemia of renal origin in adult and pediatric patients on hemodialysis and adults on peritoneal dialysis, as well as for symptomatic renal anemia in adult patients with renal insufficiency not yet on dialysis. Currently, epoetin zeta can be administered either subcutaneously or intravenously to correct for hemoglobin concentrations ≤10 g/dL (6.2 mmol/L or with dose adjustment to maintain hemoglobin levels at desired levels not in excess of 12 g/dL (7.5 mmol/L. This review article focuses on epoetin zeta indications in chronic kidney disease, its use in managing anemia of renal origin, and discusses its pharmacology and clinical utility. Keywords: biosimilar, chronic kidney disease, epoetin alfa, erythropoiesis, renal anemia, Retacrit®

  7. Simultaneous point-of-care detection of anemia and sickle cell disease in Tanzania: the RAPID study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Luke R; Ambrose, Emmanuela E; Raphael, Kevin C; Hokororo, Adolfine; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Tyburski, Erika A; Lam, Wilbur A; Ware, Russell E; McGann, Patrick T

    2018-02-01

    Both anemia and sickle cell disease (SCD) are highly prevalent across sub-Saharan Africa, and limited resources exist to diagnose these conditions quickly and accurately. The development of simple, inexpensive, and accurate point-of-care (POC) assays represents an important advance for global hematology, one that could facilitate timely and life-saving medical interventions. In this prospective study, Robust Assays for Point-of-care Identification of Disease (RAPID), we simultaneously evaluated a POC immunoassay (Sickle SCAN™) to diagnose SCD and a first-generation POC color-based assay to detect anemia. Performed at Bugando Medical Center in Mwanza, Tanzania, RAPID tested 752 participants (age 1 day to 20 years) in four busy clinical locations. With minimally trained medical staff, the SCD POC assay diagnosed SCD with 98.1% sensitivity and 91.1% specificity. The hemoglobin POC assay had 83.2% sensitivity and 74.5% specificity for detection of severe anemia (Hb ≤ 7 g/dL). Interobserver agreement was excellent for both POC assays (r = 0.95-0.96). Results for the hemoglobin POC assay have informed the second-generation assay design to be more suitable for low-resource settings. RAPID provides practical feasibility data regarding two novel POC assays for the diagnosis of anemia and SCD in real-world field evaluations and documents the utility and potential impact of these POC assays for sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Dharma Laksmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aplastic Anemia describes a disorder of the clinical syndrome is marked by a deficiency of red blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets in the absence of other forms of bone marrow damage. Aplastic anemia is classified as a rare disease in developed countries the incidence of 3-6 cases / 1 million inhabitants / year. The exact cause of someone suffering from aplastic anemia also can not be established with certainty, but there are several sources of potential risk factors. Prognosis or course of the disease varies widely aplastic anemia, but without treatment generally gives a poor prognosis /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  11. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which may help us understand how genes contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney ...

  18. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  19. Information Needs of Cancer Patients and Perception of Impact of the Disease, of Self-Efficacy, and Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinki, C; Seilacher, E; Ebel, M; Ruetters, D; Kessler, I; Stellamanns, J; Rudolph, I; Huebner, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between information needs and cancer patients' perceptions of the impact of the disease, self-efficacy, and locus of control. Using a standardized questionnaire, we obtained data from patients who attended a series of lectures. The questionnaire included questions on their information needs, sources of information, satisfaction with information, and short questionnaires on self-efficacy, perception of the disease, and locus of control of reinforcement. Data was obtained from 185 patients. Our results showed that the sources of information that were most often used were physicians (84 %), print media (68 %), and the Internet (59 %); online fora (7.5 %), non-medical practitioners (9.7 %), and telephone-based counseling (8.6 %) were only used by a minority. Patients with a high perception of their own control over the disease more often used any source of information available to them and were more often interested in acquiring additional information. Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with the need for information on all topics. Patients with a higher external locus of control significantly more often used sources of information and had significantly more need for additional information. By contrast, there were no associations with an internal locus of control. Neither external nor internal locus of control showed any associations with satisfaction with information. Information needs seem to be higher in patients with a high external locus of control and low self-efficacy. Physicians, other professionals, and institutions that provide information may take these relationships into consideration for tailoring their services to patients.

  20. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  1. Genetic and physical analysis of a YAC contig spanning the fungal disease resistance locus Asc of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesbah, L.A.; Kneppers, T.J.A.; Takken, F.L.W.; Laurent, P.; Hille, J.; Nijkamp, H.J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato is caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL). The fungus produces AAL toxins that kill the plant tissue. Resistance to the fungus segregates as a single locus, called Asc, and has been genetically mapped on

  2. Genetic and physical analysis of a YAC contig spannig the fungal disease resistance locus Asc of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesbah, L.A.; Kneppers, T.J.A.; Takken, F.L.W.; Laurent, P.J.F.; Hille, J.; Nijkamp, H.J.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Alternaria in stem canker disease of tomato is caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL). The fungus produces AAL toxins that kill the plant tissue. Resistance to the fungus segregates as a single locus, called Asc, and has been genetically mapped

  3. Clinical Trial of Vadadustat in Patients with Anemia Secondary to Stage 3 or 4 Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Edouard R; Smith, Mark T; Maroni, Bradley J; Zuraw, Qing C; deGoma, Emil M

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of anemia secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain limited. Vadadustat (AKB-6548) is an oral hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-hydroxylase domain (HIF-PHD) inhibitor that is being investigated for the treatment of anemia secondary to CKD. A phase 2a, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial (NCT01381094) was undertaken in adults with anemia secondary to CKD stage 3 or 4. Eligible subjects were evenly randomized to 5 groups: 240, 370, 500, or 630 mg of once-daily oral vadadustat or placebo for 6 weeks. All subjects received low-dose supplemental oral iron (50 mg daily). The primary endpoint was the mean absolute change in hemoglobin (Hb) from baseline to the end of treatment. Secondary endpoints included iron indices, safety, and tolerability. Ninety-three subjects were randomized. Compared with placebo, vadadustat significantly increased Hb after 6 weeks in a dose-dependent manner (analysis of variance; p anemia secondary to stage 3 or 4 CKD. Global multicenter, randomized phase 3 trials are ongoing in non-dialysis-dependent and dialysis-dependent patients. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Unusual Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    Anemia is one of the most common symptoms in children caused by numerous underlying diseases. In majority of patients, these diseases can be correctly diagnosed through physical examination, history taking, and routine laboratory tests. Bone marrow failure syndromes associated with several genetic diseases are rare causes of anemia in childhood. We reviewed the recent progress of molecular mechanisms in bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC), which are all predicted to involve defective ribosome synthesis. Delineation of the precise role of each gene product in ribosomal biogenesis and hematopoiesis may have both therapeutic and prognostic significance.

  6. Acute and chronic anemia and short- and long-term outcome of patients with peripheral arterial disease and critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüders, Florian; Engelbertz, Christiane; Meyborg, Matthias; Freisinger, Eva; Malyar, Nasser M; Zeller, Thomas; Reinecke, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Evident data about the additive effect of "the fifth cardiovascular risk factor" (anemia) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) focused on morbidity and outcome of patients with PAD are currently still missing. A total of 41,882 PAD patients were included. Of these, 5566 (13.3%) suffered from anemia. Patients with anemia were older (Pchronic kidney disease (Pdisease (Panemia: 3.7-fold, Panemia in chronic disease: 2.9-fold, Panemia: 6.4-fold, Panemia in chronic disease: 4.6-fold; Panemia. During a follow-up time up to 4years (until Dec. 31st, 2012, median 775days, 25th-75th percentiles 469-1120days) nutritional, aplastic, and anemia in chronic disease and acute anemia were high significant predictors of long-term mortality and amputation (each Panemia in chronic disease: 2-fold higher (Panemia: 3-fold higher (Panemia. This study illustrates from a large, comprehensive database the association of acute, nutritional, aplastic, and anemia in chronic disease on morbidity, in-hospital treatment and complications, short- and long term outcome, and costs of patients with PAD. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Second locus for Hirschsprung disease/Waardenburg syndrome in a large Mennonite kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dow, E.; Cross, S.; Williamson, R. [St. Mary`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Mulligan, L.M. [Univ. of Cambridge, MA (United States); Lyonnet, S. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Wolgemuth, D.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mascari, M.; Ladda, R. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1994-10-15

    We have studied a large Mennonite kindred in which 20 members were affected with Hirschburg disease (HSCR), 5 of whom had one or more manifestations of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type II (WS2). Eleven additional relatives had signs of WS2 without HSCR. Since HSCR and WS2 each represent perturbations of neural crest migration/differentiation, this large pedigree with apparent cosegregation of HSCR and WS2 offered an opportunity to search for linkage between these loci, candidate genes, and random DNA markers, particularly in view of recent discoveries of genes for Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) and Hirschsprung disease (c-ret). We have examined the following possible linked markers in 69 relatives in this family: the c-ret gene (HSCR); the human PAX3 gene (HuP2) on chromosome 2q (WS1) and placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) on chromosome 2q (linked to WS1); argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) on chromosome 9q, close to ABO blood groups which have shown weak linkage to WS; and the {beta}1 GABA receptor gene (GABARB1) on chromosome 4q13-11, close to c-kit, deletions of which cause piebaldism. Linkage between any of these loci and HSCR/WS in this kindred was excluded, demonstrating that there is at least one further locus for HSCR other than c-ret. 45 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. [The assessment of the level of coping style and health locus of control in patients with coronary heart disease and hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opuchlik, Katarzyna; Wrzesińska, Magdalena; Kocur, Józef

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of the level of coping style and health locus of control in patients with coronary heart disease and hypertension. The sample studied consisted of 112 patients (81 M, 31 F) at the age of 35-65 years. Two groups participated in the study; first with coronary heart disease and hypertension and second with hypertension without other diseases. The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situation and Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale were used in the study. Two groups of patients used the most frequent task-oriented coping style. The significant differences were seen between groups in the external health locus of control (t = 2.113; p locus of control. Patients with coronary heart disease and hypertension declare for external locus of control.

  9. [Recombinant erythropoietin as treatment for hyporegenerative anemia following hemolytic disease of the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Bacciedoni, Viviana; García, Cecilia; Schvartzman, Gabriel; Vain, Néstor

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study is to report results of erythropoietin treatment for late hyporegenerative anemia in the hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Reports previously published concern only a few cases, with controversial results. Case series report concerning 50 neonates with HDN due to Rh, ABO or KpA antigens, aged more than 7 days. Erythropoietin treatment started when hematocrit dropped to levels requiring transfusion, with an inappropriate reticulocyte response (Reticulocyte Production Index <1). At start of treatment mean age was 24.3 +/- 12.0 days (range 8-65 days), hematocrit 24.1 +/- 2.8% (range 18-30%), and Reticulocyte Production Index 0.34 +/- 0.25 (range 0.05-0.98). Hematocrit and Reticulocyte Production Index showed significant increases after 7 and 14 days of treatment (p <0.001). No difference was observed either between infants with Rh-HDN and ABO-HDN or between Rh-HDN patients with or without intrauterine transfusions. Seven infants (14%) required one packed RBC transfusion during erythropoietin therapy, 2 of them within 72 hours from starting treatment. The percentage of transfused infants showed no difference either between ABO-HDN and Rh-HDN or between Rh-HDN with and without intrauterine transfusions. Moderate, short-lasting neutropenia, not associated to infections, was observed in 11 patients. No other adverse effect was observed. The administration of erythropoietin appears to be a safe and useful therapy. Its efficacy should be confirmed by randomized studies.

  10. The Neuroanatomy of the Reticular Nucleus Locus Coeruleus in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo S. Giorgi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s Disease (AD features the accumulation of β-amyloid and Tau aggregates, which deposit as extracellular plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, respectively. Neuronal Tau aggregates may appear early in life, in the absence of clinical symptoms. This occurs in the brainstem reticular formation and mostly within Locus Coeruleus (LC, which is consistently affected during AD. LC is the main source of forebrain norepinephrine (NE and it modulates a variety of functions including sleep-waking cycle, alertness, synaptic plasticity, and memory. The iso-dendritic nature of LC neurons allows their axons to spread NE throughout the whole forebrain. Likewise, a prion-like hypothesis suggests that Tau aggregates may travel along LC axons to reach out cortical neurons. Despite this timing is compatible with cross-sectional studies, there is no actual evidence for a causal relationship between these events. In the present mini-review, we dedicate special emphasis to those various mechanisms that may link degeneration of LC neurons to the onset of AD pathology. This includes the hypothesis that a damage to LC neurons contributes to the onset of dementia due to a loss of neuroprotective effects or, even the chance that, LC degenerates independently from cortical pathology. At the same time, since LC neurons are lost in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders we considered which molecular mechanism may render these brainstem neurons so vulnerable.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heavy blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who ... heavy menstrual flow, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help reduce your monthly blood flow. ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that ... our Hematology Branch , performs research on anemia. We fund research. Our Division of Blood Diseases and Resources ( ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron- ... deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A hematologist (a blood disease specialist), a gastroenterologist (a digestive system specialist), and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stomach also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children ... blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  20. Oral manifestations compatible with chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients with Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein Cavalcanti, Laura; Fuentes Araújo, Renata L; Bonfim, Carmem; Torres-Pereira, Cassius C

    2015-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease that is characterized by several congenital abnormalities and progressive bone marrow failure and is associated with an increased susceptibility to malignant disorders. Currently, the only potential cure for hematological disorders is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, 1 of the most common complications after HSCT is the development of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), which is also a risk factor for the development of cancer, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of oral manifestations compatible with cGVHD in patients diagnosed with FA according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria. A total of 96 patients (51 females, 45 males; median age, 16 years) with FA, who were in medical follow-up after HSCT at the outpatient clinic of the bone marrow transplantation unit (Hospital de Clínicas from the Universidade Federal do Paraná) underwent an oral evaluation between January 2013 and December 2013. Post-HSCT periods varied from 1 to 261 months and were divided into 3 periods: immediate post-HSCT period; intermediate post-HSC period, and late post-HSCT period. Among the evaluated patients, 40 of 96 (42%) presented with oral manifestations of cGVHD, with 29 of 40 (73%) of these patients in the late post-HSCT period. NIH scale scores varied from 0 to 10, and lichenoid and hyperkeratotic lesions were the abnormalities most frequently observed (100%). Overall, a high prevalence of oral manifestations was observed for cGVHD patients with FA. These data highlight the importance of monitoring oral manifestations compatible with cGVHD to identify and treat individuals with a higher risk of developing oral cancer. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of chicken anemia virus and infectious bursal disease virus in commercial chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, H; van Santen, V L; Hoerr, F J; Breedlove, C

    2009-03-01

    The effects of chicken anemia virus (CAV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) coinfection in commercial layer-type and meat-type (broiler) chickens with specific maternal immunity were evaluated. In addition, the broiler progeny used had been vaccinated in ovo against IBDV. Layer chickens were inoculated intramuscularly on day 3 of age with CAV and orally on day 7 of age with an IBDV standard strain (APHIS). Broiler chickens were exposed to CAV and/or an IBDV variant strain (AL2) via the drinking water on days 3 and 14 of age. Following CAV and IBDV inoculation neither mortality nor overt clinical disease was observed in any layer or broiler group. In spite of maternal immunity against both IBDV and CAV, mean hematocrits of all layer groups inoculated with CAV (CAV, CAV + APHIS) were lower than uninfected chickens. IBDV APHIS alone or in combination with CAV did not affect the layer weight gain. However, on day 30 of age and concomitantly with maternal antibody decay, bursa lymphocyte depletion became evident in CAV + APHIS-infected layer chickens. These birds (CAV + APHIS) also seroconverted to IBDV on day 35 of age. CAV persisted at low levels in the layer chickens throughout the experimental period in CAV- and CAV+APHIS-infected chickens. Similarly, infected broiler chickens did not show changes in weight gain. Compared to CAV-infected or uninfected controls, CAV+AL2- and AL2-infected broiler chickens showed significant lymphocyte depletion in the bursa as assessed both by bursal indices and histomorphometry. Broilers also seroconverted to IBDV after day 30 of age confirming that bursal lymphocyte depletion was due to IBDV resuming replication. Thymus histomorphometry revealed significant lymphocyte depletion in all infected broiler groups at 30 days of age, but only in CAV+AL2-infected broiler chickens at 41 days of age, suggesting that IBDV infection delayed repopulation of the thymus.

  2. Depression of Vaccinal Immunity to Marek's Disease by Infection with Chicken Infectious Anemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yankun; Cui, Ning; Han, Ni; Wu, Jiayan; Cui, Zhizhong; Su, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Marek's disease (MD) has been occurring with increasing frequency in chickens in recent years. To our knowledge, however, there has been no report of the very virulent plus (vv+) MD virus (MDV) field isolate in China. Studies have shown that dual infection with immunosuppressive viruses such as chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) occurs frequently in chickens developing MD. In this study, we performed a designed set of in vivo experiments, which comprised five different groups of chickens, including the group of CVI988/Rispens-vaccinated chickens, the groups of CVI988/Rispens-vaccinated chickens infected with MDV or CIAV or both viruses (MDV and CIAV), and the group of MDV-challenged chickens. The effects of CIAV dual infection on the immunization of commercial MDV vaccine CVI988/Rispens were evaluated. The results show that infection of the SD15 strain of CIAV significantly reduced the weight and antibody titers to avian influenza virus (AIV)/Newcastle disease virus (NDV) inactivated vaccines of chickens immunized with the CVI988/Rispens, and resulted in the atrophy of thymus/bursa and the enlargement of spleen. The CVI988/Rispens vaccination conferred good immune protection for chickens challenged with 2000 PFU of the GX0101 strain of MDV. However, dual infection with SD15 significantly reduced the body weight, antibody titers induced by AIV/NDV inactivated vaccines and protective index of CVI988/Rispens, and resulted in the aggravation of the immunosuppression, mortality, and viremia of GX0101 in CVI988/Rispens-immunized/GX0101-challenged chickens. Overall, CIAV infection significantly reduced the protective effects of the CVI988/Rispens vaccine against MDV, implying that concurrent infection with CIAV may be a major contributor in the frequent attacks of MD in China in recent years.

  3. Association between vitamin D deficiency and anemia in inflammatory bowel disease patients with ileostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Fialho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D deficiency is commonly seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Vitamin D deficiency in IBD patients with ileostomy has not been systemically studied. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency and risk factors associated with low 25(OH D3 levels in those patients. Methods: 112 eligible IBD patients with ileostomy were studied. Demographic, clinical, and endoscopic variables were analyzed. Vitamin D levels before and after ileostomy were compared when available. Levels of serum 25(OHD3 <20 ng/mL were classed as being deficient. Results: 112 eligible ileostomy patients were included. The mean vitamin D level was 21.47 ± 1.08 ng/dl. Low levels of vitamin D (<30 ng/dl were present in 92 patients (82%. Vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/dL was seen in 55 patients (49%. There was no difference between patients with or without vitamin D deficiency regarding demographic variables, medication use and duration of ileostomy. Neo-ileal inflammation on endoscopy was not associated with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.155. Lower levels of phosphorus (p = 0.020 or hemoglobin (p = 0.019 and shorter duration of IBD (p = 0.047 were found in patients with vitamin D deficiency. In multivariate analysis, lower levels of phosphorus (odds ratio [OR]: 1.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16–2.89, p = 0.009 and hemoglobin (OR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.08–1.60, p = 0.006 remained significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is common in IBD patients with ileostomy and is associated with low hemoglobin levels. Further studies are needed to evaluate vitamin D supplementation as a possible adjuvant in the treatment of anemia of chronic disease in IBD patients. Resumo: Introdução: A deficiência de vitamina D em pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal submetidos a ileostomia não foi estudada sistematicamente. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a frequência e os fatores de

  4. Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  5. Avian anemia's

    OpenAIRE

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematologica...

  6. Avian anemia's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  7. Nutritional anemias and the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional anemias are important because they are easily reversed and because their underlying causes, most often unrelated to dietary intake, require individualized assessment. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) usually results from iron losses accompanying chronic bleeding, including loss to intestinal parasites, or from gastric disorders or malabsorption in the elderly. Cobalamin-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia with predilection for the elderly, nearly always stems from failure of intrinsic factor (IF)-related absorption. Folate-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia usually caused by poor intake, has nearly disappeared in countries that fortify food with folic acid. Copper-deficiency anemia, which usually results from malabsorptive disorders or from medical or nutritional interventions that provide inadequate copper or excess zinc, is uncommon but increasingly recognized. The prevalences of nutritional anemias, which are not always distinguished from non-anemic deficiency, are uncertain. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) provides an essential diagnostic tool leading to judicious matching of relevant biochemical changes with relevant anemia. Nutritional anemias usually feature abnormal MCV, whereas the predominant anemias in the aged, especially the anemias of chronic disease/chronic inflammation (ACD/ACI), of renal failure, and of unknown causes, are typically normocytic.

