WorldWideScience

Sample records for androgen receptor protein

  1. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G → T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein ∼5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo

  2. Protein-protein Interactions of the Androgen Receptor in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Royen, Martin

    2008-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Natural androgens, testosterone (T) and its derivative dihydrotestosterone (DHT) play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of the male phenotype. Androgens are steroids that exert their function via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand dependent transcription factor. The human AR gene, is located on the X chromosome, and contains 8 exons, coding for a 110 kDa, 919 amino acids protein (Brinkmann et al., 1989; Hughes and Deeb, 2006). In the classical mo...

  3. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: gonadal androgen receptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether abnormalities of the androgen receptor previously observed in skin fibroblasts from patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome also occur in the gonads of affected individuals, androgen receptor activity in the gonads of a patient with testicular feminization syndrome was investigated. Using conditions for optimal recovery of androgen receptor from human testes established by previous studies, we detected the presence of a high-affinity (dissociation constant . 3.2 X 10(-10) mol/L), low-capacity (4.2 X 10(-12) mol/mg DNA), androgen-binding protein when tritium-labeled R1881 was incubated at 4 degrees C with nuclear extracts from the gonads of control patients or from a patient with testicular feminization syndrome but not when incubated at 37 degrees C. Thus this patient has an androgen receptor with a temperature lability similar to that of receptors from normal persons

  4. Androgen receptor mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkmann, Albert; Jenster, Guido; Ris-Stalpers, Carolyn; Korput, J. A G M; Brüggenwirth, Hennie; Boehmer, A.L.; Trapman, Jan

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMale sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. At least three pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function: androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and prostate cancer. In the X-linked androgen insensitivity syn...

  5. Characterization of alternative therapeutic sites on the androgen receptor and novel protein-protein associations

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Carbó, Laia

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the correct development, differentiation, and function of male reproductive organs. Alterations in the AR protein or in the AR signaling pathway result in pathologies such as prostate cancer (PCa), which is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in men in most western industrialized countries. AR represents the major clinical target in the treatment of PCa and, to date, all the FDA-...

  6. Aberrant splicing of androgen receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G G; Faber, P.W.; SCHWEIKERT, H. U.; van Rooij, H C; Zegers, N.D.; Hodgins, M B; Degenhart, H J; Trapman, J; Brinkmann, A.O.

    1990-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symptoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. We report a G----T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46,XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely a...

  7. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) influences androgen receptor (AR) function in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein kinase D1 (PKD1), founding member of PKD protein family, is down-regulated in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). We demonstrate that PKD1 and androgen receptor (AR) are present as a protein complex in PCa cells. PKD1 is associated with a transcriptional complex which contains AR and promoter sequence of the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) gene. Ectopic expression of wild type PKD1 and the kinase dead mutant PKD1 (K628W) attenuated the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR in prostate cancer cells and yeast cells indicating that PKD1 can affect AR transcription activity, whereas knocking down PKD1 enhanced the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR. Co-expression of kinase dead mutant with AR significantly inhibited androgen-mediated cell proliferation in both LNCaP and DU145 PC cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that PKD1 can influence AR function in PCa cells

  8. Methoxychalcone Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Translocation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yeong Sang; Kumar, Vineet; Lee, Sunmin; Iwai, Aki; Neckers, Len; Malhotra, Sanjay V.; Trepel, Jane B

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor activity drives incurable castrate-resistant prostate cancer. All approved antiandrogens inhibit androgen receptor-driven transcription, and in addition the second-generation antiandrogen MDV3100 inhibits ligand-activated androgen receptor nuclear translocation, via an unknown mechanism. Here, we report methoxychalcones that lock the heat shock protein 90-androgen receptor complex in the cytoplasm in an androgen-non-responsive state, thus demonstrating a novel chemical scaff...

  9. Androgen regulation of the androgen receptor coregulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The critical role of the androgen receptor (AR) in the development of prostate cancer is well recognized. The transcriptional activity of AR is partly regulated by coregulatory proteins. It has been suggested that these coregulators could also be important in the progression of prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to identify coregulators whose expression is regulated by either the androgens and/or by the expression level of AR. We used empty vector and AR cDNA-transfected LNCaP cells (LNCaP-pcDNA3.1, and LNCaP-ARhi, respectively), and grew them for 4 and 24 hours in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) at various concentrations. The expression of 25 AR coregulators (SRC1, TIF2, PIAS1, PIASx, ARIP4, BRCA1, β-catenin, AIB3, AIB1, CBP, STAT1, NCoR1, AES, cyclin D1, p300, ARA24, LSD1, BAG1L, gelsolin, prohibitin, JMJD2C, JMJD1A, MAK, PAK6 and MAGE11) was then measured by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR). Five of the coregulators (AIB1, CBP, MAK, BRCA1 and β-catenin) showed more than 2-fold induction and 5 others (cyclin D1, gelsolin, prohibitin, JMJD1A, and JMJD2C) less than 2-fold induction. Overexpression of AR did not affect the expression of the coregulators alone. However, overexpression of AR enhanced the DHT-stimulated expression of MAK, BRCA1, AIB1 and CBP and reduced the level of expression of β-catenin, cyclinD1 and gelsolin. In conclusion, we identified 5 coactivators whose expression was induced by androgens suggesting that they could potentiate AR signaling. Overexpression of AR seems to sensitize cells for low levels of androgens

  10. Androgen regulation of the androgen receptor coregulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenius Merja A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The critical role of the androgen receptor (AR in the development of prostate cancer is well recognized. The transcriptional activity of AR is partly regulated by coregulatory proteins. It has been suggested that these coregulators could also be important in the progression of prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to identify coregulators whose expression is regulated by either the androgens and/or by the expression level of AR. Methods We used empty vector and AR cDNA-transfected LNCaP cells (LNCaP-pcDNA3.1, and LNCaP-ARhi, respectively, and grew them for 4 and 24 hours in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT at various concentrations. The expression of 25 AR coregulators (SRC1, TIF2, PIAS1, PIASx, ARIP4, BRCA1, β-catenin, AIB3, AIB1, CBP, STAT1, NCoR1, AES, cyclin D1, p300, ARA24, LSD1, BAG1L, gelsolin, prohibitin, JMJD2C, JMJD1A, MAK, PAK6 and MAGE11 was then measured by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR. Results Five of the coregulators (AIB1, CBP, MAK, BRCA1 and β-catenin showed more than 2-fold induction and 5 others (cyclin D1, gelsolin, prohibitin, JMJD1A, and JMJD2C less than 2-fold induction. Overexpression of AR did not affect the expression of the coregulators alone. However, overexpression of AR enhanced the DHT-stimulated expression of MAK, BRCA1, AIB1 and CBP and reduced the level of expression of β-catenin, cyclinD1 and gelsolin. Conclusion In conclusion, we identified 5 coactivators whose expression was induced by androgens suggesting that they could potentiate AR signaling. Overexpression of AR seems to sensitize cells for low levels of androgens.

  11. Enhancement of gene transactivation activity of androgen receptor by hepatitis B virus X protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is a regulatory protein that is required for efficient replication of HBV in its natural host. In this report, we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that HBx can physically bind to the androgen receptor (AR), which is a nuclear hormone receptor that is expressed in many different tissues including the liver. This observation is further supported by confocal microscopy, which reveals that HBx can alter the subcellular localization of the AR both in the presence and in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Further studies indicate that HBx can enhance the gene transactivation activity of AR by enhancing its DNA binding activity in a DHT-dependent manner. However, HBx does not remain associated with AR on the DNA. As AR can regulate the expression of a number of cellular genes, our results raise the possibility that HBV pathogenesis may be mediated in part via the interaction between HBx and AR

  12. Amino acid containing thapsigargin analogues deplete androgen receptor protein via synthesis inhibition and induce the death of prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griend, Donald J Vander; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan L;

    2009-01-01

    There are quantitative and/or qualitative mechanisms allowing androgen receptor (AR) growth signaling in androgen ablation refractory prostate cancer cells. Regardless of the mechanism, agents that deplete AR protein expression prevent such AR growth signaling. Thapsigargin (TG) is a highly cell......-penetrant sequiterpene-lactone that once inside cells inhibits (IC(50), approximately 10 nmol/L) critically important housekeeping SERCA 2b calcium pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using a series of five genetically diverse androgen ablation refractory human prostate cancer lines (LNCaP, LAPC-4, VCaP, MDA-PCa-2b, and......-specific proteases, such as prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific membrane antigen, or cancer-specific proteases, such as fibroblast activation protein, so that toxicity of these prodrugs is selectively targeted to metastatic sites of prostate cancer. Based on these results, these prodrugs are undergoing...

  13. Androgen receptor silences thioredoxin-interacting protein and competitively inhibits glucocorticoid receptor-mediated apoptosis in pancreatic β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Naoki; Katsuki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Yuji; Masuda, Tatsuya; Yoshinaga, Mariko; Adachi, Tetsuya; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is known to bind to the same cis-element that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to. However, the effects of androgen signaling on glucocorticoid signaling have not yet been elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of testosterone on dexamethasone (DEX, a synthetic glucocorticoid)-induced apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in males. We used INS-1 #6 cells, which were isolated from the INS-1 pancreatic β-cell line and which express high levels of AR. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone inhibited apoptosis induced by DEX in INS-1 #6 cells. AR knockdown and the AR antagonist hydroxyflutamide each diminished the anti-apoptotic effects of testosterone. AR was localized in the nucleus of both INS-1 #6 cells and pancreatic β-cells of male rats. Induction of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is known to cause pro-apoptotic effects in β-cells. Testosterone suppressed the DEX-induced increase of TXNIP at the transcriptional level. A Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that both AR and GR competitively bound to the TXNIP promoter in ligand-dependent manners. Recombinant DNA-binding domain of AR bound to the same cis-element of the TXNIP promoter that GR binds to. Our results show that AR and GR competitively bind to the same cis-element of TXNIP promoter as a silencer and enhancer, respectively. These results indicate that androgen signaling functionally competes with glucocorticoid signaling in pancreatic β-cell apoptosis. PMID:25639671

  14. Evidence for an androgen receptor in porcine Leydig cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytosol and nuclear androgen receptor concentrations were measured in freshly prepared and cultured Leydig cells of immature pig testis with exchange assays using (3H)methyltrienolone as labelled ligand. Androgen receptors in Leydig cells had high affinity for (3H)methyltrienolone and sterios binding specificity typical of an androgen receptor. The mean receptor concentrations were 76 fmol/mg protein and 210 fmol/mg DNA for cytosol and nuclei, respectively. In sucrose gradients, cytosol androgen receptors sedimented in the 4 S region. The cells maintained androgen receptors under culture conditions. Exposure of cultured cells to (3H)methyltrienolone (10 nmol/l) resulted in accumulation of androgen receptors in the nuclei with maximal uptake by 1 h. We conclude that methyltrienolone binding sites with characteristics of androgen receptors were idenfified in both cytosol and nuclei of porcine Leydig cells. (author)

  15. Overexpression of Androgen Receptors in Target Musculature Confers Androgen Sensitivity to Motoneuron Dendrites

    OpenAIRE

    Huguenard, Anna L.; Fernando, Shannon M.; Monks, D. Ashley; Sengelaub, Dale R.

    2010-01-01

    Androgen sensitivity of motoneuron dendrites is conferred indirectly via the enrichment of androgen receptors in the musculature in transgenic rats overexpressing androgen receptors in skeletal muscle.

  16. Neural protein gamma-synuclein interacting with androgen receptor promotes human prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-synuclein (SNCG) has previously been demonstrated to be significantly correlated with metastatic malignancies; however, in-depth investigation of SNCG in prostate cancer is still lacking. In the present study, we evaluated the role of SNCG in prostate cancer progression and explored the underlying mechanisms. First, alteration of SNCG expression in LNCaP cell line to test the ability of SNCG on cellular properties in vitro and vivo whenever exposing with androgen or not. Subsequently, the Dual-luciferase reporter assays were performed to evaluate whether the role of SNCG in LNCaP is through AR signaling. Last, the association between SNCG and prostate cancer progression was assessed immunohistochemically using a series of human prostate tissues. Silencing SNCG by siRNA in LNCaP cells contributes to the inhibition of cellular proliferation, the induction of cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase, the suppression of cellular migration and invasion in vitro, as well as the decrease of tumor growth in vivo with the notable exception of castrated mice. Subsequently, mechanistic studies indicated that SNCG is a novel androgen receptor (AR) coactivator. It interacts with AR and promotes prostate cancer cellular growth and proliferation by activating AR transcription in an androgen-dependent manner. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that SNCG was almost undetectable in benign or androgen-independent tissues prostate lesions. The high expression of SNCG is correlated with peripheral and lymph node invasion. Our data suggest that SNCG may serve as a biomarker for predicting human prostate cancer progression and metastasis. It also may become as a novel target for biomedical therapy in advanced prostate cancer

  17. Androgen receptor polymorphism (CAG repeats) and androgenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, D; Caglieresi, C; Moschini, C; Liberati, C D; Macchia, E; Pinchera, A; Martino, E

    2005-09-01

    Objective Polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) has been related to various pathophysiological conditions, such as osteoporosis and infertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of distribution in a normal Italian population and to assess CAG repeats (CAGr) in other conditions, such as hypoandrogenism, potentially influenced by AR polymorphism. Patients and measurements CAGr polymorphism was determined in a group of 91 healthy normoandrogenized subjects, 29 hypoandrogenized patients (hypoplasia of prostate and seminal vesicles, reduced beard or body hair, etc.) and 29 infertile patients by direct sequencing. Results The mean (+/- SD) number of CAG repeats [(CAGr)n] was 21.5 (+/- 1.7) in the control group, 21.4 (+/- 2.0) in the infertile patients and 24.0 (+/- 2.9) in the hypoandrogenic males. The difference was statistically significant between this last group and the other two (P CAGr repeats was 38% among hypoandrogenized patients, 7% among infertile patients and 5% among the control group. In hypoandrogenized subjects (CAGr)n correlated slightly with testis and prostate volume. The number of CAG repeats was not associated with any of the hormonal parameters, including testosterone, evaluated in the three groups. Conclusions Our normal population, representing subjects from Central Italy, is superimposable on other European populations with regard to (CAGr)n distribution. Hypoandrogenic males have a shift in the frequency distribution towards longer (CAGr)n. Infertile patients are not statistically different from the control group. These findings suggest that, given the same amount of circulating testosterone, as in our hypoandrogenized and control group, the final net androgenic phenotypical effect is due to AR polymorphism. PMID:16117826

  18. Immunoreactivities of androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, p450arom, p450c17 proteins in wild ground squirrels ovaries during the nonbreeding and breeding seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaonan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulatory role of androgen in the follicular development of wild female ground squirrels. Immunohistochemical staining of FSHR, LHR, P450c17, P450arom, androgen receptor (AR, estrogen receptors (ERa and ERb were executed in ovaries of female ground squirrels from both breeding and nonbreeding seasons. In addition, total ovarian proteins were extracted from the ovaries of squirrels from breeding and nonbreeding seasons, and Western blot analysis were performed in order to probe for FSHR, LHR, P450c17, P450arom, AR, ERa and ERb. The results of immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting of P450c17 showed that there was no significant difference between the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. It was found that granulosa cells expressed P450arom during the breeding season. In contrast, there was no positive staining of P450arom in the nonbreeding season. There was no significant difference in immunoreactivity of AR between the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. However, the immunoreactivities of ERa and ERb were both significantly reduced in the nonbreeding season compared to the breeding season. The positive stains of FSHR and LHR were found in the granulosa cells and theca cells of the ovaries of the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. In addition, the Western blotting results of FSHR and LHR showed a significant reduction in the nonbreeding season compared with the breeding season. These findings suggested that androgen might be predominantly converted into estrogen in order to regulate the follicular development via binding of estrogen receptors during the breeding season, whereas androgen might predominantly directly bind androgen receptor to regulate the follicular development during the nonbreeding season in the ovaries of wild female ground squirrels.

  19. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty acids, and other small hydrophobic molecules). Their combined effects are vast, influencing virtually every fundamental biological process, from development and homeostasis, to proliferation and different...

  20. Androgen receptor gene mutations in 46, XY females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Davood Omrani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The androgen insensitivity syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder with a wide spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities, ranging from complete female to ambiguous forms that more closely resemble males. The primary abnormality is a defective androgen receptor protein due to a mutation of the androgen receptor gene. This prevents normal androgen action and thus leads to impaired virilization. A point mutation of the androgen receptor gene affecting two siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome is described. On examination they both had normal external female genitalia. Genomic DNA was extracted from EDTA-preserved blood samples and isolated according to standard procedures. The androgen receptor gene was screened for mutations using an automated sequence analyzer (ABI Prism 310. Both girls possess one substitutions (G>A at position 2086 in exon 4, leading to D695N mutation. Mother was found to be a heterozygous carrier for this mutation. GTG banded karyotype of the girls showed they both have male karyotype (46, XY. In addition, the SRY gene screening showed they both have intact SRY gene. The labioscrotal folds contained palpable gonads measuring 1.5 cm in largest diameter. Ultrasound examination of the pelvis revealed absence of the uterus. Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and testosterone values were higher than normal range. To our knowledge this is the first confirmed instance of AIS due to an AR mutation occurring in familial cases in this country. Furthermore, the phenotype has complete association with this mutation. KEY WORDS: Androgen insensitivity syndrome, androgen receptor

  1. Role of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiroyoshiSuzuki; HaruoIto

    1999-01-01

    The growth of prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen, and hormonal therapy has been used for treatment of ad-vanced cancer. About 80 % of prostate cancers initially respond to hormonal therapy, howcrver, more than half of the re-sponders gradtmlly become resistant to this therapy. Changes in tumors from an androgen-responsive to an androgen-unre-sponsive state have been widely discussed. Since androgen action is mediated by androgen receptor (AR), abnonnalitiesof AR is believed to play an important role of the loss of androgen responsiveness in prostate cancer. "Ilais article focusedon the role of AR in the progression of prostate cancer.

  2. Hyperactive androgen receptor in prostate cancer, what does it mean for new therapy concepts?

    OpenAIRE

    Culig, Z.; Hobisch, A.; Hittmair, A; Radmayr, C.; Peterziel, H.; Bartsch, G; Cato, A. C. B.; Klocker, H

    1997-01-01

    Investigations on androgen signaling alterations in the late stages of prostate cancer revealed new molecular mechanisms that may be in part responsible for failure of endocrine therapy. Both primary and metastatic lesions from prostate cancer express androgen receptor protein. Amplification of androgen receptor gene occurs in a subset of prostate cancer patients. Several point mutations of androgen receptor gene have been described; they generate receptors whi...

  3. Expression of a hyperactive androgen receptor leads to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Cai, Changmeng; Giwa, Ahmed; Bivins, Aaronica; Chen, Shao-Yong; Sabry, Dina; Govardhan, Kumara; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2008-07-01

    Cellular changes that affect the androgen receptor (AR) can cause prostate cancer to transition from androgen dependent to androgen independent, which is usually lethal. One common change in prostate tumors is overexpression of the AR, which has been shown to lead to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This led us to hypothesize that expression of a hyperactive AR would be sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, stable lune cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell lines were generated, which express a virion phosphoprotein (VP)16-AR hybrid protein that contains full-length AR fused to the strong viral transcriptional activation domain VP16. This fusion protein elicited as much as a 20-fold stronger transcriptional activity than the natural AR. Stable expression of VP16-AR in LNCaP cells yielded androgen-independent cell proliferation, while under the same growth conditions the parental LNCaP cells exhibited only androgen-dependent growth. These results show that expression of a hyperactive AR is sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To study the molecular basis of this enhanced growth, we measured the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase-alpha1 (sGCalpha1), a subunit of the sGC, an androgen-regulated gene that has been shown to be involved in prostate cancer cell growth. Interestingly, the expression of sGCalpha1 is androgen independent in VP16-AR-expressing cells, in contrast to its androgen-induced expression in control LNCaP cells. RNA(I)-dependent inhibition of sGCalpha1 expression resulted in significantly reduced proliferation of VP16-AR cells, implicating an important role for sGCalpha1 in the androgen-independent growth of these cells. PMID:18469090

  4. In vivo modulation of androgen receptor by androgens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V·L·Kumar; V·Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To study the effect of androgen and antiandrogen on the level of androgen receptor(AR)mRNA.Methods:The totalRNA was extracted from the prostate and analyzed by slot blot analysis,The blots were hybrid-ized with ARcDNA probe and 1Aprobe(internal control)and autoradionraphy was performed.The intensity of signal was measured with a densitometer and the ratio of AR RNAand1ARNAwas calculated.Results:Androgenic deprivation produced by castration decreased the weight of the prostate and increased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of the castrated rats with testostrone increased the weight of prostate and decreased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of normal rats with flutamide decreased the weight of the gland and increased the levels of AR mRNA.Conclusion:Androgens produce proliferative effect on the prostate and negatively regulate the AR transcription.

  5. The rat androgen receptor gene promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Baarends (Willy); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); L.J. Blok (Leen); P. Mackenbach (Petra); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); D.N. Meijer (Dies); P.W. Faber; J. Trapman (Jan); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The androgen receptor (AR) is activated upon binding of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone and exerts regulatory effects on gene expression in androgen target cells. To study transcriptional regulation of the rat AR gene itself, the 5' genomic region of this gene was clon

  6. Androgen receptor profiling predicts prostate cancer outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Stelloo, Suzan; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; van der Poel, Henk G.; de Jong, Jeroen; van Leenders, Geert JLH; Jenster, Guido; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bergman, Andries M; Zwart, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in men. Biomarkers for outcome prediction are urgently needed, so that high-risk patients could be monitored more closely postoperatively. To identify prognostic markers and to determine causal players in prostate cancer progression, we assessed changes in chromatin state during tumor development and progression. Based on this, we assessed genomewide androgen receptor/chromatin binding and identified a distinct androgen receptor/chromati...

  7. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  8. The liver X receptor agonist T0901317 acts as androgen receptor antagonist in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T0901317 is a potent non-steroidal synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. T0901317 blocked androgenic stimulation of the proliferation of androgen-dependent LNCaP 104-S cells and androgenic suppression of the proliferation of androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, inhibited the transcriptional activation of an androgen-dependent reporter gene by androgen, and suppressed gene and protein expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a target gene of androgen receptor (AR) without affecting gene and protein expression of AR. T0901317 also inhibited binding of a radiolabeled androgen to AR, but inhibition was much weaker compared to the effect of the antiandrogens, bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide. The LXR agonist T0901317, therefore, acts as an antiandrogen in human prostate cancer cells

  9. The role of androgens and polymorphisms in the androgen receptor in the epidemiology of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testosterone binds to the androgen receptor in target tissue to mediate its effects. Variations in testosterone levels and androgen receptor activity may play a role in the etiology of breast cancer. Here, we review the epidemiologic evidence linking endogenous testosterone to breast cancer risk. Paradoxically, results from observational studies that have examined polymorphisms in the androgen receptor suggest that the low-activity androgen receptor increases breast cancer risk. We review the quality of this evidence and conclude with a discussion of how the androgen receptor and testosterone results coincide

  10. The androgen receptor in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Sakari, Matomo; Okada, Maiko; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Takahashi, Sayuri; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Kato, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    Androgens play pivotal roles in the regulation of male development and physiological processes, particularly in the male reproductive system. Most biological effects of androgens are mediated by the action of nuclear androgen receptor (AR). AR acts as a master regulator of downstream androgen-dependent signaling pathway networks. This ligand-dependent transcriptional factor modulates gene expression through the recruitment of various coregulator complexes, the induction of chromatin reorganization, and epigenetic histone modifications at target genomic loci. Dysregulation of androgen/AR signaling perturbs normal reproductive development and accounts for a wide range of pathological conditions such as androgen-insensitive syndrome, prostate cancer, and spinal bulbar muscular atrophy. In this review we summarize recent advances in understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms of AR action as well as newly recognized aspects of AR-mediated androgen signaling in both men and women. In addition, we offer a perspective on the use of animal genetic model systems aimed at eventually developing novel therapeutic AR ligands. PMID:23157556

  11. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC50 for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by ∼ 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  12. Computational Investigation on the Allosteric Modulation of Androgen Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Min-Rui; LI Jun-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Androgens have similar structures with different biological activities. To identify molecular determinants responsible for the activity difference, we have docked six steroidal androgens to the binding site or the surface of androgen receptor by using molecular docking with computational investigation. The energy was calculated respectively based on the QM (quantum mechanics) and MM (molecular mechanics) methods. The result shows that the allosteric modulation of androgen receptor plays an important role in the binding process between androgens and receptor. The open state receptor is less stable than the close state one, but the latter is more favorable for binding with androgens. It is worthy of note that when the androgen receptors binding or without binding with androgen are in close state, they are difficult to return to their open state. This phenomenon is an exception of the well known two-state model theory in which the two states are reversible. Whether the internal of close state androgen receptor has a combination of androgen or not, the androgen receptor surface can be combined with another androgen, and their surface binding energies could be very close. The result is consistent with the experimental observations, but this phenomenon of continuous combination from open state is also an exception of the two-state model theory.

  13. Proteome-wide muscle protein fractional synthesis rates predict muscle mass gain in response to a selective androgen receptor modulator in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; Shearer, Todd W; Stimpson, Stephen A; Turner, Scott M; King, Chelsea; Wong, Po-Yin Anne; Shen, Ying; Turnbull, Philip S; Kramer, Fritz; Clifton, Lisa; Russell, Alan; Hellerstein, Marc K; Evans, William J

    2016-03-15

    Biomarkers of muscle protein synthesis rate could provide early data demonstrating anabolic efficacy for treating muscle-wasting conditions. Androgenic therapies have been shown to increase muscle mass primarily by increasing the rate of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that the synthesis rate of large numbers of individual muscle proteins could serve as early response biomarkers and potentially treatment-specific signaling for predicting the effect of anabolic treatments on muscle mass. Utilizing selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) treatment in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat, we applied an unbiased, dynamic proteomics approach to measure the fractional synthesis rates (FSR) of 167-201 individual skeletal muscle proteins in triceps, EDL, and soleus. OVX rats treated with a SARM molecule (GSK212A at 0.1, 0.3, or 1 mg/kg) for 10 or 28 days showed significant, dose-related increases in body weight, lean body mass, and individual triceps but not EDL or soleus weights. Thirty-four out of the 94 proteins measured from the triceps of all rats exhibited a significant, dose-related increase in FSR after 10 days of SARM treatment. For several cytoplasmic proteins, including carbonic anhydrase 3, creatine kinase M-type (CK-M), pyruvate kinase, and aldolase-A, a change in 10-day FSR was strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.90-0.99) to the 28-day change in lean body mass and triceps weight gains, suggesting a noninvasive measurement of SARM effects. In summary, FSR of multiple muscle proteins measured by dynamics of moderate- to high-abundance proteins provides early biomarkers of the anabolic response of skeletal muscle to SARM. PMID:26714847

  14. Influences of androgen on the growth of human prostate cancer PC-3M model in nude mice and the changes of the androgen receptor levels and protein kinase C activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nude mice bearing transplanted human prostate cancer cell line PC-3M were treated with male sex hormone. Results demonstrated that low dose of testosterone propionate (TP) (50 mg/kg wt.) stimulated the tumor growth, and the androgen receptor (AR) levels and protein kinase C (PKC) activity were elevated in the tumor tissue. On the contrary higher dose of TP (400 mg/kg wt.) inhibited the tumor growth, and the AR level and PKC activity in tumor tissue were reduced significantly. These results showed that TP has a biphasic effect on the growth of human prostate cancer PC-3M cell line. The mechanism of the biphasic effect and its relationship between AR and PKC levels are also discussed

  15. A promoting role of androgen receptor in androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tzu-Huey; Zhao, Hongjuan; Peng, Yue; Beliakoff, Jason; James D Brooks; Sun, Zijie

    2007-01-01

    Although the vital role of the androgen receptor (AR) has been well demonstrated in primary prostate cancers, its role in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancers still remains unclear. Here, we used a small hairpin RNA approach to directly assess AR activity in prostate cancer cells. Reduction of AR expression in the two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and LAPC4, significantly decreased AR-mediated transcription and cell growth. Intriguingly, in two androgen-insensitive...

  16. Human androgen deficiency: insights gained from androgen receptor knockout mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Kesha Rana; Davey, Rachel A; Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of androgen action is complex. Recently, significant advances have been made into our understanding of how androgens act via the androgen receptor (AR) through the use of genetically modified mouse models. A number of global and tissue-specific AR knockout (ARKO) models have been generated using the Cre-loxP system which allows tissue- and/or cell-specific deletion. These ARKO models have examined a number of sites of androgen action including the cardiovascular system, the immu...

  17. A mutation in the DNA-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene causes complete testicular feminization in a patient with receptor-positive androgen resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Marcelli; Zoppi, S; Grino, P B; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J. D.; McPhaul, M J

    1991-01-01

    Androgen resistance is associated with a wide range of quantitative and qualitative defects in the androgen receptor. However, fibroblast cultures from approximately 10% of patients with the clinical, endocrine, and genetic features characteristic of androgen resistance express normal quantities of apparently normal androgen receptor in cultured genital skin fibroblasts (receptor-positive androgen resistance). We have analyzed the androgen receptor gene of one patient (P321) with receptor-pos...

  18. Spongian diterpenoids inhibit androgen receptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yu Chi; Labros G Meimetis; Tien, Amy H; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Carr, Gavin; Wang, Jun; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer. Antiandrogens compete with physiological ligands for AR ligand-binding domain (LBD). High-throughput screening of a marine natural product library for small molecules that inhibit AR transcriptional activity yielded the furanoditerpenoid spongia-13(16),-14-dien-19-oic acid, designated terpene 1 (T1). Characterization of T1 and the structurally related semi-synthetic...

  19. Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, N. E.; Max, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of orchiectomy (GDX) and steroid administration on the level of the cytosolic androgen receptor in the rat levator ani muscle and in rat skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus) was studied. Androgen receptor binding to muscle cytosol was measured using H-3 methyltrienolone (R1881) as ligand, 100 fold molar excess unlabeled R1881 to assess nonspecific binding, and 500 fold molar excess of triamcinolone acetonide to prevent binding to glucocorticoid and progestin receptors. Results demonstrate that modification of the levels of sex steroids can alter the content of androgen receptors of rat striated muscle. Data suggest that: (1) cytosolic androgen receptor levels increase after orchiectomy in both levator ani muscle and skeletal muscle; (2) the acute increase in receptor levels is blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis; and (3) administration of estradiol-17 beta to castrated animals increases receptor binding in levator ani muscle but not in skeletal muscle.

  20. Evaluation of androgen receptor and GATA binding protein 3 as immunohistochemical markers in the diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yukinori; Yoshida, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masahide; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma in the lungs from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas is important for determining prognosis and treatment. We evaluated novel breast specific markers, androgen receptor (AR) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) immunohistostaining, for this differential, and compare to other traditional markers. The specimens comprised 33 metastatic breast carcinomas to the lung, 566 primary lung tumors (170 adenocarcinomas, 157 squamous cell carcinomas, 31 pleomorphic carcinomas, 115 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 43 small cell carcinomas, and 49 typical carcinoids) and 42 malignant mesotheliomas. They were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies to AR, GATA3, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), mammaglobin, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15). Of the metastatic breast carcinomas, immunohistostaining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 27 cases (81.8%), 24 cases (72.7%), 26 cases (78.8%), 13 cases (39.4%), 12 cases (36.4%), 9 cases (27.3%), respectively. Of primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas, staining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 18 cases (3%), 3 cases (0.5%), 4 cases (0.7%), 2 cases (0.3%), 0 case (0%), 2 cases (0.3%), respectively. Immunohistochemistry of AR and GATA3 are reliable for differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas. PMID:25727644

  1. The PPARγ ligand ciglitazone regulates androgen receptor activation differently in androgen-dependent versus androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) regulates growth and progression of androgen-dependent as well as androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists have been reported to reduce AR activation in androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To determine whether PPARγ ligands are equally effective at inhibiting AR activity in androgen-independent prostate cancer, we examined the effect of the PPARγ ligands ciglitazone and rosiglitazone on C4-2 cells, an androgen- independent derivative of the LNCaP cell line. Luciferase-based reporter assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that PPARγ ligand reduced dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced increases in AR activity in LNCaP cells. However, in C4-2 cells, these compounds increased DHT-induced AR driven luciferase activity. In addition, ciglitazone did not significantly alter DHT-mediated increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein or mRNA levels within C4-2 cells. siRNA-based experiments demonstrated that the ciglitazone-induced regulation of AR activity observed in C4-2 cells was dependent on the presence of PPARγ. Furthermore, overexpression of the AR corepressor cyclin D1 inhibited the ability of ciglitazone to induce AR luciferase activity in C4-2 cells. Thus, our data suggest that both PPARγ and cyclin D1 levels influence the ability of ciglitazone to differentially regulate AR signaling in androgen-independent C4-2 prostate cancer cells.

  2. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Ito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor genes (AR have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species.

  3. Androgen Receptor Is Expressed in Genital Warts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Haiyang; Zhang Li; Fan Min; Yang Dexiu

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of androgen receptor(AR) in genital warts. Methods:The expressions of AR weredetected in 40 samples of genital warts from 28 males and 12 females and 9 normal foreskins by immunohistochemical stain S-Pmethod. The status of AR expression in wart and normal foreskin were compared. Results:The AR expression was revealed in all 40samples of genital wart and 9 samples of normal foreskin.There weren's any differences in AR expression between the genital wartsand normal foreskins. Conclusions:It' s supposed that androgens may play an important role in regulating the metabolism of GW andthe HPV might be one of viruses which addicts to the tissues expressing AR properly.

  4. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Zhang; Jonathan C. Zhao; Jung Kim; Ka-wing Fong; Yeqing Angela Yang; Debabrata Chakravarti; Yin-Yuan Mo; Jindan Yu

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR) activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquiti...

  5. New method for labeling and autoradiographic localization of androgen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, C.A.; Barrack, E.R.

    1987-07-01

    We have used a novel receptor labeling and autoradiographic technique to localize androgen receptors in the intact rat ventral prostate at the morphological level. Frozen slide-mounted prostate tissue sections (10 micron thick) were incubated with increasing concentrations of (/sup 3/H)-R1881 in the absence and presence of excess unlabeled R1881. Tissue sections labeled in this way were subjected to concurrent biochemical and autoradiographic analysis. After incubation and washing to remove free (/sup 3/H)-steroid, some of the sections were wiped from the slides for scintillation counting in order to characterize and quantitate (/sup 3/H)-R1881 binding. Androgen receptors could indeed be labeled in slide-mounted tissue sections, and specific (/sup 3/H)-R1881 binding to these receptors was high-affinity (Kd = 1 nM), saturable, and androgen-specific. All cellular androgen receptors appear to be retained, because receptor content in sections was comparable to the sum of receptors in subcellular fractions of homogenized tissue. Replicate labeled slide-mounted tissue sections were dried rapidly, apposed to dry emulsion-coated coverslips, and exposed in the dark for autoradiography. Silver grains were counted over nuclei or cytoplasm of epithelium or stroma to evaluate specific androgen receptor location. Autoradiographic analysis demonstrated androgen receptor localization almost exclusively in the epithelial nuclei, with little or none in the stroma. We discuss here the unique features and advantages of labeling androgen receptors in slide-mounted frozen tissue sections for autoradiographic localization.

  6. New method for labeling and autoradiographic localization of androgen receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used a novel receptor labeling and autoradiographic technique to localize androgen receptors in the intact rat ventral prostate at the morphological level. Frozen slide-mounted prostate tissue sections (10 micron thick) were incubated with increasing concentrations of [3H]-R1881 in the absence and presence of excess unlabeled R1881. Tissue sections labeled in this way were subjected to concurrent biochemical and autoradiographic analysis. After incubation and washing to remove free [3H]-steroid, some of the sections were wiped from the slides for scintillation counting in order to characterize and quantitate [3H]-R1881 binding. Androgen receptors could indeed be labeled in slide-mounted tissue sections, and specific [3H]-R1881 binding to these receptors was high-affinity (Kd = 1 nM), saturable, and androgen-specific. All cellular androgen receptors appear to be retained, because receptor content in sections was comparable to the sum of receptors in subcellular fractions of homogenized tissue. Replicate labeled slide-mounted tissue sections were dried rapidly, apposed to dry emulsion-coated coverslips, and exposed in the dark for autoradiography. Silver grains were counted over nuclei or cytoplasm of epithelium or stroma to evaluate specific androgen receptor location. Autoradiographic analysis demonstrated androgen receptor localization almost exclusively in the epithelial nuclei, with little or none in the stroma. We discuss here the unique features and advantages of labeling androgen receptors in slide-mounted frozen tissue sections for autoradiographic localization

  7. Common molecular weight of the androgen receptor monomer in different target tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously reported molecular weights for the monomeric steroid binding subunit of the androgen receptor protein have ranged from 25,000 to 167,000. The molecular weight appeared to vary among different species and target organs, as well as between different investigators. This study has examined androgen receptors from a diverse group of organs and species to determine whether these tissues share a common monomeric form. Gel filtration revealed peaks of specific [3H]dihydrotestosterone binding activity corresponding to Stokes radii of 54, 33, and 20 A in cytosols from several tissues. Phosphocellulose chromatography diminished the appearance of the smaller androgen receptor forms and facilitated the appearance of the larger 54-A form. Mixing experiments suggested that phosphocellulose was stabilizing the 54-A form by binding putative proteases which cleave this larger form. Methods were developed to generate homogeneous preparations of a given androgen receptor size for comparative study. Sucrose density gradient analysis showed sedimentation coefficients of 4.5-5.0, 3.5-4.0, and 2.5-3.0 S, respectively. The corresponding calculated molecular weights were 109,000-121,000, 52,000-59,000, and 22,000-27,000. Scatchard analysis of each of these androgen receptor forms demonstrated very similar affinity for [3H]dihydrotestosterone. Extensively purified preparations of androgen receptor from R3327 tumor contained varying amounts of the three receptor forms even though molybdate and phosphocellulose were used to stabilize the androgen receptor protein during purification. It is concluded that androgen receptors from a variety of tissues share a common monomeric subunit and that stabilization is necessary during analytical and purification procedures to prevent cleavage of the monomer by endogenous proteases

  8. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  9. Sensitization of androgen refractory prostate cancer cells to anti-androgens through re-expression of epigenetically repressed androgen receptor - Synergistic action of quercetin and curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Lokesh; Mohanty, Sujit K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-08-15

    Epigenetic repression of Androgen Receptor (AR) gene by hypermethylation of its promoter causes resistance in prostate cancer (CaP) to androgen deprivation therapy with anti-androgens. Some dietary phytocompounds like quercetin (Q) and curcumin (C) with reported DNMT-inhibitory activity were tested for their ability to re-express the AR in AR-negative CaP cell lines PC3 and DU145. Combined treatment with Q+C was much more effective than either Q or C in inhibiting DNMT, causing global hypomethylation, restoring AR mRNA and protein levels and causing apoptosis via mitochondrial depolarization of PC3 and DU145. The functional AR protein expressed in Q+C treated cells sensitized them to dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced proliferation, bicalutamide-induced apoptosis, bound to androgen response element to increase luciferase activity in gene reporter assay and was susceptible to downregulation by AR siRNA. Bisulfite sequencing revealed high methylation of AR promoter CpG sites in AR-negative DU145 and PC3 cell lines that was significantly demethylated by Q+C treatment, which restored AR expression. Notable synergistic effects of Q+C combination in re-sensitizing androgen refractory CaP cells to AR-mediated apoptosis, their known safety in clinical use, and epidemiological evidences relating their dietary consumption with lower cancer incidences indicate their potential for use in chemoprevention of androgen resistance in prostate cancer. PMID:27132804

  10. Androgen receptor heterogeneity and phosphorylation in human LNCaP cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgen receptor heterogeneity and phosphorylation were studied in the human LNCaP cell line. Fluorography after photoaffinity labeling as well as immunoblotting with a specific polyclonal antibody revealed that the human androgen receptor migrated as a closely spaced 110 kD doublet on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. A time-dependent change in the ratio between the two isoforms was not observed after R1881 treatment of intact cells. In nuclear extracts of LNCaP cells that were incubated with [32P]orthophosphate in the presence of 10 nM R1881, a 110 kD phosphorylated protein was demonstrated after immunopurification using a monoclonal antibody against the human androgen receptor. Only a very small amount of this phosphoprotein was detected in the nuclear fraction from cells not treated with R1881. These results indicate that the human androgen receptor in LNCaP cells can be phosphorylated

  11. Evidence for an androgen receptor in human testis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, M.L.; Razel, A.J.; Spelsberg, T.C.; Coulam, C.B.

    1984-11-01

    The present study identified and characterized an androgen-binding protein in human testicular tissue. Human testes were homogenized in dilute Tris buffer containing thioglycerol, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, and molybdate. The supernatant (termed cytosol) was incubated with radiolabeled androgen methyltrienolone (tritium-labeled R1881), and nonspecific binding was determined by adding 100-fold excess of unlabeled R1881 together with (/sup 3/H)R1881 to cytosol. Specific binding with saturation at 24 hours was observed. Scatchard analysis of the specific binding with the use of increasing concentrations of (/sup 3/H)R1881 alone and (/sup 3/H)R1881 plus 200-fold excess unlabeled R1881 demonstrated a high-affinity (dissociation constant . 2.18 X 10(-10) mol/L), low-capacity (2924 molecules per cell) class of binding sites. A second class of lower-affinity sites was identified with a dissociation constant equaling 1.2 X 10(-8) and 26,300 molecules per cell. The bulk of the higher-affinity class of sites was precipitated at 35% ammonium sulfate. In competitive binding assays, dihydrotestosterone and testosterone greatly diminished binding to this high-affinity class of sites. Progesterone also diminished binding but to a lesser degree. Estradiol, estriol, and estrone failed to compete for these sites. Analysis of the receptor, using sucrose gradients, revealed a major peak in the 4S region and a small peak at 8S. A similar high-affinity (dissociation constant . 4.28 X 10(-9), low-capacity (4860 molecules per cell) binding protein was identified in purified nuclei. Binding to nuclear chromatin was demonstrated in the cell-free binding assay, and nuclear binding was further illustrated in the biopsy assay of intact tissue, suggesting translocation in vivo. These properties are characteristic of the androgen receptor and suggest that human testis is a target tissue for androgen, as has been found in animal tissue.

  12. Evidence for an androgen receptor in human testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study identified and characterized an androgen-binding protein in human testicular tissue. Human testes were homogenized in dilute Tris buffer containing thioglycerol, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, and molybdate. The supernatant (termed cytosol) was incubated with radiolabeled androgen methyltrienolone (tritium-labeled R1881), and nonspecific binding was determined by adding 100-fold excess of unlabeled R1881 together with [3H]R1881 to cytosol. Specific binding with saturation at 24 hours was observed. Scatchard analysis of the specific binding with the use of increasing concentrations of [3H]R1881 alone and [3H]R1881 plus 200-fold excess unlabeled R1881 demonstrated a high-affinity (dissociation constant . 2.18 X 10(-10) mol/L), low-capacity (2924 molecules per cell) class of binding sites. A second class of lower-affinity sites was identified with a dissociation constant equaling 1.2 X 10(-8) and 26,300 molecules per cell. The bulk of the higher-affinity class of sites was precipitated at 35% ammonium sulfate. In competitive binding assays, dihydrotestosterone and testosterone greatly diminished binding to this high-affinity class of sites. Progesterone also diminished binding but to a lesser degree. Estradiol, estriol, and estrone failed to compete for these sites. Analysis of the receptor, using sucrose gradients, revealed a major peak in the 4S region and a small peak at 8S. A similar high-affinity (dissociation constant . 4.28 X 10(-9), low-capacity (4860 molecules per cell) binding protein was identified in purified nuclei. Binding to nuclear chromatin was demonstrated in the cell-free binding assay, and nuclear binding was further illustrated in the biopsy assay of intact tissue, suggesting translocation in vivo. These properties are characteristic of the androgen receptor and suggest that human testis is a target tissue for androgen, as has been found in animal tissue

  13. Androgen receptor signaling and mutations in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2010-01-01

    Normal and neoplastic growth of the prostate gland are dependent on androgen receptor (AR) expression and function. Androgenic activation of the AR, in association with its coregulatory factors, is the classical pathway that leads to transcriptional activity of AR target genes. Alternatively, cytoplasmic signaling crosstalk of AR by growth factors, neurotrophic peptides, cytokines or nonandrogenic hormones may have important roles in prostate carcinogenesis and in metastatic or androgen-indep...

  14. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy Bailey; Tahmineh Yazdi; Umesh Masharani; Blake Tyrrell; Anthony Butch; Fred Schaufele

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-ba...

  15. Clinical, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of androgen insensitivity syndromes from south Indian cohort and detection and in-silico characterization of androgen receptor gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V G, Abilash; S, Radha; K M, Marimuthu; K, Thangaraj; S, Arun; S, Nishu; A, Mohana Priya; J, Meena; D, Anuradha

    2016-01-30

    Rare cases of 9 complete androgen insensitivity syndromes, 9 cases of partial androgen insensitivity syndromes and equal number of male control samples were selected for this study. Few strong variations in clinical features were noticed; Giemsa banded metaphase revealed a 46,XY karyotype and the frequency of chromosome aberrations were significantly higher when compared with control samples. DNA sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndromes revealed three missense mutations - c.C1713>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved histidine residue with glutamine p.(His571Glu) in DNA-binding domain, c.A1715>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved tyrosine residue with cysteine p.(Tyr572Cys) in DNA-binding domain and c.G2599>A resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved valine residue with methionine p.(Val867Met) in ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor gene respectively. The heterozygous type of mutations c.C1713>G and c.G2599>A observed in mothers of the patients for familial cases concluding that the mutation was inherited from the mother. The novel mutation c.C1713>G is reported first time in androgen insensitivity syndrome. In-silico analysis of mutations observed in androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndrome predicted that the substitution at Y572C and V867M could probably disrupt the protein structure and function. PMID:26688387

  16. Outsmarting androgen receptor: creative approaches for targeting aberrant androgen signaling in advanced prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karen E Knudsen; Kelly, William Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinomas are reliant on androgen receptor (AR) activity for survival and progression. Therefore, first-line therapeutic intervention for disseminated disease entails the use of AR-directed therapeutics, achieved through androgen deprivation and direct AR antagonists. While initially effective, recurrent, ‘castrate-resistant’ prostate cancers arise, for which there is no durable means of treatment. An abundance of clinical study and preclinical modeling has led to the revelati...

  17. Different types of androgen receptor mutations in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Jialiang; Hou, Jiangang; Li, Bingkun; Li, Dongyang; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of androgen receptor (AR) are the most frequent cause of 46, XY disorders of sex development and associated with a variety of phenotypes, ranging from phenotypic women (complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS)) to milder degrees of undervirilization (partial form or PAIS) or men with only infertility (mild form or MAIS). From 2009 to 2012, two young Chinese female individuals with CAIS from two families were referred to our hospital due to primary amenorrhea. Defects in testo...

  18. Regulators of Androgen Action Resource: a one-stop shop for the comprehensive study of androgen receptor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePriest, Adam D; Fiandalo, Michael V; Schlanger, Simon; Heemers, Frederike; Mohler, James L; Liu, Song; Heemers, Hannelore V

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the main target for treatment of non-organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Failure of life-prolonging AR-targeting androgen deprivation therapy is due to flexibility in steroidogenic pathways that control intracrine androgen levels and variability in the AR transcriptional output. Androgen biosynthesis enzymes, androgen transporters and AR-associated coregulators are attractive novel CaP treatment targets. These proteins, however, are characterized by multiple transcript variants and isoforms, are subject to genomic alterations, and are differentially expressed among CaPs. Determining their therapeutic potential requires evaluation of extensive, diverse datasets that are dispersed over multiple databases, websites and literature reports. Mining and integrating these datasets are cumbersome, time-consuming tasks and provide only snapshots of relevant information. To overcome this impediment to effective, efficient study of AR and potential drug targets, we developed the Regulators of Androgen Action Resource (RAAR), a non-redundant, curated and user-friendly searchable web interface. RAAR centralizes information on gene function, clinical relevance, and resources for 55 genes that encode proteins involved in biosynthesis, metabolism and transport of androgens and for 274 AR-associated coregulator genes. Data in RAAR are organized in two levels: (i) Information pertaining to production of androgens is contained in a 'pre-receptor level' database, and coregulator gene information is provided in a 'post-receptor level' database, and (ii) an 'other resources' database contains links to additional databases that are complementary to and useful to pursue further the information provided in RAAR. For each of its 329 entries, RAAR provides access to more than 20 well-curated publicly available databases, and thus, access to thousands of data points. Hyperlinks provide direct access to gene

  19. Identification and characterization of the minimal androgen-regulated kidney-specific kidney androgen-regulated protein gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The kidney androgen-regulated protein (Kap) gene is tissue specific and regulated by androgen in mouse kidney proximal tubule cells (PTCs). In the present study, we aimed to identify the minimal PTC-specific androgen-regulated Kap promoter and analyze its androgen response elements (AREs).Adeletion series of the Kap1542 promoter/luciferase constructs were assayed in opossum kidney (OK) PTCs in the presence or absence of 15 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Kap 1542 and Kap637 had low activity and no androgen induction; Kap224 had a basal activity that was 4- to 5-fold higher than that of Kap 1542, but was only sfightly induced by DHT. Kap 147 had a basal activity that was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of Kap 1542 and was induced by DHT 4- to 6-fold. Kap77 abol-ished basal promoter activity but was still induced by DHT. Results showed that, in vitro, Kap147 was a minimal androgen-regulated promoter. Transient transfection in different cells demonstrated that Kap147 specifically initi-ated reporter gene expression in PTCs. Sequence analysis revealed two potential AREs located at positions -124 and -39 of Kap147. Mutational assays showed that only the ARE at -124 was involved in androgen response in OK cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay also verified -124 ARE bound specifically to androgen receptor. In conclusion, we defined the minimal Kap 147 promoter that may be a good model for the study of kidney PTC-specific expression and molecular mechanisms that lead to an androgen-specific responsiveness in vivo.

  20. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the androgen/ligand binding site. Unfortunately, with the inevitable progression of the cancer to castration resistance, many of these drugs become ineffective. However, there are numerous other regulatory sites on this protein that have not been exploited therapeutically. The regulation of AR activity involves a cascade of complex interactions with numerous chaperones, co-factors and co-regulatory proteins, leading ultimately to direct binding of AR dimers to specific DNA androgen response elements within the promoter and enhancers of androgen-regulated genes. As part of the family of nuclear receptors, the AR is organized into modular structural and functional domains with specialized roles in facilitating their inter-molecular interactions. These regions of the AR present attractive, yet largely unexploited, drug target sites for reducing or eliminating androgen signaling in prostate cancers. The design of small molecule inhibitors targeting these specific AR domains is only now being realized and is the culmination of decades of work, including crystallographic and biochemistry approaches to map the shape and accessibility of the AR surfaces and cavities. Here, we review the structure of the AR protein and describe recent advancements in inhibiting its activity with small molecules specifically designed to target areas distinct from the receptor’s androgen binding site. It is anticipated that these new classes of anti-AR drugs will provide an additional

  1. Molecular mechanisms of androgen receptor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Steketee (Karine)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are steroid hormones, which are necessary for development and maintenance of the functions of the male sex organs, including the prostate. Androgens also play an important role in benign abnormalities of the prostate and in the

  2. A single nucleotide substitution introduces a premature termination codon into the androgen receptor gene of a patient with receptor-negative androgen resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Marcelli; Tilley, W. D.; Wilson, C.M.; Wilson, J. D.; Griffin, J E; McPhaul, M J

    1990-01-01

    Mutations of the androgen receptor that impair the action of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone and testosterone result in abnormal male sexual development. The definition of the organization of the androgen receptor gene has permitted us to examine its structure in nine patients with androgen resistance that exhibit absent 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone binding in cultured fibroblasts (receptor-negative androgen resistance). Using labeled probes specific for each individual coding exon, we find no gro...

  3. Study of Androgen and Androgen Receptor in Relation to Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初永丽; 孙永玉; 邱红玉

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between serum testosterone level and expression of androgen receptors in ovary in relation to insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Serum testosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in 17 patients with PCOS and 20 cases as control group. The expression of androgen receptor in ovary was detected by immunohistochemistry method. The results showed that serum testosterone level [ (3. 1± 1.5) nmol/L] and insulin resistance index (0. 85±0. 49) in patients with PCOS were significantly higher than in control group (P<0. 05), and showed a positive relation (r=0. 65, P<0. 01). The expression levels of androgen receptor in ovary of patients with PCOS were significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.05). The optical density value was positively related with insulin resistance index (r=0.59,P<0. 01). It was concluded that androgen and androgen receptor could accelerate insulin resistance and the interaction of them might aggravate the pathophysiological change in PCOS.

  4. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen recept...

  5. Camptothecin disrupts androgen receptor signaling and suppresses prostate cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the main therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic prostate cancers. The present study demonstrates that the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin selectively inhibits androgen-responsive growth of prostate cancer cells. Camptothecin strikingly inhibited mutated and wild-type AR protein expression in LNCaP and PC-3/AR cells. This inhibition coincided with decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser81 and reduced androgen-mediated AR transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, camptothecin disrupted the association between AR and heat shock protein 90 and impeded binding of the synthetic androgen [3H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. Camptothecin also blocked androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, leading to downregulation of the AR target gene PSA. In addition to decreasing the intracellular and secreted prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, camptothecin markedly inhibited androgen-stimulated PSA promoter activity. Collectively, our data reveal that camptothecin not only serves as a traditional genotoxic agent but, by virtue of its ability to target and disrupt AR, may also be a novel candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Camptothecin disrupts androgen receptor signaling and suppresses prostate cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shicheng, E-mail: liusc59@yahoo.co.jp [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan); Yuan, Yiming [Department of Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Okumura, Yutaka; Shinkai, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Hitoshi [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the main therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic prostate cancers. The present study demonstrates that the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin selectively inhibits androgen-responsive growth of prostate cancer cells. Camptothecin strikingly inhibited mutated and wild-type AR protein expression in LNCaP and PC-3/AR cells. This inhibition coincided with decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser{sup 81} and reduced androgen-mediated AR transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, camptothecin disrupted the association between AR and heat shock protein 90 and impeded binding of the synthetic androgen [{sup 3}H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. Camptothecin also blocked androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, leading to downregulation of the AR target gene PSA. In addition to decreasing the intracellular and secreted prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, camptothecin markedly inhibited androgen-stimulated PSA promoter activity. Collectively, our data reveal that camptothecin not only serves as a traditional genotoxic agent but, by virtue of its ability to target and disrupt AR, may also be a novel candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. The androgen receptor: Functional structure and expression in transplanted human prostate tumors and prostate tumor cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Trapman, Jan; Ris-Stalpers, Carolyn; Korput, J. A G M; Kuiper, George; Faber, P.W.; Romijn, Johannes; Mulder, Eppo; Brinkmann, Albert

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The growth of the majority of prostate tumors is androgen-dependent, for which the presence of a functional androgen receptor is a prerequisite. Tumor growth can be inhibited by blockade of androgen receptor action. However, this inhibition is transient. To study the role of the androgen receptor in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate tumor cell growth, androgen receptor mRNA expression was monitored in six different human prostate tumor cell lines an...

