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Sample records for androgen modulated genes

  1. Neural androgen receptors modulate gene expression and social recognition but not social investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Karlsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of sex and androgen receptors (ARs for social preference and social memory is rather unknown. In this study of mice we compared males, females and males lacking ARs specifically in the nervous system, ARNesDel, with respect to social preference, assessed with the three-chambered apparatus test, and social recognition, assessed with the social discrimination procedure. In the social discrimination test we also evaluated the tentative importance of the sex of the stimulus animal. Novel object recognition and olfaction were investigated to complement the results from the social tests. Gene expression analysis was performed to reveal molecules involved in the effects of sex and androgens on social behaviors. All three test groups showed social preference in the three-chambered apparatus test. In both social tests an AR-independent sexual dimorphism was seen in the persistence of social investigation of female conspecifics, whereas the social interest towards male stimuli mice was similar in all groups. Male and female controls recognized conspecifics independent of their sex, whereas ARNesDel males recognized female but not male stimuli mice. Moreover, the non-social behaviors were not affected by AR deficiency. The gene expression analyses of hypothalamus and amygdala indicated that Oxtr, Cd38, Esr1, Cyp19a1, Ucn3, Crh and Gtf2i were differentially expressed between the three groups. In conclusion, our results suggest that ARs are required for recognition of male but not female conspecifics, while being dispensable for social investigation towards both sexes. In addition, the AR seems to regulate genes related to oxytocin, estrogen and William’s syndrome.

  2. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contributions of differential tissue distribution, tissue-specific expression of 5alpha-reductase, ligand-specific regulation of gene expression and AR interactions with tissue-specific coactivators to their observed tissue selectivity, and lead to even greater expansion of selective anabolic therapies.

  3. Pharmacodynamics of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Donghua; Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D; Xu, Huiping; Chung, Kiwon; He, Yali; Marhefka, Craig A; Veverka, Karen A; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2003-03-01

    The present study aimed to identify selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with in vivo pharmacological activity. We examined the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activity of four chiral, nonsteroidal SARMs synthesized in our laboratories. In the in vitro assays, these compounds demonstrated moderate to high androgen receptor (AR) binding affinity, with K(i) values ranging from 4 to 37 nM, and three of the compounds efficaciously stimulated AR-mediated reporter gene expression. The compounds were then administered subcutaneously to castrated rats to appraise their in vivo pharmacological activity. Androgenic activity was evaluated by the ability of these compounds to maintain the weights of prostate and seminal vesicle, whereas levator ani muscle weight was used as a measure of anabolic activity. The maximal response (E(max)) and dose for half-maximal effect (ED(50)) were determined for each compound and compared with that observed for testosterone propionate (TP). Compounds S-1 and S-4 demonstrated in vivo androgenic and anabolic activity, whereas compounds S-2 and S-3 did not. The activities of S-1 and S-4 were tissue-selective in that both compounds stimulated the anabolic organs more than the androgenic organs. These two compounds were less potent and efficacious than TP in androgenic activity, but their anabolic activity was similar to or greater than that of TP. Neither S-1 nor S-4 caused significant luteinizing hormone or follicle stimulating hormone suppression at doses near the ED(50) value. Thus, compounds S-1 and S-4 were identified as SARMs with potent and tissue-selective in vivo pharmacological activity, and represent the first members of a new class of SARMs with selective anabolic effects.

  4. Enhanced evaluation of selective androgen receptor modulators in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto-Duessel, M; He, M; Adamson, T W; Jones, J O

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a class of drugs that control the activity of the androgen receptor (AR), which mediates the response to androgens, in a tissue-selective fashion. They are specifically designed to reduce the possible complications that result from the systemic inhibition or activation of AR in patients with diseases that involve androgen signalling. However, there are no ideal in vivo models for evaluating candidate SARMs. Therefore, we created a panel of androgen-responsive genes in clinically relevant AR expressing tissues including prostate, skin, bone, fat, muscle, brain and kidney. We used select genes from this panel to compare transcriptional changes in response to the full agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the SARM bolandiol at 16 h and 6 weeks. We identified several genes in each tissue whose expression at each of these time points correlates with the known tissue-specific effects of these compounds. For example, in the prostate we found four genes whose expression was much lower in animals treated with bolandiol compared with animals treated with DHT for 6 weeks, which correlated well with differences in prostate weight. We demonstrate that adding molecular measurements (androgen-regulated gene expression) to the traditional physiological measurements (tissue weights, etc.) makes the evaluation of potential SARMs more accurate, thorough and perhaps more rapid by allowing measurement of selectivity after only 16 h of drug treatment. © 2012 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  5. Transfection of Sertoli cells with androgen receptor alters gene expression without androgen stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietz, D; Markmann, M; Lang, D; Konrad, L; Geyer, J; Kliesch, S; Chakraborty, T; Hossain, H; Bergmann, M

    2015-12-29

    Androgens play an important role for the development of male fertility and gained interest as growth and survival factors for certain types of cancer. Androgens act via the androgen receptor (AR/Ar), which is involved in various cell biological processes such as sex differentiation. To study the functional mechanisms of androgen action, cell culture systems and AR-transfected cell lines are needed. Transfection of AR into cell lines and subsequent gene expression analysis after androgen treatment is well established to investigate the molecular biology of target cells. However, it remains unclear how the transfection with AR itself can modulate the gene expression even without androgen stimulation. Therefore, we transfected Ar-deficient rat Sertoli cells 93RS2 by electroporation using a full length human AR. Transfection success was confirmed by Western Blotting, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. AR transfection-related gene expression alterations were detected with microarray-based genome-wide expression profiling of transfected and non-transfected 93RS2 cells without androgen stimulation. Microarray analysis revealed 672 differentially regulated genes with 200 up- and 472 down-regulated genes. These genes could be assigned to four major biological categories (development, hormone response, immune response and metabolism). Microarray results were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 22 candidate genes. We conclude from our data, that the transfection of Ar-deficient Sertoli cells with AR has a measurable effect on gene expression even without androgen stimulation and cause Sertoli cell damage. Studies using AR-transfected cells, subsequently stimulated, should consider alterations in AR-dependent gene expression as off-target effects of the AR transfection itself.

  6. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    Involution of the rat ventral prostate and concomitant modulation of gene expression post-castration is a well- documented phenomenon. While the rat castration model has been extensively used to study androgen regulation of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression changes ...

  7. Development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Coss, Christopher C; Dalton, James T

    2017-06-15

    The Androgen Receptor (AR), a member of the steroid hormone receptor family, plays important roles in the physiology and pathology of diverse tissues. AR ligands, which include circulating testosterone and locally synthesized dihydrotestosterone, bind to and activate the AR to elicit their effects. Ubiquitous expression of the AR, metabolism and cross reactivity with other receptors limit broad therapeutic utilization of steroidal androgens. However, the discovery of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and other tissue-selective nuclear hormone receptor modulators that activate their cognate receptors in a tissue-selective manner provides an opportunity to promote the beneficial effects of androgens and other hormones in target tissues with greatly reduced unwanted side-effects. In the last two decades, significant resources have been dedicated to the discovery and biological characterization of SARMs in an effort to harness the untapped potential of the AR. SARMs have been proposed as treatments of choice for various diseases, including muscle-wasting, breast cancer, and osteoporosis. This review provides insight into the evolution of SARMs from proof-of-concept agents to the cusp of therapeutic use in less than two decades, while covering contemporary views of their mechanisms of action and therapeutic benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deciphering the selective androgen receptor modulators paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-02-01

    The development and potential clinical use of tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have advanced tremendously over the past few years. A key aspect of SARMs is the ability to clearly differentiate between the anabolic and androgenic activities. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty and hypogonadism. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the current standing of research and development of SARMs and plausible molecular mechanisms underlying the potential for selective modulation of androgen receptor (AR) by different ligands. This paper also provides an update on SARM discovery paradigms for preclinical evaluations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical investigations and initial clinical trials, but long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy studies in patients are still necessary. Preclinically, improving knowledge of tissue selectivity at the molecular level, developing AR selectivity transcription profile, exploring in vitro/in vivo correlation, along with expanding selectivity evaluation among more androgen responsive tissues would accelerate the discovery of a new generation of more selective and safer clinical candidates, minimize false leads and hasten development of effective approaches for an expanded range of clinical conditions.

  9. Modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Bart L; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on significant recent findings regarding modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) interact with androgen receptors (ARs), and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) interact with estrogen receptors (ERs), with variable tissue selectivity. SERMs, which interact with both ERб and ERв in a tissue-specific manner to produce diverse outcomes in multiple tissues, continue to generate significant interest for clinical application. Development of SARMs for clinical application has been slower to date because of potential adverse effects, but these diverse compounds continue to be investigated for use in disorders in which modulation of the AR is important. SARMs have been investigated mostly at the basic and preclinical level to date, with few human clinical trials published. These compounds have been evaluated mostly for application in different stages of prostate cancer to date, but they hold promise for multiple other applications. Publication of the large STAR and RUTH clinical trials demonstrated that the SERMs tamoxifen and raloxifene have interesting similarities and differences in tissues that contain ERs. Lasofoxifene, bazedoxifene, and arzoxifene are newer SERMs that have been demonstrated in clinical trials to more potently increase bone mineral density and lower serum cholesterol values than tamoxifen or raloxifene. Both SARMs and SERMs hold great promise for therapeutic use in multiple disorders in which tissue-specific effects are mediated by their respective receptors.

  10. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs)

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contrib...

  11. Discovery AND Therapeutic Promise OF Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects. PMID:15994457

  12. New selective estrogen and androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Bart L; Khosla, Sundeep

    2009-07-01

    The present review focuses on the most significant recent findings regarding selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). SERMs, which interact with estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta in multiple tissues, continue to generate clinical interest in potential applications in as many disorders as the tissues in which the two known receptors are found. SARMs have been demonstrated to have fewer clinical applications to date, but continue to be investigated for use in multiple disorders in which androgen receptor modulation is likely to be important. Both types of compounds hold great promise for therapeutic use in multiple hormonal disorders involving tissue-specific effects mediated by estrogen or androgen receptors. Although SERMs have been available for clinical use for 50 years, recent investigation has focused on large randomized clinical trials for newer indications of older agents or smaller clinical trials of newer agents with improved clinical activity and reduced side effects in specific tissues. In particular, the large, prospective, randomized, controlled, multiyear Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene and Raloxifene Use in the Heart clinical trials have recently shown interesting similarities and differences between tamoxifen and raloxifene in estrogen-responsive tissues. Lasofoxifene and arzoxifene are two newer SERMs that have recently been demonstrated to improve bone mineral density and lower serum cholesterol values compared with older SERMs in smaller clinical trials. SARMs are a newer category of drug still being investigated mostly at the basic and preclinical level, with fewer clinical trials available for review. SARMs are currently being investigated mostly for use in prostate cancer at different stages but hold promise for multiple other applications. Recent clinical trials indicate that SERMs are useful in treatment of disorders of bone and mineral metabolism and breast cancer

  13. P-glycoprotein increases the efflux of the androgen dihydrotestosterone and reduces androgen responsive gene activity in prostate tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoruk, Matthew N; Giménez-Bonafé, Pepita; Guns, Emma S; Mayer, Lawrence D; Nelson, Colleen C

    2004-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is commonly associated with multi-drug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and the efflux of a broad spectrum of chemicals from the cell, including many chemotherapeutics and certain steroid hormones. The impact of P-gp and mechanisms involved in androgen transport and cellular accumulation within normal and malignant prostate cells remains unclear. Following incubation of LNCaP, PC-3, HeLa, and HeLa FLAG-androgen receptor (AR) cells with (3)H-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) alone and in combination with P-gp inhibitors, PSC-833 and verapamil, we examined the cellular accumulation and efflux of androgens, as well as gene transcriptional response. Our data reveal that the cellular transport and accumulation of DHT is dependent on the expression of functional AR and modulated by P-gp. P-gp over-expression by both transient transfection and aspirin treatment in LNCaP cells showed decreased intracellular DHT accumulation, further suggesting DHT efflux is P-gp regulated. Androgen responsiveness may be modulated by P-gp in prostate cancer cells. The biological consequences of increased P-gp expression are decreased androgen accumulation and a corresponding decrease in androgen-regulated transcriptional activity and PSA gene expression. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 4. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. BALACHANDRAN SARANYA GUNASEKARAN BHAVANI BRINDHA ARUMUGAM MEENA JAYASHANKAR ...

  15. Specific modulation of nongenomic androgen signaling in the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stacy N; Jamnongjit, Michelle; Gill, Arvind; Lutz, Lindsey B; Hammes, Stephen R

    2005-01-01

    Maturation, or meiotic progression, of amphibian oocytes is one of the few physiologically relevant steroid-mediated processes that occurs in the complete absence of transcription from beginning to end. As such, frog oocyte maturation has served as a useful model of nongenomic steroid signaling for many years. Earlier work in Xenopus laevis demonstrated that, although several steroids promoted oocyte maturation in vitro, androgens were the most abundant and potent steroids detected in the serum and ovaries of ovulating frogs. Thus, androgens were likely the primary physiologic regulators of Xenopus oocyte maturation, mediating their actions at least in part via classical androgen receptors expressed in oocytes. The importance of androgens for Xenopus oocyte maturation and ovulation has now been confirmed, as inhibition of androgen production in vivo by blocking CYP17 activity reduced hCG-triggered oocyte maturation and delayed ovulation in female frogs. Taking advantage of the absolute transcription-independence of this androgen-mediated response, selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been characterized that specifically promote genomic versus nongenomic androgen responses. These include androstenediol and estren, which preferentially promote nongenomic signals, as well as R1881 and 19-nortestosterone, which preferentially promote genomic signaling. Interestingly, the SARMs androstenediol and R1881 signal similarly in mouse oocytes, demonstrating the conserved nature of androgen-mediated maturation in vertebrates. These results suggest that SARMs may serve as useful tools for specifically regulating nongenomic androgen signaling both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  17. Selective androgen receptor modulators as function promoting therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2009-05-01

    The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Although steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5alpha-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with androgen receptor (AR) contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand-binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis.

  18. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. J. Genet. ... signal and a C-terminal. Keywords. androgen insensitivity syndrome; androgen receptor; truncation mutation; N-terminal domain; XY sex reversal. .... and an increased risk of gonadal tumour. Mutations in SRY.