  8. Transferrin microheterogeneity in rheumatoid arthritis - Relation with disease activity and anemia of chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feelders (Richard); G. Vreugdenhil (Gerard); G. de Jong (G.); A.J.G. Swaak (Antonius); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the relation between disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the microheterogeneity of transferrin. Using crossed immuno isoelectric focusing, transferrin microheterogeneity patterns were analyzed in sera of healthy individuals, nonanemic RA patients, iron deficient

  9. Prevalence of anemia in patients with type II diabetes and mild to moderate chronic kidney disease and the impact of anti-RAS medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Konstantina; Fourtounas, Costas

    2014-05-01

    Anemia is a common feature of diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) mainly due to erythropoietin (EPO) deficiency and uremic toxicity. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been established as first-choice medications for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. However, there are conflicting data regarding their impact on hemoglobin levels in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We evaluated the prevalence of anemia in 101 patients with diabetes mellitus type II and CKD at stage III-IV (group A) compared with 101 non-diabetic patients with similar renal function (group B). Moreover, we evaluated the impact of ACE inhibitors and ARBs on patients' anemia. Anemia was observed in 60 patients in group A and in 47 patients in group B (P patients in group A and 19 patients in group B were receiving exogenous EPO for correction of renal anemia (P patients in group A and 52 patients in group B were receiving ACE inhibitors and/or ARBs (P medications. Anemia is more common in diabetic patients with CKD stage III-IV than in non-diabetic patients with similar renal function. Our results indicate that ACE inhibitors and ARBs are not a significant cause of anemia for both populations.

  10. Equine infectious anemia virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2018-01-02

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including past and recent research, and commemorate scientists who have made great contributions to equine infectious anemia virus prevention.

  11. Lesions in the thymus and bone marrow in chicks with experimentally induced chicken infectious anemia disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, Burak; Gurel, Aydin

    2008-03-01

    One-day-old SPF chicks were inoculated with the Cux-l strain of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV), and the clinical development of disease and its macroscopic and microscopic alterations in the thymus and bone marrow, were observed. Tissue sections of thymus and bone marrow were stained using the streptavidin-biotin peroxidase method and examined under light microscope for evaluation of antigenic intensities in tissues. Those findings were then compared with blood parameters and ELISA results obtained through collected sera during sacrifice procedures. We sought to determine: the localization of viral antigens in thymus and bone marrow tissues after inoculation, the correlation between antigen intensities and hematologic, serologic and histopathologic findings, definitive diagnostic criteria using histopathologic and immunoperoxidase methods, and the reliability of these methods in the diagnosis of CIAV infection. For this purpose, 83, one-day-old SPF chicks were used. The birds were divided into experimental (n = 52) and control (n = 26) groups. A virus dose of TCID50 of 100,000/ml was administered intramuscularly to every bird in the experimental group. Based on the results of this study, we have suggested that clinical examination, along with macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of the thymus and bone marrow, maybe undertaken starting from day 7 post-inoculation (PI). ELISA, might be of value, as it might give consistent results starting from day 14 PI. However, the most reliable results were obtained through examination of thymus and bone marrow sections from infected birds stained by immunoperoxidase technique, as early as day 4 PI.

  12. Fine-mapping the human leukocyte antigen locus in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases: identifying causal amino acid variants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heemst, Jurgen; Huizinga, Tom J W; van der Woude, Diane; Toes, René E M

    2015-05-01

    To provide an update on and the context of the recent findings obtained with novel statistical methods on the association of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus with rheumatic diseases. Novel single nucleotide polymorphism fine-mapping data obtained for the HLA locus have indicated the strongest association with amino acid positions 11 and 13 of HLA-DRB1 molecule for several rheumatic diseases. On the basis of these data, a dominant role for position 11/13 in driving the association with these diseases is proposed and the identification of causal variants in the HLA region in relation to disease susceptibility implicated. The HLA class II locus is the most important risk factor for several rheumatic diseases. Recently, new statistical approaches have identified previously unrecognized amino acid positions in the HLA-DR molecule that associate with anticitrullinated protein antibody-negative and anticitrullinated protein antibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis. Likewise, similar findings have been made for other rheumatic conditions such as giant-cell arteritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Interestingly, all these studies point toward an association with the same amino acid positions: amino acid positions 11 and 13 of the HLA-DR β chain. As both these positions influence peptide binding by HLA-DR and have been implicated in antigen presentation, the novel fine-mapping approach is proposed to map causal variants in the HLA region relevant to rheumatoid arthritis and several rheumatic diseases. If these interpretations are correct, they would direct the biological research aiming to address the explanation for the HLA-disease association. Here, we provide an overview of the recent findings and evidence from literature that, although relevant new insights have been obtained on HLA-disease associations, the interpretation of the biological role of these amino acids as causal variants explaining that such associations should be taken with caution.

  13. Pentoxifylline for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bolignano

    Full Text Available Pentoxifylline (PTX is a promising therapeutic approach for reducing inflammation and improving anemia associated to various systemic disorders. However, whether this agent may be helpful for anemia management also in CKD patients is still object of debate.Systematic review and meta-analysis.Adults with CKD (any KDOQI stage, including ESKD patients on regular dialysis and anemia (Hb<13 g/dL in men or < 12 g/dL in women.Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Ovid-MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for studies providing data on the effects of PTX on anemia parameters in CKD patients without design or follow-up restriction.PTX derivatives at any dose regimen.Hemoglobin, hematocrit, ESAs dosage and resistance (ERI, iron indexes (ferritin, serum iron, TIBC, transferrin and serum hepcidin and adverse events.We retrieved 11 studies (377 patients including seven randomized controlled trials (all comparing PTX to placebo or standard therapy one retrospective case-control study and three prospective uncontrolled studies. Overall, PTX increased hemoglobin in three uncontrolled studies but such improvement was not confirmed in a meta-analysis of seven studies (299 patients (MD 0.12 g/dL, 95% CI -0.22 to 0.47. Similarly, there were no conclusive effects of PTX on hematocrit, ESAs dose, ferritin and TSAT in pooled analyses. Data on serum iron, ERI, TIBC and hepcidin were based on single studies. No evidence of increased rate of adverse events was also noticed.Small sample size and limited number of studies. High heterogeneity among studies with respect to CKD and anemia severity, duration of intervention and responsiveness/current therapy with iron or ESAs.There is currently no conclusive evidence supporting the utility of pentoxifylline for improving anemia control in CKD patients. Future trials designed on hard, patient-centered outcomes with larger sample size and longer follow-up are advocated.

  14. Heavy metals in locus ceruleus and motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2013-12-12

    The causes of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS) and other types of motor neuron disease (MND) remain largely unknown. Heavy metals have long been implicated in MND, and it has recently been shown that inorganic mercury selectively enters human locus ceruleus (LC) and motor neurons. We therefore used silver nitrate autometallography (AMG) to look for AMG-stainable heavy metals (inorganic mercury and bismuth) in LC and motor neurons of 24 patients with MND (18 with SALS and 6 with familial MND) and in the LC of 24 controls. Heavy metals in neurons were found in significantly more MND patients than in controls when comparing: (1) the presence of any versus no heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 88%, controls 42%), (2) the median percentage of heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 9.5%, control 0.0%), and (3) numbers of individuals with heavy metal-containing LC neurons in the upper half of the percentage range (MND 75%, controls 25%). In MND patients, 67% of remaining spinal motor neurons contained heavy metals; smaller percentages were found in hypoglossal, nucleus ambiguus and oculomotor neurons, but none in cortical motor neurons. The majority of MND patients had heavy metals in both LC and spinal motor neurons. No glia or other neurons, including neuromelanin-containing neurons of the substantia nigra, contained stainable heavy metals. Uptake of heavy metals by LC and lower motor neurons appears to be fairly common in humans, though heavy metal staining in the LC, most likely due to inorganic mercury, was seen significantly more often in MND patients than in controls. The LC innervates many cell types that are affected in MND, and it is possible that MND is triggered by toxicant-induced interactions between LC and motor neurons.

  15. Heavy metals in locus ceruleus and motor neurons in motor neuron disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The causes of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS) and other types of motor neuron disease (MND) remain largely unknown. Heavy metals have long been implicated in MND, and it has recently been shown that inorganic mercury selectively enters human locus ceruleus (LC) and motor neurons. We therefore used silver nitrate autometallography (AMG) to look for AMG-stainable heavy metals (inorganic mercury and bismuth) in LC and motor neurons of 24 patients with MND (18 with SALS and 6 with familial MND) and in the LC of 24 controls. Results Heavy metals in neurons were found in significantly more MND patients than in controls when comparing: (1) the presence of any versus no heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 88%, controls 42%), (2) the median percentage of heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 9.5%, control 0.0%), and (3) numbers of individuals with heavy metal-containing LC neurons in the upper half of the percentage range (MND 75%, controls 25%). In MND patients, 67% of remaining spinal motor neurons contained heavy metals; smaller percentages were found in hypoglossal, nucleus ambiguus and oculomotor neurons, but none in cortical motor neurons. The majority of MND patients had heavy metals in both LC and spinal motor neurons. No glia or other neurons, including neuromelanin-containing neurons of the substantia nigra, contained stainable heavy metals. Conclusions Uptake of heavy metals by LC and lower motor neurons appears to be fairly common in humans, though heavy metal staining in the LC, most likely due to inorganic mercury, was seen significantly more often in MND patients than in controls. The LC innervates many cell types that are affected in MND, and it is possible that MND is triggered by toxicant-induced interactions between LC and motor neurons. PMID:24330485

  16. Ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia as a life-threatening complication of antibiotic treatment of 'chronic Lyme disease'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Maarten; Speeckaert, Marijn; Callens, Rutger; Van Biesen, Wim

    2017-04-01

    'Chronic Lyme disease' is a controversial condition. As any hard evidence is lacking that unresolved systemic symptoms, following an appropriately diagnosed and treated Lyme disease, are related to a chronic infection with the tick-borne spirochaetes of the Borrelia genus, the term 'chronic Lyme disease' should be avoided and replaced by the term 'post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.' The improper prescription of prolonged antibiotic treatments for these patients can have an impact on the community antimicrobial resistance and on the consumption of health care resources. Moreover, these treatments can be accompanied by severe complications. In this case report, we describe a life-threatening ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia with an acute kidney injury (RIFLE-stadium F) due to a pigment-induced nephropathy in a 76-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with a so-called 'chronic Lyme disease.'

  17. A prospective observational study of early intervention with erythropoietin therapy and renal survival in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients with anemia: JET-STREAM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akizawa, Tadao; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Hirakata, Hideki; Watanabe, Yuzo; Hase, Hiroki; Nishi, Shinichi; Babazono, Tetsuya; Kumagai, Michiko; Katakura, Shingo; Uemura, Yukari; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    There is limited data showing that early treatment for anemia could prolong renal survival in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We therefore investigated the relationship between hemoglobin (Hb) levels at initiation of epoetin beta therapy and renal outcome in non-dialysis CKD patients with anemia. In this prospective, multi-center, observational study, non-dialysis CKD patients with anemia who were naïve to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) were divided into three groups based on their Hb levels at initiation of epoetin beta therapy (Group I: 10 ≤ Hb anemia compared with initiation of ESA therapy at below 9 g/dL or even 10 g/dL.

  18. Management of inflammatory bowel disease-related anemia and iron deficiency with specific reference to the role of intravenous iron in current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jürgen; Aksan, Ayşegül; Farrag, Karima; Dignass, Axel; Radeke, Heinfried H

    2017-11-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, impacting disease prognosis, morbidity, hospitalization rates and time lost from work. While iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic inflammation predominate, combinations of hematimetric and biochemical markers facilitate the diagnosis and targeted therapy of other etiologies according to their underlying pathophysiological causes. Intravenous iron replacement is currently recommended in IBD patients with moderate to severe anemia or intolerance to oral iron. Areas covered: This review examines the impact, pathophysiology and diagnostics of iron deficiency and anemia, compares the characteristics and safety profiles of available oral and intravenous iron preparations, and highlights issues which require consideration in decision making for therapy administration and monitoring. Expert opinion: Modern intravenous iron formulations have been shown to be safe and effective in IBD patients, allowing rapid anemia correction and repletion of iron stores. While traditional oral iron preparations are associated with increased inflammation, negative effects on the microbiome, and poor tolerance and compliance, first clinical trial data indicate that newer oral compounds such as ferric maltol and sucrosomial iron offer improved tolerability and may thus offer a viable alternative for the future.

  19. The rs1990760 polymorphism within the IFIH1 locus is not associated with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Addison's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidl Christian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three genes have been confirmed as major joint susceptibility genes for endocrine autoimmune disease:human leukocyte antigen class II, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22. Recent studies showed that a genetic variation within the interferon induced helicase domain 1 (IFIH1 locus (rs1990760 polymorphism is an additional risk factor in type 1 diabetes and Graves' disease (GD. Methods The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the rs1990760 polymorphism within the IFIH1 gene in German patients with GD (n = 258, Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 106, Addison's disease (AD, n = 195 and healthy controls (HC, n = 227 as well as in 55 GD families (165 individuals, German and 100 HT families (300 individuals, Italian. Furthermore, the interaction between rs1990760 polymorphism with human leukocyte antigen (HLA risk haplotype DQ2(DQA*0501-DQB*0201, the risk haplotypes DQ2/DQ8 (DQA*0301-DQB*0302 and the status of thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb and TSH receptor antibody (TRAb in patients and families were analysed. Results No significant differences were found between the allele and genotype frequencies for rs1990760 IFIH1 polymorphism in patients with GD, HT, AD and HC. Also no differences were observed when stratifying the IFIH1 rs1990760 polymorphism for gender, presence or absence of thyroid antibodies (GD:TRAb and HT:TPOAb/TgAb and HLA risk haplotypes (DQ2:for GD and HT, DQ2/DQ8:for AD. Furthermore the transmission analysis in GD and HT families revealed no differences in alleles transmission for rs1990760 IFIH1 from parents with or without HLA risk haplotype DQ2 to the affected offspring. In contrast, by dividing the HT parents according to the presence or absence of thyroid Ab titers, mothers and fathers both positive for TPOAb/TgAb overtransmitted the allele A of IFIH1 rs1990760 to their HT affected offspring (61.8% vs 38.2%;p = 0

  20. Changing patterns of radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors from chronically irradiated dogs prone either to aplastic anemia or to myeloproliferative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic patterns have been assessed in chronic 60 Co gamma irradiated dogs during preclinical phases of evolving aplastic anemia (AA) or myeloproliferative disease (MPD), principally myeloid leukemia. The results support the concept that acquired radioresistance of vital granulocyte/monocyte lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors is temporally, perhaps causally, linked to the processes mediating hematopoietic recovery and accommodation under chronic irradiation, and in turn to preclinical events of evolving MPD. In addition, the marked differential responses of progenitors to gamma and neutron irradiation in vitro might suggest differences in the nature of cellular lesions elicited by chronic gamma irradiation, in vivo. (author)

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... body. People with severe iron-deficiency anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  2. Hepcidin as a predictive factor and therapeutic target in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment for anemia of chronic disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurl, Milan; Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Asshoff, Malte; Haschka, David; Seifert, Markus; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Wilflingseder, Doris; Posch, Wilfried; Murphy, Anthony T; Witcher, Derrick R; Theurl, Igor; Weiss, Günter

    2014-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is a multifactorial disorder, resulting mainly from inflammation-driven reticuloendothelial iron retention, impaired erythropoiesis, and reduced biological activity of erythropoietin. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have been used for the treatment of anemia of chronic disease, although with varying response rates and potential adverse effects. Serum concentrations of hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis, are increased in patients with anemia of chronic disease and linked to the pathogenesis of this disease, because hepcidin blocks cellular iron egress, thus limiting availability of iron for erythropoiesis. We tested whether serum hepcidin levels can predict and affect the therapeutic efficacy of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment using a well-established rat model of anemia of chronic disease. We found that high pre-treatment hepcidin levels correlated with an impaired hematologic response to an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in rats with anemia of chronic disease. Combined treatment with an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and an inhibitor of hepcidin expression, LDN-193189, significantly reduced serum hepcidin levels, mobilized iron from tissue stores, increased serum iron levels and improved hemoglobin levels more effectively than did the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent or LDN-193189 monotherapy. In parallel, both the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent/LDN-193189 combined reduced the expression of cytokines known to inhibit erythropoiesis. We conclude that serum hepcidin levels can predict the hematologic responsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy in anemia of chronic disease. Pharmacological inhibition of hepcidin formation improves the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent's therapeutic efficacy, which may favor a reduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosages, costs and side effects. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  4. Genetic association of multiple sclerosis with the marker rs391745 near the endogenous retroviral locus HERV-Fc1: analysis of disease subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bettina; Oturai, Annette Bang; Harbo, Hanne F

    2011-01-01

    We have previously described the occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) to be associated with human endogenous retroviruses, specifically the X-linked viral locus HERV-Fc1. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible association of the HERV-Fc1 locus with subtypes of MS. MS patients...... are generally subdivided into three categories: Remitting/Relapsing and Secondary Progressive, which together constitute Bout Onset MS, and Primary Progressive. In this study of 1181 MS patients and 1886 controls we found that Bout Onset MS was associated with the C-allele of the marker rs391745 near the HERV......-Fc1 locus (p = 0.003), while primary progressive disease was not. The ability to see genetic differences between subtypes of MS near this gene speaks for the involvement of the virus HERV-Fc1 locus in modifying the disease course of MS....

  5. Serodiagnosis of celiac disease in children referred for evaluation of anemia: A pediatric hematology unit′s experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children presenting with typical clinical features of celiac disease (CD are diagnosed relatively easily, however, diagnosis remains challenging and is often delayed when they present with ′difficult to treat anemia′ without overt gastrointestinal manifestations. Index study was undertaken to report profile of patients referred to pediatric hematology unit with ′difficult anemia′ who subsequently were diagnosed with CD. Materials and Methods: The records of 83 patients (1988-2008 with CD were scrutinized retrospectively who had presented with predominant hematological manifestations. Results: CD was confirmed histologically in 31 (37%, while 52 (63% were diagnosed by serology alone. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.0 ± 2.8 years. The mean duration of symptom-diagnosis interval was 40.9 ± 30.6 months. Eighty-one (98% children had anemia (Hb < 11 g/dl and 55 (66% had received iron supplements without discernible benefit. Thirty-nine (47% patients received a blood transfusion. Thirty-six (43% patients did not have diarrhea. Majority of the patients had either a microcytic-hypochromic (48% or dimorphic (43% anemia. Twenty-four (33% had thrombocytosis, while 5 (7% had thrombocytopenia. Mean duration of follow-up for patients on roll in the clinic for more than six months was 17.7 ± 20.9 months. Conclusion: Pediatricians and hematologists need to be aware of the extra-intestinal manifestations of CD. Prolonged duration of symptoms and a diagnosis at a relatively older age is striking in children presenting with predominantly hematological manifestations. Investigations for CD are recommended in children presenting with iron deficiency anemia refractory to hematinics or who have coexisting growth retardation. Necessity for biopsy in overtly symptomatic cases is discussed.

  6. Anemia and hemoglobin serum levels are associated with exercise capacity and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Marcello; Manea, Lorenzo; Anton, Kamel; Bruzzone, Paola; Meneghello, Mara; Zamboni, Francesco; Purgato, Luigi; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Ferrari, Pietro; Testi, Renato

    2015-05-08

    Little is known about the relationship between hemoglobin concentrations, functional status and health related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of anemia and the association of hemoglobin with shortness of breath, exercise capacity, muscle strength and HRQL, in COPD patients. A total of 105 COPD patients (77 males, 71.6 ± 9.2 years) were studied. Patients were classified as anemic and non anemic using the WHO criteria. We used the Medical Research Council Dyspnoea scale (MRCs) to measure shortness of breath. Exercise capacity was assessed using the six minute walking distance (6MWD) and the peak of VO2 during the maximal cycle ergometer test (VO2max). We used the Quadriceps and Handgrip strength assessment to determine muscle strength. The Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire was used to investigate HRQL. The physiological/functional characteristics of the two groups were compared. Regression models adjusting for confounders examined the independent association of anemia and of hemoglobin levels with clinical and functional outcomes. Anemic patients (12.3%) showed a significantly higher MRCs, a lower 6MWD, VO2max, and a worse quality of life. On the contrary, there was no difference in muscle strength between the two groups. In the regression models, hemoglobin was independently associated with reduced exercise capacity and HRQL. Anemia in COPD was a risk factor for poorer exercise capacity and quality of life, and these outcomes were linearly associated with hemoglobin. Our results should stimulate further research into exploring whether increasing hemoglobin has a beneficial effect on the outcomes in COPD.