  8. Detection of androgen receptor in human prostatic adenoma by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demura, Takayoshi; Sakashita, Shigeo; Takamura, Takao; Kuroda, Kazuhide (Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    We developed a new amplified method to detect the localization of androgen receptors within the human prostatic tissue specimens. The tissue sections were treated with 50 ..mu..l of 100 nM tritiated dihydrotestosterone (/sup 3/H-DHT). The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to receptors was demonstrated as silver grains on the stained tissue sections. The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was inhibited by additional non-radioactive DHT remarkably and by testosterone partially, but not affected by additional progesterone and 17..beta..-estradiol. No binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the bladder tissue was found. These results showed that the binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was a specific reaction of /sup 3/H-DHT and androgen receptor. Androgen receptors were seen in the nuclei and the cytoplasmas of glandular epithelial cells of prostate. However, stromal cells contained less abundant androgen receptors. The method reported here has several advantages in detecting the androgen receptor of the prostatic tissue in comparison with the radioreceptor assay and other histochemical methods. 1) The needle biopsied specimens are big enough to examine. 2) Morphological observations are also possible on the same specimen because the specimens are stained with hematoxylin simultaneously. Therefore, we can know the relative ratio of androgen receptor positive cells and negative cells. 3) Binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor with this method may be more specific than other histochemical methods, since binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor was inhibited by 200-fold excess of non-radioactive DHT. 4) Treatment of scintillator, fluorographic technique shortens the exposure periods. The exposure periods are approximately six to twelve times shorter than that of the conventional autoradiography.

  9. Androgen receptor accelerates premature senescence of human dermal papilla cells in association with DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chien Yang

    Full Text Available The dermal papilla, located in the hair follicle, expresses androgen receptor and plays an important role in hair growth. Androgen/Androgen receptor actions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia, but the exact mechanism is not well known. Recent studies suggest that balding dermal papilla cells exhibit premature senescence, upregulation of p16(INK4a, and nuclear expression of DNA damage markers. To investigate whether androgen/AR signaling influences the premature senescence of dermal papilla cells, we first compared frontal scalp dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients with matched normal controls and observed that premature senescence is more prominent in the dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients. Exposure of androgen induced premature senescence in dermal papilla cells from non-balding frontal and transitional zone of balding scalp follicles but not in beard follicles. Overexpression of the AR promoted androgen-induced premature senescence in association with p16(INK4a upregulation, whereas knockdown of the androgen receptor diminished the effects of androgen. An analysis of γ-H2AX expression in response to androgen/androgen receptor signaling suggested that DNA damage contributes to androgen/androgen receptor-accelerated premature senescence. These results define androgen/androgen receptor signaling as an accelerator of premature senescence in dermal papilla cells and suggest that the androgen/androgen receptor-mediated DNA damage-p16(INK4a axis is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

  10. Up-Regulation of Hepatic Alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein Transcription by Testosterone via Androgen Receptor Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, AHSG, a liver borne plasma protein, contributes to the prevention of soft tissue calcification, modulates inflammation, reduces insulin sensitivity and fosters weight gain following high fat diet or ageing. In polycystic ovary syndrome, fetuin-A levels correlate with free androgen levels, an observation pointing to androgen sensitivity of fetuin-A expression. The present study thus explored whether the expression of hepatic fetuin-A is modified by testosterone. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with testosterone and androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, and were silenced with androgen receptor siRNA. To test the in vivo relevance, male mice were subjected to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for 7 weeks. AHSG mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and fetuin-A protein abundance by Western blotting. Results: In HepG2 cells, AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance were both up-regulated following testosterone treatment. The human alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein gene harbors putative androgen receptor response elements in the proximal 5 kb promoter sequence relative to TSS. The effect of testosterone on AHSG mRNA levels was abrogated by silencing of the androgen receptor in HepG2 cells. Moreover, treatment of HepG2 cells with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in presence of endogenous ligands in the medium significantly down-regulated AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance. In addition, ADT of male mice was followed by a significant decrease of hepatic Ahsg mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein levels. Conclusions: Testosterone participates in the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression, an effect mediated, at least partially, by androgen receptor activation.

  11. Effects of androgen on immunohistochemical localization of androgen receptor and Connexin 43 in mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Li, Jianhua; An, Yulin; Zhang, Shuiwen

    2015-10-01

    Androgens have essential roles in the regulation of follicular development and female fertility. Androgen excess is the leading defect in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and involved in the ovarian dysfunction. The aim of this study was to elucidate the regarding regulatory role of androgen in the follicular development of female mouse. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analyses were performed to detect androgen receptor (AR) and Connexin 43 (Cx43) expression in ovaries from both control and testosterone-treated group mice. In this study, localizations of AR and Cx43 were dramatically altered in testosterone-treated mouse ovaries. In addition, AR expression was significantly increased, whereas Cx43 expression was markedly decreased after testosterone treatment. Alterations of AR and Cx43 expression by testosterone with concomitant reduction of MII oocytes. Overall, these results suggest the involvement of androgen in the regulation of AR and Cx43 localizations in mouse ovary. Alterations of AR and Cx43 expression by testosterone may affect normal folliculogenesis. Together these findings will enable us to begin understanding the important roles of AR and Cx43 actions in the regulation of follicular development, as well as providing insights into the role of AR and Cx43 actions in the androgen-associated reproductive diseases such as PCOS. PMID:26206424

  12. Identification of a novel androgen receptor agonist (or “androgen mimic”) of environmental concern: spironolactone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist in humans to treat certain conditions such as hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female pattern hair loss. The drug is also used to treat hypertension as a diuretic. With this commo...

  13. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation.

    OpenAIRE

    Macke, J. P.; Hu, N; S. Hu; Bailey, M.; King, V L; Brown, T.; Hamer, D; Nathans, J

    1993-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, we have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the the entire androgen receptor cod...

  14. Distribution of androgen receptor in microdissected brain areas of the female baboon (Papio cynocephalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, R J; Roselli, C E; Resko, J A

    1988-03-29

    We measured androgen receptors in the brain and pituitary of 4 female baboons (Papio cynocephalus) by the in vitro binding of methyltrienolone (R1881) to cytosols from 17 brain subregions as well as anterior and posterior pituitaries. High levels of AR were detected in anterior (22.1 +/- 7.1 (S.E.M.) fmol/mg protein) and posterior pituitary (12.6 +/- 3.3 fmol/mg protein). In brain tissue, the highest androgen receptor levels were found in the infundibular nucleus/median eminence (9.4 +/- 2.3 fmol/mg protein), ventromedial nucleus (6.3 +/- 1.7 fmol/mg protein) and periventricular area (4.9 +/- 1.3 fmol/mg protein). Saturation analysis of anterior pituitary and brain tissue (pool of hypothalamic, preoptic area, amygdala and septum remaining after microdissection of brain nuclei) showed that [3H]R1881 binds to the androgen receptor with high specificity and affinity (Kd = 1.25 x 10(-10) M, 0.45 x 10(-10) M, in anterior pituitary and HPA cytosol, respectively). Serum testosterone levels were low in all animals (0.59 +/- 0.26 ng/ml). With these data we described the quantitative distribution of androgen receptor in the pituitary and in specific brain nuclei in a species of nonhuman primate. The distribution is similar in many respects to that described in the male rat and the data suggest a conservation of androgen receptor distribution across species. PMID:3259151

  15. LEF1 in androgen-independent prostate cancer: regulation of androgen receptor expression, prostate cancer growth and invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yirong; Wang, Longgui; Zhang, Miao; Melamed, Jonathan; Liu, Xiaomei; Reiter, Robert; Wei, Jianjun; Peng, Yi; Zou, Xuanyi; Pellicer, Angel; Garabedian, Michael J.; Ferrari, Anna; Lee, Peng

    2009-01-01

    A major obstacle in treating prostate cancer is the development of androgen-independent disease. In this study, we examined LEF1 expression in androgen-independent cancer as well as its regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression, prostate cancer growth and invasion in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Affymetrix microarray analysis of LNCaP and LNCaP-AI (androgen-independent variant LNCaP) cells revealed 100-fold increases in LEF1 expression in LNCaP-AI cells. We showed that LE...

  16. A mutation in the ligand binding domain of the androgen receptor of human LNCaP cells affects steroid binding characteristics and response to anti-androgens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veldscholte (Jos); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); G.W. Jenster (Guido); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract INCaP prostate tumor cells contain an abnormal androgen receptor system. Progestagens, estradiol and anti-androgens can compete with androgens for binding to the androgen receptor and can stimulate both cell growth and excretion of prostate specific acid phosphatase. We ha

  17. The low dose gamma ionising radiation impact upon cooperativity of androgen-specific proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with effects of the ionising radiation (γ-IR, 0.5 Gy) upon serum testosterone (T), characteristics of testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG) and androgen receptor (AR) in parallel with observation of androgen (A) responsive enzyme activity – hexokinase (HK). The interdependence or relationships of T-levels with parameters of the proteins that provide androgenic regulation are consequently analyzed in post-IR dynamics. The IR-stress adjustment data reveal expediency of TeBG- and AR-cooperativity measurements for more precise assessments of endocrine A-control at appropriate emergencies

  18. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  19. High abundance androgen receptor in goldfish brain: characteristics and seasonal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testosterone (T) exerts its actions in brain directly via androgen receptors or, after aromatization to estradiol, via estrogen receptors. Brain aromatase activity in teleost fish is 100-1000 times greater than in mammals and would be expected to significantly reduce the quantity of androgen available for receptor binding. Experiments were carried out on the goldfish Carassius auratus to determine if androgen receptors are present in teleost brain and whether their physicochemical properties reflect elevated aromatase. Cytosolic and nuclear extracts were assayed with the use of [3H]T and charcoal, Sephadex LH-20, or DNA-cellulose chromatography to separate bound and free steroids. Binding activity was saturable and had an equally high affinity for T and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Although mibolerone was a relatively weak competitor, the putative teleost androgen 11-ketotestosterone, methyltrienolone (R1881), estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol were poor ligands. Characteristics that distinguish this receptor from a steroid-binding protein in goldfish serum are the presence of binding activity in both nuclear and cytosolic extracts, a low rate of ligand-receptor dissociation, electrophoretic mobility, sedimentation properties in low vs. high salt, and tissue distribution. DNA cellulose-adhering and nonadhering forms were detected, but these did not differ in other variables measured. Although goldfish androgen receptors resembled those of mammals in all important physicochemical characteristics, they were unusually abundant compared to levels in rat brain, but comparable to levels in prostate and other male sex hormone target organs. Moreover, there were seasonal variations in total receptors, with a peak at spawning (April) 4- to 5-fold higher than values in reproductively inactive fish

  20. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: do trinucleotide repeats in androgen receptor gene have any role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Singh Rajender; Nalini J. Gupta; Baidyanath Chakravarty; Lalji Singh; Kumarasamy Thangaraj

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of CAG and GGN repeats as genetic background affecting androgen insensitivity syn- drome (AIS) phenotype. Methods: We analyzed lengths of androgen receptor (AR)-CAG and GGN repeats in 69 AIS cases, along with 136 unrelated normal male individuals. The lengths of repeats were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by allelic genotyping to determine allele length. Results: Our study revealed significantly shorter mean lengths of CAG repeats in patients (mean 18.25 repeats, range 14-26 repeats) in comparison to the controls (mean 22.57 repeats, range 12-39 repeats) (two-tailed P < 0.0001). GGN repeats, however, did not differ significantly between patients (mean 21.48 repeats) and controls (mean 21.21 repeats) (two- tailed P = 0.474). Among patients' groups, the mean number of CAG repeats in partial androgen insensitivity cases (mean 15.83 repeats) was significantly less than in complete androgen insensitivity cases (mean 19.46 repeats) (two- tailed P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The findings suggest that shorter lengths of repeats in the AR gene might act as low penetrance genetic background in varying manifestation of androgen insensitivity. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 616-624)

  1. Cross-species sensitivity to a novel androgen receptor agonist of potential environmental concern, spironolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLone, Carlie A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Cavallin, Jenna E; Kahl, Michael D; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Kathleen M; Stevens, Kyle E; Severson, Megan N; Blanksma, Chad A; Flynn, Kevin M; Hartig, Philip C; Woodard, Jonne S; Berninger, Jason P; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Johnson, Rodney D; Ankley, Gerald T

    2013-11-01

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that in humans is used to treat conditions like hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female-pattern hair loss through antagonism of the androgen receptor. Although not routinely monitored in the environment, spironolactone has been detected downstream of a pharmaceutical manufacturer, indicating a potential for exposure of aquatic species. Furthermore, spironolactone has been reported to cause masculinization of female western mosquitofish, a response indicative of androgen receptor activation. Predictive methods to identify homologous proteins to the human and western mosquitofish androgen receptor suggest that vertebrates would be more susceptible to adverse effects mediated by chemicals like spironolactone that target the androgen receptor compared with invertebrate species that lack a relevant homolog. In addition, an adverse outcome pathway previously developed for activation of the androgen receptor suggests that androgen mimics can lead to reproductive toxicity in fish. To assess this, 21-d reproduction studies were conducted with 2 fish species, fathead minnow and Japanese medaka, and the invertebrate Daphnia magna. Spironolactone significantly reduced the fecundity of medaka and fathead minnows at 50 μg/L, whereas daphnia reproduction was not affected by concentrations as large as 500 μg/L. Phenotypic masculinization of females of both fish species was observed at 5 μg/L as evidenced by formation of tubercles in fathead minnows and papillary processes in Japanese medaka. Effects in fish occurred at concentrations below those reported in the environment. These results demonstrate how a priori knowledge of an adverse outcome pathway and the conservation of a key molecular target across vertebrates can be utilized to identify potential chemicals of concern in terms of monitoring and highlight potentially sensitive species and endpoints for testing. PMID:23881739

  2. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleys, Ellane R; Halleran, Jennifer L; Enriquez, Vanessa A; da Silveira, Juliano C; West, Rachel C; Winger, Quinton A; Anthony, Russell V; Bruemmer, Jason E; Clay, Colin M; Bouma, Gerrit J

    2015-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR). Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE) in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders. PMID:25675430

  3. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to a new frameshift deletion in exon 4 of the androgen receptor gene: Functional analysis of the mutant receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Lobaccaro, J M; Lumbroso, S.; Poujol, Nicolas; Georget, V.; Brinkmann, Albert; Malpuech, Georges; Sultan, C.

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the androgen receptor gene in a large kindred with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and negative receptor-binding activity, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing identified a 13 base pair deletion within exon 4. This was responsible for a predictive frameshift in the open reading frame and introduction of a premature stop codon at position 783 instead of 919. The deletion was reproduced in androgen receptor wildtype cDNA and tran...

  4. Substitution of arginine-839 by cysteine or histidine in the androgen receptor causes different receptor phenotypes in cultured cells and coordinate degrees of clinical androgen resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Beitel, L K; Kazemi-Esfarjani, P; Kaufman, M; Lumbroso, R; DiGeorge, A M; Killinger, D W; Trifiro, M A; Pinsky, L.

    1994-01-01

    We aim to correlate point mutations in the androgen receptor gene with receptor phenotypes and with clinical phenotypes of androgen resistance. In two families, the external genitalia were predominantly female at birth, and sex-of-rearing has been female. Their androgen receptor mutation changed arginine-839 to histidine. In a third family, the external genitalia were predominantly male at birth, and sex-of-rearing has been male: their codon 839 has mutated to cysteine. In genital skin fibrob...

  5. ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ANTAGONISM BY THE ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE FENITROTHION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor antagonism by the organophosphate insecticide fenitrothion. Tamura, H., Maness, S.C., Reischmann, K. Dorman, D.C., Gray, L.E., and Gaido, K.W. (2000). Toxicol. Sci. Organophosphate insecticides represent one of the most widely used classes of pesticide...

  6. Mechanistic relationship between androgen receptor polyglutamine tract truncation and androgen-dependent transcriptional hyperactivity in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianben; Udayakumar, T S; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Brodie, Angela M; Fondell, Joseph D

    2004-04-23

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathways mediate critical events in normal and neoplastic prostate growth. Shortening of the polymorphic N-terminal polyglutamine (poly(Q)) tract of the AR gene leads to transcriptional hyperactivity and has been correlated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. The underlying mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We show here that androgen-dependent cellular proliferation and transcription in prostate cancer cells is inversely correlated to the length of the AR poly(Q) region. We further show that AR proteins containing a shortened poly(Q) region functionally respond to lower concentrations of androgens than wild type AR. Whereas DNA binding activity is relatively unaffected by AR poly(Q) variation, we found that ligand binding affinity and the ligand-induced NH(2)- to COOH-terminal intramolecular interaction is enhanced when the poly(Q) region is shortened. Importantly, we show that AR proteins containing a shortened poly(Q) region associate in vivo with higher levels of specific p160 coactivators and components of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex as compared with the wild type AR. Collectively, our findings suggest that the AR transcriptional hyperactivity associated with shortened poly(Q) length stems from altered ligand-induced conformational changes that enhance coactivator recruitment. PMID:14966121

  7. Persistent androgen receptor-mediated transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer under androgen-deprived conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Keith F.; Zheng, Dali; He, Yuhong; Bowman, Tamara; Edwards, John R.; Jia, Li

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that mediates androgen action in target tissues. Upon ligand binding, the AR binds to thousands of genomic loci and activates a cell-type specific gene program. Prostate cancer growth and progression depend on androgen-induced AR signaling. Treatment of advanced prostate cancer through medical or surgical castration leads to initial response and durable remission, but resistance inevitably develops. In castration-resistant ...

  8. Renaturation of the androgen receptor after denaturation in SDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.P.; Young, C.Y.F.; Rowley, D.R.; Tindall, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    Renaturation of the steroid binding activity of receptor proteins is a potentially useful tool for their purification and analysis. Cytosol was prepared from rat Dunning prostate tumor in buffer containing molybdate and then denatured by addition of SDS buffer and heating. Aliquots were precipitated in cold acetone and the resulting pellets were washed and solubilized with a small volume of solution containing a chaotropic agent such as 6M guanidine, 8M urea, or 5M sodium iodide. After a 20-minute incubation, samples were diluted 20-fold with buffer containing 4nM (/sup 3/H)dihydrotestosterone with or without excess unlabeled dihydrotestosterone. Diluted samples were incubated at 0/sup 0/C for varying periods of time prior to assay of bound radioactivity using hydroxylapatite. A time-course of renaturation after exposure to guanidine showed a steady increase of specific binding activity during the first 7 hrs post-dilution that remained stable up to 22 hrs. Experiments with guanidine consistently demonstrated that 25-50% of binding activity was recoverable. Preliminary results using urea or sodium iodide were similar. Efforts to optimize recovery and to characterize the renatured androgen receptor are in progress.

  9. Renaturation of the androgen receptor after denaturation in SDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaturation of the steroid binding activity of receptor proteins is a potentially useful tool for their purification and analysis. Cytosol was prepared from rat Dunning prostate tumor in buffer containing molybdate and then denatured by addition of SDS buffer and heating. Aliquots were precipitated in cold acetone and the resulting pellets were washed and solubilized with a small volume of solution containing a chaotropic agent such as 6M guanidine, 8M urea, or 5M sodium iodide. After a 20-minute incubation, samples were diluted 20-fold with buffer containing 4nM [3H]dihydrotestosterone with or without excess unlabeled dihydrotestosterone. Diluted samples were incubated at 00C for varying periods of time prior to assay of bound radioactivity using hydroxylapatite. A time-course of renaturation after exposure to guanidine showed a steady increase of specific binding activity during the first 7 hrs post-dilution that remained stable up to 22 hrs. Experiments with guanidine consistently demonstrated that 25-50% of binding activity was recoverable. Preliminary results using urea or sodium iodide were similar. Efforts to optimize recovery and to characterize the renatured androgen receptor are in progress

  10. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Min Ma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b. Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  11. ARA24/Ran enhances the androgen-dependent NH2- and COOH-terminal interaction of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) acts as an androgen-dependent transcription factor controlling the development of prostate tissue. Upon binding to androgen, AR undergoes a dynamic structural change leading to interaction between the NH2- and COOH-terminal regions of AR (N-C interaction). ARA24/Ran, which is a small GTPase, functions as an AR coactivator. Here, we report that ARA24/Ran enhances the N-C interaction of AR. The constitutively GTP- or GDP-bound form of ARA24/Ran repressed the AR N-C interaction. ARA24/Ran did not enhance the transcriptional activities of AR mutants that disrupt the N-C interaction. ARA24/Ran formed an endogenous protein complex with nuclear AR, but not cytoplasmic AR. Unlike SRC-1 with the positive activity for AR N-C interaction, ARA24/Ran did not enhance the transcriptional activity of the COOH-terminal domain-deleted AR mutant that is constitutively localized in the nucleus. These data demonstrate that ARA24/Ran increases AR transactivation by enhancing the AR N-C interaction in the nucleus

  12. Androgen Receptor Accelerates Premature Senescence of Human Dermal Papilla Cells in Association with DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Chien Yang; Hung-Chun Fu; Ching-Yuan Wu; Kuo-Ting Wei; Ko-En Huang; Hong-Yo Kang

    2013-01-01

    The dermal papilla, located in the hair follicle, expresses androgen receptor and plays an important role in hair growth. Androgen/Androgen receptor actions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia, but the exact mechanism is not well known. Recent studies suggest that balding dermal papilla cells exhibit premature senescence, upregulation of p16(INK4a), and nuclear expression of DNA damage markers. To investigate whether androgen/AR signaling influences the premature...

  13. Androgen Receptor Accelerates Premature Senescence of Human Dermal Papilla Cells in Association with DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yi-Chien; Fu, Hung-Chun; Wu, Ching-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Ting; Huang, Ko-En; Kang, Hong-Yo

    2013-01-01

    The dermal papilla, located in the hair follicle, expresses androgen receptor and plays an important role in hair growth. Androgen/Androgen receptor actions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia, but the exact mechanism is not well known. Recent studies suggest that balding dermal papilla cells exhibit premature senescence, upregulation of p16 INK4a , and nuclear expression of DNA damage markers. To investigate whether androgen/AR signaling influences the premature...

  14. Androgen receptor coregulator ARA267-α interacts with death receptor-6 revealed by the yeast two-hybrid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAI Tiejun; WANG Xin; ZHANG Zhiwen; XIN Dianqi; NA Yanqun; GUO Yinglu

    2004-01-01

    ARA267-αis a newly identified androgen receptor coactivator.In order to further elucidate its precise role in cells,using the ARA267- α fragment containing four PHD and one SET conserved domains as bait we revealed an ARA267-α-PHD-SET-interacting protein,death receptor-6(DR6),in the yeast two-hybrid screening.DR6 is the member of TNF receptor family and has a death domain in its intracellular cytoplasmic portion(DR6cp)to mediate the cell apoptosis.The interaction between ARA267-α-PHD-SET and DR6cp was confirmed in vitro and in vivo.Our finding implied that androgen signaling pathway might cross talk with apoptosis signaling pathway through the interaction between ARA267-α and DR6.

  15. Novel mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene (1790p) associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florina Raicu; Rossella Giuliani; Valentina Gatta; Chiara Palka; Paolo Guanciali Franchi; Pierluigi Lelli-Chiesa; Stefano Tumini; Liborio Stuppia

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene cause androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), resulting in an impaired embryonic sex differentiation in 46,XY genetic men. Complete androgen insensitivity (CAIS) produces a female external phenotype, whereas cases with partial androgen insensitivity (PAIS) have various ambiguities of the genitalia. Mild androgen insensitivity (MAIS) is characterized by undermasculinization and gynecomastia. Here we describe a 2-month-old 46,XY female patient, with all of the characteristics of CAIS. Defects in testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) synthesis were excluded. Sequencing of the AR gene showed the presence in exon 6 of a T to C transition in the second base of codon 790, nucleotide position 2369, causing a novel missense Leu790Pro mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. The identification of a novel AR mutation in a girl with CAIS provides significant information due to the importance of missense mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the AR, which are able to induce functional abnormalities in the androgen binding capability, stabilization of active conformation, or interaction with coactivators. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 687-691)

  16. Significance of androgen receptor and CD10 expression in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and trichoepithelioma

    OpenAIRE

    ASTARCI, HESNA M.; GURBUZ, GULFEM A.; Sengul, Demet; Hucumenoglu, Sema; Kocer, Ugur; USTUN, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of trichoepithelioma (TE) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) on the basis of clinical symptoms and laboratory investigations may be difficult in certain patients. The aim of the present study was to compare cluster of differentiation 10 (CD10) and androgen receptor (AR) expression patterns in BCC and TE, to investigate the predictive power of these proteins as markers of the two conditions. A total of 39 cases of BCC and 15 cases of TE were retrieved from the pathology depa...

  17. Androgens upregulate Cdc25C protein by inhibiting its proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chou

    Full Text Available Cdc25C is a cell cycle protein of the dual specificity phosphatase family essential for activating the cdk1/Cyclin B1 complex in cells entering into mitosis. Since altered cell cycle is a hallmark of human cancers, we investigated androgen regulation of Cdc25C protein in human prostate cancer (PCa cells, including androgen-sensitive (AS LNCaP C-33 cells and androgen-independent (AI LNCaP C-81 as well as PC-3 cells. In the regular culture condition containing fetal bovine serum (FBS, Cdc25C protein levels were similar in these PCa cells. In a steroid-reduced condition, Cdc25C protein was greatly decreased in AS C-33 cells but not AI C-81 or PC-3 cells. In androgen-treated C-33 cells, the Cdc25C protein level was greatly elevated, following a dose- and a time-dependent manner, correlating with increased cell proliferation. This androgen effect was blocked by Casodex, an androgen receptor blocker. Nevertheless, epidermal growth factor (EGF, a growth stimulator of PCa cells, could only increase Cdc25C protein level by about 1.5-fold. Altered expression of Cdc25C in C-33 cells and PC-3 cells by cDNA and/or shRNA transfection is associated with the corresponding changes of cell growth and Cyclin B1 protein level. Actinomycin D and cycloheximide could only partially block androgen-induced Cdc25C protein level. Treatments with both proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors resulted in elevated Cdc25C protein levels. Immunoprecipitation revealed that androgens reduced the ubiquitination of Cdc25C proteins. These results show for the first time that Cdc25C protein plays a role in regulating PCa cell growth, and androgen treatments, but not EGF, greatly increase Cdc25C protein levels in AS PCa cells, which is in part by decreasing its degradation. These results can lead to advanced PCa therapy via up-regulating the degradation pathways of Cdc25C protein.

  18. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kesha Rana; Nicole KL Lee; Jeffrey D Zajac; Helen E MacLean

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor(AR)‑regulated genes ininvitroandinvivomodels. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factormyogenin was signiifcantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity(ARΔZF2) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating thatmyogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligaseFbxo32 was repressed by 12h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, andc‑Myc expression was decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7, p57Kip2, Igf2 andcalcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all butp57Kip2was also decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase‑mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  19. The androgen receptor in hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Lei Mao; Zhi-Qi Zhu; Charlie Degui Chen

    2009-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is responsive to hormone therapy that interferes with androgen receptor (AR) signalling.However,the effect is short-lived,as nearly all tumours progress to a hormone-refractory (HR) state,a lethal stage of the disease.Intuitively,the AR should not be involved because hormone therapy that blocks or reduces AR activity is not effective in treating HR turnouts.However,there is still a consensus that AR plays an essential role in HR prostate cancer (HRPC) because AR signalling is still functional in HR tumours.AR signalling can be activated in HR turnouts through several mechanisms.First,activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways can sensitize the AR to castrate levels of androgens.Also,mutations in the AR can change AR ligand specificity,thereby allowing it to be activated by non-steroids or anti-androgens.Finally,overexpression of the wild-type AR sensitizes itself to low concentrations of androgens.Therefore,drugs targeting AR signalling could still be effective in treating HRPC.

  20. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  1. Classical androgen receptors in non-classical sites in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkey, Sara; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Doncarlos, Lydia L.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptors are expressed in many different neuronal populations in the central nervous system where they often act as transcription factors in the cell nucleus. However, recent studies have detected androgen receptor immunoreactivity in neuronal and glial processes of the adult rat neocortex, hippocampal formation, and amygdala as well as in the telencephalon of Eastern Fence and green anole lizards. This review discusses previously published findings on extranuclear androgen receptor...

  2. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  3. Andrographolide Targets Androgen Receptor Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P.; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The auth...

  4. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  5. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5′ splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  6. Coregulator Control of Androgen Receptor Action by a Novel Nuclear Receptor-Binding Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Jehle, Katja; Cato, Laura; Neeb, Antje; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Jung, Nicole; Smith, Emmanuel W.; Buzon, Victor; Carbó, Laia R.; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; Schmitz, Katja; Fruk, Ljiljana; Luy, Burkhard; Chen, Yu; Cox, Marc B.; Bräse, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is essential for prostate cancer development. It is activated by androgens through its ligand-binding domain (LBD), which consists predominantly of 11 α-helices. Upon ligand binding, the last helix is reorganized to an agonist conformation termed activator function-2 (AF-2) for coactivator binding. Several coactivators bind to the AF-2 pocket through conserved LXXLL or FXXLF sequences to enhance the activity of the rec...

  7. The androgen-binding protein gene is expressed in male and female rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y M; Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Petrusz, P; Joseph, D R

    1990-12-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABP) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in liver, are encoded by the same gene. We have now found that the ABP-SHBG gene is also expressed in male and female rat brain. Immunoreactive ABP was found to be present in neuronal cell bodies throughout the brain as well as in fibers of the hypothalamic median eminence. The highest concentrations of immunoreactive cell bodies were located in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Likewise, ABP mRNA was present in all brain regions examined. Analysis of cDNA clones representing brain ABP mRNAs revealed amino acid sequence differences in brain and testicular ABPs. The protein encoded by an alternatively processed RNA has sequence characteristics suggesting that the protein could act as a competitior of ABP binding to cell surface receptors. These data and gene-sequencing experiments indicate that a specific ABP gene promoter is used for transcription initiation in brain. ABP may function in brain as an androgen carrier protein; however, in view of the widespread presence of ABP and ABP mRNA in brain, the protein may have a much broader, yet unknown, function. PMID:1701136

  8. The study of the androgen receptor profile and changes of level of serum testosterone in human prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptors in biopsy specimens of 22 cases of human prostatic cancer (PC) were studied by radioligand binding assay. The cytoplasmic androgen receptor (AcR) and nuclear androgen receptor (AnR) densities were 305.70 +- 461.68 and 363.04 +- 391.44 pmol/g protein respectively, both were significantly higher than those of 36 benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and 9 normal prostate (NP). Among the prostatic cancers, the AnR/AcR ratios were significantly different between metastatic and primary cancers. This result suggested that there might be migration of AR from nucleus to cytosol in the process of metastasis. The serum testosterone studied by RIA method are significantly lower than that of BPH and NP. Thawmounted autoradiography demonstrated that AR were mainly located in epithelial cells of the glandular tissue of prostate

  9. Use of radioactive 7alpha, 17alpha-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone (mibolerone) in the assay of androgen receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritiated 7alpha, 17alpha-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone (DMNT; mibolerone), a synthetic androgen stable to metabolic conversion in the rat ventral prostate, is an excellent radioactive ligand for the quantitation and characterization of androgen receptors in prostate, liver, and cultured cells. DMNT is more receptor-selective than 17alpha-methyl-17beta-hydroxy-estra-4,9,11-trien-3-one (R1881); DMNT interacts with glucocorticoid and progestin receptors much less strongly than R1881. Unlike 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, DMNT does not bind tightly to testosterone-estradiol binding globulin of human serum. The hydroxylapatite-filter assay employed clearly distinguished between DMNT binding to androgen receptors of rat ventral prostate and interaction of DMNT with androgen binding protein of epididymides. The prostate cytosol (3H)DMNT-receptor complex sediments in two forms (4 and 8 S) in a low salt medium. In 0.4 M KCl, both the prostate cytosol and nuclear (3H)DMNT-receptor complexes migrated as 3-4 S components. The formation of both the cytosol and nuclear DMNT-receptor complexes is inhibited by antiandrogens and 17beta-estradiol

  10. Anti-androgen effects of the pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin on interactions of androgen receptor with corepressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In the mammalian two-hybrid assay, cypermethrin enhanced the AR–SRMT interaction, as well as the AR–NCoR interaction, and the significant enhancement was detected at the concentration of 10−5 M. - Highlights: • We have developed the mammalian two-hybrid assays. • The AR N terminus interacts with RIDs of SMRT and NCoR in the mammalian cells. • Cypermethrin enhances the interaction of AR with SMRT. • Cypermethrin enhances the interaction of AR with NCoR. - Abstract: To clarify whether the mechanism of androgen receptor (AR) antagonism of the pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin associates with the interactions between the AR and corepressors silencing mediator for thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) and nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR), we have developed the mammalian two-hybrid assays. The AR N-terminal domain 1–660 amino acid residues were subcloned into the plasmid pVP16 to construct VP16-ARNTD. The C-terminal receptor interaction domains (RIDs) of SMRT and NCoR were used to construct pM-SMRT and pM-NCoR. The constructed vectors pVP16-ARNTD, pM-SMRT or pM-NCoR, the reporter pG5CAT and the control pCMVβ were cotranfected into the CV-1 cells. The cells were treated with cypermethrin at the indicated concentrations. The AR N terminus interacted with RIDs of SMRT and NCoR. The interactions between the AR and corepressors SMRT and NCoR were enhanced by cypermethrin, and the significant enhancement was detected at the concentration of 10−5 M. The mammalian two-hybrid assays demonstrate the utility to detect the interactions of the AR with SMRT and NCoR. Cypermethrin functions as an anti-androgen by enhancing the associations of the AR with SMRT and NCoR. We provide a novel mechanism in anti-androgen action of cypermethrin associated with the recruitment of SMRT and NCoR to AR

  11. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rennie, Paul S.; Artem Cherkasov; Nada Lallous; Kush Dalal

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR) is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the ...

  12. Androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rakesh; Handelsman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Androgen abuse is the most potent and prevalent form of sports doping detected. It originated from the early years of the Cold War as an epidemic confined to drug cheating within elite power sports. In the decades following the end of the Cold War, it has become disseminated into an endemic based within the illicit drug subcultures serving recreational abusers seeking cosmetic body sculpting effects. Within sports, both direct androgen abuse (administration of androgens), as well as indirect androgen abuse (administration of nonandrogenic drugs to increase endogenous testosterone), is mostly readily detectable with mass spectrometry-based anti-doping urine tests. The ongoing temptation of fame and fortune and the effectiveness of androgen abuse in power sports continue to entice cheating via renewed approaches aiming to exploit androgens. These require ongoing vigilance, inventiveness in anti-doping science, and targeting coaches as well as athletes in order to build resilience against doping and maintain fairness in elite sport. The challenge of androgen abuse in the community among recreational abusers has barely been recognized and effective approaches remain to be developed. PMID:27347677

  13. Nonneural Androgen Receptors Affect Sexual Differentiation of Brain and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A; Ramzan, Firyal; Monks, D Ashley

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone, acting via estrogenic and androgenic pathways, is the major endocrine mechanism promoting sexual differentiation of the mammalian nervous system and behavior, but we have an incomplete knowledge of which cells and tissues mediate these effects. To distinguish between neural and nonneural actions of androgens in sexual differentiation of brain and behavior, we generated a loxP-based transgenic mouse, which overexpresses androgen receptors (ARs) when activated by Cre. We used this transgene to overexpress AR globally in all tissues using a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-Cre driver (CMV-AR), and we used a Nestin-Cre driver to overexpress AR only in neural tissue (Nes-AR). We then examined whether neural or global AR overexpression can affect socio-sexual behaviors using a resident-intruder paradigm. We found that both neural and global AR overexpression resulted in decreased aggressive behaviors and increased thrusting during mounting of intruders, consistent with a neural site of action. Global, but not neural, AR overexpression in males led to an increase in same-sex anogenital investigation. Together, these results suggest novel roles for nonneural AR in sexual differentiation of mice, and indicate that excess AR can lead to a paradoxical reduction of male-typical behavior. PMID:26636184

  14. Phospho-kinase profile of triple negative breast cancer and androgen receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the oncogenesis of different tumors, as is the case in prostate cancer. In triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) a gene expression classification has described different subgroups including a luminal androgen subtype. The AR can be controlled by several mechanisms like the activation of membrane tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling pathways. However little is known in TNBC about how the AR is modulated by these mechanisms and the potential therapeutic strategists to inhibit its expression. We used human samples to evaluate the expression of AR by western-blot and phospho-proteomic kinase arrays that recognize membrane tyrosine kinase receptors and downstream mediators. Western-blots in human cell lines were carried out to analyze the expression and activation of individual proteins. Drugs against these kinases in different conditions were used to measure the expression of the androgen receptor. PCR experiments were performed to assess changes in the AR gene after therapeutic modulation of these pathways. AR is present in a subset of TNBC and its expression correlates with activated membrane receptor kinases-EGFR and PDGFRβ in human samples and cell lines. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway in TNBC cell lines decreased notably the expression of the AR. Concomitant administration of the anti-androgen bicalutamide with the EGFR, PDGFRβ and Erk1/2 inhibitors, decreased the amount of AR compared to each agent given alone, and had an additive anti-proliferative effect. Administration of dihydrotestosterone augmented the expression of AR that was not modified by the inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR or Erk1/2 pathways. AR expression was posttranscriptionally regulated by PI3K or Erk1/2 inhibition. Our results describe the expression of the AR in TNBC as a druggable target and further suggest the combination of bicalutamide with inhibitors of EGFR, PDGFRβ or Erk1/2 for future development

  15. In human granulosa cells from small antral follicles, androgen receptor mRNA and androgen levels in follicular fluid correlate with FSH receptor mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Rasmussen, I. A.; Kristensen, S. G.;

    2011-01-01

    women). Expressions of androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels in granulosa cells, and of androstenedione and testosterone in follicular fluid, were correlated to the expression of the FSH receptor (FSHR), LH receptor (LHR), CYP19 and anti-Mullerian Hormone-receptor II (AMHRII) mRNA in the granulosa cells...... and to the follicular fluid concentrations of AMH, inhibin-B, progesterone and estradiol. AR mRNA expression in granulosa cells and the follicular fluid content of androgens both showed a highly significant positive association with the expression of FSHR mRNA in granulosa cells. AR mRNA expression...... between the follicular fluid levels of androgen and FSHR expression. This suggests that follicular sensitivity towards FSH stimulation may be augmented by stimulation of androgens via the AR....

  16. Contributions of sex, testosterone, and androgen receptor CAG repeat number to virtual Morris water maze performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Nicole T; Diamond, Michael P; Land, Susan J; Moffat, Scott D

    2014-03-01

    The possibility that androgens contribute to the male advantage typically found on measures of spatial cognition has been investigated using a variety of approaches. To date, evidence to support the notion that androgens affect spatial cognition in healthy young adults is somewhat equivocal. The present study sought to clarify the association between testosterone (T) and spatial performance by extending measurements of androgenicity to include both measures of circulating T as well as an androgen receptor-specific genetic marker. The aims of this study were to assess the contributions of sex, T, and androgen receptor CAG repeat number (CAGr) on virtual Morris water task (vMWT) performance in a group of healthy young men and women. The hypothesis that men would outperform women on vMWT outcomes was supported. Results indicate that CAGr may interact with T to impact navigation performance and suggest that consideration of androgen receptor sensitivity is an important consideration in evaluating hormone-behavior relationships. PMID:24495604

  17. Androgen receptor targeted therapies in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Bench to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Sadar, Marianne D

    2016-08-01

    The androgen receptor is a transcription factor and validated therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy remains the gold standard treatment, but it is not curative, and eventually the disease will return as lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. There have been improvements in the therapeutic landscape with new agents approved, such as abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel and Ra-223, in the past 5 years. New insight into the mechanisms of resistance to treatments in advanced disease is being and has been elucidated. All current androgen receptor-targeting therapies inhibit the growth of prostate cancer by blocking the ligand-binding domain, where androgen binds to activate the receptor. Persuasive evidence supports the concept that constitutively active androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain are one of the resistant mechanisms underlying advanced disease. Transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor requires a functional AF-1 region in its N-terminal domain. Preclinical evidence proved that this domain is a druggable target to forecast a potential paradigm shift in the management of advanced prostate cancer. This review presents an overview of androgen receptor-related mechanisms of resistance as well as novel therapeutic agents to overcome resistance that is linked to the expression of androgen receptor splice variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27302572

  18. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Bailey

    Full Text Available Testosterone (T and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR, cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22. All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  19. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  20. Nuclear androgen receptors in human prostatic tissue. Extraction with heparin and estimation of the number of binding sites with different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for the estimation of nuclear androgen receptors in benign prostatic hyperplastic tissue is described, which employs extraction of receptors from nuclei with buffers containing heparin. Extraction of a nuclear pellet with a heparin-containing (1 g/l) buffer appeared to have definite advantages over 0.4 mol/l KCl extraction. Heparin appeared to be twice as efficient in extracting androgen receptors. In addition aggregated receptor proteins, formed after storage at -800C, were partly deaggregated by heparin. Specific isolation of the androgen receptor was performed using either agar gel electrophoresis, protamine sulphate precipitation or LH-20 gel filtration. A comparison was made between the amounts of estimated receptors with these different techniques. Protamine sulphate precipitation resulted in the highest estimates of receptor-bound 5α-[3H]dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT). Treatment of the labelled nuclear extracts with a charcoal suspension prior to the receptor assay resulted in lower amounts of estimated androgen receptors. A method for routine evaluation of nuclear androgen receptors in prostatic tissue has been evaluated, which involves extraction of nuclear pellets with a heparin-containing (1 g/l) buffer, exchange labelling of the nuclear extracts for 20 h at 100C and quantification of the receptors with protamine sulphate precipitation. (Auth.)

  1. Molecular and Biochemical Effects of a Kola Nut Extract on Androgen Receptor-Mediated Pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low incidence of prostate cancer in Asians has been attributed to chemo preventative properties of certain chemicals found in their diet. This study characterized the androgenic and chemo preventative properties of the Jamaican bush tea Bizzy using androgen receptor positive and negative cell lines. Exposure of prostate cells to Biz-2 resulted in a growth inhibition (GI50) of 15 ppm in LNCaP cells and 3.6 ppm in DU145 cells. Biz-2 elicited a 2-fold increase in the mRNA of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2, with a 10-fold increase in that of the pro apoptotic gene Bax. We observed a 2.4- to 7.5-fold change in apoptotic cells in both cell lines. Biz-2 at 10 ppm elicited a time- and dose-dependent stimulation of both the protein and mRNA levels of several androgen-regulated genes. Biz-2 caused a 36% decrease in PSA secretion and a significant increase in PSA mRNA. The relative binding affinity (IC50) of Biz-2 for AR was 2- to 5-fold lower than that of the synthetic androgen R1881. Biz-2 was found to be a specific ligand for the AR in that the natural ligand, DHT, and the anti-androgen, flutamide, displaced Biz-2 bound to AR and inhibited Biz-2-induced transcription and PSA secretion. This study provided evidence that Biz-2 extract possesses the ability to modulate prostate cancer cell biology in an AR-dependent manner.

  2. Molecular and Biochemical Effects of a Kola Nut Extract on Androgen Receptor-Mediated Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasree Solipuram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The low incidence of prostate cancer in Asians has been attributed to chemopreventative properties of certain chemicals found in their diet. This study characterized the androgenic and chemopreventative properties of the Jamaican bush tea “Bizzy,” using androgen receptor positive and negative cell lines. Exposure of prostate cells to Biz-2 resulted in a growth inhibition (GI50 of 15 ppm in LNCaP cells and 3.6 ppm in DU145 cells. Biz-2 elicited a 2-fold increase in the mRNA of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2, with a 10-fold increase in that of the proapoptotic gene Bax. We observed a 2.4- to 7.5-fold change in apoptotic cells in both cell lines. Biz-2 at 10 ppm elicited a time- and dose-dependent stimulation of both the protein and mRNA levels of several androgen-regulated genes. Biz-2 caused a 36% decrease in PSA secretion and a significant increase in PSA mRNA. The relative binding affinity (IC50 of Biz-2 for AR was 2- to 5-fold lower than that of the synthetic androgen R1881. Biz-2 was found to be a specific ligand for the AR in that the natural ligand, DHT, and the anti-androgen, flutamide, displaced Biz-2 bound to AR and inhibited Biz-2-induced transcription and PSA secretion. This study provided evidence that Biz-2 extract possesses the ability to modulate prostate cancer cell biology in an AR-dependent manner.

  3. Androgen receptor and miRNA-126* axis controls follicle-stimulating hormone receptor expression in porcine ovarian granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xing; Li, Qiqi; Pan, Zengxiang; Li, Qifa

    2016-08-01

    Androgen, which acts via the androgen receptor (AR), plays crucial roles in mammalian ovarian function. Recent studies showed that androgen/AR signaling regulates follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) expression in follicles; however, the detailed mechanism underlying this regulation remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AR and miR-126* cooperate to inhibit FSHR expression and function in pig follicular granulosa cells (pGCs). In pGCs, overexpression of AR decreased, whereas knockdown increased, FSHR mRNA and protein expression; however, neither manipulation affected FSHR promoter activity. Using a dual-luciferase reporter assay, we found that the FSHR gene is a direct target of miR-126*, which inhibits FSHR expression and increases the rate of AR-induced apoptosis in pGCs. Collectively, our data show for the first time that the AR/miR-126* axis exerts synergetic effects in the regulation of FSHR expression and apoptosis in pGCs. Our findings thus define a novel pathway, AR/miR-126*/FSHR, that regulates mammalian GC functions. PMID:27222597

  4. A protein in rat prostatic chromatin interacting with androgen regulated gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUYOUHAI; RONGCHANG; 等

    1992-01-01

    2M NaCl-insoluble fraction of rat ventral Prostate chromatin(residual proteins)contain proteins able to interact specifically with androgen-receptor complex and is ,therefore,a part of the aceptor complex.Among residual proteins a 98 KDa protein has been found which binds significantly to a genomic fiagment containing an androgen-regulated gene coding for a 22 KDa protein The biological significance of this binding in androgen action need to be further studied.A mini-plasmid clone containing 22 KDa protein coding sequence was cloned into charon 4A genomic library from which a 5.7 Kb genomic fragment was isolated,identified by hybridization with a 5' and a 3' cDNA probes,and shown to contain the 3' flanking sequence.Restriction enzyme treatment of this fragment yielded a 4.7 Kb restriction fragmwent representing the 5' upstream region and a 1.0 Kb containing part of the coding sequence.Deletion studies indicated that the 97 KDa protein bound only to a subclone of about 300 bp segment .Furthermore,gel shifting experiment supported its DNA-protein binding.

  5. Human CMTM2/CKLFSF2 enhances the ligand-induced transactivation of the androgen receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU DaZhen; YIN CaiHua; ZHANG YingMei; TIAN LinJie; LI Ting; LI Dan; MA DaLong; GUO YingLu; WANG Ying

    2009-01-01

    CKLF (chemokine-like factor)-Iike MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link domain) transmembrane domain containing (CMTM) is a novel gene family. One member of this family, CMTM2, also named chemokine-like factor superfamily 2 (CKLFSF2), is expressed highly in the testis and moderately in the prostate, marrow and peripheral blood cells. However, the function of human CMTM2 remains unknown. Here, we found that CMTM2 was upregulated in 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated LNCaP cells. We investigated the relationship between CMTM2 and the androgen receptor. Our results showed that CMTM2 enhanced DHT-mediated androgen receptor (AR) transactiration and the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA). We also observed that CMTM2 enhanced the AR protein level, which was reversed by silencing endogenous CMTM2 expression, which suggested that CMTM2 might play an important role in maintaining the AR protein level. We also found that CMTM2 suppressed Akt activation. A previous study showed that Akt could phosphorylate AR at Ser210 and Ser790 and lead to AR ubiquitylation and degradation as well as suppression of AR activity.Taken together, suppressing Akt activation and increasing the AR protein level might be one of the mechanisms for the CMTM2-mediated enhancement of AR transactivation.

  6. Expression of androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen in male breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen-regulated proteins prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP) are present in high concentrations in normal prostate and prostatic cancer and are considered to be tissue-specific to prostate. These markers are commonly used to diagnose metastatic prostate carcinoma at various sites including the male breast. However, expression of these two proteins in tumors arising in tissues regulated by androgens such as male breast carcinoma has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study we analyzed the expression of PSA, PSAP and androgen receptor (AR) by immunohistochemistry in 26 cases of male breast carcinomas and correlated these with the expression of other prognostic markers. AR, PSA and PSAP expression was observed in 81%, 23% and 0% of carcinomas, respectively. Combined expression of AR and PSA was observed in only four tumors. Although the biological significance of PSA expression in male breast carcinomas is not clear, caution should be exercised when it is used as a diagnostic marker of metastatic prostate carcinoma

  7. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghotbaddini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  8. Activated Cdc42-associated kinase Ack1 promotes prostate cancer progression via androgen receptor tyrosine phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Nupam P.; Liu, Yuanbo; Majumder, Samarpan; Warren, Maria R.; Parker, Carol E.; Mohler, James L.; Earp, H. Shelton; Whang, Young E.

    2007-01-01

    Activation of the androgen receptor (AR) may play a role in androgen-independent progression of prostate cancer. Multiple mechanisms of AR activation, including stimulation by tyrosine kinases, have been postulated. We and others have recently shown involvement of activated Cdc42-associated tyrosine kinase Ack1 in advanced human prostate cancer. Here we provide the molecular basis for interplay between Ack1 and AR in prostate cancer cells. Activated Ack1 promoted androgen-independent growth o...

  9. Experimental Evidence of Persistent Androgen-Receptor-Dependency in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Osamu Ogawa; Tomomi Kamba; Takahiro Inoue; Takashi Kobayashi

    2013-01-01

    In the majority of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), product of a gene that is almost exclusively regulated by the androgen receptor (AR), still acts as a serum marker reflecting disease burden, indicating that AR signaling is activated even under castrate level of serum androgen. Accumulated evidence shows that transcriptional ability of AR is activated both in ligand-dependent and -independent manners in CRPC cells. Some androgen-independent subli...

  10. Functional analysis of androgen receptor mutations that confer anti-androgen resistance identified in circulating cell-free DNA from prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lallous, Nada; Volik, Stanislav V.; Awrey, Shannon; LeBlanc, Eric; Tse, Ronnie; Murillo, Josef; Singh, Kriti; Azad, Arun A.; Wyatt, Alexander W.; LeBihan, Stephane; Chi, Kim N.; Gleave, Martin E.; Paul S. Rennie; Collins, Colin C; Cherkasov, Artem

    2016-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) is a pivotal drug target for the treatment of prostate cancer, including its lethal castration-resistant (CRPC) form. All current non-steroidal AR antagonists, such as hydroxyflutamide, bicalutamide, and enzalutamide, target the androgen binding site of the receptor, competing with endogenous androgenic steroids. Several AR mutations in this binding site have been associated with poor prognosis and resistance to conventional prostate cancer drugs. In orde...

  11. Steroid-induced androgen receptor-oestradiol receptor beta-Src complex triggers prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, A; Castoria, G; Di Domenico, M; de Falco, A; Bilancio, A; Lombardi, M; Barone, M V; Ametrano, D; Zannini, M S; Abbondanza, C; Auricchio, F

    2000-10-16

    Treatment of human prostate carcinoma-derived LNCaP cells with androgen or oestradiol triggers simultaneous association of androgen receptor and oestradiol receptor beta with Src, activates the Src/Raf-1/Erk-2 pathway and stimulates cell proliferation. Surprisingly, either androgen or oestradiol action on each of these steps is inhibited by both anti-androgens and anti-oestrogens. Similar findings for oestradiol receptor alpha were observed in MCF-7 or T47D cells stimulated by either oestradiol or androgens. Microinjection of LNCaP, MCF-7 and T47D cells with SrcK(-) abolishes steroid-stimulated S-phase entry. Data from transfected Cos cells confirm and extend the findings from these cells. Hormone-stimulated Src interaction with the androgen receptor and oestradiol receptor alpha or beta is detected using glutathione S:-transferase fusion constructs. Src SH2 interacts with phosphotyrosine 537 of oestradiol receptor alpha and the Src SH3 domain with a proline-rich stretch of the androgen receptor. The role of this phosphotyrosine is stressed by its requirement for association of oestradiol receptor alpha with Src and consequent activation of Src in intact Cos cells. PMID:11032808

  12. Different types of androgen receptor mutations in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jialiang; Hou, Jiangang; Li, Bingkun; Li, Dongyang; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Xiang

    2015-02-01

    Mutations of androgen receptor (AR) are the most frequent cause of 46, XY disorders of sex development and associated with a variety of phenotypes, ranging from phenotypic women (complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS)) to milder degrees of undervirilization (partial form or PAIS) or men with only infertility (mild form or MAIS). From 2009 to 2012, two young Chinese female individuals with CAIS from two families were referred to our hospital due to primary amenorrhea. Defects in testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) synthesis were excluded. Physical examination revealed that the patients have normal female external genitalia, normal breast development, vellus hair in the axilla and on the arms and legs, but absence of pubic hair, and a blind-ending vagina. Two different types of AR mutations have been detected by sequencing of genomic DNA: Family A showed deletion of exon 2 in AR gene; Family B showed a single nucleotide C-to-T transition in exon 8 of AR gene resulting in a proline 893-to-leucine substitution (Pro893Leu). Testicular histology showed developmental immaturity of seminiferous tubules with the absence of spermatogenic cells or spermatozoa. No AR immunoreactivity was observed in either case. Three adult patients recovered well from bilateral orchiectomy. The juvenile patient of family B was followed up. Our present study on these two families revealed two different types of AR mutation. The definitive diagnosis of AIS was based on clinical examination and genetic investigations. Our findings verified the mechanism of CAIS and also enriched AR Gene Mutation Database. PMID:25674389

  13. BTG2 is an LXXLL-dependent co-repressor for androgen receptor transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → BTG2 associates with AR, androgen causes an increase of the interaction. → BTG2 as a co-repressor inhibits the AR-mediated transcription activity. → BTG2 inhibits the transcription activity and expression of PSA. → An intact 92LxxLL96 motif is essential and necessary for these activities of BTG2, while the 20LxxLL24 motif is not required. → Ectopic expression of BTG2 reduces proliferation of prostate cancer cells. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor gene, BTG2 has been down-regulated in prostate cancer and the ectopic expression of this gene has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Sequence analysis revealed that the BTG2 protein contains two leucine-rich motifs (20LxxLL24 and 92LxxLL96), which are usually found in nuclear receptor co-factors. Based on this, we postulated that there will be an association between BTG2 and AR. In this study, we discovered that BTG2 directly bound to the androgen receptor (AR) in the absence of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and in the presence of the androgen, this interaction was increased. BTG2 bearing the mutant 20LxxLL24 motif bound to AR equally efficient as the wild-type BTG2, while BTG2 bearing the mutant 92LxxLL96 motif failed to interact with AR. Functional studies indicated that ectopic expression of BTG2 caused a significant inhibition of AR-mediated transcriptional activity and a decreased growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen-induced promoter activation and expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are significantly attenuated by BTG2. The intact 92LxxLL96 motif is required for these activities. These findings, for the first time, demonstrate that BTG2 complexes with AR via an LxxLL-dependent mechanism and may play a role in prostate cancer via modulating the AR signaling pathway.