  19. Mass spectrometry of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-07-01

    Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are an emerging class of drugs for treatment of various diseases including osteoporosis and muscle wasting as well as the correction of age-related functional decline such as muscle strength and power. Several SARMs, which have advanced to preclinical and clinical trials, are composed of diverse chemical structures including arylpropionamide-, bicyclic hydantoin-, quinoline-, and tetrahydroquinoline-derived nuclei. Since January 2008, SARMs have been categorized as anabolic agents and prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Suitable detection methods for these low-molecular weight drugs were based on mass spectrometric approaches, which necessitated the elucidation of dissociation pathways in order to characterize and identify the target analytes in doping control samples as well as potential metabolic products and synthetic analogs. Fragmentation patterns of representatives of each category of SARMs after electrospray ionization (ESI) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) as well as electron ionization (EI) are summarized. The complexity and structural heterogeneity of these drugs is a daunting challenge for detection methods. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. [Bone and Men's Health. Bone selective androgen receptor modulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Androgen, one of the sex steroid hormones shows various biological activities on the corresponding various tissues. Many efforts to produce novel drug materials maintaining a desired biological activity with an adequate tissue selectivity, which is so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) , are being performed. As one of such efforts, studies on SARMs against bone tissues which possess a significant potential to stimulate a bone formation with reducing undesirable androgenic virilizing activities are in progress all over the world. This review focuses on the research and development activities of such SARMs and discuses their usefulness for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  1. Nonsteroidal Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators Enhance Female Sexual Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Amanda; Hwang, Dong Jin; Duke, Charles B.; He, Yali; Siddam, Anjaiah; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Women experience a decline in estrogen and androgen levels after natural or surgically induced menopause, effects that are associated with a loss of sexual desire and bone mineral density. Studies in our laboratories have shown the beneficial effects of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) in the treatment of osteoporosis and muscle wasting in animal models. A series of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide analogs was synthesized to eval...

  2. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic o...

  3. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) as Function Promoting Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The last decade has witnessed unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Recent Findings While steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5α-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with AR contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. Summary SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis. PMID:19357508

  5. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  6. Comparative safety evaluation of selective androgen receptor modulators and anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seul Min; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) have been in use for decades for the treatment of short stature, severe burns, HIV wasting syndrome, osteoporosis, and anemia. However, their lack of selective effects on certain symptoms and unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties has limited their long-term usage in clinics. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have some advantages over AASs; they are highly specific for androgen receptors, are orally available, and, most importantly, act as strong receptor agonists in skeletal muscle and bone, and as weak agonists or antagonists in androgen-responsive tissues such as the prostate and sebaceous glands. The exact molecular mechanism, however, has not been fully elucidated. This article includes a toxicological review of major AASs, and a comparative safety analysis of major AASs and SARMs in clinical trials to evaluate the therapeutic potential of SARMs. Based on the robust tissue selectivity of SARMs over AASs, they are worth considering as a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of various muscle-wasting diseases.

  7. PTTG1, A novel androgen responsive gene is required for androgen-induced prostate cancer cell growth and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Bo [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Yaqiong [Biobank for Clinical Data and Samples in Pediatric, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100045 (China); Huang, Shengquan; Niu, Xiaohua [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Mao, Zebin [The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Health Science Center, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Xin, Dianqi, E-mail: xin-dianqi@163.com [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Androgens (AR) play an important role in initiation and progression of prostate cancer. It has been shown that AR exert their effects mainly through the androgen-activated AR which binds to androgen response elements (AREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes to regulate the transcription of androgen-responsive genes, thus, identification of AR downstream target gene is critical to understand androgen function in prostate cancer. In this study, our results showed that androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression, which was blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, Casodex. Bioinformatics analysis and experiments using PTTG1 promoter deletion mutants showed that the PTTG1 promoter contains a putative androgen response element (ARE), which localizes in the −851 to −836 region of the promoter. Androgen activated androgen receptor (AR) binding to this ARE was confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Furthermore, Knockdown of PTTG1 expression using short hairpin RNA significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. In addition, we showed PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. These results suggest that PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor and take part in prostate cancer proliferation and metastasis. - Highlights: • Androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression. • Knockdown of PTTG1 expression significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. • PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. • PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor.

  8. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  9. Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators enhance female sexual motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda; Hwang, Dong Jin; Duke, Charles B; He, Yali; Siddam, Anjaiah; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2010-08-01

    Women experience a decline in estrogen and androgen levels after natural or surgically induced menopause, effects that are associated with a loss of sexual desire and bone mineral density. Studies in our laboratories have shown the beneficial effects of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) in the treatment of osteoporosis and muscle wasting in animal models. A series of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide analogs was synthesized to evaluate the effects of B-ring substitutions on in vitro and in vivo pharmacologic activity, especially female sexual motivation. The androgen receptor (AR) relative binding affinities ranged from 0.1 to 26.5% (relative to dihydrotestosterone) and demonstrated a range of agonist activity at 100 nM. In vivo pharmacologic activity was first assessed by using male rats. Structural modifications to the B-ring significantly affected the selectivity of the SARMs, demonstrating that single-atom substitutions can dramatically and unexpectedly influence activity in androgenic (i.e., prostate) and anabolic (i.e., muscle) tissues. (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-(3-fluoro,4-chlorophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-propanamide (S-23) displayed full agonist activity in androgenic and anabolic tissues; however, the remaining SARMs were more prostate-sparing, selectively maintaining the size of the levator ani muscle in castrated rats. The partner-preference paradigm was used to evaluate the effects of SARMs on female sexual motivation. With the exception of two four-halo substituted analogs, the SARMs increased sexual motivation in ovariectomized rats, with potency and efficacy comparable with testosterone propionate. These results indicate that the AR is important in regulating female libido given the nonaromatizable nature of SARMs and it could be a superior alternative to steroidal testosterone preparations in the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

  10. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L; Bohl, Casey E; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, or end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty, and hypogonadism. This review summarizes the current standing of research and development of SARMs, crystallography of AR with SARMs, plausible mechanisms for their action and the potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs.

  11. The long-term outcome of boys with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and a mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas-Herald, A.; S. Bertelloni (Silvano); A. Juul (Anders); J. Bryce (Jillian); Jiang, J.; M. Rodie (Martina); R. Sinnott (Richard); Boroujerdi, M.; Lindhardt Johansen, M.; O. Hiort (Olaf); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin); M.L. Cools (Martine); Guaragna-Filho, G.; Guerra-Junior, G.; N. Weintrob (Naomi); S.E. Hannema (Sabine); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); T. Guran (Tulay); F. Darendeliler (Feyza); A. Nordenström (Anna); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); Acerini, C.; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R.; S.F. Ahmed (Faisal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term

  12. Improving selective androgen receptor modulator discovery and preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeremy Orion

    2009-09-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent a new class of pharmaceuticals that may find wide clinical use. However, selectivity is not understood at the molecular level, which has made the discovery and preclinical evaluation of SARMs difficult. We review the current state of SARM discovery and preclinical evaluation, as well as our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling AR selectivity. We then discuss how increasing our molecular knowledge of AR selectivity will help create better discovery and evaluation methods and lead to a wider array of safer SARMs. The SARM field has advanced rapidly, but without a solid foundation of molecular knowledge to inform discovery and preclinical evaluation methods. The field has also taken a narrow view of selectivity, disregarding many androgen-responsive tissues, which could lead to unforeseen and detrimental side effects with chronic administration of SARMs. An investment in basic research could accelerate the discovery of a new generation of more selective and safer SARMs that could be used to treat an expanded range of clinical conditions.

  13. Nutritional Effect on Androgen-Response Gene Expression and Prostate Tumor Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2001-01-01

    .... The dietary influence on ventral prostate weight does not seem to involve androgen action axis because dietary components did not influence the expression of several androgen-response genes, serum testosterone...

  14. The long and winding road for selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, James T

    2017-10-01

    Numerous selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with differing chemical structures and nearly ideal pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed that are well tolerated and selectively increase lean body mass in humans. However, definitive demonstration of the linkage between lean body mass and physical function in a relevant, large patient population has remained elusive for a SARM. The clinical endpoints serving as their basis of approval have shifted with time and clinical indication and are likely to continue to do so as the field matures with additional safety and efficacy data pertaining to the relationship between lean body mass and physical function, regulatory decisions with SARMs and other agents, and yet unexplored clinical indications. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  16. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  17. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtutman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC. Previously, we reported that Hedgehog (Hh signaling was conditionally activated by androgen deprivation in androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells and here we studied the potential for cross-talk between Hh and androgen signaling activities in androgen deprived and androgen independent (AI prostate cancer cells. Results Treatment of a variety of androgen-deprived or AI prostate cancer cells with the Hh inhibitor, cyclopamine, resulted in dose-dependent modulation of the expression of genes that are regulated by androgen. The effect of cyclopamine on endogenous androgen-regulated gene expression in androgen deprived and AI prostate cancer cells was consistent with the suppressive effects of cyclopamine on the expression of a reporter gene (luciferase from two different androgen-dependent promoters. Similarly, reduction of smoothened (Smo expression with siRNA co-suppressed expression of androgen-inducible KLK2 and KLK3 in androgen deprived cells without affecting the expression of androgen receptor (AR mRNA or protein. Cyclopamine also prevented the outgrowth of AI cells from androgen growth-dependent parental LNCaP cells and suppressed the growth of an overt AI-LNCaP variant whereas supplemental androgen (R1881 restored growth to the AI cells in the presence of cyclopamine. Conversely, overexpression of Gli1 or Gli2 in LNCaP cells enhanced AR-specific gene expression in the absence of androgen. Overexpressed Gli1/Gli2 also enabled parental LNCaP cells to

  18. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. "Topological significance" analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiles from prostate cancer cells reveals key mechanisms of androgen response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaikkalam Vellaichamy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of prostate cancer progression to androgen independence has been extensively studied. Several studies systematically analyzed gene expression profiles in the context of biological networks and pathways, uncovering novel aspects of prostate cancer. Despite significant research efforts, the mechanisms underlying tumor progression are poorly understood. We applied a novel approach to reconstruct system-wide molecular events following stimulation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells with synthetic androgen and to identify potential mechanisms of androgen-independent progression of prostate cancer.We have performed concurrent measurements of gene expression and protein levels following the treatment using microarrays and iTRAQ proteomics. Sets of up-regulated genes and proteins were analyzed using our novel concept of "topological significance". This method combines high-throughput molecular data with the global network of protein interactions to identify nodes which occupy significant network positions with respect to differentially expressed genes or proteins. Our analysis identified the network of growth factor regulation of cell cycle as the main response module for androgen treatment in LNCap cells. We show that the majority of signaling nodes in this network occupy significant positions with respect to the observed gene expression and proteomic profiles elicited by androgen stimulus. Our results further indicate that growth factor signaling probably represents a "second phase" response, not directly dependent on the initial androgen stimulus.We conclude that in prostate cancer cells the proliferative signals are likely to be transmitted from multiple growth factor receptors by a multitude of signaling pathways converging on several key regulators of cell proliferation such as c-Myc, Cyclin D and CREB1. Moreover, these pathways are not isolated but constitute an interconnected network module containing many alternative routes from inputs

  20. Molecular analysis of the androgen-receptor gene in a family with receptor-positive partial androgen insensitivity: an unusual type of intronic mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); S. Ramnarain; M.C. Verleun-Mooijman; D.P.E. Satijn (David); J. Trapman (Jan); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the coding part and the intron-exon boundaries of the androgen-receptor gene of a patient with partial androgen insensitivity, no mutation was found. The androgen receptor of this patient displayed normal ligand-binding parameters and migrated as a

  1. [Hormone replacement Up-to-date. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Current status and their future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kato, Ryuichi; Kobayashi, Koh

    2007-09-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with tissue or organ-specificity are expected for their development. Indeed, they will be widely applied for patients with late onset of hypodonadism and those with prostate cancer who have hormone treatment-induced osteoporosis. SARMs having anabolic action on the bone or muscle but no or weak androgenic action on the prostate will be welcomed in the clinical setting.

  2. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Dogus Murat; Allioli, Nathalie; Decaussin, Myriam; de Bernard, Simon; Ruffion, Alain; Samarut, Jacques; Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) among androgen-regulated genes (ARG) and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely) give rise to cancer. ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens) using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1). By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91) and DLX1 (0.94). We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could be complementary to known genes overexpressed in PCa and included along

  5. Arylisothiocyanato selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dong Jin; Yang, Jun; Xu, Huiping; Rakov, Igor M; Mohler, Michael L; Dalton, James T; Miller, Duane D

    2006-10-01

    A new series of androgen receptor targeted agents (ARTA) was prepared and tested in androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cell lines. These agents were bicalutamide analogs with isothiocyanato substituted B-rings. Also, the linker sulfone of R-bicalutamide was maintained or replaced with several alternative linkages including ether, amine, N-methylamine, thioether, and methylene (in this case the product was a racemic mixture) functional groups at the X-position. To expand the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these arylisothiocyanato AR ligands, B-ring halogenated arylisothiocyanato ligands were also prepared and tested. The arylisothiocyanato AR ligands showed strong binding affinities to AR ranging from 0.6 to 54 nM. Among them, thioether and ether linkages demonstrated high binding affinities (0.6 and 4.6 nM, respectively) and selective cell growth inhibition (approximately 3- to 6-fold) for LNCaP, an androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell line, when compared to the androgen independent prostate cell lines (DU145, PC-3, and PPC-1) and a bladder cell line (TSU-Pr1). However, the ligands were inactive (IC50>100 mM) in a normal monkey kidney cell line (CV-1) that was used as the control for non-specific toxicity.

  6. Tissue Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Increase Pelvic Floor Muscle Mass in Ovariectomized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Sullivan, Ryan D; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Tillmann, Heather; Getzenberg, Robert H; Narayanan, Ramesh

    2017-03-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a prevalent condition, is represented by an involuntary leakage of urine that results, at least in part, from weakened or damaged pelvic floor muscles and is triggered by physical stress. Current treatment options are limited with no oral therapies available. The pelvic floor is rich in androgen receptor and molecules with anabolic activity including selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may serve as therapeutic options for individuals with SUI. In this study, two SARMs (GTx-024 and GTx-027) were evaluated in a post-menopausal animal model in order to determine their effect on pelvic floor muscles. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and their pelvic muscles allowed to regress. The animals were then treated with vehicle or doses of GTx-024 or GTx-027. Animal total body weight, lean body mass, and pelvic floor muscle weights were measured along with the expression of genes associated with muscle catabolism. Treatment with the SARMs resulted in a restoration of the pelvic muscles to the sham-operated weight. Coordinately, the induction of genes associated with muscle catabolism was inhibited. Although a trend was observed towards an increase in total lean body mass in the SARM-treated groups, no significant differences were detected. Treatment of an ovariectomized mouse model with SARMs resulted in an increase in pelvic floor muscles, which may translate to an improvement of symptoms associated with SUI and serves as the basis for evaluating their clinical use. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 640-646, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nutritional Effect on Androgen-Response Gene Expression and Prostate Tumor Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2001-01-01

    ... (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and intraprostatic T and DHT in experimental animals. Thus, high fat diet is likely to modulate the ventral prostate weight via an androgen-independent mechanism...