  7. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  8. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  9. Hospitalization and 1-year all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease at Stages 1 and 2: Effect of mild anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseir, William; Artul, Suheil; Nasrallah, Najib; Mograbi, Julnar; Mahamid, Mahmud

    2016-07-01

    The effect of anemia in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) on morbidity and mortality is known. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of mild anemia on hospitalization and 1-year all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with Stage 1 and 2 CKD. Hospitalized T2DM patients (n = 307) with a glomerular filtration rate ≥ 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) and urinary albumin excretion > 30 mg/24 h (Stage 1 and 2 CKD) were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups based on hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations: those with (mean [ ± SD] Hb 10.7 ± 0.7 g/dL) and without (mean Hb 13.3 ± 1.28 g/dL) anemia. There was no significant difference between patients with and without anemia in terms of age, gender, body mass index, HbA1c, and cardiovascular diseases. The mean length of hospitalization of the 130 anemic and 177 non-anemic patients was 4.3 ± 3.5 and 3.5 ± 1.9 days, respectively (P anemia (9.2% vs 1.7%, respectively; P = 0.002). After adjusting for confounding variables, multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that mild anemia was significantly associated with 1-year all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.15, 95% confidence interval 1.92-2.54; P = 0.033). Mild anemia may increase the length of hospitalization and was associated with 1-year all-cause mortality among hospitalized T2DM patients with Stage 1 and 2 CKD. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Next-Generation Sequencing of the HLA locus: Methods and impacts on HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapito, Raphael; Radosavljevic, Mirjana; Bahram, Seiamak

    2016-11-01

    The human Major Histocompatibility Complex, known as the "Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)", could be defined as a "super locus" (historically called "supergene") governing the adaptive immune system in vertebrates. It also harbors genes involved in innate immunity. HLA is the most gene-dense, polymorphic and disease-associated region of the human genome. It is of critical medical relevance given its involvement in the fate of the transplanted organs/tissues and its association with more than 100 diseases. However, despite these important roles, comprehensive sequence analysis of the 4 megabase HLA locus has been limited due to technological challenges. Thanks to recent improvements in Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies however, one is now able to handle the peculiarities of the MHC notably the tight linkage disequilibrium between genes as well as their high degree of polymorphism (and hence heterozygosity). Increased read lengths, throughput, accuracy, as well as development of new bioinformatics tools now enable to efficiently generate complete and accurate full-length HLA haplotypes without phase ambiguities. The present report reviews current NGS approaches to capture, sequence and analyze HLA genes and loci. The impact of these new methodologies on various applications including HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji Suk; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Kyoung Sook; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Park, Sue Kyung; Lee, Joongyub; Hyun, Young Youl; Chung, Wookyung; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Ahn, Curie; Choi, Kyu Hun

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD). Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR. Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR.

  12. Vitamin D status of HIV-infected women and its association with HIV disease progression, anemia, and mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Mehta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has a potential role in slowing HIV disease progression and preventing mortality based on its extensive involvement in the immune system; however, this relationship has not been examined in large studies or in resource-limited settings.Vitamin D levels were assessed in 884 HIV-infected pregnant women at enrollment in a trial of multivitamin supplementation (not including vitamin D in Tanzania. Women were followed up for a median of 69.5 months, and information on hemoglobin levels, HIV disease progression, and mortality was recorded. Proportional hazard models and generalized estimating equations were used to assess the relationship of these outcomes with vitamin D status.Low vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D<32 ng/mL was significantly associated with progression to WHO HIV disease stage III or greater in multivariate models (incidence rate ratio [RR]: 1.25; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.05, 1.50. No significant relationship was observed between vitamin D status and T-cell counts during follow-up. Women with low vitamin D status had 46% higher risk of developing severe anemia during follow-up, compared to women with adequate vitamin D levels (RR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.96. Women in the highest vitamin D quintile had a 42% lower risk of all-cause mortality, compared to the lowest quintile (RR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.84. Vitamin D status had a protective association with HIV disease progression, all-cause mortality, and development of anemia during follow-up in HIV-infected women. If confirmed in randomized trials, vitamin D supplementation could represent a simple and inexpensive method to prolonging the time to initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients, particularly in resource-limited settings.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  15. Clinical utility of Beckman-Coulter Gen's reticulocyte analysis in the study of anemia of chronic disease (ACD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana; Ortega, Carlos; Santos, Luís; Teixeira, Alexandre; Dinis, Maria Joáo; Vasconcelos, Iponina; Lacerda, Jorge; Fonseca, Elisa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the reticulocyte parameters (classical and research parameters) acquired by the Beckman Coulter GEN'S blood counter (GEN'S; Brea, CA, USA) to establish the "reticulocyte profile" characteristics of patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD). The reticulocyte parameters and profile provided by the GEN'S were studied in 38 anemic patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for the ACD, and the results were compared with those of 38 healthy controls in a multivariate statistical analysis using the Student t-test and the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis.Statistically significant (P 0.9), for the IRF (high) and the reticulocyte population data: mean channel scatter retics (high) and the mean channel conductivity retics (high). This study establishes the reticulocyte parameters and reticulocyte profile as provided by the GEN'S and characteristic of patients with ACD as compared with normal subjects. This should provide the basis for further studies comparing the reticulocyte profile of patients with ACD with those found in other types of anemia.

  16. Artificial intelligence for optimal anemia management in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Michael E; Gaweda, Adam E

    2016-08-01

    Computational intelligence for the prediction of hemoglobin to guide the selection of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dose results in improved anemia management. The models used for the prediction result from the use of individual patient data and help to increase the number of hemoglobin observations within the target range. The benefits of using these modeling techniques appear to be a decrease in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use and a decrease in the number of transfusions. This study confirms the results of previous smaller studies and suggests that additional beneficial results may be achieved. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Positive predictive value of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition diagnosis codes for anemia caused by bleeding in the Danish National Registry of Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalfani, Jihen; Frøslev, Trine; Olsen, Morten; Ben Ghezala, Inès; Gammelager, Henrik; Arendt, Johan Fb; Erichsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Valid data on anemia caused by bleeding are needed for epidemiological research and monitoring health care. The Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP) is a nationwide medical database with information on all Danish residents' hospital history. We aimed to assess the positive predictive value (PPV) of the diagnostic coding of anemia caused by bleeding in the DNRP. In the DNRP, we identified all patients with International Classification of Disease, 10th edition codes for anemia caused by bleeding (acute: D50.0; chronic: D62.6) at three Danish hospitals from 2000 through 2009. For these patients we computed the PPV using hemoglobin level data, from Aarhus University laboratory database, as reference standard. Anemia was defined by a hemoglobin level less than 7.0 mmol/L for women and less than 8.0 mmol/L for men. We identified 3391 patients in the DNRP with a diagnosis of anemia caused by bleeding. The overall PPV was 95.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.6%-96.0%). The PPV was 97.6% (95% CI: 96.6%-98.3%) for men and 94.0% (95% CI: 92.9%-94.9%) for women, and the PPV increased with age at diagnosis. The PPV varied according to type of discharging departments, from 89.2% (95% CI: 83.4%-93.4%) in gynecology to 96.8% (95% CI: 94.9%-98.2%) in surgery, and was lower for outpatients compared with inpatients. We found a high PPV of the coding for anemia caused by bleeding in the DNRP. The registry is a valid source of data on anemia caused by bleeding for various purposes including research and monitoring health care.

  18. Lack of hepcidin ameliorates anemia and improves growth in an adenine-induced mouse model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, Oleh; Sureshbabu, Angara; Doty, Steve B; Zhu, Yuan-Shan; Patino, Edwin; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Choi, Mary E; Boskey, Adele; Rivella, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Growth delay is common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), often associated with poor quality of life. The role of anemia in uremic growth delay is poorly understood. Here we describe an induction of uremic growth retardation by a 0.2% adenine diet in wild-type (WT) and hepcidin gene (Hamp) knockout (KO) mice, compared with their respective littermates fed a regular diet. Experiments were started at weaning (3 wk). After 8 wk, blood was collected and mice were euthanized. Adenine-fed WT mice developed CKD (blood urea nitrogen 82.8 ± 11.6 mg/dl and creatinine 0.57 ± 0.07 mg/dl) and were 2.1 cm shorter compared with WT controls. WT adenine-fed mice were anemic and had low serum iron, elevated Hamp, and elevated IL6 and TNF-α. WT adenine-fed mice had advanced mineral bone disease (serum phosphorus 16.9 ± 3.1 mg/dl and FGF23 204.0 ± 115.0 ng/ml) with loss of cortical and trabecular bone volume seen on microcomputed tomography. Hamp disruption rescued the anemia phenotype resulting in improved growth rate in mice with CKD, thus providing direct experimental evidence of the relationship between Hamp pathway and growth impairment in CKD. Hamp disruption ameliorated CKD-induced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis derangements and growth plate alterations. Disruption of Hamp did not mitigate the development of uremia, inflammation, and mineral and bone disease in this model. Taken together, these results indicate that an adenine diet can be successfully used to study growth in mice with CKD. Hepcidin appears to be related to pathways of growth retardation in CKD suggesting that investigation of hepcidin-lowering therapies in juvenile CKD is warranted. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Neuromelanin imaging of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus among patients with Parkinson's disease using 3Tesla MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Kanako; Ohtsuka, Chigumi; Kato, Kanako; Terayama, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which loss of dopaminergic neurons from the pars compacta of substantia nigra (SNc) and locus ceruleus (LC) in the major pathologic substrate. To investigate the relationships between the loss of SNc and LC neurons, and the stage of illness, we compared the signal intensity of SNc and LC between PD patients and normal controls by using a neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 Tesla. We examined 41 PD patients in early stage, 10 in progressive stage, and 22 healthy controls. In PD, we observed a significant loss of neuromelanin in LC (p<0.0001) and lateral area of SNc (p=0.0011) while no significant difference between neuromelanin imaging and severity of PD was observed. The present study suggests that neuromelanin imaging using 3T MRI is a useful tool for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. (author)

  20. Clinico-aetiologic profile of macrocytic anemias with special reference to megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Vineetha; Dutta, Tarun Kumar; Badhe, Bhawana A; Bobby, Zachariah; Panigrahi, Ashish K

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to study the clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with macrocytic anemia and to determine the etiology of macrocytic anemia with special reference to megaloblastic anemia. This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried over a period of 18 months on 60 adult patients (age ≥13 years) of macrocytic anemia. Macrocytic anemia was identified when peripheral blood examination showed anemia with a mean red blood corpuscular volume of >95 fl. The most common cause of macrocytic anemia was megaloblastic anemia (38.4%). The major causes of nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia were primary bone marrow disorders (35%), liver diseases (15%) and hemolytic anemia (8.3%). There was a significant male preponderance in the study (65%). The megaloblastic anemias observed were due to either vitamin B(12) deficiency (78.3%) or combined B(12) and folate deficiency (21.7%). A significant proportion of non-vegetarians (73.9%) had megaloblastic anemia. Patients with an MCV of >110fl were more likely to have megaloblastic anemia (p value 0.0007). Three patients (mean age 55 years) with a megaloblastic marrow did not respond to vitamin replacement and were found to have myelodysplastic syndrome. Megaloblastic anemia due to Vitamin B(12) or folate deficiency remains the most important cause of macrocytic anemia. In settings with limited laboratory facilities, a therapeutic trial of vitamins B(12) or folic acid is useful in determining the specific vitamin deficiency.

  1. A anemia falciforme como problema de Saúde Pública no Brasil The sickle cell disease as a Public Health problem in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto B. de Paiva e Silva

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Apesar de a anemia falciforme ser a doença hereditária de maior prevalência no Brasil, a literatura nacional carece de investigações a respeito dos seus aspectos de Saúde Pública. Investigou-se a realidade vivida por 80 pacientes adultos (49 mulheres e 31 homens com diagnóstico de anemia falciforme, seguidos regularmente em centro hematológico. O diagnóstico tardio da doença foi um dos principais aspectos detectados na casuística examinada. Observou-se que a problemática maior do paciente adulto com a anemia falciforme esta centrada nos aspectos econômicos, sobretudo na falta de oportunidades profissionais, apesar de os mesmos poderem participar do mercado de trabalho, desde que estejam recebendo tratamento médico adequado e exerçam funções compatíveis com as suas limitações e potencialidades. A orientação psicoterapêutica teve uma grande aceitação pelos pacientes, sem diferença significativa entre os sexos. Concluiu-se haver necessidade da implantação de programas comunitários de diagnóstico precoce e de orientação médica, social e psicológica dos doentes com a anemia falciforme no Brasil, bem como de aconselhamento genético não diretivo dos casais de heterozigotos com o traço falciforme.Sickle cell anemia is the most prevalent hereditary disease in Brazil. However, the Brazilian literature registers no investigations into the public health aspects of the disease. This present study investigates the way of life of 80 adult patients (49 women and 31 men with a diagnosis of sicklecell anemia, at a blood center in Brazil. The late diagnosis of the disease was one of the most significant aspects observed in this group of patients. It was also observed that the dominant problem faced by adult patients with sickle cell anemia is of an economic nature, mainly due to lack of professional opportunities. However, patients can well undertake economic activities under adequate medical supervision, according to their

  2. Delta-He, Ret-He and a New Diagnostic Plot for Differential Diagnosis and Therapy Monitoring of Patients Suffering from Various Disease-Specific Types of Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimann, Andreas; Cremer, Malte; Hernáiz-Driever, Pablo; Zimmermann, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to prove the usefulness of a new diagnostic plot (Hema-Plot), illustrating the relationship between the hemoglobin content of reticulocytes (Ret-He) as a marker of functional iron deficiency and the difference between the reticulocyte and erythrocyte hemoglobin content (Delta-He) as a marker of an impaired hemoglobinization of newly formed reticulocytes occurring during inflammatory processes, to differentiate between various disease-specific types of anemia. A complete blood and reticulocyte count was performed on routine EDTA blood samples from 345 patients with and without various disease-specific types of anemia using the Sysmex XN-9000 hematology analyzer: blood healthy newborns (n = 23), blood healthy adults (n = 31), patients suffering from anemia of chronic disease (ACD) due to diverse oncological, chronic inflammatory, or autoimmune diseases (total n = 138) with (n = 65) and without therapy (n = 73), patients with thalassemia and/or hemoglobinopathy (n = 18), patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) (n = 35), patients with a combination of ACD and IDA (n = 17), as well as patients suffering from sepsis (total n = 83) with (n = 32) and without therapy (n = 51). The results for Ret-He, Delta-He, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were statistically compared (Mann-Whitney U Test) between the particular patient groups and the diagnostic plots were drawn. Delta-Hemoglobin showed a statistically significant difference between blood healthy newborns and blood healthy adults (p ≤ 0.05), while Ret-He and C-reactive protein did not. In addition, of all three biomarkers only Delta-He showed a statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between the ACD/IDA and IDA cohort. Delta-He, Ret-He, and CRP showed a statistically significant difference between patient cohorts with and without therapy suffering from ACD, ACD/IDA, and sepsis before and after medical therapy (p ≤ 0.05). The Hema-Plot illustrated the dynamic character of Ret-He and

  3. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  4. Pernicious Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helps your body absorb vitamin B12. Have an autoimmune disorder that involves the endocrine glands, such as Addison's ... Research suggests a link may exist between these autoimmune disorders and pernicious anemia that's caused by an autoimmune ...

  5. Etiological study of microcytic hypochromic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kafle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microcytic hypochromic anemia is a distinct morphologic subtype of anemia with well- de ned etiology and treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the etiology and frequency of microcytic hypochromic anemia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital. One hundred cases of microcytic hypochromic anemia were included. Relevant clinical history, hemogram, reticulocyte count, iron pro les were documented in a proforma. Bone marrow aspiration and hemoglobin electrophoresis was conducted when required. Data was analysed by Microsoft SPSS 16 windows. Result: Iron de ciency was the commonest etiology (49%. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (20.8% was the commonest cause of iron de ciency, malignancy (24.3% was the commonest cause of anemia of chronic disease. Mean value of Mean Corpuscular Volume was lowest in hemolytic anemia (71.0 . Mean Red cell Distribution Width was normal (14.0% in hemolytic anemia but was raised in other types. Mean serum iron was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (32.2μg/dl and chronic disease (34.8μg/dl, normal in hemolytic anemia (83μg/dl and raised in sideroblastic anemia (295μg/dl. Mean serum ferritin was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (7.6ng/ml, raised in chronic disease (158.6ng/ml and normal in hemolytic anemia (99.2ng/ml. Serum ferritin was normal in sideroblastic anemia (93ng/ml. Mean Total Iron Binding Capacity was raised in iron de ciency anemia (458μg/dl and normal in other microcytic hypochromic anemias. Conclusion: Diagnosis of microcytic hypochromic anemia requires a standardized approach which includes clinical details, hemogram, peripheral blood smear, reticulocyte count, iron pro le, hemoglobin electrophoresis and bone marrow examination. 

  6. Coping Styles Mediate the Relationship Between Self-esteem, Health Locus of Control, and Health-Promoting Behavior in Chinese Patients With Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Huijing; Tian, Qian; Chen, Yuxia; Cheng, Cheng; Fan, Xiuzhen

    Health-promoting behavior plays an important role in reducing the burden of coronary heart disease. Self-esteem and health locus of control may contribute to health-promoting behavior, and coping styles may mediate these associations. The aims of our study were to examine whether self-esteem and health locus of control are associated with health-promoting behavior and examine the possible mediating effect of coping styles in patients with coronary heart disease. Health-promoting behavior, self-esteem, health locus of control, and coping styles were assessed in 272 hospitalized patients (60 ± 12 years, 61% male) with coronary heart disease. Hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to analyze the relationships between health-promoting behavior and other variables. Mediation effect was examined according to the methods of Baron and Kenny. The mean score for health-promoting behavior was 2.57 ± 0.51; 38.2% of patients (n = 104) scored lower than 2.5. Self-esteem (β = .139, P locus of control and health-promoting behavior. Confrontation plays a mediating role in the association among self-esteem, internal health locus of control, and health-promoting behavior. Strategies should be undertaken to encourage the use of confrontation coping style, which will facilitate health-promoting behavior.

  7. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless ...

  9. What Is Fanconi Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Your Body FA is one of many types of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of anemia is fatigue (tiredness). Fatigue occurs because your body ...

  10. About Anemia (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Anemia KidsHealth / For Kids / About Anemia What's in this ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia happens when a person doesn't have ...

  11. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn with late-onset anemia due to anti-M: a case report and review of the Japanese literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Ohto, Hitoshi; Nollet, Kenneth E; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Saito, Shunnichi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Negishi, Yutaka; Ishida, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) attributed to M/N-incompatibility varies from asymptomatic to lethally hydropic. Case reports are rare, and the clinical significance of anti-M is not completely understood. A challenging case of HDFN due to anti-M prompted an investigation of the Japanese literature, in order to characterize the clinical spectrum of M/N-incompatibility pregnancies in Japan and report results to English-language readers. Japanese reports of HDFN attributed to M/N incompatibility were compiled. Abstracted data include maternal antibody titers at delivery, fetal direct antiglobulin test, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, reticulocyte count at birth, and therapeutic interventions. We investigated characteristics of HDFN due to M/N-incompatible pregnancies in Japan after encountering a case of severe HDFN along with late-onset anemia in an infant born to a woman carrying IgG anti-M with a titer of 1. In total, thirty-three babies with HDFN due to anti-M and one due to anti-N have been reported in Japan since 1975. The median maternal antibody titer was 64 at delivery and was 16 or less in 10 of 34 women (29%). Five of 34 babies (15%) were stillborn or died as neonates. Twenty-one of 29 survivors (72%) had severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. The reticulocyte count of neonates with anemia stayed below the reference interval. Sixteen (55%) developed late-onset anemia and 14 (48%) were transfused with M-negative RBCs. Significant positive correlation (P hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. Low reticulocyte count in neonates with late-onset anemia is consistent with suppressed erythropoiesis due to anti-M. © 2013.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  15. Detection of slipped-DNAs at the trinucleotide repeats of the myotonic dystrophy type I disease locus in patient tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Axford

    Full Text Available Slipped-strand DNAs, formed by out-of-register mispairing of repeat units on complementary strands, were proposed over 55 years ago as transient intermediates in repeat length mutations, hypothesized to cause at least 40 neurodegenerative diseases. While slipped-DNAs have been characterized in vitro, evidence of slipped-DNAs at an endogenous locus in biologically relevant tissues, where instability varies widely, is lacking. Here, using an anti-DNA junction antibody and immunoprecipitation, we identify slipped-DNAs at the unstable trinucleotide repeats (CTGn•(CAGn of the myotonic dystrophy disease locus in patient brain, heart, muscle and other tissues, where the largest expansions arise in non-mitotic tissues such as cortex and heart, and are smallest in the cerebellum. Slipped-DNAs are shown to be present on the expanded allele and in chromatinized DNA. Slipped-DNAs are present as clusters of slip-outs along a DNA, with each slip-out having 1-100 extrahelical repeats. The allelic levels of slipped-DNA containing molecules were significantly greater in the heart over the cerebellum (relative to genomic equivalents of pre-IP input DNA of a DM1 individual; an enrichment consistent with increased allelic levels of slipped-DNA structures in tissues having greater levels of CTG instability. Surprisingly, this supports the formation of slipped-DNAs as persistent mutation products of repeat instability, and not merely as transient mutagenic intermediates. These findings further our understanding of the processes of mutation and genetic variation.

  16. The S2 accessory gene of equine infectious anemia virus is essential for expression of disease in ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerness, Angela J; Flaherty, Maureen T; Perry, Stephanie T; Jia, Bin; Payne, Susan L; Fuller, Frederick J

    2006-05-25

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that persistently infects horses and causes a disease that is characterized by periodic episodes of fever, thrombocytopenia, and viremia. EIAV encodes only four regulatory/accessory genes, (tat, rev, ttm, and S2) and is the least genetically complex of all known lentiviruses. We sought to determine the role of the EIAV S2 accessory gene of EIAV by introducing mutations that would prevent S2 expression on the p19/wenv17 infectious molecular clone. Virus derived from the p19/wenv17 molecular clone is highly virulent and routinely fatal when given in high doses (J. Virol. 72 (1998) 483). In contrast, an S2 deletion mutant on the p19/wenv17 background is unable to induce acute disease and plasma virus loads were reduced by 2.5 to 4.0 logs at 15 days post-infection. The S2 deleted virus failed to produce any detectable clinical signs during a 5-month observation period. These results demonstrate that S2 gene expression is essential for disease expression of EIAV.