  14. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  15. Androgen receptor expression predicts breast cancer survival: the role of genetic and epigenetic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer outcome, including response to therapy, risk of metastasis and survival, is difficult to predict using currently available methods, highlighting the urgent need for more informative biomarkers. Androgen receptor (AR) has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis however its potential to be an informative biomarker has yet to be fully explored. In this study, AR protein levels were determined in a cohort of 73 Grade III invasive breast ductal adenocarcinomas. The levels of Androgen receptor protein in a cohort of breast tumour samples was determined by immunohistochemistry and the results were compared with clinical characteristics, including survival. The role of defects in the regulation of Androgen receptor gene expression were examined by mutation and methylation screening of the 5' end of the gene, reporter assays of the 5' and 3' end of the AR gene, and searching for miRNAs that may regulate AR gene expression. AR was expressed in 56% of tumours and expression was significantly inversely associated with 10-year survival (P = 0.004). An investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the loss of AR expression revealed that hypermethylation of the AR promoter is associated with loss of AR expression in breast cancer cells but not in primary breast tumours. In AR negative breast tumours, mutation screening identified the same mutation (T105A) in the 5'UTR of two AR negative breast cancer patients but not reported in the normal human population. Reporter assay analysis of this mutation however found no evidence for a negative impact on AR 5'UTR activity. The role of miR-124 in regulating AR expression was also investigated, however no evidence for this was found. This study highlights the potential for AR expression to be an informative biomarker for breast cancer survival and sets the scene for a more comprehensive investigation of the molecular basis of this phenomenon

  16. Choline Kinase Alpha as an Androgen Receptor Chaperone and Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asim, Mohammad; Massie, Charles E.; Orafidiya, Folake; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Warren, Anne Y.; Esmaeili, Mohsen; Selth, Luke A.; Zecchini, Heather I.; Luko, Katarina; Qureshi, Arham; Baridi, Ajoeb; Menon, Suraj; Madhu, Basetti; Escriu, Carlos; Lyons, Scott; Vowler, Sarah L.; Zecchini, Vincent R.; Shaw, Greg; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Russell, Roslin; Mohammed, Hisham; Stefanos, Niki; Lynch, Andy G.; Grigorenko, Elena; D’Santos, Clive; Taylor, Chris; Lamb, Alastair; Sriranjan, Rouchelle; Yang, Jiali; Stark, Rory; Dehm, Scott M.; Rennie, Paul S.; Carroll, Jason S.; Griffiths, John R.; Tavaré, Simon; Mills, Ian G.; McEwan, Iain J.; Baniahmad, Aria; Tilley, Wayne D.; Neal, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR) is a major drug target in prostate cancer (PCa). We profiled the AR-regulated kinome to identify clinically relevant and druggable effectors of AR signaling. Methods: Using genome-wide approaches, we interrogated all AR regulated kinases. Among these, choline kinase alpha (CHKA) expression was evaluated in benign (n = 195), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (n = 153) and prostate cancer (PCa) lesions (n = 359). We interrogated how CHKA regulates AR signaling using biochemical assays and investigated androgen regulation of CHKA expression in men with PCa, both untreated (n = 20) and treated with an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor degarelix (n = 27). We studied the effect of CHKA inhibition on the PCa transcriptome using RNA sequencing and tested the effect of CHKA inhibition on cell growth, clonogenic survival and invasion. Tumor xenografts (n = 6 per group) were generated in mice using genetically engineered prostate cancer cells with inducible CHKA knockdown. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests, Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier methods. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: CHKA expression was shown to be androgen regulated in cell lines, xenografts, and human tissue (log fold change from 6.75 to 6.59, P = .002) and was positively associated with tumor stage. CHKA binds directly to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR, enhancing its stability. As such, CHKA is the first kinase identified as an AR chaperone. Inhibition of CHKA repressed the AR transcriptional program including pathways enriched for regulation of protein folding, decreased AR protein levels, and inhibited the growth of PCa cell lines, human PCa explants, and tumor xenografts. Conclusions: CHKA can act as an AR chaperone, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence for kinases as molecular chaperones, making CHKA both a marker of tumor progression and a potential therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:26657335

  17. EXPRESSION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR IN THE DEVELOPING RAT EPIDIDYMIS AND ITS REGULATION BY ANDROGENS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the distribution, developmental patterns, and hormonal control of androgen re- ceptors(AR) in the developing and ethane dimethane sulfonate(EDS) treated male SD rat epididymis. Methods The ABC technique of immunohistochemistry and image analysis were used to assess optodensity means (OPTDM) of AR, providing a measure of relative nuclear AR concentration. Results The specific AR immunostaining was observed in the nuclei of epididymal epithelium, peritubular smooth muscle cells and intertubular connective tissue cells. The rela- tive AR concentrations varied with the different segments of the epididymis in the adult rat(P<0. 05 or P<0.01). AR protein was highest in the caput (0. 763--0. 026),lowest in the corpus (0. 712±0. 025) and intermediate in the cauda (0. 736±0. 008). Levels of epididymal AR changed with development. In the cauda, AR level was highest on day 21 (0. 773±0. 028),intermediate on day 35(0. 762±0. 022),and lowest on day 90~120(0. 736±0. 008). The 90~120d group was significantly different from the 21d group (P<0. 01)and 35d group (P<0. 05). After the adult rats were treated with EDS to eradicate Leydig cells and endogenous testosterone, it was observed that the OPTDM of AR in the epididymal cauda epithelium was significantly reduced (P<0. 001), and was restored to the control level by using ex- ogenous testosterone replacement (P<0. 001). Conclusion These results suggest that the epididymal corpus depends least on androgens and the AR expression in the epididymis decreases with age and is dependent on circulating andro- gens.

  18. Localization of androgen receptors and estrogen receptors in the same cells of the songbird brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahr, M. (Univ. of Kaiserslautern (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-01

    Estrogens and androgens each have unique effects but act together for the neural differentiation and control of sexual behaviors in male vertebrates, such as the canary. The neuronal basis for these synergistic effects is elusive because the spatial relation between estrogen target cells and androgen target cells is unknown. This study localized estrogen receptor (ER)-containing cells by using immunocytochemistry and androgen receptor (AR)-containing cells by using autoradiography in the same sections of the male canary brain. Three cell types, those containing only ER, those containing only AR, and those containing both ER and AR, were found in tissue-specific frequencies. The midbrain nucleus intercollicularis exhibited the highest number of cells expressing both ER and AR, whereas ER and AR are expressed only in disjunctive cell populations in the forebrain nucleus hyperstriatalis ventrale, pars caudale. Synergistic effects of androgens and estrogens for the neural behavorial control could result from cells containing both ER and AR (intracellular) and from neural circuits containing ER and AR in different cells (intercellular).

  19. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine C Hornig

    Full Text Available A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR of the androgen receptor (AR gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  20. Androgen Receptor Expression and Cellular Proliferation During Transition from Androgen-Dependent to Recurrent Growth after Castration in the CWR22 Prostate Cancer Xenograft

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Desok; Gregory, Christopher W.; French, Frank S.; Smith, Gary J.; Mohler, James L.

    2002-01-01

    Androgen receptor expression was analyzed in the CWR22 human prostate cancer xenograft model to better understand its role in prostate cancer recurrence after castration. In androgen-dependent tumors, 98.5% of tumor cell nuclei expressed androgen receptor with a mean optical density of 0.26 ± 0.01. On day 2 after castration androgen deprivation decreased immunostained cells to 2% that stained weakly (mean optical density, 0.16 ± 0.08). Cellular proliferation measured using Ki-67 revealed

  1. Identification of the functional domains of ANT-1, a novel coactivator of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we identified a transcriptional coactivator for the activation function-1 (AF-1) domain of the human androgen receptor (AR) and designated it androgen receptor N-terminal domain transactivating protein-1 (ANT-1). This coactivator, which contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs from amino acid (aa) 294, is identical to a component of U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and binds specifically to the AR or glucocorticoid receptor. Here, we identified four distinct functional domains. The AR-AF-1-binding domain, which bound to either aa 180-360 or 360-532 in AR-AF-1, clearly overlapped with TAU-1 and TAU-5. This domain and the subnuclear speckle formation domain in ANT-1 were assigned within the TPR motifs, while the transactivating and nuclear localization signal domains resided within the N-terminal sequence. The existence of these functional domains may further support the idea that ANT-1 can function as an AR-AF-1-specific coactivator while mediating a transcription-splicing coupling

  2. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable.Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment.In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  3. Identification and Characterization of the Androgen Receptor From the American Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Kohno, Satomi; Doheny, Brenna M; Ogino, Yukiko; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-08-01

    Androgens are essential for the development, reproduction, and health throughout the life span of vertebrates, particularly during the initiation and maintenance of male sexual characteristics. Androgen signaling is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. Mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors, such as exogenous hormones or contaminants that mimic hormones, can disrupt endocrine signaling and function. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), a unique model for ecological research in that it exhibits environment-dependent sex determination, is oviparous and long lived. Alligators from a contaminated environment exhibit low reproductive success and morphological disorders of the testis and phallus in neonates and juveniles, both associated with androgen signaling; thus, the alterations are hypothesized to be related to disrupted androgen signaling. However, this line of research has been limited because of a lack of information on the alligator AR gene. Here, we isolated A mississippiensis AR homologs (AmAR) and evaluated receptor-hormone/chemical interactions using a transactivation assay. We showed that AmAR responded to all natural androgens and their effects were inhibited by cotreatment with antiandrogens, such as flutamide, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, and vinclozolin. Intriguingly, we found a spliced form of the AR from alligator cDNA, which lacks seven amino acids within the ligand-binding domain that shows no response to androgens. Finally, we have initial data on a possible dominant-negative function of the spliced form of the AR against androgen-induced AmAR. PMID:25974402

  4. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Brown, T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Immunohistochemical study of androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptors in salivary gland tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Augusto Ito

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the immunohistochemical expression of androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor in pleomorphic adenomas, Warthin's tumors, mucoepidermoid carcinomas and adenoid cystic carcinomas of salivary glands. A total of 41 pleomorphic adenomas, 30 Warthin's tumors, 30 mucoepidermoid carcinomas and 30 adenoid cystic carcinomas were analyzed, and the immunohistochemical expression of these hormone receptors were assessed. It was observed that all cases were negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Androgen receptor was positive in 2 cases each of pleomorphic adenoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. In conclusion, the results do not support a role of estrogen and progesterone in the tumorigenesis of pleomorphic adenomas, Warthin's tumors, mucoepidermoid carcinomas and adenoid cystic carcinomas. However, androgen receptors can play a role in a small set of salivary gland tumors, and this would deserve further studies.

  6. Five-alpha Reductase Inhibitor Influences Expression of Androgen Receptor and HOXB13 in Human Hyperplastic Prostate Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Chaeyong Jung; Youngwoong Park; Young-Rang Kim; Soo Bang Ryu; Taek Won Kang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Five-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) are known as chemopreventive agents in prostate cancer with a risk of high-grade disease. This study evaluated the effects of 5ARI on androgen receptor (AR) and proteins involved in prostate cell growth such as HOXB13 expression in human prostate tissue and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Materials and Methods We retrospectively selected 21 patients who underwent TURP between March 2007 and February 2010 for previously confirmed BPH by prostate...

  7. Dominant-negative androgen receptor inhibition of intracrine androgen-dependent growth of castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Titus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (CaP is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in CaP treatment, but CaP recurs despite castrate levels of circulating androgen. Continued expression of the androgen receptor (AR and its ligands has been linked to castration-recurrent CaP growth. PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this report, the ligand-dependent dominant-negative ARΔ142-337 (ARΔTR was expressed in castration-recurrent CWR-R1 cell and tumor models to elucidate the role of AR signaling. Expression of ARΔTR decreased CWR-R1 tumor growth in the presence and absence of exogenous testosterone (T and improved survival in the presence of exogenous T. There was evidence for negative selection of ARΔTR transgene in T-treated mice. Mass spectrometry revealed castration-recurrent CaP dihydrotestosterone (DHT levels sufficient to activate AR and ARΔTR. In the absence of exogenous testosterone, CWR-R1-ARΔTR and control cells exhibited altered androgen profiles that implicated epithelial CaP cells as a source of intratumoral AR ligands. CONCLUSION: The study provides in vivo evidence that activation of AR signaling by intratumoral AR ligands is required for castration-recurrent CaP growth and that epithelial CaP cells produce sufficient active androgens for CaP recurrence during androgen deprivation therapy. Targeting intracrine T and DHT synthesis should provide a mechanism to inhibit AR and growth of castration-recurrent CaP.

  8. Dominant-Negative Androgen Receptor Inhibition of Intracrine Androgen-Dependent Growth of Castration-Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Boris; Li, Xiangping; Haack, Karin; Moore, Dominic T.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (CaP) is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in CaP treatment, but CaP recurs despite castrate levels of circulating androgen. Continued expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its ligands has been linked to castration-recurrent CaP growth. Principal Finding In this report, the ligand-dependent dominant-negative ARΔ142–337 (ARΔTR) was expressed in castration-recurrent CWR-R1 cell and tumor models to elucidate the role of AR signaling. Expression of ARΔTR decreased CWR-R1 tumor growth in the presence and absence of exogenous testosterone (T) and improved survival in the presence of exogenous T. There was evidence for negative selection of ARΔTR transgene in T-treated mice. Mass spectrometry revealed castration-recurrent CaP dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels sufficient to activate AR and ARΔTR. In the absence of exogenous testosterone, CWR-R1-ARΔTR and control cells exhibited altered androgen profiles that implicated epithelial CaP cells as a source of intratumoral AR ligands. Conclusion The study provides in vivo evidence that activation of AR signaling by intratumoral AR ligands is required for castration-recurrent CaP growth and that epithelial CaP cells produce sufficient active androgens for CaP recurrence during androgen deprivation therapy. Targeting intracrine T and DHT synthesis should provide a mechanism to inhibit AR and growth of castration-recurrent CaP. PMID:22272301

  9. Rapid increase of spines by dihydrotestosterone and testosterone in hippocampal neurons: Dependence on synaptic androgen receptor and kinase networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Hojo, Yasushi; Mukai, Hideo; Murakami, Gen; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Kim, Jonghyuk; Ikeda, Muneki; Hiragushi, Ayako; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-09-24

    Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by locally synthesized androgen is important in addition to circulating androgen. Here, we investigated the rapid changes of dendritic spines in response to the elevation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T), by using hippocampal slices from adult male rats, in order to clarify whether these signaling processes include synaptic/extranuclear androgen receptor (AR) and activation of kinases. We found that the application of 10nM DHT and 10nM T increased the total density of spines by approximately 1.3-fold within 2h, by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected CA1 pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, DHT and T increased different head-sized spines. While DHT increased middle- and large-head spines, T increased small-head spines. Androgen-induced spinogenesis was suppressed by individually blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC, p38 MAPK, LIMK or calcineurin. On the other hand, blocking CaMKII did not inhibit spinogenesis. Blocking PI3K altered the spine head diameter distribution, but did not change the total spine density. Blocking mRNA and protein synthesis did not suppress the enhancing effects induced by DHT or T. The enhanced spinogenesis by androgens was blocked by AR antagonist, which AR was localized postsynaptically. Taken together, these results imply that enhanced spinogenesis by DHT and T is mediated by synaptic/extranuclear AR which rapidly drives the kinase networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25511993

  10. Prevalence of androgen receptors in invasive breast carcinoma and its relation with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and Her2/neu expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and aims: Although Breast carcinoma had many targeted bio markers for its treatment, however, it is a heterogeneous disease with different outcomes and need new markers especially for the triple negative group when estrogen receptor, progesterone receptors and Her2/ neu are negative. Androgen receptor is a new target with unclear role. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of androgen receptors in invasive breast cancer and tries to elucidate its relation to some well recognized clinico pathological and immunohistochemical markers. Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty cases of invasive breast carcinoma were evaluated for type, grade and stage and studied immunohistochemically for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Her2/neu and androgen expression. Androgen receptor expression was correlated with histopathological factors and the three studied markers separately then the studied cases were classified into three groups according to estrogen, progesterone receptor and Her2/neu expression and correlated with androgen receptor expression. Results: Androgen receptor was expressed in 71% of breast cancer cases. Its expression is associated significantly with both the stage and the grade. Also it was significantly associated with estrogen receptor and Her2/neu expression. It was expressed in a significant number of triple negative breast carcinoma, in Her2/neu positive cases and in estrogen negative cases which indicate that androgen receptor could be a new target for the treatment of these groups. Conclusions: Although the impact of androgen receptor on breast cancer outcomes had not been clearly established, this result may provide evidence that androgen receptor is a good prognostic and predictive marker.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain with a coactivator-like peptide and selective androgen receptor modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain has been crystallized as a ternary complex with a coactivator-like undecapeptide and two different synthetic ligands. The ligand-binding domain of the human androgen receptor has been cloned, overproduced and crystallized in the presence of a coactivator-like 11-mer peptide and two different nonsteroidal ligands. The crystals of the two ternary complexes were isomorphous and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. They diffracted to 1.7 and 1.95 Å resolution, respectively. Structure determination of these two complexes will help in understanding the mode of binding of selective nonsteroidal androgens versus endogenous steroidal ligands and possibly the origin of their tissue selectivity

  12. Design, Syntheses and Bioactivities of Androgen Receptor Targeted Taxane Analogs, Simplified Fluorescently Labeled Discodermolide Analogs, and Conformationally Constrained Discodermolide Analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer for men in America. The androgen receptor exerts transcriptional activity and plays an important role for the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor ligands bind the androgen receptor and inhibit its transcriptional activity effectively. However, prostate cancer can progress to hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) to avoid this effect. Chemotherapies are currently the primary treatments for HRPC. Unfortunately, none of...

  13. Androgen receptor immunoreactivity in rat occipital cortex after callosotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lepore

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Gonadal steroidogenesis can be influenced by direct neural links between the central nervous system and the gonads. It is known that androgen receptor (AR is expressed in many areas of the rat brain involved in neuroendocrine control of reproduction, such as the cerebral cortex. It has been recently shown that the occipital cortex exerts an inhibitory effect on testicular stereoidogenesis by a pituitary-independent neural mechanism. Moreover, the complete transection of the corpus callosum leads to an increase in testosterone (T secretion of hemigonadectomized rats. The present study was undertaken to analyze the possible corticocortical influences regulating male reproductive activities. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: 1 intact animals as control; 2 rats undergoing sham callosotomy; 3 posterior callosotomy; 4 gonadectomy and posterior callosotomy. Western blot analysis showed no remarkable variations in cortical AR expression in any of the groups except in group I where a significant decrease in AR levels was found. Similarly, both immunocytochemical study and cell count estimation showed a lower AR immunoreactivity in occipital cortex of callosotomized rats than in other groups. In addition, there was no difference in serum T and LH concentration between sham-callosotomized and callosotomized rats. In conclusion, our results show that posterior callosotomy led to a reduction in AR in the right occipital cortex suggesting a putative inhibiting effect of the contralateral cortical area.

  14. Androgen receptor and monoamine oxidase polymorphism in wild bonobos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Garai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor gene (AR, monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA and monoamine oxidase B gene (MAOB have been found to have associations with behavioral traits, such as aggressiveness, and disorders in humans. However, the extent to which similar genetic effects might influence the behavior of wild apes is unclear. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ, AR glycine repeat (ARG, MAOA intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MAin2 and MAOB intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MBin2 in 32 wild bonobos, Pan paniscus, and compared them with those of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and humans. We found that bonobos were polymorphic on the four loci examined. Both loci MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos showed a higher diversity than in chimpanzees. Because monoamine oxidase influences aggressiveness, the differences between the polymorphisms of MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos and chimpanzees may be associated with the differences in aggression between the two species. In order to understand the evolution of these loci and AR, MAOA and MAOB in humans and non-human primates, it would be useful to conduct future studies focusing on the potential association between aggressiveness, and other personality traits, and polymorphisms documented in bonobos.

  15. Androgen receptors in brain and pituitary of female rats: cyclic changes and comparisons with the male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, R J; Reid, D L; Resko, J A

    1986-03-01

    The in vitro binding of a synthetic androgen, methyltrienolone ([3H]-R1881), to brain and pituitary (PIT) cytosol and nuclear extracts was determined in male and female rats. Purified cytosol was prepared from PIT or hypothalamic-preoptic area-amygdala (HPA) and incubated in the presence of 0.1 to 10 nM [3H]-R1881. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of a single, saturable, high-affinity binding site in PIT cytosol with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.42 X 10(-10) M in females and 0.95 X 10(-10) M in intact males. The Kd of HPA cytosol was much less in castrated males [0.47 +/- 0.05 (SEM) X 10(-10)M, n = 7] and females (0.63 +/- 0.1 X 10(-10) M, n = 4) than in intact males (5.8 +/- 1.1 X 10(-10) M, n = 8). Treatment of castrated males with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) for 24 h (250 micrograms/100 g of body weight) increased the Kd of HPA cytosol only slightly (1.6 X 10(-10) M, mean of two replicates). Scatchard analysis of salt-extracted nuclear androgen receptor (ARn) showed a single, high-affinity binding site with similar Kd values in PIT and HPA of intact and castrated, DHT-treated male rats (PIT Kd = 7.3 X 10(-10) M, 9.3 X 10(-10) M; HPA Kd = 1.5 X 10(-9) M, 1.3 X 10(-9) M, respectively). Competition studies involving a range of several radioinert steroids revealed that the binding of [3H]-R1881 to cytosol (ARc) and nuclear extract was specific for androgen receptor when triamcinolone acetonide (10 microM) was added. The ARc and ARn levels were quantified in PIT, preoptic area (POA), hypothalamus (HT), amygdala, hippocampus, and cortex by single point estimation. Significantly (p less than 0.01) greater amounts of ARc were detected in PIT of ovariectomized females (32.7 +/- 2.9 fmol/mg of protein) than in that of orchidectomized males (22.33 +/- 1.6 fmol/mg of protein). The highest levels in the brain were seen in HT and POA. Pituitary ARc in females varied throughout the estrous cycle. Significantly (p less than 0.01) greater amounts were detected on

  16. BA321, a novel carborane analog that binds to androgen and estrogen receptors, acts as a new selective androgen receptor modulator of bone in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Endo, Yasuyuki; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2016-09-01

    Carboranes are a class of carbon-containing polyhedral boron cluster compounds with globular geometry and hydrophobic surface that interact with hormone receptors such as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). We have synthesized BA321, a novel carborane compound, which binds to AR. We found here that it also binds to ERs, ERα and ERβ. In orchidectomized (ORX) mice, femoral bone mass was markedly reduced due to androgen deficiency and BA321 restored bone loss in the male, whilst the decreased weight of seminal vesicle in ORX mice was not recovered by administration of BA321. In female mice, BA321 acts as a pure estrogen agonist, and restored both the loss of bone mass and uterine atrophy due to estrogen deficiency in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In bone tissues, the trabecular bone loss occurred in both ORX and OVX mice, and BA321 completely restored the trabecular bone loss in both sexes. Cortical bone loss occurred in ORX mice but not in OVX mice, and BA321 clearly restored cortical bone loss due to androgen deficiency in ORX mice. Therefore, BA321 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that may offer a new therapy option for osteoporosis in the male. PMID:27402268

  17. Androgen receptor transcriptionally regulates μ-opioid receptor expression in rat trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Seok; Zhang, Youping; Asgar, Jamila; Auh, Q-Schick; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y

    2016-09-01

    The involvement of testosterone in pain, inflammation, and analgesia has been reported, but the role of androgen receptor (AR), a steroid receptor for testosterone, is not well understood. We have previously shown that peripheral inflammation upregulates μ-opioid receptor (MOR) in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) in a testosterone-dependent manner. In this study, we hypothesized that testosterone regulates MOR expression via transcriptional activities of AR in TG. We first examined whether AR is co-expressed with MOR in TG neurons. Our immunohistochemical experiment revealed that AR staining is detected in neurons of all sizes in TG and that a subset of AR is expressed in MOR as well as in TRPV1-positive neurons. We identified the promoter region of the rat MOR gene contains putative AR binding sites. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that AR directly binds to these sites in TG extracts. We confirmed with luciferase reporter assay that AR activated the MOR promoter in response to androgens in a human neuroblastoma cell line (5H-5YSY). These data demonstrated that AR functions as a transcriptional regulator of the MOR gene activity. Finally, we showed that flutamide, a specific AR antagonist, prevents complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced upregulation of MOR mRNA in TG, and that flutamide dose-dependently blocks the efficacy of DAMGO, a specific MOR agonist, on CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Our results expand the knowledge regarding the role of androgens and their receptor in pain and analgesia and have important clinical implications, particularly for inflammatory pain patients with low or compromised plasma testosterone levels. PMID:27320211

  18. Identification of androgen receptors in normal human osteoblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sex steroids, androgens and estrogens, are major regulators of bone metabolism. However, whether these hormones act on bone cells through direct or indirect mechanisms has remained unclear. A nuclear binding assay recently used to demonstrate estrogen receptors in bone was used to identify specific nuclear binding of a tritiated synthetic androgen, [3H]R1881 (methyltrienolone), in 21 of 25 (84%) human osteoblast-like cell strains and a concentration of bound steroid receptors of 821 ± 140 molecules per cell nucleus. Binding was saturable and steroid-specific. Androgen receptor gene expression in osteoblasts was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Relative concentrations of androgen and estrogen receptors were compared by measuring specific nuclear estrogen binding. Nuclear binding of [3H]estradiol was observed in 27 of 30 (90%) cell strains; the concentration of bound estradiol receptor was 1537 ± 221 molecules per cell nucleus. The concentrations of nuclear binding sites were similar in males and females for both [3H]R1881 and [3H]estradiol. The authors conclude that both androgens and estrogens act directly on human bone cells through their respective receptor-mediated mechanisms

  19. Content of Androgen Receptor in Cultured Genital Skin Fibroblast From Different Ages of Chinese Normal Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建; 何立敏; 张金山; 杨震; 周云

    1995-01-01

    A ratpid, simple, reliable method is described for assaying androgen receptor (AR) in dispersed, whole, cultured human genital skin fibroblasts (GSF) with a synthetic androgen, 3H-methyltrienolone (3H-R1881). Receptors for androgen in GSF exhiblt high affinity (Kd=3.0±0.1 nmol/L), low binding capacity and androgen specificity. The content of AR in cultured GSF from 40 normal men varying in age from 1.5—60 years u:as also investigated by this assay. Scatchard analysis and slngle plot revealed the presence of 4.500-8500 binding sites per cell, mean number of AR in GSF of these men is 6288±1082 binding sites/cell. No significant difference was observed in the content of AR in different age groups. This result showed that the content of AR in these ceils did not change with age.

  20. Detection of androgen receptor in human prostatic adenoma by the autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a new amplified method to detect the localization of androgen receptors within the human prostatic tissue specimens. The tissue sections were treated with 50 μl of 100 nM tritiated dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT). The binding of 3H-DHT to receptors were demonstrated as silver grains on the stained tissue sections. The binding of 3H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was inhibited by additional non-radioactive DHT remarkably and by testosterone partially, but not affected by additional progesterone and 17#betta#-estradiol. No binding of 3H-DHT to the bladder tissue was found. These results showed that the binding of 3H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was a specific reaction of 3H-DHT and androgen receptor. Androgen receptors were seen in the nuclei and the cytoplasmas of glandular epithelial cells of prostate. However, stromal cells contained less abundant androgen receptors. The method reported here has several advantages in detecting the androgen receptor of the prostatic tissue in comparison with the radioreceptor assay and other histochemical methods. 1) The needle biopsied specimens are big enough to examine. 2) Morphological observation are also possible on the same specimen because the specimens are stained with hematoxylin simultaneously. Therefore, we can know the relative ratio of androgen receptor positive cells and negative cells. 3) Binding of 3H-DHT to the receptor with this method may be more specific than other histochemical methods, since binding of 3H-DHT to the receptor was inhibited by 200-fold excess of non-radioactive DHT. 4) Treatment of scintillator, fluorographic technique shortens the exposure periods. The exposure periods are approximately six to twelve times shorter than that of the conventional autoradiography. (J.P.N.)

  1. Size matters: Associations between the androgen receptor CAG repeat length and the intrafollicular hormone milieu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbo, T; Macek, M; Chrudimska, J;

    2015-01-01

    Granulosa cell (GC) expressed androgen receptors (AR) and intrafollicular androgens are central to fertility. The transactivating domain of the AR contains a polymorphic CAG repeat sequence, which is linked to the transcriptional activity of AR and may influence the GC function. This study aims to...... expression compared to medium CAG repeat lengths (P = 0.03). In conclusion, long CAG repeat lengths in the AR were associated to significant attenuated levels of androgens and an increased conversion of testosterone into oestradiol, in human small antral follicles....

  2. Identification of testosterone-/androgen receptor-regulated genes in mouse Sertoli cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiao-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Zhen-Ming; Lu, Wei; Liu, Ling; Li, Gang; Cai, Zhi-Ming; Gui, Yao-Ting; Chang, Chawnshang

    2011-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) play important roles in male spermatogenesis and fertility, yet detailed androgen/AR signals in Sertoli cells remain unclear. To identify AR target genes in Sertoli cells, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of testis between mice lacking AR in Sertoli cells (S-AR−/y) and their littermate wild-type (WT) mice. Digital gene expression analysis identified 2276 genes downregulated and 2865 genes upregulated in the S-AR−/y mice testis compared to WT ones. T...

  3. Tubulin-Targeting Chemotherapy Impairs Androgen Receptor Activity in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Horbinski, Craig; Garzotto, Mark; Qian, David Z.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Recent insights into the regulation of the androgen receptor (AR) activity led to novel therapeutic targeting of AR function in prostate cancer patients. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapy for treatment of castration-resistant-prostate cancer (CRPC), but the mechanism underlying the action of this tubulin-targeting drug is not fully understood. This study investigates the contribution of microtubules and the cytoskeleton to androgen-mediated signaling, and the consequences of their inhibit...

  4. Restoration of Spermatogenesis and Male Fertility Using an Androgen Receptor Transgene

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, William H.; Easton, Evan; Moreci, Rebecca S.; Toocheck, Corey; Anamthathmakula, Prashanth; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam

    2015-01-01

    Androgens signal through the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate male secondary sexual characteristics, reproductive tract development, prostate function, sperm production, bone and muscle mass as well as body hair growth among other functions. We developed a transgenic mouse model in which endogenous AR expression was replaced by a functionally modified AR transgene. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) was constructed containing all AR exons and introns plus 40 kb each of 5' and 3' regula...

  5. Investigation of androgen receptor antagonist compounds present in influent and effluent from a wastewater works

    OpenAIRE

    Oladapo, Francis Olumide

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of synthetic chemicals and their metabolites present in the environment can antagonise the receptor activity of androgen hormones present in wildlife and humans. With increasing global production of new synthetic chemicals, little is known about their environmental fate, health consequences and end-points. This study was conducted to identify and characterise chemicals with anti-androgenic activity present in wastewater influent and effluent. This study was underta...

  6. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Seve...

  7. Androgen regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity during fetal rabbit lung development.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, J M; Nielsen, H C

    1993-01-01

    Fetal lung development progresses in a sex-specific manner with male fetuses exhibiting delayed maturation. Androgens, both exogenous and endogenous, inhibit while epidermal growth factor (EGF) enhances fetal lung development. We hypothesized that one mechanism responsible for the delay in male fetal lung development is an androgen-induced delay in EGF receptor binding activity. We measured EGF binding in sex-specific fetal rabbit lung plasma membranes isolated from control fetuses (days 21, ...

  8. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Junxi; Hadoke, Patrick W.F.; Takov, Kaloyan; Korczak, Agnieszka; Denvir, Martin A.; Smith, Lee B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO) and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall. Methods and Results Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO) from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO), endoth...

  9. An electrospun scaffold loaded with anti-androgen receptor compound for accelerating wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Cassandra Chong; Yiwei Wang; Peter K. M. Maitz; Ulla Simanainen; Zhe Li

    2013-01-01

    Current dermal regenerative scaffolds provide wound coverage, and structural support and guidance for tissue repair, but usually lack enough bio-signals needed for speeding up skin cell growth, migration, wound closure, and skin regeneration. In this study, an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor called ASC-J9 is used to demonstrate the concept and feasibility of fabricating drug-loaded scaffolds via electrospinning. Inhibition of androgen is known to promote skin wound healing. The novel ASC-J9 ...

  10. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A.; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide...

  11. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  12. Identification of testosterone-/androgen receptor-regulated genes in mouse Sertoli cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-Xia Zhang; Xiao-Yan Zhang; Zhen-Ming Zhang; Wei Lu; Ling Liu; Gang Li; Zhi-Ming Cai; Yao-Ting Gui; Chawnshang Chang

    2012-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) play important roles in male spermatogenesis and fertility,yet detailed androgenlAR signals in Sertoli cells remain unclear.To identify AR target genes in Sertoli cells,we analyzed the gene expression profiles of testis between mice lacking AR in Sertoli cells (S-AR-/y) and their littermate wild-type (WT) mice.Digital gene expression analysis identified 2276 genes downregulated and 2865 genes upregulated in the S-AR-/y mice testis compared to WT ones.To further nail down the difference within Sertoli cells,we first constructed Sertoli cell line TM4 with stably transfected AR (named as TM4/AR) and found androgens failed to transactivate AR in Sertoli TM4 and TM4/AR cells.Interestingly,additional transient transfection of AR-cDNA resulted in significant androgen responsiveness with TM4/AR cells showing 10 times more androgen sensitivity than TM4 cells.In the condition where maximal androgen response was demonstrated,we then analyzed gene expression and found the expression levels of 2313 genes were changed more than twofold by transient transfection of AR-cDNA in the presence of testosterone.Among these genes,603 androgen-/ AR-regulated genes,including 164 upregulated and 439 downregulated,were found in both S-AR-/y mice testis and TM4/AR cells.Using informatics analysis,the gene ontology was applied to analyze these androgen-/AR-regulated genes to predict the potential roles of androgen/AR in the process of spermatogenesis.Together,using gene analysis in both S-AR-/y mice testis and TM4/AR cells may help us to better understand the androgen/AR signals in Sertoli cells and their influences in spermatogenesis.

  13. Androgen receptor isoforms in human and rat prostate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-JieXIA; Gang-YaoHAO; Xiao-DaTANG

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoforms and its variability of expression in human and rat prostatic tissues. Methods: Human benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatic cancer tissues were obtained from patients undergoing prostatectomy, and rat ventral prostate was incised 3 days after castration. Forty-one AR-positive BPH specimens, 3 prostatic cancer specimens, and 6 rat prostates were used. After processing at 4℃, the tissues were examined by means of high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) technique to determine their AR isoforms. Results:From the prostatic specimens, 3 types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5, 6.0, and 5.3. In human BPH tissues, 15/41 (36.6%) specimens showed all the three types of isoforms, while 19/41 (46.3%) showed 2 isoforms at various combinations and 7/41(17.1%), 1 isoform. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, one showed 3 isoforms, one, 2 isoforms, and the other failed to show any isoform. All rat prostatic tissues showed 2 isoforms at different combinations. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to the isoforms was inhibited by the addition of 100-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, but not progesterone, oestradiol or diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: AR isoforms are different in different patients. Although their genesis is not clear, the therapeutic implication of the present observation appears to be interesting, that may help clarifying the individual differences in the response to hormonal therapy.(Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:307-310)

  14. Potent anti-prostate cancer agents derived from a novel androgen receptor down-regulating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Khandelwal, Aakanksha; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Bruno, Robert D; Gediya, Lalji K; Njar, Vincent C O

    2008-04-01

    The search for novel androgen receptor (AR) down-regulating agents by catalyst HipHop pharmacophore modeling led to the discovery of some lead molecules. Unexpectedly, the effect of these leads on human prostate cancer LNCaP cell viability did not correlate with the ability of the compounds to cause down-regulation of AR protein expression. Through rational synthetic optimization of the lead compound (BTB01434), we have discovered a series of novel substituted diaryl molecules as potent anti-prostate cancer agents. Some compounds (1-6) were shown to be extremely potent inhibitors of LNCaP cell viability with GI(50) values in the nanomolar range (1.45-83 nM). The most potent compound (4-methylphenyl)[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]amine (5) with a GI(50) value of 1.45 nM is 27,000 times more potent than our lead compound BTB01434 (GI(50)=39.8 microM). In addition, some of the compounds exhibited modest anti-androgenic activities and one was also a potent inhibitor (GI(50)=850 nM) of PC-3 (AR-null) cell growth. A clear structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been established for activity against LNCaP cells, where potent molecules possess two substituted/unsubstituted aromatic rings connected through a sulfonamide linker. These novel compounds are strong candidates for development for the treatment of hormone-sensitive and importantly hormone-refractory prostate cancers in humans. PMID:18316193

  15. Steroid-induced androgen receptor–oestradiol receptor β–Src complex triggers prostate cancer cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Migliaccio, Antimo; Castoria, Gabriella; Di Domenico, Marina; de Falco, Antonietta; Bilancio, Antonio; Lombardi, Maria; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Ametrano, Donatella; Zannini, Maria Stella; Abbondanza, Ciro; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of human prostate carcinoma-derived LNCaP cells with androgen or oestradiol triggers simultaneous association of androgen receptor and oestradiol receptor β with Src, activates the Src/Raf-1/Erk-2 pathway and stimulates cell proliferation. Surprisingly, either androgen or oestradiol action on each of these steps is inhibited by both anti-androgens and anti-oestrogens. Similar findings for oestradiol receptor α were observed in MCF-7 or T47D cells stimulated by either oestradiol or a...

  16. Disruption of androgen and estrogen receptor activity in prostate cancer by a novel dietary diterpene carnosol: implications for chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremy J Johnson; Syed, Deeba N.; Suh, Yewseok; Heren, Chenelle R.; Saleem, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Emerging data is suggesting that estrogens, in addition to androgens, may also be contributing to the development of prostate cancer (PCa). In view of this notion agents that target estrogens, in addition to androgens, may be a novel approach for PCa chemoprevention and treatment. Thus, the identification and development of non-toxic dietary agents capable of disrupting androgen receptor (AR) in addition to estrogen receptor (ER) could be extremely useful in the management of PCa. Through mol...

  17. Expression and function of androgen receptor coactivator p44/Mep50/WDR77 in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ligr

    Full Text Available Hormones, including estrogen and progesterone, and their receptors play an important role in the development and progression of ovarian carcinoma. Androgen, its receptor and coactivators have also been implicated in these processes. p44/Mep50/WDR77 was identified as a subunit of the methylosome complex and lately characterized as a steroid receptor coactivator that enhances androgen receptor as well as estrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional activity in a ligand-dependent manner. We previously described distinct expression and function of p44 in prostate, testis, and breast cancers. In this report, we examined the expression and function of p44 in ovarian cancer. In contrast to findings in prostate and testicular cancer and similar to breast cancer, p44 shows strong cytoplasmic localization in morphologically normal ovarian surface and fallopian tube epithelia, while nuclear p44 is observed in invasive ovarian carcinoma. We observed that p44 can serve as a coactivator of both androgen receptor (AR and estrogen receptor (ER in ovarian cells. Further, overexpression of nuclear-localized p44 stimulates proliferation and invasion in ovarian cancer cells in the presence of estrogen or androgen. These findings strongly suggest that p44 plays a role in mediating the effects of hormones during ovarian tumorigenesis.

  18. Prolonged androgen deprivation leads to downregulation of androgen receptor and prostate-specific membrane antigen in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Fulton, Melody D.; JOHNSON, JACQUELINE M.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2012-01-01

    Emergence of androgen-independent cancer cells during androgen deprivation therapy presents a significant challenge to successful treatment outcomes in prostate cancer. Elucidating the role of androgen deprivation in the transition from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state may enable the development of more effective therapeutic strategies against prostate cancer. Herein, we describe an in vitro model for assessing the effects of continuous androgen-deprivation on prostate c...

  19. Studies on Androgen Receptor mRNA expression in Pancreas, Hypothalamus and Ovary of Androgen Sterilized Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li WANG; Jing-wen HOU; Li-min LU; Jin YU; Sui-qi GUI

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression in pancreas,hypothalamus and ovary of androgen sterilized rats (ASR)Methods ASR model was established by subcutaneous injection of testosterone propionate to SD female rats at the age of 9 days. Around the age of 106 days (proestrus),all rats were killed, serum △ 4-andronestedione (△ 4-A), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), insulin (Ins) and C-peptide (C-P)were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Total RNA in pancreas, hypothalamus and ovary were extracted and the amount of AR mRNA was quantitatedly analyzed by RT-PCR with single base mutant template as inner standard. Results Serum concentrations of△ 4-A, TT, FT, Ins and C-P in ASR model rats were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0. 05, P<0. 01). The expression of AR mRNA in pancreas, hypothalamus and ovary increased significantly (P<0. 05,P<0. 01) of model rats as compared with control group. Conclusion The elevated serum androgen levels in ASR model could enhance the expression of AR mRNA levels in pancreas, hypothalamus and ovary, which further induce hyperinsulinemia and anovulation.

  20. Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 Has Dual Functions as a Major Regulator of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changmeng Cai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1, KDM1A functions as a transcriptional corepressor through demethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4 but has a coactivator function on some genes through mechanisms that are unclear. We show that LSD1, interacting with CoREST, associates with and coactivates androgen receptor (AR on a large fraction of androgen-stimulated genes. A subset of these AR/LSD1-associated enhancer sites have histone 3 threonine 6 phosphorylation (H3T6ph, and these sites are further enriched for androgen-stimulated genes. Significantly, despite its coactivator activity, LSD1 still mediates H3K4me2 demethylation at these androgen-stimulated enhancers. FOXA1 is also associated with LSD1 at AR-regulated enhancer sites, and a FOXA1 interaction with LSD1 enhances binding of both proteins at these sites. These findings show that LSD1 functions broadly as a regulator of AR function, that it maintains a transcriptional repression function at AR-regulated enhancers through H3K4 demethylation, and that it has a distinct AR-linked coactivator function mediated by demethylation of other substrates.

  1. Effects of antiandrogens on transformation and transcription activation of wild-type and mutated (LNCaP) androgen receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J. Veldscholte (Jos); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractLNCaP cells contain androgen receptors with a mutation in the steroid binding domain (Thr 868 changed to Ala) resulting in a changed hormone specificity. Both the wild-type and mutated androgen receptors were transfected into COS cells. Transcription activation was studied in cells co-tr

  2. Measurement of androgen receptor expression in adult liver, fetal liver, and Hep-G2 cells by the polymerase chain reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Stubbs, A P; Engelman, J L; Walker, J I; Faik, P; Murphy, G M; Wilkinson, M L

    1994-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most commonly fatal malignant tumour worldwide. The role of androgen receptors, which have been found in hepatocellular carcinoma, is controversial. Sequence specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to quantify, for the first time, the expression of androgen receptor in four adult liver biopsy specimens (HL-A to HL-D), fetal liver, and Hep-G2 cells. The measurement of androgen receptor is expressed as a ratio (androgen receptor: beta-actin) of the valu...

  3. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine the...... CAG-repeat number in relation to body fat mass and circulating androgens, and to identify the best hormonal marker of low muscle size amongst total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based study of 783 Danish men aged 20......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake...

  4. S578N mutation of the androgen receptor in an adolescent with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yuan; WANG De-fen; LI Xiao-ying; YANG Jun; WANG Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) was first described by the American gynecologist Morris in 1953 and was initially described in 82 patients.1 The syndrome was designated "testicular feminization syndrome" , because the testes produce hormones with estrogen-like actions.1 Clinical AIS manifestations include the appearance of normal female external genitalia without internal female genital organs. Other clinical manifestations include undescended testes, normal female breast development, and scant axillary and pubic hair. AIS is the most common condition that cancause male undermasculinisation.

  5. Uncovering the Roles of miRNAs and Their Relationship with Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ChunJiao, Song; Huan, Chen; ChaoYang, Xu; GuoMei, Ru

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly occurring malignant tumor in Europe and America. Normal and neoplastic growth of prostate gland are dependent on androgen receptor (AR) expression and function. PCa is driven by androgen and its receptor, and they continue to be the key drivers of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). CRPC is the terminal stage of PCa and seriously jeopardizes the patient's quality of life and lifespan. miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs, 18–25 nt in lengt...

  6. The impact of the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene on muscle and adipose tissues in 20-29-year-old Danish men: Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2010-01-01

    The number of CAG repeats (CAG(n)) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor.......The number of CAG repeats (CAG(n)) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor....

  7. Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, N. E.; Max, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of orchiectomy (GDX) and of subsequent administration of testosterone propionate (TP) or 17(beta)-estradiol (E2) on the maximum binding (Bmax) and apparent Kd of the cytosolic androgen receptor in levator ani (LA) and skeletal muscles of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats are investigated experimentally. The results are presented in graphs and discussed. In LA, BMAX is found to rise from a control level of 2.5 fmol/mg protein to 280, 600, 478, and 133 percent of control at 12 h, 14 d, 30 d, and 44 d after GDX, respectively, while Kd increased only insignificantly (from 680 to 960 fM); Bmax is held at control levels for 6 h by cycloheximide given at GDX, is unaffected by TP given at 30 d, and is further increased (by 480 percent at 44 d) by administration of E2 at 30 d. Bmax in skeletal muscles is found to increase to 139, 212, 220, and 158 percent of control at 12 h, 14 d, 30 d, and 44 d, respectively; Bmax is returned to control at 44 d by TP at 30 d but is not affected by E2. The effect of E2 in LA is attributed to either induction of the cytosolic receptor or a decreased rate of receptor degradation.

  8. Disruption of androgen and estrogen receptor activity in prostate cancer by a novel dietary diterpene carnosol: implications for chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Syed, Deeba N.; Suh, Yewseok; Heren, Chenelle R.; Saleem, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Emerging data is suggesting that estrogens, in addition to androgens, may also be contributing to the development of prostate cancer (PCa). In view of this notion agents that target estrogens, in addition to androgens, may be a novel approach for PCa chemoprevention and treatment. Thus, the identification and development of non-toxic dietary agents capable of disrupting androgen receptor (AR) in addition to estrogen receptor (ER) could be extremely useful in the management of PCa. Through molecular modeling we found carnosol, a dietary diterpene fits within the ligand binding domain of both AR and ER-α. Using a TR-FRET assay we found that carnosol interacts with both AR and ER-α and additional experiments confirmed that it functions as a receptor antagonist with no agonist effects. LNCaP, 22Rv1, and MCF7 cells treated with carnosol (20–40 µM) showed decreased protein expression of AR and ER-α. Oral administration of carnosol at 30 mg/kg five days weekly for 28 days to 22Rv1 PCa xenografted mice suppressed tumor growth by 36% (p = 0.028) and was associated with a decrease in serum PSA by 26% (p=0.0042). These properties make carnosol unique to any known anti-androgen or anti-estrogen investigated so far for the simultaneous disruption of AR and ER-α. We suggest that carnosol may be developed or chemically modified through more rigorous structure activity relationship studies for a new class of investigational agents - a dual AR/ER modulator. PMID:20736335

  9. Purification and immunochemical characterization of the cytoplasmic androgen-binding protein of rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytoplasmic androgen-binding (CAB) protein of the male rate liver has been implicated to play a role in the androgen-dependent regulation of α2u-globulin synthesis. The liver of the adult male rat contains about 50 fmol of specific high-affinity androgen-binding activity per milligram of total cytosolic protein. Photoaffinity labeling with [3H]R-1881 followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography shows that the CAB is a 31-kilodalton protein. By means of DEAE-cellulose chromatography and preparative SCS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the authors have purified the CAB protein to electrophoretic homogeneity and have raised polyclonal rabbit antiserum that is monospecific to this protein. In the sucrose density gradient, the antiserum reacted with the androgen-binding component of the male liver cytosol prelabeled with tritiated dihydrotestosterone. Western blot analysis of the liver cytosol showed that the antiserum recognizes only the 31-kDa androgen-binding component. Such immunoblotting also showed that unlike the young adult, the androgen-insensitive states during prepuberty and senescence are associated with a marked reduction in the hepatic concentration of the immunoreactive CAB protein. No immunochemical cross-reactivity between CAB and another androgen-binding component of Mr 29K was observed. The latter finding favors the possibility that 31- and 29-kDa androgen-binding components may have distinct sequence structure

  10. Androgen Receptor in Macrophages of Male Rat is Greater Than in Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Ahmadi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available he presence and possible sex differences of androgen receptor in peritoneal macrophages was investigated using immunomagnetic beads. Macrophages were incubated with different concentrations of [3H]-5αDHT in the presence or absence of a 100 fold excess of unlabelled 5α-DHT. Labelled cells were separated from unbound steroid by immunomagnetic beads coated with anti-rat macrophage antibody. The binding identified in the rat macrophages was highly selective towards androgenic compounds. The dissociation constant (kd value for the receptor was calculated to be 3.3X10-9M and 5X10-9M for macrophages of male and female rat respectively. The number of receptors in each cell was 792±3 and 120±1 for male and female respectively. Indicating a sex differences in androgen receptor (p<0.001. Taken together it can be concluded that part of sex differences in immune responses and also auto-immune disease could be related to sex differences in androgen receptor in macrophages.

  11. Anti-androgen effects of cypermethrin on the amino- and carboxyl-terminal interaction of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Both the known AR antagonist nilutamide and the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin inhibited DHT-induced AR N/C interaction in the mammalian two-hybrid assay. However, cypermethrin was a weaker androgen antagonist than nilutamide. Highlights: ► We have developed the mammalian two-hybrid assay. ► The assay displayed appropriate response to DHT and nilutamide. ► The N/C interaction was induced by DHT in a dose-dependent manner. ► Nilutamide inhibited DHT-induced AR N/C interaction. ► Cypermethrin exhibits inhibitory effects on DHT-induced AR N/C interaction. -- Abstract: The pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin has been demonstrated to be an environmental anti-androgen in the androgen receptor (AR) reporter gene assay. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal (N/C) interaction is required for transcription potential of the AR. In order to characterize the anti-androgen effects of cypermethrin involved in the N/C interaction of AR, the mammalian two-hybrid assay has been developed in the study. The fusion vectors pVP16-ARNTD, pM-ARLBD and the pG5CAT Reporter Vector were cotransfected into the CV-1 cells. The assay displayed appropriate response to the potent, classical AR agonist 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and known AR antagonist nilutamide. The N/C interaction was induced by DHT from 10−11 M to 10−5 M in a dose-dependent manner. Nilutamide did not activate N/C interaction, while inhibited DHT-induced AR N/C interaction at the concentrations from 10−7 M to 10−5 M. Treatment of CV-1 cells with cypermethrin alone did not activate the reporter CAT. Cypermethrin significantly decreased the DHT-induced reporter CAT expression at the higher concentration of 10−5 M. The mammalian two-hybrid assay provides a promising tool both for defining mechanism involved in AR N/C interaction of EDCs and for screening of chemicals with androgen agonistic and antagonistic activities. Cypermethrin exhibits inhibitory effects on the DHT-induced AR N

  12. Steroid-induced androgen receptor–oestradiol receptor β–Src complex triggers prostate cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Antimo; Castoria, Gabriella; Di Domenico, Marina; de Falco, Antonietta; Bilancio, Antonio; Lombardi, Maria; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Ametrano, Donatella; Zannini, Maria Stella; Abbondanza, Ciro; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of human prostate carcinoma-derived LNCaP cells with androgen or oestradiol triggers simultaneous association of androgen receptor and oestradiol receptor β with Src, activates the Src/Raf-1/Erk-2 pathway and stimulates cell proliferation. Surprisingly, either androgen or oestradiol action on each of these steps is inhibited by both anti-androgens and anti-oestrogens. Similar findings for oestradiol receptor α were observed in MCF-7 or T47D cells stimulated by either oestradiol or androgens. Microinjection of LNCaP, MCF-7 and T47D cells with SrcK– abolishes steroid-stimulated S-phase entry. Data from transfected Cos cells confirm and extend the findings from these cells. Hormone-stimulated Src interaction with the androgen receptor and oestradiol receptor α or β is detected using glutathione S-transferase fusion constructs. Src SH2 interacts with phosphotyrosine 537 of oestradiol receptor α and the Src SH3 domain with a proline-rich stretch of the androgen receptor. The role of this phosphotyrosine is stressed by its requirement for association of oestradiol receptor α with Src and consequent activation of Src in intact Cos cells. PMID:11032808

  13. Specific interaction of radioactive anti-androgen TSAA-291 with androgen receptor in rat prostates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A steroidal anti-androgen TSSA-291 (16β-ethyl-17β-hydroxy-4-oestren-3-one) bound to a macromolecular component in the cytosol of rat ventral prostates with high affinity (Kdsub(d) = 5.0 x 10-9M) and in a saturable manner. The number of binding sites was comparable to that for 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT). [3H]TSAA-291 binding was effectively displaced by unlabelled 5α-DHT, 19-nortestosterone and cyproterone acetate but to a lesser degree by corticosterone. Glycerol density-gradient centrifugation analysis revealed that the sedimentation coefficient of the [3H]-TSAA-291-macromolecule complex was 3-4.5 S. However, when the unlabelled cytosol was fractionated by glycerol density-gradient centrifugation before the binding of [3H]TSAA-291 was examined, specific binding of [3H]TSAA-291 was observed in fractions corresponding to 8-10 S. Binding of the [3H]TSAA-291-macromolecules comples to prostatic nuclei and DNA-cellulose was considerably less than binding by the [3H]5α-DHT-macromolecule complex. Instability of the TSAA-291 binding coponent on heat treatment before and after complex formation was also revealed and the results are discussed in terms of the anti-androgenic activity of TSAA-291. (author)

  14. Beyond aggression: Androgen-receptor blockade modulates social interaction in wild meerkats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Greene, Lydia K; Goncalves, Ines Braga; Fenkes, Miriam; Wisse, Jillian H; Drewe, Julian A; Manser, Marta B; Clutton-Brock, Tim; Drea, Christine M

    2016-02-01

    In male vertebrates, androgens are inextricably linked to reproduction, social dominance, and aggression, often at the cost of paternal investment or prosociality. Testosterone is invoked to explain rank-related reproductive differences, but its role within a status class, particularly among subordinates, is underappreciated. Recent evidence, especially for monogamous and cooperatively breeding species, suggests broader androgenic mediation of adult social interaction. We explored the actions of androgens in subordinate, male members of a cooperatively breeding species, the meerkat (Suricata suricatta). Although male meerkats show no rank-related testosterone differences, subordinate helpers rarely reproduce. We blocked androgen receptors, in the field, by treating subordinate males with the antiandrogen, flutamide. We monitored androgen concentrations (via baseline serum and time-sequential fecal sampling) and recorded behavior within their groups (via focal observation). Relative to controls, flutamide-treated animals initiated less and received more high-intensity aggression (biting, threatening, feeding competition), engaged in more prosocial behavior (social sniffing, grooming, huddling), and less frequently initiated play or assumed a 'dominant' role during play, revealing significant androgenic effects across a broad range of social behavior. By contrast, guarding or vigilance and measures of olfactory and vocal communication in subordinate males appeared unaffected by flutamide treatment. Thus, androgens in male meerkat helpers are aligned with the traditional trade-off between promoting reproductive and aggressive behavior at a cost to affiliation. Our findings, based on rare endocrine manipulation in wild mammals, show a more pervasive role for androgens in adult social behavior than is often recognized, with possible relevance for understanding tradeoffs in cooperative systems. PMID:26545817

  15. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  16. AOP description: Androgen receptor agonism leading to reproductive dysfunction (in fish)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This adverse outcome pathway details the linkage between binding and activation of androgen receptor as a nuclear transcription factor in females and the adverse effect of reduced cumulative fecundity in repeat-spawning fish species. Cumulative fecundity is the most apical endpoi...

  17. Cross species sensitivity to a novel androgen receptor agonist of potential environmental concern, spironolactone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spironolactone (SPL) is a pharmaceutical that is used in humans as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist to treat conditions like hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female pattern hair loss, in addition to its common usage as a diuretic to treat hypertension. Althoug...

  18. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego;

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...

  19. [Epigenetic Regulation by Androgen Receptor and Possible Function in Bone Metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yuuki

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic regulation underlying AR(Androgen receptor)mediated transcription is important component to understand pathophysiology of osteoporosis in men. In this commentary, it is reported recent findings related to epigenetic landscape governed by AR and its cofactors including lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), and possible implication for bone metabolism. PMID:27346313

  20. Sequential Androgen Receptor Pathway Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer: Piling-Up The Benefits or a Case for Cross-Resistance?

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand Tombal

    2014-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been accumulating evidence that, even in a low serum testosterone environment, the androgen receptor (AR) remains the main driver of prostate cancer progression. This has led to the discovery and clinical development of new anti-androgens and androgen biosynthesis inhibitors. Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate are the lead compounds of this new generation of agents, but multiple other agents are on their way. Because they both target the ligand-dependent regu...