  8. Screening of bisphenol A, triclosan and paraben analogues as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolšek, Katra; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Sollner Dolenc, Marija

    2015-02-01

    A homeostasis of the glucocorticoid and androgen endocrine system is essential to human health. Their disturbance can lead to various diseases, for example cardiovascular, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, infertility, cancer. Fifteen widely used industrial chemicals that disrupt endocrine activity were selected for evaluation of potential (anti)glucocorticoid and (anti)androgenic activities. The human breast carcinoma MDA-kb2 cell line was utilized for reporter gene assays, since it expresses both the androgen and the glucocorticoid-responsive reporter. Two new antiandrogens, 4,4'-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol) (dBPS) and 4,4'-thiodiphenol (THIO), and two new antiglucocorticoids, bisphenol Z and its analog bis[4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl] sulfone (BHEPS) were identified. Moreover, four new glucocorticoid agonists (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, propyl paraben and bisphenol F) were found. To elucidate the structure-activity relationship of bisphenols, we performed molecular docking experiments with androgen and glucocorticoid receptor. These docking experiments had shown that bulky structures such as BHEPS and bisphenol Z act as antiglucocorticoid, because they are positioned toward helix H12 in the antagonist conformation and could therefore be responsible for H12 conformational change and the switch between agonistic and antagonistic conformation of receptor. On the other hand smaller structures cannot interact with H12. The results of in vitro screening of fifteen industrial chemicals as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities demand additional in vivo testing of these chemicals for formulating any relevant hazard identification to human health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  10. Synthesis of potent, substituted carbazoles as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris P; Bhaket, Pushpal; Muthukaman, Nagarajan; Lyttle, C Richard; Shomali, Maysoun; Gallacher, Kyla; Slocum, Connie; Hattersley, Gary

    2010-12-15

    The synthesis and in vitro binding affinity for a novel series of potent androgen receptor modulators is described. One of the more potent compounds (17, RAD35010) was further characterized in vivo where it restored levator ani weight in castrated male rats to near sham level while having no significant effect on prostate weight. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of androgen metabolism gene polymorphisms with prostate cancer risk and androgen concentrations: Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Douglas K; Chau, Cindy H; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J; Leach, Robin J; Johnson-Pais, Teresa L; Hsing, Ann W; Hoque, Ashraful; Parnes, Howard L; Schenk, Jeannette M; Tangen, Catherine M; Thompson, Ian M; Reichardt, Juergen K V; Figg, William D

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer is highly influenced by androgens and genes. The authors investigated whether genetic polymorphisms along the androgen biosynthesis and metabolism pathways are associated with androgen concentrations or with the risk of prostate cancer or high-grade disease from finasteride treatment. A nested case-control study from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial using data from men who had biopsy-proven prostate cancer (cases) and a group of biopsy-negative, frequency-matched controls was conducted to investigate the association of 51 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 genes of the androgen pathway with overall (total), low-grade, and high-grade prostate cancer incidence and serum hormone concentrations. There were significant associations of genetic polymorphisms in steroid 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1) (reference SNPs: rs3736316, rs3822430, rs1560149, rs248797, and rs472402) and SRD5A2 (rs2300700) with the risk of high-grade prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial; 2 SNPs were significantly associated with an increased risk (SRD5A1 rs472402 [odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.75; Ptrend = .03] and SRD5A2 rs2300700 [odds ratio, 1.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.18; Ptrend = .01]). Eleven SNPs in SRD5A1, SRD5A2, cytochrome P450 family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1), and CYP3A4 were associated with modifying the mean concentrations of serum androgen and sex hormone-binding globulin; and 2 SNPs (SRD5A1 rs824811 and CYP1B1 rs10012; Ptrend cancer risk. Germline genetic variations of androgen-related pathway genes are associated with serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies to examine the functional consequence of novel causal variants are warranted. Cancer 2016;122:2332-2340. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Enhancer RNAs participate in androgen receptor-driven looping that selectively enhances gene activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Fei, Teng; Chen, Yiwen; Li, Tiantian; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Xiaodong; Sun, Tong; Sweeney, Christopher J; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Chen, Shaoyong; Balk, Steven P; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Brown, Myles; Kantoff, Philip W

    2014-05-20

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key factor that regulates the behavior and fate of prostate cancer cells. The AR-regulated network is activated when AR binds enhancer elements and modulates specific enhancer-promoter looping. Kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3), which codes for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), is a well-known AR-regulated gene and its upstream enhancers produce bidirectional enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), termed KLK3e. Here, we demonstrate that KLK3e facilitates the spatial interaction of the KLK3 enhancer and the KLK2 promoter and enhances long-distance KLK2 transcriptional activation. KLK3e carries the core enhancer element derived from the androgen response element III (ARE III), which is required for the interaction of AR and Mediator 1 (Med1). Furthermore, we show that KLK3e processes RNA-dependent enhancer activity depending on the integrity of core enhancer elements. The transcription of KLK3e was detectable and its expression is significantly correlated with KLK3 (R(2) = 0.6213, P enhances AR-dependent gene expression.

  13. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Negatively Regulate Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Growth and Epithelial:Mesenchymal Stem Cell Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Ahn, Sunjoo; Cheney, Misty D.; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Miller, Duane D.; Steiner, Mitchell S.; Dalton, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The androgen receptor (AR) is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75–95% of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and 40–70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide a novel targeted approach to ...

  14. [A potential of selective androgen receptor modulator(SARM)for the therapy of osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Toshihiko

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the drugs, which show anabolic, effect on bone and muscle without stimulating prostate has been developed. They show tissue-specific selective androgen actions and called selective androgen receptor modulators(SARMs). The development of drug targeting bone and muscle in male is very promising as a treatment tool for osteoporosis and sarcopenia in the near future. The clinical study is under going especially in the field of cachexia associated with cancer, but unfortunately there is no drug in the current market at present. The current situation of the development of SARMs will be reviewed.

  15. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogus Murat Altintas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa among androgen-regulated genes (ARG and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely give rise to cancer. METHODS: ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91 and DLX1 (0.94. CONCLUSIONS: We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could

  16. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) negatively regulate triple-negative breast cancer growth and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Ahn, Sunjoo; Cheney, Misty D; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Miller, Duane D; Steiner, Mitchell S; Dalton, James T

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75-95% of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and 40-70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer. Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR) were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action. Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures. 1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer.

  17. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs negatively regulate triple-negative breast cancer growth and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narayanan

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75-95% of estrogen receptor (ER-positive and 40-70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer.Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action.Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures.1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer.

  18. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, YK11, Up-Regulates Osteoblastic Proliferation and Differentiation in MC3T3-E1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsu, Tomofumi; Kusakabe, Taichi; Kato, Keisuke; Inouye, Yoshio; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Kanno, Yuichiro

    2018-01-01

    Androgens are key regulators that play a critical role in the male reproductive system and have anabolic effects on bone mineral density and skeletal muscle mass. We have previously reported that YK11 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) and induces myogenic differentiation and selective gene regulation. In this study, we show that treatment of YK11 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) accelerated cell proliferation and mineralization in MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblast cells. Further, YK11-treated cells increased osteoblast specific differentiation markers, such as osteoprotegerin and osteocalcin, compared to untreated cells. These observations were attenuated by androgen receptor (AR) antagonist treatment. To clarify the effect of YK11, we investigated rapid non-genomic signaling by AR. The phosphorylated Akt protein level was increased by YK11 and DHT treatment, suggesting that YK11 activates Akt-signaling via non-genomic signaling of AR. Because it is known Akt-signaling is a key regulator of androgen-mediated osteoblast differentiation, YK11 has osteogenic activity as well as androgen.

  19. N-Aryl-oxazolidin-2-imine Muscle Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators Enhance Potency through Pharmacophore Reorientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nirschl, Alexandra A.; Zou, Yan; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Sutton, James C.; Simpkins, Ligaya M.; Lupisella, John A.; Kuhns, Joyce E.; Seethala, Ramakrishna; Golla, Rajasree; Sleph, Paul G.; Beehler, Blake C.; Grover, Gary J.; Egan, Donald; Fura, Aberra; Vyas, Viral P.; Li, Yi-Xin; Sack, John S.; Kish, Kevin F.; An, Yongmi; Bryson, James A.; Gougoutas, Jack Z.; DiMarco, John; Zahler, Robert; Ostrowski, Jacek; Hamann, Lawrence G.; (BMS)

    2010-11-09

    A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) scaffold was discovered as a byproduct obtained during synthesis of our earlier series of imidazolidin-2-ones. The resulting oxazolidin-2-imines are among the most potent SARMs known, with many analogues exhibiting sub-nM in vitro potency in binding and functional assays. Despite the potential for hydrolytic instability at gut pH, compounds of the present class showed good oral bioavailability and were highly active in a standard rodent pharmacological model.

  20. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator, NEP28, is efficacious in muscle and brain without serious side effects on prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Kazumasa; Harada, Koichiro; Ichihara, Junji; Takata, Naoko; Takahashi, Yasuhiko; Saito, Koichi

    2013-11-15

    Age-related androgen depletion is known to be a risk factor for various diseases, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that age-related androgen depletion results in accumulation of β-amyloid protein and thereby acts as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Supplemental androgen therapy has been shown to be efficacious in treating osteoporosis and sarcopenia. In addition, studies in animals have demonstrated that androgens can play a protective role against Alzheimer's disease. However, androgen therapy is not used routinely for these indications, because of side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a new class of compounds. SARMs maintain the beneficial effects of androgens on bone and muscle while reducing unwanted side effects. NEP28 is a new SARM exhibiting high selectivity for androgen receptor. To investigate the pharmacological effects of NEP28, we compared the effects on muscle, prostate, and brain with mice that were androgen depleted by orchidectomy and then treated with either placebo, NEP28, dihydrotestosterone, or methyltestosterone. We demonstrated that NEP28 showed tissue-selective effect equivalent to or higher than existing SARMs. In addition, the administration of NEP28 increased the activity of neprilysin, a known Aβ-degrading enzyme. These results indicate that SARM is efficacious for the treatment of not only osteoporosis and sarcopenia, but also Alzheimer's disease. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma, E-mail: dalma@stthomas.edu [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); University of St. Thomas, 2115 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Wang Ronglin [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Villeneuve, Daniel L. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Bencic, David C.; Lazorchak, Jim [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Ankley, Gerald T. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States)

    2011-01-25

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  2. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Brown, T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Pharmacological characterization of an imidazolopyrazole as novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Allan, George F; Tannenbaum, Pamela; Sbriscia, Tifanie; Linton, Olivia; Lai, Muh-Tsann; Haynes-Johnson, Donna; Bhattacharjee, Sheela; Lundeen, Scott G; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgens with tissue-selective activity. SARMs that have anabolic activity on muscle while having minimal stimulatory activity on prostate are classified as SARM agonists. They can be used to prevent the loss of lean body mass that is associated with cancer, immunodeficiency, renal disease and aging. They may also have anabolic activity on bone; thus, unlike estrogens, they may reverse the loss of bone strength associated with aging or hypogonadism. Our in-house effort on SARM program discovers a nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligand with a unique imidazolopyrazole moiety in its structure. In vitro, this compound is a weak androgen receptor binder and a weak androgen agonist. Despite this, in orchidectomized mature rats it is an effective SARM agonist, with an ED(50) on levator ani muscle of 3.3mg/kg and an ED(50) on ventral prostate of >30mg/kg. It has its maximal effect on muscle at the dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, this compound has mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities on prostate, reducing the weight of that tissue in intact rats by 22% at 10mg/kg. The compound does not have significant effect on gonadotropin levels or testosterone levels in both orchidectomized and intact male rats. It does not have notable progestin, estrogen or glucocorticoid agonistic or antagonistic activity in rats. In a female sexual behavior model, it improves the sexual desire of ovariectomized female rats for sexually mature intact males over nonsexually ovariectomized females. Overall, the imidazolopyrazole is a potent prostate-sparing candidate for development as a SARM agonist with an appropriate pharmacological profile for clinical benefit in muscle-wasting conditions and female sexual function disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective androgen receptor modulators for the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Hancock, Michael L; Steiner, Mitchell S; Dalton, James T

    2014-01-01

    Several testosterone preparations are used in the treatment of hypogonadism in the ageing male. These therapies differ in their convenience, flexibility, regional availability and expense but share their pharmacokinetic basis of approval and dearth of long-term safety data. The brevity and relatively reduced cost of pharmacokinetic based registration trials provides little commercial incentive to develop improved novel therapies for the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been shown to provide anabolic benefit in the absence of androgenic effects on prostate, hair and skin. Current clinical development for SARMs is focused on acute muscle wasting conditions with defined clinical endpoints of physical function and lean body mass. Similar regulatory clarity concerning clinical deficits in men with hypogonadism is required before the beneficial pharmacology and desirable pharmacokinetics of SARMs can be employed in the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism. PMID:24407183

  5. Selective androgen receptor modulators for the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Hancock, Michael L; Steiner, Mitchell S; Dalton, James T

    2014-01-01

    Several testosterone preparations are used in the treatment of hypogonadism in the ageing male. These therapies differ in their convenience, flexibility, regional availability and expense but share their pharmacokinetic basis of approval and dearth of long-term safety data. The brevity and relatively reduced cost of pharmacokinetic based registration trials provides little commercial incentive to develop improved novel therapies for the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been shown to provide anabolic benefit in the absence of androgenic effects on prostate, hair and skin. Current clinical development for SARMs is focused on acute muscle wasting conditions with defi ned clinical endpoints of physical function and lean body mass. Similar regulatory clarity concerning clinical deficits in men with hypogonadism is required before the beneficial pharmacology and desirable pharmacokinetics of SARMs can be employed in the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism.