  17. Immune selection of equine infectious anemia virus env variants during the long-term inapparent stage of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Sparks, Wendy O; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Li, Yuxing; Antons, Amanda K; Oaks, J Lindsay; Carpenter, Susan

    2007-06-20

    The principal neutralizing domain (PND) of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is located in the V3 region of SU. Genetic variation in the PND is considered to play an important role in immune escape and EIAV persistence; however, few studies have characterized genetic variation in SU during the inapparent stage of disease. To better understand the mechanisms of virus persistence, we undertook a longitudinal study of SU variation in a pony experimentally inoculated with the virulent EIAV(Wyo). Viral RNA isolated from the inoculum and from sequential sera samples was amplified by RT-PCR, cloned, and individual clones were sequenced. Of the 147 SU clones obtained, we identified 71 distinct V3 variants that partitioned into five major non-overlapping groups, designated PND-1 to PND-5, which segregated with specific stages of clinical disease. Genotypes representative of each group were inserted into an infectious molecular clone, and chimeric viruses were tested for susceptibility to neutralization by autologous sera from successive times post-infection. Overall, there was a trend for increasing resistance to neutralizing antibody during disease progression. The PND genotype associated with recrudescence late in infection was resistant to both type-specific and broadly neutralizing antibody, and displayed a reduced replication phenotype in vitro. These findings indicate that neutralizing antibody exerts selective pressure throughout infection and suggest that viral strategies of immune evasion and persistence change in the face of an evolving and maturing host immune response.

  18. Tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2 deficiency does not protect against obesity-induced metabolic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme I Lancaster

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a state of chronic low grade inflammation that plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance. Tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2 is a serine/threonine mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K involved in regulating responses to specific inflammatory stimuli. Here we have used mice lacking Tpl2 to examine its role in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Wild type (wt and tpl2(-/- mice accumulated comparable amounts of fat and lean mass when fed either a standard chow diet or two different high fat (HF diets containing either 42% or 59% of energy content derived from fat. No differences in glucose tolerance were observed between wt and tpl2(-/- mice on any of these diets. Insulin tolerance was similar on both standard chow and 42% HF diets, but was slightly impaired in tpl2(-/- mice fed the 59% HFD. While gene expression markers of macrophage recruitment and inflammation were increased in the white adipose tissue of HF fed mice compared with standard chow fed mice, no differences were observed between wt and tpl2(-/- mice. Finally, a HF diet did not increase Tpl2 expression nor did it activate Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, the MAPK downstream of Tpl2. These findings argue that Tpl2 does not play a non-redundant role in obesity-associated metabolic dysfunction.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies FCGR2A as a susceptibility locus for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Breunis, Willemijn B.; Lee, Yi-Ching; Shimizu, Chisato; Wright, Victoria J.; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Tan, Dennis E. K.; Sim, Kar Seng; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Yin; Pang, Junxiong; Mitchell, Paul; Cimaz, Rolando; Dahdah, Nagib; Cheung, Yiu-Fai; Huang, Guo-Ying; Yang, Wanling; Park, In-Sook; Lee, Jong-Keuk; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Levin, Michael; Burns, Jane C.; Burgner, David; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Fang; Wu, Lin; Yoo, Jeong-Jin; Hong, Soo-Jong; Kim, Kwi-Joo; Kim, Jae-Jung; Park, Young-Mi; Mi Hong, Young; Sohn, Sejung; Young Jang, Gi; Ha, Kee-Soo; Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Byeon, Jung-Hye; Weon Yun, Sin; Ki Han, Myung; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Hwang, Ja-Young; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Seob Song, Min; Lee, Hyoung-Doo; Kim, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae-Moo; Chang, Jeng-Sheng; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Liang, Chi-Di; Chen, Ming-Ren; Chi, Hsin; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Chang, Luan-Yin; Huang, Li-Min; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Kao-Pin; Lee, Meng-Luen; Hwang, Betau; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lee, Pi-Chang; Odam, Miranda; Christiansen, Frank T.; Witt, Campbell; Goldwater, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Palasanthiran, Pamela; Ziegler, John; Nissen, Michael; Nourse, Clare; Kuipers, Irene M.; Ottenkamp, Jaap J.; Geissler, Judy; Biezeveld, Maarten; Tacke, Carline; Filippini, Luc; Brogan, Paul; Klein, Nigel; Shah, Vanita; Dillon, Michael; Booy, Robert; Shingadia, Delane; Bose, Anu; Mukasa, Thomas; Tulloh, Robert; Michie, Colin; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette L.; Rowley, Anne H.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Mason, Wilbert; Takahashi, Masato; Melish, Marian E.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Viswanathan, Ananth; Rochtchina, Elena; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney; Holliday, Elizabeth; Harrap, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology, with clinical observations suggesting a substantial genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study and replication analysis in 2,173 individuals with Kawasaki disease and 9,383 controls from

  1. A major non-HLA locus in celiac disease maps to chromosome 19.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, van MJ; Meijer, JW; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Bardoel, A.F.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pearson, PL; Houwen, RH; Wijmenga, C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of celiac disease is still unknown despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8. It is clear that non-HLA genes contribute to celiac disease development as well, but none of the previous genome-wide screens in celiac disease

  2. Anemia and hematinic deficiencies in gastric parietal cell antibody-positive and -negative oral mucosal disease patients with microcytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Pin Lin

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that GPCA in microcytosis patients' sera may have caused significantly lower mean vitamin B12 level as well as significantly higher mean RDW and serum homocysteine level in our GPCA+/microcytosis patients than in GPCA−/microcytosis patients. Herein, iron deficiency anemia was the most common type of anemia in anemic GPCA+/microcytosis and GPCA−/microcytosis patients.

  3. Sickle Cell Anemia: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Disease Also called: Hemoglobin SS disease, Sickle cell anemia On this page Basics Summary Start Here Diagnosis ... red blood cells. This is a condition called anemia , and it can make you feel tired. The ...

  4. Sideroblastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Bhandari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders that have as a common feature with the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the marrow. We present a case of young female, nursing student who presented with increasing palpitation, fatigue and exertional shortness of breath for the last one year. She had a low hemoglobin and high serum iron. Anemia with iron overload prompted us to do bone marrow study and there were 19% ringed sideroblasts and iron overload fulfilling the diagnosis of sideroblastic anemia. We searched for secondary causes of ringed sideroblast but could not find any culprit. Her cytogenetics report was normal and genetic analysis was not done due to financial reason. Since the diagnosis 3 months back, patient is on pyridoxine, folic acid, deferasirox and still needs regular blood transfusion suggesting that she may be pyridoxine refractory and may develop iron overload.

  5. Extended exome sequencing identifies BACH2 as a novel major risk locus for Addison's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, D.; Bianchi, Matteo; Landegren, Nils; Nordin, Jessika; Dalin, Frida; Mathioudaki, Argyri; Eriksson, G. N.; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Dahlqvist, Johanna; Zetterqvist, H.; Karlsson, Andreas; Hallgren, Anna; Farias, F. H. G.; Murén, Eva; Ahlgren, Kerstin M.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundAutoimmune disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Addisons disease, the adrenal glands are targeted by destructive autoimmunity. Despite being the most common cause of primary adrenal failure, little is known about its aetiology. MethodsTo understand the genetic background of Addisons disease, we utilized the extensively characterized patients of the Swedish Addison Registry. We developed an extended exome capture array comprising a selected se...

  6. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Richter, G.M.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Noack, D.; Nothnagel, M.; El Mokhtari, N.E.; Loos, B.G.; Jepsen, S.; Schreiber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a

  7. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adult Onset Still's Disease with a Serum Ferritin of 26,387 μg/L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum ferritin rises in the anemia of chronic inflammation reflecting increased iron storage and other changes mediated by inflammation. When iron deficiency coexists, the ferritin may not always decline into the subnormal range. We describe the rare interaction of iron deficiency with the extreme hyperferritinemia characteristic of adult onset Still's disease. The combination has clinical relevance and allows deductions about the presence of serum ferritin at 26,387 μg/L despite obvious iron depletion. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was delayed and became fully obvious when her Still's disease remitted and serum ferritin decreased to 6.5 μg/L. The coexistence of iron deficiency should be considered when evaluating a patient with anemia of chronic inflammation even when the ferritin level is elevated several hundredfold. Further insights on ferritin metabolism in Still's disease are suggested by the likelihood that the patient's massive hyperferritinemia in the acute phase of Still's disease was almost entirely of the iron-free apoferritin form.

  8. Mapping of the disease locus and identification of ADAMTS10 as a candidate gene in a canine model of primary open angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kuchtey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, with elevated intraocular pressure as an important risk factor. Increased resistance to outflow of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork causes elevated intraocular pressure, but the specific mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we used genome-wide SNP arrays to map the disease gene in a colony of Beagle dogs with inherited POAG to within a single 4 Mb locus on canine chromosome 20. The Beagle POAG locus is syntenic to a previously mapped human quantitative trait locus for intraocular pressure on human chromosome 19. Sequence capture and next-generation sequencing of the entire canine POAG locus revealed a total of 2,692 SNPs segregating with disease. Of the disease-segregating SNPs, 54 were within exons, 8 of which result in amino acid substitutions. The strongest candidate variant causes a glycine to arginine substitution in a highly conserved region of the metalloproteinase ADAMTS10. Western blotting revealed ADAMTS10 protein is preferentially expressed in the trabecular meshwork, supporting an effect of the variant specific to aqueous humor outflow. The Gly661Arg variant in ADAMTS10 found in the POAG Beagles suggests that altered processing of extracellular matrix and/or defects in microfibril structure or function may be involved in raising intraocular pressure, offering specific biochemical targets for future research and treatment strategies.

  9. Perception of cancer patients of their disease, self-efficacy and locus of control and usage of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Marie-Desirée; Rudolph, Ivonne; Keinki, Christian; Hoppe, Andrea; Muecke, Ralph; Micke, Oliver; Muenstedt, Karsten; Huebner, Jutta

    2015-08-01

    A high percentage of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of our study was to learn more about the association of CAM usage, information needs, perceived impact of disease, locus of control and self-efficacy of cancer patients. We asked patients attending a series of lectures on CAM using a standardized questionnaire which integrated questions on information needs, CAM and validated short questionnaires on self-efficacy, perception of the disease and locus of control of reinforcement. One hundred and eighty-five patients answered the questionnaire, from whom 45 % used CAM. Sixty percentage disclosed using CAM to the general practitioner and 57 % to the oncologist. Physicians and nurses, print media and the Internet are the most important source of information on CAM (used by 20-25 % each). Impact on neither daily life, perceived personal control nor coherence was associated with CAM usage, disclosure to physicians or sources of information. There also was no association between CAM usage and self-efficacy. In contrast, there was a significant association between CAM user rate and a high external locus of control. While CAM usage is agreed upon by many physicians due to the idea that it helps patients to become active and feel more in control of the disease, our data are in favor of the contrary. A strong perception of external locus of control seems to be a driver of CAM usage. Physicians should be aware of this association when counseling on CAM.

  10. Improved differential diagnosis of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia: a prospective multicenter evaluation of soluble transferrin receptor and the sTfR/log ferritin index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skikne, Barry S; Punnonen, Kari; Caldron, Paul H; Bennett, Michael T; Rehu, Mari; Gasior, Gail H; Chamberlin, Janna S; Sullivan, Linda A; Bray, Kurtis R; Southwick, Paula C

    2011-11-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most prevalent forms of anemia and often occur concurrently. Standard tests of iron status used in differential diagnosis are affected by inflammation, hindering clinical interpretation. In contrast, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) indicates iron deficiency and is unaffected by inflammation. Objectives of this prospective multicenter clinical trial were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR and the sTfR/log ferritin index (sTfR Index) for differential diagnosis using the automated Access(®) sTfR assay (Beckman Coulter) and sTfR Index. We consecutively enrolled 145 anemic patients with common disorders associated with IDA and ACD. Subjects with IDA or ACD + IDA had significantly higher sTfR and sTfR Index values than subjects with ACD (P < 0.0001). ROC curves produced the following cutoffs for sTfR: 21 nmol/L (or 1.55 mg/L), and the sTfR Index: 14 (using nmol/L) (or 1.03 using mg/L). The sTfR Index was superior to sTfR (AUC 0.87 vs. 0.74, P < 0.0001). Use of all three parameters in combination more than doubled the detection of IDA, from 41% (ferritin alone) to 92% (ferritin, sTfR, sTfR Index). Use of sTfR and the sTfR Index improves detection of IDA, particularly in situations where routine markers provide equivocal results. Findings demonstrate a significant advantage in the simultaneous determination of ferritin, sTfR and sTfR Index. Obtaining a ferritin level alone may delay diagnosis of combined IDA and ACD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Rankine-Mullings, Angela E; Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxy...

  12. Pernicious anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs vitamin B12 to make red blood cells. You get ... shots in the beginning. Some people may also need to take vitamin B12 supplements by mouth. A certain type of ...

  13. Administrative database concerns: accuracy of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision coding is poor for preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Basques, Bryce A; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-15

    Cross-sectional study. To objectively evaluate the ability of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes, which are used as the foundation for administratively coded national databases, to identify preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion. National database research in spine surgery continues to rise. However, the validity of studies based on administratively coded data, such as the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, are dependent on the accuracy of ICD-9 coding. Such coding has previously been found to have poor sensitivity to conditions such as obesity and infection. A cross-sectional study was performed at an academic medical center. Hospital-reported anemia ICD-9 codes (those used for administratively coded databases) were directly compared with the chart-documented preoperative hematocrits (true laboratory values). A patient was deemed to have preoperative anemia if the preoperative hematocrit was less than the lower end of the normal range (36.0% for females and 41.0% for males). The study included 260 patients. Of these, 37 patients (14.2%) were anemic; however, only 10 patients (3.8%) received an "anemia" ICD-9 code. Of the 10 patients coded as anemic, 7 were anemic by definition, whereas 3 were not, and thus were miscoded. This equates to an ICD-9 code sensitivity of 0.19, with a specificity of 0.99, and positive and negative predictive values of 0.70 and 0.88, respectively. This study uses preoperative anemia to demonstrate the potential inaccuracies of ICD-9 coding. These results have implications for publications using databases that are compiled from ICD-9 coding data. Furthermore, the findings of the current investigation raise concerns regarding the accuracy of additional comorbidities. Although administrative databases are powerful resources that provide large sample sizes, it is crucial that we further consider the quality of the data source relative to its intended purpose.

  14. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Intravenous Iron Dextran as a Component of Anemia Management in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Report of Safety and Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenar Yessayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We aimed to demonstrate safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID during treatment of anemic stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Methods. Efficacy data was obtained by retrospective chart review of 150 consecutively enrolled patients. Patients were assigned per protocol to oral or IV iron, with IV iron given to those with lower iron stores and/or hemoglobin. Iron and darbepoetin were administered to achieve and maintain hemoglobin at 10–12 g/dL. Efficacy endpoints were mean hemoglobin and change in iron indices approximately 30 and 60 days after enrollment. Safety data was obtained by retrospective review of reported adverse drug events (ADEs following 1699 infusions of LMWID (0.5–1.0 g. Results. Mean hemoglobin, iron saturation, and ferritin increased significantly from baseline to 60 days in patients assigned to LMWID (hemoglobin: 11.3 versus 9.4 g/dL; iron saturation: 24% versus 12.9%; ferritin: 294.7 versus 134.7 ng/mL; all . Iron stores and hemoglobin were maintained in the group assigned to oral iron. Of 1699 iron dextran infusions, three ADEs occurred. Conclusions. Treatment of anemia in CKD stages 3 and 4 with LMWID and darbepoetin is efficacious. The serious ADE rate was 0.06% per infusion.

  16. An unusual association between hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, mixed connective tissue disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Amar H; Shah, Anushi A; Yong, Sherri L; Ahmed, Zohair

    2017-07-01

    In the adult patient, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is uncommon and frequently difficult to diagnose due to its nonspecific presentation and numerous complications. Herein, we present the case of a 25-year-old female who initially presented for evaluation of persistent fevers and fatigue. She was found to have splenomegaly, generalized lymphadenopathy, pancytopenia, and acute hepatic failure. Her course was further complicated by the development of nephrotic syndrome and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Antinuclear antibody and ribonucleoprotein were positive, with concurrent physical examination findings, indicating underlying mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Ferritin was greater than 40,000 ng/dL. Viral studies, including hepatitis A, B, and C, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus were negative. On the basis of her clinical presentation, a diagnosis of HLH secondary to MCTD was made. This was later confirmed on liver biopsy. She was started on high-dose prednisone and her symptoms completely resolved. She was then transitioned to azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, prophylactic antibiotics, and a prednisone taper for long-term management. This case is notable for the association of both AIHA and MCTD with HLH, providing support for a possible relationship between these 3 conditions.

  17. Neurocognitive Deficits in Children With Sickle Cell Disease Are Associated With the Severity of Anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, Channa T.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Heijboer, Harriët; Peters, Marjolein; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Background. Although neurocognitive deficits in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) have been well documented, the etiology of these deficits has not been completely clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of laboratory markers of disease severity and radiological

  18. A mutagenesis-derived broad-spectrum disease resistance locus in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew caused by the fungal pathogens Puccinia triticina, P. graminis f. sp. tritici, P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, and Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, respectively, are destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. The most effective and widely uti...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  2. Anemia in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec; Fatma Tuncay Ozgunen; Ismail Cuneyt Evruke; Suleyman Cansun Demir

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  4. The influence of IS1301 in the capsule biosynthesis locus on meningococcal carriage and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Kugelberg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that insertion of IS1301 in the sia/ctr intergenic region (IGR of serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis (MenC isolates from Spain confers increased resistance against complement-mediated killing. Here we investigate the significance of IS1301 in the same location in N. meningitidis isolates from the UK. PCR and sequencing was used to screen a collection of more than 1500 meningococcal carriage and disease isolates from the UK for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR. IS1301 was not identified in the IGR among vaccine failure strains but was frequently found in serogroup B isolates (MenB from clonal complex 269 (cc269. Almost all IS1301 insertions in cc269 were associated with novel polymorphisms, and did not change capsule expression or resistance to human complement. After excluding sequence types (STs distant from the central genotype within cc269, there was no significant difference for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR of carriage isolates compared to disease isolates. Isolates with insertion of IS1301 in the IGR are not responsible for MenC disease in UK vaccine failures. Novel polymorphisms associated with IS1301 in the IGR of UK MenB isolates do not lead to the resistance phenotype seen for IS1301 in the IGR of MenC isolates.

  5. The Prevalence and Management of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sang Ryol; Park, Sue K; Jung, Ji Yong; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Oh, Yun Kyu; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Sung, Suah

    2017-02-01

    Anemia is a common and significant complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, its prevalence and current management status has not been studied thoroughly in Korea. We examined the prevalence of anemia, its association with clinical and laboratory factors, and utilization of iron agents and erythropoiesis stimulating agents using the baseline data from the large-scale CKD cohort in Korea. We defined anemia when hemoglobin level was lower than 13.0 g/dL in males and 12.0 g/dL in females, or received by erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Overall prevalence of anemia was 45.0% among 2,198 non-dialysis CKD patients from stage 1 to 5. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) as a cause, CKD stages, body mass index (BMI), smoking, leukocyte count, serum albumin, iron markers, calcium, and phosphorus concentration were identified as independent risk factors for anemia. Considering the current coverage of Korean National Health Insurance System, only 7.9% among applicable patients were managed by intravenous iron agents, and 42.7% were managed by erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

  6. A new machine learning approach for predicting the response to anemia treatment in a large cohort of End Stage Renal Disease patients undergoing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Carlo; Mari, Flavio; Stopper, Andrea; Gatti, Emanuele; Escandell-Montero, Pablo; Martínez-Martínez, José M; Martín-Guerrero, José D

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) anemia is one of the main common comorbidities in patients undergoing End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Iron supplement and especially Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESA) have become the treatment of choice for that anemia. However, it is very complicated to find an adequate treatment for every patient in each particular situation since dosage guidelines are based on average behaviors, and thus, they do not take into account the particular response to those drugs by different patients, although that response may vary enormously from one patient to another and even for the same patient in different stages of the anemia. This work proposes an advance with respect to previous works that have faced this problem using different methodologies (Machine Learning (ML), among others), since the diversity of the CKD population has been explicitly taken into account in order to produce a general and reliable model for the prediction of ESA/Iron therapy response. Furthermore, the ML model makes use of both human physiology and drug pharmacology to produce a model that outperforms previous approaches, yielding Mean Absolute Errors (MAE) of the Hemoglobin (Hb) prediction around or lower than 0.6 g/dl in the three countries analyzed in the study, namely, Spain, Italy and Portugal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Retinopathy and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello, Natalie A; Pfeffer, Marc A; Skali, Hicham; McGill, Janet B; Rossert, Jerome; Olson, Kurt A; Weinrauch, Larry; Cooper, Mark E; de Zeeuw, Dick; Rossing, Peter; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Retinopathy is an established microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but its independent relationship with macrovascular and other microvascular complications is less well defined across the spectrum of kidney disease in T2DM. We examined the prognostic value of

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition in which ... to grow and develop. The iron that full-term infants have stored in their bodies is used ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  13. Toxic hemolytic anemias.