  1. Selectivity in progesterone and androgen receptor binding of progestagens used in oral contraceptives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative binding affinities (RBAs) of four progestational compounds (norethisterone, levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene) for the human progesterone and androgen receptors were measured in MCF-7 cytosol and intact MCF-7 cells. For the binding to the progesterone receptor, both Org 2058 and Org 3236 (or 3-keto-desogestrel) were used as labelled ligands. The following ranking (low to high) for the RBA of the nuclear (intact cells) progesterone receptor irrespective of the ligand used is found: norethisterone much less than levonorgestrel less than 3-keto-destogestrel less than gestodene. The difference between the various progestagens is significant with the exception of that between 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene, when Org 2058 is used as ligand. For the cytosolic progesterone receptor, the same order is found with the exception that similar RBAs are found for gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel. The four progestagens clearly differ with respect to binding to the androgen receptor using dihydrotestosterone as labelled ligand in intact cells; the ranking (low to high) is: norethisterone less than 3 keto-desogestrel less than levonorgestrel and gestodene. The difference between 3-keto-desogestrel and levonorgestrel or gestodene is significant. The selectivity indices (ratio of the mean RBA for the progesterone receptor to that of androgen receptor) in intact cells are significantly higher for 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene than for levonorgestrel and norethisterone. From these results we conclude that the introduction of the 18-methyl in norethisterone (levonorgestel) increases both the binding to the progesterone and androgen receptors

  2. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    OpenAIRE

    Dhiman, Vineet K; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-stu...

  3. Endocrine disruptors differently influence estrogen receptor β and androgen receptor in male and female rat VSMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Marco; Bulzomi, Pamela; Lecis, Marco; Leone, Stefano; Campesi, Ilaria; Franconi, Flavia; Marino, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Sex steroid hormones differently control the major physiological processes in male and female organisms. In particular, their effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration are at the root of sex/gender-related differences reported in the cardiovascular system. Several exogenous substances, defined endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), could interfere with these androgen and estrogen effects; however, the sex/gender-related susceptibility of VSMC motility to EDCs is completely unknown. Here, the effect of naturally occurring (naringenin, Nar) and synthetic (bisphenol A, BPA) EDCs on male and female VSMC motility has been evaluated. 17β-estradiol (E2, 0.1 nM-1 µM) induced a dose-dependent inhibition of motility in female-derived VSMC. In contrast, neither dihydrotestosterone (DHT, 0.01-100 nM) nor the common precursor of sex steroid hormones, testosterone (Tes, 0.01-100 nM) modified male-derived VSMC motility. Estrogen receptor (ER) β subtype-dependent activation of p38 was necessary for the E2 effect on cell motility. High BPA concentration prevented E2 effects in female-derived cells being without any effect in male-derived cells. Nar mimicked E2 effects on female-derived cells even in the presence of E2 or BPA. Intriguingly, Nar also inhibited the male-derived VSMC mobility. This latter effect was prevented by ERβ inhibitor, but not by the androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor. As a whole, ERβ-dependent signals in VSMC results more susceptible to the impact of EDCs than AR signals suggesting a possible high and overall susceptibility of female to EDCs. However, several male-derived cells, including VSMC, express ERβ, which could also serve as target of EDC disruption in male organisms. PMID:24347325

  4. CLONING, EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists, including those recommended for use in the EPA's Tier 1 screening battery, typically use mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) such as rat or human. Although we know that the amino acid s...

  5. The Androgen Receptor Regulates PPARγ Expression and Activity in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokpa, Emuejevoke; Bolden, Adrienne; Stewart, LaMonica V

    2016-12-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates growth and differentiation within normal prostate and prostate cancers. However the factors that control PPARγ within the prostate cancers have not been characterized. The goal of this study was to examine whether the androgen receptor (AR) regulates PPARγ expression and function within human prostate cancer cells. qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed nanomolar concentrations of the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) decrease PPARγ mRNA and protein within the castration-resistant, AR-positive C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cell lines. The AR antagonists bicalutamide and enzalutamide blocked the ability of DHT to reduce PPARγ levels. In addition, siRNA mediated knockdown of AR increased PPARγ protein levels and ligand-induced PPARγ transcriptional activity within the C4-2 cell line. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors that interfere with AR function increased the level of basal PPARγ and prevented the DHT-mediated suppression of PPARγ. These data suggest that AR normally functions to suppress PPARγ expression within AR-positive prostate cancer cells. To determine whether increases in AR protein would influence PPARγ expression and activity, we used lipofectamine-based transfections to overexpress AR within the AR-null PC-3 cells. The addition of AR to PC-3 cells did not significantly alter PPARγ protein levels. However, the ability of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone to induce activation of a PPARγ-driven luciferase reporter and induce expression of FABP4 was suppressed in AR-positive PC-3 cells. Together, these data indicate AR serves as a key modulator of PPARγ expression and function within prostate tumors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2664-2672, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945682

  6. Restoration of the cellular secretory milieu overrides androgen dependence of in vivo generated castration resistant prostate cancer cells overexpressing the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Huang, Yanfang; Ratnam, Manohar

    2016-07-22

    It is believed that growth of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells is enabled by sensitization to minimal residual post-castrate androgen due to overexpression of the androgen receptor (AR). Evidence is derived from androgen-induced colony formation in the absence of cell-secreted factors or from studies involving forced AR overexpression in hormone-dependent cells. On the other hand, standard cell line models established from CRPC patient tumors (e.g., LNCaP and VCaP) are hormone-dependent and require selection pressure in castrated mice to re-emerge as CRPC cells and the resulting tumors then tend to be insensitive to the androgen antagonist enzalutamide. Therefore, we examined established CRPC model cells produced by castration of mice bearing hormone-dependent cell line xenografts including CRPC cells overexpressing full-length AR (C4-2) or co-expressing wtAR and splice-variant AR-V7 that is incapable of ligand binding (22Rv1). In standard colony formation assays, C4-2 cells were shown to be androgen-dependent and sensitive to enzalutamide whereas 22Rv1 cells were incapable of colony formation under identical conditions. However, both C4-2 and 22Rv1 cells formed colonies in conditioned media derived from the same cells or from HEK293 fibroblasts that were proven to lack androgenic activity. This effect was (i) not enhanced by androgen, (ii) insensitive to enzalutamide, (iii) dependent on AR (in C4-2) and on AR-V7 and wtAR (in 22Rv1) and (iv) sensitive to inhibitors of several signaling pathways, similar to androgen-stimulation. Therefore, during progression to CRPC in vivo, coordinate cellular changes accompanying overexpression of AR may enable cooperation between hormone-independent activity of AR and actions of cellular secretory factors to completely override androgen-dependence and sensitivity to drugs targeting hormonal factors. PMID:27179779

  7. Gene expression changes in rat prostate after activation or blocking of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Dalgaard, Majken; Holst, Bjørn;

    2005-01-01

    Several endpoints of different molecular complexity were studied in the Hershberger assay in order to evaluate the specificity and suitability of this test as a broad screening model. Androgen and estrogen receptors were activated or blocked, and expression of typical estrogen- or androgen...... anti-estrogen, ICI 182780, only affected ODC expression. Therefore, estrogenic or anti-estrogenic compounds would not be expected to seriously affect the outcome of a Hershberger test. However, EB given alone to castrated rats resulted in various effects. EB increased seminal vesicle weight, an effect...... reversed by ICI 182780, and affected TRPM-2, PBP C3, ODC, IGF-1, AR, and ERa mRNA levels. AR expression in the prostate seemed to be under regulation of both estrogens and androgens, as ICI 182780 inhibited the testosterone-induced AR expression, and flutamide inhibited the EB-induced AR expression. These...

  8. SIRT1 IS REQUIRED FOR ANTAGONIST-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTIONAL REPRESSION OF ANDROGEN-RESPONSIVE GENES BY THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Yan; Ngo, Duyen; Forman, Lora W.; Qin, David C.; Jacob, Johanna; Faller, Douglas V

    2007-01-01

    Androgen antagonists or androgen deprivation is a primary therapeutic modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Invariably, however, the disease becomes progressive and unresponsive to androgen ablation therapy (hormone refractory). The molecular mechanisms by which the androgen antagonists inhibit prostate cancer proliferation are not fully defined. In this report, we demonstrate that SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide-dependent histone deacetylase linked to the regulation of ...

  9. Human reporter gene assays: Transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor is modulated by the cellular environment and promoter context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and mediates the physiological effects of androgens. Androgens are essential for male development and disruption of androgen signaling may cause androgen-dependent developmental defects and/or tumors. Here we present a comparative analysis of various model systems for the investigation of endocrine active compounds in human cell lines. We generated reporter plasmids containing androgen response elements derived from the human secretory component or the rat probasin genes as well as the glucocorticoid consensus response element and compared their activities to that of the mouse mammary tumor virus promotor. Additionally, we generated an expression plasmid containing the AR cDNA derived from LNCaP cells. In 22Rv1 cells transiently transfected with human AR, all reporters displayed a dose-dependent, high activity when treated with androgens. Interestingly, the potency of testosterone and its metabolite dihydrotestosterone was very low in HepG2 but not in 22Rv1 cells, independent of the reporter used. The efficacies of the androgens tested were comparable in both cell lines but highly dependent on the reporter used. Based on these results, 22Rv1 cells provide a highly sensitive in vitro test system to analyze endocrine activities of xenobiotics. Furthermore, this study highlights the need to investigate the (anti-) androgenic activity of compounds in dependence of the cellular and promoter context

  10. Androgen via p21 Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor α-induced JNK Activation and Apoptosis*

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Fangming; Kokontis, John; Lin, Yuting; Liao, Shutsung; Lin, Anning; Xiang, Jialing

    2009-01-01

    The male hormone androgen is a growth/survival factor for its target tissues or organs. Yet, the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. Here, we report that androgen via p21 inhibits tumor necrosis factor α-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Inhibition by androgen requires the transcription activity of androgen receptor (AR) and de novo protein synthesis. Androgen·AR induces expression of p21 that in turn inhibits tumor necrosis factor α-induced JNK and apoptosis. Furthermore, ge...

  11. Genetic and Functional Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggenwirth, Hennie

    1998-01-01

    textabstractNuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are intermediary factors through which extracellular signals regulate expression of genes that are involved in homeostasis, development, and differentiation (Beato et al. '995, Mangelsdorf and Evans 1995). These receptors are characterized by a modular structure, with domains involved in transcription activation, DNA binding. hormone binding, and dimerization. The nuclear receptor super-family comprises three subfamilies of receptors, which might h...

  12. Polymorphic variation in the androgen receptor gene: association with risk of testicular germ cell cancer and metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Västermark, Åke; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg; Hagströmer, Oskar; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Eberhard, Jakob; Ståhl, Olof; Cedermark, Gabriella Cohn; Rastkhani, Hamideh; Daugaard, Gedske; Arver, Stefan; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    Increasing incidence of testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is most probably related to environment and lifestyle. However, an underlying genetic predisposition may play a role and since sex steroids are assumed to be important for the rise and progression of TGCC, a study of androgen receptor (AR...... endocrine disruptors. From a biological point of view, our findings strengthen the hypothesis of the importance of androgen action in the aetiology and pathogenesis of testicular malignancy. Future studies should focus on the impact of sex hormones on foetal germ cell development and the interaction between...... environmental factors and androgen receptor variants in relation to the risk of testicular malignancy....

  13. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents

  14. Antiproliferation effects of an androgen receptor triple-helix forming oligonucleotide on prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To provide experimental basis for antigene radiation therapy through exploring the effects of antigene strategy on androgen receptor (AR) expression and proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Methods: The triple-helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO) targeting 2447-2461nt of AR cDNA was designed and transfected LNCaP prostate cancer cells with liposome. 24-72 h after transfection, the cellular proliferation was detected by 3H-thymidine (TdR) incorporation test, the expression of AR gene was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and expression of AR protein was performed by radioligand binding assay. The results of TFO were compared with antisense oligonucleotide (ASON). Results: At all time points, the AR expression levels in TFO group were markedly lower than that of ASON group (P<0.05). The inhibitory rate of TFO for cellular proliferation was significantly higher than that of ASON (P<0.05). Conclusion: The TFO was a potent inhibitor for AR expression and cell proliferation of LNCaP cells , and could be used in antigene radiotherapy. (authors)

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Katsuji; Miyawaki, Toshio; Hitaka, Takenori; Imai, Yumi N; Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Junichi; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Tasaka, Akihiro; Shiraishi, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-05-15

    To develop effective drugs for hypogonadism, sarcopenia, and cachexia, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that exhibit not only anabolic effects on organs such as muscles and the central nervous system (CNS) but also neutral or antagonistic effects on the prostate. Based on the information obtained from a docking model with androgen receptor (AR), we modified a hit compound A identified through high-throughput screening. Among the prepared compounds, 1-(4-cyano-1-naphthyl)-2,3-disubstituted pyrrolidine derivatives 17h, 17m, and 17j had highly potent AR agonistic activities in vitro and good tissue selectivity in vivo. These derivatives increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without influencing the prostate and seminal vesicle. In addition, these compounds induced sexual behavior in castrated rats, indicating that the compounds could also act as agonists on the CNS. PMID:25862209

  16. Androgen receptor antagonists compromise T cell response against prostate cancer leading to early tumor relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Xu, Meng; Liang, Yong; Yang, Kaiting; Guo, Yajun; Yang, Xuanming; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Surgical and medical androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a cornerstone for prostate cancer treatment, but relapse usually occurs. We herein show that orchiectomy synergizes with immunotherapy, whereas the more widely used treatment of medical ADT involving androgen receptor (AR) antagonists suppresses immunotherapy. Furthermore, we observed that the use of medical ADT could unexpectedly impair the adaptive immune responses through interference with initial T cell priming rather than in the reactivation or expansion phases. Mechanistically, we have revealed that inadvertent immunosuppression might be potentially mediated by a receptor shared with γ-aminobutyric acid. Our data demonstrate that the timing and dosing of antiandrogens are critical to maximizing the antitumor effects of combination therapy. This study highlights an underappreciated mechanism of AR antagonist-mediated immunosuppression and provides a new strategy to enhance immune response and prevent the relapse of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27053771

  17. Repression of Runx2 by Androgen Receptor (AR) in Osteoblasts and Prostate Cancer Cells: AR Binds Runx2 and Abrogates Its Recruitment to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Baniwal, Sanjeev K.; Khalid, Omar; Sir, Donna; Buchanan, Grant; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Frenkel, Baruch

    2009-01-01

    Runx2 and androgen receptor (AR) are master transcription factors with pivotal roles in bone metabolism and prostate cancer (PCa). We dissected AR-mediated repression of Runx2 in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated osteoblastic and PCa cells using reporter assays and endogenous Runx2 target genes. Repression required DHT, but not AR’s transactivation function, and was associated with nuclear colocalization of the two proteins. Runx2 and AR coimmunoprecipitated and interacted directly in glutath...

  18. Genetic and Functional Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractNuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are intermediary factors through which extracellular signals regulate expression of genes that are involved in homeostasis, development, and differentiation (Beato et al. '995, Mangelsdorf and Evans 1995). These receptors are characterized by a modular st

  19. Androgen receptor expression as a prognostic and predictive marker in triple-negative breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Zakaria; Nehal El-Mashad; Dareen Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It is clear that triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumors are heterogeneous group, but clinically important sub-sets have begun to emerge. We investigate the immunohistochemical expression of androgen receptor (AR) among those hormonal insensitive groups which have only the option of chemotherapy. Exploiting this knowledge for therapy has been challenging. Patients & methods: Seventy seven patients with TNBC subtype, treated from January 2009 until February 2011 were evaluated ...

  20. Androgen receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with aggression in Japanese Akita Inu

    OpenAIRE

    Konno, Akitsugu; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    We tested for an association between variable number of tandem repeats in the canine androgen receptor (AR) gene and personality differences in Japanese Akita Inu dogs. The polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG) repeat region coding for glutamine in exon 1 of the AR gene was genotyped using genomic DNA obtained from 171 dogs. Three alleles (23, 24 and 26 repeats) were detected, and the allele frequency differed with the coat colour. We assessed the personality profiles of 100 fawn-coloured dogs (54 ...

  1. Expression and significance of androgen receptor coactivators in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Boorjian, Stephen A.; Heemers, Hannelore V.; Frank, Igor; Farmer, Sara A.; Schmidt, Lucy J.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2008-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is approximately three times more common in men than women. While the etiology for this gender difference in incidence remains unknown, a role for androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been suggested. The mechanisms by which AR activity is regulated in UC cells, however, are largely elusive. Here, we explore the significance of coregulators that are critical for the formation of a functional AR transcriptional complex, in UC cells. Using two AR-positive...

  2. Pterostilbene-Isothiocyanate Conjugate Suppresses Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells Irrespective of Androgen Receptor Status

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil, Kumar; Sharan, Shruti; Chakraborty, Ajanta; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy and anti-hormonal therapies are the most common treatments for non-organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa). However, the effectiveness of these therapies is limited, thus necessitating the development of alternative approaches. The present study focused on analyzing the role of pterostilbene (PTER)-isothiocyanate (ITC) conjugate – a novel class of hybrid compound synthesized by appending an ITC moiety on PTER backbone – in regulating the functions of androgen receptor (AR), thereby ...

  3. GLI1, a crucial mediator of sonic hedgehog signaling in prostate cancer, functions as a negative modulator for androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → GLI1, which play a central role in sonic hedgehog signaling in prostate cancer, can act as a co-repressor to substantially block androgen receptor-mediated transactivation. → GLI1 directly interacts with AR. → SHH-GLI pathway might be one of determinants governing the transition of prostate cancer from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state. -- Abstract: Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, acting in a combinatorial manner with androgen signaling, is essential for prostate patterning and development. Recently, elevated activation of SHH signaling has been shown to play important roles in proliferation, progression and metastasis of prostate cancer. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time, that GLI1, which has been shown to play a central role in SHH signaling in prostate cancer, can act as a co-repressor to substantially block androgen receptor (AR)-mediated transactivation, at least in part, by directly interacting with AR. Our observations suggest that the SHH-GLI pathway might be one of determinants governing the transition of prostate cancer from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state by compensating, or even superseding androgen signaling.

  4. GLI1, a crucial mediator of sonic hedgehog signaling in prostate cancer, functions as a negative modulator for androgen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guangchun; Goto, Yutaka; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Matsubara, Eri [Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Nakamura, Masafumi [Department of Cancer Therapy and Research, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Zheng, Hong [School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Lu, Jian [Department of Pathophysiology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Takayanagi, Ryoichi [Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Nomura, Masatoshi, E-mail: nomura@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} GLI1, which play a central role in sonic hedgehog signaling in prostate cancer, can act as a co-repressor to substantially block androgen receptor-mediated transactivation. {yields} GLI1 directly interacts with AR. {yields} SHH-GLI pathway might be one of determinants governing the transition of prostate cancer from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state. -- Abstract: Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, acting in a combinatorial manner with androgen signaling, is essential for prostate patterning and development. Recently, elevated activation of SHH signaling has been shown to play important roles in proliferation, progression and metastasis of prostate cancer. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time, that GLI1, which has been shown to play a central role in SHH signaling in prostate cancer, can act as a co-repressor to substantially block androgen receptor (AR)-mediated transactivation, at least in part, by directly interacting with AR. Our observations suggest that the SHH-GLI pathway might be one of determinants governing the transition of prostate cancer from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state by compensating, or even superseding androgen signaling.

  5. Identification of androgen receptor antagonists: In vitro investigation and classification methodology for flavonoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Doering, Jon A; Ma, Zhiyuan; Tang, Song; Liu, Hongling; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-09-01

    A tremendous gap exists between the number of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) possibly in the environment and the limitation of traditional regulatory testing. In this study, the anti-androgenic potencies of 21 flavonoids were analyzed in vitro, and another 32 flavonoids from the literature were selected as additional chemicals. Molecular dynamic simulations were employed to obtain four different separation approaches based on the different behaviors of ligands and receptors during the process of interaction. Specifically, ligand-receptor complex which highlighted the discriminating features of ligand escape or retention via "mousetrap" mechanism, hydrogen bonds formed during simulation times, ligand stability and the stability of the helix-12 of the receptor were investigated. Together, a methodology was generated that 87.5% of flavonoids could be discriminated as active versus inactive antagonists, and over 90% inactive antagonists could be filtered out before QSAR study. This methodology could be used as a "proof of concept" to identify inactive anti-androgenic flavonoids, as well could be beneficial for rapid risk assessment and regulation of multiple new chemicals for androgenicity. PMID:27258897

  6. G Protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Elliott M.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors and heterotrimeric G proteins can diffuse laterally in the plasma membrane such that one receptor can catalyze the activation (GDP/GTP exchange) of multiple G proteins. In some cases, these processes are fast enough to support molecular signal amplification, where a single receptor maintains the activation of multiple G proteins at steady-state. Amplification in cells is probably highly regulated. It depends upon the identities of the G receptor and G protein - som...

  7. Cloning and expression analysis of androgen receptor gene in chicken embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hironori; Ogino, Yukiko; Yamada, Gen

    2006-03-01

    We cloned a full-length androgen receptor (AR) cDNA from chicken (Gallus gallus) gonads. The cDNA sequence has an open reading frame of 2109 bp encoding 703 amino acids. The chicken AR (cAR) shares high homology with ARs from other species in its amino acid sequences, in particular DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD). RT-PCR analysis revealed that cAR mRNA is expressed in several embryonic tissues of both sexes, and relatively higher expression was observed in left ovary compared with testis. The immunoreactive signal of AR was co-localized within the ovarian cell nucleus, while such nuclear localization was not detected in those of testis. To get insight on the possible role of androgen-AR signaling during gonadal development, non-steroidal AR antagonist, flutamide, was administrated in ovo. The treatment induced the disorganization of sex cords in ovarian cortex at day 12 of incubation. The effect was restored by testosterone co-treatment, implying the possibility that AR mediated signaling may be involved in ovarian morphogenesis. Furthermore, co-treatment of flutamide with estradiol-17beta (E2) also restored the phenotype, suggesting androgen-AR signaling might activate aromatase expression that is necessary for estrogen synthesis. These findings suggest androgen-AR signaling might contribute to chicken embryonic ovarian development. PMID:16480982

  8. Proliferative response of human prostate cancer cell to hormone inhibited by androgen receptor antisense RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江军; 王洛夫; 方玉华; 靳风烁; 靳文生

    2004-01-01

    Background The failure of endocrine treatment for advanced prostate cancer might be related to aberrant activation of androgen receptor (AR). Prostate cancer cell line LNCaP contains AR that can be activated by androgen, estrogen and progesterone. This study was set to investigate the effects of antisense AR RNA on growth of LNCaP cultured in medium containing varied concentrations of R1881, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone, respectively. Methods LNCaP cells transfected with antisense AR RNA retroviral vector pL-AR-SN were designated as LNCaPas-AR. LNCaP cells containing empty vector pLXSN served as LNCaPNeo. LNCaP and LNCaPNeo were taken as controls. In vitro cell growth assay, proliferative cells of LNCaP and tranfected LNCaPs were counted by typan staining when they cultured with synthetic androgen R1881, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone, respectively. Results Growth of LNCaPas-AR was inhibited significantly (P<0.05) compared with that of LNCaP and LNCaPNeo at 1 nmol/L R1881, 10 nmol/L 17β-estradiol, and 1 nmol/L progesterone, respectively. No difference was seen between LNCaP and LNCaPNeo(P>0.05). Microscopic observation showed that LNCaP and LNCaPNeo cells grew well, but only few LNCaPas-AR cells were alive. Conclusions Our observations indicate that antisense AR RNA retroviral vector pL-AR-SN could change androgen-independent characteristics of LNCaP cells, which might shed some novel insights into the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  9. Environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect androgen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hnida, Christina; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    of certain PAHs to activate the Ah receptor was assessed in H4IIE liver cancer cells, stably transfected with a luciferase reporter gene system. The positive control 2, 3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) caused a 13-14-fold induction of luciferase activity reaching maximum activity at 0.1 nM. DB...

  10. Environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect androgen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hnida, Christina; Larsen, John Christian

    of certain PAHs to activate the Ah receptor was assessed in H4IIE liver cancer cells, stably transfected with a luciferase reporter gene system. The positive control 2, 3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) caused a 13-14-fold induction of luciferase activity reaching maximum activity at 0.1 nM. DB...

  11. 17beta-estradiol-induced activation of ERK1/2 through endogenous androgen receptor-estradiol receptor alpha-Src complex in human prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieffi, Paolo; Kisslinger, Annamaria; Sinisi, Antonio A; Abbondanza, Ciro; Tramontano, Donatella

    2003-09-01

    We examined the effect of estrogens on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in EPN cells, a line of epithelial cells derived from human normal prostate. 17beta-estradiol (E2) caused a rapid and transient activation of MAPK (ERK1/2) within 5 min. This effect was counteracted by the anti-estrogen ICI 182-780 and by MEK inhibitor PD098059. The activation of ERK1/2 through 17beta-estradiol triggered simultaneous association of endogenous androgen receptor, estrogen receptor alpha and Src. In addition, E2 stimulated the proliferation of EPN cells, suggesting that the formation of the ternary complex and the consequent activation of ERKs are implicated in the mechanism regulating proliferation of epithelial prostate cells. PMID:12888920

  12. Androgen receptor CAG polymorphism and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei Biolchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a very frequent age-related proliferative abnormality in men. Polymorphic CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR can alter transactivation of androgen-responsive genes and potentially influence BPH risk. We investigated the association between CAG repeat length and risk of BPH in a case-control study of a Brazilian population. We evaluated 214 patients; 126 with BPH and 88 healthy controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes and the AR gene was analyzed using fragment analysis. Hazard ratio (HR and 95% confidence interval were estimated using logistic regression models. Mean CAG length was not different between patients with BPH and controls. The CAG repeat length was examined as a categorical variable (CAG 21 and CAG 22 and did not differ between the control vs. the BPH group. We found no evidence for an association between AR CAG repeat length in BPH risk in a population-based sample of Brazilians.

  13. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Several other AR inhibitors are currently in development for the treatment of CRPC. The present article reviews ODM-201, a new-generation AR inhibitor with a unique molecular structure, in the treatment of CRPC. The design of an ongoing Phase III trial (ARAMIS) of ODM-201 in men with non-metastatic CRPC is also discussed, at a disease stage for which there is currently no approved treatment. PMID:26313416

  14. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide resistance mutation and in the syngeneic prostate cancer rat model Dunning R3327-G. The prevalence of six selected AR mutations was determined in plasma DNA originating from 100 resistant patients and found to be at least 12%. Altogether the results show BAY 1024767 to be a strong antagonist for several AR mutants linked to therapy resistance, which opens the door for next-generation compounds that can benefit patients based on their mutation profile. PMID:26760770

  15. Krüppel-like factor 8 is a novel androgen receptor co-activator in human prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-jiang HE; Xue-feng GU; Wan-hai XU; De-jun YANG; Xiao-min WANG; Yu SU

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Krüppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) plays important roles in cell cycle and oncogenic transformation.On other hand,androgen receptor (AR) is crucial in development of both androgen-dependent and independent prostatic malignancies.The aim of this study is to investigate the role of KLF8 in prostate cancer (PCa) and the relationship between KLF8 and AR.Methods.: Eight human PCa cell lines,including androgen-dependent LNCap cells and androgen-independent 22Rv1 cells,as well as human PCa samples were studied.LNCap cells and 22Rv1 cells were transfected with plasmids encoding full-length wild-type KLF8 or KLF8 shRNA.The expression of KLF8 protein was detected using Western blotting or immunohistochemical staining.Cell proliferation in vitro was measured with MTT assay,and in vivo in a xenograft nude mouse model.Yeast two-hybrid screening,co-immunoprecipitation and pull down assays were used to examine the binding of KLF8 to AR.Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to measure the transcriptional activity of the genes targeted by AR.Results: In 133 human PCa samples,KLF8 protein staining was observed in 92.65% (63/68) of high-grade PCa,66.15% (43/65) of low-grade PCa,and 6.82% (3/44) of adjacent normal tissues.The expression of KLF8 was significantly associated with poorer overall survival.Overexpression of KLF8 enhanced the proliferation of both LNCap and 22Rv1 cells,while knockdown of endogenous KLF8 suppressed the proliferation.These manipulations exerted similar effects on the tumor volumes in the xenograft nude mouse model.Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that KLF8 was a novel AR-interacting protein.With pull down assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay,we demonstrated that KLF8 bound directly to AR,and KLF8 enhanced AR target gene transcription.Conclusion: The results demonstrate that KLF8 is a novel AR transcriptional co-activator that is overexpressed in PCa and may play a role in progression of hormone-refractory PCa.

  16. Morphology of the epithelial cells and expression of androgen receptor in rat prostate dorsal lobe in experimental hyperprolactinemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcin Wylot; Wojciech Głabowski; Maria Laszczyńska; Sylwia Słuczanowska-Głabowska

    2006-01-01

    The effect of hyperprolactinemia on the prostate has not been well investigated. Since androgens play an important role in prostate development, growth and function, the goal of the present study was to estimate the influence of hyperprolactinemia on expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in rat epithelial cells of prostate dorsal lobe and on morphology of these cells. Studies were performed on sexually mature male Wistar rats. The experimental group rats received metoclopramide (MCP) intra...

  17. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Polymorphism and Epigenetic Influence among the South Indian Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpi Dasgupta; Pisapati V S Sirisha; Kudugunti Neelaveni; Kathragadda Anuradha; Alla G Reddy; Kumarasamy Thangaraj; B Mohan Reddy

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the role of androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism and X chromosome inactivation (XCI) pattern among Indian PCOS women and controls which has not been hitherto explored and also to test the hypothesis that shorter CAG alleles would be preferentially activated in PCOS. CAG repeat polymorphism and X chromosome methylation patterns were compared between PCOS and non-PCOS women. 250 PCOS women and 299 controls were included for this study. Androgen r...

  18. The effect of 125I labeled anti-androgen receptor agent on the proliferation of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Based on the previous experience of using anti-androgen receptor triple helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO) to inhibit proliferation of prostate cancer cells, a 125I labeled TFO was prepared and tested in this experiment as an androgen receptor targeted antigene radiotherapy. Methods: 125I-TFO was labeled through Iodogen and then transfected LNCaP prostate cancer cells via liposome. The unlabeled TFO, 125I, and naturally cultured cells served as controls. The cellular proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolium tetrazolium (MTT) method, the expression of androgen receptor gene was carried out by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical study. Results: The radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity and specific activity of 125I-TFO were 63.7%, 95.6% and 80.1 kBq/μg, respectively. At the same TFO concentration, the androgen receptor expression level in 125I-TFO treated cells was markedly lower than that of TFO group (P125I-TFO on cellular proliferation was significantly higher (P< 0.01). Conclusion: The inhibitory effect on androgen receptor expression and cell proliferation of prostate cancer cells of antigene therapy with radio-labeled TFO were significantly more obvious than that of classical antigene therapy. (authors)

  19. Positive association of the androgen receptor CAG repeat length polymorphism with the risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño, César; Robles, Paulo; Salazar, Carolina; Leone, Paola E; García-Cárdenas, Jennyfer M; Naranjo, Manuel; López-Cortés, Andrés

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in Ecuador (15.6%). The androgen receptor gene codes for a protein that has an androgen‑binding domain, DNA‑binding domain and N‑terminal domain, which contains two polymorphic trinucleotide repeats (CAG and GGC). The aim of the present study was to determine whether variations in the number of repetitions of CAG and GGC are associated with the pathological features and the risk of developing PC. The polymorphic CAG and GGC repeat lengths in 108 mestizo patients with PC, 148 healthy mestizo individuals, and 78 healthy indigenous individuals were examined via a retrospective case‑control study. Genotypes were determined by genomic sequencing. The results demonstrated that patients with ≤21 CAG repeats have an increased risk of developing PC [odds ratio (OR)=2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.79‑5.01; P<0.001]. The presence of ≤21 CAG repeats was also associated with a tumor stage ≥T2c (OR=4.75; 95% CI=1.77‑12.72; P<0.005) and a Gleason score ≥7 (OR=2.9; 95% CI=1.1‑7.66; P=0.03). In addition, the combination of ≤21 CAG and ≥17 GGC repeats was associated with the risk of developing PC (OR=2.42; 95% CI=1.38‑4.25; P=0.002) and with tumor stage ≥T2c (OR=2.77; 95% CI=1.13‑6.79; P=0.02). In conclusion, the histopathological characteristics and PC risk in Ecuadorian indigenous and mestizo populations differs in association with the CAG repeats, and the combination of CAG and GGC repeats. PMID:27357524

  20. Antiinflammatory effect of androgen receptor activation in human benign prostatic hyperplasia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignozzi, Linda; Cellai, Ilaria; Santi, Raffaella; Lombardelli, Letizia; Morelli, Annamaria; Comeglio, Paolo; Filippi, Sandra; Logiodice, Federica; Carini, Marco; Nesi, Gabriella; Gacci, Mauro; Piccinni, Marie-Pierre; Adorini, Luciano; Maggi, Mario

    2012-07-01

    Progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) involves chronic inflammation and immune dysregulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that prostate inflammation and tissue remodeling are exacerbated by hypogonadism and prevented by testosterone supplementation. We now investigated whether, in humans, hypogonadism was associated with more severe BPH inflammation and the in vitro effect of the selective androgen receptor agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on cultures of stromal cells derived from BPH patients (hBPH). Histological analysis of inflammatory infiltrates in prostatectomy specimens from a cohort of BPH patients and correlation with serum testosterone level was performed. Even after adjusting for confounding factors, hypogonadism was associated with a fivefold increased risk of intraprostatic inflammation, which was also more severe than that observed in eugonadal BPH patients. Triggering hBPH cells by inflammatory stimuli (tumor necrosis factor α, lipopolysaccharide, or CD4(+)T cells) induced abundant secretion of inflammatory/growth factors (interleukin 6 (IL6), IL8, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)). Co-culture of CD4(+)T cells with hBPH cells induced secretion of Th1 inducer (IL12), Th1-recruiting chemokine (interferon γ inducible protein 10, IP10), and Th2 (IL9)- and Th17 (IL17)-specific cytokines. Pretreatment with DHT inhibited NF-κB activation and suppressed secretion of several inflammatory/growth factors, with the most pronounced effects on IL8, IL6, and bFGF. Reduced inflammatory cytokine production by T-cells, an increase in IL10, and a significant reduction of T cells proliferation suggested that DHT exerted a broad anti inflammatory effect on testosterone cells [corrected]. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DHT exerts an immune regulatory role on human prostatic stromal cells, inhibiting their potential to actively induce and/or sustain autoimmune and inflammatory responses. PMID:22562653

  1. Tissue- and cell-specific functions of the androgen receptor revealed through conditional knockout models in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido

    2012-04-16

    This review aims to evaluate the contribution of individual cell-selective knockout models to our current understanding of androgen action. Cre/loxP technology has allowed the generation of cell-selective knockout models targeting the androgen receptor (AR) in distinct putative target cells in a wide variety of organs and tissues including: testis, ovary, accessory sex tissues, muscle, bone, fat, liver, skin and myeloid tissue. In some androgen-regulated processes such as spermatogenesis and folliculogenesis this approach has lead to the identification of a key cellular mediator of androgen action (Sertoli and granulosa cells, respectively). In many target tissues, however, the final response to androgens appears to be more complex. Here, cell-selective knockout technology offers a platform upon which we can begin to unravel the more complex interplay and signaling pathways of androgens. A prototypic example is the analysis of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in many accessory sex glands. Furthermore, for some actions of testosterone, in which part of the effect is mediated by the active metabolite 17β-estradiol, conditional knockout technology offers a novel strategy to study the relative contribution of AR and estrogen receptor-mediated signaling. The latter approach has already resulted in a better understanding of androgen action in brain and bone. Finally, cell-selective knockout technology has generated valuable models to search for AR-controlled molecular mediators of androgen action, a strategy that has successfully been applied to the study of androgen action in the testis and in the epididymis. Although some conditional knockout models have provided clear answers to physiologic questions, it should be noted that others have pointed to unexpected complexities or technical limitations confounding interpretation of the results. PMID:21871526

  2. Chimeric molecules facilitate the degradation of androgen receptors and repress the growth of LNCaP cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Qing Tang; Bang-Min Han; Xin-Quan Yao; Yan Hong; Yan Wang; Fu-Jun Zhao; Sheng-Qiang Yu; Xiao-Wen Sun; Shu-Jie Xia

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational degradation of protein plays an important role in cell life.We employed chimeric molecules (dihydrotestosterone-based proteolysis-targeting chimeric molecule [DHT-PROTAC]) to facilitate androgen receptor (AR) degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and to investigate the role of AR in cell proliferation and viability in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells.Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were applied to analyse AR levels in LNCaP cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.Cell counting and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay were used to evaluate cell proliferation and viability after AR elimination in both LNCaP and PC-3 cells.AR was tagged for elimination via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and this could be blocked by proteasome inhibitors.Degradation of AR depended on DHT-PROTAC concentration,and either DHT or an ALAPYIP-(arg)s peptide could compete with DHT-PROTAC.Inhibition of cell proliferation and decreased viability were observed in LNCaP cells,but not in PC-3 or 786-O cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.These data indicate that AR elimination is facilitated via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and that the growth of LNCaP cells is repressed after AR degradation.

  3. An examination of the characteristics, concentration, and distribution of androgen receptor in rat testis during sexual maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzek, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In these studies a nuclear exchange assay was established in rat testis in which exchange after 86 hours at 4{degree}C was greater than 85% complete and receptor was stable. Receptor concentration per DNA measured by exchange declined between 15 and 25 days of age in the rat testis, then increased 4-fold during sexual maturation. Proliferation of germ cells which had low receptor concentration appeared to account for the early decline in testicular receptor concentration, whereas increase in receptor number per Sertoli cell between 25 and 35 days of age contributed to the later increase. Detailed studies showed that other possible explanations for changes in receptor number were not likely. Androgen receptor dynamics in testicular cells showed rapid, specific uptake of ({sup 3}H)-testosterone that was easily blocked by unlabeled testosterone, and medroxyprogesterone acetate, but not as well as by the anti-androgens cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide.

  4. Pomegranate Polyphenols Downregulate Expression of Androgen Synthesizing Genes in Human Prostate Cancer Cells Overexpressing the Androgen Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Mee Young; Seeram, Navindra P.; Heber, David

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is dependent on circulating testosterone in its early stages and is treatable with radiation and surgery. However, recurrent prostate tumors advance to an androgen-independent state where they progress in the absence of circulating testosterone leading to metastasis and death. During the development of androgen independence, prostate cancer cells are known to increase intracellular testosterone synthesis which maintains cancer cell growth in the absence of significant amounts ...

  5. Androgen receptor polyglutamine repeat number: models of selection and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Calen P; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Variation in polyglutamine repeat number in the androgen receptor (AR CAGn) is negatively correlated with the transcription of androgen-responsive genes and is associated with susceptibility to an extensive list of human disease. Only a small portion of the heritability for many of these diseases is explained by conventional SNP-based genome-wide association studies, and the forces shaping AR CAGn among humans remains largely unexplored. Here, we propose evolutionary models for understanding selection at the AR CAG locus, namely balancing selection, sexual conflict, accumulation-selection, and antagonistic pleiotropy. We evaluate these models by examining AR CAGn-linked susceptibility to eight extensively studied diseases representing the diverse physiological roles of androgens, and consider the costs of these diseases by their frequency and fitness effects. Five diseases could contribute to the distribution of AR CAGn observed among contemporary human populations. With support for disease susceptibilities associated with long and short AR CAGn, balancing selection provides a useful model for studying selection at this locus. Gender-specific differences AR CAGn health effects also support this locus as a candidate for sexual conflict over repeat number. Accompanied by the accumulation of AR CAGn in humans, these models help explain the distribution of repeat number in contemporary human populations. PMID:23467468

  6. Androgen receptors and serum testosterone levels identify different subsets of postmenopausal breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secreto Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen receptors (AR are frequently expressed in breast cancers, but their implication in cancer growth is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the role of the androgen/AR pathway in breast cancer development. Methods AR expression was evaluated by immunochemistry in a cohort of 528 postmenopausal breast cancer patients previously examined for the association of serum testosterone levels with patient and tumor characteristics. AR expression was classified according to the percentage of stained cells: AR-absent (0% and AR-poorly (1%-30%, AR-moderately (>30%-60%, and AR-highly (>60% positive. Results Statistical analysis was performed in 451 patients who experienced natural menopause. AR-high expression was significantly related with low histologic grade and estrogen receptor (ER- and progesterone receptor (PR-positive status (P trendP=0.022, although a trend across the AR expression categories was not present. When women defined by ER status were analyzed separately, regression analysis in the ER-positive group showed a significant association of high testosterone levels with AR-highly-positive expression (OR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.10-3.16, but the association was essentially due to patients greater than or equal to 65 years (OR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.22-4.82. In ER-positive group, elevated testosterone levels appeared also associated with AR-absent expression, although the small number of patients in this category limited the appearance of significant effects (OR 1.92; 95% CI, 0.73–5.02: the association was present in both age groups ( Conclusions The findings in the present study confirm that testosterone levels are a marker of hormone-dependent breast cancer and suggest that the contemporary evaluation of ER status, AR expression, and circulating testosterone levels may identify different subsets of cancers whose growth may be influenced by androgens.

  7. Androgen Receptor Repeat Length Polymorphism Associated with Male-to-Female Transsexualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Lauren; Bernard, Pascal; Sánchez, Francisco J.; Baird, Paul N.; Vilain, Eric; Kennedy, Trudy; Harley, Vincent R.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a likely genetic component to transsexualism, and genes involved in sex steroidogenesis are good candidates. We explored the specific hypothesis that male-to-female transsexualism is associated with gene variants responsible for undermasculinization and/or feminization. Specifically, we assessed the role of disease-associated repeat length polymorphisms in the androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and aromatase (CYP19) genes. Methods Subject-control analysis included 112 male-to-female transsexuals and 258 non-transsexual males. Associations and interactions were investigated between CAG repeat length in the AR gene, CA repeat length in the ERβ gene, and TTTA repeat length in the CYP19 gene and male-to-female transsexualism. Results A significant association was identified between transsexualism and the AR allele, with transsexuals having longer AR repeat lengths than non-transsexual male control subjects (p = .04). No associations for transsexualism were evident in repeat lengths for CYP19 or ERβ genes. Individuals were then classified as short or long for each gene polymorphism on the basis of control median polymorphism lengths in order to further elucidate possible combined effects. No interaction associations between the three genes and transsexualism were identified. Conclusions This study provides evidence that male gender identity might be partly mediated through the androgen receptor. PMID:18962445

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of androgen receptor in rat caput epididymis during postnatal development

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Timurkaan; Fatih Mehmet Gür

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental pattern of androgen receptor (AR) in caput epididymis.Materials and methods: In this study three randomly selected rats were sacrificed at ages 21, 56, 90 and 120 days old. All male rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether before killing. Then, the caput epididymides were removed and fixed in Bouin’s fixative at +4°C for 36 hour. Afterwards the tissue samples were embedded in paraffin for routine histological methods. Later...

  9. Androgen Receptors Mediate Masculinization of Astrocytes in the Rat Posterodorsal Medial Amygdala During Puberty

    OpenAIRE

    JOHNSON, RYAN T.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes in the posterodorsal portion of the medial amygdala (MePD) are sexually dimorphic in adult rats: males have more astrocytes in the right MePD and more elaborate processes in the left MePD than do females. Functional androgen receptors (ARs) are required for masculinization of MePD astrocytes, as these measures are demasculinized in adult genetic males carrying the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) of the AR gene, which renders AR dysfunctional. We now report that the number of...

  10. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  11. Peripheral androgen receptors sustain the acrobatics and fine motor skill of elaborate male courtship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Longpre, Kristy M; Chew, Jennifer G; Fusani, Leonida; Schlinger, Barney A

    2013-09-01

    Androgenic hormones regulate many aspects of animal social behavior, including the elaborate display routines on which many species rely for advertisement and competition. One way that this might occur is through peripheral effects of androgens, particularly on skeletal muscles that control complex movements and postures of the body and its limbs. However, the specific contribution of peripheral androgen-muscle interactions to the performance of elaborate behavioral displays in the natural world has never been examined. We study this issue in one of the only natural physiological models of animal acrobatics: the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus). In this tropical bird, males compete with each other and court females by producing firecracker-like wing- snaps and by rapidly dancing among saplings over the forest floor. To test how activation of peripheral androgen receptors (AR) influences this display, we treat reproductively active adult male birds with the peripherally selective antiandrogen bicalutamide (BICAL) and observe the effects of this manipulation on male display performance. We not only validate the peripheral specificity of BICAL in this species, but we also show that BICAL treatment reduces the frequency with which adult male birds perform their acrobatic display maneuvers and disrupts the overall structure and fine-scale patterning of these birds' main complex wing-snap sonation. In addition, this manipulation has no effect on the behavioral metrics associated with male motivation to display. Together, our findings help differentiate the various effects of peripheral and central AR on the performance of a complex sociosexual behavioral phenotype by indicating that peripheral AR can optimize the motor skills necessary for the production of an elaborate animal display. PMID:23782945

  12. Targeting the human androgen receptor gene with platinated triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mindy K; Brown, Terry R; Miller, Paul S

    2015-04-01

    Platinum-derivatized homopyrimidine triplex-forming oligonucleotides (Pt-TFOs) consisting of 2'-O-methyl-5-methyluridine, 2'-O-methyl-5-methylcytidine, and a single 3'-N7-trans-chlorodiammine platinum(II)-2'-deoxyguanosine were designed to cross-link to the transcribed strand at four different sequences in the human androgen receptor (AR) gene. Fluorescence microscopy showed that a fluorescein-tagged Pt-TFO localizes in both the cytoplasm and nucleus when it is transfected into LAPC-4 cells, a human prostate cancer cell line, using Lipofectamine 2000. A capture assay employing streptavidin-coated magnetic beads followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was used to demonstrate that 5'-biotin-conjugated Pt-TFOs cross-link in vitro to their four designated AR gene targets in genomic DNA extracted from LAPC-4 cells. Similarly, the capture assay was used to examine cross-linking between the 5'-biotin-conjugated Pt-TFOs and the AR gene in LAPC-4 cells in culture. Three of the four Pt-TFOs cross-linked to their designated target, suggesting that different regions of the AR gene are not uniformly accessible to Pt-TFO cross-linking. LAPC-4 cells were transfected with fluorescein-tagged Pt-TFO or a control oligonucleotide that does not bind or cross-link to AR DNA. The levels of AR mRNA in highly fluorescent cells isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting were determined by RT-qPCR, and the levels of AR protein were monitored by immunofluorescence microscopy. Decreases in mRNA and protein levels of 40 and 30%, respectively, were observed for fluorescein-tagged Pt-TFO versus control treated cells. Although the levels of knockdown of AR mRNA and protein were modest, the results suggest that Pt-TFOs hold potential as agents for controlling gene expression by cross-linking to DNA and disrupting transcription. PMID:25768916

  13. Identification of the molecular switch that regulates access of 5α-DHT to the androgen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Penning, Trevor M.; Bauman, David R.; Jin, Yi; Rizner, Tea Lanisik

    2007-01-01

    Pairs of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) govern ligand access to steroid receptors in target tissues and act as molecular switches. By acting as reductases or oxidases, HSDs convert potent ligands into their cognate inactive metabolites or vice-versa. This pre-receptor regulation of steroid hormone action may have profound effects on hormonal response. We have identified the HSDs responsible for regulating ligand access to the androgen receptor (AR) in human prostate. Type 3 3α-hydroxyst...

  14. [The construction and the expression of V5 epitope fused human androgen receptor vector in the yeast cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Luo, Fangni; Dai, Weixing; Li, Shanshan; Huang, Renhua; Xie, Yangmei; Xue, Feiyue; Li, Xiangming

    2013-08-01

    When we try to establish the gene recombinant yeast cell to screen the androgenic endocrine disruptors, the key procedure is the androgen receptor (AR) expression in the yeast cell. For this purpose, we obtained the GPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphote dehydrogenase) promoter from the yeast genosome of W303-1A using PCR system and inserting it into Swa I and BamH I sites of pYestrp2. The new constructed vector was named pGPD. The V5 epitope tag DNA with a 5'-BamH I and a 3'-EcoR I sticky end was cloned into the corresponding site of the pGPD vector to yield the vector of pGPDV5. The 2 723 bp full length AR ORF amplified by PCR from pcDNA3.1/AR was fused to V5 epitope tag DNA in pGPDV5 to give the AR yeast expression vector of pGPDV5/AR. This fused vector was transformed into the yeast cell (W303-1A). Western blot was used to detect the V5 fused protein of AR, in the protocol of which the primary monoclonal antibody (IgG(2a)) of mouse anti-V5 and the polyclonal secondary antibody of goat anti-mouse (IgG) linked to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were used to detect the specific protein in the given sample of the transformed yeast extract. The result showed that the fused protein of AR was expressed successfully in the yeast cell. PMID:24059072

  15. Effect of organochlorine pesticides on human androgen receptor activation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many persistent organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been implicated in adverse effects, that is, reproductive and developmental effects, in man and in wildlife alike. It has been hypothesized that these so-called xeno-hormones could be responsible for the increased incidence in various male sexual differentiation disorders such as hypospadias, cryptorchidism, low sperm counts and quality. In this report, OCs, called endocrine disrupters, were tested for their interaction with the androgen receptor. The stable prostatic cell line PALM, which contains a human androgen receptor (hAR) expression vector and the reporter MMTV-luciferase, was used to characterize the response of hAR to OC and was compared with synthetic androgen compound R1881. We found that all the OC pesticides tested were able to shift the agonist [3H]-R1881 from its binding site to the AR in competitive binding assays. In addition, these compounds antagonize - in a dose-dependent manner - the AR-mediated transcription by synthetic AR ligand R1881. None of the pesticides reacted as agonists. These results demonstrate that OC endocrine activities in vivo probably result from direct and specific binding to the AR ligand-binding domain. Although the antagonistic potential of OC pesticides is lower than that of hydroxyflutamide, they are capable of disrupting the male hormone signaling pathway. Because these chemicals are extremely persistent and tend to bioaccumulate, these results support the hypothesis that the recent increase in the incidence of male sexual disorders could be due to long exposure to ubiquitous OC pesticides found in the environment

  16. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals. Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  17. CLONING AND IN VITRO EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR α FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the ma...

  18. Unraveling the Complexities of Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Heemers, Hannelore V.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    Androgen signaling is critical for proliferation of prostate cancer cells but cannot be fully inhibited by current androgen deprivation therapies. A study by Xu et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell provides insights into the complexities of androgen signaling in prostate cancer and suggests avenues to target a subset of androgen-sensitive genes.

  19. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract modulates CHOP/GADD153 to promote androgen receptor degradation and decreases xenograft tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petiwala, Sakina M; Berhe, Saba; Li, Gongbo; Puthenveetil, Angela G; Rahman, Ozair; Nonn, Larisa; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has long been attributed to preventing or delaying the onset of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and various solid organ cancers. In this particular study, a rosemary extract standardized to carnosic acid was evaluated for its potential in disrupting the endoplasmic reticulum machinery to decrease the viability of prostate cancer cells and promote degradation of the androgen receptor. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells procured from two different patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were treated with standardized rosemary extract and evaluated by flow cytometry, MTT, BrdU, Western blot and fluorescent microscopy. A significant modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins was observed in cancer cells while normal prostate epithelial cells did not undergo endoplasmic reticulum stress. This biphasic response suggests that standardized rosemary extract may preferentially target cancer cells as opposed to "normal" cells. Furthermore, we observed standardized rosemary extract to decrease androgen receptor expression that appears to be regulated by the expression of CHOP/GADD153. Using a xenograft tumor model we observed standardized rosemary extract when given orally to significantly suppress tumor growth by 46% compared to mice not receiving standardized rosemary extract. In the last several years regulatory governing bodies (e.g. European Union) have approved standardized rosemary extracts as food preservatives. These results are especially significant as it is becoming more likely that individuals will be receiving standardized rosemary extracts that are a part of a natural preservative system in various food preparations. Taken a step further, it is possible that the potential benefits that are often associated with a "Mediterranean Diet" in the future may begin to extend beyond the Mediterranean diet as more of the population is consuming standardized rosemary extracts. PMID

  20. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract modulates CHOP/GADD153 to promote androgen receptor degradation and decreases xenograft tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakina M Petiwala

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet has long been attributed to preventing or delaying the onset of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and various solid organ cancers. In this particular study, a rosemary extract standardized to carnosic acid was evaluated for its potential in disrupting the endoplasmic reticulum machinery to decrease the viability of prostate cancer cells and promote degradation of the androgen receptor. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells procured from two different patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were treated with standardized rosemary extract and evaluated by flow cytometry, MTT, BrdU, Western blot and fluorescent microscopy. A significant modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins was observed in cancer cells while normal prostate epithelial cells did not undergo endoplasmic reticulum stress. This biphasic response suggests that standardized rosemary extract may preferentially target cancer cells as opposed to "normal" cells. Furthermore, we observed standardized rosemary extract to decrease androgen receptor expression that appears to be regulated by the expression of CHOP/GADD153. Using a xenograft tumor model we observed standardized rosemary extract when given orally to significantly suppress tumor growth by 46% compared to mice not receiving standardized rosemary extract. In the last several years regulatory governing bodies (e.g. European Union have approved standardized rosemary extracts as food preservatives. These results are especially significant as it is becoming more likely that individuals will be receiving standardized rosemary extracts that are a part of a natural preservative system in various food preparations. Taken a step further, it is possible that the potential benefits that are often associated with a "Mediterranean Diet" in the future may begin to extend beyond the Mediterranean diet as more of the population is consuming standardized rosemary

  1. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC.