  6. Selective androgen receptor modulators for the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C Coss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several testosterone preparations are used in the treatment of hypogonadism in the ageing male. These therapies differ in their convenience, flexibility, regional availability and expense but share their pharmacokinetic basis of approval and dearth of long-term safety data. The brevity and relatively reduced cost of pharmacokinetic based registration trials provides little commercial incentive to develop improved novel therapies for the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs have been shown to provide anabolic benefit in the absence of androgenic effects on prostate, hair and skin. Current clinical development for SARMs is focused on acute muscle wasting conditions with defi ned clinical endpoints of physical function and lean body mass. Similar regulatory clarity concerning clinical deficits in men with hypogonadism is required before the beneficial pharmacology and desirable pharmacokinetics of SARMs can be employed in the treatment of late onset male hypogonadism.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Katsuji; Miyawaki, Toshio; Hitaka, Takenori; Imai, Yumi N; Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Junichi; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Tasaka, Akihiro; Shiraishi, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-05-15

    To develop effective drugs for hypogonadism, sarcopenia, and cachexia, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that exhibit not only anabolic effects on organs such as muscles and the central nervous system (CNS) but also neutral or antagonistic effects on the prostate. Based on the information obtained from a docking model with androgen receptor (AR), we modified a hit compound A identified through high-throughput screening. Among the prepared compounds, 1-(4-cyano-1-naphthyl)-2,3-disubstituted pyrrolidine derivatives 17h, 17m, and 17j had highly potent AR agonistic activities in vitro and good tissue selectivity in vivo. These derivatives increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without influencing the prostate and seminal vesicle. In addition, these compounds induced sexual behavior in castrated rats, indicating that the compounds could also act as agonists on the CNS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Androgen Modulates Functions of Endothelial Progenitor Cells through Activated Egr1 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhou Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches show that androgens have important effects on migration of endothelial cells and endothelial protection in coronary heart disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs as a progenitor cell type that can differentiate into endothelial cells, have a critical role in angiogenesis and endothelial protection. The relationship between androgen and the functions of EPCs has animated much interest and controversy. In this study, we investigated the angiogenic and migratory functions of EPCs after treatment by dihydrotestosterone (DHT and the molecular mechanisms as well. We found that DHT treatment enhanced the incorporation of EPCs into tubular structures formed by HUVECs and the migratory activity of EPCs in the transwell assay dose dependently. Moreover, microarray analysis was performed to explore how DHT changes the gene expression profiles of EPCs. We found 346 differentially expressed genes in androgen-treated EPCs. Angiogenesis-related genes like Egr-1, Vcan, Efnb2, and Cdk2ap1 were identified to be regulated upon DHT treatment. Furthermore, the enhanced angiogenic and migratory abilities of EPCs after DHT treatment were inhibited by Egr1-siRNA transfection. In conclusion, our findings suggest that DHT markedly enhances the vessel forming ability and migration capacity of EPCs. Egr1 signaling may be a possible pathway in this process.

  9. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BALACHANDRAN SARANYA

    male breast cancer (Wooster et al. 1992) and prostate cancer. (Tilley et al. 1996). The two most important androgens are testosterone and. 5α-dihydrotestosterone, whose actions ..... Among the steroid recep- tors, the AR records the highest density, witnessing more than 600 different mutations leading to AIS (Gottlieb et al.

  10. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...... pedigree segregating AIS, where the molecular analyses of the androgen receptor gene in the family provided evidences that a 25-bp deletion of the DNA-binding domain is causative of this equine syndrome....

  11. Chemical Composition and Labeling of Substances Marketed as Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators and Sold via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Eichner, Amy; Bhasin, Shalender; Deuster, Patricia A; Eichner, Daniel

    2017-11-28

    Recent reports have described the increasing use of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators, which have not been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to enhance appearance and performance. The composition and purity of such products is not known. To determine the chemical identity and the amounts of ingredients in dietary supplements and products marketed and sold through the internet as selective androgen receptor modulators and compare the analyzed contents with product labels. Web-based searches were performed from February 18, 2016, to March 25, 2016, using the Google search engine on the Chrome and Internet Explorer web browsers to identify suppliers selling selective androgen receptor modulators. The products were purchased and the identities of the compounds and their amounts were determined from April to August 2016 using chain-of-custody and World Anti-Doping Association-approved analytical procedures. Analytical findings were compared against the label information. Products marketed and sold as selective androgen receptor modulators. Chemical identities and the amount of ingredients in each product marketed and sold as selective androgen receptor modulators. Among 44 products marketed and sold as selective androgen receptor modulators, only 23 (52%) contained 1 or more selective androgen receptor modulators (Ostarine, LGD-4033, or Andarine). An additional 17 products (39%) contained another unapproved drug, including the growth hormone secretagogue ibutamoren, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ agonist GW501516, and the Rev-ErbA agonist SR9009. Of the 44 tested products, no active compound was detected in 4 (9%) and substances not listed on the label were contained in 11 (25%). In only 18 of the 44 products (41%), the amount of active compound in the product matched that listed on the label. The amount of the compounds listed on the label differed substantially from that found by analysis in 26 of 44 products

  12. Microarray analysis of androgen-regulated gene expression in testis: the use of the androgen-binding protein (ABP-transgenic mouse as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Gail

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is an androgen-dependent process, yet the molecular mechanisms of androgens' actions in testis are poorly understood. Transgenic mice overexpressing rat androgen-binding protein (ABP in their testes have reduced levels of intratesticular androgens and, as a result, show a progressive impairment of spermatogenesis. We used this model to characterize changes in global gene expression in testis in response to reduced bioavailability of androgens. Methods Total RNA was extracted from testes of 30-day old transgenic and wild-type control mice, converted to cRNA, labeled with biotin, and hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray results were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Three-hundred-eighty-one genes (3.05% of all transcripts represented on the chips were up-regulated and 198 genes (1.59% were down-regulated by at least a factor of 2 in the androgen-deficient animals compared to controls. Genes encoding membrane proteins, intracellular signaling molecules, enzymes, proteins participating in the immune response, and those involved in cytoskeleton organization were significantly overrepresented in the up-regulated group. Among the down-regulated transcripts, those coding for extracellular proteins were overrepresented most dramatically, followed by those related to proteolysis, cell adhesion, immune response, and growth factor, cytokine, and ion channel activities. Transcripts with the greatest potential impact on cellular activities included several transcription factors, intracellular signal transducers, secreted signaling molecules and enzymes, and various cell surface molecules. Major nodes in the up-regulated network were IL-6, AGT, MYC, and A2M, those in the down-regulated network were IL-2, -4, and -10, MAPK8, SOCS1, and CREB1. Conclusion Microarray analysis followed by gene ontology profiling and connectivity analysis identified several functional

  13. Selective androgen receptor modulators: comparative excretion study of bicalutamide in bovine urine and faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Dante; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Cesbron, Nora; Penot, Mylène; Sydor, Alexandre; Prévost, Stéphanie; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2017-07-01

    Besides their development for therapeutic purposes, non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (non-steroidal SARMs) are also known to impact growth-associated pathways as ligands of androgenic receptors (AR). They present a potential for abuse in sports and food-producing animals as an interesting alternative to anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). These compounds are easily available and could therefore be (mis)used in livestock production as growth promoters. To prevent such practices, dedicated analytical strategies should be developed for specific and sensitive detection of these compounds in biological matrices. The present study focused on Bicalutamide, a non-steroidal SARM used in human treatment of non-metastatic prostate cancer because of its anti-androgenic activity exhibiting no anti-anabolic effects. To select the most appropriate matrix to be used for control purposes, different animal matrices (urine and faeces) have been investigated and SARM metabolism studied to highlight relevant metabolites of such treatments and establish associated detection time windows. The aim of this work was thus to compare the urinary and faecal eliminations of bicalutamide in a calf, and investigate phase I and II metabolites. The results in both matrices showed that bicalutamide was very rapidly and mainly excreted under its free form. The concentration levels were observed as higher in faeces (ppm) than urine (ppb); although both matrices were assessed as suitable for residue control. The metabolites found were consistent with hydroxylation (phase I reaction) combined or not with glucuronidation and sulfation (phase II reactions). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...

  15. A Study of the androgen receptor gene polymorphism and the level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in androgenetic alopecia. INTRODUCTION. Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common cause of hair loss in both men and women. In men, it is often referred to as male-pattern baldness; a common form of scalp hair loss that af- fects most males by old age1. The con- dition can ...

  16. A Study of the androgen receptor gene polymorphism and the level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) occurs in men and women. The nature of the genetic predisposition to androgenetic alopecia is still unresolved. The aim of the work is to study the genotype of the androgen receptor gene (StuI polymorphism) and its relationship to AGA in a case control study and to determine the ...

  17. Selective androgen receptor modulators for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting associated with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, James T; Taylor, Ryan P; Mohler, Michael L; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2013-12-01

    This review highlights selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) as emerging agents in late-stage clinical development for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting associated with cancer. Muscle wasting, including a loss of skeletal muscle, is a cancer-related symptom that begins early in the progression of cancer and affects a patient's quality of life, ability to tolerate chemotherapy, and survival. SARMs increase muscle mass and improve physical function in healthy and diseased individuals, and potentially may provide a new therapy for muscle wasting and cancer cachexia. SARMs modulate the same anabolic pathways targeted with classical steroidal androgens, but within the dose range in which expected effects on muscle mass and function are seen androgenic side-effects on prostate, skin, and hair have not been observed. Unlike testosterone, SARMs are orally active, nonaromatizable, nonvirilizing, and tissue-selective anabolic agents. Recent clinical efficacy data for LGD-4033, MK-0773, MK-3984, and enobosarm (GTx-024, ostarine, and S-22) are reviewed. Enobosarm, a nonsteroidal SARM, is the most well characterized clinically, and has consistently demonstrated increases in lean body mass and better physical function across several populations along with a lower hazard ratio for survival in cancer patients. Completed in May 2013, results for the Phase III clinical trials entitled Prevention and treatment Of muscle Wasting in patiEnts with Cancer1 (POWER1) and POWER2 evaluating enobosarm for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer will be available soon, and will potentially establish a SARM, enobosarm, as the first drug for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in cancer patients.

  18. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    -29 years, who matched the background population as regards body mass index, chronic disease, medication, physical activity, smoking, and sociodemographic parameters. Genotyping was performed in 767 men, whole body DXA in 783 men, and MRI in 406 consecutively included men. Main Outcome Measures: Six......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake......Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine...

  19. PCA3 noncoding RNA is involved in the control of prostate-cancer cell survival and modulates androgen receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Gimba, Etel Rodrigues Pereira; Palumbo, Antonio; Mello, Kivvi Duarte de; Sternberg, Cinthya; Caetano, Mauricio S; Oliveira, Felipe Leite de; Neves, Adriana Freitas; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    PCA3 is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) that is highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but its functional role is unknown. To investigate its putative function in PCa biology, we used gene expression knockdown by small interference RNA, and also analyzed its involvement in androgen receptor (AR) signaling. LNCaP and PC3 cells were used as in vitro models for these functional assays, and three different siRNA sequences were specifically designed to target PCA3 exon 4. Transfected cells were analyzed by real-time qRT-PCR and cell growth, viability, and apoptosis assays. Associations between PCA3 and the androgen-receptor (AR) signaling pathway were investigated by treating LNCaP cells with 100 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and with its antagonist (flutamide), and analyzing the expression of some AR-modulated genes (TMPRSS2, NDRG1, GREB1, PSA, AR, FGF8, CdK1, CdK2 and PMEPA1). PCA3 expression levels were investigated in different cell compartments by using differential centrifugation and qRT-PCR. LNCaP siPCA3-transfected cells significantly inhibited cell growth and viability, and increased the proportion of cells in the sub G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and the percentage of pyknotic nuclei, compared to those transfected with scramble siRNA (siSCr)-transfected cells. DHT-treated LNCaP cells induced a significant upregulation of PCA3 expression, which was reversed by flutamide. In siPCA3/LNCaP-transfected cells, the expression of AR target genes was downregulated compared to siSCr-transfected cells. The siPCA3 transfection also counteracted DHT stimulatory effects on the AR signaling cascade, significantly downregulating expression of the AR target gene. Analysis of PCA3 expression in different cell compartments provided evidence that the main functional roles of PCA3 occur in the nuclei and microsomal cell fractions. Our findings suggest that the ncRNA PCA3 is involved in the control of PCa cell survival, in part through modulating AR signaling, which may raise new

  20. Mechanism of the tissue-specific action of the selective androgen receptor modulator S-101479.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ohyabu, Yuki; Morikyu, Teruyuki; Ishige, Hirohide; Albers, Michael; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) comprise a new class of molecules that induce anabolic effects with fewer side effects than those of other anabolic agents. We previously reported that the novel SARM S-101479 had a tissue-selective bone anabolic effect with diminished side effects in female animals. However, the mechanism of its tissue selectivity is not well known. In this report, we show that S-101479 increased alkaline phosphatase activity and androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cell lines in the same manner as the natural androgen ligand dihydrotestosterone (DHT); conversely, stimulation of AR dimerization was very low compared with that of DHT (34.4%). S-101479 increased bone mineral content in ovariectomized rats without promoting endometrial proliferation. Yeast two-hybrid interaction assays revealed that DHT promoted recruitment of numerous cofactors to AR such as TIF2, SRC1, β-catenin, NCoA3, gelsolin and PROX1 in a dose-dependent manner. SARMs induced recruitment of fewer cofactors than DHT; in particular, S-101479 failed to induce recruitment of canonical p160 coactivators such as SRC1, TIF2 and notably NCoA3 but only stimulated binding of AR to gelsolin and PROX1. The results suggest that a full capability of the AR to dimerize and to effectively and unselectively recruit all canonical cofactors is not a prerequisite for transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cells and resulting anabolic effects in bone tissues. Instead, few relevant cofactors might be sufficient to promote AR activity in these tissues.

  1. Update of the human secretoglobin (SCGB gene superfamily and an example of 'evolutionary bloom' of androgen-binding protein genes within the mouse Scgb gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The secretoglobins (SCGBs comprise a family of small, secreted proteins found in animals exclusively of mammalian lineage. There are 11 human SCGB genes and five pseudogenes. Interestingly, mice have 68 Scgb genes, four of which are highly orthologous to human SCGB genes; the remainder represent an 'evolutionary bloom' and make up a large gene family represented by only six counterparts in humans. SCGBs are found in high concentrations in many mammalian secretions, including fluids of the lung, lacrimal gland, salivary gland, prostate and uterus. Whereas the biological activities of most individual SCGBs have not been fully characterised, what already has been discovered suggests that this family has an important role in the modulation of inflammation, tissue repair and tumorigenesis. In mice, the large Scgb1b and Scgb2b gene families encode the androgen-binding proteins, which have been shown to play a role in mate selection. Although much has been learned about SCGBs in recent years, clearly more research remains to be done to allow a better understanding of the roles of these proteins in human health and disease. Such information is predicted to reveal valuable novel drug targets for the treatment of inflammation, as well as designing biomarkers that might identify tissue damage or cancer.