    OpenAIRE

    ZEMANOVÁ, Vendula

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with toxic hemolytic anemias which are often unheeded. There are described laboratory signs of hemolytic anemias, their dividing into the various groups and it focuses mainly to toxic and drug-related hemolytic anemias and their causations.

  14. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  15. Renal disease in adult Nigerians with sickle cell anemia: A report of prevalence, clinical features and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R A Bolarinwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal abnormalities in adult Nigerians with sickle cell anemia (SCA have not been extensively studied. To determine the prevalence, pattern and the associated risk factors of renal disease, 72 subjects with SCA from two centers in the southwestern Nigeria were investigated. Socio-demographic data, body mass index and clinical findings were documented. The urine analysis, serum bio-chemistry, hemogram and renal factors attributable to SCA were determined. Presence of albuminuria of at least 1+ or microalbuminuria in those negative with dipstick; and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the Cockcroft-Gault formula categorized subjects to various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Subjects with and without albuminuria were compared to determine the relative risk associated with renal disease. Four (5.6% subjects had macro-albuminuria, while 32 (44.4% had micro-albuminuria and 30 (41.7% had hemoglobinuria. In the subjects with albuminuria, age, hematocrit, systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, urea and creatinine clearance were numerically higher while the eGFR was numerically lower. There was no significant difference in the clinical parameters studied in the two groups of subjects. The diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in the albuminuric group. Based on eGFR, 22 (30.6% subjects had hyperfiltration (GFR > 140 mL/min/1.73 m2, of whom 36.4% had albuminuria, 18 (25.0% had stage 1 CKD, 30 (41.7% had stage 2 CKD and two (2.7% subjects had stage 3 CKD with albuminuria. None had stage 4 and 5 CKD. We conclude that renal abnormalities, importantly albuminuria, is common in adult Nigerians with SCA and the pattern and incidence are similar to those reported from other parts of the world. Regular blood pressure monitoring, early diagnosis and active intervention are advocated to delay progression to end-stage kidney disease in view of poor outcomes of renal replacement therapy in SCA patients with nephropathy.

  16. Disease-related growth factor and embryonic signaling pathways modulate an enhancer of TCF21 expression at the 6q23.2 coronary heart disease locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint L Miller

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is the leading cause of mortality in both developed and developing countries worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have now identified 46 independent susceptibility loci for CHD, however, the biological and disease-relevant mechanisms for these associations remain elusive. The large-scale meta-analysis of GWAS recently identified in Caucasians a CHD-associated locus at chromosome 6q23.2, a region containing the transcription factor TCF21 gene. TCF21 (Capsulin/Pod1/Epicardin is a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor family, and regulates cell fate decisions and differentiation in the developing coronary vasculature. Herein, we characterize a cis-regulatory mechanism by which the lead polymorphism rs12190287 disrupts an atypical activator protein 1 (AP-1 element, as demonstrated by allele-specific transcriptional regulation, transcription factor binding, and chromatin organization, leading to altered TCF21 expression. Further, this element is shown to mediate signaling through platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFR-β and Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 pathways. A second disease allele identified in East Asians also appears to disrupt an AP-1-like element. Thus, both disease-related growth factor and embryonic signaling pathways may regulate CHD risk through two independent alleles at TCF21.

  17. Genetic and functional identification of the likely causative variant for cholesterol gallstone disease at the ABCG5/8 lithogenic locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Kampen, Oliver; Buch, Stephan; Nothnagel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The sterolin locus (ABCG5/ABCG8) confers susceptibility for cholesterol gallstone disease in humans. Both the responsible variant and the molecular mechanism causing an increased incidence of gallstones in these patients have as yet not been identified. Genetic mapping utilized patient samples from...... Germany (2,808 cases, 2,089 controls), Chile (680 cases, 442 controls), Denmark (366 cases, 766 controls), India (247 cases, 224 controls), and China (280 cases, 244 controls). Analysis of allelic imbalance in complementary DNA (cDNA) samples from human liver (n = 22) was performed using pyrosequencing....... Transiently transfected HEK293 cells were used for [(3) H]-cholesterol export assays, analysis of protein expression, and localization of allelic constructs. Through fine mapping in German and Chilean samples, an ∼250 kB disease-associated interval could be defined for this locus. Lack of allelic imbalance...

  18. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  19. Strategies for glucose control in a study population with diabetes, renal disease and anemia (Treat study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrauch, Larry A; D'Elia, John A; Finn, Peter; Lewis, Eldrin F; Desai, Akshay S; Claggett, Brian L; Cooper, Mark E; McGill, Janet B

    2016-03-01

    Glucose lowering medication use among patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced renal disease (eGFRrenal disease advances, most of the oral anti-diabetic agents requiring renal clearance must be reduced or discontinued. The potential for prolonged hypoglycemia, fluid/volume overload and congestive heart failure may complicate medication choices. In order to evaluate patterns of glycemia management we describe glucose lowering medication use among patients with advanced renal disease and type 2 diabetes in a large multinational outcome trial designed to focus on patients with eGFRrenal function when compared with standard populations with normal kidney function. The use of multiple oral agents, or oral agents plus insulin was quite common. While gender did not appear to play a role in medication choices, there were significant regional variations. For example, oral agents were used more in North America compared with other regions (Latin America, Australia/Western Europe, Russia/Eastern Europe). Patients enrolled at more advanced ages were less likely to be on a regimen of rapid-acting insulin alone consistent with recommendations that suggest a preference for longer-acting preparations in the geriatric population (1). Higher degrees of obesity were associated more complex treatment regimens. Despite this population being at high risk for cardiovascular events, the use of beta blockers (50%), statins (64%) and aspirin (48%) were relatively low, especially in the group that did not require medications to achieve adequate glycemic control. Current attempts to compare strategies for diabetes therapy must control for baseline demographic group differences influencing treatment choice. Future recommendations for glycemic control in patients with Grade 3 or higher chronic kidney disease require additional studies, with matched populations. We suggest that evaluation of studies similar to TREAT will assist in determining the optimal therapeutic regimens for populations

  20. Transduction of Photoreceptors With Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Lentiviral Vectors: Safety and Biodistribution of StarGen for Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter; Loader, Julie; Kelleher, Michelle; Iqball, Sharifah; Ferrige, Georgina; de Belin, Jackie; Carlucci, Marie; Angell-Manning, Diana; Hurst, Felicity; Ellis, Scott; Miskin, James; Fernandes, Alcides; Wong, Paul; Allikmets, Rando; Bergstrom, Christopher; Aaberg, Thomas; Yan, Jiong; Kong, Jian; Gouras, Peter; Prefontaine, Annick; Vezina, Mark; Bussieres, Martin; Naylor, Stuart; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. StarGen is an equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vector that expresses the photoreceptor-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) protein that is mutated in Stargardt disease (STGD1), a juvenile macular dystrophy. EIAV vectors are able to efficiently transduce rod and cone photoreceptors in addition to retinal pigment epithelium in the adult macaque and rabbit retina following subretinal delivery. The safety and biodistribution of StarGen following subretinal delivery in macaques and rabbits was assessed. Methods. Regular ophthalmic examinations, IOP measurements, ERG responses, and histopathology were carried out in both species to compare control and vector-treated eyes. Tissue and fluid samples were obtained to evaluate the persistence, biodistribution, and shedding of the vector following subretinal delivery. Results. Ophthalmic examinations revealed a slightly higher level of inflammation in StarGen compared with control treated eyes in both species. However, inflammation was transient and no overt toxicity was observed in StarGen treated eyes and there were no abnormal clinical findings. There was no StarGen-associated rise in IOP or abnormal ERG response in either rabbits or macaques. Histopathologic examination of the eyes did not reveal any detrimental changes resulting from subretinal administration of StarGen. Although antibodies to StarGen vector components were detected in rabbit but not macaque serum, this immunologic response did not result in any long-term toxicity. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the StarGen vector was restricted to the ocular compartment. Conclusions. In summary, these studies demonstrate StarGen to be well tolerated and localized following subretinal administration. PMID:23620430

  1. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  2. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  3. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  4. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  5. Clinical impact of the ERBP Working Group 2010 Recommendations for the anemia management in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis: ACERCA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Cases, Aleix; Carballada, Alberto Torre; Iranzo, Javier Torralba; Bronsoms, Josep; Vallès-Prats, Martí; Monserrat, Daniel Torán; Jimenez, Elisabet Masso

    2015-01-01

    The Anemia Working Group of ERBP in 2010 recommended a target hemoglobin (Hb) level in the range of 11-12 g/dL, without intentionally exceeding 13 g/dL during the treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). This study evaluated if there was a clinical impact of this statement in the anemia management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients treated with ESAs not on dialysis in routine clinical practice in Spain. This was an observational and cross-sectional study carried out in CKD patients not on dialysis in Spain who initiated ESA treatment (naïve), or were shifted from a previous ESA to another ESAs (converted) since January 2011. Of 441 patients evaluated, 67.6% were naïve and 32.4% were converted. At the study visit, 42.5% of naïve patients achieved the Hb target of 11-12 g/dL, with a mean Hb of 11.3±1.3 g/dL (vs 10.1±0.9 g/dL at the start of ESA therapy). Only 35.3% of converted patients maintained Hb levels within the recommended target at the study visit. Yet, 8.2% of naïve patients and 7.9% of those converted had Hb levels >13 g/dL. Hb levels were similar across subgroups of patients, regardless of the presence of significant comorbidities. Anemia management in CKD patients treated with ESAs by Spanish nephrologists seems to be aimed at preventing Hb levels anemia management in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of macrocytic anemias in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Takayo; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2017-10-01

    Anemia is one of the most common health problems in the primary care setting. Macrocytosis in adults is defined as a red blood cell (RBC) mean corpuscular volume (MCV) >100 femtoliter (fL). Macrocytic anemias are generally classified into megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia is caused by deficiency or impaired utilization of vitamin B12 and/or folate, whereas nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia is caused by various diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), liver dysfunction, alcoholism, hypothyroidism, certain drugs, and by less commonly inherited disorders of DNA synthesis. Macrocytic anemias are treated with cause-specific therapies, and it is crucial to differentiate nonmegaloblastic from megaloblastic anemia. Because MDS and myeloid neoplasms commonly affect the elderly, primary care physicians may encounter more cases of macrocytic anemias in the near future, as the older population increases. When MDS is suspected along with leukocytopenia and/or thrombocytopenia with anemia, a hematology consultation may be appropriate.

  7. [Infectious complications after surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell anemia disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco Junior, Cypriano Petrus; Fonseca, Patricia Belintani Blum; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of infectious complications in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) after surgical splenectomy for acute splenic sequestration crisis. Retrospective cohort of children with SCD who were born after 2002 and were regularly monitored until July 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: cases (children with SCD who underwent surgical splenectomy after an episode of splenic sequestration) and controls (children with SCD who did not have splenic sequestration and surgical procedures), in order to compare the frequency of invasive infections (sepsis, meningitis, bacteremia with positive blood cultures, acute chest syndrome and/or pneumonia) by data collected from medical records. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. 44 patients were included in the case group. The mean age at the time of splenectomy was 2.6 years (1-6.9 years) and the mean postoperative length of follow-up was 6.1 years (3.8-9.9 years). The control group consisted of 69 patients with a mean age at the initial follow-up visit of 5.6 months (1-49 months) and a mean length of follow-up of 7.2 years (4-10.3 years). All children received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. No significant difference was observed between groups in relation to infections during the follow-up. Surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease that had splenic sequestration did not affect the frequency of infectious complications during 6 years of clinical follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathological and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in the remnant kidney rat model of chronic kidney disease associated anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Sandra; Garrido, Patrícia; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be corrected by treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO); however, some patients become hyporesponsive. The molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to study hyporesponsiveness to rHuEPO therapy using the remnant kidney rat model of anemia associated with CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. At starting, male Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups, for a 3-week protocol: Sham, CRF (vehicle) and two rHuEPO (200 k/kg body weight [BW]/week) treated groups; at the end of protocol, the rHuEPO treated rats were subdivided in responders (CRF200) and non-responders (CRF200NR), according to their hematologic response; blood, cellular and tissue studies were performed. The CRF200 group achieved correction of anemia, while the CRF200NR group developed anemia, after an initial response (1st week) to rHuEPO therapy. CRF and CRF200NR groups presented a trend to higher serum CRP levels; CRF200NR showed also high levels of renal inflammatory markers, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, nuclear factor kappa B, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1); no changes were found in iron metabolism. Our data suggest that the development of anemia/rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness is associated with a higher systemic and renal inflammatory condition, favoring hypoxia and triggering an increase in renal expression of HIF-1α, TGF-β1 and CTGF that will further aggravate renal fibrosis, which will enhance the inflammatory response, creating a cycle that promotes disease progression. New therapeutic strategies to reduce inflammation in CKD patients could improve the response to rHuEPO therapy and reduce hyporesponsiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-10-07

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time.

  10. Síndrome de compressão orbitária relacionada à anemia falciforme Orbital compression syndrome in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ferrari Marback

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Relatar caso raro de síndrome de compressão orbitária bilateral secundária a hematoma subperiósteo em criança portadora de anemia falciforme. Métodos: Relato de caso de criança aos 08 anos de idade, com anemia falciforme (eletroforese de hemoglobina - SS e síndrome de compressão orbitária bilateral assimétrica apresentando-se com hematomas extradurais espontâneos, proptose e dor em ambos os olhos. Evoluiu com remissão completa dos sinais e sintomas em 20 dias apenas com tratamento sintomático. São apresentados os exames de imagem da fase aguda e após resolução do quadro clínico. Conclusão: Anemia falciforme deve ser incluída entre as causas de síndrome de compressão orbitária.Purpose: To present a case of bilateral orbital compression syndrome secondary to subperiosteal hematoma in sickle cell disease. Methods: Case report of a child with sickle cell disease and asymmetric bilateral orbital compression syndrome, with extradural hematomas, ocular pain and proptosis. There was remission of symptoms and signs in about 20 days with symptomatic treatment alone. Radiological aspects in the acute and remission phases are presented. Conclusion: Sickle Cell disease should be included as a cause of orbital compression syndrome.

  11. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  14. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R; Littke, Matt H; McGuire, Travis C

    2003-09-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined.

  15. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mealey, Robert H.; Zhang Baoshan; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2003-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined

  16. Epitope specificity is critical for high and moderate avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with control of viral load and clinical disease in horses with equine infectious anemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H.; Zhang, Baoshan; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infections in horses. We hypothesized that high-avidity CTL specific for nonvariable epitopes might be associated with low viral load and minimal disease in EIAV-infected horses. To test this hypothesis, memory CTL (CTLm) responses were analyzed in two infected horses with high plasma viral loads and recurrent disease (progressors), and in two infected horses with low-to-undetectable viral loads and mild disease (nonprogressors). High-avidity CTLm in one progressor recognized an envelope gp90 epitope, and the data documented for the first time in EIAV that viral variation led to CTL escape. Each of the nonprogressors had high-to-moderate avidity CTLm directed against epitopes within Rev, including the nuclear export and nuclear localization domains. These results suggested that the epitope specificity of high- and moderate-avidity CTLm was an important determinant for disease outcome in the EIAV-infected horses examined. PMID:12954220

  17. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meetei, AR; Winter, de J.P.; Medhurst, A.L. dr.; Wallisch, M; Waisfisz, Q.; Vrugt, van der H.J.; Oostra, A.B.; Yan, Z; Ling, C; Bishop, CE; Hoatlin, M.E.; Joenje, H.

    2003-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage

  18. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here...... a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin...

  19. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Suk Han

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients.We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR.Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%. Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR < 30 mg/g as a reference group; 30-299 mg/g, adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.88-2.33; ≥300 mg/g, adjusted OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.12-3.10. In addition, graded associations were observed in cross-categorized groups of a higher ACR and eGFR compared to the reference group with an ACR <30 mg/g and eGFR ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m2.The present study demonstrated that albuminuria was a significant risk factor for anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR.

  20. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  1. Survey of attitude of physicians on updates in the management of anemia in chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souqiyyeh Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed in this study to assess the opinion of medical directors of dialysis centers in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA about updates of strategies for treatment of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. A questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of the 174 active dialysis centers in the KSA including centers under the Ministry of Health (MOH (67 %, the governmental non-MOH sector (12% and private hospitals (21 % that together care for a population of more than 11,300 chronic dialysis patients. The study was performed between November 2008 and March 2009. A total of 143 of the 174 (82.1% medical directors answered the questionnaire. This covered 9563 (84% dialysis patients in the KSA. There were 95 (68.8% respondents who believed that the mechanism of action of ESAs is due to both blood concentration and direct action on the stem cells that form red cells. Only 81 (57% respondents believed that the half-life of the short-acting ESAs is less than one day, 67 (46.9% believed the half-life of darbepoetin is 2-4 days, and 52 (36.6% believed the half-life of CERA is 5-10 days; 79 (55.6% respondents believed that the interval of dosing of darbepoetin is once biweekly, and 92 (71.9% believed that the interval of dosing of CERA is once a month. There were 110 (76.9% respondents who believed the CKD should receive a long-acting than short-acting ESAs for the more stable hemoglobin levels, 64 (44.8% believed that pharmacodynamics of the CERA are better than other ESAs and warrant its use over all of them, and 115 (80.6% believed that the target hemoglobin is 11-13 g/dL in CKD patients is well established. Finally, 65 (51.5% respondents would request more than 30% of the stock of ESAs in the future as short-acting ESAs vs 71 (55% for darbepoetin and 40 (37.4% for CERA. There were no statistically significant differences among the respondents according to their affiliations (MOH, non MOH and private sector on any of the issues in the

  2. Changing patterns of radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors from chronically irradiated dogs prone either to aplastic anemia or to myeloproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, T M; Kaspar, L V

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic patterns have been assessed in chronic 60Co gamma irradiated dogs during preclinical phases of evolving aplastic anemia (AA) or myeloproliferative disease (MPD), principally myeloid leukemia. Within the AA-prone dog, a singular phase of progressive decline in blood levels of granulocytes and monocytes was noted along with a similar reduction in marrow progenitors committed to granulocyte/monocyte differentiation (CFU-GM). Measured radioresistance of the preAA CFU-GM in vitro, relative to control CFU-GM from nonirradiated animals, revealed only slightly increased resistance to gamma rays, but significantly increased resistance to fission neutrons. Within the MPD-prone dogs, four preclinical phases (i.e. suppression, partial recovery, accommodation, and preleukemic transition) preceding development of overt MPD were evidenced by the monitored change in blood granulocyte/monocyte counts and marrow progenitor levels. Analysis of radioresistance of preMPD CFU-GM revealed marked changes with time of exposure and, in turn, with preclinical phase transitions. Gamma ray resistance increased in the initial phases of exposure, with maximal levels occurring during the middle phase of exposure (accommodation, phase III) followed by a tailing off of resistance at later times. Resistance to fission neutrons by preMPD CFU-GM was observed as well, but somewhat later in the exposure course and at a much lower, more consistent level. These differential patterns of radioresistance expressed by marrow CFU-GM of chronically irradiated MPD-prone dogs to gamma rays and fission neutrons gave rise to preclinical phase-specific 'relative biological effectiveness' (RBE) values. From these observations, we conclude that: (i) CFU-GM of MPD-prone dogs acquire and maintain marked radioresistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays, but only marginally elevated radioresistance to high-LET fission neutrons during the course of chronic gamma ray exposure; and (ii) CFU-GM of

  3. Survey of attitude of physicians on updates in the management of anemia in chronic kidney disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souqiyyeh, Muhammad Ziad; Shaheen, Faissal Abdulraheem

    2009-01-01

    We aimed in this study to assess the opinion of medical directors of dialysis centers in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) about updates of strategies for treatment of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of the 174 active dialysis centers in the KSA including centers under the Ministry of Health (MOH) (67 %), the governmental non-MOH sector (12%) and private hospitals (21 %) that together care for a population of more than 11,300 chronic dialysis patients. The study was performed between November 2008 and March 2009. A total of 143 of the 174 (82.1%) medical directors answered the questionnaire. This covered 9563 (84%) dialysis patients in the KSA. There were 95 (68.8%) respondents who believed that the mechanism of action of ESAs is due to both blood concentration and direct action on the stem cells that form red cells. Only 81 (57%) respondents believed that the half-life of the short-acting ESAs is less than one day, 67 (46.9%) believed the half-life of darbepoetin is 2-4 days, and 52 (36.6%) believed the half-life of CERA is 5-10 days; 79 (55.6%) respondents believed that the interval of dosing of darbepoetin is once biweekly, and 92 (71.9%) believed that the interval of dosing of CERA is once a month. There were 110 (76.9%) respondents who believed the CKD should receive a long-acting than short-acting ESAs for the more stable hemoglobin levels, 64 (44.8%) believed that pharmacodynamics of the CERA are better than other ESAs and warrant its use over all of them, and 115 (80.6%) believed that the target hemoglobin is 11-13 g/dL in CKD patients is well established. Finally, 65 (51.5%) respondents would request more than 30% of the stock of ESAs in the future as short-acting ESAs vs 71 (55%) for darbepoetin and 40 (37.4%) for CERA. There were no statistically significant differences among the respondents according to their affiliations (MOH, non MOH and private sector) on any of the issues in the

  4. Immune Hemolytic Anemia in a Patient with Tuberculous Lymphadenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nandennavar, Manjunath; Cyriac, Sanju; Krishnakumar,; Sagar, TG

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in tuberculosis is usually anemia of chronic disease. Severe hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare in tuberculosis patients. We report a patient diagnosed with tubercular lymphadenitis complicated by Coomb′s positive hemolytic anemia. Patient responded well to antituberculous treatment. Hematological parameters improved after initiation of antituberculosis treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case from India of an adult patient with tuberculous lymphadenitis presen...