  2. In vivo imaging of brain androgen receptors in rats: a [18F]FDHT PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Steroid hormones like androgens play an important role in the development and maintenance of several brain functions. Androgens can act through androgen receptors (AR) in the brain. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of positron emission tomography (PET) with 16β-[18F]fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone ([18F]FDHT) to image AR expression in the brain. Methods: Male Wistar rats were either orchiectomized to inhibit endogenous androgen production or underwent sham-surgery. Fifteen days after surgery, rats were subjected to a 90-min dynamic [18F]FDHT PET scan with arterial blood sampling. In a subset of orchiectomized rats, 1 mg/kg dihydrotestosterone was co-injected with the tracer in order to saturate the AR. Plasma samples were analyzed for the presence of radioactive metabolites by radio-TLC. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed to quantify brain kinetics of the tracer. After the PET scan, the animals were terminated for ex-vivo biodistribution. Results: PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies showed low [18F]FDHT uptake in all brain regions, except pituitary. [18F]FDHT uptake in the surrounding cranial bones was high and increased over time. [18F]FDHT was rapidly metabolized in rats. Metabolism was significantly faster in orchiectomized rats than in sham-orchiectomized rats. Quantitative analysis of PET data indicated substantial spill-over of activity from cranial bones into peripheral brain regions, which prevented further analysis of peripheral brain regions. Logan graphical analysis and kinetic modeling using 1- and 2-tissue compartment models showed reversible and homogenously distributed tracer uptake in central brain regions. [18F]FDHT uptake in the brain could not be blocked by endogenous androgens or administration of dihydrotestosterone. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that imaging of AR availability in rat brain with [18F]FDHT PET is not feasible. The low AR expression in the brain, the rapid metabolism of

  3. Microarray analysis of androgen-regulated gene expression in testis: the use of the androgen-binding protein (ABP-transgenic mouse as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Gail

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is an androgen-dependent process, yet the molecular mechanisms of androgens' actions in testis are poorly understood. Transgenic mice overexpressing rat androgen-binding protein (ABP in their testes have reduced levels of intratesticular androgens and, as a result, show a progressive impairment of spermatogenesis. We used this model to characterize changes in global gene expression in testis in response to reduced bioavailability of androgens. Methods Total RNA was extracted from testes of 30-day old transgenic and wild-type control mice, converted to cRNA, labeled with biotin, and hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray results were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Three-hundred-eighty-one genes (3.05% of all transcripts represented on the chips were up-regulated and 198 genes (1.59% were down-regulated by at least a factor of 2 in the androgen-deficient animals compared to controls. Genes encoding membrane proteins, intracellular signaling molecules, enzymes, proteins participating in the immune response, and those involved in cytoskeleton organization were significantly overrepresented in the up-regulated group. Among the down-regulated transcripts, those coding for extracellular proteins were overrepresented most dramatically, followed by those related to proteolysis, cell adhesion, immune response, and growth factor, cytokine, and ion channel activities. Transcripts with the greatest potential impact on cellular activities included several transcription factors, intracellular signal transducers, secreted signaling molecules and enzymes, and various cell surface molecules. Major nodes in the up-regulated network were IL-6, AGT, MYC, and A2M, those in the down-regulated network were IL-2, -4, and -10, MAPK8, SOCS1, and CREB1. Conclusion Microarray analysis followed by gene ontology profiling and connectivity analysis identified several functional

  4. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Role of Androgen Receptors as Targets for Therapy of Pre-treated Post-menopausal Patients With ER/PgR-negative/AR-positive or ER and/or PgRpositive/ AR-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer (ARTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Metastatic Breastcancer; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Progesterone Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Androgen Receptor Gene Overexpression

  5. Androgen receptors and serum testosterone levels identify different subsets of postmenopausal breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgen receptors (AR) are frequently expressed in breast cancers, but their implication in cancer growth is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the role of the androgen/AR pathway in breast cancer development. AR expression was evaluated by immunochemistry in a cohort of 528 postmenopausal breast cancer patients previously examined for the association of serum testosterone levels with patient and tumor characteristics. AR expression was classified according to the percentage of stained cells: AR-absent (0%) and AR-poorly (1%-30%), AR-moderately (>30%-60%), and AR-highly (>60%) positive. Statistical analysis was performed in 451 patients who experienced natural menopause. AR-high expression was significantly related with low histologic grade and estrogen receptor (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive status (P trend<0.001). Mean testosterone levels were significantly higher in the AR-high category than in the other categories combined (P=0.022), although a trend across the AR expression categories was not present. When women defined by ER status were analyzed separately, regression analysis in the ER-positive group showed a significant association of high testosterone levels with AR-highly-positive expression (OR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.10-3.16), but the association was essentially due to patients greater than or equal to 65 years (OR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.22-4.82). In ER-positive group, elevated testosterone levels appeared also associated with AR-absent expression, although the small number of patients in this category limited the appearance of significant effects (OR 1.92; 95% CI, 0.73–5.02): the association was present in both age groups (<65 and ≥65 years). In the ER-negative group, elevated testosterone levels were found associated (borderline significance) with AR-absent expression (OR 2.82, 95% CI, 0.98-8.06). In this ER-negative/AR-absent subset of tumors, elevated testosterone levels cannot stimulate cancer growth either

  6. Restoration of spermatogenesis and male fertility using an androgen receptor transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William H; Easton, Evan; Moreci, Rebecca S; Toocheck, Corey; Anamthathmakula, Prashanth; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam

    2015-01-01

    Androgens signal through the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate male secondary sexual characteristics, reproductive tract development, prostate function, sperm production, bone and muscle mass as well as body hair growth among other functions. We developed a transgenic mouse model in which endogenous AR expression was replaced by a functionally modified AR transgene. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) was constructed containing all AR exons and introns plus 40 kb each of 5' and 3' regulatory sequence. Insertion of an internal ribosome entry site and the EGFP gene 3' to AR allowed co-expression of AR and EGFP. Pronuclear injection of the BAC resulted in six founder mice that displayed EGFP production in appropriate AR expressing tissues. The six founder mice were mated into a Sertoli cell specific AR knockout (SCARKO) background in which spermatogenesis is blocked at the meiosis stage of germ cell development. The AR-EGFP transgene was expressed in a cyclical manner similar to that of endogenous AR in Sertoli cells and fertility was restored as offspring were produced in the absence of Sertoli cell AR. Thus, the AR-EGFP transgene under the control of AR regulatory elements is capable of rescuing AR function in a cell selective, AR-null background. These initial studies provide proof of principle that a strategy employing the AR-EGFP transgene can be used to understand AR functions. Transgenic mice expressing selective modifications of the AR-EGFP transgene may provide crucial information needed to elicit the molecular mechanisms by which AR acts in the testis and other androgen responsive tissues. PMID:25803277

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of androgen receptor in rat caput epididymis during postnatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Timurkaan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental pattern of androgen receptor (AR in caput epididymis.Materials and methods: In this study three randomly selected rats were sacrificed at ages 21, 56, 90 and 120 days old. All male rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether before killing. Then, the caput epididymides were removed and fixed in Bouin’s fixative at +4°C for 36 hour. Afterwards the tissue samples were embedded in paraffin for routine histological methods. Later the tissues were sectioned at 5μm and mounted on poly-L-lysin-coated slides. To solve the antigen masking problem, we performed microwave stimulated antigen retrieval technique before the immunohistochemical staining. Avidin-Biotin-Peroxidase Complex (ABC method was applied for immunohistochemical staining.Results: In all age groups of rats studied, positive immunohistochemical staining for the AR appeared in nuclei of epididymal cells. The staining intensity of AR positive cells did not change depending on age. In caput epididymis, immunostainable AR was found in tubular epithelial cells (principal cells, basal cells and apical cells and peritubular smooth muscle cells. The AR staining in the epithelial cells appeared to be stronger than in the peritubular smooth muscle cells. In the epithelial cells; staining intensity was stronger in principal cells than in basal cells and apical cells.Conclusion: Staining intensity of AR positive epididymal cells irrespective of age indicated the necessity of androgens for postnatal differentiation and maintaining the structure of the epididymis. Stronger staining intensity in principal cells suggested that principal cells are more sensitive to androgen stimulation. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 260-266.

  8. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES: INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species Differences in Androgen and Estrogen Receptor Structure and Function Among Vertebrates and Invertebrates: Interspecies Extrapolations regarding Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals VS Wilson1, GT Ankley2, M Gooding 1,3, PD Reynolds 1,4, NC Noriega 1, M Cardon 1, P Hartig1,...

  9. BINDING OF STEROIDS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS TO THE RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA EXPRESSED IN COS CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binding of Steroids and Environmental Chemicals to the Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha Expressed in COS Cells. Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray. Jr., Phillip C. Hartig and Vickie S. Wilson U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology...

  10. ANALYSIS OF ANDROGEN- AND EGF-RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN THE FETAL RAT PHALLUS AFTER EXPOSURE TO VINCLOZOLIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analysis of Androgen- and EGF-Receptor Expression in the Fetal Rat Phallus After Exposure to Vinclozolin Cynthia Wolf1,2, Barbara Abbott1, Gerald A. LeBlanc2, and L. Earl Gray, Jr.11USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, RTP, NC 27711, 2NCSU, Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Ral...

  11. Ligand-independent androgen receptors promote ovarian teratocarcinoma cell growth by stimulating self-renewal of cancer stem/progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Min Chung; Wei-Chun Chang; Lumin Chen; Tze-Yi Lin; Liang-Chi Chen; Yao-Ching Hung; Wen-Lung Ma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ovarian teratocarcinoma (OVTC) arises from germ cells and contains a high percentage of cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs), which promote cancer development through their ability to self-renew. Androgen and androgen receptor (androgen/AR) signaling has been reported to participate in cancer stemness in some types of cancer; however, this phenomenon has never been studied in OVTC. Methods: Ovarian teratocarcinoma cell line PA1 was manipulated to overexpress or knockdown AR by ...

  12. Inhibition of human prostate cancer xenograft growth by 125I labeled triple-helin forming oligonucleotide directed against androgen receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; MA Yi; LU Han-ping; GAO Jin-hui; LIANG Chang-sheng; LIU Chang-zheng; ZOU Jun-tao; WANG Hua-qiao

    2008-01-01

    Background The failure of hormone treatment for advanced prostate cancer might be related to aberrant activation of the androgen receptor.We have shown that 125I labeled triple-helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO) against the androgen receptor gene inhibits androgen receptor expression and cell proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in vitro.This study aimed at exploring the effects of the 125I-TFO on prostate tumor growth in vivo using a nude mouse xenograft model.Methods TFO was labeled with 125I by the iodogen method.Thirty-two nude mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors were randomized into 4 groups and were intratumorally injected with 125I-TFO,unlabeled TFO,Na125I and normal saline.Tumor size was measured weekly.The tumor growth inhibition rate (RI) was calculated by measurement of tumor weight.The expression of the androgen receptor gene was performed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical study.The prostate specific antigen (PSA) serum levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.The tumor cell apoptosis index (Al) was detected by TUNEL assay.Results Tumor measurements showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by either 125I-TFO or TFO,with tumor RIs of 50.79% and 32.80% respectively.125I-TFO caused greater inhibition of androgen receptor expression and higher Als in tumor tissue than TFO.Both the tumor weight and the PSA serum levels in 125I-TFO treated mice ((0.93±0.15) g and (17.43±1.85) ng/ml,respectively) were significantly lower than those ((1.27±0.21) g and (28.25±3.41)ng/ml,respectively) in TFO treated mice (all P<0.05).Na125I did not significantly affect tumor growth and androgen receptor expression in tumor tissue.Conclusions The 125I-TFO can effectively inhibit androgen receptor expression and tumor growth of human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo.The inhibitory efficacy of 125I-TFO is more potent than that of TFO,providing a reference for future studies of antigen radiotherapy.

  13. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R; Kwilas, Anna R; Donahue, Renee N; Hodge, James W

    2014-10-15

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone render prostate tumor cells more sensitive to T cell-mediated lysis through immunogenic modulation, and that these immunomodulatory activities are androgen receptor (AR)-dependent. In studies reported here, the NAIP gene was significantly down-regulated in human prostate tumor cells treated in vitro and in vivo with enzalutamide. Functional analysis revealed that NAIP played a critical role in inducing CTL sensitivity. Amplification of AR is a major mechanism of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Here, we show that enzalutamide enhances sensitivity to immune-mediated killing of prostate tumor cells that overexpress AR. The immunomodulatory properties of enzalutamide and abiraterone provide a rationale for their use in combination with immunotherapeutic agents in CRPC, especially for patients with minimal response to enzalutamide or abiraterone alone, or for patients who have developed resistance to ADT. PMID:25344864

  14. Characterization of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5b]pyridine at androgen receptor: mechanistic support for its role in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass-Holmes, Mashunté; Aguilar, Byron J; Gragg, Richard D; Darling-Reed, Selina; Goodman, Carl B

    2015-01-01

    2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5b]pyridine (PhIP) is a dietary mutagenic carcinogen that has been shown not only to induce the formation of DNA adducts, but is capable of inducing tumors in the colon, mammary, and prostate glands. The normal development and maturation of the prostate gland, as well as early progression of prostate cancer, is dependent on androgens acting on the androgen receptor (AR). The actual mechanism by which PhIP interacts with our biological system and its potential interaction at the AR has yet to be fully defined. Here, we describe our work in evaluating the molecular events associated with PhIP-mediated disruption of AR function in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate, by molecular docking simulation, that PhIP and its metabolite can bind to the ligand-binding domain (LBD). The binding competes with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the native AR binding cavity of the receptor. In vitro assays show that PhIP increase AR protein expression in LNCaP cells and alters its responsiveness through PSA protein and mRNA expression. We propose that the mechanism for the tissue-specific carcinogenicity seen in the rat prostate tumors and the presumptive human prostate cancer associated with the consumption of well-done meat may be mediated by this receptor activation. Our results indicate that PhIP may play an important role in modifications of AR function. PMID:25628930

  15. Androgen receptor isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie XIA; Xiao-Da TANG; Qing-Zheng MA

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoform expressions in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line. Methods: With high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) method we demonstrated the different expressions of AR isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissues and LNCaP cell line. Results: Data were obtained from three prostatic cancer specimens and the LNCaP cell line. Three types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5,6.0, and 5.3. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, 1 sample showed all the three types of AR isoforms, the second specimen expressed at 6.5 and 6.0, and the third failed to show any type of isoforms. The LNCaP cell line expressed all the three AR isoforms. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT) to these three isoforms was inhibited by the addition ofl00-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, while not by progesterone, oestradiol and diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: The expression of AR isofonns is different in different prostate cancer tissues, which may be related to the difference in the effect of anti-androgen therapy in different patients.

  16. Chiral dimethylamine flutamide derivatives-modeling, synthesis, androgen receptor affinities and carbon-11 labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most prostate cancers are androgen dependent upon initial diagnosis. On the other hand, some very aggressive forms of prostate cancer were shown to have lost the expression of the androgen receptor (AR). Although the AR is routinely targeted in endocrine treatment, the clinical outcome remains suboptimal. Therefore, it is crucial to demonstrate the presence and activity of the AR in each case of prostate cancer, before and after treatment. While noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to determine AR expression of tumor cells in vivo, fully optimized PET imaging agents are not yet available. Based on molecular modeling, three novel derivatives of hydroxyflutamide (Compounds 1-3) were designed and synthesized. They contain an electron-rich group (dimethylamine) located on the methyl moiety, which may confer a better stability to the molecule in vivo. Compounds 1-3 have AR binding that is similar or higher than that of the currently used commercial drugs. An automated carbon-11 radiolabeling route was developed, and the compounds were successfully labeled with a 10-15% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, 99% radiochemical purity and a specific activity of 4Ci/μmol end of bombardment (n=15). These labeled biomarkers may facilitate the future quantitative molecular imaging of AR-positive prostate cancer using PET and may also allow for image-guided treatment of prostate cancer

  17. An electrospun scaffold loaded with anti-androgen receptor compound for accelerating wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra Chong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Current dermal regenerative scaffolds provide wound coverage, and structural support and guidance for tissue repair, but usually lack enough bio-signals needed for speeding up skin cell growth, migration, wound closure, and skin regeneration. In this study, an androgen receptor (AR inhibitor called ASC-J9 is used to demonstrate the concept and feasibility of fabricating drug-loaded scaffolds via electrospinning. Inhibition of androgen is known to promote skin wound healing. The novel ASC-J9 - loaded porous scaffold was fabricated for skin wound repair using electrospun fibers of collagen and polycaprolactone (PCL blend. Our preliminary results indicated that ASC-J9 - loaded scaffolds facilitated more efficient attachment and ingrowth of dermal fibroblasts, compared to the control collagen-PCL scaffold. A significant increase of cell proliferation was observed with the drug-loaded scaffold over a 28-day period. The drug-loaded scaffold also accelerated keratinocyte migration and wound closure in a contraction-inhibited mouse wound model over 21 days. The data indicated a sustained release of ASC-J9 from the scaffold and its potential to accelerate wound healing by promoting cell proliferation and migration over an extended period of time. More importantly, our results proved the concept and feasibility of fabricating drug-releasing or bioactive dermal scaffolds for more effective wound healing.

  18. Myoglobin expression in prostate cancer is correlated to androgen receptor expression and markers of tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Sebastian; Bicker, Anne; Montani, Matteo; Ikenberg, Kristian; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Sailer, Verena; Wild, Peter; Dietrich, Dimo; Uhl, Barbara; Sulser, Tullio; Moch, Holger; Gorr, Thomas A; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Hankeln, Thomas; Kristiansen, Glen

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies identified unexpected expression and transcriptional complexity of the hemoprotein myoglobin (MB) in human breast cancer but its role in prostate cancer is still unclear. Expression of MB was immunohistochemically analyzed in three independent cohorts of radical prostatectomy specimens (n = 409, n = 625, and n = 237). MB expression data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and molecular parameters of androgen and hypoxia signaling. Expression levels of novel tumor-associated MB transcript variants and the VEGF gene as a hypoxia marker were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Fifty-three percent of the prostate cancer cases were MB positive and significantly correlated with androgen receptor (AR) expression (p < 0.001). The positive correlation with CAIX (p < 0.001) and FASN (p = 0.008) as well as the paralleled increased expression of the tumor-associated MB transcript variants and VEGF suggest that hypoxia participates in MB expression regulation. Analogous to breast cancer, MB expression in prostate cancer is associated with steroid hormone signaling and markers of hypoxia. Further studies must elucidate the novel functional roles of MB in human carcinomas, which probably extend beyond its classic intramuscular function in oxygen storage. PMID:25172328

  19. Oestradiol metabolism and androgen receptor genotypes are associated with right ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventetuolo, Corey E; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Manichaikul, Ani; Barr, R Graham; Johnson, Craig; Bluemke, David A; Lima, Joao A C; Tandri, Hari; Ouyang, Pamela; Kawut, Steven M

    2016-02-01

    Sex hormones are linked to right ventricular (RV) function, but the relationship between genetic variation in these pathways and RV function is unknown.We performed a cross-sectional study of 2761 genotyped adults without cardiovascular disease. The relationships between RV measures and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 candidate genes were assessed. Urinary oestradiol (E2) metabolites produced by cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) and serum testosterone were measured in women and men respectively.In African-American (AA) women, the CYP1B1 SNP rs162561 was associated with RV ejection fraction (RVEF), such that each copy of the A allele was associated with a 2.0% increase in RVEF. Haplotype analysis revealed associations with RVEF in AA (global pmetabolite levels were associated with significantly higher RVEF. In men, androgen receptors SNPs (rs1337080; rs5918764) were significantly associated with all RV measures and modified the relationship between testosterone and RVEF.Genetic variation in E2 metabolism and androgen signalling was associated with RV morphology in a sex-specific manner. The CYP1B1 SNP identified is in tight linkage disequilibrium with SNPs associated with pulmonary hypertension and oncogenesis, suggesting these pathways may underpin sexual dimorphism in RV failure. PMID:26647441

  20. Expression changes of androgen receptor RNA in androgen-independence prostatic cancer%前列腺癌雄激素依赖转化后雄激素受体基因表达变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘寿华; 阎家峻; 郑专

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The mechanism for transforming androgen-dependent prostatic cancer cells into androgen-independent prostatic cancer cells is uncertain. Androgen receptor RNA plays a vital role in transforming androgen-dependent prostatic cancer into androgen-independent prostatic cancer. This study investigated the transcription of androgen receptor (AR) RNA in order to determine the role of AR-RNA in the transformation.Methods: Thirty three patients with prostate cancer were treated using androgen deprivation and all of the patients had long time follow-up. Of these patients, 18 were transformed into the androgen-independent prostatic cancer. The transcription of AR RNA was detected using RT-PCR at androgen-dependent and androgen-independent conditions in 18 patients, and before or after androgen deprivation in 15 patients. Results: The transcription of androgen receptor RNA at androgen-dependent and androgen-independent conditions in 18 patients were [(28.4±3.4) Ct vs (36.7±1.8) Ct, t=14.43, P<0.001]. Before and after androgen deprivation in 15 patients were [(29.5±3.1) Ct vs (29.1±3.2) Ct,t=0.409, P>0.05]. Conclusion: The elevation of transcription in androgen receptor RNA is most likely related to the mechanism used for the transformation of androgen-dependent prostatic cancer into androgen-independent prostatic cancer.%背景与目的:前列腺癌雄激素依赖性转化的机制目前尚不完全清楚,多数认为雄激素受体(androgen receptor,AR)基因的变化可能起重要作用,本研究主要探讨AR基因表达变化在前列腺癌雄激素依赖转化过程中的作用.方法:通过对33例晚期前列腺癌患者进行雄激素阻断治疗并长时间的随访,期间有18例患者发生了雄激素依赖转化,15例患者未发生雄激素依赖转化.采用RT-PCR法测定18例患者雄激素依赖转化前后及15例患者雄激素阻断治疗前后癌细胞内AR基因的表达情况.结果:18例患者雄激素依赖转化前

  1. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. The authors have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46, XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development

  2. CSF1 Receptor Targeting In Prostate Cancer Reverses Macrophage-Mediated Resistance To Androgen Blockade Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Jemima; Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Liu, Connie; Priceman, Saul J.; Moughon, Diana; Jiang, Ziyue; Pouliot, Frederic; Magyar, Clara; Sung, James L.; Xu, Jingying; Deng, Gang; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Fradet, Yves; Lacombe, Louis; Jung, Michael E.; Huang, Jiaoti; Wu, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote cancer progression and therapeutic resistance by enhancing angiogenesis, matrix-remodeling and immunosuppression. In this study prostate cancer (PCa) under androgen blockade therapy (ABT) was investigated, demonstrating that TAMs contribute to PCa disease recurrence through paracrine signaling processes. ABT induced the tumor cells to express macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (M-CSF-1 or CSF-1) and other cytokines that recruit and modulate macrophages, causing a significant increase in TAM infiltration. Inhibitors of CSF-1 signaling through its receptor, CSF-1R, were tested in combination with ABT, demonstrating that blockade of TAM influx in this setting disrupts tumor promotion and sustains a more durable therapeutic response compared to ABT alone. PMID:25736687

  3. Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butovskaya, Marina L.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Vasilyev, Vasiliy A.; Dronova, Daria A.; Karelin, Dmitri V.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Shibalev, Dmitri V.; Shackelford, Todd K.; Fink, Bernhard; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)—the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17–70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born. PMID:26291982

  4. GENERATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR WITH SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Preparation of anti-human androgen receptor(hAR) monoclonal antibody (McAb). Methods: Four cells lines of hybridoma secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against AR were first established by fusion SP2/0 cell with spleen cell from BALB/c mice immunized with the coupling complex of hAR-KLH. Results: Paraffin-embedded sections of 45 prostate cancers were detected. There was an overall concordance of 91% using Immunohistochemistry between AR polyclonal antibody from Zymed and hAR-N McAb selfmade. Conclusion: The results show that the McAb obtained in this study would be a useful tool to detect the AR status in prostate cancer.

  5. CACUL1 functions as a negative regulator of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanbyeul; Lee, Sang Hyup; Um, Soo-Jong; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and thus its regulation is an important tool in PCa therapy. Here, we report that CDK2-associated cullin 1 (CACUL1) directly associates with AR and suppresses AR transcriptional activity. In addition, CACUL1 represses histone demethylase LSD1-mediated AR transactivation by competing with LSD1 for AR binding. Depletion of CACUL1 enhances the LSD1 occupancy of the AR-target promoter, accompanied by decreased accumulation of H3K9me2, a repressive transcriptional marker. CACUL1 and LSD1 oppositely regulate CDX-induced cell death in AR-positive LNCaP and metastatic castrate-resistant LNCaP-LN3 cells. These data suggest that CACUL1 impairs LSD1-mediated activation of AR, thereby implicating it as a potential antitumor target in PCa. PMID:27085459

  6. Androgen receptor variant-7: an important predictive biomarker in castrate resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sartor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent manuscript in New England Journal of Medicine by Antonarakis et al. [1] has important clinical implications. This study evaluates mRNA expression of a particular androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, in circulating tumor cells (CTCs from metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients receiving enzalutamide or abiraterone. The findings were striking, none of the 18 patients with detectable AR-V7 in CTCs had prostate-specific antigen (PSA responses. Further, the median time to PSA progression after enzalutamide or abiraterone treatment was only 1.3-1.4 months in AR-V7-positive patients as compared to 5.3-6.1 months in AR-V7 negative patients. AR-V7 in CTCs was also associated with shorter survival.

  7. Vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, A; Wang, B; Picon-Ruiz, M; Buchwald, P; Ince, Tan A

    2016-05-01

    Anti-estrogen and anti-HER2 treatments have been among the first and most successful examples of targeted therapy for breast cancer (BC). However, the treatment of triple-negative BC (TNBC) that lack estrogen receptor expression or HER2 amplification remains a major challenge. We previously discovered that approximately two-thirds of TNBCs express vitamin D receptor (VDR) and/or androgen receptor (AR) and hypothesized that TNBCs co-expressing AR and VDR (HR2-av TNBC) could be treated by targeting both of these hormone receptors. To evaluate the feasibility of VDR/AR-targeted therapy in TNBC, we characterized 15 different BC lines and identified 2 HR2-av TNBC lines and examined the changes in their phenotype, viability, and proliferation after VDR and AR-targeted treatment. Treatment of BC cell lines with VDR or AR agonists inhibited cell viability in a receptor-dependent manner, and their combination appeared to inhibit cell viability additively. Moreover, cell viability was further decreased when AR/VDR agonist hormones were combined with chemotherapeutic drugs. The mechanisms of inhibition by AR/VDR agonist hormones included cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in TNBC cell lines. In addition, AR/VDR agonist hormones induced differentiation and inhibited cancer stem cells (CSCs) measured by reduction in tumorsphere formation efficiency, high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and CSC markers. Surprisingly, we found that AR antagonists inhibited proliferation of most BC cell lines in an AR-independent manner, raising questions regarding their mechanism of action. In summary, AR/VDR-targeted agonist hormone therapy can inhibit HR2-av TNBC through multiple mechanisms in a receptor-dependent manner and can be combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27120467

  8. Deletion of the steroid-binding domain of the human androgen receptor gene in one family with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cloning of a cDNA for the human androgen receptor gene has resulted in the availability for cDNA probes that span various parts of the gene, including the entire steroid-binding domain and part of the DNA-binding domain, as well as part of the 5' region of the gene. The radiolabeled probes were used to screen for androgen receptor mutations on Southern blots prepared by restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from human subjects with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). In this investigation, the authors considered only patients presenting complete AIS and with the androgen receptor (-) form as the most probably subjects to show a gene deletion. One subject from each of six unrelated families with the receptor (-) form of complete AIS and 10 normal subjects were studied. In the 10 normal subjects and in 5 of the 6 patients, identical DNA restriction fragment patterns were observed with EcoRI and BamHI. Analysis of other members of this family confirmed the apparent gene deletion. The data provide direct proof that complete AIS in some families can result from a deletion of the androgen receptor structural gene. However, other families do not demonstrate such a deletion, suggesting that point mutations may also result in the receptor (-) form of complete AIS, adding further to the genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome

  9. Radioecological effects upon the nuclear translocation of androgen-receptor complexes as the cause of endocrine regulation disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male albino rats were conditioned during 1 mo in reference point 'Prypyats'' (800 m from the Chernobyl NPP) at gamma-phone ≥0.5 mSv/h and than their androgen receptor system' parameters in reproductive (prostate) and somatic (liver) organs, i.e. nuclear acceptation of androgen receptor complexes (ARC) were measured. Radioecological effects (≥0,36 Gy) upon nuclear translocation of ARC's in prostate and liver were similar, consisting of about 2.7-time decrease for relevant values, thus proving some fall in the working activity of the receptor system. The revealed phenomenon supposed to be an essential cause of depression in reproductive potential of gonad cells and detoxicating abilities of hepatocytes for sensitive residents at exposures to prolonged low doses' impacts of ionizing irradiation of Chernobyl 30-km zone. (Authors)

  10. Ablation of the androgen receptor from vascular smooth muscle cells demonstrates a role for testosterone in vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongxing; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Wu, Junxi; Vesey, Alex T; Lerman, Daniel A; Dweck, Marc R; Newby, David E; Smith, Lee B; MacRae, Vicky E

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification powerfully predicts mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease. Men have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to women of a similar age. These gender disparities suggest an influence of sex hormones. Testosterone is the primary and most well-recognised androgen in men. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that exogenous androgen treatment induces vascular calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed expression of androgen receptor (AR) in the calcified media of human femoral artery tissue and calcified human valves. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed increased phosphate (Pi)-induced mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification following either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment for 9 days. Testosterone and DHT treatment increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) mRNA expression. Testosterone-induced calcification was blunted in VSMC-specific AR-ablated (SM-ARKO) VSMCs compared to WT. Consistent with these data, SM-ARKO VSMCs showed a reduction in Osterix mRNA expression. However, intriguingly, a counter-intuitive increase in Alpl was observed. These novel data demonstrate that androgens play a role in inducing vascular calcification through the AR. Androgen signalling may represent a novel potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention. PMID:27095121

  11. Androgen Receptor in Teleosts%硬骨鱼类雄激素受体研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲鲁鲁; 张子平; 王艺磊; 陈芸

    2011-01-01

    The biological activity of androgens is mediated by the nuclear androgen receptor (nAR) in vertebrates, nAR is a ligand-regulated transcriptional factor, which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily.nAR has been characterized from mammals to teleosts. The nAR subtype is found to exist in two different isoforms in several fish species due to a teleost specific gene duplication event. These subtypes of nAR form two distinct molecular clusters and display different tissue distributions and expression patterns during embryogenesis and gonad development. Recently, increasing evidence has shown the nongenomic or cell surface receptor ( the membrane androgen receptor, mAR )-mediated actions of androgen. Here we review the gene structure;molecular and biological characteristics; tissue distribution; and ligand-binding features of nAR. Furthermore,we also review the characteristics, distribution and relationship of mAR with regards to the reproductive cycle in teleost fish.%在脊椎动物中,雄激素的生理作用主要是通过核雄激素受体(nuclear androgen receptor,nAR)介导的,这种转录因子属于核受体超家族成员.从哺乳动物到硬骨鱼类,均存在nAR.与高等脊椎动物不同的是,由于基因倍增等原因,部分硬骨鱼类nAR存在2种亚型.它们在鱼类胚胎发育和性腺发育过程中表现为不同的组织分布和表达类型.新近研究表明,雄激素也可以引起细胞的非基凶组效应,即不通过经典的核受体做出反应,而是在质膜通过膜雄激素受体(membrane androgen receptor,mAR)来调节.本文就nAR的基凶结构、分子生物学特性、组织分布、激素亲和力等方面的研究进行综述的同时,也对鱼类mAR的激素亲和特性、组织分布及其与生殖周期关系等方面的研究做了介绍.

  12. Androgen receptor functioned as a suppressor in the prostate cancer cell line PC3 in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Sheng-qiang; HAN Bang-min; SHAO Yi; WU Ji-tao; ZHAO Fu-jun; LIU Hai-tao; SUN Xiao-wen; TANG Yue-qing; XIA Shu-jie

    2009-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the most common urogenital tumors in the world with an increasing incidence in China. Androgen deprivation therapy is the major therapeutic option for advanced prostate cancer. However, the role of androgen receptor (AR) in hormone-refractory prostate cancer still remains unclear. This work aimed to investigate the role of AR in an androgen independent prostate cancer cell line by in vitro and in vivo studies.Methods The role of AR in the proliferation and invasion/metastasis ability of PC3-AR9 (a PC3 stable clone expressing human AR driven by natural human AR promoter) were examined with MTT assay, soft agar assay, chamber invasion assay, wound healing assay, and also with orthotopic xenograft mouse model.Results Restoring androgen receptor in PC3 cells resulted in decreased proliferation and invasion/metastasis ability in MTT, soft agar, chamber invasion and wound healing assay. In the mouse orthotopic xenograft model, PC3-AR9 resulted in smaller primary tumors and metastasis tumors, with a lower proliferation rate and higher apoptosis rate.Conclusion The AR might function as a tumor suppressor in PC3 cells both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Androgen receptor-negative human prostate cancer cells induce osteogenesis in mice through FGF9-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi Gang; Mathew, Paul; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Zurita, Amado J; Liu, Jie; Sikes, Charles; Multani, Asha S; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lopez, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Fanning, Tina V; Prieto, Victor G; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba S; Troncoso, Patricia; Raymond, Austin K; Logothetis, Christopher J; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Maity, Sankar; Navone, Nora M

    2008-08-01

    In prostate cancer, androgen blockade strategies are commonly used to treat osteoblastic bone metastases. However, responses to these therapies are typically brief, and the mechanism underlying androgen-independent progression is not clear. Here, we established what we believe to be the first human androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer xenografts whose cells induced an osteoblastic reaction in bone and in the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Accordingly, these cells grew in castrated as well as intact male mice. We identified FGF9 as being overexpressed in the xenografts relative to other bone-derived prostate cancer cells and discovered that FGF9 induced osteoblast proliferation and new bone formation in a bone organ assay. Mice treated with FGF9-neutralizing antibody developed smaller bone tumors and reduced bone formation. Finally, we found positive FGF9 immunostaining in prostate cancer cells in 24 of 56 primary tumors derived from human organ-confined prostate cancer and in 25 of 25 bone metastasis cases studied. Collectively, these results suggest that FGF9 contributes to prostate cancer-induced new bone formation and may participate in the osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer in bone. Androgen receptor-null cells may contribute to the castration-resistant osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer cells in bone and provide a preclinical model for studying therapies that target these cells. PMID:18618013

  14. A novel E153X point mutation in the androgen receptor gene in a patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SilviaBCopelli; SergeLumbmso; FrancoiseAudran; ElianaHPellizzari; JuanJHeinrich; SelvaBCigorraga; CharlesSultan; HectorEChemes

    1999-01-01

    Aim: To study a 46, XY newbom patient with a phenotype suggestive of an androgen insensitivity syndrome to confirm an anomaly in the AR gene. Methods: Genomic DNA from leukecytes was isolated in order to analyze SRY gene by PCR and sequencing of the eight exons of AR gene. Isolation of human Leydig cell mesenchymal precursorsfrom the testis was performed in order to study testosterone production and response to hCG stimulation in culture,Results: Surgical exploration disclosed two testes, no Wolffian structures and important Mullerian derivatives. The SRY gene was present in peripheral blood leukecytes. Sequencing of the AR gene evidenced a previously unreported G to T transversion in exon 1 that changed the normal gintamine 153 codon to a stop codon. Interstitial cell cultures produced sizable amounts of testosterone and were responsive to hCG stimulation. Conclusion: This E153X nonsense point mutation has not been described previously in cases of A/S, and could lead to the synthesis of a short truncated(153 vs 919 residues) non functional AR probably responsible for the phenotype of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). (Asian J Androl 1999 Jun; 1 : 73 - 77)

  15. Expression of androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer bone metastases is associated with castration-resistance and short survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Hörnberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Constitutively active androgen receptor variants (AR-V lacking the ligand binding domain (LBD may promote the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. The expression of AR-Vs in the clinically most important metastatic site, the bone, has, however, not been well documented. Our aim was therefore to compare levels of AR-Vs in hormone-naive (HN and CRPC bone metastases in comparison to primary PC and non-malignant prostate tissue, as well as in relation to AR protein expression, whole-genome transcription profiles and patient survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hormone-naïve (n = 10 and CRPC bone metastases samples (n = 30 were obtained from 40 patients at metastasis surgery. Non-malignant and malignant prostate samples were acquired from 13 prostatectomized men. Levels of full length AR (ARfl and AR-Vs termed AR-V1, AR-V7, and AR-V567es mRNA were measured with RT-PCR and whole-genome transcription profiles with an Illumina Beadchip array. Protein levels were examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Transcripts for ARfl, AR-V1, and AR-V7 were detected in most primary tumors and metastases, and levels were significantly increased in CRPC bone metastases. The AR-V567es transcript was detected in 23% of the CRPC bone metastases only. A sub-group of CRPC bone metastases expressed LBD-truncated AR proteins at levels comparable to the ARfl. Detectable AR-V567es and/or AR-V7 mRNA in the upper quartile, seen in 1/3 of all CRPC bone metastases, was associated with a high nuclear AR immunostaining score, disturbed cell cycle regulation and short survival. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Expression of AR-Vs is increased in CRPC compared to HN bone metastases and associated with a particularly poor prognosis. Further studies are needed to test if patients expressing such AR-Vs in their bone metastases benefit more from drugs acting on or down-stream of these AR-Vs than from therapies inhibiting androgen synthesis.

  16. Androgen regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) mRNA expression and receptor binding in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Michael J.; Goel, Nirupa; Sandau, Ursula S.; Bale, Tracy L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Stress-induced affective disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are more prevalent in females than in males. The reduced vulnerability to these disorders in males may be due to the presence of androgens, which are known to dampen the stress response and reduce anxiety-like behaviors. However, a neurobiological mechanism for this sex difference has yet to be elucidated. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) has been implicated in regulating anxiety-type behaviors and is expressed in stress-responsive brain regions that also contain androgen receptors (AR). We hypothesized that androgen may exert its effects through actions on CRHR2 and we therefore examined the regulation of CRHR2 mRNA and receptor binding in the male rat forebrain following androgen administration. Young adult male Sprague/Dawley rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and treated with the non-aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHTP) using hormone filled Silastic capsules. Control animals received empty capsules. Using quantitative real time RT-PCR, CRHR2 mRNA levels were determined in block dissected brain regions. DHTP treatment significantly increased CRHR2 mRNA expression in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and lateral septum (p < 0.01) when compared to vehicle-treated controls. A similar trend was observed in amygdala (p = 0.05). Furthermore, in vitro autoradiography revealed significantly higher CRHR2 binding in the lateral septum in androgen-treated males, with the highest difference observed in the ventral lateral region. Regulation of CRHR2 mRNA by AR was also examined using an in vitro approach. Hippocampal neurons, which contain high levels of AR, were harvested from E17–18 rat fetuses, and maintained in primary culture for 14 days. Neurons were then treated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 1 nM), DHT plus flutamide (an androgen receptor antagonist), or vehicle for 48 hours. CRHR2 mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real time RT-PCR. Consistent with in

  17. DJ-1 and androgen receptor immunohistochemical expression in prostatic carcinoma: A possible role in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Aim: Androgen plays a fundamental role in the growth and differentiation of prostate. Androgen receptor (AR) expression may represent a potential marker of prognosis in prostate cancer. However, there have been variable results regarding its ability to predict clinical progression. Despite the oncogenic properties of DJ-1, its significance in prostate cancer development and progression is not well understood. This research shed some light on the possible role of immunohistochemical expression of DJ-1 in clinically localized prostatic carcinoma in relation to the established role of AR and other clinico pathologic parameters. Materials and Methods: The immunohistochemical expression of AR and DJ-1 was evaluated in 129 samples including benign hyperplasia (n = 60) and prostatic carcinoma (n = 69). Results: The mean value of AR immunostaining was significantly higher in prostatic carcinomas than in benign hyperplasia (P = 0.001). A significant inverse correlation was found between AR immunostaining and the grade of prostatic carcinomas. A significantly higher median DJ-1 score was found in prostatic carcinoma than in benign hyperplasia (P = 0.0001). There was a significant direct correlation between AR and DJ-1 score (P = 0.0001). AR is more sensitive in predicting prostatic carcinoma than DJ-1 but DJ-1 is more specific than AR. Conclusion: AR nuclear expression was consistently present in benign and adenocarcinoma epithelium. But, there may be limited clinical use for AR expression in localized carcinoma due to its constant heterogeneity. DJ-1 with its oncogenic properties, specificity for prostatic carcinoma and homogenous expression gives an ideal complementary role to AR in the detection and treatment of prostatic carcinomas.

  18. Temporal role of Sertoli cell androgen receptor expression in spermatogenic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Rasmani; Corcoran, Lisa; Robson, Mat; McTavish, Kirsten J; Upton, Dannielle; Handelsman, David J; Allan, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    Sertoli cell (SC) androgen receptor (AR) activity is vital for spermatogenesis. We created a unique gain-of-function transgenic (Tg) mouse model to determine the temporal role of SCAR expression in testicular development. The SC-specific rat Abpa promoter directed human Tg AR [Tg SC-specific AR (TgSCAR)] expression, providing strong premature postnatal AR immunolocalized to SC nuclei. Independent Tg lines revealed that TgSCAR dose dependently reduced postnatal and mature testis size (to 60% normal), whereas androgen-dependent mature seminal vesicle weights and serum testosterone levels remained normal. Total SC numbers were reduced in developing and mature TgSCAR testes, despite normal or higher Fshr mRNA and circulating FSH levels. Postnatal TgSCAR testes exhibited elevated levels of AR-regulated Rhox5 and Spinlw1 transcripts, and precocious SC function was demonstrated by early seminiferous tubular lumen formation and up-regulated expression of crucial SC tight-junction (Cldn11 and Tjp1) and phagocytic (Elmo1) transcripts. Early postnatal Amh expression was elevated but declined to normal levels in peripubertal-pubertal TgSCAR vs. control testes, indicating differential age-related regulation featuring AR-independent Amh down-regulation. TgSCAR induced premature postnatal spermatogenic development, shown by increased levels of meiotic (Dmc1 and Spo11) and postmeiotic (Capza3 and Prm1) germ cell transcripts, elevated meiotic-postmeiotic germ:Sertoli cell ratios, and accelerated spermatid development. Meiotic germ:Sertoli cell ratios were further increased in adult TgSCAR mice, indicating predominant SCAR-mediated control of meiotic development. However, postmeiotic germ:Sertoli cell ratios declined below normal. Our unique TgSCAR paradigm reveals that atypical SC-specific temporal AR expression provides a direct molecular mechanism for induction of precocious testicular development, leading to reduced adult testis size and decreased postmeiotic development. PMID

  19. Neural Androgen Receptors Modulate Gene Expression and Social Recognition But Not Social Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Sara A; Studer, Erik; Kettunen, Petronella; Westberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex and androgen receptors (ARs) for social preference and social memory is rather unknown. In this study of mice we compared males, females and males lacking ARs specifically in the nervous system, AR(NesDel), with respect to social preference, assessed with the three-chambered apparatus test, and social recognition, assessed with the social discrimination procedure. In the social discrimination test we also evaluated the tentative importance of the sex of the stimulus animal. Novel object recognition and olfaction were investigated to complement the results from the social tests. Gene expression analysis was performed to reveal molecules involved in the effects of sex and androgens on social behaviors. All three test groups showed social preference in the three-chambered apparatus test. In both social tests an AR-independent sexual dimorphism was seen in the persistence of social investigation of female conspecifics, whereas the social interest toward male stimuli mice was similar in all groups. Male and female controls recognized conspecifics independent of their sex, whereas AR(NesDel) males recognized female but not male stimuli mice. Moreover, the non-social behaviors were not affected by AR deficiency. The gene expression analyses of hypothalamus and amygdala indicated that Oxtr, Cd38, Esr1, Cyp19a1, Ucn3, Crh, and Gtf2i were differentially expressed between the three groups. In conclusion, our results suggest that ARs are required for recognition of male but not female conspecifics, while being dispensable for social investigation toward both sexes. In addition, the AR seems to regulate genes related to oxytocin, estrogen and William's syndrome. PMID:27014003

  20. Sox2 is an androgen receptor-repressed gene that promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kregel

    Full Text Available Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR, has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways.

  1. Neural androgen receptors modulate gene expression and social recognition but not social investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Karlsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of sex and androgen receptors (ARs for social preference and social memory is rather unknown. In this study of mice we compared males, females and males lacking ARs specifically in the nervous system, ARNesDel, with respect to social preference, assessed with the three-chambered apparatus test, and social recognition, assessed with the social discrimination procedure. In the social discrimination test we also evaluated the tentative importance of the sex of the stimulus animal. Novel object recognition and olfaction were investigated to complement the results from the social tests. Gene expression analysis was performed to reveal molecules involved in the effects of sex and androgens on social behaviors. All three test groups showed social preference in the three-chambered apparatus test. In both social tests an AR-independent sexual dimorphism was seen in the persistence of social investigation of female conspecifics, whereas the social interest towards male stimuli mice was similar in all groups. Male and female controls recognized conspecifics independent of their sex, whereas ARNesDel males recognized female but not male stimuli mice. Moreover, the non-social behaviors were not affected by AR deficiency. The gene expression analyses of hypothalamus and amygdala indicated that Oxtr, Cd38, Esr1, Cyp19a1, Ucn3, Crh and Gtf2i were differentially expressed between the three groups. In conclusion, our results suggest that ARs are required for recognition of male but not female conspecifics, while being dispensable for social investigation towards both sexes. In addition, the AR seems to regulate genes related to oxytocin, estrogen and William’s syndrome.

  2. The Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR) and Docking Studies of Curcumin Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Guanhong; Chu, Yanyan; Jiang, Nan; YANG Jing; Li, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor antagonists have been proved to be effective anti-prostate cancer agents. 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking methods were performed on curcumin derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists. The bioactive conformation was explored by docking the potent compound 29 into the binding site of AR. The constructed Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated co...

  3. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaca

    Full Text Available Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  4. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meERα and huERα, meERβ1 and huERβ, meERβ2, and huERβ with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meARα and huAR, meARβ, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for Cα atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  5. Quantitative Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging of Androgen Receptor and Prostate-Specific Antigen in Prostate Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Lippolis, Giuseppe; Helczynski, Leszek; Anand, Aseem; Peltola, Mari; Pettersson, Kim; Lilja, Hans; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are expressed in the prostate and are involved in prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to develop reliable protocols for reproducible quantification of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate tissue using time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) imaging techniques. AR and PSA were detected with TRF in tissue microarrays from 91 PCa patients. p63/ alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) staining on consecutive sections was used to categorize tissue areas as benign or cancerous. Automated image analysis was used to quantify staining intensity. AR intensity was significantly higher in AMACR+ and lower in AMACR- cancer areas as compared with benign epithelium. The PSA intensity was significantly lower in cancer areas, particularly in AMACR- glands. The AR/PSA ratio varied significantly in the AMACR+ tumor cells as compared with benign glands. There was a trend of more rapid disease progression in patients with higher AR/PSA ratios in the AMACR- areas. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing reproducible protocols for TRF imaging and automated image analysis to study the expression of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate. It also highlighted the differences in AR and PSA protein expression within AMACR- and AMACR+ cancer regions. PMID:27026295

  6. Androgen receptor mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome: a high content analysis approach leading to personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare disease associated with inactivating mutations of AR that disrupt male sexual differentiation, and cause a spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities having as a common denominator loss of reproductive viability. No established treatment exists for these conditions, however there are sporadic reports of patients (or recapitulated mutations in cell lines that respond to administration of supraphysiologic doses (or pulses of testosterone or synthetic ligands. Here, we utilize a novel high content analysis (HCA approach to study AR function at the single cell level in genital skin fibroblasts (GSF. We discuss in detail findings in GSF from three historical patients with AIS, which include identification of novel mechanisms of AR malfunction, and the potential ability to utilize HCA for personalized treatment of patients affected by this condition.

  7. A Novel Mutation in Human Androgen Receptor Gene Causing Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Patient Presenting with Gynecomastia at Puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçyiğit, Cemil; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Çatlı, Gönül; Onay, Hüseyin; Dündar, Bumin Nuri

    2016-06-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) typically presents with micropenis, perineoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with descending or undescending testes and gynecomastia at puberty. It is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. However, AR gene mutations are found in less than a third of PAIS cases. A 16-year-old boy was admitted with complaints of gynecomastia and sparse facial hair. Family history revealed male relatives from maternal side with similar clinical phenotype. His external genitalia were phenotypically male with pubic hair Tanner stage IV, penoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with bilateral atrophic testes. He had elevated gonadotropins with a normal testosterone level. Chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY karyotype. Due to the family history suggesting a disorder of X-linked trait, PAIS was considered and molecular analysis of AR gene was performed. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel hemizygous mutation p.T576I (c.1727C>T) in the AR gene. The diagnosis of PAIS is based upon clinical phenotype and laboratory findings and can be confirmed by detection of a defect in the AR gene. An accurate approach including a detailed family history suggesting an X-linked trait is an important clue for a quick diagnosis. PMID:27087292

  8. Identification of Genetic Variants Within Androgen Receptor Gene of Sika Deer and its Association with Antler Production

    OpenAIRE

    Liguo Yang; Shujun Zhang; Lijun Huo; Pu Zhang; Bin Fan; Lei Shen; Guohua Hua; Feifei Yang; Jiajun Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Antler production is one of the most important economical traits of Sika deer. However, the genetic mechanism of antler growth and genetic markers associated with antler yield remain unclear. In the present study Androgen Receptor (AR) gene has been considered as a candidate gene to identify the polymorphisms. Besides, its effect on antler production was investigated in Chinese Sika deer. Genomic sequences of exons1-7 of Sika deer have been successfully obtained and showed high homogeneity wi...

  9. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Extract Modulates CHOP/GADD153 to Promote Androgen Receptor Degradation and Decreases Xenograft Tumor Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Petiwala, Sakina M.; Saba Berhe; Gongbo Li; Puthenveetil, Angela G.; Ozair Rahman; Larisa Nonn; Jeremy J Johnson

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has long been attributed to preventing or delaying the onset of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and various solid organ cancers. In this particular study, a rosemary extract standardized to carnosic acid was evaluated for its potential in disrupting the endoplasmic reticulum machinery to decrease the viability of prostate cancer cells and promote degradation of the androgen receptor. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells p...

  10. Activity-Directed Synthesis with Intermolecular Reactions: Development of a Fragment into a Range of Androgen Receptor Agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Karageorgis, George; Dow, Mark; Aimon, Anthony; Warriner, Stuart; Nelson, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Activity-directed synthesis (ADS), a novel discovery approach in which bioactive molecules emerge in parallel with associated syntheses, was exploited to develop a weakly binding fragment into novel androgen receptor agonists. Harnessing promiscuous intermolecular reactions of carbenoid compounds enabled highly efficient exploration of chemical space. Four substrates were prepared, yet exploited in 326 reactions to explore diverse chemical space; guided by bioactivity alone, the products of j...

  11. The Impact of Androgen Receptor Expression on Breast Cancer Survival: A Retrospective Study and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Qing; Mao, Yan; Fei, Xiao-Chun; Shen, Kun-wei

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of androgen receptor (AR) as a prognostic biomarker of breast cancer. However, its predictive role in disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) still remains inconclusive. The present study aimed to retrospectively investigate the association between AR and survival outcomes in breast cancer and also identify this association by a meta-analysis of published researches. Clinical data from 109 patients with breast cancer, who underwent surger...

  12. The Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Estrogen Receptor 1 is Related to Sex Dimorphism in the Gerbil Prostate Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Bruno D A; Maldarine, Juliana S; Zani, Bruno C; Biancardi, Manoel F; Santos, Fernanda C A; Góes, Rejane M; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2016-08-01

    The development of the prostate gland in females has not yet been clearly elucidated, and the sexual dimorphism associated with such gland development in general is far from being understood. In the present study, we used tridimensional (3D) reconstructions and histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to describe the sexual dimorphism and its causes in the early postnatal development of the prostate in male and female Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). We observed that the female prostate was smaller, had fewer branches throughout the development, and underwent differentiation earlier than that in males. Also, the expression of the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 or ER-alpha) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) was decreased in the periductal region, and the expression of the androgen receptor (AR) was increased in the epithelium. All together, these changes decreased proliferation and branching and led to an earlier prematuration of the female prostate. These new data shed light on the underlying mechanisms involved with the sexual dimorphism in the development of the prostate. Anat Rec, 299:1130-1139, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27184581

  13. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shtutman Michael; Tanner Matthew J; Carkner Richard D; Baghel Prateek S; Levina Elina; Feuerstein Michael A; Chen Mengqian; Vacherot Francis; Terry Stéphane; de la Taille Alexandre; Buttyan Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR) despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC....

  14. The fate of the duplicated androgen receptor in fishes: a late neofunctionalization event?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haendler Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the observation of an increased number of paralogous genes in teleost fishes compared with other vertebrates and on the conserved synteny between duplicated copies, it has been shown that a whole genome duplication (WGD occurred during the evolution of Actinopterygian fish. Comparative phylogenetic dating of this duplication event suggests that it occurred early on, specifically in teleosts. It has been proposed that this event might have facilitated the evolutionary radiation and the phenotypic diversification of the teleost fish, notably by allowing the sub- or neo-functionalization of many duplicated genes. Results In this paper, we studied in a wide range of Actinopterygians the duplication and fate of the androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4, a nuclear receptor known to play a key role in sex-determination in vertebrates. The pattern of AR gene duplication is consistent with an early WGD event: it has been duplicated into two genes AR-A and AR-B after the split of the Acipenseriformes from the lineage leading to teleost fish but before the divergence of Osteoglossiformes. Genomic and syntenic analyses in addition to lack of PCR amplification show that one of the duplicated copies, AR-B, was lost in several basal Clupeocephala such as Cypriniformes (including the model species zebrafish, Siluriformes, Characiformes and Salmoniformes. Interestingly, we also found that, in basal teleost fish (Osteoglossiformes and Anguilliformes, the two copies remain very similar, whereas, specifically in Percomorphs, one of the copies, AR-B, has accumulated substitutions in both the ligand binding domain (LBD and the DNA binding domain (DBD. Conclusion The comparison of the mutations present in these divergent AR-B with those known in human to be implicated in complete, partial or mild androgen insensitivity syndrome suggests that the existence of two distinct AR duplicates may be correlated to specific functional differences that may be

  15. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Davis, J. Wade; Hormann, Anette M.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized thataselected subset of chemicalsusedin natural gas drilling operationsandalso surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas–related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operationsmayresult in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  16. [7α-18F]fluoro-17α-methyl-5α-dihydrotestosterone: a ligand for androgen receptor-mediated imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have synthesized a 18F-labeled androgen, [7α-18F]fluoro-17α-methyl-5α-dihydrotestosterone, in a no-carrier-added radiosynthesis by exchange of 18F- (tetrabutylammonium fluoride) with the 7β-tosyloxy of 17α-methyl-5α-dihydrotestosterone. The nonradioactive steroid binds with high affinity and specificity to the androgen receptor and binds poorly, if at all, to other steroid receptors and plasma sex hormone binding globulin. The 7α-18F-androgen concentrates markedly in the prostate of rats by an androgen receptor-dependent mechanism. It is likely that [7α-18F]fluoro-17α-methyl-5α-dihydrotestosterone will be an excellent positron emission tomography imaging agent for prostate cancer

  17. Diabetes protects from prostate cancer by downregulating androgen receptor: new insights from LNCaP cells and PAC120 mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Barbosa-Desongles

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes has been associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer in observational studies, and this inverse association has been recently confirmed in several large cohort studies. However the mechanisms involved in this protective effect remain to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to explore whether different features of type 2 diabetes (hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] protect against the development of prostate cancer. For this purpose LNCaP cells were used for in vitro experiments and nude mice in which PAC120 (hormone-dependent human prostate cancer xenografts had been implanted were used for in vivo examinations. We provide evidence that increasing glucose concentrations downregulate androgen receptor (AR mRNA and protein levels through NF-κB activation in LNCaP cells. Moreover, there was a synergic effect of glucose and TNFα in downregulating the AR in LNCaP cells. By contrast, insulin had no effect on AR regulation. In vivo experiments showed that streptozotocin-induced diabetes (STZ-DM produces tumor growth retardation and a significant reduction in AR expression in PAC120 prostate cancer mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that hyperglycemia and TNF-α play an important role in protecting against prostate cancer by reducing androgen receptor levels via NF-κB.

  18. Establishment of a novel immortalized human prostatic epithelial cell line stably expressing androgen receptor and its application for the functional screening of androgen receptor modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we developed a human prostatic epithelial cell line BPH-1-AR stably expressing AR by lentiviral transduction. Characterization by immunoblot and RT-PCR showed that AR was stably expressed in all representative BPH-1-AR clones. Androgen treatment induced a secretory differentiation phenotype in BPH-1-AR cells but suppressed their cell proliferation. Treatments with AR agonists induced transactivation of a transfected PSA-gene promoter reporter in BPH-1-AR cells, whereas this transactivation was suppressed by an AR antagonist flutamide, indicating that the transduced AR in BPH-1-AR cells was functional. Finally, we utilized BPH-1-AR cells to evaluate the androgenic activities and growth effects of five newly developed non-steroidal compounds. Results showed that these compounds showed androgenic activities and growth-inhibitory effects on BPH-1-AR cells. Our results showed that BPH-1-AR cell line would be a valuable in vitro model for the study of androgen-regulated processes in prostatic epithelial cells and identification of compounds with AR-modulating activities.

  19. The diverse and contrasting effects of using human prostate cancer cell lines to study androgen receptor roles in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Qiang Yu; Kuo-Pao Lai; Shu-Jie Xia; Hong-Chiang Chang; Chawnshang Chang; Shuyuan Yeh

    2009-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa).Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in blocking tumor growth,but it eventually leads to the hormonerefractory state.The detailed mechanisms of the conversion from androgen dependence to androgen independence remain unclear.Several PCa cell lines were established to study the role of AR in PCa,but the results were often inconsistent or contrasting in different cell lines,or in the same cell line grown under different conditions.The cellular and molecular alteration of epithelial cells and their microenvironments are complicated,and it is difficult to use a single cell line to address this important issue and also to study the pathophysiological effects of AR.In this paper,we summarize the different effects of AR on multiple cell lines and show the disadvantages of using a single human PCa cell line to study AR effects on PCa.We also discuss the advantages of widely used epithelium-stroma co-culture systems,xenograft mouse models,and genetically engineered PCa mouse models.The combination of in vitro cell line studies and in vivo mouse models might lead to more credible results and better strategies for the study of AR roles in PCa.