  2. Development of a selective androgen receptor modulator for transdermal use in hypogonadal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V; Patel, N J; Mackrell, J G; Sweetana, S A; Bullock, H; Ma, Y L; Waterhouse, T H; Yaden, B C; Henck, J; Zeng, Q Q; Gavardinas, K; Jadhav, P; Saeed, A; Garcia-Losada, P; Robins, D A; Benson, C T

    2018-03-12

    We have identified a non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM), termed LY305, that is bioavailable through a transdermal route of administration while highly cleared via hepatic metabolism to limit parent compound exposure in the liver. Selection of this compound and its transdermal formulation was based on the optimization of skin absorption properties using both in vitro and in vivo skin models that supported PBPK modeling for human PK predictions. This molecule is an agonist in perineal muscle while being a weak partial agonist in the androgenic tissues such as prostate. When LY305 was tested in animal models of skeletal atrophy it restored the skeletal muscle mass through accelerated repair. In a bone fracture model, LY305 remained osteoprotective in the regenerating tissue and void of deleterious effects. Finally, in a small cohort of healthy volunteers, we assessed the safety and tolerability of LY305 when administered transdermally. LY305 showed a dose-dependent increase in serum exposure and was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Notably, there were no statistically significant changes to hematocrit or HDL after 4-week treatment period. Collectively, LY305 represents a first of its kind de novo development of a non-steroidal transdermal SARM with unique properties which could find clinical utility in hypogonadal men. © 2018 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  3. Structural elucidation of major selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) metabolites for doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neeraj; Hansson, Annelie; Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D; Thevis, Mario; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael; Globisch, Daniel

    2018-01-31

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a class of androgen receptor drugs, which have a high potential to be performance enhancers in human and animal sports. Arylpropionamides are one of the major SARM classes and get rapidly metabolized significantly complicating simple detection of misconduct in blood or urine sample analysis. Specific drug-derived metabolites are required as references due to a short half-life of the parent compound but are generally lacking. The difficulty in metabolism studies is the determination of the correct regio and stereoselectivity during metabolic conversion processes. In this study, we have elucidated and verified the chemical structure of two major equine arylpropionamide-based SARM metabolites using a combination of chemical synthesis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. These synthesized SARM-derived metabolites can readily be utilized as reference standards for routine mass spectrometry-based doping control analysis of at least three commonly used performance-enhancing drugs to unambigously identify misconduct.

  4. Potent, nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) based on 8H-[1,4]oxazino[2,3-f]quinolin-8-ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Robert I; Thompson, Anthony W; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Caferro, Thomas R; Cummings, Marquis L; Deckhut, Charlotte P; Adams, Mark E; Tegley, Christopher M; Edwards, James P; López, Francisco J; Kallel, E Adam; Karanewsky, Donald S; Schrader, William T; Marschke, Keith B; Zhi, Lin

    2007-10-01

    A series of androgen receptor modulators based on 8H-[1,4]oxazino[2,3-f]quinolin-8-ones was synthesized and evaluated in an androgen receptor transcriptional activation assay. The most potent analogues from the series exhibited single-digit nanomolar potency in vitro. Compound 18h demonstrated full efficacy in the maintenance of muscle weight, at 10 mg/kg, with reduced activity in prostate weight in an in vivo model of androgen action.

  5. BA321, a novel carborane analog that binds to androgen and estrogen receptors, acts as a new selective androgen receptor modulator of bone in male mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kenta [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Cooperative Major in Advanced Health Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hirata, Michiko [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tominari, Tsukasa [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Global Innovation Research, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsumoto, Chiho [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Endo, Yasuyuki [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1, Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 981-8558 (Japan); Murphy, Gillian [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Institute, Li Ka Shing Centre, Cambridge, CB2 0RE (United Kingdom); Nagase, Hideaki [Institute of Global Innovation Research, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7FY (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-09

    Carboranes are a class of carbon-containing polyhedral boron cluster compounds with globular geometry and hydrophobic surface that interact with hormone receptors such as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). We have synthesized BA321, a novel carborane compound, which binds to AR. We found here that it also binds to ERs, ERα and ERβ. In orchidectomized (ORX) mice, femoral bone mass was markedly reduced due to androgen deficiency and BA321 restored bone loss in the male, whilst the decreased weight of seminal vesicle in ORX mice was not recovered by administration of BA321. In female mice, BA321 acts as a pure estrogen agonist, and restored both the loss of bone mass and uterine atrophy due to estrogen deficiency in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In bone tissues, the trabecular bone loss occurred in both ORX and OVX mice, and BA321 completely restored the trabecular bone loss in both sexes. Cortical bone loss occurred in ORX mice but not in OVX mice, and BA321 clearly restored cortical bone loss due to androgen deficiency in ORX mice. Therefore, BA321 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that may offer a new therapy option for osteoporosis in the male. - Highlights: • A novel carborane compound BA321 binds to both AR and ERs, ERα and ERβ. • BA321 restores bone loss in orchidectomized mice without effects on sex organ. • BA321 acts as an estrogen agonist in bone and uterus in ovariectomized mice. • BA321 may be a new SARM to prevent the loss of musculoskeletal mass in elder men.

  6. Synthesis of potent and tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs): 2-(2,2,2)-Trifluoroethyl-benzimidazole scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Raymond A; Lanter, James C; Alford, Vernon C; Allan, George F; Sbriscia, Tifanie; Lundeen, Scott G; Sui, Zhihua

    2007-03-15

    The synthesis and in vivo SAR of 2-(2,2,2)-trifluoroethyl-benzimidazoles are described. Prostate antagonism and/or levator ani agonism can be modulated by varying the substitution at the 2-position of 5,6-dichloro-benzimidazoles. Potent androgen agonists on the muscle were discovered that strongly bind to the androgen receptor (2-17 nM) and show potent in vivo efficacy (0.03-0.11 mg/day). True SARMs showing both prostate antagonism and levator ani agonism were revealed.

  7. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  8. Anti-androgenic effects of S-40542, a novel non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejishima, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Suzuki, Mika; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Nagata, Naoya; Yamada, Shizuo

    2012-10-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) would provide alternative therapeutic agent for androgen-related diseases. We identified a tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) derivative, 1-(8-nitro-3a, 4, 5, 9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-4-yl) ethane-1, 2-diol (S-40542) as a novel SARM antagonist. Affinity for nuclear receptors of S-40542 was evaluated in receptor-binding studies. Androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity of S-40542 was investigated by luciferase reporter assay in DU145AR cells. Normal and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) model rats were repeatedly treated with S-40542 and flutamide. The tissue weights of prostate and levator ani muscle as well as blood levels of testosterone and luteinizing hormone were measured. S-40542 bound to the AR with high affinity. S-40542 at relatively high concentrations increased the transcriptional activity. This agent also showed a concentration-dependent AR antagonistic action in the presence of 1 nM 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Repeated treatment with S-40542 and flutamide decreased dose-dependently the weights of the prostate to a similar extent. In contrast, the tissue weight-reducing effect by S-40542 treatment on the levator ani muscle was much weaker than that of flutamide. S-40542 had little effect on the blood level of testosterone and luteinizing hormone, whereas flutamide increased the level of both hormones. Furthermore, S-40542 decreased dose-dependently prostate weight of BPH rats. The current results indicate that S-40542 possesses the prostate-selective SARM activity, suggestive of clinical benefit against benign prostate hyperplasia. THQ compounds may be useful for the research of mode of action of SARMs and for the development of safe SARM antagonists. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Testosterone increases renal anti-aging klotho gene expression via the androgen receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Che; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Shih, Meng-Fu; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2014-12-01

    Gender is known to be associated with longevity and oestrogen administration induced longevity-associated gene expression is one of the potential mechanisms underlying the benefits of oestrogen on lifespan, whereas the role of testosterone in the regulation of longevity-associated gene expressions remains largely unclear. The klotho gene, predominantly expressed in the kidney, has recently been discovered to be an aging suppressor gene. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory effects of testosterone on renal klotho gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In testosterone-administered mouse kidney and NRK-52E cells, increased klotho expression was accompanied by the up-regulation of the nuclear androgen receptor (AR). Overexpression of AR enhanced the expression of klotho mRNA and protein. Conversely, testosterone-induced klotho expression was attenuated in the presence of flutamide, an AR antagonist. A reporter assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that AR directly binds to the klotho promoter via androgen response elements (AREs) which reconfirmed its importance for AR binding via the element mutation. In summary, our study demonstrates that testosterone up-regulates anti-aging klotho together with AR expression in the kidney in vivo and in vitro by recruiting AR on to the AREs of the klotho promoter.

  10. The association between inflammation-related genes and serum androgen levels in men: The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tamra E.; Chu, Lisa W.; Li, Qizhai; Yu, Kai; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Menashe, Idan; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Quraishi, Sabah M.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Weiss, Jocelyn M.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Hayes, Richard B.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hsing, Ann W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Androgens and inflammation have been implicated in the etiology of several cancers, including prostate cancer. Serum androgens have been shown to correlate with markers of inflammation and expression of inflammation-related genes. METHODS In this report, we evaluated associations between 9,932 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) marking common genetic variants in 774 inflammation-related genes and four serum androgen levels (total testosterone [T], bioavailable T [BioT]; 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol glucuronide [3αdiol G], and 4-Androstene-3,17-dione [androstenedione]), in 560 healthy men (median age 64 years) drawn from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Baseline serum androgens were measured by radioimmunoassay. Genotypes were determined as part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility Study genome-wide scan. SNP-hormone associations were evaluated using linear regression of hormones adjusted for age. Gene-based p-values were generated using an adaptive rank truncated product method. RESULTS Suggestive associations were observed for two inflammation-related genes and circulating androgen levels (false discovery rate [FDR] q-valueT in MMP2 and rs3822356T>C in CD14 (FDR q-value=0.09 for both SNPs). Other genes implicated in either SNP or gene-based tests were IK with T and BioT, PRG2 with T, and TNFSF9 with androstenedione. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest possible cross-talk between androgen levels and inflammation pathways, but larger studies are needed to confirm these findings and to further clarify the interrelationship between inflammation and androgens and their effects on cancer risk. PMID:21520164

  11. Discovery of the selective androgen receptor modulator MK-0773 using a rational development strategy based on differential transcriptional requirements for androgenic anabolism versus reproductive physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Kimmel, Donald B; Bai, Chang; Scafonas, Angela; Rutledge, Sujane; Vogel, Robert L; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Chen, Fang; Nantermet, Pascale V; Kasparcova, Viera; Leu, Chih-Tai; Zhang, Hai-Zhuan; Duggan, Mark E; Gentile, Michael A; Hodor, Paul; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Opas, Evan E; Adamski, Sharon A; Cusick, Tara E; Wang, Jiabing; Mitchell, Helen J; Kim, Yuntae; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Perkins, James J; Meissner, Robert S; Hartman, George D; Freedman, Leonard P; Harada, Shun-ichi; Ray, William J

    2010-05-28

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgen receptor (AR) ligands that induce anabolism while having reduced effects in reproductive tissues. In various experimental contexts SARMs fully activate, partially activate, or even antagonize the AR, but how these complex activities translate into tissue selectivity is not known. Here, we probed receptor function using >1000 synthetic AR ligands. These compounds produced a spectrum of activities in each assay ranging from 0 to 100% of maximal response. By testing different classes of compounds in ovariectomized rats, we established that ligands that transactivated a model promoter 40-80% of an agonist, recruited the coactivator GRIP-1 SARMs were synthesized including MK-0773, a 4-aza-steroid that exhibited tissue selectivity in humans. Thus, AR activated to moderate levels due to reduced cofactor recruitment, and N-/C-terminal interactions produce a fully anabolic response, whereas more complete receptor activation is required for reproductive effects. This bimodal activation provides a molecular basis for the development of SARMs.

  12. Discovery of the Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator MK-0773 Using a Rational Development Strategy Based on Differential Transcriptional Requirements for Androgenic Anabolism Versus Reproductive Physiology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Kimmel, Donald B.; Bai, Chang; Scafonas, Angela; Rutledge, SuJane; Vogel, Robert L.; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Chen, Fang; Nantermet, Pascale V.; Kasparcova, Viera; Leu, Chih-tai; Zhang, Hai-Zhuan; Duggan, Mark E.; Gentile, Michael A.; Hodor, Paul; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Opas, Evan E.; Adamski, Sharon A.; Cusick, Tara E.; Wang, Jiabing; Mitchell, Helen J.; Kim, Yuntae; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Perkins, James J.; Meissner, Robert S.; Hartman, George D.; Freedman, Leonard P.; Harada, Shun-ichi; Ray, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgen receptor (AR) ligands that induce anabolism while having reduced effects in reproductive tissues. In various experimental contexts SARMs fully activate, partially activate, or even antagonize the AR, but how these complex activities translate into tissue selectivity is not known. Here, we probed receptor function using >1000 synthetic AR ligands. These compounds produced a spectrum of activities in each assay ranging from 0 to 100% of maximal response. By testing different classes of compounds in ovariectomized rats, we established that ligands that transactivated a model promoter 40–80% of an agonist, recruited the coactivator GRIP-1 SARMs were synthesized including MK-0773, a 4-aza-steroid that exhibited tissue selectivity in humans. Thus, AR activated to moderate levels due to reduced cofactor recruitment, and N-/C-terminal interactions produce a fully anabolic response, whereas more complete receptor activation is required for reproductive effects. This bimodal activation provides a molecular basis for the development of SARMs. PMID:20356837

  13. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 16-substituted 4-azasteroids as tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Helen J; Dankulich, William P; Hartman, George D; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Schmidt, Azriel; Vogel, Robert L; Bai, Chang; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Zhang, Hai Z; Chen, Fang; Leu, Chih-Tai; Kimmel, Donald B; Ray, William J; Nantermet, Pascale; Gentile, Michael A; Duggan, Mark E; Meissner, Robert S

    2009-08-13

    A novel series of 16-substituted-4-azasteroids has been identified as potential tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators. These ligands display potent hAR binding and agonist activity, low virilizing potential, and good pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs. On the basis of its in vitro profile, 21 was evaluated in the OVX and ORX rat models and exhibited an osteoanabolic, tissue-selective profile.

  14. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... that the method can be applied to modulating the expression of native genes on the chromosome. We constructed a series of strains in which the expression of the las operon, containing the genes pfk, pyk, and ldh, was modulated by integrating a truncated copy of the pfk gene. Importantly, the modulation affected...