  5. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    OpenAIRE

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-01-01

    Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis) and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (I...

  6. Anemia of chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bogun, L.

    2015-01-01

    В лекции рассматривается одна из самых распространенных форм анемий, которая развивается как воспалительная реакция в ответ на системное заболевание. Приведены данные об основных причинах возникновения, патогенезе, клинических проявлениях анемии, а также основные подходы к диагностике и лечению этого заболевания....

  7. Predictors of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia : An analysis of the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin-alfa) Therapy (TREAT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, John J. V.; Uno, Hajime; Jarolim, Petr; Desai, Akshay S.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Ivanovich, Peter; Levey, Andrew S.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; McGill, Janet B.; Parfrey, Patrick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Toto, Robert M.; Solomon, Scott D.; Pfeffer, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims This study aims to examine predictors of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with the triad of diabetes, CKD, and anemia represent a significant proportion of patients with cardiovascular disease and are at particularly high risk for

  8. Anemias excluding cobalamin and folate deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dublis, Stephanie; Shah, Shefali; Nand, Sucha; Anderes, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Anemias are one of the commonest maladies affecting humans. They result from either a failure of production by the bone marrow (hypoproliferative), or from premature destruction or loss (hyperproliferative) of red cells. Hypoproliferative anemias typically result from deficiencies of essential nutrients, stem cell abnormalities or deficiency, and infiltrative processes of the bone marrow. In the hyperproliferative forms, the bone marrow function is normal and anemia results from bleeding or shortened erythrocyte lifespan due to hemoglobinopathies, red cell enzyme disorders, membrane defects, or external factors such as antibodies, trauma, or heat injury. The etiology of anemia is frequently obvious, but when obscure, a systematic diagnostic approach frequently yields the answer. It is important to realize that anemias are usually a consequence of another disease process, which must be identified. Without correction of the underlying disease process, the treatment is likely to fail. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum Hepcidin and Iron Indices Affect Anemia Status Differently According to the Kidney Function of Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Korean Cohort Study For Outcome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Woo Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: No studies have examined the association among serum hepcidin, iron indices, or anemia status based on the kidney function of non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Methods: We reviewed data of 2238 patients from a large-scale multicenter prospective Korean study (2011–2016 and excluded 198 patients with missing data regarding serum hepcidin, hemoglobin, transferrin saturation (TSAT, ferritin, and usage of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA or supplemental iron and 363 patients using ESA or supplemental iron. Finally, 1677 patients were included. Results: The mean patient age was 53.5 years, and 65.4% were men. TSAT and serum hepcidin were significantly associated with anemia status, whereas serum ferritin was not, regardless of anemia severity. For patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR ≥45 mL/min/1.73 m2, a 10% increase of TSAT was associated with hemoglobin <13 g/dL (odds ratio [OR], 0.628; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.515-0.765; P<0.001 and hemoglobin <11.5 g/dL (OR, 0.672; 95% CI, 0.476-0.950; P=0.024, whereas a 10-ng/mL increase of serum hepcidin was associated with hemoglobin <11.5 g/dL (OR, 1.379; 95% CI, 1.173-1.620; P<0.001 and hemoglobin <10.0 g/dL (OR, 1.360; 95% CI, 1.115-1.659; P=0.002 for patients with eGFR <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 according to multivariate logistic analysis. Conclusions: TSAT was associated with less severe anemia in early CKD patients. Serum hepcidin was associated with more severe anemia in advanced CKD patients.

  10. Nonregenerative anemia: mechanisms of decreased or ineffective erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, C N; Fry, M M

    2015-03-01

    In veterinary medicine, anemia without an appropriate compensatory hematopoietic response is termed nonregenerative. Nonregenerative anemia is a common clinical entity, occurring as a result of diminished or ineffective erythropoiesis in association with many types of pathology. This article reviews nonregenerative anemia in domestic animals, emphasizing mechanisms of disease, and also covers other conditions associated with nonregenerative anemia in people. Many aspects of nonregenerative anemia in animals are worthy of further investigation, from molecular mechanisms of disease to epidemiologic impacts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Quantitation of Marek's disease and chicken anemia viruses in organs of experimentally infected chickens and commercial chickens by multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Irit; Raibshtein, I; Al-Touri, A

    2013-06-01

    The worldwide distribution of chicken anemia virus (CAV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV) is well documented. In addition to their economic significance in single- or dual-virus infections, the two viruses can often accompany various other pathogens and affect poultry health either directly, by causing tumors, anemia, and delayed growth, or indirectly, by aggravating other diseases, as a result of their immunosuppressive effects. After a decade of employing the molecular diagnosis of those viruses, which replaced conventional virus isolation, we present the development of a real-time multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of both viruses. The real-time PCRs for MDV and for CAV alone are more sensitive than the respective end-point PCRs. In addition, the multiplex real-time shows a similar sensitivity when compared to the single real-time PCR for each virus. The newly developed real-time multiplex PCR is of importance in terms of the diagnosis and detection of low copies of each virus, MDV and CAV in single- and in multiple-virus infections, and its applicability will be further evaluated.

  12. Mieloma Múltiplo e anemia Multiple Myeloma and anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Cançado

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Anemia é uma complicação comum em pacientes com mieloma múltiplo (MM e ocorre em mais de 2/3 dos pacientes. Anemia de doença crônica, deficiência de eritropoetina (EPO devido à insuficiência renal e efeito mielossupressivo da quimioterapia são os principais mecanismos patofisiológicos que contribuem para o desenvolvimento de anemia no MM. Nos pacientes que obtêm remissão completa com tratamento quimioterápico, anemia usualmente se normaliza. Nos pacientes que não respondem ou apresentam recaída do mieloma, anemia freqüentemente persiste. As opções de tratamento dos pacientes anêmicos com MM incluem transfusões de hemácias e EPO recombinante humana. Essa proteína é biologicamente equivalente à EPO endógena e sua administração promove aumento dos valores de hemoglobina por tempo mais prolongado sem os riscos das transfusões de sangue. Vários estudos têm relatado melhora significante da eritropoese, redução da necessidade transfusional e melhora da qualidade de vida com o uso da EPO como tratamento a longo prazo da anemia associada ao mieloma. Nesse artigo, propomos o tratamento da anemia do MM baseado nas recomendações propostas pela Sociedade Americana de Hematologia (ASH em conjunto com a Sociedade Americana de Oncologia Clínica (ASCO, pela Organização Européia para Pesquisa e Tratamento do Câncer (EORTC, pelo IMF (Internacional Myeloma Foundation e pelo NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network.Anemia is a common complication in patients with multiple myeloma (MM occurring in more than two thirds of all patients. Anemia of chronic diseases, erythropoietin (EPO deficiency due to renal impairment and the myelosuppressive effect of chemotherapy are the most important pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the development of anemia in MM. In patients who achieve complete remission after chemotherapy, anemia usually normalizes. Non-responders and relapsing myeloma patients often continue to suffer

  13. Inborn anemias in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an α-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes

  14. Anemia in the emergency department: evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Timothy G; Johnson, Roy L; Rubenstein, Scott D

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is a common worldwide problem that is associated with nonspecific complaints. The initial focus for the emergency evaluation of anemia is to determine whether the problem is acute or chronic. Acute anemia is most commonly associated with blood loss, and the patient is usually symptomatic. Chronic anemia is usually well tolerated and is often discovered coincidentally. Once diagnosed, the etiology of anemia can often be determined by applying a systematic approach to its evaluation. The severity of the anemia impacts clinical outcomes, particularly in critically ill patients; however, the specific threshold to transfuse is uncertain. Evaluation of the current literature and clinical guidelines does not settle this controversy, but it does help clarify that a restrictive transfusion strategy (ie, for patients with a hemoglobin anemias may have well-defined treatment options (eg, sickle cell disease), but empiric use of nutritional supplements to treat anemia of uncertain etiology is discouraged.

  15. Safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients with end stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis: results from a phase IV clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Norouzi Javidan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO is available for correcting anemia. PDpoetin, a new brand of rHuEPO, has been certified by Food and Drug Department of Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran for clinical use in patients with chronic kidney disease. We conducted this post-marketing survey to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Patients from 4 centers in Iran were enrolled for this multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled phase IV clinical trial. Changes in blood chemistry, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, renal function, and other characteristics of the patients were recorded for 4 months; 501 of the patients recruited, completed this study. Mean age of the patients was 50.9 (±16.2 years. 48.7% of patients were female. Mean of the hemoglobin value in all of the 4 centers was 9.29 (±1.43 g/dL at beginning of the study and reached 10.96 (±2.23 g/dL after 4 months and showed significant increase overall (P<0.001. PDpoetin dose was stable at 50-100 U/kg thrice weekly. Hemorheologic disturbancesand changes in blood electrolytes was not observed. No case of immunological reactions to PDpoetin was observed. Our study, therefore, showed that PDpoetin has significantly raised the level of hemoglobin in the hemodialysis patients (about 1.7±0.6 g/dL. Anemia were successfully corrected in 49% of patients under study. Use of this biosimilar was shown to be safe and effective for the maintenance of hemoglobin in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  16. A 21 Nucleotide Duplication on the α1- and α2-Globin Genes Involves a Variety of Hypochromic Microcytic Anemias, From Mild to Hb H Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farashi, Samaneh; Faramarzi Garous, Negin; Zeinali, Fatemeh; Vakili, Shadi; Ashki, Mehri; Imanian, Hashem; Najmabadi, Hossein; Azarkeivan, Azita; Tamaddoni, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) is a common genetic disorder in Iran and many parts of the world. Genetic defects in the α-globin gene cluster can result in α-thal that may develop into a clinical phenotype varying from almost asymptomatic to a lethal hemolytic anemia. Loss of one functional α gene, indicated as heterozygous α(+)-thal, shows minor hematological abnormalities. Homozygosity for α(+)- or heterozygosity for α(0)-thal have more severe hematological abnormalities due to a markedly reduced α chain output. At the molecular level, the absence of three α-globin genes resulting from the compound heterozygous state for α(0)- and α(+)-thal, lead to Hb H disease. Here we present a 21 nucleotide (nt) duplication consisting of six amino acids and 3 bp of intronic sequence at the exon-intron boundary, in both the α-globin genes, detected by direct DNA sequencing. This duplication was identified in three patients originating from two different Iranian ethnic groups and one Arab during more than 12 years. The clinical presentation of these individuals varies widely from a mild asymptomatic anemia (heterozygote in α1-globin gene) to a severely anemic state, diagnosed as an Hb H individual requiring blood transfusion (duplication on the α2-globin gene in combination with the - -(MED) double α-globin gene deletion). The third individual, who was homozygous for this nt duplication on the α1-globin gene, showed severe hypochromic microcytic anemia and splenomegaly. In the last decade, numerous α-globin mutations have demonstrated the necessity of prenatal diagnosis (PND) for α-thal, and this study has contributed another mutation as important enough that needs to be considered.

  17. Anemia: An approach to evaluation, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kuriakose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is very commonly encountered in general clinical practice among all age groups. The more commonly used way to classify anemia has been to categorize it as being microcytic (mean corpuscular volume [MCV] 100 fL, which in turn allows for a more practical way to attempt to come up with a cause for any decrease in hemoglobin. Microcytic anemias are usually due to iron deficiency (in turn, a result of a number of different etiologies ranging from decreased intake, malabsorption, or blood loss, hemoglobinopathies (thalassemic syndromes, and some cases of severe anemia resulting from chronic disease. Normocytic anemia is often a result of anemia of chronic disease, hemolysis, or secondary to bone marrow failure. Macrocytic anemias are frequently caused by deficiencies of folic acid and/or Vitamin B12, exposure to toxic agents like drugs that interfere with DNA metabolism and alcohol, as also bone marrow failure states, such as from myelodysplastic syndrome. A comprehensive history, physical examination, and directed laboratory evaluation will help to identify a specific cause for anemia.

  18. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  19. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  20. Development of mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia and Evans' syndrome following chicken pox infection in a case of low-titer cold agglutinin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yumi; Masuya, Masahiro; Katayama, Naoyuki; Miyata, Eri; Sugimoto, Yuka; Shibasaki, Tetsunori; Yamamura, Kentaro; Ohishi, Kohshi; Minami, Nobuyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Nobori, Tsutomu

    2006-10-01

    We describe a patient with low-titer cold agglutinin disease (CAD) who developed mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and idiopathic thrombocytopenia following chicken pox infection. At least 1 year before admission to hospital, the patient had mild hemolytic anemia associated with low-titer cold agglutinins. A severe hemolytic crisis and thrombocytopenia (Evans' syndrome) occurred several days after infection with chicken pox, and the patient was referred to our hospital. Serological findings revealed the presence of both cold agglutinins and warm-reactive autoantibodies against erythrocytes, and the diagnosis was mixed-type AIHA. Following steroid therapy, the hemoglobin (Hb) level and platelet count improved. The patient was closely followed over a 10-year period with recurrent documented hemolysis after viral or bacterial infections. Warm-reactive autoantibodies have not been detected in the last 2 years, and only the immunoglobulin M anti-I cold agglutinins with a low titer and wide thermal amplitude have remained unchanged. Therefore, the patient has received at least 10 mg prednisolone daily to maintain a Hb level of 10 g/dL. To the best of our knowledge, no adult case of low-titer CAD that has evolved into mixed-type AIHA and Evans' syndrome after chicken pox infection has been previously reported in the literature.

  1. Iron deficiency anemia refractory to iron preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with iron deficiency anemia are treated effectively with oral iron preparations. However, a small number of these patients are refractory to such treatments, even when the pathologic condition underlying the anemia is concurrently treated. The pathological basis for this refractoriness can be explained by several factors, including malabsorption of iron, e.g. atrophic gastritis, deficiency of other hematopoietic vitamins or minerals, e.g. vitamin B12 or zinc, other undiagnosed anemic disorders, e.g. renal anemia or hematopoietic diseases, as well as certain hereditary disorders of iron metabolism, e.g. iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) caused by genetic mutation of the TMPRSS6 gene. This review focuses on the diagnosis and pathoetiology of iron deficiency anemia that is refractory to conventional oral iron preparations.

  2. Fanconi Anemia — Case Report of Rare Aplastic Anemia at Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaconu Alina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, defective haematopoiesis, and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and cancers. FA was first described in 1927 by the Swiss pediatrician Guido Fanconi. The diagnosis is based on morphological abnormalities, hematologic abnormalities (pancytopenia, macrocytic anemia and progressive bone marrow failure and genetic tests (cariograma.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even ... More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ... and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all infants for anemia at 1 ... heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . In infants and young children, signs of anemia ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  8. The Anemias of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  10. Side Effects: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  11. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  12. A Novel Antisense CAG Repeat Transcript at JPH3 Locus Mediating Expanded Polyglutamine Protein Toxicity in Huntington’s Disease-Like 2 (HDL2) Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, Brian; Rudnicki, Dobrila D.; Zhao, Jing; Weitz, Tara Murphy; Cheng, Yin; Gu, Xiaofeng; Greiner, Erin; Park, Chang Sin; Wang, Nan; Sopher, Bryce L.; La Spada, Albert R.; Osmand, Alex; Margolis, Russell L.; Sun, Yi E.; Yang, X. William

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Huntington’s disease like-2 (HDL2) is a phenocopy of Huntington’s disease caused by CTG/CAG repeat expansion at the Junctophilin-3 (JPH3) locus. The mechanisms underlying HDL2 pathogenesis remain unclear. Here we developed a BAC transgenic mouse model of HDL2 (BAC-HDL2) that exhibits progressive motor deficits, selective neurodegenerative pathology and ubiquitin-positive nuclear inclusions (NIs). Molecular analyses reveal a novel promoter at the transgene locus driving the expression of a CAG repeat transcript (HDL2-CAG) from the strand antisense to JPH3, which encodes an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) protein. Importantly, BAC-HDL2 but not control BAC mice accumulate polyQ-containing NIs in a pattern strikingly similar to those in the patients. Furthermore, BAC mice with genetic silencing of the expanded CUG transcript still express HDL2-CAG transcript and manifest polyQ pathogenesis. Finally, studies of HDL2 mice and patients revealed CBP sequestration into NIs and evidence for interference of CBP-mediated transcriptional activation. These results suggest overlapping polyQ-mediated pathogenic mechanisms in HD and HDL2 PMID:21555070

  13. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart- ... infections Motor or cognitive development delays in ... with chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary ...

  20. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  2. Hepatosplenomegalic lipidosis: what unless Gaucher? Adult cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) with anemia, mesenteric lipodystrophy, increased plasma chitotriosidase activity and a homozygous lysosomal acid lipase -1 exon 8 splice junction mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vom Dahl, S.; Harzer, K.; Rolfs, A.; Albrecht, B.; Niederau, C.; Vogt, C.; van Weely, S.; Aerts, J.; Müller, G.; Häussinger, D.

    1999-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman was admitted for hepatosplenomegaly and anemia. Bone marrow cytology showed "sea-blue histiocytes", vacuolated macrophages and plasma cells. As primary liver disease, malignancy or hematologic disorders were excluded, and plasma chitotriosidase activity was increased 27-fold over

  3. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  4. Anemia: progress in molecular mechanisms and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to both the understanding of frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that are likely to benefit from new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease); rare genetic disorders of RBC production; and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new approaches to treatment include drugs that target recently defined pathways in RBC production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin-family gene expression, as well as gene therapies that use improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies.