  20. Expression patterns of GATA3 and the androgen receptor are strongly correlated in patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sewha; Moon, Byung-In; Lim, Woosung; Park, Sanghui; Cho, Min Sun; Sung, Sun Hee

    2016-09-01

    GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA3) is a diagnostically useful immunohistochemical marker of breast cancer. Because of its strong association with estrogen receptor expression, GATA3 has markedly reduced sensitivity in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We constructed a tissue microarray using a large series of TNBCs and evaluated GATA3 expression by TNBC subtype as defined by surrogate immunohistochemical markers. A total of 205 TNBCs were classified into cancers of the molecular apocrine type (n=23, 11.2%), claudin-low type (n=21, 10.2%), basal-like type (n=91, 44.4%), mixed type (n=62, 30.2%), and null type (n=8, 3.9%). The GATA3 scores (staining intensity × proportion) were categorized as negative (0), focally positive (1-10), or positive (11-300). GATA3 staining was negative in 153 cancers (74.6%), focally positive in 11 (5.4%), and positive in 41 (20.0%). The rate of focal positivity or positivity for GATA3 was significantly higher in the molecular apocrine type (73.9%, 17/23) than in other types of TNBCs (P=.001). The mean GATA3 score of molecular apocrine-type TNBC was significantly higher than that of the other types (P=.001) and differed significantly between androgen receptor (AR)-positive and AR-negative TNBCs (P<.001). In conclusion, GATA3 expression was correlated strongly with AR-positive, molecular apocrine-type TNBCs. Co-expression of AR and GATA3 is a specific feature of molecular apocrine-type TNBC, which may serve as a diagnostic aid for cancer of unknown primary. PMID:27184484

  1. Chronic Blockade of the Androgen Receptor Abolishes Age-Dependent Increases in Blood Pressure in Female Growth-Restricted Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira; Rudsenske, Benjamin R; Davis, Gwendolyn K; Newsome, Ashley D; Alexander, Barbara T

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction induced via placental insufficiency programs a significant increase in blood pressure at 12 months of age in female growth-restricted rats that is associated with early cessation of estrous cyclicity, indicative of premature reproductive senescence. In addition, female growth-restricted rats at 12 months of age exhibit a significant increase in circulating testosterone with no change in circulating estradiol. Testosterone is positively associated with blood pressure after menopause in women. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that androgen receptor blockade would abolish the significant increase in blood pressure that develops with age in female growth-restricted rats. Mean arterial pressure was measured in animals pretreated with and without the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide (8 mg/kg/day, SC for 2 weeks). Flutamide abolished the significant increase in blood pressure in growth-restricted rats relative to control at 12 months of age. To examine the mechanism(s) by which androgens contribute to increased blood pressure in growth-restricted rats, blood pressure was assessed in rats untreated or treated with enalapril (250 mg/L for 2 weeks). Enalapril eliminated the increase in blood pressure in growth-restricted relative to vehicle- and flutamide-treated controls. Furthermore, the increase in medullary angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA expression was abolished in flutamide-treated growth-restricted relative to untreated counterparts and controls; cortical angiotensin-converting enzyme mRNA expression was reduced in flutamide-treated growth-restricted versus untreated counterparts. Thus, these data indicate that androgens, via activation of the renin-angiotensin system, are important mediators of increased blood pressure that develops by 12 months of age in female growth-restricted rats. PMID:27113045

  2. Androgens with activity at estrogen receptor beta have anxiolytic and cognitive-enhancing effects in male rats and mice

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Koonce, Carolyn J.; Edinger, Kassandra L.; Osborne, Danielle M.; Alicia A Walf

    2008-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and its metabolites may underlie some beneficial effects for anxiety and cognition, but the mechanisms for these effects are unclear. T is reduced to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which can be converted to 5α-androstane,3α,17β-diol (3α-diol) and/or 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol (3β-diol). Additionally, T can be converted to androstenedione, and then to androsterone. These metabolites bind with varying affinity to androgen receptors (ARs; T and DHT), estrogen receptors (ERβ; 3α-diol,...

  3. Androgen Receptors Expression in Pituitary of Male Viscacha in relation to Growth and Reproductive Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Palmira Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the androgen receptors (AR expression in pituitary pars distalis (PD of male viscachas in relation to growth and reproductive cycle. AR were detected by immunocytochemistry and quantified by image analysis. Pituitary glands from fetus, immature, prepubertal, and adult viscachas during their reproductive cycle were used. In the fetal PD, the immunoreactivity (ir was mainly cytoplasmic. In immature and prepubertal animals, AR-ir was cytoplasmic (ARc-ir and nuclear (ARn-ir in medial region. In adult animals, ARn-ir cells were numerous at caudal end. AR regionalization varied between the PD zones in relation to growth. In immature animals, the ARn-ir increased whereas the cytoplasmic expression decreased in relation to the fetal glands. The percentage of ARc-ir cells increased in prepubertal animals whereas the nuclear AR expression was predominant in adult viscachas. The AR expression changed in adults, showing minimum percentage in the gonadal regression period. The variation of nuclear AR expression was directly related with testosterone concentration. These results demonstrated variations in the immunostaining pattern, regionalization, and number of AR-ir cells throughout development, growth, and reproductive cycle, suggesting the involvement of AR in the regulation of the pituitary activity of male viscacha.

  4. Ligand fishing using new chitosan based functionalized Androgen Receptor magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Sroka, Wiktor Dariusz; Sikora, Adam; Chełminiak, Dorota; Ziegler-Borowska, Marta; Siódmiak, Tomasz; Moaddel, Ruin

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles with chemically modified chitosan has been proposed as a potential support for the immobilization of the androgen receptor (AR). The study involved comparison of different AR carriers like commercially available magnetic beads coated with silica (BcMag) and chitosan coated nanoparticles with different amount of amino groups. The immobilization was carried out through covalent immobilization of the AR through the terminal amino group or through available carboxylic acids. The initial characterization of the AR coated magnetic beads was carried out with dihydrotestosterone, a known AR ligand. Subsequently, chitosan modified nanporticles with long-distanced primary amino groups (Fe3O4CS-(NH2)3) (upto 8.34mM/g) were used for further study to isolate known AR ligands (bicalutamide, flutamide, hydroxyflutamide and levonogestrel) from a mixture of tested compounds in ammonium acetate buffer [10mM, pH 7.4]. The results showed that the selected nanoparticles are a promising semi-quantitative tool for the identification of high affinity compounds to AR and might be of special importance in the identification of novel agonists or antiandrogens. PMID:27156644

  5. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype. PMID:26744914

  6. Iodine-125 Nilutamide as Novel Radio-therapeutic Ligand for Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilutamide is potent anti-androgen that is used in patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma. The labeling of nilutamide with iodine radioisotopes give an advantage to localize these radionuclides in prostate for imaging and/or therapy depending on the radionuclide used. During this study, nilutamide was labeled successfully with iodine-125 in a neutral ph medium using chloramine-T as oxidizing agent and the radiochemical yield obtained was greater than 96%. The biodistribution of the iodine-125-nilutamide in normal mice indicated the ability of the tracer to bind with specific receptors in prostate and other male organs with 3.5 % at 4 hours post injection. The clearance of the tracer from the blood pool was slow and equal to 40% of the initial blood uptake at 4 hours post injection. The in vivo stability of the tracer was established by the absence of the thyroid uptake. The competition binding was achieved via 1M injection of testosterone and IV injection of non-labeled nilutamide 2 hours before the administration of the tracer. The results referred to a significant reduction in the uptake of the tracer by the prior administration of testosterone and non-labeled nilutamide by 60% and 30%, respectively at 4 hours post injection

  7. Androgen receptor status predicts response to chemotherapy, not risk of breast cancer in Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Anurupa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerably little is known about the biological role and clinical significance of androgen receptor expression in breast cancer. The objectives of this study were to characterize AR-CAG repeat genotypes in a cohort of women with breast cancer and to determine the influence of AR on response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and clinical outcome. Materials and methods Genotyping of the AR CAG repeat region was done on 70 patients and 80 healthy aged- matched female controls. To assess response to NACT, tissue samples from 30 LABC cases were evaluated quantitatively by real time for AR mRNA expression. The clinical response was correlated with both the pre and post chemotherapy AR expression. The CAG alleles did not show differences between cases and controls when the mean of short, long and average length of both CAG alleles was considered. However, analysis when done defining short allele as CAGn Conclusions Although, expansion of the CAGn in the AR gene doesn't show any major effect on breast cancer risk, patients with positive AR expression, pre neoadjuvant chemotherapy, were found to be good responders and a decrease in mRNA level of AR gene related to the chemotherapy-induced apoptosis could serve as an important independent predictor of response to NACT.

  8. Identification of Novel Steroidal Androgen Receptor Degrading Agents Inspired by Galeterone 3β-Imidazole Carbamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Kwegyir-Afful, Andrew K; Martin, Marlena S; Ramamurthy, Vidya P; Ramalingam, Senthilmurugan; Njar, Vincent C O

    2016-07-14

    Degradation of all forms of androgen receptors (ARs) is emerging as an advantageous therapeutic paradigm for the effective treatment of prostate cancer. In continuation of our program to identify and develop improved efficacious novel small-molecule agents designed to disrupt AR signaling through enhanced AR degradation, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated novel C-3 modified analogues of our phase 3 clinical agent, galeterone (5). Concerns of potential in vivo stability of our recently discovered more efficacious galeterone 3β-imidazole carbamate (6) led to the design and synthesis of new steroidal compounds. Two of the 11 compounds, 3β-pyridyl ether (8) and 3β-imidazole (17) with antiproliferative GI50 values of 3.24 and 2.54 μM against CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cell, are 2.75- and 3.5-fold superior to 5. In addition, compounds 8 and 17 possess improved (∼4-fold) AR-V7 degrading activities. Importantly, these two compounds are expected to be metabolically stable, making them suitable for further development as new therapeutics against all forms of prostate cancer. PMID:27437082

  9. Up and Down Expression of Androgen Receptor,Estrogen Receptor beta and Platelet Derived Growth Factor beta by Testosterone in Aortic Vascular Smooth Muscle Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Saizhu; Lv Hongsong; Zhou Kexiang; Sun Fei; Ma Rui; Zheng Hua; Wei Heming; Rong Zhiyi

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of testosterone enanthate(TE) on serum lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and the expression of androgen receptor ( AR), estrogen receptor beta ( ER -β) and platelet derived growth factor beta (PDGFR-β ) in aortic vascular smooth muscle tissues(VSMTs). Methods Forty aged male rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, group A (placebo group),group B (2.5 mg/kg intramuscular injection of TE once a week ), group C (5.0 mg/kg intramuscular injection of TE once a week ), group D ( 10.0 mg,/kg intramuscular injection of TE once a week). All animals were fed freely during 16 - week treatment periods. The expression of AR , ER - βand PDGFR - β were studied by Western bolt. Results Average serum LDL - C was lower in group D than that in group A ( p < 0.01 ).Compared with the other groups, average serum TC was also lower in group D ( p < 0.05). AR expression in aortic vascular smooth muscle tissues could be regulated by TE: 99.50 ± 21.74, 125.38 ± 28.68 and 101.98 ±15.42 for TE concentrations at 2.5 mg/kg, 5.0 mg/kgand 10.0 mg/kg, respectively , the expression of ER -β could be regulated by TE: 92.34 ± 18.68, 47.72 ±18.12, 82.13 ±23.50, and the expression of PDGFR -β could be regulated as well by TE: 219.70 ± 45.59,50.16 ± 9.72, 125.36 ± 15.74 ( Data for AR , ER - βand PDGFR - β protein band intensity were expressed with x ± s, with control group taken as 100).Conclusions This study indicates that androgens have significant effects on serum lipids and lipoprotein metabolism. Testosterone enanthate at 5.0 mg/kg can stimulate the expression of AR, but inhibite the expression of PDGFR. Testosterone enanthate at the concentrations of 5.0 mg/kg and 10.0 mg/kg can inhibite the expression of ER - β.

  10. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Pistelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001 and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01, but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72 or overall survival (p = 0.93. Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target.

  11. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistelli, Mirco, E-mail: mirco.pistelli@alice.it; Caramanti, Miriam [Clinica di Oncologia Medica, AO Ospedali Riuniti-Ancona, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona 60020 (Italy); Biscotti, Tommasina; Santinelli, Alfredo [Anatomia Patologica, AO Ospedali Riuniti-Ancona, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona 60020 (Italy); Pagliacci, Alessandra; De Lisa, Mariagrazia; Ballatore, Zelmira; Ridolfi, Francesca; Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Berardi, Rossana; Battelli, Nicola; Cascinu, Stefano [Clinica di Oncologia Medica, AO Ospedali Riuniti-Ancona, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona 60020 (Italy)

    2014-06-27

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001) and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01), but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72) or overall survival (p = 0.93). Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target.

  12. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001) and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01), but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72) or overall survival (p = 0.93). Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target

  13. Five-alpha Reductase Inhibitor Influences Expression of Androgen Receptor and HOXB13 in Human Hyperplastic Prostate Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaeyong Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Five-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs are known as chemopreventive agents in prostate cancer with a risk of high-grade disease. This study evaluated the effects of 5ARI on androgen receptor (AR and proteins involved in prostate cell growth such as HOXB13 expression in human prostate tissue and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Materials and Methods We retrospectively selected 21 patients who underwent TURP between March 2007 and February 2010 for previously confirmed BPH by prostate biopsy. They were grouped into control (group 1, n = 9 and 5ARI treatment (group 2, n = 12 before TURP. AR and HOXB13 expression in prostate tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. We tested the effect of 5ARI on the expression of AR, prostate specific antigen (PSA and HOXB13 in LNCaP cells. Cells were assessed by Western blot analysis, MTT in vitro proliferation assay, and ELISA. Results: Group 2 showed stronger reactivity for AR and HOXB13 than those of the group 1. MTT assay showed death of LNCaP cells at 25uM of 5ARI. At the same time, ELISA assay for PSA showed that 5ARI inhibited secretion of PSA in LNCaP cells. Western blot analysis showed that 5ARI did not greatly alter AR expression but it stimulated the expression of HOXB13. Conclusions These results demonstrated that 5ARI influences AR and HOXB13 expression in both LNCaP cells and human prostate tissue. In order to use 5ARI in chemoprevention of prostate cancer, we still need to clarify the influence of 5ARI in ARs and oncogenic proteins and its regulation pathway.

  14. Androgen receptor CAG repeats length polymorphism and the risk of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rajender

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS refers to an inheritable androgen excess disorder characterized by multiple small follicles located at the ovarian periphery. Hyperandrogenism in PCOS, and inverse correlation between androgen receptor (AR CAG numbers and AR function, led us to hypothesize that CAG length variations may affect PCOS risk. METHODS: CAG repeat region of 169 patients recruited following strictly defined Rotterdam (2003 inclusion criteria and that of 175 ethnically similar control samples, were analyzed. We also conducted a meta-analysis on the data taken from published studies, to generate a pooled estimate on 2194 cases and 2242 controls. RESULTS: CAG bi-allelic mean length was between 8.5 and 24.5 (mean = 17.43, SD = 2.43 repeats in the controls and between 11 and 24 (mean = 17.39, SD = 2.29 repeats in the cases, without any significant difference between the two groups. Further, comparison of bi-allelic mean and its frequency distribution in three categories (short, moderate and long alleles did not show any significant difference between controls and various case subgroups. Frequency distribution of bi-allelic mean in two categories (extreme and moderate alleles showed over-representation of extreme sized alleles in the cases with marginally significant value (50.3% vs. 61.5%, χ(2 = 4.41; P = 0.036, which turned insignificant upon applying Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. X-chromosome inactivation analysis showed no significant difference in the inactivation pattern of CAG alleles or in the comparison of weighed bi-allelic mean between cases and controls. Meta-analysis also showed no significant correlation between CAG length and PCOS risk, except a minor over-representation of short CAG alleles in the cases. CONCLUSION: CAG bi-allelic mean length did not differ between controls and cases/case sub-groups nor did the allele distribution. Over-representation of short

  15. Screening of 397 chemicals and development of a quantitative structure-activity relationship model for androgen receptor antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Annemarie; Niemelä, Jay Russell; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Jensen, Gunde Egeskov

    2008-01-01

    We have screened 397 chemicals for human androgen receptor (AR) antagonism by a sensitive reporter gene assay to generate data for the development of a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. A total of 523 chemicals comprising data on 292 chemicals from our laboratory and data...... synthetic androgen R1881. The MultiCASE expert system was used to construct a QSAR model for AR antagonizing potential. A "5 Times, 2-Fold 50% Cross Validation" of the model showed a sensitivity of 64%, a specificity of 84%, and a concordance of 76%. Data for 102 chemicals were generated for an external...... validation of the model resulting in a sensitivity of 57%, a specificity of 98%, and a concordance of 92% of the model. The model was run on a set of 176103 chemicals, and 47% were within the domain of the model. Approximately 8% of chemicals was predicted active for AR antagonism. We conclude that the...

  16. Protein-Protein Interactions at the Adrenergic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Cotecchia, Susanna; Stanasila, Laura; Diviani, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors are among the best characterized G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and knowledge on this receptor family has provided several important paradigms about GPCR function and regulation. One of the most recent paradigms initially supported by studies on adrenergic receptors is that both βarrestins and G protein-coupled receptors themselves can act as scaffolds binding a variety of proteins and this can result in growing complexity of the receptor-mediated cellular effect...

  17. Effects of estrogen replacement and lower androgen status on skeletal muscle collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Reitelseder, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    myofibrillar protein FSR only in ERT users. Similarly, muscle collagen FSR tended to be lower in ERT users compared with Controls. In ERT participants, the androgen profile was reduced, whereas estradiol and sex hormone–binding globulin were higher. In conclusion, at rest, myofibrillar protein FSR was lower in...

  18. Combination of carmustine and selenite effectively inhibits tumor growth by targeting androgen receptor, androgen receptor-variants, and Akt in preclinical models: New hope for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani; Thamilselvan, Sivagnanam

    2016-10-01

    Despite established androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, AR/AR-variants signaling remain a major obstacle for the successful treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In addition, CRPC cells adapt to survive via AR-independent pathways to escape next generation therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for drugs that can target these signaling pathways in CRPC. In this study, we sought to determine whether carmustine and selenite in combination could induce apoptosis and inhibit growth of CRPC in-vitro and in-vivo. CRPC (22Rv1, VCaP, and PC-3) cell lines in culture and xenograft mouse were used. Combination of carmustine and selenite treatment significantly increased reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and growth inhibition in CRPC cells with down regulation of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Mcl-1) and proliferative proteins (c-Myc and cyclin-D1). This effect was associated with complete reduction of AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA and significant induction of p27Kip1. Combination treatment substantially abolished phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3β, and anchorage-independent growth in AR-positive and AR-negative cells. Consistent with in-vitro results, combination treatment effectively induced apoptosis and completely inhibited xenograft tumor growth and markedly reduced AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA, and Bcl-2 in xenograft tumors without causing genotoxicity in host mice. Individual agent treatment showed only partial effect. The combination treatment showed a significant synergistic effect. The present study is the first to demonstrate that the combination of carmustine and selenite treatment completely suppressed CRPC tumor growth by reducing AR/AR-variants and Akt signaling. Our findings suggest that the combination of carmustine and selenite could constitute a promising next-generation therapy for successful treatment of patients with CRPC. PMID:27198552

  19. No effects of androgen receptor gene CAG and GGC repeat polymorphisms on digit ratio (2D:4D): Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Voracek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A series of meta-analyses assessed whether differentially efficacious variants (CAG and GGC repeat-length polymorphisms) of the human androgen receptor gene are associated with digit ratio (2D:4D), a widely investigated putative pointer to prenatal androgen action. Methods: Extensive literature search strategies identified a maximum of 16 samples (total N = 2157) eligible for meta-analysis. Results: In contrast to a small-sample (N = 50) initial report, widely cited affirmatively ...

  20. Widely used pharmaceuticals present in the environment revealed as in vitro antagonists for human estrogen and androgen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Janochová, Jana; Filipová, Alena; Křesinová, Zdena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    A considerable amount of scientific evidence indicates that a number of pharmaceuticals that could be detected in the environment can contribute towards the development of problems associated with human reproductive systems, as well as those of wildlife. We investigated the estrogenic and androgenic effects of select pharmaceuticals with high production volume and environmental relevance. We examined the receptor-binding activities of these pharmaceuticals in the T47D human cell line using altered secretion of cytokine CXCL12. Functional yeast-luciferase reporter gene assays were also employed to confirm the mechanism of receptor binding by estrogen and androgen. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, namely ibuprofen, diclofenac and antiarrhythmic agent amiodarone showed strong anti-estrogenic effects in the T47D cell line. In the yeast-luciferase assay, these anti-inflammatory drugs also demonstrated anti-estrogenic potency and inhibited the E2 response in a concentration-dependent manner. Amiodarone did not exhibit any response in the yeast-luciferase assay; therefore, the endocrine disruption presumably occurred at a different level without directly involving the receptor. All the anti-inflammatory drugs considered in this study, including ketoprofen, naproxen and clofibrate, exhibited a dose-dependent antagonism towards the androgen receptor in the yeast-luciferase assays. Several other drugs, including the stimulant caffeine, did not show any response in the tests that were employed. A risk assessment analysis using 'Hazard Quotient' suggested a potential risk, especially in the cases of ibuprofen, ketoprofen, diclofenac and clofibrate. The results reveal the intrinsic endocrine disrupting nature of several pharmaceuticals and thus could contribute towards explaining a number of adverse health effects on humans and wildlife. PMID:26978704

  1. Testosterone reduces knee passive range of motion and expression of relaxin receptor isoforms via 5α-dihydrotestosterone and androgen receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Muniandy, Sekaran; Yusof, Ashril; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian steroids such as estrogen and progesterone have been reported to influence knee laxity. The effect of testosterone, however, remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone on the knee range of motion (ROM) and the molecular mechanisms that might involve changes in the expression of relaxin receptor isoforms, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 in the patella tendon and lateral collateral ligament of the female rat knee. Ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats received three days treatment with peanut oil (control), testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg) and testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg) plus flutamide, an androgen receptor blocker or finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor. Duplicate groups received similar treatment however in the presence of relaxin (25 ng/kg). A day after the last drug injection, knee passive ROM was measured by using a digital miniature goniometer. Both tendon and ligament were harvested and then analysed for protein and mRNA expression for Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 respectively. Knee passive ROM, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression were significantly reduced following treatment with testosterone. Flutamide or finasteride administration antagonized the testosterone effect. Concomitant administration of testosterone and relaxin did not result in a significant change in knee ROM as compared to testosterone only treatment; however this was significantly increased following flutamide or finasteride addition. Testosterone effect on knee passive ROM is likely mediated via dihydro-testosterone (DHT), and involves downregulation of Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression, which may provide the mechanism underlying testosterone-induced decrease in female knee laxity. PMID:24642882

  2. Testosterone Reduces Knee Passive Range of Motion and Expression of Relaxin Receptor Isoforms via 5α-Dihydrotestosterone and Androgen Receptor Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouzeh Dehghan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian steroids such as estrogen and progesterone have been reported to influence knee laxity. The effect of testosterone, however, remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone on the knee range of motion (ROM and the molecular mechanisms that might involve changes in the expression of relaxin receptor isoforms, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 in the patella tendon and lateral collateral ligament of the female rat knee. Ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats received three days treatment with peanut oil (control, testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg and testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg plus flutamide, an androgen receptor blocker or finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor. Duplicate groups received similar treatment however in the presence of relaxin (25 ng/kg. A day after the last drug injection, knee passive ROM was measured by using a digital miniature goniometer. Both tendon and ligament were harvested and then analysed for protein and mRNA expression for Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 respectively. Knee passive ROM, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression were significantly reduced following treatment with testosterone. Flutamide or finasteride administration antagonized the testosterone effect. Concomitant administration of testosterone and relaxin did not result in a significant change in knee ROM as compared to testosterone only treatment; however this was significantly increased following flutamide or finasteride addition. Testosterone effect on knee passive ROM is likely mediated via dihydro-testosterone (DHT, and involves downregulation of Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression, which may provide the mechanism underlying testosterone-induced decrease in female knee laxity.

  3. Specific in vitro toxicity of crude and refined petroleum products: II. Estrogen (alpha and beta) and androgen receptor-mediated responses in yeast assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrabie, C.M.; Candido, A.; van Duursen, M.B.M.; Jonker, M.T.O.

    2010-01-01

    The present study is the second in a series aiming at a systematic inventory of specific toxic effects of oils. By employing a recombinant yeast stably transfected with human estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) or -beta (ERbeta) or androgen receptor (AR) and expressing yeast enhanced green fluorescent

  4. Non-linear association between androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeat lengths and reproductive parameters in fertile European and Inuit men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokken, L J S; Rylander, L; Jönsson, B A;

    2013-01-01

    Recently the dogma that there is an inverse linear association between androgen receptor (AR) CAG and GGN polymorphisms and receptor activity has been challenged. We analysed the pattern of association between 21 male reproductive phenotypes and AR CAG/GGN repeat lengths in 557 proven-fertile men...

  5. Identification of a group of brominated flame retardants as novel androgen receptor antagonists and potential neuronal and endocrine disrupters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Pradhan, Ajay; Asnake, Solomon; Walstad, Anders; Ivarsson, Per; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used in industrial products to reduce the risk of fire. However, their continuous release into the environment is a concern as they are often persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic. Information on the impact these compounds have on human health and wildlife is limited and only a few of them have been identified to disrupt hormone receptor functions. In the present study we used in silico modeling to determine the interactions of selected BFRs with the human androgen receptor (AR). Three compounds were found to dock into the ligand-binding domain of the human AR and these were further tested using in vitro analysis. Allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE) and 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) were observed to act as AR antagonists. These BFRs have recently been detected in the environment, in house dust and in aquatic animals. The compounds have been detected at high concentrations in both blubber and brain of seals and we therefore also assessed their impact on the expression of L-type amino acid transporter system (LAT) genes, that are needed for amino acid uptake across the blood-brain barrier, as disruption of LAT gene function has been implicated in several brain disorders. The three BFRs down-regulated the expression of AR target genes that encode for prostate specific antigen (PSA), 5α-reductases and β-microseminoprotein. The potency of PSA inhibition was of the same magnitude as the common prostate cancer drugs, demonstrating that these compounds are strong AR antagonists. Western blot analysis of AR protein showed that ATE, BATE and DPTE decreased the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced AR protein levels, further confirming that these BFRs act as AR antagonists. The transcription of the LAT genes was altered by the three BFRs, indicating an effect on amino-acid uptake across cellular membranes and blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrated that ATE, BATE

  6. A preliminary MTD-PLS study for androgen receptor binding of steroid compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Alina; Seclaman, E.; Kurunczi, L.; Funar-Timofei, Simona

    The relative binding affinities (RBA) of a series of 30 steroids for Human Androgen Receptor (AR) were used to initiate a MTD-PLS study. The 3D structures of all the compounds were obtained through geometry optimization in the framework of AM1 semiempirical quantum chemical method. The MTD hypermolecule (HM) was constructed, superposing these structures on the AR-bonded dihydrotestosterone (DHT) skeleton obtained from PDB (AR complex, ID 1I37). The parameters characterizing the HM vertices were collected using: AM1 charges, XlogP fragmental values, calculated fragmental polarizabilities (from refractivities), volumes, and H-bond parameters (Raevsky's thermodynamic originated scale). The resulted QSAR data matrix was submitted to PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and PLS (Projections in Latent Structures) procedure (SIMCA P 9.0); five compounds were selected as test set, and the remaining 25 molecules were used as training set. In the PLS procedure supplementary chemical information was introduced, i.e. the steric effect was always considered detrimental, and the hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions were imposed to be beneficial. The initial PLS model using the entire training set has the following characteristics: R2Y = 0.584, Q2 = 0.344. Based on distances to the model criterions (DMODX and DMODY), five compounds were eliminated and the obtained final model had the following characteristics: R2Y D 0.891, Q2 D 0.591. For this the external predictivity on the test set was unsatisfactory. A tentative explanation for these behaviors is the weak information content of the input QSAR matrix for the present series comparatively with other successful MTD-PLS modeling published elsewhere.

  7. Elevated expression of the Sertoli cell androgen receptor disrupts male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Rasmani; Upton, Dannielle; Desai, Reena; Noori, Omar; Jimenez, Mark; Handelsman, David J; Allan, Charles M

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we created a unique gain-of-function mouse model with Sertoli cell-specific transgenic androgen receptor expression (TgSCAR) showing that SCAR activity controls the synchronized postnatal development of somatic Sertoli and Leydig cells and meiotic-postmeiotic germ cells. Moderate TgSCAR (TgSCAR(m)) expression reduced testis size but had no effect on male fertility. Here, we reveal that higher TgSCAR expression (TgSCAR(H)) causes male infertility. Higher SCAR activity, shown by upregulated AR-dependent transcripts (Rhox5, Spinw1), resulted in smaller adult TgSCAR(H) testes (50% of normal) despite normal or elevated circulating and intratesticular testosterone levels. Unlike fertile TgSCAR(m) males, testes of adult TgSCAR(H) males exhibited focal regions of interstitial hypertrophy featuring immature adult Leydig cells and higher intratesticular dihydrotestosterone and 5α-androstane 3α,17β-diol levels that are normally associated with pubertal development. Mature TgSCAR(H) testes also exhibited markedly reduced Sertoli cell numbers (70%), although meiotic and postmeiotic germ cell/Sertoli cell ratios were twofold higher than normal, suggesting that elevated TgSCAR activity supports excessive spermatogenic development. Concurrent with the higher germ cell load of TgSCAR(H) Sertoli cells were increased levels of apoptotic germ cells in TgSCAR(H) relative to TgSCAR(m) testes. In addition, TgSCAR(H) testes displayed unique morphological degeneration that featured accumulated cellular and spermatozoa clusters in dilated channels of rete testes, consistent with reduced epididymal sperm numbers. Our findings reveal for the first time that excessive Sertoli cell AR activity in mature testes can reach a level that disturbs Sertoli/germ cell homeostasis, impacts focal Leydig cell function, reduces sperm output, and disrupts male fertility. PMID:27354237

  8. Novel, potent anti-androgens of therapeutic potential: recent advances and promising developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasaitis, Tadas S; Njar, Vincent C O

    2010-04-01

    The beneficial effect of androgen ablation has been well established in prostate cancer therapy. Despite the initial response, patients typically relapse with a more aggressive form described as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRCP), driven by continued androgen receptor (AR) signaling. This review details the current state of anti-androgen therapy, mainly for CRPC, with major emphasis on the most potent and promising compounds under development. Anti-androgen failure has been linked to elevated AR expression, increased expression of coactivator proteins, AR mutations, ligand-independent AR activation and persistent intraprostatic androgens. MDV3100, BMS-641988 and VN/124-1 were developed to overcome these mechanisms. In CRCP, prostate cancer cells still rely on intracellular androgens and, to a greater extent, on active AR for growth and survival. Therefore, potent anti-androgens that efficiently disrupt the functions (signaling) of AR are envisioned to be effective drugs for all types of prostate cancers. PMID:21426013

  9. Sequential Androgen Receptor Pathway Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer: Piling-Up The Benefits or a Case for Cross-Resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Tombal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years, there has been accumulating evidence that, even in a low serum testosterone environment, the androgen receptor (AR remains the main driver of prostate cancer progression. This has led to the discovery and clinical development of new anti-androgens and androgen biosynthesis inhibitors. Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate are the lead compounds of this new generation of agents, but multiple other agents are on their way. Because they both target the ligand-dependent regulation of AR activity, it is plausible that cross-resistance may exist when both drugs are used sequentially, and that the benefit of these agents may fade away when sequencing them. As the exact mechanisms for cross- resistance between AR-targeted agents remain unclear at this point, additional clinical studies are crucial to define the exact combination or sequencing order that could yield highest clinical benefits. Moreover, new molecular targets are needed in order to address these resistances, as well as establishing biomarkers to improve patient selection that could most benefit from AR-targeted therapies, but also help develop novel agents to improve and optimise the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  10. Identification of NR0B1 as a novel androgen receptor co-repressor in mouse Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chi; Luo, Man-Ling; Guo, Huan; Wang, Tian-Tian; Lin, Shou-Ren; Chen, Jian-Bo; Ma, Qian; Gu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Zhi-Mao; Gui, Yao-Ting

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 0 group B member 1 (Nr0b1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family that is predominantly expressed in mouse Sertoli cells (SCs). Mutations of NR0B1 in humans cause adrenal failure and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The targeted mutagenesis of Nr0b1 in mice has revealed a primary gonadal defect characterized by the overexpression of aromatase and cellular obstruction of the seminiferous tubules and efferent ductules, leading to germ cell death and infertility. The transgenic expression of Nr0b1 under the control of the Müllerian-inhibiting substance promoter (MIS-Nr0b1), which is selectively expressed in SCs, improves fertility. Testicular androgen receptor (AR) was also expressed in SCs. Many genes are directly regulated by androgen and its AR, which are involved in spermatogenesis and male infertility. As the association between NR0B1 and AR remains unclear in mouse SCs, we decided to further explore the relationship between them. In the present study, we have identified NR0B1 as a novel AR co-repressor in mouse SCs. Using RT‑qPCR and immunofluorescence, we determined that NR0B1 was mainly expressed in mouse SCs in an age-dependent manner from 2-8 weeks of age postnatally. The inhibition of the effects of AR on AR target genes by NR0B1, in an androgen‑dependent manner, was further demonstrated by western blot analysis and RT-qPCR in TM4 cells, a mouse Sertoli cell line. Finally, in vitro luciferase and co-immunoprecipitation assays validated that NR0B1, as an AR co-repressor, significantly inhibited the transcriptional activation of its target genes. These results suggest that novel inhibitory mechanisms underlie the effects of NR0B1 in modulating androgen-dependent gene transcription in mouse SCs. PMID:27431683

  11. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sarswat, Amit [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Maikhuri, Jagdamba P. [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Vishnu L. [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  12. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  13. An androgen receptor mutation in the MDA-MB-453 cell line model of molecular apocrine breast cancer compromises receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicole L; Buchanan, Grant; Harris, Jonathan M; Selth, Luke A; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Hanson, Adrienne R; Birrell, Stephen N; Butler, Lisa M; Hickey, Theresa E; Tilley, Wayne D

    2012-08-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the estrogen receptor-α-negative, androgen receptor (AR)-positive molecular apocrine subtype of breast cancer is driven by AR signaling. The MDA-MB-453 cell line is the prototypical model of this breast cancer subtype; its proliferation is stimulated by androgens such as 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) but inhibited by the progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) via AR-mediated mechanisms. We report here that the AR gene in MDA-MB-453 cells contains a G-T transversion in exon 7, resulting in a receptor variant with a glutamine to histidine substitution at amino acid 865 (Q865H) in the ligand binding domain. Compared with wild-type AR, the Q865H variant exhibited reduced sensitivity to DHT and MPA in transactivation assays in MDA-MB-453 and PC-3 cells but did not respond to non-androgenic ligands or receptor antagonists. Ligand binding, molecular modeling, mammalian two-hybrid and immunoblot assays revealed effects of the Q865H mutation on ligand dissociation, AR intramolecular interactions, and receptor stability. Microarray expression profiling demonstrated that DHT and MPA regulate distinct transcriptional programs in MDA-MB-453 cells. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis revealed that DHT- but not MPA-regulated genes were associated with estrogen-responsive transcriptomes from MCF-7 cells and the Wnt signaling pathway. These findings suggest that the divergent proliferative responses of MDA-MB-453 cells to DHT and MPA result from the different genetic programs elicited by these two ligands through the AR-Q865H variant. This work highlights the necessity to characterize additional models of molecular apocrine breast cancer to determine the precise role of AR signaling in this breast cancer subtype. PMID:22719059

  14. Prostaglandin receptor EP3 mediates growth inhibitory effect of aspirin through androgen receptor and contributes to castration resistance in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Eiji; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Itsumi, Momoe; Inokuchi, Junichi; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Although numerous epidemiological studies show aspirin to reduce risk of prostate cancer, the mechanism of this effect is unclear. Here, we first confirmed that aspirin downregulated androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen in prostate cancer cells. We also found that aspirin upregulated prostaglandin receptor subtype EP3 but not EP2 or EP4. The EP3 antagonist L798106 and EP3 knockdown increased AR expression and cell proliferation, whereas the EP3 agonist sulprostone decreased them, indicating that EP3 affects AR expression. Additionally, EP3 (PTGER3) transcript levels were significantly decreased in human prostate cancer tissues compared with those in normal human prostate tissues, suggesting that EP3 is important to prostate carcinogenesis. Decreased EP3 expression was also seen in castration-resistant subtype CxR cells compared with parental LNCaP cells. Finally, we found that aspirin and EP3 modulators affected prostate cancer cell growth. Taken together, aspirin suppressed LNCaP cell proliferation via EP3 signaling activation; EP3 downregulation contributed to prostate carcinogenesis and to progression from androgen-dependent prostate cancer to castration-resistant prostate cancer by regulating AR expression. In conclusion, cyclooxygenases and EP3 may represent attractive therapeutic molecular targets in androgen-dependent prostate cancer. PMID:23493387

  15. Prolonged androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of estrogen receptors in the brain and pelvic floor muscles of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Erik; Calich, Hannah J; Currie, R William; Wassersug, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Androgen deprivation in males has detrimental effects on various tissues and bodily functions, some of which can be restored by estradiol (E2) administration. We investigated how the duration of androgen deprivation affects the autoregulation of estrogen receptors (ERs) levels in core brain areas associated with sexual behavior and cognition, as well as in pelvic floor muscles (PFM). We also measured c-Fos levels in brain areas associated with sexual behavior shortly after the rats mated. Prolonged castration increases ERα levels in the preoptic area (POA) and E2 treatment reverses these effects. In the POA, c-Fos levels after mating are not affected by the duration of androgen deprivation and/or E2 treatment. ERβ levels in the POA as well as c-Fos levels in the POA and the core area of nucleus accumbens correlate with the mounting frequency for E2-treated Short-Term castrates. Additionally, ERβ levels in the medial amygdala are positively correlated with the mounting frequency of Long-Term castrates that received E2 treatment. In the hippocampus, ERs are downregulated only when E2 is administered early after castration, whereas downregulation of ERα in the prefrontal cortex only occurs with delayed E2 treatment. Early, but not delayed, E2 treatment after castration increases ERβ levels in the bulbocavernosus and ERα levels in the levator ani of male rats. Our data suggest that the duration of androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of ERs by E2 treatment in select brain areas and pelvic floor muscles of male rats. PMID:25746452

  16. Androgen Receptor Inactivation Contributes to Antitumor Efficacy of CYP17 Inhibitor VN/124-1 in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasaitis, Tadas; Belosay, Aashvini; Schayowitz, Adam; Khandelwal, Aakanksha; Chopra, Pankaj; Gediya, Lalji K.; Guo, Zhiyong; Fang, Hong-Bin; Njar, Vincent C. O.; Brodie, Angela M. H.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that our novel compound 3β-hydroxy-17-(1H-benzimidazole-1-yl)androsta-5,16-diene (VN/124-1) is a potent CYP17 inhibitor/antiandrogen and strongly inhibits the formation and proliferation of human prostate cancer LAPC4 tumor xenografts in SCID mice. In this study, we report that VN/124-1 and other novel CYP17 inhibitors also cause down-regulation of AR protein expression in vitro and in vivo. This mechanism of action appears to contribute to their antitumor efficacy. We compared the in vivo antitumor efficacy of VN/124-1 with that of castration and a clinically used antiandrogen, casodex, and show that VN/124-1 is more potent than castration in LAPC4 xenograft model. Treatment with VN/124-1 (0.13 mmol/kg/twice daily) was also very effective in preventing the formation of LAPC4 tumors (6.94 vs. 2410.28 mm3 in control group). VN/124-1 (0.13 mmol/kg/twice daily) and VN/124-1 (0.13 mmol/kg/twice daily) + castration induced regression of LAPC4 tumor xenografts by 26.55% and 60.67%, respectively. Treatments with casodex (0.13 mmol/kg/twice daily) or castration caused significant tumor suppression compared with control. Furthermore, treatment with VN/124-1 caused marked down-regulation of AR protein expression, in contrast to treatments with casodex or castration that caused significant up-regulation of AR protein expression. The results suggest that VN/124-1 acts by several mechanisms (CPY17 inhibition, competitive inhibition and down-regulation of the androgen receptor). These actions contribute to inhibition of the formation of LAPC4 tumors and cause regression of growth of established tumors. VN/124-1 is more efficacious than castration in the LAPC4 xenograft model suggesting the compound has potential for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:18723482

  17. Substitution of Ala564 in the first zinc cluster of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding domain of the androgen receptor by Asp, Asn, or Leu exerts differential effects on DNA binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); J.M. Lobaccaro; L. Chiche; C. Sultan; J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn the androgen receptor of a patient with androgen insensitivity, the alanine residue at position 564 in the first zinc cluster of the DNA-binding domain was substituted by aspartic acid. In other members of the steroid receptor family, either valine or ala

  18. High-Mobility Group Chromatin Proteins 1 and 2 Functionally Interact with Steroid Hormone Receptors To Enhance Their DNA Binding In Vitro and Transcriptional Activity in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj; Melvin, Vida; Prendergast, Paul; Altmann, Magda; Ronfani, Lorenza; Marco E. Bianchi; Taraseviciene, Laima; Nordeen, Steven K.; Allegretto, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Dean P.

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported that the chromatin high-mobility group protein 1 (HMG-1) enhances the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of progesterone receptor (PR) in vitro, thus providing the first evidence that HMG-1 may have a coregulatory role in steroid receptor-mediated gene transcription. Here we show that HMG-1 and the highly related HMG-2 stimulate DNA binding by other steroid receptors, including estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid receptors, but have no effect on DNA binding by se...

  19. β-Catenin Binds to the Activation Function 2 Region of the Androgen Receptor and Modulates the Effects of the N-Terminal Domain and TIF2 on Ligand-Dependent Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Liang-Nian; Herrell, Roger; Byers, Stephen; Shah, Salimuddin; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Gelmann, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional molecule that is activated by signaling through WNT receptors. β-Catenin can also enhance the transcriptional activity of some steroid hormone receptors such as the androgen receptor and retinoic acid receptor α. Androgens can affect nuclear translocation of β-catenin and influence its subcellular distribution. Using mammalian two-hybrid binding assays, analysis of reporter gene transcription, and coimmunoprecipitation, we now show that β-catenin binds to the an...

  20. Effects of Sorafenib on C-Terminally Truncated Androgen Receptor Variants in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schrader

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa is commonly associated with an aberrant, ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor (AR. A putative mechanism allowing prostate cancer (PCa cells to grow under low levels of androgens, is the expression of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated AR lacking the AR-ligand binding domain (LBD. Due to the absence of a LBD, these receptors, termed ARΔLBD, are unable to respond to any form of anti-hormonal therapies. In this study we demonstrate that the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits AR as well as ARΔLBD-signalling in CRPCa cells. This inhibition was paralleled by proteasomal degradation of the AR- and ARΔLBD-molecules. In line with these observations, maximal antiproliferative effects of sorafenib were achieved in AR and ARΔLBD-positive PCa cells. The present findings warrant further investigations on sorafenib as an option for the treatment of advanced AR-positive PCa.

  1. Immunorecognition of estrogen and androgen receptors in the brain and thoracic ganglion mass of mud crab, Scylla paramamosain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haihui Ye; Huiyang Huang; Shaojing Li; Guizhong Wang

    2008-01-01

    The brain and the thoracic ganglion of a crustacean can synthesize and secrete gonad-stimulating hormone (GSH) which stimulates the maturation of gonad. In the previous experiments, sex steroid hormones (estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, etc.) have been detected from the crustacean. However, the feedback regulation of sex steroid hormones on the brain and the thoracic ganglion of the crustacean has not been reported so far. In the present experiment, monoclonal antibodies were applied to investigate the immunorecognition of estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) in the brain and the thoracic ganglion mass of Scylla paramamosain. The results showed that the distribution of the immunopositive substances of ER and AR was extremely similar. They distributed in the protocerebrum, deutocerebrum and tritocerebrum of the brain, and mainly in protocerebrum. In the thoracic ganglion mass, immunopositive substances distributed in the subesophageal ganglion, thoracic ganglion and abdominal ganglion, and mostly in subesophageal ganglion. Immunopositive substances of ER and AR mostly existed in the cytoplasm of neurons. The present study will provide morphological evidence for the origin and the evolution of ER and AR. In addition, the immunoreactivities of ER and AR suggested that the estrogen and androgen may be involved in the feedback regulation of crustacean neuroendocrine.

  2. Evolutionary Fate of the Androgen Receptor-Signaling Pathway in Ray-Finned Fishes with a Special Focus on Cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Thibault; Salzburger, Walter; Böhne, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of the steroid system is coupled to the evolution of multicellular animals. In vertebrates in particular, the steroid receptor repertoire has been shaped by genome duplications characteristic to this lineage. Here, we investigate for the first time the composition of the androgen receptor-signaling pathway in ray-finned fish genomes by focusing in particular on duplicates that emerged from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication. We trace lineage- and species-specific duplications and gene losses for the genomic and nongenomic pathway of androgen signaling and subsequently investigate the sequence evolution of these genes. In one particular fish lineage, the cichlids, we find evidence for differing selection pressures acting on teleost-specific whole-genome duplication paralogs at a derived evolutionary stage. We then look into the expression of these duplicated genes in four cichlid species from Lake Tanganyika indicating, once more, rapid changes in expression patterns in closely related fish species. We focus on a particular case, the cichlid specific duplication of the rac1 GTPase, which shows possible signs of a neofunctionalization event. PMID:26333839

  3. Effects of triclocarban on the transcription of estrogen, androgen and aryl hydrocarbon receptor responsive genes in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Hunecke, Danele; Luch, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial agent that is used in detergents, soaps and other personal hygiene products. Similarly to triclosan the widespread use of TCC has raised concerns about its endocrine potential. In luciferase-based reporter assays TCC has been shown to enhance estrogenic and androgenic activities following cellular coexposure with estrogen or dihydrotestosterone, respectively. The present study demonstrates that although coexposure with TCC enhances the estrogenic and androgenic readout of luciferase-based reporter cell lines such as HeLa9908 and MDA-kb2, it fails to act as a xenoandrogen on transcriptional level, nor does it induce cell proliferation in the estrogen sensitive E-screen. In addition TCC did not alter the expression of estrogen responsive genes in human mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells exposed to 17β-estradiol, bisphenol A, butylparaben or genistein. However, TCC was shown to interfere with the regulon of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) as TCC showed a costimulatory effect on transcription of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, effectively lowering the transcriptional threshold for both genes in the presence of estrogens. It thus seems, that while the induction of the respective luciferase reporter assays by TCC is an unspecific false positive signal caused by luciferase stabilisation, TCC has the potential to interfere with the regulatory crosstalk of the estrogen receptor (ER) and the AhR regulon. PMID:23524099

  4. Analysis of the molecular networks in androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer revealed fragile and robust subsystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Tasseff

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy is currently the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, in nearly all cases, androgen ablation fails to permanently arrest cancer progression. As androgens like testosterone are withdrawn, prostate cancer cells lose their androgen sensitivity and begin to proliferate without hormone growth factors. In this study, we constructed and analyzed a mathematical model of the integration between hormone growth factor signaling, androgen receptor activation, and the expression of cyclin D and Prostate-Specific Antigen in human LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma cells. The objective of the study was to investigate which signaling systems were important in the loss of androgen dependence. The model was formulated as a set of ordinary differential equations which described 212 species and 384 interactions, including both the mRNA and protein levels for key species. An ensemble approach was chosen to constrain model parameters and to estimate the impact of parametric uncertainty on model predictions. Model parameters were identified using 14 steady-state and dynamic LNCaP data sets taken from literature sources. Alterations in the rate of Prostatic Acid Phosphatase expression was sufficient to capture varying levels of androgen dependence. Analysis of the model provided insight into the importance of network components as a function of androgen dependence. The importance of androgen receptor availability and the MAPK/Akt signaling axes was independent of androgen status. Interestingly, androgen receptor availability was important even in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Translation became progressively more important in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Further analysis suggested a positive synergy between the MAPK and Akt signaling axes and the translation of key proliferative markers like cyclin D in androgen-independent cells. Taken together, the results support the targeting of both the Akt and MAPK

  5. Looking beyond Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Sunkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will provide a description of recent efforts in our laboratory contributing to a general goal of identifying critical determinants of prostate cancer growth in both androgen-dependent and -independent contexts. Important outcomes to date have indicated that the sustained activation of AR transcriptional activity in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC cells results in a gene expression profile separate from the androgen-responsive profile of androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC cells. Contributing to this reprogramming is enhanced FoxA1 recruitment of AR to G2/M phase target gene loci and the enhanced chromatin looping of CRPC-specific gene regulatory elements facilitated by PI3K/Akt-phosphorylated MED1. We have also observed a role for FoxA1 beyond AR signaling in driving G1/S phase cell cycle progression that relies on interactions with novel collaborators MYBL2 and CREB1. Finally, we describe an in-depth mechanism of GATA2-mediated androgen-responsive gene expression in both ADPC and CRPC cells. Altogether these efforts provide evidence to support the development of novel prostate cancer therapeutics that address downstream targets of AR activity as well as AR-independent drivers of disease-relevant transcription programs.

  6. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskararao, G.; Himabindu, Y.; Samir Ranjan Nayak; Sriharibabu, M.

    2014-01-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen ...

  7. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G protein and corresponding downstream signaling, have led to identification of physiologically relevant GPCRs as steroid extranuclear receptors. Examples include G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30 for estrogen, membrane progestin receptor for progesterone, G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A and zinc transporter member 9 (ZIP9 for androgen, and trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 for thyroid hormone. These receptor-mediated biological effects have been extended to reproductive development, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrinology and cancer pathophysiology. However, although great progress have been achieved, there are still important questions that need to be answered, including the identities of GPCRs responsible for the remaining steroids (e.g., glucocorticoid, the structural basis of steroids and GPCRs’ interaction and the integration of extranuclear and nuclear signaling to the final physiological function. Here, we reviewed the several significant developments in this field and highlighted a hypothesis that attempts to explain the general interaction between steroids and GPCRs.

  8. Resistance to docetaxel in prostate cancer is associated with androgen receptor activation and loss of KDM5D expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Kazumasa; Jeong, Seong Ho; Hinohara, Kunihiko; Qu, Fangfang; Wang, Xiaodong; Hiraki, Masayuki; Azuma, Haruhito; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Kantoff, Philip W; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2016-05-31

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in prostate cancer, and suppression of its signaling with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the mainstay of treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer for more than 70 y. Chemotherapy has been reserved for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-led trial E3805: ChemoHormonal Therapy Versus Androgen Ablation Randomized Trial for Extensive Disease in Prostate Cancer (CHAARTED) showed that the addition of docetaxel to ADT prolonged overall survival compared with ADT alone in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This finding suggests that there is an interaction between AR signaling activity and docetaxel sensitivity. Here we demonstrate that the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and LAPC4 display markedly different sensitivity to docetaxel with AR activation, and RNA-seq analysis of these cell lines identified KDM5D (lysine-specific demethylase 5D) encoded on the Y chromosome as a potential mediator of this sensitivity. Knocking down KDM5D expression in LNCaP leads to docetaxel resistance in the presence of dihydrotestosterone. KDM5D physically interacts with AR in the nucleus, and regulates its transcriptional activity by demethylating H3K4me3 active transcriptional marks. Attenuating KDM5D expression dysregulates AR signaling, resulting in docetaxel insensitivity. KDM5D deletion was also observed in the LNCaP-derived CRPC cell line 104R2, which displayed docetaxel insensitivity with AR activation, unlike parental LNCaP. Dataset analysis from the Oncomine database revealed significantly decreased KDM5D expression in CRPC and poorer prognosis with low KDM5D expression. Taking these data together, this work indicates that KDM5D modulates the AR axis and that this is associated with altered docetaxel sensitivity. PMID:27185910

  9. Synthesis of 16α-[125I]iodo-5α-dihydrotestosterone and evaluation of its affinity for the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analogs of 5α-dihydrotestosterone, halogenated at carbon 11, were synthesized as potential gamma-emitting ligands for the androgen receptor. These compounds, were chosen for synthesis because estradiol, similarly substituted, is strongly bound to the estrogen receptor, and both androgen and estrogen receptors have generally similar structural requirements for the D-ring. The 16α-halogenated steroids, including 16α-[125I]iodo-5α-dihydrotestosterone were synthesized from 16β-bromo-5α-dihydrotestosterone by halogen exchange. The cis-β-bromohydrin substrate was synthesized from 5α-androstane-3,17-dione by selective ketalization, dibromination at C-16 and stereoselective reduction. 16α-iodo dihydrotestosterone was devoid of androgen activity in vivo at concentrations at which 5α-dihydrotestosterone was fully stimulatory. The 16α-iodo, 16α-bromo, and 16β-bromo analogs were allowed to compete with [3H]-dihydrotestosterone for binding to the androgen receptor; the 16α-iodo compound had a relative binding affinity 1/100th and both bromo compounds 1/30th that of dihydrotestosterone. In addition, no specific binding was detected when the 16α-[125I]iodo analog was incubated with prostatic cytosol. (author)

  10. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF ADENOVIRAL TRANSDUCTION OF AN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR POSITIVE CELL LINE WITH AN MMTV-LUC REPORTER FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standardization and Validation of Adenoviral Transduction of an Androgen Receptor Positive Cell Line with an MMTV-Luc Reporter for Endocrine Screening P. Hartig, K . Bobseine, M. Cardon, C. Lambright and L. E. Gray, Jr. USEPA, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC...

  11. Sertoli Cell-Specific Deletion of the Androgen Receptor Compromises Testicular Immune Privilege in Mice1

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Jing; Greenlee, Anne R.; Taub, Chloe J.; Braun, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian testis, meiotic and postmeiotic germ cell antigens are granted immune privilege. Both local immune suppression and specialized intercellular junctions between somatic Sertoli cells have been proposed to contribute to a highly restricted and effective blood-testis barrier (BTB) that helps maintain tolerance to germ cell antigens. Several studies have suggested that androgens play a role in immune suppression, although direct evidence for this is lacking. We previously reported...

  12. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable. Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells...

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a nonsteroidal bromine-76-labeled androgen receptor ligand 3-[76Br]bromo-hydroxyflutamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Androgen receptors (ARs) are overexpressed in normal tissues and in most primary and metastatic prostate cancers. In our efforts to develop a nonsteroidal AR-specific imaging agent, we synthesized (±)-3-[76Br]bromo-hydroxyflutamide (76Br-), an analog of hydroxyflutamide, the active metabolite of the AR antagonist ligand flutamide. Materials and Methods: 76Br- was synthesized in three steps, starting with commercially available compounds. Labeling of 76Br- was achieved through the nucleophilic opening of an epoxide intermediate, and a labeled compound was obtained in high specific activity and good radiochemical yield. Results and Discussion: (±)-3-Bromo-hydroxyflutamide has a significantly higher affinity for ARs compared to hydroxyflutamide, its parent compound. The androgen target-tissue uptake of 76Br- in diethylstilbestrol-treated male rats was examined; however, AR-mediated uptake was minimal due most likely to the rapid metabolic debromination of the radiolabeled ligand. Conclusions: This study is part of our first look at a novel class of nonsteroidal AR antagonists as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents, which are alternatives to steroidal AR agonist-based imaging agents. Although 76Br- has a significant affinity for ARs, it showed limited promise as a PET imaging agent because of its poor target-tissue distribution properties

  14. Characterization of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5b]pyridine at androgen receptor: mechanistic support for its role in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Glass-Holmes, Mashunté; Aguilar, Byron J.; Richard D. Gragg; DARLING-REED, SELINA; GOODMAN, CARL B.