  15. Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butovskaya, Marina L.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Vasilyev, Vasiliy A.; Dronova, Daria A.; Karelin, Dmitri V.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Shibalev, Dmitri V.; Shackelford, Todd K.; Fink, Bernhard; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)—the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17–70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born. PMID:26291982

  16. Inhibition of Androgen-Independent Growth of Prostate Cancer by siRNA- Mediated Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    mediated shift of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing and antineoplastic agents. J Biol Chem 2002;277:49374–82. 39. Wright ME, Tsai MJ, Aebersold R. Androgen receptor...two orders of magnitude better than nanowire arrays, but these assays require extensive labeling and mul- tiple chemical and biochemical manipulations

  17. The fungus Cunninghamella elegans can produce human and equine metabolites of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydevik, Axel; Thevis, Mario; Krug, Oliver; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2013-05-01

    1. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a group of substances that have potential to be used as doping agents in sports. Being a relatively new group not available on the open market means that no reference materials are commercially available for the main metabolites. In the presented study, the in vitro metabolism of SARMs by the fungus Cunninghamella elegans has been investigated with the purpose of finding out if it can produce relevant human and equine metabolites. 2. Three different SARMs, S1, S4 and S24, were incubated for 5 days with C. elegans. The samples were analysed both with and without sample pretreatment using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. 3. All the important phase I and some phase II metabolites from human and horse were formed by the fungus. They were formed through reactions such as hydroxylation, deacetylation, O-dephenylation, nitro-reduction, acetylation and sulfonation. 4. The study showed that the fungus produced relevant metabolites of the SARMs and thus can be used to mimic mammalian metabolism. Furthermore, it has the potential to be used for future production of reference material.

  18. GGC and StuI polymorphism on the androgen receptor gene in endometrial cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masahiro; Karube, Akihiro; Karube, Yuko; Watari, Michiko; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2005-01-01

    Androgens have an anti-proliferative effect on endometrial cells. Human androgen receptor (AR) gene contains two polymorphic short tandem repeats of GGC and CAG, and a single-nucleotide polymorphism on exon 1 that is recognized by the restriction enzyme, StuI. Prior studies have shown that the lengths of the CAG repeat are inversely and linearly related to AR activity and associated with endometrial cancer. However, little is known about the GGC repeat and the StuI polymorphism of the AR gene. Thus, we investigated whether these AR polymorphisms are risk factors for endometrial cancer. To test this hypothesis, the genetic distributions of these polymorphisms were investigated in blood samples from endometrial cancer patients and healthy controls. The allelic and genotyping profiles were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and direct DNA sequencing, and analyzed statistically. The GGC repeat was significantly longer in endometrial cancer patients as compared to normal healthy controls. In general, an increased risk of endometrial cancer was found with increasing GGC repeat. The relative risk for the 17 GGC repeat was greater than 4, as compared to controls. However, the StuI polymorphism was not significantly different between patients and controls. The findings suggest that increased numbers of GGC repeat on the AR gene may be a risk factor for endometrial cancer

  19. Gene expression changes in rat prostate after activation or blocking of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Dalgaard, Majken; Holst, Bjørn

    2005-01-01

    responsive genes (complement C3, ER alpha, ER beta, AR, TRPM-2, PBPC3, ODC, and IGF-1 mRNA) was analyzed in rat ventral prostate by real time RT-PCR. Administration of estradiol benzoate (EB) to castrated testosterone-treated rats had no effect on reproductive organ weights or gene expression levels...... and the anti-estrogen, ICI 182780, only affected ODC expression. Therefore, estrogenic or anti-estrogenic compounds would not be expected to seriously affect the outcome of a Hershberger test. However, EB given alone to castrated rats resulted in various effects. EB increased seminal vesicle weight, an effect....... These data indicate that estrogens have various effects in castrated male rats and that expression of several genes is under multi-hormonal control in the ventral prostate. However, interactions between estrogens and androgens do not play a major role in the Hershberger assay, as simultaneous TP...

  20. Design and synthesis of tricyclic tetrahydroquinolines as a new series of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Naoya; Miyakawa, Motonori; Amano, Seiji; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Inoguchi, Kiyoshi

    2011-03-15

    Some tricyclic tetrahydroquinolines (THQs) were found to have the potential of a new series of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Compound 5b was first designed and synthesized under our hypothesis based on a four-point pharmacophoric requirement of the 3-carbonyl, 18-methyl, 17-hydroxyl, and 13-quaternary carbon groups of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). It was revealed that this compound exhibits not only a strong androgen receptor (AR) agonistic activity (EC(50)=9.2 nM) but also the highest selectivity in binding affinity to AR among the steroid hormone receptors. Furthermore, this compound showed a weak virilizing effect with retention of the desired anabolic effect as compared with DHT in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ockham's razor and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs): are we overlooking the role of 5alpha-reductase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-02-01

    Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of AR ligands that possess tissue-selective pharmacological activities. SARMs of various chemical structures have been discovered and characterized, and lead compounds with much improved specificity for AR, in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles, and higher degree of tissue selectivity have entered clinical development, and are expected to dramatically expand the clinical applications of androgens. With the rapid progress in SARM discovery and increasing demand for mechanism-based drug design, more and more research efforts have been devoted to the mechanisms of action of the observed tissue selectivity of SARMs. There is increasing enthusiasm in adapting the molecular mechanisms of action from SERM research to the SARM field; however, is the SARM story really so complicated? The tissue-specific expression of 5alpha-reductase might provide a simple explanation for this puzzle.

  2. Novel, non-steroidal, selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with anabolic activity in bone and muscle and improved safety profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, J; Negro-Vilar, A

    2002-03-01

    A novel approach to the treatment of osteoporosis in men, and possibly women, is the development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that can stimulate formation of new bone with substantially diminished proliferative activity in the prostate, as well as reduced virilizing activity in women. Over the last several years, we have developed a program to discover and develop novel, non-steroidal, orally-active selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that provide improved therapeutic benefits and reduce risk and side effects. In recent studies, we have used a skeletally mature orchiectomized (ORX) male rat as an animal model of male hypogonadism for assessing the efficacy of LGD2226, a nonsteroidal, non-aromatizable, and non-5alpha-reducible SARM. We assessed the activity of LGD2226 on bone turnover, bone mass and bone strength, and also evaluated the effects exerted on classic androgen-dependent targets, such as prostate, seminal vesicles and muscle. A substantial loss of bone density was observed in ORX animals, and this loss was prevented by SARMs, as well as standard androgens. Biochemical markers of bone turnover revealed an early increase of bone resorption in androgen-deficient rats that was repressed in ORX animals treated with the oral SARM, LGD2226, during a 4-month treatment period. Differences in architectural properties and bone strength were detected by histomorphometric and mechanical analyses, demonstrating beneficial effects of LGD2226 on bone quality in androgen-deficient rats. Histomorphometric analysis of cortical bone revealed distinct anabolic activity of LGD2226 in periosteal bone. LGD2226 was able to prevent bone loss and maintain bone quality in ORX rats by stimulating bone formation, while also inhibiting bone turnover. LGD2226 also exerted anabolic activity on the levator ani muscle. Taken together, these results suggest that orally-active, non-steroidal SARMs may be useful therapeutics for both muscle and bone in elderly

  3. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  4. The CAG polymorphism in androgen receptor (AR) gene impacts the moral permissibility of harmful behavior in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pingyuan; Fang, Pengpeng; Yang, Xing; Ru, Wenzhao; Wang, Bei; Gao, Xiaocai; Liu, Jinting

    2017-06-01

    The moral permissibility of harm is strikingly varied among individuals. In light of the connection between testosterone levels and utilitarian moral judgment, this study examined to what extent a CAG polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene, a genetic polymorphism with the ability to regulate testosterone function, contributes to individual differences in moral judgment. Four hundred and thirty-nine Chinese Han participants completed permissibility ratings of harm in moral dilemmas and moral transgression scenarios. Results showed a significant association between the CAG polymorphism and moral permissibility of harm in females. Females with more copies of the S allele, which is associated with higher availability of testosterone, were more likely to judge harmful utilitarian acts and unintentionally harmful acts as permissible, while these effects were absent in males. The findings provide the first evidence for a link between the androgen receptor gene and moral judgment and highlight the role of androgens in moral foundations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Local delivery of a selective androgen receptor modulator failed as an anabolic agent in a rat bone marrow ablation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, Hannu T; Kulkova, Julia; Moritz, Niko; Kähkönen, Esa; Mattila, Riina H

    2015-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been developed to have systemic anabolic effects on bones and muscles without the adverse effects of steroidal androgens. One unexplored therapeutic option is the targeted application of SARMs for the enhancement of local new bone formation. We evaluated the osteogenic efficacy of a locally released SARM (ORM-11984). ORM-11984 was mixed with a copolymer of L-lactide and ɛ-caprolactone (PLCL). An in vitro dissolution test confirmed the sustainable release of ORM-11984 from the matrix. A bone marrow ablation model was used in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Implants containing 10%, 30%, or 50% ORM-11984 by weight or pure PLCL were inserted into the medullary canal of the ablated tibia. At 6 and 12 weeks, the volume of intramedullary new bone and the perimeter of bone-implant contact were measured by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was a negative correlation between the amount of new bone around the implant and the dose of ORM-11984. There was only a mild (and not statistically significant) enhancement of bone formation in ablated bones subjected to the lowest dose of the SARM (10%). This study suggests that intramedullary/endosteal osteogenesis had a negative, dose-dependent response to locally released SARM. This result highlights the complexity of androgenic effects on bones and also suggests that there are biological limits to the targeted local application of SARMs.

  6. Molecular characterization of insulin-like androgenic gland hormone-binding protein gene from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense and investigation of its transcriptional relationship with the insulin-like androgenic gland hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fajun; Bai, Hongkun; Xiong, Yiwei; Fu, Hongtuo; Jiang, Sufei; Jiang, Fengwei; Jin, Shubo; Sun, Shengming; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Wenyi

    2015-05-15

    Insulin-like androgenic gland hormone-binding protein (IAGBP) has been investigated in crustaceans in vitro. However, the relationship between IAGBP and its putative binding protein partner insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) has not been studied at the transcriptional level in vivo. In the current study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of IAGBP from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (Mn-IAGBP) and investigated the transcriptional patterns of Mn-IAGBP and the M. nipponense IAG gene (Mn-IAG) at different developmental stages and in different tissues. Mn-IAGBP mRNA was detected in all examined tissues from adult male prawns, with the highest transcriptional levels in the testis. Mn-IAG mRNA was detected in the androgenic gland and hepatopancreas. The genomic sequences of Mn-IAGBP and Mn-IAG were isolated by genome walking and two gene copies were found in both Mn-IAGBP and Mn-IAG. The relationship between Mn-IAGBP and Mn-IAG at the transcriptional level was studied by RNA interference. Injection of Mn-IAGBP double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) significantly reduced the transcription of Mn-IAG, while injection of Mn-IAG dsRNA significantly reduced the transcription of Mn-IAGBP in testis, muscle, androgenic gland, and hepatopancreas. These results demonstrate the involvement of the IAGBP gene in IAG signaling in M. nipponense. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sarswat, Amit [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Maikhuri, Jagdamba P. [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Vishnu L. [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  8. Natural proteasome inhibitor celastrol suppresses androgen-independent prostate cancer progression by modulating apoptotic proteins and NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Dai

    Full Text Available Celastrol is a natural proteasome inhibitor that exhibits promising anti-tumor effects in human malignancies, especially the androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC with constitutive NF-κB activation. Celastrol induces apoptosis by means of proteasome inhibition and suppresses prostate tumor growth. However, the detailed mechanism of action remains elusive. In the current study, we aim to test the hypothesis that celastrol suppresses AIPC progression via inhibiting the constitutive NF-κB activity as well as modulating the Bcl-2 family proteins.We examined the efficacy of celastrol both in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the role of NF-κB in celastrol-mediated AIPC regression. We found that celastrol inhibited cell proliferation in all three AIPC cell lines (PC-3, DU145 and CL1, with IC₅₀ in the range of 1-2 µM. Celastrol also suppressed cell migration and invasion. Celastrol significantly induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased sub-G1 population, caspase activation and PARP cleavage. Moreover, celastrol promoted cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and activated the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa. In addition, celastrol rapidly blocked cytosolic IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of RelA. Likewise, celastrol inhibited the expression of multiple NF-κB target genes that are involved in proliferation, invasion and anti-apoptosis. Celastrol suppressed AIPC tumor progression by inhibiting proliferation, increasing apoptosis and decreasing angiogenesis, in PC-3 xenograft model in nude mouse. Furthermore, increased cellular IκBα and inhibited expression of various NF-κB target genes were observed in tumor tissues.Our data suggest that, via targeting the proteasome, celastrol suppresses proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis by inducing the apoptotic machinery and attenuating constitutive NF-κB activity in AIPC both in vitro and in vivo. Celastrol as an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine could thus be

  9. Mass spectrometric characterization of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) YK-11 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Piper, Thomas; Dib, Josef; Lagojda, Andreas; Kühne, Dirk; Packschies, Lars; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2017-07-30

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent an emerging class of therapeutics targeting inter alia conditions referred to as cachexia and sarcopenia. Due to their anabolic properties, the use of SARMs is prohibited in sports as regulated by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), and doping control laboratories test for these anabolic agents in blood and urine. In order to accomplish and maintain comprehensive test methods, the characterization of new drug candidates is critical for efficient sports drug testing. Hence, in the present study the mass spectrometric properties of the SARM YK-11 were investigated. YK-11 was synthesized according to literature data and three different stable-isotope-labeled analogs were prepared to support the mass spectrometric studies. Using high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry following electrospray ionization as well as electron ionization, the dissociation pathways of YK-11 were investigated, and characteristic features of its (product ion) mass spectra were elucidated. These studies were flanked by density functional theory (DFT) computation providing information on proton affinities of selected functional groups of the analyte. The steroidal SARM YK-11 was found to readily protonate under ESI conditions followed by substantial in-source dissociation processes eliminating methanol, acetic acid methyl ester, and/or ketene. DFT computation yielded energetically favored structures of the protonated species resulting from the aforementioned elimination processes particularly following protonation of the steroidal D-ring substituent. Underlying dissociation pathways were suggested, supported by stable-isotope labeling of the analyte, and diagnostic product ions for the steroidal nucleus and the D-ring substituent were identified. Further, trimethylsilylated YK-11 and its deuterated analogs were subjected to electron ionization high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry, complementing the dataset characterizing

  10. Cav1.3 channel α1D protein is overexpressed and modulates androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruibao; Zeng, Xing; Zhang, Ruitao; Huang, Jiaoti; Kuang, Xiangxing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jihong; Tawfik, Ossama; Thrasher, James Brantley; Li, Benyi