  5. Anemia hemolítica auto-imune e outras manifestações imunes da leucemia linfocítica crônica Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and other autoimmune diseases related to chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José O. Bordin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia linfocítica crônica (LLC é freqüentemente associada a manifestações auto-imunes principalmente relacionadas às células do sistema hematopoético causando anemia hemolítica auto-imune (AHAI, púrpura trombocitopênica imune (PTI, aplasia pura de série vermelha (APSV, e neutropenia imune. A LLC é diagnosticada em até 15% dos pacientes com AHAI, e em cerca de 50% dos pacientes com AHAI secundária a doença maligna. A PTI ocorre em 2%, e a APSV em 1% dos pacientes com LLC. Prednisona é o tratamento inicial de escolha para a citopenia imune associada à LLC. Para cerca de 60% dos pacientes que apresentam recidiva da manifestação auto-imune tem sido utilizada esplenectomia, imunoglobulina endovenosa, ou ciclosporina. Embora as evidências sobre fisiopatologia sejam limitadas, os mecanismos fisiopatológicos da auto-imunidade na LLC estão relacionados à atividade dos linfócitos B leucêmicos que atuam como células apresentadoras de antígeno aberrantes, e são eficientes em processar e apresentar proteínas da membrana de hemácias e de plaquetas às células TH auto-reativas. Linfócitos TH específicos para certos auto-antígenos podem escapar de mecanismos de controle de auto-tolerância, e, se ativados, podem causar doença auto-imune. O diagnóstico de AHAI contra-indica o uso de fludarabina em pacientes com LLC, pois esse análogo da purina tem sido associado ao desenvolvimento de AHAI grave e fatal, com risco consideravelmente mais alto para pacientes mais imunossuprimidos devido a vários tratamentos anteriores.Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is frequently associated with autoimmune diseases directed against hematopoietic cells, including autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, pure red cell aplasia (PRCA, and immune neutropenia. CLL represents the diagnosis in up to 15% of the patients with AIHA, and in 50% of the patients with AIHA secondary to malignancy. ITP occurs in 2% and

  6. Oral versus intravenous iron therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and iron deficiency with and without anemia in Germany – a real-world evidence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein J

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Stein,1,2 Jennifer Scarlet Haas,3 Siew Hwa Ong,4 Kathrin Borchert,3 Thomas Hardt,5 Elmira Lechat,4 Kerry Nip,5 Douglas Foerster,4 Sebastian Braun,3 Daniel C Baumgart6 1Interdisciplinary Crohn Colitis Center Rhein-Main, Frankfurt/Main, Germany; 2Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, DGD Clinics Sachsenhausen, Teaching Hospital of the J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany; 3Xcenda GmbH, Hannover, Germany; 4Vifor Pharma Ltd., Glattbrugg, Switzerland; 5Vifor Pharma Deutschland GmbH, Munich, Germany; 6Division of Gastroenterology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: Iron-deficiency anemia and iron deficiency are common comorbidities associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD resulting in impaired quality of life and high health care costs. Intravenous iron has shown clinical benefit compared to oral iron therapy. Aim: This study aimed to compare health care outcomes and costs after oral vs intravenous iron treatment for IBD patients with iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia (ID/A in Germany. Methods: IBD patients with ID/A were identified by ICD-10-GM codes and newly commenced iron treatment via ATC codes in 2013 within the InGef (formerly Health Risk Institute research claims database. Propensity score matching was performed to balance both treatment groups. Non-observable covariates were adjusted by applying the difference-in-differences (DID approach. Results: In 2013, 589 IBD patients with ID/A began oral and 442 intravenous iron treatment. After matching, 380 patients in each treatment group were analyzed. The intravenous group had fewer all-cause hospitalizations (37% vs 48% and ID/A-related hospitalizations (5% vs 14% than the oral iron group. The 1-year preobservation period comparison revealed significant health care cost differences between both groups. After adjusting for cost differences by DID method, total health care cost savings in the intravenous iron group were

  7. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  8. Managing anemia in lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Birgegård

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Gunnar BirgegårdDepartment of Haematology, University Hospital, Uppsala, SwedenAbstract: Anemia is common in cancer, and lymphoproliferative disease is no exception. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA have been used for renal anemia since 1986, and considerably later in cancer anemia. The first studies were published around 1993, but the use of ESA did not become common in cancer anemia until in the late 1990s. Cancer anemia is still under-treated. This review gives an overview of the use of ESA in hematologic malignancies. A background is given about this treatment in the cancer field generally. The pathophysiology of cancer anemia is described with special emphasis on the disturbances in iron metabolism. Functional iron deficiency has been shown to be both frequent and important as a hindrance for response to ESA treatment, and recent studies are reported in some detail, where the use of intravenous iron was shown to improve the response rate of ESA treatment.Keywords: Epo, epoetin, ESA, cancer anemia, lymphoma, myeloma, lymphoproliferative disease

  9. Profile of peginesatide and its potential for the treatment of anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease who are on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ashraf MikhailRenal Unit, Morriston Hospital, Swansea University, Wales, UKAbstract: Peginesatide is a synthetic, dimeric peptide that is covalently linked to polyethylene glycol (PEG. The amino acid sequence of peginesatide is unrelated to that of erythropoietin (EPO and is not immunologically cross-reactive with EPO. Peginesatide binds to and activates the human EPO receptor, stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of human red cell precursors in vitro in a manner similar to other EPO-stimulating agents (ESAs. In Phase II and III studies in dialysis and predialysis patients, peginesatide administered once monthly was as effective as epoetin alfa given thrice weekly (dialysis patients or darbepoetin given once weekly (nondialysis patients, in correcting anemia of chronic kidney disease as well as maintaining hemoglobin within the desired target range. In the dialysis population, the reported side-effect profile of peginesatide was comparable to that known with other marketed ESAs. In the nondialysis studies, compared with those treated with darbepoetin, patients treated with peginesatide experienced a higher adverse-effect profile. Peginesatide is likely to be licensed for treatment of renal anemia in dialysis patients and not in nondialysis patients. Despite this limitation, peginesatide is likely to prove valuable in treating dialysis patients because of its infrequent mode of administration, thereby allowing for a reduced number of injections, with associated better compliance, reduced cold storage requirement, and improved stock accountability. PEGylated therapeutic proteins can elicit immunological response to the PEG moiety of the therapeutic complex. Only long-term experience and post-marketing surveillance will address whether this immunological response will have any impact on the clinical efficacy or safety of peginesatide in clinical practice.Keywords: peginesatide, dialysis, chronic kidney disease

  10. Coronary Artery Disease Is a Predictor of Progression to Dialysis in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and Anemia: An Analysis of the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabe, Marwa A; Claggett, Brian; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Desai, Akshay S; Ivanovich, Peter; Kewalramani, Reshma; Lewis, Eldrin F; McMurray, John J V; Olson, Kurt A; Parfrey, Patrick; Solomon, Scott D; Pfeffer, Marc A

    2016-04-23

    Although clear evidence shows that chronic kidney disease is a predictor of cardiovascular events, death, and accelerated coronary artery disease (CAD) progression, it remains unknown whether CAD is a predictor of progression of chronic kidney disease to end-stage renal disease. We sought to assess whether CAD adds prognostic information to established predictors of progression to dialysis in patients with chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and anemia. Using the previously described Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT) population, we compared baseline characteristics of patients with and without CAD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between CAD and the outcomes of end-stage renal disease and the composite of death or end-stage renal disease. Of the 4038 patients, 1791 had a history of known CAD. These patients were older (mean age 70 versus 65 years, Pdisease. CAD patients were less likely to have marked proteinuria (29% versus 39%, Pdisease (adjusted hazard ratio 1.20 [95% CI 1.01-1.42], P=0.04) and to have the composite of death or end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio 1.15 [95% CI 1.01-1.30], P=0.03). In patients with chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and anemia, a history of CAD is an independent predictor of progression to dialysis. In patients with diabetic nephropathy, a history of CAD contributes important prognostic information to traditional risk factors for worsening renal disease. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. Advancements in anemias related to chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Gian Cesare; Lechi Santonastaso, Clara

    2010-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD), the most frequent anemia among hospitalized patients, occurs in chronic inflammatory disorders, such as chronic infections, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Different causes contribute to ACD including diversion of iron traffic, diminished erythropoiesis, blunted response to erythropoietin, erythrophagocytosis, hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. A particular case of ACD is represented by anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACD is characterized by hyposideremia and altered iron transport. Cytokines are implicated in the ACD by reducing erythropoiesis and increasing iron sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The regulation of iron absorption across the epithelium of the proximal small intestine is essential for maintaining body iron concentrations within a physiologically defined range. Hepcidin controls cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export protein ferroportin, causing ferroportin to be phosphorylated and degraded in lysosomes. Finally, hepcidin inhibits iron release from the reticulo-endothelial system. Increased expression of hepcidin leads to decreased iron absorption and iron deficient anemia. Hepcidin, therefore, is a negative regulator of iron transport in plasma. Causes of anemia in patients with CKD are multifactorial, but the most well-known cause is inadequate erythropoietin production. In these patients, anemia increases the risk of either cardiovascular disease or renal failure.

  12. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  13. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  14. Pernicious Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants and Training Grants and Training ...

  15. Stroke in patients with sickle cell disease: clinical and neurological aspects Acidente cerebrovascular em pacientes com anemia falciforme: aspectos clínicos e neurológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Camargo de Oliveira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize a group of patients (n=8 with sickle cell disease (SCD and ischemic stroke concerning the clinical, neurological, imaging and progressive aspects. Data were collected from records and completed with an interview of patients and their parents. In this study there were 8 patients with ages ranging from 10 to 23 years old; SCD diagnosis was given between one and two years of age with clinical features of fatigue and anemia. The stroke was ischemic in all individuals and the first cerebrovascular event occurred before 6 years of age; 3 patients had recurrence of stroke despite prophylactic blood transfusion therapy and both cerebral hemispheres were affected in 4 patients. Clinical and neurological current features observed were: acute pain crises, sialorrhea, mouth breathing, motor, and neuropsychological impairments resulting from cortical-subcortical structure lesions.O objetivo deste estudo foi caracterizar um grupo de sujeitos (n=8 com antecedentes de anemia falciforme (AF e acidente vascular cerebral (AVC isquêmico, dos pontos de vista clínico, neurológico, radiológico e evolutivo, reavaliados através de exame neurológico e neuropsicológico. A partir de prontuários dos sujeitos com diagnóstico comprovado de AF e AVC, coletamos dados, complementados por entrevista com pacientes e responsáveis. Foram avaliados 8 pacientes; atualmente com idades entre 10 e 23 anos; diagnóstico da AF entre um e dois anos; quadro clínico de fraqueza e anemia. Em todos, o AVC foi isquêmico e o primeiro evento na maioria ocorreu antes dos 6 anos de idade; houve recorrência do AVC em 3, apesar da profilaxia com transfusão sanguínea; ambos os hemisférios afetados em 4; no quadro clínico e neurológico atual constatamos crises dolorosas, sialorréia, respiração oral e importante comprometimento motor e neuropsicológico, resultantes de lesões estruturais cortico-subcorticais.

  16. Anemia in the elderly: a consequence of aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawi, Racha; Moukhadder, Hassan; Taher, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Anemia in the elderly is a common finding that is associated with a poorer quality of life, worse outcomes, and increased mortality. While this entity is frequently overlooked, there is often an underlying cause that is correctable. Areas covered: In this review, we shed light on the prevalence of anemia in the elderly population, review the most common causes, particularly iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, and describe the available treatment modalities. When a clear etiology for the anemia is ruled-out, the term unexplained anemia may be utilized; while still an under-explored field, one of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms appears to be associated with an age-related inflammatory process. Expert commentary: Treating anemia secondary to nutritional deficiencies can be straightforward, but the management of the other types of anemia is not always the case. Treating anemia of chronic disease and anemia of chronic kidney disease may be limited by elevated levels of hepcidin and new promising treatments are still in pre-clinical and clinical trial phases. Caution should be employed when using erythropoiesis stimulating agents due to safety concerns, and when prescribing blood transfusion therapy, both of which lack the specific guidelines for use in the elderly.

  17. Anemia and stroke: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiafa, G; Savopoulos, C; Kanellos, I; Mylonas, K S; Tsikalakis, G; Tegos, T; Kakaletsis, N; Hatzitolios, A I

    2017-06-01

    Anemia seems to have a clear relationship with cerebrovascular events (CVEs), as there is a direct connection between central nervous system, blood supply, and tissue oxygen delivery. Anemia is considered a hyperkinetic state which disturbs endothelial adhesion molecule genes that may lead to thrombus formation. Furthermore, blood flow augmentation and turbulence may result in the migration of this thrombus, thus producing artery-to-artery embolism. It is for this reason that anemia is characterized as "the fifth cardiovascular risk factor." Anemia is consistently present in patients with acute stroke, ranging from 15% to 29%, while the mortality rate was significantly higher in patients suffering from anemia at the time of admission. Different types of anemia (sickle cell disease, beta thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia [IDA]) have been associated with increased cardiovascular and CVE risk. The relation between hemoglobin level and stroke would require further investigation. Unfortunately, treatment of anemia in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease still lacks clear targets and specific therapy has not developed. However, packed red blood cell transfusion is generally reserved for therapy in patients with CVEs. What is more, treatment of IDA prevents thrombosis and the occurrence of stroke; although iron levels should be checked, chronic administration favors thrombosis. Regarding erythropoietin (EPO), as there is lack of studies in anemic stroke patients, it would be desirable to utilize both neuroprotective and hematopoietic properties of EPO in anemic stroke patients. This review aims to clarify the poorly investigated and defined issues concerning the relation of anemia and CVEs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Impact of anemia correction on the production of the circulating morphogenetic protein α-Klotho in patients with Stages 3B-4 chronic kidney disease: A new direction of cardionephroprotection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, Yu S; Mukhin, N A; Kozlovskaya, L V; Milovanova, S Yu; Markina, M M

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the impact of anemia correction with erythropoiesis stimulants on the serum level of the circulating morphogenetic protein α-Klotho in patients with Stages 3B--4 chronic kidney disease (CKD). 64 patients aged 42±8 years with Stages 3B--4 nondiabetic CKD were examined and divided into 2 groups: 1) 32 patients with anemia (the target hemoglobin levels could be achieved and kept with erythropoietin and iron saccharate in 20 patients (Group A) and those could not be done in 12 patients (Group 1B). A control group (Group 2) consisted of 32 non-anemic patients matched for gender, age, and degree of a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) reduction. Along with iron exchange indicators, the time course of changes in serum Klotho levels were examined in all the 64 patients during screening and one year after the end of the study. For correction of anemia, 32 patients with this condition (Groups 1A and 1B) took short-acting epoetin (hypodermic recormon 2,000 IU thrice per week + iron (intravenous venofer 5 ml of 100 mg once per week)) under control of hemoglobin levels and serum transferrin iron and ferritin saturation. After achieving the target hemoglobin level of 110-120 g/l, for its keeping, all the patients received, instead of short-acting epoetin, long-acting hypodermic darbepoetin-α 1.5 µg once every 2 months and intravenous iron saccharate 100 mg once every 2 weeks. Among the 32 anemic patients in Group 1, 20 (63%) (Group 1 A) could achieve the target hemoglobin level (110--120 g/l) and maintain it within this range, by performing therapy with epoitin-β + iron saccharate; anemia (the hemoglobin level of anemia, left ventricular hypertrophy, and heart failure), but also a pathogenetic factor of CKD progression. Anemia correction with erythropoiesis stimulants has been shown to enhance the renal and extrarenal production of α-Klotho.

  19. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  20. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  1. Correlation between the induction of Th1 cytokines by an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus vaccine and protection against disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Ying; Liang, Hua; Wei, Li; Xiang, Wenhua; Shen, Rongxian; Shao, Yiming

    2007-03-01

    The equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) donkey-leukocyte attenuated vaccine (DLV) has been used to protect against equine infectious anaemia (EIA) disease for several decades in China. The attenuated mechanism and immunological protective mechanisms remain to be elucidated. To identify responses that correlate with the protection against disease, we immunized horses with DLV, followed by challenge with an EIAV wild-type strain LN. All vaccinated horses were asymptomatic and had a low level of virus replication (10(7) copies ml-1) and intermittent febrile episodes. Cytokine production in the DLV-vaccinated horses increased and attained a plateau level at approximately 50 days post-vaccination, and exceeded 10(7) copies per 10(7) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 1-3 months post-challenge. However, non-vaccinated control horses died after several fever episodes (>or=39 degrees C), which coincided with higher viral load (10(6)-10(7) copies ml-1) and lower cytokine production (<10(4) copies per 10(7) PBMCs). The results indicate that high levels of EIAV-specific cytokines induced by the attenuated EIAV vaccine may contribute to the protective immune response against EIA disease.

  2. Cold agglutinin disease (CADwith autoimmune haemolytic anaemia: a case report of a coronary artery disease patient Doença por aglutininas a frio (DAC com anemia hemolítica auto-imune: relato de caso de um coronariopata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro A. Barbosa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Cold agglutinin disease (CAD with autoimmune haemolytic anemia is characterized by the production of harmful cold autoantibodies associated with increased red cell destruction during exposure to cold. The treatment of CAD is very difficult and a great effort is required to obtain therapeutic success. Cyclophosphamide is a potent immunosuppressive agent which is widely used in all bone marrow transplantation conditioning regimens for patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia. In this report, we describe the case of a coronary artery disease patient with severe CAD, but without lymphoproliferative disease, in which general measures and immunosuppressive therapies were adopted, there by avoiding blood transfusions.A doença por aglutininas a frio (CAD cursando com anemia hemolítica auto-imune (AHAI é decorrente da produção de autoanticorpos que reagem muito bem a baixas temperaturas, dirigidos contra hemácias autólogas. A habilidade desses anticorpos em destruir as hemácias encontra-se diretamente relacionada à sua capacidade em fixar complemento durante a exposição do paciente a baixas temperaturas. A AHAI por anticorpos frios pode ser idiopática - ausência de doença de base - ou secundária, geralmente associada a desordens linfoproliferativas de células B ou determinados processos infecciosos. A hemólise é intravascular, através de aglutininas da classe IgM, com teste direto da antiglobulina humana positivo para complemento. O tratamento da CAD é difícil, exigindo um esforço contínuo, necessário para se obter sucesso terapêutico. A ciclofosfamida é um agente imunossupressor potente, amplamente utilizado em transplantes de medula óssea, particularmente nos portadores de anemia aplástica. Descrevemos o caso de um coronariopata portador de CAD severa, cuja exploração diagnóstica excluiu doença linfoproliferativa. Adotamos medidas gerais de suporte e terapia imunossupressora, coibindo o uso de hemotransfusões.

  3. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad Mahmoud; Jaberian Sara; Pazouki Abdolreza; Riazi Sajedeh; Rangraz Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber Somayyeh

    2017-01-01

    Background. The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Fanconi anemia Fanconi anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Fanconi anemia is a condition that affects many parts of ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  6. Anemia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of <11 g/dl in the first and third trimester and <10.5 g/dl in second trimester. According to the literature, anemia, particularly severe anemia (Hb<7g/dl is associated with increased risk of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and long term adverse effects in the newborn. The association of hemoglobin levels to perinatal outcome has been shown to be U shaped with both high and low hemoglobin levels being associated adverse perinatal outcome such as low birth weight, increased stillbirths. Anemia in pregnancy is a major public health problem. Ideally a woman should have adequate iron stores when she conceives, in order meet to additional requirements of pregnancy. This review focuses on the occurrence, types, maternal and perinatal outcomes, prevention and treatment of anemia during pregnancy. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 300-316

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs ...

  8. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  9. Impact of dialysis technique on renal anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Scatena, Alessia; Paoletti, Sabrina; Migliori, Massimiliano

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a significant complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a major cause of death in dialysis patients. Clinical studies have shown that anemia is associated with reduced survival in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. Furthermore, an association between anemia and adverse cardiovascular outcomes has also been observed in patients with earlier stages of CKD not yet requiring dialysis. Although this fact still remains controversial, high-efficiency on-line hemodiafiltration (HDF) has been shown to improve anemia and to reduce the need for erythropoietin-stimulating agents in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This positive effect has been attributed to the fact that the convective methods might remove some protein-bound erythropoietic inhibitor substances. Moreover, in HD patients, renal anemia is linked to the inflammatory state of uremic syndrome. It is also worth nothing that the improvement in anemia is associated with a reduced inflammatory state in patients undergoing on-line HDF. Here, we have reviewed the current knowledge of the effect of dialysis technique on renal anemia. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Health-related behavior, profile of health locus of control and acceptance of illness in patients suffering from chronic somatic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Janowski

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to determine health-related behaviors, profile of health locus of control (HLC, and to assess the relationships between these constructs among patients suffering from chronic somatic diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three-hundred adult patients suffering from various chronic diseases participated in the study. The patients' mean age was 54.6 years (SD = 17.57. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were found between the different clinical groups in health-related behavior, acceptance of illness, internal HLC or chance HLC. Patients with neurologic conditions showed slightly lower powerful others HLC than did some other clinical groups. Health-related behavior was significantly positively related to all three categories of HLC, with most prominent associations observed with powerful others HLC. Only one type of health-related behavior--preventive behavior--correlated significantly and negatively with acceptance of illness. Differences in the frequency of health-related behavior were also found due to gender (women showing more healthy nutritional habits than men, age (older subjects showing more frequent health-promoting behavior, education (higher education was associated with less frequent health-promoting behavior and marital status (widowed subjects reporting more frequent health-promoting behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Health-related behavior in patients with chronic diseases seems to be unrelated to a specific diagnosis; however it shows associations with both internal and external HLC. Sociodemographic factors are also crucial factors determining frequency of health-related behavior in such patients.

  11. Persistence of chicken anemia virus antigen and inclusions in spontaneous cases of Marek's disease visceral lymphomas in broiler chickens at slaughterhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed Sabry; Ono, Hiroki; Sasaki, Jun; Ochiai, Kenji; Goryo, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    The chicken anemia virus (CAV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV) infect chickens worldwide; a single or dual infection by these viruses has a great impact on poultry production. In the present study, we examined the existence of CAV antigen and its inclusions in Marek's disease (MD) lymphomas in chickens in the slaughterhouses of Iwate prefecture, Japan. Forty-nine spleens and 13 livers with different degrees of nodular lesions were histopathologically examined at our laboratory. Grossly, the tested organs showed various sizes and anatomical architectures. Based on the cellular morphology and the infiltrative nature of the neoplastic lymphocytes, MD was confirmed in 76% (37/49) of the spleens and 92% (12/13) of the livers. The lesions of MD, according to the pattern of lymphocytic accumulation in the affected organs, were divided into multifocal, coalesced and diffuse. CAV intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected within the small and the large bizarre lymphocytes of the MD lymphomas in 2 livers and 9 spleens, and the immunostaining test for CAV confirmed the persistence of CAV antigens and inclusions in the neoplastic cells. This study demonstrated the persistence of CAV infection within the neoplastic cells of naturally occurring MD lymphomas in chickens.

  12. Diabetic foot ulcer carries high amputation and mortality rates, particularly in the presence of advanced age, peripheral artery disease and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael Henrique Rodrigues; Cardoso, Natália Anício; Procópio, Ricardo Jayme; Navarro, Túlio Pinho; Dardik, Alan; de Loiola Cisneros, Ligia

    2017-12-01

    Foot ulcer is also a clinical marker for limb amputation and for death in diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine amputation and mortality rates and its associated factors in patients with diabetic foot ulcerations in a tertiary hospital in Brazil. Retrospective medical records from 654 diabetic foot patients were reviewed. The risk factors were determined using the conditional logistic regression model analysis. The mean patient age was 63.1 years (SD 12.20). Peripheral arterial disease was present in 160 patients (24.5%). Major amputations were performed in 135 (21%). The in-hospital mortality rate was 12% and the mortality rate of the amputees was 22.2%. The lowest hemoglobin level, the median value was 9.50g/dL, (4.0-17.0). Anemia was detected in 89.6% of patients submitted to amputation and in 82,1% of those who died. Hemoglobin foot ulcer is associated with high amputation and mortality rates. Old age, peripheral arterial disease and low hemoglobin level are risk factor for major amputation. Old age, major amputation and low hemoglobin level are risk factors for death. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  14. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  15. Risk variants of the α-synuclein locus and REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: a genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnarå, Kari Anne; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Dietrichs, Espen; Toft, Mathias

    2018-02-21

    Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous disorder where genetic factors may underlie clinical variability. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia strongly linked to synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that SNCA variants conferring risk of Parkinson's disease would also predispose to an RBD phenotype. We assessed possible RBD (pRBD) status using the RBD screening questionnaire and investigated known susceptibility variants for Parkinson's disease located in the α-synuclein (SNCA) and tau (MAPT) gene loci in 325 Parkinson's disease patients. Associations between genetic risk variants and RBD were investigated by logistic regression, and an independent dataset of 382 patients from the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI) study was used for replication. pRBD was associated with rs3756063 located in the 5' region of SNCA (two-sided p = 0.018, odds ratio 1.44). We replicated this finding in the PPMI dataset (one-sided p = 0.036, odds ratio 1.35) and meta-analyzed the results (two-sided p = 0.0032, odds ratio 1.40). The Parkinson's disease risk variant in the 3' region of SNCA and the MAPT variant showed no association with pRBD. Our findings provide proof of principle that a largely stable, dichotomous clinical feature of Parkinson's disease can be linked to a specific genetic susceptibility profile. Indirectly, it also supports the hypothesis of RBD as relevant marker for a distinct subtype of the disorder.