    2014-01-01

    2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5b]pyridine (PhIP) is a dietary mutagenic carcinogen that has been shown not only to induce the formation of DNA adducts, but is capable of inducing tumors in the colon, mammary, and prostate glands. The normal development and maturation of the prostate gland, as well as early progression of prostate cancer, is dependent on androgens acting on the androgen receptor (AR). The actual mechanism by which PhIP interacts with our biological system and its potentia...

  15. Screening for mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing infertility in Syrian men using real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14 known point mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing male infertility were screened by real time PCR and by DNA sequencing, in order to identify point mutations in the AR gene causing infertility in azoospermic men. We screened 110 Syrian patients suffering from non-obstructive azoospermia with no chromosomal aberrations or AZF micro deletions. We discovered a new AR mutation, del 57Leu, described for the first time as a possible cause of male infertility. Furthermore, we found two patients with the Ala474Val mutation and one patient bearing the Pro390Ser mutation. Our results indicate that these mutations are significant markers for idiopathic male infertility in the Syrian society and in Mediterranean populations in general. (author)

  16. Histone H4 Lys 20 methyltransferase SET8 promotes androgen receptor-mediated transcription activation in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lushuai [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yanyan; Du, Fengxia [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Han, Xiao [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Xiaohua [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Niu, Yuanjie [Chawnshang Chang Sex Hormone Research Center, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Ren, Shancheng, E-mail: renshancheng@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Yingli, E-mail: sunyl@big.ac.cn [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Dihydrotestosterone stimulates H4K20me1 enrichment at the PSA promoter. • SET8 promotes AR-mediated transcription activation. • SET8 interacts with AR and promotes cell proliferation. - Abstract: Histone methylation status in different lysine residues has an important role in transcription regulation. The effect of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1) on androgen receptor (AR)-mediated gene transcription remains unclear. Here we show that AR agonist stimulates the enrichment of H4K20me1 and SET8 at the promoter of AR target gene PSA in an AR dependent manner. Furthermore, SET8 is crucial for the transcription activation of PSA. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrate that SET8 interacts with AR. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is involved in AR-mediated transcription activation, possibly through its interaction with AR and H4K20me1 modification.

  17. First pharmacophore-based identification of androgen receptor down-regulating agents: discovery of potent anti-prostate cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Khandelwal, Aakanksha; Chopra, Pankaj; Maheshwari, Neha; Gediya, Lalji K; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Bruno, Robert D; Clement, Omoshile O; Njar, Vincent C O

    2007-05-15

    A qualitative 3D pharmacophore model (a common feature based model or Catalyst HipHop algorithm) was developed for well-known natural product androgen receptor down-regulating agents (ARDAs). The four common chemical features identified included: one hydrophobic group, one ring aromatic group, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. This model served as a template in virtual screening of the Maybridge and NCI databases that resulted in identification of six new ARDAs (EC(50) values 17.5-212 microM). Five of these molecules strongly inhibited the growth of human prostate LNCaP cells. These novel compounds may be used as leads to develop other novel anti-prostate cancer agents. PMID:17383188

  18. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hu; Zhu, Chen; Qin, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Li, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ju, Xiaobing; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Gu, Min, E-mail: medzhao1980@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yin, Changjun, E-mail: drcjyin@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression.

  19. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression

  20. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; Chen, Yao; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Ding, Hongjuan; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-03-01

    The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports.We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and WanFang. Data on sample size, mean, and standard deviation (SD) of AR-CAG repeat length were extracted independently by 3 investigators.Forty-four reports were selected based on criteria. The overall infertile patients and azoospermic patients were found to have longer AR-CAG repeat length (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.28, P < 0.01; SMD = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.10-0.61, P < 0.01). AR-CAG repeat length was longer in infertile men in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races (SMD = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.43, P <0.01; SMD = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.02-0.25, P <0.05; SMD = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.15-0.63, P <0.01). The overall study shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility. The subgroup study on races shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races. Increased AR-CAG repeat length was also associated with azoospermia.This meta-analysis supports that increased androgen receptor CAG length is capable of causing male infertility susceptibility. PMID:26962784

  1. A Rapid and Efficient Immunoenzymatic Assay to Detect Receptor Protein Interactions: G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Zappelli; Simona Daniele; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Claudia Martini; Maria Letizia Trincavelli

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the largest families of cell surface receptors, and are the target of at least one-third of the current therapeutic drugs on the market. Along their life cycle, GPCRs are accompanied by a range of specialized GPCR-interacting proteins (GIPs), which take part in receptor proper folding, targeting to the appropriate subcellular compartments and in receptor signaling tasks, and also in receptor regulation processes, such as desensitization and...

  2. Inhibition effect of cypermethrin mediated by co-regulators SRC-1 and SMRT in interleukin-6-induced androgen receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Zhou, Ji-Long; Wang, Hui; Ju, Qiang; Ding, Zhen; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ge, Xing; Shi, Qiao-Mei; Pan, Chen; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Zhang, Mei-Rong; Yu, Hong-Min; Xu, Li-Chun

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that the pesticide cypermethrin may induce androgen receptor (AR) antagonism via ligand-independent mechanisms. The Real-Time Cell Analysis (RTCA) iCELLigence system was used to investigate the inhibitory effect of cypermethrin on interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced ligand-independent LNCaP cell growth. Then, the mammalian two-hybrid assays were applied to clarify whether the mechanism of IL-6-induced AR antagonism of cypermethrin was associated with the interactions of the AR and co-activator steroid receptor co-activator-1 (SRC-1) and co-repressor silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT). Cypermethrin inhibited the LNCaP cell growth induced by IL-6. The interactions of AR-SRC-1 and AR-SMRT mediated by IL-6 were suppressed by cypermethrin. The results indicate that the IL-6-mediated AR antagonism induced by cypermethrin is related to repress the recruitment of co-regulators SRC-1 and SMRT to the AR in a ligand-independent manner. Inhibition of the interactions of AR-SRC-1 and AR-SMRT mediated by IL-6 contributes to the AR antagonism induced by cypermethrin. PMID:27239967

  3. A novel insA2933 causes premature termination of translation and is accompanied by overexpression of truncated androgen receptor gene in a patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek-Plewa, J; Starzyk, J B; Trzeciak, W H

    2015-11-01

    A patient with a female phenotype, 46,XY karyotype, and a diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was examined. Her mother and three 46,XX sisters were also included in the study. Sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene (AR) revealed a novel A2933 insertion that alters the Tyr codon to a termination codon (Y857X), resulting in a truncated form of the receptor. Computer simulation revealed major conformational changes in the hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the hormone. An insA2933 results in a truncated receptor incapable of binding the ligand and is responsible for the clinical symptoms of CAIS in the patient. The levels of the AR transcript in peripheral blood leukocytes were higher in the patient than in her heterozygous mother and her heterozygous sister, as well as in the two healthy sisters. It is hypothesized that elevated levels of the AR transcript in the patient might be caused by the inability of the truncated receptor to react with IFI-16, which functions in complex with AR to inhibit the expression of the AR gene. PMID:25997614

  4. Testosterone-induced responsiveness to androgen in Shionogi mouse carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary cell cultures from an androgen-dependent mouse mammary carcinoma, the Shionogi-SC 115 tumor, were cultured in the presence or absence of testosterone (50 nM). Characteristic changes in cellular morphology and cell growth were observed according to the presence or absence of the androgen. The testosterone-dependent changes were observed in culture as long as cells were maintained in androgen-containing medium. Cellular proteins were analyzed after culture in the presence or absence of testosterone. After [35S]methionine labeling of cells and SDS-PAGE of the cytosol, several proteins were specifically synthesized in the presence of testosterone, predominantly a 45 kD protein, which was not seen in the absence of the androgen. Conversely, a protein of 35 kD present in absence of the hormone disappeared in the presence of testosterone. The anti-androgen cyproterone acetate inhibited the characteristic cellular morphology, cell proliferation and protein synthesis observed in the presence of the androgen. The anti-progestin and anti-glucocorticosteroid RU 486 also showed limited anti-androgen activity. The concentration of specific androgen receptor-binding sites did not change significantly after 3 months of culture with or without testosterone, i.e., in responsive and unresponsive cells

  5. Melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cooray, Sadani N.; Clark, Adrian J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The melanocortin receptor family consists of 5 members which belong to the GPCR superfamily. Their specific ligands, the melanocortins are peptide hormones which are formed by the proteolytic cleavage of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) protein. It is now recognised that certain GPCRs require accessory proteins for their function. Like these GPCRs the melanocortin receptor family is also known to be associated with accessory proteins that regulate their function. ...

  6. DAX-1 expression in human breast cancer: comparison with estrogen receptors ER-α, ER-β and androgen receptor status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So far there have been no reports on the expression pattern of DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1) in human breast cells and its relationship to the estrogen receptors, ER-α and ER-β, and the androgen receptor (AR). In this study we evaluated, by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, the presence and distribution of DAX-1 in benign breast disease (BBD), in situ carcinoma (CIS), and ductal and lobular breast carcinomas. In BBD and breast carcinomas, DAX-1 was present in both the nuclei and the cytoplasm of epithelial cells, although in infiltrative carcinomas the percentage of nuclear immunoreaction was higher than in CIS. An important relation was observed between DAX-1 and AR expression and between this orphan receptor and nodal status. DAX-1 might modify the AR and ER-β intracellular location, and because a direct positive relation between the expression of these three receptors was found it could be assumed that the presence of DAX-1 in neoplastic cells might indicate a possible failure of endocrine therapies

  7. Selective ablation of the androgen receptor in mouse sertoli cells affects sertoli cell maturation, barrier formation and cytoskeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Willems

    Full Text Available The observation that mice with a selective ablation of the androgen receptor (AR in Sertoli cells (SC (SCARKO mice display a complete block in meiosis supports the contention that SC play a pivotal role in the control of germ cell development by androgens. To delineate the physiological and molecular mechanism responsible for this control, we compared tubular development in pubertal SCARKO mice and littermate controls. Particular attention was paid to differences in SC maturation, SC barrier formation and cytoskeletal organization and to the molecular mediators potentially involved. Functional analysis of SC barrier development by hypertonic perfusion and lanthanum permeation techniques and immunohistochemical analysis of junction formation showed that SCARKO mice still attempt to produce a barrier separating basal and adluminal compartment but that barrier formation is delayed and defective. Defective barrier formation was accompanied by disturbances in SC nuclear maturation (immature shape, absence of prominent, tripartite nucleoli and SC polarization (aberrant positioning of SC nuclei and cytoskeletal elements such as vimentin. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to study the transcript levels of genes potentially related to the described phenomena between day 8 and 35. Differences in the expression of SC genes known to play a role in junction formation could be shown from day 8 for Cldn11, from day 15 for Cldn3 and Espn, from day 20 for Cdh2 and Jam3 and from day 35 for ZO-1. Marked differences were also noted in the transcript levels of several genes that are also related to cell adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics but that have not yet been studied in SC (Actn3, Ank3, Anxa9, Scin, Emb, Mpzl2. It is concluded that absence of a functional AR in SC impedes the remodeling of testicular tubules expected at the onset of spermatogenesis and interferes with the creation of the specific environment needed for germ cell development.

  8. Morphology of the epithelial cells and expression of androgen receptor in rat prostate dorsal lobe in experimental hyperprolactinemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Wylot

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hyperprolactinemia on the prostate has not been well investigated. Since androgens play an important role in prostate development, growth and function, the goal of the present study was to estimate the influence of hyperprolactinemia on expression of the androgen receptor (AR in rat epithelial cells of prostate dorsal lobe and on morphology of these cells. Studies were performed on sexually mature male Wistar rats. The experimental group rats received metoclopramide (MCP intraperitoneally to provoke hyperprolactinemia. The control group animals were given saline in the same way. For light and electron microscopy the prostate dorsal lobes were obtained routinely. To evaluate the intensity of immunohistochemical reaction for AR in epithelial cells, the optical density was measured and computer-assisted image analysis system was used. Morphological observations of the dorsal lobe epithelial cells were carried out in transmission electron microscope. MCP caused over twofold increase in prolactin (PRL serum levels. In rats with hyperprolactinemia, the testosterone levels (T were twofold decreased. The intensity of immunohistochemical reaction for AR in epithelial cells of dorsal lobe in the experimental group was significantly lower than in the control group. In the dorsal lobe epithelial cells of experimental group animals, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed highly dilated RER cisternae and reduced number of microvilli on the cellular surface when compared to the control group. The results show that hyperprolactinemia in male rats causes morphological abnormalities in the dorsal lobe of prostate. The abnormalities are caused by elevated prolactin either directly or indirectly through decreased level of testosterone. Decreased expression of AR in epithelial cells of prostate dorsal lobe is likely to be caused by decreased testosterone level.

  9. Up-regulation of SOX9 in sertoli cells from testiculopathic patients accounts for increasing anti-mullerian hormone expression via impaired androgen receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chung Lan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Testosterone provokes Sertoli cell maturation and represses AMH production. In adult patients with Sertoli-cells-only syndrome (SCOS and androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS, high level of AMH expression is detected in Sertoli cells due to defect of androgen/AR signaling. OBJECTIVE: We postulated that up-regulation of SOX9 due to impairment of androgen/AR signaling in Sertoli cells might explain why high level of anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH expression occur in these testiculopathic patients. METHODS: Biological research of testicular specimens from men with azoospermia or mouse. The serum hormone levels were studied in 23 men with obstructive azoospermia, 33 men with SCOS azoospermia and 21 volunteers with normal seminograms during a period of 4 years. Immunohistochemical staining and reverse-transcription PCR were used to examine the relationships among AR, SOX9 and AMH expression in adult human and mouse testes. The ability of AR to repress the expression of SOX9 and AMH was evaluated in vitro in TM4 Sertoli cells and C3H10T1/2 cells. RESULTS: SCOS specimens showed up-regulation of SOX9 and AMH proteins but down-regulation of AR proteins in Sertoli cells. The mRNA levels of AR were significantly lower and the SOX9, AMH mRNA levels higher in all SCOS patients compared to controls (P< 0.05. The testosterone levels in the SCOS patients were within the normal range, but most were below the median of the controls. Furthermore, our in vitro cell line experiments demonstrated that androgen/AR signaling suppressed the gene and protein levels of AMH via repression of SOX9. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that the functional androgen/AR signaling to repress SOX9 and AMH expression is essential for Sertoli cell maturation. Impairment of androgen/AR signaling promotes SOX9-mediated AMH production, accounts for impairments of Sertoli cells in SCOS azoospermic patients.

  10. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  11. Modulation of opioid receptor function by protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaras-Melainis, Konstantinos; Gomes, Ivone; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Zachariou, Venetia; Devi, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Opioid receptors, MORP, DORP and KORP, belong to the family A of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and have been found to modulate a large number of physiological functions, including mood, stress, appetite, nociception and immune responses. Exogenously applied opioid alkaloids produce analgesia, hedonia and addiction. Addiction is linked to alterations in function and responsiveness of all three opioid receptors in the brain. Over the last few years, a large number of studies identified protein-protein interactions that play an essential role in opioid receptor function and responsiveness. Here, we summarize interactions shown to affect receptor biogenesis and trafficking, as well as those affecting signal transduction events following receptor activation. This article also examines protein interactions modulating the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, events that play a major role in opiate analgesia. Like several other GPCRs, opioid receptors may form homo or heterodimers. The last part of this review summarizes recent knowledge on proteins known to affect opioid receptor dimerization. PMID:19273296

  12. The ETS domain transcription factor ELK1 directs a critical component of growth signaling by the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Chari, Venkatesh; Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Gonit, Mesfin; Trumbly, Robert; Ratnam, Manohar

    2013-04-19

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for diverse aspects of prostate development and function. Molecular mechanisms by which prostate cancer (PC) cells redirect AR signaling to genes that primarily support growth are unclear. A systematic search for critical AR-tethering proteins led to ELK1, an ETS transcription factor of the ternary complex factor subfamily. Although genetically redundant, ELK1 was obligatory for AR-dependent growth and clonogenic survival in both hormone-dependent PC and castration-recurrent PC cells but not for AR-negative cell growth. AR required ELK1 to up-regulate a major subset of its target genes that was strongly and primarily enriched for cell growth functions. AR functioned as a coactivator of ELK1 by association through its A/B domain, bypassing the classical mechanism of ELK1 activation by phosphorylation and without inducing ternary complex target genes. The ELK1-AR synergy per se was ligand-independent, although it required ligand for nuclear localization of AR as targeting the AR A/B domain to the nucleus recapitulated the action of hormone; accordingly, Casodex was a poor antagonist of the synergy. ELK3, the closest substitute for ELK1 in structure/function and genome recognition, did not interact with AR. ELK1 thus directs selective and sustained gene induction that is a substantial and critical component of growth signaling by AR in PC cells. The ELK1-AR interaction offers a functionally tumor-selective drug target. PMID:23426362

  13. The effect of diet-induced insulin resistance on DNA methylation of the androgen receptor promoter in the penile cavernosal smooth muscle of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Wook Kim; Mi-Mi Oh; Cheol-Yong Yoon; Jae-Hyun Bae; Je-Jong Kim; Du-Geon Moon

    2013-01-01

    Population studies have suggested an association between diabetes and the symptoms of testosterone deficiency.Recently,the expression of the androgen receptor (AR) has been shown to be decreased in diabetic patients.Furthermore,diabetes has been shown to induce global methylation.In this study,we used an animal model to investigate whether diabetes results in increased methylation of the AR promoter and whether these changes are associated with the decreased expression of AR in penile cavernosal smooth muscle tissue.Twenty C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups,receiving either high-(mature diabetic) or low-(mature control) caloric meals for 14 weeks.Another 10 mice were killed at 1 week (young control).Animals in the mature diabetic group showed decreased testosterone levels,although this was not statistically significant.In both control groups,no significant methylation was observed in the AR promoter region CpG island (-85 to +339).In the mature diabetic group,significant methylation was observed at + 185 and +200 of the AR promoter.These changes were associated with increased homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and decreased corpus cavernosal tissue mass and expression of AR mRNA and protein.We conclude that in these animals,insulin resistance increased the methvlation of the GC-rich regions of the AR oromoter,leading to decreased AR exnression.

  14. Androgen Receptor Antagonists and Anti-Prostate Cancer Activities of Some Newly Synthesized Substituted Fused Pyrazolo-, Triazolo- and Thiazolo-Pyrimidine Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahashwan, Saleh A.; Fayed, Ahmed A.; Ramadan, Mohamed A.; Amr, Abd El-Galil E.; Al-Harbi, Naif O.

    2014-01-01

    A series of substituted pyrazole, triazole and thiazole derivatives (2–13) were synthesized from 1-(naphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-yl)hydrazine as starting material and evaluated as androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer agents. The newly synthesized compounds showed potent androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer activities with low toxicity (lethal dose 50 (LD50)) comparable to Bicalutamide as reference drug. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MS spectral data and elemental analysis. The detailed synthesis, spectroscopic data, LD50 values and pharmacological activities of the synthesized compounds are reported. PMID:25421248

  15. Androgen Receptor Antagonists and Anti-Prostate Cancer Activities of Some Newly Synthesized Substituted Fused Pyrazolo-, Triazolo- and Thiazolo-Pyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Bahashwan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of substituted pyrazole, triazole and thiazole derivatives (2–13 were synthesized from 1-(naphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-ylhydrazine as starting material and evaluated as androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer agents. The newly synthesized compounds showed potent androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer activities with low toxicity (lethal dose 50 (LD50 comparable to Bicalutamide as reference drug. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MS spectral data and elemental analysis. The detailed synthesis, spectroscopic data, LD50 values and pharmacological activities of the synthesized compounds are reported.

  16. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R.; Kwilas, Anna R.; Donahue, Renee N.; Hodge, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone r...

  17. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade is not equivalent to androgen ablation by castration in the rat ventral prostate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil M Limaye; Irfan Asangani; Thyagarajan Kalyani; Paturu Kondaiah

    2008-06-01

    Involution of the rat ventral prostate and concomitant modulation of gene expression post-castration is a well-documented phenomenon. While the rat castration model has been extensively used to study androgen regulation of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression changes post-castration are due to androgen depletion alone. To obtain insights into this, we performed differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (DD-RT-PCR) which resulted in the identification of castration and/or flutamide-regulated genes in the rat ventral prostate. These include clusterin, methionine adenosyl transferase II, and prostate-specific transcripts such as PBPC1BS, S100RVP and A7. While clusterin, PBPC1BS and methionine adenosyl transferase II are regulated by both castration and flutamide, S100 RVP and A7 are regulated by castration alone. Interestingly, we show that flutamide, unlike castration, does not induce apoptosis in the rat ventral prostate epithelium, which could be an underlying cause for the differential effects of castration and flutamide treatment. We propose that castration leads to enrichment and depletion of stromal and epithelial cell types, respectively, resulting in erroneous conclusions on some of the cell type-specific transcripts as being androgen regulated.

  18. Norfloxacin drug induces reproductive toxicity and alters androgen receptor gene expression in testes and cloacal gland of male Japanese quail (Coturnix Japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram P; Sastry, Kochiganti V H; Dubey, Pawan K; Agrawal, Radha; Singh, Renu; Pandey, Nitin Kumar; Mohan, Jag

    2013-09-01

    In an attempt to investigate the reproductive toxicity of norfloxacin in Japanese quail, male quail were given norfloxacin at 20 mg/kg body weight for 14 d. Then reproductive function and androgen receptor (AR) gene expression was examined in treated and control birds. The results of the present study indicate that fertility, cloacal gland area, sperm concentration, and serum testosterone were reduced significantly (p quail. PMID:23720395

  19. Comparison of animal models for the evaluation of radiolabeled androgens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodistribution of two 18F-labeled androgens and an 124I/125I-labeled androgen were studied in five androgen receptor (prostate) animal models with or lacking sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). As models for androgen-receptor positive ovarian cancer, xenografts of three human ovarian cancer cell lines were tested in SCID mice. SHBG in the prostate model systems significantly affects the metabolism, clearance, and distribution of the radiolabeled androgens in several tissues, but ovarian cancer animal models were disappointing

  20. Cytoplasmic androgen binding protein of rat liver: molecular characterization after photoaffinity labeling and functional correlation with the age-dependent synthesis of alpha 2u-globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liver of the mature male rat contains a moderate affinity (Kd = 10(-8)M), low-capacity, cytoplasmic androgen binding protein (CAB) whose appearance during puberty and disappearance during senescence correlate with the androgen-dependent synthesis of alpha 2u-globulin. Molecular properties of CAB were examined by photoaffinity labeling with tritiated methyltrienolone (R-1881), a synthetic androgen, and by its localization within the hepatocytes which are competent to produce alpha 2u-globulin. Photoaffinity labeling of the liver cytosol derived from postpubertal male rats, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography, showed a predominant androgen binding band corresponding to Mr 31,000. This 31-kilodalton (kDa) binding component was conspicuously absent in the liver of androgen-insensitive prepubertal and senescent male rats and in adult male rats treated with estradiol-17 beta. In addition, unlike the cytoplasmic extract, the nuclear lysate of the male rat hepatocytes did not contain the 31-kDa androgen binder. Disappearance of the 31-kDa androgen binding band from the cytosolic fraction of androgen-insensitive animals was associated with a concomitant appearance of a minor androgen binding component of apparent Mr 29,000. The livers of postpubertal male rats normally contain two subpopulations of hepatocytes, only one of which is highly active (competent) in alpha 2u-globulin synthesis. Separation of these two subpopulations through a fluorescence-activated cell sorter followed by whole cell labeling showed more than a 2-fold higher uptake of R-1881 by the competent cells

  1. A crayfish insulin-like-binding protein: another piece in the androgenic gland insulin-like hormone puzzle is revealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-08-01

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a "pulldown" methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23-38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development. PMID:23775079

  2. PCA3 noncoding RNA is involved in the control of prostate-cancer cell survival and modulates androgen receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCA3 is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) that is highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but its functional role is unknown. To investigate its putative function in PCa biology, we used gene expression knockdown by small interference RNA, and also analyzed its involvement in androgen receptor (AR) signaling. LNCaP and PC3 cells were used as in vitro models for these functional assays, and three different siRNA sequences were specifically designed to target PCA3 exon 4. Transfected cells were analyzed by real-time qRT-PCR and cell growth, viability, and apoptosis assays. Associations between PCA3 and the androgen-receptor (AR) signaling pathway were investigated by treating LNCaP cells with 100 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and with its antagonist (flutamide), and analyzing the expression of some AR-modulated genes (TMPRSS2, NDRG1, GREB1, PSA, AR, FGF8, CdK1, CdK2 and PMEPA1). PCA3 expression levels were investigated in different cell compartments by using differential centrifugation and qRT-PCR. LNCaP siPCA3-transfected cells significantly inhibited cell growth and viability, and increased the proportion of cells in the sub G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and the percentage of pyknotic nuclei, compared to those transfected with scramble siRNA (siSCr)-transfected cells. DHT-treated LNCaP cells induced a significant upregulation of PCA3 expression, which was reversed by flutamide. In siPCA3/LNCaP-transfected cells, the expression of AR target genes was downregulated compared to siSCr-transfected cells. The siPCA3 transfection also counteracted DHT stimulatory effects on the AR signaling cascade, significantly downregulating expression of the AR target gene. Analysis of PCA3 expression in different cell compartments provided evidence that the main functional roles of PCA3 occur in the nuclei and microsomal cell fractions. Our findings suggest that the ncRNA PCA3 is involved in the control of PCa cell survival, in part through modulating AR signaling, which may raise new

  3. PCA3 noncoding RNA is involved in the control of prostate-cancer cell survival and modulates androgen receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Luciana Bueno

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCA3 is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA that is highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa cells, but its functional role is unknown. To investigate its putative function in PCa biology, we used gene expression knockdown by small interference RNA, and also analyzed its involvement in androgen receptor (AR signaling. Methods LNCaP and PC3 cells were used as in vitro models for these functional assays, and three different siRNA sequences were specifically designed to target PCA3 exon 4. Transfected cells were analyzed by real-time qRT-PCR and cell growth, viability, and apoptosis assays. Associations between PCA3 and the androgen-receptor (AR signaling pathway were investigated by treating LNCaP cells with 100 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT and with its antagonist (flutamide, and analyzing the expression of some AR-modulated genes (TMPRSS2, NDRG1, GREB1, PSA, AR, FGF8, CdK1, CdK2 and PMEPA1. PCA3 expression levels were investigated in different cell compartments by using differential centrifugation and qRT-PCR. Results LNCaP siPCA3-transfected cells significantly inhibited cell growth and viability, and increased the proportion of cells in the sub G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and the percentage of pyknotic nuclei, compared to those transfected with scramble siRNA (siSCr-transfected cells. DHT-treated LNCaP cells induced a significant upregulation of PCA3 expression, which was reversed by flutamide. In siPCA3/LNCaP-transfected cells, the expression of AR target genes was downregulated compared to siSCr-transfected cells. The siPCA3 transfection also counteracted DHT stimulatory effects on the AR signaling cascade, significantly downregulating expression of the AR target gene. Analysis of PCA3 expression in different cell compartments provided evidence that the main functional roles of PCA3 occur in the nuclei and microsomal cell fractions. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ncRNA PCA3 is involved in the control of PCa cell survival

  4. Differential impact of the expression of the androgen receptor by age in estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the expression of the androgen receptor (AR) to determine its significance in breast cancer. AR expression levels were analyzed in 250 invasive breast cancers by immunohistochemistry and any association with the clinicopathological features was evaluated. AR expression was higher in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases than in ER-negative cases (P < 0.0001). AR expression was associated with ER level, and it increased with age in ER-positive cases. The cut-off value was determined to be 75% (Cancer Res. 2009;69:6131–6140), and AR expression was considered to be high in 155 (62%) cases. High AR expression significantly correlated with lower nuclear grade (P < 0.0001), ER and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0022), HER2 negativity (P = 0.0113), lower Ki67 index (P < 0.0001) and a longer disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (P = 0.0003 and 0.0107). This association between a high AR expression and a good DFS and DMFS was significant for ER-positive tumors (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0018); however, no association existed between AR expression and prognosis for ER-negative tumors. In patients ≤51 years old, a high AR expression level significantly correlated with a better prognosis, but this was not significant in patients who were 50 or younger. Multivariate Cox hazard analyses revealed AR expression to be independently associated with a good prognosis in overall patients (HR 0.46, P = 0.0052) and in the ER-positive cohort (HR 0.34, P = 0.0009). AR expression is associated with a less aggressive phenotype and a good prognosis in patients with ER-positive breast cancer. This is considered to be a specific phenomenon for postmenopausal breast cancer patients

  5. Assessment of estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities of the mycotoxin zearalenone and its metabolites using in vitro receptor-specific bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Real, Macarena; Jimenez-Diaz, Inmaculada; Belhassen, Hidaya; Hedhili, Abderazzak; Torné, Pablo; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2014-12-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a well-known mycotoxin present in numerous agricultural products. Humans and animals are therefore at a risk of exposure to zearalenone through consumption of contaminated food. After intake, ZEN is reduced to α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZEL and β-ZEL), zearalanone (ZAN), and α- and β-zearalanol (α-ZAL and β-ZAL). Although their estrogenicity has been well characterized, much less is known about their interaction with other nuclear receptors. This study was undertaken to investigate interactions of ZEN and its five metabolites, with the human androgen receptor (hAR) and estrogen receptor alpha (hERα). Their ability to induce hAR-mediated reporter gene expression was examined in androgen-sensitive PALM cells, whereas the effects on hERα function were assessed in MCF-7 cells using the E-Screen bioassay. We confirm that ZEN and its metabolites are full agonists for hERα and demonstrate that all six compounds tested possess hAR-mediated antagonistic activity in PALM cells, in which ZAN, α-ZAL, and β-ZAL were the most effective hAR antagonists. Overall, the observed estrogenic and anti-androgenic potencies of ZEN and its metabolites suggest that these compounds may interfere with the endocrine system by various modes of action and that further investigation is warranted into their role as endocrine disrupters in animals and humans. PMID:25455890

  6. Schizophrenia and the androgen receptor gene: Report of a sibship showing co-segregation with Reifenstein Syndrome but no evidence for linkage in 23 multiply affected families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arranz, M.; Sharma, T.; Sham, P.; Kerwin, R. [Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    Crow et al. have reported excess sharing of alleles by male sibling pairs with schizophrenia, at a triplet repeat marker within the androgen receptor gene, indicating that mutations at or near this gene may be a risk factor for males. In this report, we describe a pair of male siblings concordant for both schizophrenia and Reifenstein syndrome, which is caused by a mutation in this gene. This provides support for the hypothesis that the androgen receptor may contribute to liability to develop schizophrenia. Because of this, we have examined a collection of 23 pedigrees multiply affected by schizophrenia for linkage to the androgen receptor. We have found no evidence for linkage by both the LOD score and affected sibling-pair methods, under a range of genetic models with a broad and narrow definition of phenotype, and when families with male-to-male transmission are excluded. However, because of the small number of informative male-male pairs in our sample, we cannot confirm or refute the excess allele sharing for males reported by Crow. 35 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. 雄激素受体基因的表型异种突变%Phenotypic heterogeneity of mutations in androgen receptor gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Singh Rajender; Lalji Singh; Kumarasamy Thangaraj

    2007-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene has been extensively studied in diverse clinical conditions. In addition to the point mutations, trinucleotide repeat (CAG and GGN) length polymorphisms have been an additional subject of interest and controversy among geneticists. The polymorphic variations in triplet repeats have been associated with a number of disorders, but at the same time contradictory findings have also been reported. Further, studies on the same disorder in different populations have generated different results. Therefore, combined analysis or review of the published studies has been of much value to extract information on the significance of variations in the gene in various clinical conditions. AR genetics has been reviewed extensively but until now review articles have focused on individual clinical categories such as androgen insensitivity, male infertility, prostate cancer, and so on. We have made the first effort to review most the aspects of AR genetics. The impact of androgens in various disorders and polymorphic variations in the AR gene is the main focus of this review. Additionally, the correlations observed in various studies have been discussed in the light of in vitro evidences available for the effect of AR gene variations on the action of androgens.

  8. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length Is Associated With Body Fat and Serum SHBG in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar;

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate associations between the AR (CAG)n polymorphism and development of pubic hair, levels of androgens, and body fat content in healthy boys. Methods: A longitudinal study of 78 healthy boys (age 6.2-12.4 years at inclusion) from the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study was conducted with clinical...... examinations and blood samples drawn every 6 months. The AR (CAG)n length was established by direct DNA sequencing and reproductive hormones were measured in serum by standardized analyses. Results: Median AR (CAG)n length was 22 (range, 17-30). Before puberty (at 10 years of age), boys with long CAG repeats...... (CAG ≥24) had lower levels of SHBG (88 vs 125 nmol/L) (P <.05) and a nonsignificant trend toward higher median skinfold thickness (41 vs 31 mm) (P = .06) compared with boys with an average number of CAG repeats (CAG 21-23). In contrast, the inverse association was observed at puberty (at 12 years of...

  9. Modulation of opioid receptor function by protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaras-Melainis, Konstantinos; Gomes, Ivone; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Zachariou, Venetia; Devi, Lakshmi,

    2009-01-01

    Opioid receptors, MORP, DORP and KORP, belong to the family A of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and have been found to modulate a large number of physiological functions, including mood, stress, appetite, nociception and immune responses. Exogenously applied opioid alkaloids produce analgesia, hedonia and addiction. Addiction is linked to alterations in function and responsiveness of all three opioid receptors in the brain. Over the last few years, a large number of studies identified pr...

  10. Physical and functional interactions of human papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear receptor coactivators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced immortalization of epithelial cells, which usually requires integration of the viral DNA into the host cell genome, steroid hormone-activated nuclear receptors (NRs) are thought to bind to specific DNA sequences within transcriptional regulatory regions on the long control region to either increase or suppress transcription of dependent genes. In this study, our data suggest that the NR coactivator function of HPV E2 proteins might be mediated through physical and functional interactions with not only NRs but also the NR coactivators GRIP1 (glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1) and Zac1 (zinc-finger protein which regulates apoptosis and cell cycle arrest 1), reciprocally regulating their transactivation activities. GRIP1 and Zac1 both were able to act synergistically with HPV E2 proteins on the E2-, androgen receptor-, and estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation systems. GRIP1 and Zac1 might selectively function with HPV E2 proteins on thyroid receptor- and p53-dependent transcriptional activation, respectively. Hence, the transcriptional function of E2 might be mediated through NRs and NR coactivators to regulate E2-, NR-, and p53-dependent transcriptional activations

  11. Androgen receptor modulates Foxp3 expression in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Walecki, Magdalena; Eisel, Florian; Klug, Jörg; Baal, Nelli; Paradowska-Dogan, Agnieszka; Wahle, Eva; Hackstein, Holger; Meinhardt, Andreas; Fijak, Monika

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells are crucial for the maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Androgens significantly induce Foxp3 expression in humans and regulate the differentiation of Treg cells. A functional androgen receptor–binding site is identified within the Foxp3 locus leading to epigenetic changes of histone H4.

  12. Phosphorylated mTOR is associated to androgen receptor expression in early triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistelli, M; Ballatore, Z; Santinelli, A; Biscotti, T; Piva, F; Occhipinti, G; Della Mora, A; Pagliacci, A; Battelli, N; Bastianelli, L; De Lisa, M; Bracci, R; Maccaroni, E; Berardi, R; Cascinu, S

    2016-08-01

    The significance of phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR) expression is unknown in triple-negative breast carcinoma (TNBC). The aims of the present study were to assess the expression of p-mTOR in early TNBC and to evaluate possible correlations between androgen receptor (AR) expression, clinicopathological parameters and disease outcome. Between January 2009 and December 2013, all consecutive patients who were diagnosed and completed the treatment of invasive TNBC at our institution were eligible for this analysis. Patients with stage IV disease were excluded. The evaluation of p-mTOR immunohistochemical staining was semi-quantitatively considering both the percentage of positive tumor cells (range, 0-100%) and staining intensity (range, 0-3+). Ninety-eight TNBC patients were included. Approximately 33% of cases were p-mTOR positive and there was no association between positive immunostaining for p-mTOR and DFS (p=0.74) and OS (p=0.81). p-mTOR positivity was associated with small tumor size (p=0.03) and AR expression (p=0.04). High expression of p-mTOR may drive tumor proliferation in almost one third of TNBC. The biological association between mTOR activation and AR pathway suggests that there may exist a subgroup of TNBC in which the combination of both AR antagonism and mTOR inhibition should have a synergistic effect on cell growth and tumor progression. PMID:27350136

  13. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of the selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024(Enobosarm) with itraconazole, rifampin, probenecid, celecoxib and rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2016-08-01

    GTx-024 (also known as enobosarm) is a first in class selective androgen receptor modulator being developed for diverse indications in oncology. Preclinical studies of GTx-024 supported the evaluation of several potential drug-drug interactions in a clinical setting. A series of open-label Phase I GTx-024 drug-drug interaction studies were designed to interrogate potential interactions with CYP3A4 inhibitor (itraconazole), a CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin), a pan-UGT inhibitor (probenecid), a CYP2C9 substrate (celecoxib) and a BCRP substrate (rosuvastatin). The plasma pharmacokinetics of GTx-024, its major metabolite (GTx-024 glucuronide), and each substrate were characterized in detail. Itraconazole administration had no effect on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics. Likewise, GTx-024 administration did not significantly change the pharmacokinetics of celecoxib or rosuvastatin. Rifampin administration had the largest impact on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics of any co-administered agent and reduced the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) by 23 % and the area under the curve (AUC∞) by 43 %. Probenecid had a complex interaction with GTx-024 whereby both GTx-024 plasma levels and GTx-024 glucuronide plasma levels (AUC∞) were increased by co-administration of the UGT inhibitor (50 and 112 %, respectively). Overall, GTx-024 was well tolerated and poses very little risk of generating clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. PMID:27105861

  14. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yafeng; Luk, Alison; Young, Francis P.; Lynch, David; Chua, Wei; Balakrishnar, Bavanthi; de Souza, Paul; Becker, Therese M.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7) was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs): We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies. PMID:27527157

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in brown trout: Interference of estrogenic and androgenic inputs in primary hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Célia; Madureira, Tânia Vieira; Ferreira, Nádia; Pinheiro, Ivone; Castro, L Filipe C; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a pivotal regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism in vertebrates. Here, we isolated and characterized for the first time the PPARγ gene from brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario). Hormones have been reported to interfere with the regulatory function of PPARγ in various organisms, albeit with little focus on fish. Thus, primary hepatocytes isolated from juveniles of brown trout were exposed to 1, 10 and 50μM of ethinylestradiol (EE2) or testosterone (T). A significant (3 fold) decrease was obtained in response to 50μM of EE2 and to 10 and 50μM of T (13 and 14 folds), while a 3 fold increase was observed at 1μM of EE2. Therefore, trout PPARγ seems a target for natural/synthetic compounds with estrogenic or androgenic properties and so, we advocate considering PPARγ as another alert sensor gene when assessing the effects of sex-steroid endocrine disruptors. PMID:27541269

  16. Strategies for Imaging Androgen Receptor Signaling Pathway in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Hormonal Manipulation and Radiation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravina Giovanni Luca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (Pca is a heterogeneous disease; its etiology appears to be related to genetic and epigenetic factors. Radiotherapy and hormone manipulation are effective treatments, but many tumors will progress despite these treatments. Molecular imaging provides novel opportunities for image-guided optimization and management of these treatment modalities. Here we reviewed the advances in targeted imaging of key biomarkers of androgen receptor signaling pathways. A computerized search was performed to identify all relevant studies in Medline up to 2013. There are well-known limitations and inaccuracies of current imaging approaches for monitoring biological changes governing tumor progression. The close integration of molecular biology and clinical imaging could ease the development of new molecular imaging agents providing novel tools to monitor a number of biological events that, until a few years ago, were studied by conventional molecular assays. Advances in translational research may represent the next step in improving the oncological outcome of men with Pca who remain at high risk for systemic failure. This aim may be obtained by combining the anatomical properties of conventional imaging modalities with biological information to better predict tumor response to conventional treatments.

  17. Heterogeneity of triple-negative breast cancer: mammographic, US, and MR imaging features according to androgen receptor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Min Sun; Song, Sung Eun; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon; Park, In-Ae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-16

    Our aim was to determine whether triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) with and without androgen receptor (AR) expression have distinguishing imaging features on mammography, breast ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. AR expression was assessed immunohistochemically in 125 patients with TNBC from a consecutive series of 1,086 operable invasive breast cancers. Two experienced radiologists blinded to clinicopathological findings reviewed all imaging studies in consensus using the BI-RADS lexicon. The imaging and pathological features of 33 AR-positive TNBCs were compared with those of 92 AR-negative TNBCs. The presence of mammographic calcifications with or without a mass (p < 0.001), non-mass enhancement on MR imaging (p < 0.001), and masses with irregular shape or spiculated margins on US (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002) and MR imaging (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001) were significantly associated with AR-positive TNBC. Compared with AR-negative TNBC, AR-positive TNBC was more likely to have a ductal carcinoma in situ component (59.8 % vs. 90.9 %, p = 0.001) and low Ki-67 expression (30.4 % vs. 51.5 %, p = 0.030). AR-positive and AR-negative TNBCs have different imaging features, and certain imaging findings can be useful to predict AR status in TNBC. (orig.)

  18. Undermasculinized genitalia in a boy with an abnormally expanded CAG repeat length in the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, T; Muroya, K; Ishii, T; Suzuki, Y; Nakada, T; Sasagawa, I

    2001-06-01

    We report an 11-year-old boy with undermasculinized genitalia and an abnormally expanded CAG repeat length at exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. He had microphallus and scrotal hypospadias with chordee, and underwent urethroplasty at 4 years of age. At 11 years of age, a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test yielded a relatively high leutinizing hormone (LH) response (0.7-->20.4 IU/l) and a relatively low follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) response (1.7-->4.8 IU/l), and an human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test showed sufficient responses of testosterone (0.7-->23.0 nmol/l) and dihydrotestosterone (0.38-->2.95 nmol/l). The CAG repeat length was 44 for the boy and ranged from 12 to 32 for 100 control males. The DNA sequences of the AR gene were normal for the exons 1-8 and for the splice donor, splice acceptor and branch sites. The markedly expanded CAG repeat length appears to be relevant to the undermasculinized genitalia of this boy, because such an expandsion, which has previously been reported only in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is known to reduce AR function. PMID:11422120

  19. Optimisation of an immunohistochemistry method for the determination of androgen receptor expression levels in circulating tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AZD3514 inhibits and down regulates the androgen receptor (AR) and has undergone clinical trials in prostate cancer. To provide proof-of-mechanism (POM) in patients, an immunohistochemistry (IHC) method for determination of AR in circulating tumour cells (CTC) was developed and validated. After an assessment of specificity validation focused on intra- and inter-operator reproducibility utilising a novel modification of incurred sample reanalysis (ISR). β-Content γ-confidence tolerance intervals (BCTI) and Cohen’s Kappa (κ) were employed in statistical analysis of results. In a first set of IHC reproducibility experiments, almost perfect agreement was recorded (κ=0.94) when two different operators scored CTC as overall positive or negative for AR. However, BCTI analysis identified a specific bias in scoring staining intensity, where one operator favoured moderate over strong assignments, whereas the reverse was the case with the second operator. After a period of additional training involving deployment of a panel of standardised images, a second set of validation experiments were conducted. These showed correction of the inter-operator bias by BCTI with κ for scoring intensity increasing from 0.59 to 0.81, indicative of almost perfect agreement. By application of BCTI to the validation of IHC, operator bias and therefore poor reproducibility can be identified, characterised and corrected to achieve a level of error normally associated with a quantitative biomarker assay, such as an ELISA. The methodological approach described herein can be applied to any generic IHC technique

  20. The androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism and modification of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism encodes a string of 9–32 glutamines. Women with germline BRCA1 mutations who carry at least one AR allele with 28 or more repeats have been reported to have an earlier age at onset of breast cancer. A total of 604 living female Australian and British BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers from 376 families were genotyped for the AR CAG repeat polymorphism. The association between AR genotype and disease risk was assessed using Cox regression. AR genotype was analyzed as a dichotomous covariate using cut-points previously reported to be associated with increased risk among BRCA1 mutation carriers, and as a continuous variable considering smaller allele, larger allele and average allele size. There was no evidence that the AR CAG repeat polymorphism modified disease risk in the 376 BRCA1 or 219 BRCA2 mutation carriers screened successfully. The rate ratio associated with possession of at least one allele with 28 or more CAG repeats was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.42–1.29; P = 0.3) for BRCA1 carriers, and 1.12 (95% confidence interval 0.55–2.25; P = 0.8) for BRCA2 carriers. The AR exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism does not appear to have an effect on breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

  1. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  2. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7 Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7 was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs: We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies.

  3. Androgen and retinoic acid interaction in LNCaP cells, effects on cell proliferation and expression of retinoic acid receptors and epidermal growth factor receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Robert J

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of the expression of retinoic acid receptors (RAR α and γ in adult rat prostate by testosterone (T suggests that RAR signaling events might mediate some of the androgen effects on prostate cells. Method In this study, we examined the interactions between T and retinoic acid (RA in cell growth of human prostate carcinoma cells, LNCaP, and their relationship with the expression of RAR and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R. Results Both T and RA, when administered alone, stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation in LNCaP cells in a dose-dependent manner; the effect of each agent was reciprocally attenuated by the other agent. Testosterone treatment of LNCaP cells also resulted in dose dependent, biphasic increases in RAR α and γ mRNAs; increases paralleled that of 3H-thymidine incorporation and were attenuated by the presence of 100 nM RA. These results suggest a link between RAR signaling and the effect of T on LNCaP cell growth. Gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the presence of putative androgen responsive element (ARE in the promoter region of RAR α gene, suggesting that a direct AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. Furthermore, treatment of LNCaP cells with 20 nM T resulted in an increase in EGF-R. In contrast, EGF-R was suppressed by 100 nM RA that also suppressed the effect of T. Conclusions Current results demonstrate interactions between T and RA in the expression of RARs and cell growth in LNCaP cells. The presence of putative ARE in the promoter of the RAR α gene suggests that AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. The opposite effects of T and RA on the expression of RAR and EGF-R suggest that signal events of these receptors might be involved in the interaction between T and RA in the control of LNCaP cell growth.

  4. Androgen and retinoic acid interaction in LNCaP cells, effects on cell proliferation and expression of retinoic acid receptors and epidermal growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modulation of the expression of retinoic acid receptors (RAR) α and γ in adult rat prostate by testosterone (T) suggests that RAR signaling events might mediate some of the androgen effects on prostate cells. In this study, we examined the interactions between T and retinoic acid (RA) in cell growth of human prostate carcinoma cells, LNCaP, and their relationship with the expression of RAR and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). Both T and RA, when administered alone, stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation in LNCaP cells in a dose-dependent manner; the effect of each agent was reciprocally attenuated by the other agent. Testosterone treatment of LNCaP cells also resulted in dose dependent, biphasic increases in RAR α and γ mRNAs; increases paralleled that of 3H-thymidine incorporation and were attenuated by the presence of 100 nM RA. These results suggest a link between RAR signaling and the effect of T on LNCaP cell growth. Gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the presence of putative androgen responsive element (ARE) in the promoter region of RAR α gene, suggesting that a direct AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. Furthermore, treatment of LNCaP cells with 20 nM T resulted in an increase in EGF-R. In contrast, EGF-R was suppressed by 100 nM RA that also suppressed the effect of T. Current results demonstrate interactions between T and RA in the expression of RARs and cell growth in LNCaP cells. The presence of putative ARE in the promoter of the RAR α gene suggests that AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. The opposite effects of T and RA on the expression of RAR and EGF-R suggest that signal events of these receptors might be involved in the interaction between T and RA in the control of LNCaP cell growth

  5. Receptor Proteins in Selective Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Behrends

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy has long been thought to be an essential but unselective bulk degradation pathway. However, increasing evidence suggests selective autophagosomal turnover of a broad range of substrates. Bifunctional autophagy receptors play a key role in selective autophagy by tethering cargo to the site of autophagosomal engulfment. While the identity of molecular components involved in selective autophagy has been revealed at least to some extent, we are only beginning to understand how selectivity is achieved in this process. Here, we summarize the mechanistic and structural basis of receptor-mediated selective autophagy.

  6. Environmental gestagens activate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) nuclear progesterone and androgen receptors in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestagen is a collective term for endogenous and synthetic progesterone receptor (PR) ligands. In teleost fishes, 17á,20â-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) and17á,20â,21- trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20â-S) are the predominant progestogens, whereas in other vertebrates the major pro...

  7. Effect of highly bioaccumulated polychlorinated biphenyl congeners on estrogen and androgen receptor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, E.C.; Andersen, H. R.; Rasmussen, T.H.;

    2001-01-01

    in transiently co-transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary cells with an IC50, of 6.2 muM. In summary, this study indicate that the di-ortho, multiple-chloro substituted biphenyls, PCB # 138, PCB # 153 and PCB # 180, can compete with the binding of the natural ligand to two nuclear receptors and thus...

  8. G-protein coupling of cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since the cloning of the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the early 1990's extensive research has focused on understanding their signal transduction pathways. While it has been known for sometime that both receptors can couple to intracellular signalling via pertussis toxin sensitive G-proteins (Gi/Go), the specificity and kinetics of these interactions have only recently been elucidated. We have developed an in situ reconstitution approach to investigating receptor-G-protein interactions. This approach involves chaotropic extraction of receptor containing membranes in order to inactivate or remove endogenous G-proteins. Recombinant or isolated brain G-proteins can then be added back to the receptors, and their activation monitored through the binding of [35S]-GTPγS. This technique has been utilised for an extensive study of cannabinoid receptor mediated activation of G-proteins. In these studies we have established that CB1 couples with high affinity to both Gi and Go type G-proteins. In contrast, CB2 couples strongly to Gi, but has a very low affinity for Go. This finding correlated well with the previous findings that while CB1 and CB2 both couple to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, CB1 but not CB2 could also inhibit calcium channels. We then examined the ability of a range of cannabinoid agonists to activate the Gi and Go via CB1. Conventional receptor theory suggests that a receptor is either active or inactive with regard to a G-protein and that the active receptor activates all relevant G-proteins equally. However, in this study we found that agonists could produce different degrees of activation, depending on which G-protein was present. Further studies have compared the ability of the two endocannabinoids to drive the activation of Gi or Go. These studies show that agonists can induce multiple forms of activated receptor that differ in their ability to catalyse the activation of Gi or Go. The ability of an agonist to drive a receptor

  9. Structure, dynamics and interactions of the N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor

    OpenAIRE

    De Mol, Eva

    2014-01-01

    [spa] El cáncer de próstata (PCa) es el segundo tipo de cáncer más común en hombres después del cáncer de pulmón. Alrededor de 1.1 millones de hombres en todo el mundo se les diagnosticó PCa durante el año 2012. El cáncer de próstata depende esencialmente de la estimulación de los andrógenos para el crecimiento y la supervivencia celular. El receptor androgénico (AR) es un receptor de hormonas nuclear que es activado por las hormonas andrógenas y la proteína mediante la cual los efectos fisio...

  10. Antiandrogens and androgen depleting therapies in prostate cancer: novel agents for an established target

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu; Clegg, Nicola J.; Scher, Howard I.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the androgen receptor is critical for prostate cancer growth at all points in the illness. Currently therapies targeting the androgen receptor, including androgen depletion approaches and antiandrogens, do not completely inhibit androgen receptor activity. Prostate cancer cells develop resistance to castration by acquiring changes such as AR overexpression that result in reactivation of the receptor. Based on understanding of these resistance mechanisms and androgen synthesis pa...

  11. Pure Apocrine Carcinomas Represent a Clinicopathologically Distinct Androgen Receptor-Positive Subset of Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Anne M; E Gottlieb, Chelsea; M Wendroth, Scott; M Brenin, Christiana; Atkins, Kristen A

    2016-08-01

    Apocrine carcinomas comprise ∼1% of all breast cancers and are characterized by large cells bearing abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm, round nuclei, and prominent nucleoli. They are typically estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor/HER2 negative, making them unresponsive to typical hormonal or HER2-based chemotherapy. However, this subtype of triple-negative breast cancers expresses androgen receptor (AR), a feature not shared by most nonapocrine triple-negative cancers (NA-TNCs). AR therefore represents a potential diagnostic tool and therapeutic target for apocrine breast carcinoma. All pure apocrine carcinomas diagnosed during a 10-year period were reviewed, and clinicopathologic characteristics were compared with a control group of 26 NA-TNC cases. Twenty apocrine carcinomas were identified (∼0.8% of all breast cancers). The mean age at diagnosis was 69.3 years for apocrine carcinomas and 56.7 years for NA-TNC. All apocrine carcinomas and no NA-TNC were AR positive. The proportions of apocrine carcinoma grades varied, with G1 being seen in 15% of patients, G2 in 55%, and G3 in 30%. In contrast, 100% of NA-TNC cases were G3. The majority of apocrine carcinomas presented at low T stage (T1: 70%; T2: 20%; T3: 10%; T4: 0%), whereas NA-TNC cases more often presented at T2 or higher (T1: 46.2%; T2: 30.8%; T3: 11.5%; T4: 11.5%). Thirty percent of apocrine carcinomas and 30.8% of NA-TNCs had nodal metastases at presentation. Apocrine carcinomas had a favorable clinical prognosis, with 80% of patients showing no evidence of disease-related morbidity or mortality (mean follow-up: 45.2 mo). Pure apocrine carcinomas represent a clinicopathologically distinct subgroup of triple-negative breast cancer characterized by AR positivity. When compared with NA-TNC, apocrine carcinomas more often present in older women with lower grade and T stage, a group in which a more conservative treatment regimen is often desired. PMID:27259012

  12. Control of adrenal androgen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, W D; Parker, L N

    The major adrenal androgens are dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and androstenedione (delta 4). Studies by Cutler et al in 1978 demonstrated that these androgens are detectable in blood of all domestic and laboratory animals studied, but that only 4 species show increase in one or more with sexual maturation: rabbit, dog, chimpanzee and man. Studies by Grover and Odell in 1975 show these androgens do not bind to the androgen receptor obtained from rat prostate and thus probably are androgens only by conversion to an active androgen in vivo. Thomas and Oake in 1974 showed human skin converted DHEA to testosterone. The control of adrenal androgen secretion is in part modulated by ACTH. However, other factors or hormones must exist also, for a variety of clinical observations show dissociation in adrenal androgen versus cortisol secretion. Other substances that have been said to be controllers of adrenal androgen secretion include estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, gonadotropins and lipotropin. None of these appear to be the usual physiological modulator, although under some circumstances each may increase androgen production. Studies from our laboratory using in vivo experiments in the castrate dog and published in 1979 indicated that crude extracts of bovine pituitary contained a substance that either modified ACTH stimulation of adrenal androgen secretion, or stimulated secretion itself - Cortisol Androgen Stimulating Hormone. Parker et al in 1983 showed a 60,000 MW glycoprotein was extractable from human pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion by dispersed canine adrenal cells in vitro, but did not stimulate cortisol secretion. This material contained no ACTH by radioimmunoassay. In 1982 Brubaker et al reported a substance was also present in human fetal pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion, but did not effect cortisol. PMID:6100259

  13. Transcripts of genes encoding reproductive neuroendocrine hormones and androgen receptor in the brain and testis of goldfish exposed to vinclozolin, flutamide, testosterone, and their combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Mahdi; Habibi, Hamid R; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi

    2016-08-01

    Vinclozolin (VZ) is a pesticide that acts as an anti-androgen to impair reproduction in mammals. However, VZ-induced disruption of reproduction is largely unknown in fish. In the present study, we have established a combination exposure in which adult goldfish were exposed to VZ (30 and 100 μg/L), anti-androgen flutamide (Flu, 300 μg/L), and androgen testosterone (T, 1 μg/L) to better understand effects of VZ on reproductive endocrine system. mRNA levels of kisspeptin (kiss-1 and kiss-2) and its receptor (gpr54), salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (gnrh3) and androgen receptor (ar) in the mid-brain, and luteinizing hormone receptor (lhr) in the testis were analyzed and compared with those of control following 10 days of exposure. kiss-1 mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to 100 µg/L VZ and to Flu, while kiss-2 mRNA level was increased following exposure to Flu and to combinations of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu, 100 µg/L VZ with T, and Flu with T. gpr54 mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to Flu and to combination of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu and 100 µg/L VZ with T. gnrh3 mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to 100 µg/L VZ, to Flu, and to combinations of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu, 100 µg/L VZ with T, and Flu with T. The mid-brain ar mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to Flu and to combinations of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu, 100 µg/L VZ with T, and Flu with T. Testicular lhr mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to Flu and to combination of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu. These results suggest that VZ and Flu are capable of interfering with kisspeptin and GnRH systems to alter pituitary and testicular horonal functions in adult goldfish and the brain ar mediates VZ-induced disruption of androgen production. PMID:26899179

  14. Hedgehog overexpression leads to the formation of prostate cancer stem cells with metastatic property irrespective of androgen receptor expression in the mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chin-Pao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog signalling has been implicated in prostate tumorigenesis in human subjects and mouse models, but its effects on transforming normal basal/stem cells toward malignant cancer stem cells remain poorly understood. Methods We produced pCX-shh-IG mice that overexpress Hedgehog protein persistently in adult prostates, allowing for elucidation of the mechanism during prostate cancer initiation and progression. Various markers were used to characterize and confirm the transformation of normal prostate basal/stem cells into malignant cancer stem cells under the influence of Hedgehog overexpression. Results The pCX-shh-IG mice developed prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN that led to invasive and metastatic prostate cancers within 90 days. The prostate cancer was initiated through activation of P63+ basal/stem cells along with simultaneous activation of Hedgehog signalling members, suggesting that P63+/Patch1+ and P63+/Smo+ cells may serve as cancer-initiating cells and progress into malignant prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs. In the hyperplastic lesions and tumors, the progeny of PCSCs differentiated into cells of basal-intermediate and intermediate-luminal characteristics, whereas rare ChgA+ neuroendocrine differentiation was seen. Furthermore, in the metastatic loci within lymph nodes, kidneys, and lungs, the P63+ PCSCs formed prostate-like glandular structures, characteristic of the primitive structures during early prostate development. Besides, androgen receptor (AR expression was detected heterogeneously during tumor progression. The existence of P63+/AR-, CK14+/AR- and CD44+/AR- progeny indicates direct procurement of AR- malignant cancer trait. Conclusions These data support a cancer stem cell scenario in which Hedgehog signalling plays important roles in transforming normal prostate basal/stem cells into PCSCs and in the progression of PCSCs into metastatic tumor cells.