    2014-07-01

    Widespread use of L-type calcium channel blockers for treating hypertension has led to multiple epidemiologic studies to assess the risk of prostate cancer incidence. These studies revealed a reverse correlation between the likelihood of prostate cancer risk and the use of L-type calcium channel blockers among men without family history but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we examined the expression profiles of multiple L-type calcium channel genes in prostate cancers and determined their functional roles in androgen receptor (AR) transactivation and cell growth. By reanalyzing the ONCOMINE database, we found that L-type calcium channel CACNA1D gene expression levels in cancer tissues were significantly higher than noncancer tissues in 14 of 15 published complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray data sets, of which 9 data sets showed an increase of 2- to 17-folds. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining experiments revealed that CACNA1D gene and its coding protein α1D were highly expressed in prostate cancers, especially in castration-resistant diseases, compared with benign prostate tissues. Consistent with the notion of CACNA1D as an ERG-regulated gene, CACNA1D gene expression levels were significantly higher in prostate cancers with TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion compared with the cases without this gene fusion. Blocking L-type channel's function or knocking down CACNA1D gene expression significantly suppressed androgen-stimulated Ca(2+) influx, AR transactivation, and cell growth in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that CACNA1D gene overexpression is associated with prostate cancer progression and might play an important role in Ca(2+) influx, AR activation, and cell growth in prostate cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Photoperiod modulation of aggressive behavior is independent of androgens in a tropical cichlid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-de-Freitas, Eliane; Carvalho, Thaís Billalba; Oliveira, Rui F

    2014-10-01

    Photoperiod is a major environmental cue that signals breeding conditions in animals living in temperate climates. Therefore, the activity of the reproductive (i.e. hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, HPG) axis and of the expression of reproductive behaviors, including territoriality, is responsive to changes in day length. However, at low latitudes the seasonal variation in day length decreases dramatically and photoperiod becomes less reliable as a breeding entraining cue in tropical species. In spite of this, some tropical mammals and birds have been found to still respond to small amplitude changes in photoperiod (e.g. 17min). Here we tested the effect of 2 photoperiod regimes, referred to as long-day (LD: 16L:08D) and short-day (SD: 08L:16D), on the activity of the HPG axis, on aggressive behavior and in the androgen response to social challenges in males of the tropical cichlid fish Tilapia rendalli. For each treatment, fish were transferred from a pre-treatment photoperiod of 12L:12D to their treatment photoperiod (either LD or SD) in which they were kept for 20days on stock tanks. Afterwards, males were isolated for 4days in glass aquaria in order to establish territories and initial androgen levels (testosterone, T; 11-ketotestosterone, KT) were assessed. On the 4th day, territorial intrusions were promoted such that 1/3 of the isolated males acted as residents and another 1/3 as intruders. Territorial intrusions lasted for 1h to test the effects of a social challenge under different photoperiod regimes. Photoperiod treatment (either SD or LD) failed to induce significant changes in the HPG activity, as measured by androgen levels and gonadosomatic index. However, SD increased the intensity of aggressive behaviors and shortened the time to settle a dominance hierarchy in an androgen-independent manner. The androgen responsiveness to the simulated territorial intrusion was only present in KT but not for T. The percent change in KT levels in response to the

  12. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  13. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs) in human prostate cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Anna; Leonetti, Carlo; Di Donato, Marzia; Gabucci, Elisa; Porru, Manuela; Varchi, Greta; Guerrini, Andrea; Amadori, Dino; Arienti, Chiara; Pignatta, Sara; Paganelli, Giulia; Caraglia, Michele; Castoria, Gabriella; Zoli, Wainer

    2013-01-01

    The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S)-11 and (R)-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R)-9 and (S)-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R)-bicalutamide), also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R)-9 was higher than that of (S)-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S)-11 and (R)-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R)-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R)-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R)-9 and (S)-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  14. Rescue of Metabolic Alterations in AR113Q Skeletal Muscle by Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Giorgetti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, a progressive degenerative disorder, is caused by a CAG/glutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (polyQ AR. Recent studies demonstrate that skeletal muscle is an important site of toxicity that contributes to the SBMA phenotype. Here, we sought to identify critical pathways altered in muscle that underlie disease manifestations in AR113Q mice. This led to the unanticipated identification of gene expression changes affecting regulators of carbohydrate metabolism, similar to those triggered by denervation. AR113Q muscle exhibits diminished glycolysis, altered mitochondria, and an impaired response to exercise. Strikingly, the expression of genes regulating muscle energy metabolism is rescued following peripheral polyQ AR gene silencing by antisense oligonucleotides (ASO, a therapeutic strategy that alleviates disease. Our data establish the occurrence of a metabolic imbalance in SBMA muscle triggered by peripheral expression of the polyQ AR and indicate that alterations in energy utilization contribute to non-neuronal disease manifestations.

  15. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype.

  16. Testosterone and androgen receptor gene polymorphism are associated with confidence and competitiveness in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Kumsta, Robert; Naef, Michael; Gromoll, Jörg; Heinrichs, Markus

    2017-06-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. Studies in non-human animals and humans have demonstrated the important role of testosterone in competitive interactions. Here, we investigated whether endogenous testosterone levels predict the decision to compete, in a design excluding spite as a motive underlying competitiveness. In a laboratory experiment with real monetary incentives, 181 men solved arithmetic problems, first under a noncompetitive piece rate, followed by a competition incentive scheme. We also assessed several parameters relevant to competition, such as risk taking, performance, and confidence in one's own performance. Salivary testosterone levels were measured before and 20min after the competition task using mass spectrometry. Participants were also genotyped for the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene, known to influence the efficacy of testosterone signaling in a reciprocal relationship to the number of CAG repeats. We observed a significant positive association between basal testosterone levels and the decision to compete, and that higher testosterone levels were related to greater confidence in one's own performance. Whereas the number of CAG repeats was not associated with the choice to compete, a lower number of CAG repeats was related to greater confidence in those who chose to compete, but this effect was attributable to the polymorphism's effect on actual performance. An increase in testosterone levels was observed following the experiment, and this increase varied with self-reported high-school math grades. We expand upon the latest research by documenting effects of the androgen system in confidence in one's own ability, and conclude that testosterone promotes competitiveness without spite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Androgen modulation of social decision making mechanisms in the brain: an integrative and embodied perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui F Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Apart from their role in reproduction androgens also respond to social challenges and this response has been seen as a way to regulate the expression of behaviour according to the perceived social environment (Challenge hypothesis, Wingfield et al. 1990. This hypothesis implies that social decision-making mechanisms localized in the central nervous system (CNS are open to the influence of peripheral hormones that ultimately are under the control of the CNS through the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore, two puzzling questions emerge at two different levels of biological analysis: (1 Why does the brain, which perceives the social environment and regulates androgen production in the gonad, need feedback information from the gonad to adjust its social decision-making processes? (2 How does the brain regulate gonadal androgen responses to social challenges and how do these feedback into the brain? In this paper, we will address these two questions using the integrative approach proposed by Niko Tinbergen, who proposed that a full understanding of behaviour requires its analysis at both proximate (physiology, ontogeny and ultimate (ecology, evolution levels.

  18. GEN GEN: the genomic genetic analysis of androgen-metabolic genes and prostate cancer as a paradigm for the dissection of complex phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, J K

    1999-07-15

    Prostate cancer will be diagnosed in about 179,300 men in the US in 1999 alone. Some 37,000 individuals die of this disease annually. Prostate cancer is characterized by a substantial racial/ethnic variation in risk: highest in African-American men, lowest in Asian men and intermediate in Caucasian and Latino men. We set out to investigate as our central hypothesis that genetic variants of genes involved in androgen metabolism by themselves and in combination significantly contribute to prostate cancer progression and its racial/ethnic variation. Specifically, we examined the hypothesis that DNA sequence (allelic) variations in the type II (or prostatic) steroid 5alpha-reductase (SRD5A2) gene contribute substantially to the risk and progression of prostate cancer particularly across racial/ethnic lines. The "candidate gene", SRD5A2, was chosen because the reaction product [i.e. dihydrotestosterone (DHT)] of the enzyme encoded by this gene modulates directly cell division in the prostate. DHT binds to the androgen receptor (AR) and the DHT-AR complex leads to the transactivation of a variety of genes which ultimately modulates cell division in the prostate. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that variation in DHT levels play an important role in risk of prostate cancer. Thus, steroid 5alpha-reductase activity encoded by SRD5A2 variant alleles may be important in regulating intraprostatic DHT steady state levels by controlling its biosynthesis. A second candidate gene, the type II 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B2) gene, encodes the enzyme that initiates the metabolic inactivation of testosterone (T) to DHT. We have identified allelic variants in this gene as well. Here I review our strategy for identifying candidate genes for prostate cancer, a multifactorial disease. I summarize the significant findings, particularly of allelic variants in the HSD3B2 and SRD5A2 genes and discuss how they by themselves, in combination and through interactions with the

  19. Preliminary study on androgen dependence of calcitonin gene-related peptide in rat penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhou-Jun; Chen, Shan-Wen; Lu, Ying-Li; Li, Liao-Yuan; Zhou, Xie-Lai; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Chen, Zhao-Dian

    2005-03-01

    To study the androgen dependence of the neurotransmitter, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in rat penis. Forty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Group A (intact controls), Group B (castrated) and Group C (gavaged with finasteride 4.5 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)). Four and ten weeks later respectively, half of rats in each group were anaesthetized. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of serum testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by means of radioimmunoassay. Penile samples were harvested for the investigation of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers with immunohistochemistry. The computer-assisted imaging analysis system was applied to calculate the area proportion of the CGRP-positive nerve fibers (CGRP-PNF) in each group. 1) Both 4 and 10 weeks later, testosterone and DHT levels in Group B decreased significantly compared with those in Group A, (P 0.05); However, 10 weeks later, the proportion of CGRP-PNF in Groups B and C was significantly less than that in Group A (P testosterone and DHT in rat penis.

  20. Screening for two selective androgen receptor modulators using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in doping control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Kohler, Maxie; Schlörer, Nils; Fusshöller, Gregor; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have become a major field of clinical research enabling the tissue-selective stimulation of androgen receptors. The treatment of debilitating diseases, osteoporosis and frailty are primary goals and promising results have been obtained from clinical trials. However, the potential for misuse of SARMs in sport is great and drug testing methods based on liquid chromatography were established for different classes including arylpropionamide-, 2-quinolinone- and bicyclic hydantoin-derived compounds. As gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are still important analytical tools in sports drug testing, a method to determine 2-quinolinone- and bicyclic hydantoin-derived SARMs established. Spiked urine samples were subjected to routine doping control protocols including enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, concentration and derivatisation to trimethylsilylated analogues followed by GC-MS analysis. The method was validated for the items specificity, lower limit of detection (0.2-10 ng mL(-1)), recovery (83-85%), intraday and interday precision (9-15% and 13-18%, respectively), which demonstrates the suitability of conventional GC-MS systems to determine representatives of an emerging class of compounds in doping control specimens.

  1. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs). PMID:16604181

  2. Age disrupts androgen receptor-modulated negative feedback in the gonadal axis in healthy men

    OpenAIRE

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Takahashi, Paul Y.; Keenan, Daniel M.; Liu, Peter Y.; Mielke, Kristi L.; Weist, Suanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts negative feedback on the hypothalamo-pituitary (GnRH-LH) unit, but the relative roles of the CNS and pituitary are not established. We postulated that relatively greater LH responses to flutamide (brain-permeant antiandrogen) than bicalutamide (brain-impermeant antiandrogen) should reflect greater feedback via CNS than pituitary/peripheral androgen receptor-dependent pathways. To this end, 24 healthy men ages 20–73 yr, BMI 21–32 kg/m2, participated in a prospective, pl...

  3. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the Androgen receptor gene modifies the risk for hypospadias in Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypospadias is a birth defect of the urethra in males, and a milder form of 46,XY disorder of sexual development (DSD). The disease is characterized by a ventrally placed urinary opening due to a premature fetal arrest of the urethra development. Moreover, the Androgen receptor (AR) gene has an essential role in the hormone-dependent stage of sexual development. In addition, longer AR polyglutamine repeat lengths encoded by CAG repeats are associated with lower transcriptional activity in vitro. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the role of the CAG repeat length in the AR gene in hypospadias cases as compared to the controls. Our study included 211 hypospadias and 208 controls of Caucasian origin. Methods We amplified the CAG repeat region with PCR, and calculated the difference in the mean CAG repeat length between the hypospadias and control group using the T-test for independent groups. Results We detected a significant increase of the CAG repeat length in the hypospadias cases when compared to the controls (contrast estimate: 2.29, 95% Confidence Interval (1.73-2.84); p-value: 0.001). In addition, the odds ratios between the hypospadias and controls revealed that the hypospadias cases are two to 3 times as likely to have longer CAG repeats than a shorter length for each repeat length investigated. Conclusions We have investigated the largest number of hypospadias cases with regards to the CAG repeat length, and we provide evidence that a higher number of the CAG repeat sequence in the AR gene have a clear effect on the risk of hypospadias in Caucasians. PMID:23167717

  4. Association of androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphism with cryptorchidism: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Ge, Xing; Wang, Heng-Xue; Shi, Qiao-Mei; Ding, Zhen; Xu, Li-Chun

    2018-04-01

    Researches on association between variations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene repeat polymorphisms and cryptorchidism (CO) had conflicting results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to analyse the potential effects of AR CAG and/or GGN repeat polymorphism on CO. Studies were independently appraised by two investigators on PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO databases and Foreign Medical Retrieval System. Case-control studies with measurement of CAG and/or GGN repeat length were included. Weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the CAG or GGN repeat polymorphism and CO were calculated. Five reports were included in this analysis. Overall, no difference was identified between patients and fertile men in CAG repeat length. However, when the CO was divided into unilateral and bilateral, longer CAG repeat region was significantly associated with CO in bilateral group (WMD = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.01-1.47; p < .05). In addition, GGN lengths were significantly higher in patients compared with those in controls (WMD = 1.17; 95% CI, 0.28-2.06; p < .05). No obvious effect was found in the GGN length when compared unilateral or bilateral group with control respectively. The results in this meta-analysis indicated that AR CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms may be an important pathogenesis of CO. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Androgen and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baron, John

    1999-01-01

    This project will assess the association between the risk of breast cancer and polymorphisms of the androgen and vitamin D receptor among subjects in a recently- completed population-based case-control study in Sweden...