  16. Treatment for children with severe aplastic anemia and sickle cell disease in low income countries in Latin America: a report on the recent meetings of the Monza International School of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (MISPHO): Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Scott C; Wilimas, Judy A; Flores, Andronica; Pacheco, C; de Reyes, Gladis; Machin, Sergio; Svarch, Eva; Navarrete, Marta; Nieves, Rosa; Rodriguez, Hilze; Masera, Giuseppe

    2007-05-01

    Treatment of hematologic disorders in low-income countries (LIC) is difficult. This report summarizes treatment of sickle cell disease and aplastic anemia by pediatric hematologists from 15 LIC who participate in the Monza International School of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (MISPHO). Patients with severe sickle cell disease were treated with low dose hydroxyurea, which safely reduced vaso-occlusive crises. Patients with severe aplastic anemia fared poorly due to lack of availability and high cost of anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine and lack of access to stem cell transplantation. Appropriate therapy was most likely to occur in MISPHO centers with an active twinning program with a center in a high-income country.

  17. Dysfunctional Sensory Modalities, Locus Coeruleus, and Basal Forebrain: Early Determinants that Promote Neuropathogenesis of Cognitive and Memory Decline and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2016-10-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. It is essential to unravel its etiology and pathogenesis. This should enable us to study the presymptomatic stages of the disease and to analyze and reverse the antemortem behavioral, memory, and cognitive dysfunction. Prima facie, an ongoing chronic vulnerability involving neural insult may lead normal elderly to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and then to AD. Development of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies to thwart the disease pathology obviously requires a thorough delineation of underlying disruptive neuropathological processes. Our sensory capacity for touch, smell, taste, hearing, and vision declines with advancing age. Declines in different sensory attributes are considered here to be the primary "first-tier pathologies." Olfactory loss is among the first clinical signs of neurodegenerative diseases including AD and Parkinson's disease (PD). Sensory dysfunction in the aged promotes pathological disturbances in the locus coeruleus, basal forebrain, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and several key areas of neocortex and brainstem. Hence, sensory dysfunction is the pivotal factor that may upregulate cognitive and memory dysfunction. The age-related constellation of comorbid pathological factors may include apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, alcohol abuse, head trauma, and obstructive sleep apnea. The concepts and trajectories delineated here are the dynamic pillars of the current hypothesis presented-it postulates that the sensory decline, in conjunction with the above pathologies, is crucial in triggering neurodegeneration and promoting cognitive/memory dysfunction in aging and AD. The application of this thesis can be important in formulating new multifactorial preventive and treatment strategies (suggested here) in order to attenuate cognitive and memory decline and ameliorate pathological dysfunction in aging, MCI, and AD.

  18. Genetic and Informatic Analyses Implicate Kif12 as a Candidate Gene within the Mpkd2 Locus That Modulates Renal Cystic Disease Severity in the Cys1cpk Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mrug

    Full Text Available We have previously mapped the interval on Chromosome 4 for a major polycystic kidney disease modifier (Mpkd of the B6(Cg-Cys1cpk/J mouse model of recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD. Informatic analyses predicted that this interval contains at least three individual renal cystic disease severity-modulating loci (Mpkd1-3. In the current study, we provide further validation of these predicted effects using a congenic mouse line carrying the entire CAST/EiJ (CAST-derived Mpkd1-3 interval on the C57BL/6J background. We have also generated a derivative congenic line with a refined CAST-derived Mpkd1-2 interval and demonstrated its dominantly-acting disease-modulating effects (e.g., 4.2-fold increase in total cyst area; p<0.001. The relative strength of these effects allowed the use of recombinants from these crosses to fine map the Mpkd2 effects to a <14 Mbp interval that contains 92 RefSeq sequences. One of them corresponds to the previously described positional Mpkd2 candidate gene, Kif12. Among the positional Mpkd2 candidates, only expression of Kif12 correlates strongly with the expression pattern of Cys1 across multiple anatomical nephron structures and developmental time points. Also, we demonstrate that Kif12 encodes a primary cilium-associated protein. Together, these data provide genetic and informatic validation of the predicted renal cystic disease-modulating effects of Mpkd1-3 loci and implicate Kif12 as the candidate locus for Mpkd2.

  19. Fanconi anemia - learning from children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Svahn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomic recessive and X-linked disease with chromosomal instability after exposure to crosslinking agents as the hallmark. Clinical features of FA are somatic malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer proneness, however there is wide clinical heterogeneity. The symptom most frequently and early associated with morbidity and mortality is progressive pancytopenia in the first decade of life although acute myelogenous leukemia (AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS can appear before aplastic anemia. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head-neck, intestinal or genital tract has a very high incidence in FA and can appear at young age. This paper will focus on treatment of bone marrow failure in FA.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another condition. Finally, the CBC looks at mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV). MCV is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. The results may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that have strong potential ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issues. For more information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources ...

  17. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Disease: H00920 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00920 Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, dyserythropoietic anemia, and calvarial ...hyperostosis Patients with this disease suffer from exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, dyserythropoietic anemia...eleg O ... TITLE ... Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, dyserythropoeitic anemia, a

  19. Tissue Sites of Persistent Infection and Active Replication of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus during Acute Disease and Asymptomatic Infection in Experimentally Infected Equids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Sharon M.; Cook, Sheila J.; Cook, R. Frank; Rushlow, Keith E.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses is characterized by recurring cycles of disease and viremia that typically progress to an inapparent infection in which clinical symptoms are absent as host immune responses maintain control of virus replication indefinitely. The dynamics of EIAV viremia and its association with disease cycles have been well characterized, but there has been to date no comprehensive quantitative analyses of the specific tissue sites of EIAV infection and replication in experimentally infected equids during acute disease episodes and during asymptomatic infections in long-term inapparent carriers. To characterize the in vivo site(s) of viral infection and replication, we developed a quantitative competitive PCR assay capable of detecting 10 copies of viral DNA and a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-PCR assay with a sensitivity of about 30 copies of viral singly spliced mRNA. Animals were experimentally infected with one of two reference viruses: the animal-passaged field isolate designated EIAVWyo and the virulent cell-adapted strain designated EIAVPV. Tissues and blood cells were isolated during the initial acute disease or from asymptomatic animals and analyzed for viral DNA and RNA levels by the respective quantitative assays. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the appearance of clinical symptoms in experimentally infected equids coincided with rapid widespread seeding of viral infection and replication in a variety of tissues. During acute disease, the predominant cellular site of viral infection and replication was the spleen, which typically accounted for over 90% of the cellular viral burden. In asymptomatic animals, viral DNA and RNA persisted in virtually all tissues tested, but at extremely low levels, a finding indicative of tight but incomplete immune control of EIAV replication. During all disease states, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were found to harbor less than 1% of

  20. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ahmet; Cengiz, Murad; Ozdemir, Zeynep Canan; Celik, Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Paraoxonase-1 is an esterase enzyme and it has 3 types of activity, namely paraoxonase, arylesterase, and diazoxonase. It has been reported that paraoxonase-1 deficiency is related to increased susceptibility to development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. Thirty children with iron deficiency anemia, 30 children with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia, and 40 healthy children aged 6 months to 6 years were enrolled in this study. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured with a spectrophotometer by using commercially available kits. Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia group (103 ± 73 and 102 ± 41 U/L, respectively) were significantly lower than mean activities of control group (188 ± 100 and 147 ± 34 U/L, respectively; P .05). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment with vitamin B(12) in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia; however, there were no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes after iron treatment in iron deficiency anemia group. Important correlations were found between vitamin B(12) levels and both paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (r = .367, P paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and after vitamin B(12) therapy the activities of these enzymes returned to near-normal levels.

  1. Types of anemia and mortality among older disabled women living in the community: the Women's Health and Aging Study I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semba, Richard D; Ricks, Michelle O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Xue, Qian-Li; Chaves, Paulo; Fried, Linda P; Guralnik, Jack M

    2007-08-01

    To classify the different types of anemia among moderately to severely disabled women living in the community and examine the relationship between types of anemia and mortality. We studied anemia in 688 women, >or=65 years, in the Women's Health and Aging Study I, a population based study of moderately to severely disabled older women living in the community in Baltimore, Maryland. Anemia was defined by World Health Organization criteria. Causes of anemia were classified as due to nutritional deficiencies (iron, folate, and B12 deficiencies), anemia of chronic inflammation, anemia with renal disease, and unexplained anemia. 147 of 688 (21.4%) women were anemic (hemoglobin anemia due to nutritional causes, 45 (30.6%) had anemia due to chronic inflammation, 29 (19.7%) had anemia and renal disease, and 51 (34.7%) had unexplained anemia. The proportions of those who died over five years among non-anemic women and women with anemia due to nutritional causes, chronic inflammation, renal disease, and unexplained anemia were 26.1%, 18.2%, 38.6%, 64.3%, and 33.3%, respectively (panemia and renal disease (HR 1.99, 95% CI 1.18-3.35, p=0.009) and anemia of chronic inflammation (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.00-2.84, p=0.05) had higher risk of death. Anemia is common among moderately to severely disabled older women living in the community, and about one-third of the anemia is unexplained. Anemia with renal disease and anemia of chronic inflammation are associated with a higher mortality.

  2. Hemolysis of the red cell : Towards improved understanding of hereditary hemolytic anemia and new diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisjes, Henk Rick

    2018-01-01

    The condition in which in the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs or their number is insufficient to meet physiological needs is characterized as anemia. Anemia is an underestimated burden of disease and despite that the vast majority of anemia is caused by iron deficiency, a substantial number of

  3. Anemia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wendy W; Schrier, Stanley L

    2012-05-01

    There have been several large-scale epidemiologic studies, including the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III), which have described the prevalence and impact of anemia in the elderly. The information derived has been critically important. However, given the large number of patients surveyed, these reports necessarily relied substantially on the laboratory-based screening evaluations. There are now two recent reports describing the cause of anemia in elderly outpatients, and although the numbers are smaller than the large scale surveys, they constitute comprehensive hematologic evaluations with therapeutic interventions and clinical follow-up. The purpose of this review is to compare these different analyses. There are distinct differences and similarities in the two types of studies, which are derived from patients seen in hematology clinics. Despite comprehensive hematologic evaluation, the puzzling entity of unexplained anemia of the elderly is confirmed and found to account for 30-46% of patients. NHANES III classified iron-deficiency anemia with other nutritional anemias, a classification that might be correct in the developing third world, but in North America and Western Europe, iron deficiency is more often caused by blood loss and the cause must be sought and dealt with. The myelodysplastic syndromes are an important cause of anemia in the elderly, with a prevalence of at least 4%. Large-scale screening studies of anemia in the elderly are of great importance, and when complemented by comprehensive hematologic evaluations, provide a more accurate picture of the clinical situation.

  4. Effect of peritoneal dialysis versus hemodialysis on renal anemia in renal in end-stage disease patients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Ning; Zhang, Wen-Long; Sun, Tao; Ma, Fu-Zhe; Su, Sensen; Xu, Zhong-Gao

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) on renal anemia (RA) in renal disease patients by a meta-analysis. Relevant studies published before June 2015 were searched. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to evaluate the effect of HD and PD on RA based on five indexes: hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation index, serum albumin, and parathyroid hormone. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias assessment were conducted to evaluate the stability and reliability of our results. A total of fourteen eligible studies with 1103 cases underwent HD and 625 cases underwent PD were used for this meta-analysis. There were no significant difference for levels of hemoglobin (SMD = -0.23, 95% CI: -0.74 to 0.28), ferritin (SMD = 0.01, 95% CI: -0.59 to 0.62), parathyroid hormone (SMD = 0.11, 95% CI: -1.53 to 1.75) and transferrin saturation index (SMD = -0.06, 95% CI: -0.67 to 0.56) between HD and PD group. However, the content of serum albumin in HD group was much more than that in PD group (SMD = 1.58, 95% CI: 0.35 to 2.81). Neither of the included studies could reverse the pooled side effect and Egger's test demonstrated no publication bias. Both of the two dialysis strategies have a similar effect on RA in renal disease patients.

  5. Different Populations of Human Locus Ceruleus Neurons Contain Heavy Metals or Hyperphosphorylated Tau: Implications for Amyloid-β and Tau Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A marked loss of locus ceruleus (LC) neurons is a striking pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). LC neurons are particularly prone to taking up circulating toxicants such as heavy metals, and hyperphosphorylated tau (tau(HYP)) appears early in these neurons. In an attempt to find out if both heavy metals and tau(HYP) could be damaging LC neurons, we looked in the LC neurons of 21 sporadic AD patients and 43 non-demented controls for the heavy metals mercury, bismuth, and silver using autometallography, and for tau(HYP) using AT8 immunostaining. Heavy metals or tau(HYP) were usually seen in separate LC neurons, and rarely co-existed within the same neuron. The number of heavy metal-containing LC neurons did not correlate with the number containing tau(HYP). Heavy metals therefore appear to occupy a mostly different population of LC neurons to those containing tau(HYP), indicating that the LC in AD is vulnerable to two different assaults. Reduced brain noradrenaline from LC damage is linked to amyloid-β deposition, and tau(HYP) in the LC may seed neurofibrillary tangles in other neurons. A model is described, incorporating the present findings, that proposes that the LC plays a part in both the amyloid-β and tau pathologies of AD.

  6. Hirschsprung disease, microcephaly, mental retardation, and characteristic facial features: delineation of a new syndrome and identification of a locus at chromosome 2q22-q23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowat, D R; Croaker, G D; Cass, D T; Kerr, B A; Chaitow, J; Adès, L C; Chia, N L; Wilson, M J

    1998-01-01

    We have identified six children with a distinctive facial phenotype in association with mental retardation (MR), microcephaly, and short stature, four of whom presented with Hirschsprung (HSCR) disease in the neonatal period. HSCR was diagnosed in a further child at the age of 3 years after investigation for severe chronic constipation and another child, identified as sharing the same facial phenotype, had chronic constipation, but did not have HSCR. One of our patients has an interstitial deletion of chromosome 2, del(2)(q21q23). These children strongly resemble the patient reported by Lurie et al with HSCR and dysmorphic features associated with del(2)(q22q23). All patients have been isolated cases, suggesting a contiguous gene syndrome or a dominant single gene disorder involving a locus for HSCR located at 2q22-q23. Review of published reports suggests that there is significant phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity within the group of patients with HSCR, MR, and microcephaly. In particular, our patients appear to have a separate disorder from Goldberg-Shprintzen syndrome, for which autosomal recessive inheritance has been proposed because of sib recurrence and consanguinity in some families. Images PMID:9719364

  7. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  8. The hepcidin-ferroportin system as a therapeutic target in anemias and iron overload disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2011-01-01

    The review summarizes the current understanding of the role of hepcidin and ferroportin in normal iron homeostasis and its disorders. The various approaches to therapeutic targeting of hepcidin and ferroportin in iron-overload disorders (mainly hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia) and iron-restrictive anemias (anemias associated with infections, inflammatory disorders, and certain malignancies, anemia of chronic kidney diseases, and iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia) are also discussed.

  9. UV-repair is impaired in fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaiger, H.; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M.; Schweiger, M.; Innsbruck Univ.

    1982-01-01

    Fanconi's anemia, a hereditary autosomal disease with chromosomal instability, elevated incidence of cancer and clinical symptoms is accompanied by a DNA repair deficiency. Fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia were found to be impaired in the DNA repair of UV damage. Nucleoid decondensation and recondensation after UV irradiation were less efficient in fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia than in those from a healthy proband. These data confirm our earlier findings that DNA ligase is deficient in Fanconi's anemia. (orig.)

  10. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  11. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankine-Mullings, Angela E; Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-09-12

    Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxyurea significantly reduced the conversion from conditional TCD velocities to abnormal velocities; whether hydroxyurea can be used for children with newly diagnosed severe cerebrovascular disease in place of starting transfusion therapy remains unknown. The primary objective of the EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND) trial is to investigate the effect of open label hydroxyurea on the maximum time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) after 18 months of treatment compared to the pre-treatment value. Secondary objectives include the effects of hydroxyurea on serial TCD velocities, the incidence of neurological and non-neurological events, quality of life (QOL), body composition and metabolism, toxicity and treatment response, changes to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), genetic and serologic markers of disease severity, and cognitive and pulmonary function. This prospective Phase II trial will enroll children with SCA in Jamaica, between the ages of 2 and 17 years, with either conditional (170-199 cm/sec) or abnormal (≥ 200 cm/sec) TCD velocities. Oral hydroxyurea will be administered daily and escalated to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Participants will be seen in the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU) in Kingston, Jamaica monthly until achieving MTD, and then every 3 months. TCD will be performed every 6 months. Currently, 43 participants have been enrolled out of a projected 50. There was one withdrawal due to immigration, with

  12. Association Study Between Coronary Artery Disease and rs1333049 Polymorphism at 9p21.3 Locus in Italian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignataro, Piero; Pezone, Lucia; Di Gioia, Giuseppe; Franco, Danilo; Iaccarino, Guido; Iolascon, Achille; Ciccarelli, Michele; Capasso, Mario

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we verify the association between the rs1333049 single nucleotide polymorphism (9p21.3) within CDKN2A-CDKN2B and coronary artery disease (CAD) in an Italian population. We replicated rs1333049_G allele association with a significantly reduced risk of CAD (OR = 0.816; 95% confidence interval [0.705-0.945]; p = 0.0065) in 711 CAD patients and 755 normal healthy individuals. This effect is maintained even stratifying patients by gender and by risk factors. A significant association was found with age of CAD onset. Interestingly, we found a protective trend of association between the rs1333049_G allele and peripheral artery disease, a progressive atherosclerotic condition in which plaque builds up in the arteries that carry blood to the head, organs, and limbs (OR = 0.724; 95% CI [0.520-1.007]; p = 0.054). No genotype-phenotype association was found with more severe CAD clinical parameters. If certain genetic factors predispose individuals to adverse outcomes, the knowledge of a patient's genotype may influence clinical management.

  13. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: Prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke-Jian Lei; Hungwen Chen; Ji-Lan Liu [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient`s biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type la disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease. 22 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-08-13

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease.

  15. The Role of Health Locus of Control in Predicting Depression Symptoms in a Sample of Iranian Older Adults with Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflakseir, Abdul-Aziz; Mohammad-Abadi, Mohammad-Saleh

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prediction of depression on a group of Iranian older adults based on components of health locus of control. Sixty-six men and 42 women over the age of 55 were recruited from the retirement clubs in Shiraz, using convenience sampling. The participants completed the research questionnaires including the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC). The findings on health locus of control revealed that the highest score was on internal locus of control followed by God, powerful others and chance. The mean score on depression was on a normal range. Multiple regression analysis showed that two independent variables including internal control (ß = -.32, p control (ß = -.20, = p locus of control such as chance and powerful others as well as age did not predict depression. Findings also revealed that the independents variables explained 26% of the total variance of depression (R2 = .26, p locus of control on depression.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also can cause internal bleeding. Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... iron as they grow and begin to eat solid foods. Talk with your child's doctor about a ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells ... cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood ... remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of blood loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron- ... Pediatrics recommends testing all infants for anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... explain tests and procedures that your doctor may use to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science ... deficiency anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to get the ... iron-deficiency anemia, red blood cells will be small in size with an MCV of less than ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special measures can help prevent the condition in these groups. ... is a complete blood count (CBC). The CBC measures many parts of your blood. This test checks ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... test called a complete blood count (CBC) to see if you have lower than normal red blood ... iron-deficiency anemia: Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also are at increased risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk ... infants for anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting less than the recommended daily ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend to prevent your iron- ... colon under sedation to view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less ... deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... people who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This urge to move often occurs with strange ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ... flow. In some cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... size of your liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding ... bleeding in the stomach, upper intestines, colon, or pelvic organs. Treatment Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. Fresh and frozen ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may ... of other nutrients in your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Many tests and procedures are used ... cells usually are smaller than normal. Other Blood Tests If the CBC results confirm you have anemia, ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen ... mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help your doctor screen for iron-deficiency ...