  15. Sequence Evolution and Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Other Pathway-Related Genes in a Unisexual Fish, the Amazon Molly, Poecilia formosa, and Its Bisexual Ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fangjun; Schlupp, Ingo; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa) originated from a single hybridization of two bisexual ancestors, Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). As a gynogenetic species, the Amazon molly needs to copulate with a heterospecific male, but the genetic information of the sperm-donor does not contribute to the next generation, as the sperm only acts as the trigger for the diploid eggs’ embryogenesis. Here, we study the sequence evolution and gene expression of the duplicated genes coding for androgen receptors (ars) and other pathway-related genes, i.e., the estrogen receptors (ers) and cytochrome P450, family19, subfamily A, aromatase genes (cyp19as), in the Amazon molly, in comparison to its bisexual ancestors. Mollies possess–as most other teleost fish—two copies of the ar, er, and cyp19a genes, i.e., arα/arβ, erα/erβ1, and cyp19a1 (also referred as cyp19a1a)/cyp19a2 (also referred to as cyp19a1b), respectively. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the ancestral bisexual species were generally predicted not to alter protein function. Some derived substitutions in the P. mexicana and one in P. formosa are predicted to impact protein function. We also describe the gene expression pattern of the ars and pathway-related genes in various tissues (i.e., brain, gill, and ovary) and provide SNP markers for allele specific expression research. As a general tendency, the levels of gene expression were lowest in gill and highest in ovarian tissues, while expression levels in the brain were intermediate in most cases. Expression levels in P. formosa were conserved where expression did not differ between the two bisexual ancestors. In those cases where gene expression levels significantly differed between the bisexual species, P. formosa expression was always comparable to the higher expression level among the two ancestors. Interestingly, erβ1 was expressed neither in brain nor in gill in the analyzed

  16. Sequence Evolution and Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Other Pathway-Related Genes in a Unisexual Fish, the Amazon Molly, Poecilia formosa, and Its Bisexual Ancestors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa originated from a single hybridization of two bisexual ancestors, Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna. As a gynogenetic species, the Amazon molly needs to copulate with a heterospecific male, but the genetic information of the sperm-donor does not contribute to the next generation, as the sperm only acts as the trigger for the diploid eggs' embryogenesis. Here, we study the sequence evolution and gene expression of the duplicated genes coding for androgen receptors (ars and other pathway-related genes, i.e., the estrogen receptors (ers and cytochrome P450, family19, subfamily A, aromatase genes (cyp19as, in the Amazon molly, in comparison to its bisexual ancestors. Mollies possess-as most other teleost fish-two copies of the ar, er, and cyp19a genes, i.e., arα/arβ, erα/erβ1, and cyp19a1 (also referred as cyp19a1a/cyp19a2 (also referred to as cyp19a1b, respectively. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among the ancestral bisexual species were generally predicted not to alter protein function. Some derived substitutions in the P. mexicana and one in P. formosa are predicted to impact protein function. We also describe the gene expression pattern of the ars and pathway-related genes in various tissues (i.e., brain, gill, and ovary and provide SNP markers for allele specific expression research. As a general tendency, the levels of gene expression were lowest in gill and highest in ovarian tissues, while expression levels in the brain were intermediate in most cases. Expression levels in P. formosa were conserved where expression did not differ between the two bisexual ancestors. In those cases where gene expression levels significantly differed between the bisexual species, P. formosa expression was always comparable to the higher expression level among the two ancestors. Interestingly, erβ1 was expressed neither in brain nor in gill in the

  17. Androgen receptor expands the population of cancer stem cells in upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Huang, Chi-Ping; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Lin; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) affects the development and progression of upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma (UUTUC). However, the regulatory mechanism exerted by AR to affect UUTUC cells remains unclear. Here we investigated whether AR promotes UUTUC development and progression, possibly by expanding the population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are a particular population of cells within cancer cells responsible for tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. We compared UUTUC cells with or without the addition of AR on their CSC population with flow cytometry, colony formation and sphere formation assay to determine the effect of AR on CSC activity, and real-time PCR was used to detect the expression stemness genes and miRNAs. In vivo tumor formation was evaluated with the implantation of cancer cells in nude mice. We found that the addition of AR in UUTUC cells, significantly increased the population of CSC, clonogenicity, sphere formation and the expression of stemness genes (Oct4, Bmi1 and Nanog), altered CSC-related miRNA profile, as well as promoted epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). And AR inhibitor, enzalutamide was shown to suppress AR’s effect on tumorsphere formation. Furthermore, in an immune-deficient mouse model, the addition of AR in UUTUC cells also increased the tumor formation capacity. This study will help us better understand the extent to which AR contributes to UUTUC progression by expanding their CSC population and capacity. Our findings could explain high incidence of UUTUC observed in males. And targeting AR may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for genetically diversified urothelial carcinomas in precision medicine era.

  18. Correlation of androgen receptor and SRD5A2 gene mutations with pediatric hypospadias in 46, XY DSD children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X H; Zhang, W Q; Qu, X S

    2016-01-01

    We performed an exploratory study by analyzing the correlation of 46, XY disorders of sex development (46, XY DSD) with androgen receptor (AR) and steroid 5α-reductase-2 (SRD5A2) gene mutations and a safety analysis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) gel treatment for pediatric micropenis. We collected samples from 76 pediatric patients with 46, XY DSD and 50 healthy adult men with normal fertility as the control group. The pediatric patients were treated with DHT gel (0.1-0.3 mg/kg/day) for three to six months. The extended penis length, testicular volume, and multiple blood parameters were collected before treatment and one, three, and six months after treatment. Of the 76 cases with 46, XY DSD, 31.58% had hypospadias with micropenis and 6.58% had male pseudohermaphroditism. Through AR gene screening, it was found that 14 patients had AR point mutations and 22 patients had SRD5A2 mutations. After treatment with DHT, the penis length of the patients significantly improved after one, three, and six months of treatment, with longer treatment times resulting in greater improvement. Before treatment with DHT, the average serum DHT value of patients with 46, XY DSD was 24.29 pg/mL. After one, three, and six months of treatment, this value increased to 430.71, 328.9, and 323.6 pg/mL, respectively. We conclude that for pediatric patients who have male hermaphroditism or hypospadias with micropenis, AR and SRD5A2 gene mutation detection should be performed. Local application of DHT gel can promote penis growth effectively without systemic adverse reactions. PMID:27051040

  19. Identification and characterisation of an androgen receptor from zebrafish Danio rerio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Andersen, Ole; Bjerregaard, Poul;

    2007-01-01

    zebrafish Danio rerio. The predicted protein of 868 residues has an estimated calculated molecular weight of 96 kDa. The amino acid sequence of the zebrafish AR (zfRA) shows high homology with other vertebrate ARs. The highest overall similarity was 82% to ARs from fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and...

  20. Sex differences in androgen receptors of the human mamillary bodies are related to endocrine status rather than to sexual orientation or transsexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, F P; Fernández-Guasti, A; Fodor, M; Kraan, E M; Swaab, D F

    2001-02-01

    In a previous study we found androgen receptor (AR) sex differences in several regions throughout the human hypothalamus. Generally, men had stronger nuclear AR immunoreactivity (AR-ir) than women. The strongest nuclear labeling was found in the caudal hypothalamus in the mamillary body complex (MBC), which is known to be involved in aspects of cognition and sexual behavior. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the sex difference in AR-ir of the MBC is related to sexual orientation or gender identity (i.e. the feeling of being male or female) or to circulating levels of androgens, as nuclear AR-ir is known to be up-regulated by androgens. Therefore, we studied the MBC in postmortem brain material from the following groups: young heterosexual men, young homosexual men, aged heterosexual castrated and noncastrated men, castrated and noncastrated transsexuals, young heterosexual women, and a young virilized woman. Nuclear AR-ir did not differ significantly between heterosexual and homosexual men, but was significantly stronger than that in women. A female-like pattern of AR-ir (i.e. no to weak nuclear staining) was observed in 26- to 53-yr-old castrated male-to-female transsexuals and in old castrated and noncastrated men, 67--87 yr of age. In analogy with animal studies showing strong activational effects of androgens on nuclear AR-ir, the present data suggest that nuclear AR-ir in the human MBC is dependent on the presence or absence of circulating levels of androgen. The group data were, moreover, supported by the fact that a male-like AR-ir (i.e. intense nuclear AR-ir) was found in a 36-yr-old bisexual noncastrated male-to-female transsexual and in a heterosexual virilized woman, 46 yr of age, with high levels of circulating testosterone. In conclusion, the sexually dimorphic AR-ir in the MBC seemed to be clearly related to circulating levels of androgens and not to sexual orientation or gender identity. The functional implications of these

  1. Proteomic-coupled-network analysis of T877A-androgen receptor interactomes can predict clinical prostate cancer outcomes between White (non-Hispanic and African-American groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Zaman

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR remains an important contributor to the neoplastic evolution of prostate cancer (CaP. CaP progression is linked to several somatic AR mutational changes that endow upon the AR dramatic gain-of-function properties. One of the most common somatic mutations identified is Thr877-to-Ala (T877A, located in the ligand-binding domain, that results in a receptor capable of promiscuous binding and activation by a variety of steroid hormones and ligands including estrogens, progestins, glucocorticoids, and several anti-androgens. In an attempt to further define somatic mutated AR gain-of-function properties, as a consequence of its promiscuous ligand binding, we undertook a proteomic/network analysis approach to characterize the protein interactome of the mutant T877A-AR in LNCaP cells under eight different ligand-specific treatments (dihydrotestosterone, mibolerone, R1881, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, dexamethasone, and cyproterone acetate. In extending the analysis of our multi-ligand complexes of the mutant T877A-AR we observed significant enrichment of specific complexes between normal and primary prostatic tumors, which were furthermore correlated with known clinical outcomes. Further analysis of certain mutant T877A-AR complexes showed specific population preferences distinguishing primary prostatic disease between white (non-Hispanic vs. African-American males. Moreover, these cancer-related AR-protein complexes demonstrated predictive survival outcomes specific to CaP, and not for breast, lung, lymphoma or medulloblastoma cancers. Our study, by coupling data generated by our proteomics to network analysis of clinical samples, has helped to define real and novel biological pathways in complicated gain-of-function AR complex systems.

  2. ASC-J9(®) suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer progression via degrading the enzalutamide-induced androgen receptor mutant AR-F876L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghao; Lin, Wanying; Lin, Changyi; Li, Lei; Sun, Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-28

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed powerful anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) has promising therapeutic effects to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and extending patients' lives an extra 4.8 months. However, most Enz therapy eventually fails with the development of Enz resistance. The detailed mechanisms how CRPC develops Enz resistance remain unclear and may involve multiple mechanisms. Among them, the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR-F876L in some CRPC patients may represent one driving force that confers Enz resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), not only degrades wild-type AR, but also has the ability to target AR-F876L. The consequence of suppressing AR-F876L may then abrogate AR-F876L mediated CRPC cell proliferation and metastasis. Thus, developing ASC-J9(®) as a new therapeutic approach may represent a novel therapy to better suppress CRPC that has already developed Enz resistance. PMID:27233475

  3. Testosterone treatment increases androgen receptor and aromatase gene expression in myotubes from patients with PCOS and controls, but does not induce insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun;

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin mediated glucose disposal and the skeletal muscle tissue is capable to synthesize, convert and degrade androgens. Insulin sensitivity...... sensitivity and if testosterone is implicated in muscular insulin resistance in PCOS, this is by and indirect mechanism....... is conserved in cultured myotubes (in vitro) from patients with PCOS, but the effect of testosterone on this insulin sensitivity is unknown. We investigated the effect of 7days testosterone treatment (100nmol/l) on glucose transport and gene expression levels of hormone receptors and enzymes involved...

  4. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja;

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes the ...

  5. Novel Chemical Strategies for Labeling Small Molecule Ligands for Androgen, Progestin, and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors for Imaging Prostate and Breast Cancer and the Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary of Progress The specific aims of this project can be summarized as follows: Aim 1: Prepare and evaluate radiolabeled ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a new nuclear hormone receptor target for tumor imaging and hormone therapy. Aim 2: Prepare steroids labeled with a cyclopentadienyl tricarbonyl technetium or rhenium unit. Aim 3: Prepare and evaluate other organometallic systems of novel design as ligand mimics and halogenated ligands for nuclear hormone receptor-based tumor imaging. As is described in detail in the report, we made excellent progress on all three of these aims; the highlights of our progress are the following: (1) we have prepared the first fluorine-18 labeled analogs of ligands for the PPARγ receptor and used these in tissue distribution studies in rats; (2) we have developed three new methods for the synthesis of cyclopentadienyltricarbonyl rhenium and technetium (CpRe(CO)3 and CpTc(CO)3) systems and we have adapted these to the synthesis of steroids labeled with these metals, as well as ligands for other receptor systems; (3) we have prepared a number of fluorine-18 labeled steroidal and non-steroidal androgens and measured their tissue distribution in rats; (4) we have prepared iodine and bromine-labeled progestins with high progesterone receptor binding affinity; and (5) we have prepared inorganic metal tricarbonyl complexes and steroid receptor ligands in which the metal tricarbonyl unit is an integral part off the ligand core

  6. A role for the androgen metabolite, 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol, in modulating oestrogen receptor beta-mediated regulation of hormonal stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, R J; Weiser, M J; Zuloaga, D G

    2009-03-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a basic response of animals to environmental perturbations that threaten homeostasis. These responses are regulated by neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) that synthesise and secrete corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH). Other PVN neuropeptides, such as arginine vasopressin and oxytocin, can also modulate activity of CRH neurones in the PVN and enhance CRH secretagogue activity of the anterior pituitary gland. In rodents, sex differences in HPA reactivity are well established; females exhibit a more robust activation of the HPA axis after stress than do males. These sex differences primarily result from opposing actions of sex steroids, testosterone and oestrogen, on HPA function. Ostreogen enhances stress activated adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) secretion, whereas testosterone decreases the gain of the HPA axis and inhibits ACTH and CORT responses to stress. Data show that androgens can act directly on PVN neurones in the male rat through a novel pathway involving oestrogen receptor (ER)beta, whereas oestrogen acts predominantly through ERalpha. Thus, we examined the hypothesis that, in males, testosterone suppresses HPA function via an androgen metabolite that binds ERbeta. Clues to the neurobiological mechanisms underlying such a novel action can be gleaned from studies showing extensive colocalisation of ERbeta in oxytocin-containing cells of the PVN. Hence, in this review, we address the possibility that testosterone inhibits HPA reactivity by metabolising to 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol, a compound that binds ERbeta and regulates oxytocin containing neurones of the PVN. These findings suggest a re-evaluation of studies examining pathways for androgen receptor signalling. PMID:19207807

  7. A Role for the Androgen Metabolite, 5α-Androstane-3β,17β-Diol, in Modulating Oestrogen Receptor β-Mediated Regulation of Hormonal Stress Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, R. J.; Weiser, M. J.; Zuloaga, D. G.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a basic response of animals to environmental perturbations that threaten homeostasis. These responses are regulated by neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) that synthesise and secrete corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH). Other PVN neuropeptides, such as arginine vasopressin and oxytocin, can also modulate activity of CRH neurones in the PVN and enhance CRH secretagogue activity of the anterior pituitary gland. In rodents, sex differences in HPA reactivity are well established; females exhibit a more robust activation of the HPA axis after stress than do males. These sex differences primarily result from opposing actions of sex steroids, testosterone and oestrogen, on HPA function. Ostreogen enhances stress activated adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) secretion, whereas testosterone decreases the gain of the HPA axis and inhibits ACTH and CORT responses to stress. Data show that androgens can act directly on PVN neurones in the male rat through a novel pathway involving oestrogen receptor (ER)β, whereas oestrogen acts predominantly through ERα. Thus, we examined the hypothesis that, in males, testosterone suppresses HPA function via an androgen metabolite that binds ERβ. Clues to the neurobiological mechanisms underlying such a novel action can be gleaned from studies showing extensive colocalisation of ERβ in oxytocin-containing cells of the PVN. Hence, in this review, we address the possibility that testosterone inhibits HPA reactivity by metabolising to 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol, a compound that binds ERβ and regulates oxytocin containing neurones of the PVN. These findings suggest a re-evaluation of studies examining pathways for androgen receptor signalling. PMID:19207807

  8. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  9. Hinokitiol, a metal chelator derived from natural plants, suppresses cell growth and disrupts androgen receptor signaling in prostate carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinokitiol (β-thujaplicin), a troplone-related compound found in the heartwood of cupressaceous plants, strongly inhibits the proliferation of a broad range of tumor cell lines. This is the first report to demonstrate that hinokitiol, a metal chelator derived from natural plants, suppresses cell growth and disrupts AR signaling in prostate carcinoma cell lines. Our present studies indicate that hinokitiol suppresses androgen/AR-mediated cell growth and androgen-stimulated DNA synthesis by [3H]thymidine incorporation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hinokitiol simultaneously suppresses the intracellular and secreted PSA levels, a marker for the progression of prostate cancer. Hinokitiol significantly represses the AR mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Additionally, the ligand-binding assay shows that hinokitiol blocks binding of the synthetic androgen [3H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. These findings collectively suggest that hinokitiol is potentially effective against prostate cancer in vitro, and thus it might become a novel chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for prostate cancer

  10. Androgen receptor regulated microRNA miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression by targeting the ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jingjing; Xu, Chen; Fang, Ziyu; Li, Yaoming; Liu, Houqi; Wang, Yue; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2016-05-20

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous gene regulators that play key roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. However, specific miRNA expression patterns in prostate cancer tissues from Chinese patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we compared miRNA expression patterns in 65 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues by RNA sequencing and found that miR-182-5p was the most up-regulated miRNA in prostate cancer tissues. The result was validated using realtime PCR in 18 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues. In in vitro analysis, it was confirmed that miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration and inhibit apoptosis. In addition, the androgen receptor directly regulated the transcription of miR-182-5p, which could target to the 3'UTR of ARRDC3 mRNA and affect the expression of ARRDC3 and its downstream gene ITGB4. For the in vivo experiment, miR-182-5p overexpression also promoted the growth and progression of prostate cancer tumors. In this regard, we suggest that miR-182-5p may be a key androgen receptor-regulated factor that contributes to the development and metastasis of Chinese prostate cancers and may be a potential target for the early diagnosis and therapeutic studies of prostate cancer. PMID:27109471

  11. The Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR and Docking Studies of Curcumin Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor antagonists have been proved to be effective anti-prostate cancer agents. 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking methods were performed on curcumin derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists. The bioactive conformation was explored by docking the potent compound 29 into the binding site of AR. The constructed Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA and Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q2 of 0.658 and 0.567, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r2 of 0.988 and 0.978, and predicted correction coefficients r2pred of 0.715 and 0.793, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of novel potent AR antagonists. A set of 30 new analogs were proposed by utilizing the results revealed in the present study, and were predicted with potential activities in the developed models.

  12. Immunoexpression of androgen receptor and nine markers of maturation in the testes of adolescent boys with Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Anne M; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Dunkel, Leo;

    2007-01-01

    boys with KS by describing the immunoexpression of some developmentally regulated markers of testis maturation in relation to serum levels of reproductive hormones. SETTING: This study was conducted at a university central hospital pediatric referral endocrinology outpatient clinic. PATIENTS: Patients...... relative androgen deficiency, at least at the testicular level, develops in boys with KS during puberty....

  13. MASCULINIZATION OF FEMALE MOSQUITO FISH IN KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT -CONTAMINATED FENHOLLOWAY RIVER WATER IS ASSOCIATED WITH ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AGONIST ACTIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Female mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis holbrooki) downstream from Kraft paper mills in Florida display masculinization of the anal fin, an androgen-dependent trait. The current investigation was designed to determine if water contaminated with pulp-mill effluent (PME) from the Fen...

  14. G-protein-coupled receptors: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most versatile group of cell surface receptors. Drugs active at these receptors have therapeutic actions across a wide range of human diseases ranging from allergic rhinitis to pain, hypertension and schizophrenia. This review provides a brief historical overview of the properties and signalling characteristics of this important family of receptors.

  15. Identification of a Novel Androgen Receptor Mutation in a Family With Multiple Components Compatible With the Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, Grete; Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E.; Jørgensen, Niels; Duno, Morten; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Skakkebæk, Niels E.; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    testicular cancer showed features consistent with insufficient testis development and TDS.Conclusion: The presence of all hallmarks of TDS, including germ cell cancer, in a family with a novel AR mutation causing a partial decrease in AR function is in line with the concept that reduced androgen signaling...... may contribute to the development of TDS. It also seems consistent with the hypothesis that environmental factors interfering with this pathway can play a role in the pathogenesis of TDS....

  16. Development and Implementation of a High-Throughput High-Content Screening Assay to Identify Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Paul A; Nguyen, Minh M; Dar, Javid A; Ai, Junkui; Wang, Yujuan; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Shun, Tongying; Shinde, Sunita; Camarco, Daniel P; Hua, Yun; Huryn, Donna M; Wilson, Gabriela Mustata; Lazo, John S; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) can be treated with abiraterone, a potent inhibitor of androgen synthesis, or enzalutamide, a second-generation androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, both targeting AR signaling. However, most patients relapse after several months of therapy and a majority of patients with relapsed CRPC tumors express the AR target gene prostate-specific antigen (PSA), suggesting that AR signaling is reactivated and can be targeted again to inhibit the relapsed tumors. Novel small molecules capable of inhibiting AR function may lead to urgently needed therapies for patients resistant to abiraterone, enzalutamide, and/or other previously approved antiandrogen therapies. Here, we describe a high-throughput high-content screening (HCS) campaign to identify small-molecule inhibitors of AR nuclear localization in the C4-2 CRPC cell line stably transfected with GFP-AR-GFP (2GFP-AR). The implementation of this HCS assay to screen a National Institutes of Health library of 219,055 compounds led to the discovery of 3 small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization and function in C4-2 cells, demonstrating the feasibility of using this cell-based phenotypic assay to identify small molecules targeting the subcellular localization of AR. Furthermore, the three hit compounds provide opportunities to develop novel AR drugs with potential for therapeutic intervention in CRPC patients who have relapsed after treatment with antiandrogens, such as abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. PMID:27187604

  17. Synthesis of novel C17 steroidal carbamates. Studies on CYP17 action, androgen receptor binding and function, and prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Vânia M A; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Guo, Zhiyong; Njar, Vincent C O; Salvador, Jorge A R

    2008-11-01

    We have exploited the reaction of 1,1'-carbonylbis(2-methylimidazole) (CBMI) with several 17beta-hydroxy androstanes to synthesize a series of novel C17 steroidal carbamates. Structural elucidation features have been provided for the final compounds based on 1D and 2D NMR techniques, IR spectroscopy, and related literature. The new compounds were tested for inhibition of human cytochrome 17alpha-hydroxylase-C17,20-lyase (CYP17) and androgen receptor (AR) binding and function effects. Their inhibitory potential against PC-3 cell proliferation was also evaluated. Compounds 11 and 23 were found to inhibit CYP17 with IC50 values of 17.1 and 11.5 microM, respectively. The carbamate moiety at C17 allowed tight binding of the synthesized compounds to both wild-type (wt-) and mutated AR. When bound to the mutated AR, the compounds were found to have a dual effect, stimulating transcription at low concentrations while almost fully blocking it at the higher concentrations tested, in the presence of the natural androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Compounds 8 and 12 were the most active against PC-3 cell proliferation with EC50 values of 2.2 and 0.2 microM, respectively. PMID:18582482

  18. Melanocortin receptor accessory proteins in adrenal disease and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, David S.; Ramachandrappa, Shwetha; Clark, Adrian J; Chan, Li F.

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortin receptor accessory proteins (MRAPs) are regulators of the melanocortin receptor family. MRAP is an essential accessory factor for the functional expression of the MC2R/ACTH receptor. The importance of MRAP in adrenal gland physiology is demonstrated by the clinical condition familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 2. The role of its paralog melanocortin-2-receptor accessory protein 2 (MRAP2), which is predominantly expressed in the hypothalamus including the paraventricular nucle...

  19. 雄激素受体基因新突变致雄激素不敏感综合征%Study on a novel androgen receptor gene mutation causing androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张曼娜; 张惠杰; 杨军; 顾丽群; 刘建民; 王卫庆; 宁光; 李小英

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析2例雄激素不敏感综合征患者及其家系的临床及分子遗传学.方法 收集2例雄激素小敏感综合征患者的临床资料,从患者及其家系成员的外周血单个核细胞抽提基因组DNA,应用PCR扩增雄激素受体基因并直接测序,明确患者及其父母基因有无突变.结果 患者1表现为女性外生殖器、单侧乳房发育、原发性闭经、阴毛腋毛缺如.患者2表现为男性化不全,体毛稀少、双侧乳房发育、尿道下裂.基因检测证实患者1雄激素受体基因第2号外显子第579位密码子点突变(S579N),并证实为一新突变.患者2第5号外显子第747位密码子点突变(V747M).结论 该2例雄激素受体不敏感综合征系分别由雄激素受体基因S579N及V747M所致,其中S579N突变尚未见文献报道.%Objective To investigate the clinical and genetic characteristics in two patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Methods Clinical features and laboratory data were collected from the patients and their families. All exons of the androgen receptor gene were amplified by PCR and PCR products were sequenced. Results Patient 1 presented with unambiguous female external genitalia, unilateral gynecomastia and primary amenorrhea. He did not have axillary hairs or pubic hairs. Patient 2 presented with undervirilization including scanty body hairs, gynecomastia and hypospadias. A missense mutation of

  20. Phosphoproteome analysis demonstrates the potential role of THRAP3 phosphorylation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Yoko; Arakawa, Noriaki; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Hisashi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2016-04-01

    Elucidating the androgen-independent growth mechanism is critical for developing effective treatment strategies to combat androgen-independent prostate cancer. We performed a comparative phosphoproteome analysis using a prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, and an LNCaP-derived androgen-independent cell line, LNCaP-AI, to identify phosphoproteins involved in this mechanism. We performed quantitative comparisons of the phosphopeptide levels in tryptic digests of protein extracts from these cell lines using MS. We found that the levels of 69 phosphopeptides in 66 proteins significantly differed between LNCaP and LNCaP-AI. In particular, we focused on thyroid hormone receptor associated protein 3 (THRAP3), which is a known transcriptional coactivator of the androgen receptor. The phosphorylation level of THRAP3 was significantly lower at S248 and S253 in LNCaP-AI cells. Furthermore, pull-down assays showed that 32 proteins uniquely bound to the nonphosphorylatable mutant form of THRAP3, whereas 31 other proteins uniquely bound to the phosphorylation-mimic form. Many of the differentially interacting proteins were identified as being involved with RNA splicing and processing. These results suggest that the phosphorylation state of THRAP3 at S248 and S253 might be involved in the mechanism of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth by changing the interaction partners. PMID:26841317

  1. Sarcosine induces increase in HER2/neu expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Malin; Bouchelouche, Pierre; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Capala, Jacek; Nordling, Jørgen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    epithelial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of sarcosine on HER2/neu expression in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP (androgen dependent), PC-3 and DU145 (both androgen independent). Relative amounts of HER2/neu and androgen receptor (AR) transcripts were determined using RT......Increasing evidence suggests that Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) is involved in progression of prostate cancer. Recently, sarcosine was reported to be highly increased during prostate cancer progression, and exogenous sarcosine induces an invasive phenotype in benign prostate......-qPCR. Total expression of HER2/neu was confirmed by Western blot (WB). HER2/neu protein on the surface of living LNCaP cells was visualized by confocal microscopy using a HER2/neu-specific fluorescent probe. Exposure of LNCaP cells to 50 μM sarcosine for 24 h resulted in a 58% increase of the HER2/neu m...

  2. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-01-01

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors. PMID:27623747

  3. Yeast Ste2 receptors as tools for study of mammalian protein kinases and adaptors involved in receptor trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Background Mammalian receptors that couple to effectors via heterotrimeric G proteins (e.g., beta 2-adrenergic receptors) and receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (e.g., insulin and IGF-I receptors) constitute the proximal points of two dominant cell signaling pathways. Receptors coupled to G proteins can be substrates for tyrosine kinases, integrating signals from both pathways. Yeast cells, in contrast, display G protein-coupled receptors (e.g., alpha-factor pheromone receptor ...

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Myriam; Kancharla, Arun; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Agranovich, Daniel; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27529230

  5. The Presence of Clitoromegaly in the Nonclassical Form of 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency Could Be Partially Modulated by the CAG Polymorphic Tract of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gomes, Larissa; Bugano Diniz Gomes, Diogo; Marcondes, José Antônio Miguel; Madureira, Guiomar; de Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Bachega, Tânia A. Sartori Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background In the nonclassical form (NC), good correlation has been observed between genotypes and 17OH-progesterone (17-OHP) levels. However, this correlation was not identified with regard to the severity of hyperandrogenic manifestations, which could depend on interindividual variability in peripheral androgen sensitivity. Androgen action is modulated by the polymorphic CAG tract (nCAG) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and by polymorphisms in 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) enzyme, both of which are involved in the severity of hyperandrogenic disorders. Objectives To analyze whether nCAG-AR and SRD5A2 polymorphisms influence the severity of the nonclassical phenotype. Patients NC patients (n = 114) diagnosed by stimulated-17OHP ≥10 ng/mL were divided into groups according to the beginning of hyperandrogenic manifestations (pediatric and adolescent/adult) and CYP21A2 genotypes (C/C: homozygosis for mild mutations; A/C: compound heterozygosis for severe/mild mutations). Methods CYP21A2 mutations were screened by allelic-specific PCR, MLPA and/or sequencing. HpaII-digested and HpaII-undigested DNA samples underwent GeneScan analysis to study nCAG, and the SRD5A2 polymorphisms were screened by RLFP. Results Mean nCAG did not differ among pediatric, adolescent/adult and asymptomatic subjects. In the C/C genotype, we observed a significantly lower frequency of longer CAG alleles in pediatric patients than in adolescent/adults (p = 0.01). In patients carrying the A/C genotype, the frequencies of shorter and longer CAG alleles did not differ between pediatric patients and adolescent/adults (p>0.05). Patients with clitoromegaly had significantly lower weighted CAG biallelic mean than those without it: 19.1±2.7 and 21.6±2.5, respectively (p = 0.007), independent of the CYP21A2 genotype's severity. The SRD5A2 polymorphisms were not associated with the variability of hyperandrogenic NC phenotypes. Conclusions In this series, we observed a modulatory effect of the CAG

  6. Production of recombinant insulin-like androgenic gland hormones from three decapod species: In vitro testicular phosphorylation and activation of a newly identified tyrosine kinase receptor from the Eastern spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizen, Joseph; Chandler, Jennifer C; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Sagi, Amir; Battaglene, Stephen C; Elizur, Abigail; Ventura, Tomer

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans the insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) is responsible for male sexual differentiation. To date, the biochemical pathways through which IAG exerts its effects are poorly understood and could be elucidated through the production of a functional recombinant IAG (rIAG). We have successfully expressed glycosylated, biologically active IAG using the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. We co-expressed recombinant single-chain precursor molecules consisting of the B and A chains (the mature hormone) tethered by a flexible linker, producing rIAGs of the following commercially important species: Eastern spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi (Sv), redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq) and giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). We then tested the biological activity of each, through the ability to increase phosphorylation in the testis; both Sv and Cq rIAGs significantly elevated phosphorylation specific to their species, and in a dose-dependent manner. Mr rIAG was tested on Macrobrachium australiense (Ma), eliciting a similar response. Moreover, using bioinformatics analyses of the de novo assembled spiny lobster transcriptome, we identified a spiny lobster tyrosine kinase insulin receptor (Sv-TKIR). We validated this discovery with a receptor activation assay in COS-7 cells expressing Sv-TKIR, using a reporter SRE-LUC system designed for RTKs, with each of the rIAG proteins acting as the activation ligand. Using recombinant proteins, we aim to develop specific tools to control sexual development through the administration of IAG within the critical sexual differentiation time window. The biologically active rIAGs generated might facilitate commercially feasible solutions for the long sought techniques for sex-change induction and monosex population culture in crustaceans and shed new light on the physiological mode of action of IAG in crustaceans. PMID:26883686

  7. Androgens and androgen receptors in prostatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.G.J.M. van Aubel (Olav)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractOur understanding of the testicular control of growth and functioning of the accessory sex glands began with an observation in the 18th century of John Hunter (1), who discovered in animals the endocrine dependency of the prostate. He demonstrated that castration in experimental animals

  8. Quantifying Agonist Activity at G Protein-coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    When an agonist activates a population of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it elicits a signaling pathway that culminates in the response of the cell or tissue. This process can be analyzed at the level of a single receptor, a population of receptors, or a downstream response. Here we describe how to analyze the downstream response to obtain an estimate of the agonist affinity constant for the active state of single receptors.

  9. Identification of selected in vitro generated phase-I metabolites of the steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator MK-0773 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagojda, Andreas; Kuehne, Dirk; Krug, Oliver; Thomas, Andreas; Wigger, Tina; Karst, Uwe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Research into developing anabolic agents for various therapeutic purposes has been pursued for decades. As the clinical utility of anabolic-androgenic steroids has been found to be limited because of their lack of tissue selectivity and associated off-target effects, alternative drug entities have been designed and are commonly referred to as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). While most of these SARMs are of nonsteroidal structure, the drug candidate MK-0773 comprises a 4-aza-steroidal nucleus. Besides the intended therapeutic use, SARMs have been found to be illicitly distributed and misused as doping agents in sport, necessitating frequently updated doping control analytical assays. As steroidal compounds reportedly undergo considerable metabolic transformations, the phase-I metabolism of MK-0773 was simulated using human liver microsomal (HLM) preparations and electrochemical conversion. Subsequently, major metabolic products were identified and characterized employing liquid chromatography-high-resolution/high- accuracy tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. MK-0773 produced numerous phase-I metabolites under the chosen in vitro incubation reactions, mostly resulting from mono- and bisoxygenation of the steroid. HLM yielded at least 10 monooxygenated species, while electrochemistry-based experiments resulted predominantly in three monohydroxylated metabolites. Elemental composition data and product ion mass spectra were generated for these analytes, ESI/APCI measurements corroborated the formation of at least two N-oxygenated metabolites, and NMR data obtained from electrochemistry-derived products supported structures suggested for three monohydroxylated compounds. Hereby, the hydroxylation of the A-ring located N- bound methyl group was found to be of particular intensity. In the absence of controlled elimination studies, the

  10. Structural insights into G-protein-coupled receptor activation☆

    OpenAIRE

    Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of eukaryotic plasma membrane receptors, and are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to external signals. GPCRs share a common architecture comprising seven transmembrane (TM) helices. Binding of an activating ligand enables the receptor to catalyze the exchange of GTP for GDP in a heterotrimeric G protein. GPCRs are in a conformational equilibrium between inactive and activating states. Crystallographic and spectroscop...

  11. Androgen actions on the human hair follicle: perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Shigeki; Itami, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    Androgens stimulate beard growth but suppress hair growth in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). This condition is known as 'androgen paradox'. Human pilosebaceous units possess enough enzymes to form the active androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. In hair follicles, 5α-reductase type 1 and 2, androgen receptors (AR) and AR coactivators can regulate androgen sensitivity of dermal papillae (DP). To regulate hair growth, androgens stimulate production of IGF-1 as positive mediators from beard DP cells and of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, dickkopf1 and IL-6 as negative mediators from balding DP cells. In addition, androgens enhance inducible nitric oxide synthase from occipital DP cells and stem cell factor for positive regulation of hair growth in beard and negative regulation of balding DP cells. Moreover, AGA involves crosstalk between androgen and Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Finally, recent data on susceptibility genes have provided us with the impetus to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of AGA. PMID:23016593

  12. Testosterone enables growth and hypertrophy in fusion impaired myoblasts that display myotube atrophy: deciphering the role of androgen and IGF-I receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David C; Stewart, Claire E; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Dugdale, Hannah F; Yousefian, Farzad; Lewis, Mark P; Sharples, Adam P

    2016-06-01

    We have previously highlighted the ability of testosterone (T) to improve differentiation and myotube hypertrophy in fusion impaired myoblasts that display reduced myotube hypertrophy via multiple population doublings (PD) versus their parental controls (CON); an observation which is abrogated via PI3K/Akt inhibition (Deane et al. 2013). However, whether the most predominant molecular mechanism responsible for T induced hypertrophy occurs directly via androgen receptor or indirectly via IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt pathway is currently debated. PD and CON C2C12 muscle cells were exposed to low serum conditions in the presence or absence of T (100 nM) ± inhibitors of AR (flutamide/F, 40 μm) and IGF-IR (picropodophyllin/PPP, 150 nM) for 72 h and 7 days (early/late muscle differentiation respectively). T increased AR and Akt abundance, myogenin gene expression, and myotube hypertrophy, but not ERK1/2 activity in both CON and PD cell types. Akt activity was not increased significantly in either cell type with T. Testosterone was also unable to promote early differentiation in the presence of IGF-IR inhibitor (PPP) yet still able to promote appropriate later increases in myotube hypertrophy and AR abundance despite IGF-IR inhibition. The addition of the AR inhibitor powerfully attenuated all T induced increases in differentiation and myotube hypertrophy with corresponding reductions in AR abundance, phosphorylated Akt, ERK1/2 and gene expression of IGF-IR, myoD and myogenin with increases in myostatin mRNA in both cell types. Interestingly, despite basally reduced differentiation and myotube hypertrophy, PD cells showed larger T induced increases in AR abundance vs. CON cells, a response abrogated in the presence of AR but not IGF-IR inhibitors. Furthermore, T induced increases in Akt abundance were sustained despite the presence of IGF-IR inhibition in PD cells only. Importantly, flutamide alone reduced IGF-IR mRNA in both cell types across time points, with an observed

  13. Diverse spatial, temporal, and sexual expression of recently duplicated androgen-binding protein genes in Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emes Richard D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genes for salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP subunits have been evolving rapidly in ancestors of the house mouse Mus musculus, as evidenced both by recent and extensive gene duplication and by high ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution rates. This makes ABP an appropriate model system with which to investigate how recent adaptive evolution of paralogous genes results in functional innovation (neofunctionalization. Results It was our goal to find evidence for the expression of as many of the Abp paralogues in the mouse genome as possible. We observed expression of six Abpa paralogues and five Abpbg paralogues in ten glands and other organs located predominantly in the head and neck (olfactory lobe of the brain, three salivary glands, lacrimal gland, Harderian gland, vomeronasal organ, and major olfactory epithelium. These Abp paralogues differed dramatically in their specific expression in these different glands and in their sexual dimorphism of expression. We also studied the appearance of expression in both late-stage embryos and postnatal animals prior to puberty and found significantly different timing of the onset of expression among the various paralogues. Conclusion The multiple changes in the spatial expression profile of these genes resulting in various combinations of expression in glands and other organs in the head and face of the mouse strongly suggest that neofunctionalization of these genes, driven by adaptive evolution, has occurred following duplication. The extensive diversification in expression of this family of proteins provides two lines of evidence for a pheromonal role for ABP: 1 different patterns of Abpa/Abpbg expression in different glands; and 2 sexual dimorphism in the expression of the paralogues in a subset of those glands. These expression patterns differ dramatically among various glands that are located almost exclusively in the head and neck, where the sensory

  14. Natural proteasome inhibitor celastrol suppresses androgen-independent prostate cancer progression by modulating apoptotic proteins and NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Dai

    Full Text Available Celastrol is a natural proteasome inhibitor that exhibits promising anti-tumor effects in human malignancies, especially the androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC with constitutive NF-κB activation. Celastrol induces apoptosis by means of proteasome inhibition and suppresses prostate tumor growth. However, the detailed mechanism of action remains elusive. In the current study, we aim to test the hypothesis that celastrol suppresses AIPC progression via inhibiting the constitutive NF-κB activity as well as modulating the Bcl-2 family proteins.We examined the efficacy of celastrol both in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the role of NF-κB in celastrol-mediated AIPC regression. We found that celastrol inhibited cell proliferation in all three AIPC cell lines (PC-3, DU145 and CL1, with IC₅₀ in the range of 1-2 µM. Celastrol also suppressed cell migration and invasion. Celastrol significantly induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased sub-G1 population, caspase activation and PARP cleavage. Moreover, celastrol promoted cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and activated the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa. In addition, celastrol rapidly blocked cytosolic IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of RelA. Likewise, celastrol inhibited the expression of multiple NF-κB target genes that are involved in proliferation, invasion and anti-apoptosis. Celastrol suppressed AIPC tumor progression by inhibiting proliferation, increasing apoptosis and decreasing angiogenesis, in PC-3 xenograft model in nude mouse. Furthermore, increased cellular IκBα and inhibited expression of various NF-κB target genes were observed in tumor tissues.Our data suggest that, via targeting the proteasome, celastrol suppresses proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis by inducing the apoptotic machinery and attenuating constitutive NF-κB activity in AIPC both in vitro and in vivo. Celastrol as an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine could thus be

  15. Protein: FBB5 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBB5 RNA silencing RAN ARA24 Ran_(biology) GTP-binding nuclear ... protein Ran Androgen receptor-ass ... 24, GTPase Ran, Ras-like protein TC4, Ras-related nuclear ... protein 9606 Homo sapiens P62826 5901 1I2M, 3GJ4, ...

  16. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K. Heather

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  17. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has more than 1000 members and is the largest family of proteins in the body. GPCRs mediate signalling of stimuli as diverse as light, ions, small molecules, peptides and proteins and are the targets for many pharmaceuticals. Most GPCR ligands...... are believed to activate (agonists) or inhibit (competitive antagonists) receptor signalling by binding the receptor at the same site as the endogenous agonist, the orthosteric site. In contrast, allosteric ligands modulate receptor function by binding to different regions in the receptor, allosteric...... outlines the current status and perspectives of allosteric modulation of GPCR function with emphasis on the pharmacology of endogenous and synthesised modulators, their receptor interactions and the therapeutic prospects of allosteric ligands compared to orthosteric ligands....

  18. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    OpenAIRE

    Berrevoets, Cor; P. Doesburg; Steketee, Karine; Trapman, Jan; Brinkmann, Albert

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in this in vivo interaction were determined in more detail. Cotransfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and two-hybrid experiments in yeast revealed that two regions in the NH2-terminal domain are involved in the ...

  19. Heterotrimeric G proteins precouple with G protein-coupled receptors in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nobles, M.; Benians, A.; Tinker, A

    2005-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, we investigate how heterotrimeric G proteins interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the absence of receptor activation, the alpha 2A adrenergic and muscarinic M4 receptors are present on the cell membrane as dimers. Furthermore, there is an interaction between the G protein subunits alpha o, beta 1, and gamma 2 and a number of GPCRs including M4, a2A, the adenosine All receptor, and the dopamine D2 receptor under r...

  20. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  1. The melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandrappa, Shwetha; Gorrigan, Rebecca J.; Clark, Adrian J.L.; Chan, Li F.

    2013-01-01

    The five melanocortin receptors (MCRs) named MC1R–MC5R have diverse physiological roles encompassing pigmentation, steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis and feeding behavior as well as exocrine function. Since their identification almost 20 years ago much has been learnt about these receptors. As well as interacting with their endogenous ligands the melanocortin peptides, there is now a growing list of important peptides that can modulate the way these receptors signal, acting as agonists, anta...

  2. The melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    LiChan

    2013-01-01

    The five melanocortin receptors named MC1R-MC5R have diverse physiological roles encompassing pigmentation, steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis and feeding behaviour as well as exocrine function. Since their identification almost 20 years ago much has been learnt about these receptors. As well as interacting with their endogenous ligands the melanocortin peptides, there is now a growing list of important peptides that can modulate the way these receptors signal, acting as agonists, antagonis...

  3. The G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P;

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor, that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L......, there is increasing evidence that the receptor is involved in regulation of inflammation, metabolism and endocrine functions. GPRC6A could thus be an interesting target for new drugs in these therapeutic areas....

  4. SOCS proteins in regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Kabir, Nuzhat N.; Flores Morales, Amilcar;

    2014-01-01

    signaling mediated by RTKs must be tightly regulated by interacting proteins including protein-tyrosine phosphatases and ubiquitin ligases. The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family proteins are well-known negative regulators of cytokine receptors signaling consisting of eight structurally similar...... proteins, SOCS1-7, and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS). A key feature of this family of proteins is the presence of an SH2 domain and a SOCS box. Recent studies suggest that SOCS proteins also play a role in RTK signaling. Activation of RTK results in transcriptional activation of SOCS......-encoding genes. These proteins associate with RTKs through their SH2 domains and subsequently recruit the E3 ubiquitin machinery through the SOCS box, and thereby limit receptor stability by inducing ubiquitination. In a similar fashion, SOCS proteins negatively regulate mitogenic signaling by RTKs. It is also...

  5. The brominated flame retardants TBP-AE and TBP-DBPE antagonize the chicken androgen receptor and act as potential endocrine disrupters in chicken LMH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnake, Solomon; Pradhan, Ajay; Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Modig, Carina; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-12-01

    Increased exposure of birds to endocrine disrupting compounds has resulted in developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. We have recently identified the flame retardants, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-AE), 2-3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE) and the TBP-DBPE metabolite 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-BAE) as antagonists to both the human androgen receptor (AR) and the zebrafish AR. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether these compounds also interact with the chicken AR. In silico modeling studies showed that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE were able to dock into to the chicken AR ligand-binding pocket. In vitro transfection assays revealed that all three brominated compounds acted as chicken AR antagonists, inhibiting testosterone induced AR activation. In addition, qRT-PCR studies confirmed that they act as AR antagonists and demonstrated that they also alter gene expression patterns of apoptotic, anti-apoptotic, drug metabolizing and amino acid transporter genes. These studies, using chicken LMH cells, suggest that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE are potential endocrine disrupters in chicken. PMID:26318274

  6. Pyridine analogues of curcumin exhibit high activity for inhibiting CWR-22Rv1 human prostate cancer cell growth and androgen receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHOU, DAI-YING; ZHAO, SU-QING; DU, ZHI-YUN; ZHENG, XI; ZHANG, KUN

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations required for curcumin to exert its anticancer activity (IC50, 20 µM) are difficult to achieve in the blood plasma of patients, due to the low bioavailability of the compound. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to the development of curcumin analogues that exhibit stronger anticancer activity and a lower IC50 than curcumin. The present study investigated twelve pyridine analogues of curcumin, labeled as groups AN, BN, EN and FN, to determine their effects in CWR-22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. The inhibitory effects of these compounds on testosterone (TT)-induced androgen receptor (AR) activity was determined by performing an AR-linked luciferase assay and by TT-induced expression of prostate-specific antigen. The results of the current study suggested that the FN group of analogues had the strongest inhibitory effect of growth on CWR-22Rv1 cultured cells, and were the most potent inhibitor of AR activity compared with curcumin, and the AN, BN and EN analogues. Thus, the results of the present study indicate the inhibition of the AR pathways as a potential mechanism for the anticancer effect of curcumin analogues in human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, curcumin analogues with pyridine as a distal ring and tetrahydrothiopyran-4-one as a linker may be good candidates for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer, by targeting the AR signaling pathway. PMID:27313760

  7. A simple screening method for detection of Klinefelter syndrome and other X-chromosome aneuploidies based on copy number of the androgen receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Garn, I D; Aksglaede, L; Juul, A; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2007-01-01

    copy number assessment of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, located to Xq11.2-q12. We analysed samples from 50 individuals, including a healthy male and female controls and patients with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY; 48,XXXY) (n = 28), mosaicisms (46,XX/47,XXY/48XXYY; 45,X/46,XY) (n = 3), other sex...... chromosome abnormalities (46,XX males; 47,XYY)(n = 4) and normal karyotypes (46,XY) (n = 13). The reference range for the AR-copy number was established as 0.8-1.2 for one copy and 1.7-2.3 for two copies. The qPCR results were within the reference range in 17/18 samples (94%) or 30/31 (97%) samples with one...... or two copies of the AR gene, respectively. None of the Klinefelter patients were misdiagnosed as having a karyotype with only one X-chromosome, and in none of the 46,XY males were two copies demonstrated. We systematically compared qPCR results with those obtained with another PCR-based method, the...

  8. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China:a cross-sectional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanMin Ma; DaLin He; KaiJie Wu; Liang Ning; Jin Zeng; Bo Kou; HongJun Xie; ZhenKun Ma; XinYang Wang; YongGuang Gong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and iffty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years) were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAGS) if they harbored repeat length of≤20 or as CAG long (CAGL) if their CAG repeat length was>20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the speciifed physicians;CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method;and the serum levels of the sex hormones were detected by radioimmunoassay. Student’s t-test or linear regression analysis was used to assess the associations among AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length. This investigation showed that the serum total testosterone (T) level was positively associated with the AR CAG repeat length (P= 0.01); whereas, no signiifcant correlation of T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism with the penile length was found (P= 0.593). Interestingly, an inverse association was observed between serum prolactin (PRL) levels and penile length by linear regression analyses (b=-0.024, P= 0.039, 95%conifdence interval (CI):-0.047, 0). Collectively, this study provides the ifrst evidence that serum PRL, but not T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism, is correlated with penile length in the Han adult population from northwestern China.

  9. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a...

  12. Anabolic Androgenic Steroid (AAS) Related Deaths: Autoptic, Histopathological and Toxicological Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Frati, Paola; Busardò, Francesco P.; Cipolloni, Luigi; Dominicis, Enrico De; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) represent a large group of synthetic derivatives of testosterone, produced to maximize anabolic effects and minimize the androgenic ones. AAS can be administered orally, parenterally by intramuscular injection and transdermally. Androgens act by binding to the nuclear androgen receptor (AR) in the cytoplasm and then translocate into the nucleus. This binding results in sequential conformational changes of the receptor affecting the interaction between recep...

  13. Oligomeric forms of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)

    OpenAIRE

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Oligomerization is a general characteristic of cell membrane receptors that is shared by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) together with their G protein partners. Recent studies of these complexes, both in vivo and in purified reconstituted forms, unequivocally support this contention for GPCRs, perhaps with only rare exceptions. As evidence has evolved from experimental cell lines to more relevant in vivo studies and from indirect biophysical approaches to well defined isolated complexes o...

  14. Semiotic Selection of Mutated or Misfolded Receptor Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    contention that the plasma membrane acts as the locus where several contextual cues may be integrated. As such it allows the semiotic selection of those receptor configurations that provide cells with the minimum essential requirements for agency. The occurrence of protein misfolding makes it impossible for...... focused on the significance and semiotic nature of the interplay between membrane receptors and the epigenetic control of gene expression, as mediated by the control of mismatched repairing and protein folding mechanisms....

  15. Serum testosterone levels and androgen receptor CAG polymorphism correlate with hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute liver failure in male HBV carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Yan Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Augmentation of androgen/androgen receptor (AR pathway may influence chronic hepatitis B (CHB more likely in males. AR activity is modulated by a polymorphic CAG repeat sequence in AR exon 1. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum testosterone levels, CAG repeat numbers and hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute liver failure (ALF. METHODS: Three hundred and seventy eight male CHB patients with ALF and 441 asymptomatic HBV carriers (AsCs were recruited. AR CAG repeats numbers were analyzed. The serum testosterone levels of AsCs, ALFs and patients with hepatitis B flare groups, and sequential serum samples, were assessed quantitatively. RESULTS: The median CAG repeat (M-CAG frequency was significantly higher in ALF patients than AsCs (P<0.001. Patients with M-CAG alleles (P<0.001, OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.1-4.2 had the highest risk for ALF. Serum testosterone levels were significantly higher (P<0.001 at hepatitis flare point (8.2 ± 3.0 ng/mL than inactive phase (6.4 ± 2.0 ng/mL. CHB (8.30 ± 2.71 ng/mL, P = 7.6 × 10(-6 and ALF group (2.61 ± 1.83 ng/mL, P = 1.7 × 10(-17 had significantly different levels of testosterone in comparison with AsCs group (6.56 ± 2.36 ng/mL. The serum testosterone levels sharply decreased from hepatitis flare phase to liver failure phase, and tended to be normal at the recovery phase. Male AsCs with M-CAG alleles had significantly lower serum testosterone levels (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: There was a serum testosterone fluctuation during hepatitis B flare and HBV-related ALF, and the median CAG repeats in AR gene exon 1 were associated with lower serum testosterone levels in asymptomatic HBV carriers and an increased susceptibility to HBV-related ALF.

  16. Metabolite Profiling and a Transcriptional Activation Assay Provide Direct Evidence of Androgen Receptor Antagonism by Bisphenol A in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread environmental contamination by bisphenol A (BPA) has created the need to fully define its potential toxic mechanisms of action (MOA) to properly assess human health and ecological risks from exposure. Although long recognized as an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, some ...

  17. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin: A Prospectus

    OpenAIRE

    Filipek, Sławomir; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Teller, David C.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2002-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a retinal photoreceptor protein of bipartite structure consisting of the transmembrane protein opsin and a light-sensitive chromophore 11-cis-retinal, linked to opsin via a protonated Schiff base. Studies on rhodopsin have unveiled many structural and functional features that are common to a large and pharmacologically important group of proteins from the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, of which rhodopsin is the best-studied member. In this work, we focus on struct...

  18. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival in...

  19. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  20. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    <