  6. The impact of the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene on muscle and adipose tissues in 20-29-year-old Danish men: Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    .108), and relative LBMtotal (r=–0.082), and positively with relative SATthigh (r=0.137), relative SATlower trunk (r=0.188), relative FMlower extremity (r=0.107), and relative FMtotal (r=0.082). These relationships remained significant, controlling for physical activity, smoking, chronic disease, and age. CAGn did...... not correlate with any circulating androgen. Conclusions: The CAG repeat polymorphism affects body composition in young men: absolute musclethigh and absolute musclelower trunk increase as CAGn decreases. Expressed relatively, muscle areas and LBM increase, while SAT and FM decrease as CAGn decreases......Background: The number of CAG repeats (CAGn) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor. Objective: To examine the impact of CAGn on muscle, fat distribution, and circulating androgen levels. Design, settings...

  7. Involvement of different mechanisms for the association of CAG repeat length polymorphism in androgen receptor gene with prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xueying; Li, Jie; Xu, Xingxing; Boyd, Lara K; He, Weiyang; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Kudahetti, Sakunthala C; Cao, Guangwen; Berney, Daniel; Ren, Guosheng; Gou, Xin; Zhang, Hongwei; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2014-01-01

    While androgen and androgen receptor (AR) activity have been strongly implicated in prostate cancer development and therapy, the influence of the CAG repeat, which is found within the first exon of the AR gene, on prostate carcinogenesis is still unclear. We investigated the differences in the length of the CAG repeat between prostate cancer patients and controls in the Chinese population as well as between TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive and negative samples. A general association between prostate cancer and either longer or shorter AR CAG repeat length was not observed in the Chinese population. However, our data suggest that certain CAG repeat lengths may increase or decrease prostate cancer risk. Shorter CAG repeat length was also not shown to be associated with a higher induction rate of TMPRSS2 and ERG proximity, an essential step for TMPRSS2:ERG fusion formation. However, samples with a CAG repeat of 17 were found more frequently in the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive than negative prostate cancer cases and mediated a higher rate of androgen-induced TMPRSS2 and ERG co-localisation than AR with longer (24) and shorter (15) CAG repeats. This suggests that 17 CAG repeats may be associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive prostate cancer, but may have a preventive role for prostate cancer in the Chinese population, which has a low TMPRSS2:ERG fusion frequency. This study suggests that different mechanisms for the association of CAG repeat length polymorphism and prostate cancer exist in different ethnic populations. PMID:25520876

  8. Age disrupts androgen receptor-modulated negative feedback in the gonadal axis in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Johannes D; Takahashi, Paul Y; Keenan, Daniel M; Liu, Peter Y; Mielke, Kristi L; Weist, Suanne M

    2010-10-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts negative feedback on the hypothalamo-pituitary (GnRH-LH) unit, but the relative roles of the CNS and pituitary are not established. We postulated that relatively greater LH responses to flutamide (brain-permeant antiandrogen) than bicalutamide (brain-impermeant antiandrogen) should reflect greater feedback via CNS than pituitary/peripheral androgen receptor-dependent pathways. To this end, 24 healthy men ages 20-73 yr, BMI 21-32 kg/m2, participated in a prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind crossover study of the effects of antiandrogen control of pulsatile, basal, and entropic (pattern regularity) measurements of LH secretion. Analysis of covariance revealed that flutamide but not bicalutamide 1) increased pulsatile LH secretion (P = 0.003), 2) potentiated the age-related abbreviation of LH secretory bursts (P = 0.025), 3) suppressed incremental GnRH-induced LH release (P = 0.015), and 4) decreased the regularity of GnRH-stimulated LH release (P = 0.012). Furthermore, the effect of flutamide exceeded that of bicalutamide in 1) raising mean LH (P = 0.002) and T (P = 0.017) concentrations, 2) accelerating LH pulse frequency (P = 0.013), 3) amplifying total (basal plus pulsatile) LH (P = 0.002) and T (P brain-predominant and pituitary-dependent feedback mechanisms in healthy men.

  9. miR-17-5p targets the p300/CBP-associated factor and modulates androgen receptor transcriptional activity in cultured prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Ai-Yu; Eischeid, Alex N; Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Dongqing; Wang, Zhao-Yi; Young, Charles YF; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signalling is critical to the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Transcriptional activity of AR involves chromatin recruitment of co-activators, including the p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF). Distinct miRNA expression profiles have been identified in PCa cells during the development and progression of the disease. Whether miRNAs regulate PCAF expression in PCa cells to regulate AR transcriptional activity is still unclear. Expression of PCAF was investigated in several PCa cell lines by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The effects of PCAF expression on AR-regulated transcriptional activity and cell growth in PCa cells were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation, reporter gene construct analysis, and MTS assay. Targeting of PCAF by miR-17-5p was evaluated using the luciferase reporter assay. PCAF was upregulated in several PCa cell lines. Upregulation of PCAF promoted AR transcriptional activation and cell growth in cultured PCa cells. Expression of PCAF in PCa cells was associated with the downregulation of miR-17-5p. Targeting of the 3’-untranslated region of PCAF mRNA by miR-17-5p caused translational suppression and RNA degradation, and, consequently, modulation of AR transcriptional activity in PCa cells. PCAF is upregulated in cultured PCa cells, and upregulation of PCAF is associated with the downregulation of miR-17-5p. Targeting of PCAF by miR-17-5p modulates AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in cultured PCa cells

  10. miR-17-5p targets the p300/CBP-associated factor and modulates androgen receptor transcriptional activity in cultured prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Ai-Yu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen receptor (AR signalling is critical to the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa. Transcriptional activity of AR involves chromatin recruitment of co-activators, including the p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF. Distinct miRNA expression profiles have been identified in PCa cells during the development and progression of the disease. Whether miRNAs regulate PCAF expression in PCa cells to regulate AR transcriptional activity is still unclear. Methods Expression of PCAF was investigated in several PCa cell lines by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The effects of PCAF expression on AR-regulated transcriptional activity and cell growth in PCa cells were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation, reporter gene construct analysis, and MTS assay. Targeting of PCAF by miR-17-5p was evaluated using the luciferase reporter assay. Results PCAF was upregulated in several PCa cell lines. Upregulation of PCAF promoted AR transcriptional activation and cell growth in cultured PCa cells. Expression of PCAF in PCa cells was associated with the downregulation of miR-17-5p. Targeting of the 3’-untranslated region of PCAF mRNA by miR-17-5p caused translational suppression and RNA degradation, and, consequently, modulation of AR transcriptional activity in PCa cells. Conclusions PCAF is upregulated in cultured PCa cells, and upregulation of PCAF is associated with the downregulation of miR-17-5p. Targeting of PCAF by miR-17-5p modulates AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in cultured PCa cells.

  11. Anabolic/androgenic steroid administration during adolescence and adulthood differentially modulates aggression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2015-03-01

    Anabolic/androgenic steroid (AAS) use remains high in both teens and adults in the U.S. and worldwide despite studies showing that AAS use is associated with a higher incidence of aggression and anxiety. Recently we showed that chronic exposure to AAS through adolescence increases aggression and decreases anxious behaviors, while during AAS-withdrawal aggression is lowered to species-normative levels and anxiety increases. AAS exposure is known to differentially alter behaviors and their underlying neural substrates between adults and adolescents and thus the current study investigated whether exposure to AAS during adulthood affects the relationship between aggression and anxiety in a manner similar to that previously observed in adolescents. Male hamsters were administered a moderate dose of AAS (5.0mg/kg/day×30days) during adolescence (P27-56) or young adulthood (P65-P94) and then tested for aggression and anxiety during AAS exposure (i.e., on P57 or P95) and during AAS withdrawal (i.e., 30days later on P77 or P115). Adolescent exposure to AAS increased aggressive responding during the AAS exposure period and anxiety-like responding during AAS withdrawal. Neither behavior was similarly influenced by adult exposure to AAS. Adult AAS exposure produced no difference in aggressive responding during AAS exposure (P95) or AAS withdrawal (P115); however, while AAS exposure during adulthood produced no difference in anxiety-like responding during AAS exposure, adult hamsters administered AAS were less anxious than vehicle control animals following AAS withdrawal. Together these data suggest that the aggression and anxiety provoking influence of AAS are likely a developmental phenomenon and that adult exposure to AAS may be anxiolytic over the long term. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phase I trial of the androgen receptor modulator CR1447 in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zweifel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available CR1447 (4-hydroxytestosterone, 4-OHT binds to the androgen receptor and has antiproliferative activity in both ER-positive and ER-negative/AR-positive breast cancer cells in preclinical studies. The objective of this first-in man trial was to evaluate the safety and to determine the dose of CR1447, administered as an ointment, for Phase II. Escalating doses (100, 200, 400 mg of CR1447 were administered topically on a daily basis to patients with ER-positive/AR-positive/HER2-negative advanced breast cancer pretreated with several lines of therapy. 14 patients have been treated for a total of 42 cycles. Two patients, one at dose level 100 mg and one at dose level 200 mg, showed early tumour progression and were replaced. Related adverse events were all ≤ grade 2 and included fatigue, bone and joint pain, stiffness, dry skin and mouth, nausea, sweating, urinary tract infection, rash, headache and distress. No drug-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs were seen. Two patients (17% achieved stable disease at 3 months. Pharmacokinetic analysis confirmed dose-dependent transdermal uptake of CR1447. 4-OH-androstenedione (4-OHA, a key metabolite of 4-OHT, was undetectable in most of the plasma samples. Urine metabolites of 4-OHT and 4-OHA indicate high exposure of 4-OHT after topical administration. Oestradiol serum concentrations did not increase, confirming preclinical data that CR1447 is not converted to estrogens in vivo. In conclusion, CR1447 administered transdermally as an ointment is well tolerated and appears to have single-agent activity in heavily pretreated ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer patients. The recommended phase II dose is 400 mg/day.

  13. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of the selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024(Enobosarm) with itraconazole, rifampin, probenecid, celecoxib and rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2016-08-01

    GTx-024 (also known as enobosarm) is a first in class selective androgen receptor modulator being developed for diverse indications in oncology. Preclinical studies of GTx-024 supported the evaluation of several potential drug-drug interactions in a clinical setting. A series of open-label Phase I GTx-024 drug-drug interaction studies were designed to interrogate potential interactions with CYP3A4 inhibitor (itraconazole), a CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin), a pan-UGT inhibitor (probenecid), a CYP2C9 substrate (celecoxib) and a BCRP substrate (rosuvastatin). The plasma pharmacokinetics of GTx-024, its major metabolite (GTx-024 glucuronide), and each substrate were characterized in detail. Itraconazole administration had no effect on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics. Likewise, GTx-024 administration did not significantly change the pharmacokinetics of celecoxib or rosuvastatin. Rifampin administration had the largest impact on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics of any co-administered agent and reduced the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) by 23 % and the area under the curve (AUC∞) by 43 %. Probenecid had a complex interaction with GTx-024 whereby both GTx-024 plasma levels and GTx-024 glucuronide plasma levels (AUC∞) were increased by co-administration of the UGT inhibitor (50 and 112 %, respectively). Overall, GTx-024 was well tolerated and poses very little risk of generating clinically relevant drug-drug interactions.

  14. Prevention of body weight loss and sarcopenia by a novel selective androgen receptor modulator in cancer cachexia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Megumi; Aikawa, Katsuji; Hara, Takahito; Yamaoka, Masuo

    2017-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is a syndrome that impairs the quality of life and overall survival of patients, and thus the effectiveness of anticancer agents. There are no effective therapies for cancer cachexia due to the complexity of the syndrome, and insufficient knowledge of its pathogenesis results in difficulty establishing appropriate animal models. Previously, promising results have been obtained in clinical trials using novel agents including the ghrelin receptor agonist anamorelin, and the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) enobosarm to treat cachexia in patients with cancer. The present study examined the pharmacological effects of SARM-2f, a novel non-steroidal small molecule SARM, in animal models. SARM-2f increased body and skeletal muscle weight without significantly increasing the weight of the seminal vesicles or prostates of the castrated male rats. In the mice with tumor necrosis factor α-induced cachexia, SARM-2f and TP restored body weight, carcass weight, and food consumption rate. In the C26 and G361 cancer cachexia animal models, body and carcass weight, lean body mass, and the weight of the levator ani muscle were increased by SARM-2f and TP treatments. Tissue selectivity of SARM-2f was also observed in these animal models. The results demonstrate the anabolic effects of SARM-2f in a cytokine-induced cachexia model and other cancer cachexia models, and suggest that SARM-2f may be a novel therapeutic option for cachexia in patients with cancer.

  15. Mass spectrometric characterization of urinary metabolites of the selective androgen receptor modulator andarine (S-4) for routine doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Fusshöller, Gregor; Beuck, Simon; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-08-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are potent anabolic agents with tissue-selective properties. Due to their potential misuse in elite sport, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has prohibited SARMs since 2008, and although no representative drug candidate has yet received full clinical approval, recent findings of SARMs illegally sold via the internet have further supported the need to efficiently test for these compounds in doping controls. In the present communication, the mass spectrometric characterization of urinary metabolites of the SARM Andarine (also referred to as S-4) compared with earlier in vitro and animal studies is reported. Liquid chromatography interfaced to high-resolution/high-accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry was used to identify phase I and II metabolites, confirming the predicted target analytes for sports drug testing purposes including the glucuronic acid conjugates of the active drug, its monohydroxylated and/or deacetylated product, the hydrolysis product resulting from the removal of the compound's B-ring, as well as the sulfate of the monohydroxylated and the deacetylated phase I metabolite. The obtained data will support future efforts to effectively screen for and confirm the misuse of the non-approved drug candidate Andarine. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Mass spectrometric studies on selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) using electron ionization and electrospray ionization/collision-induced dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2018-02-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been identified as a promising class of drug candidates potentially applicable to diverse pathological conditions commonly associated with significantly reduced muscle mass. Due to a suspected and meanwhile repeatedly proven misuse of SARMs in elite and amateur sport, sustaining constantly updated doping control analytical methods is critical for sports drug testing laboratories. These test methods predominantly utilize mass spectrometry-based instrumentations and, consequently, studies on the mass spectrometric behavior of new compounds and, where available, their metabolic products are vital for comprehensive doping controls. In this communication, the dissociation patterns of three new SARM drug candidates referred to as GSK2881078, PF-06260414, and TFM-4 AS-1 as observed under electron ionization as well as electrospray ionization/collision-induced dissociation are discussed. By means of high resolution/high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry employing quadrupole-orbitrap mass analyzers, information on precursor-product ion relationships and elemental compositions was obtained and subsequently utilized to suggest dissociation routes of the target compounds. This information can contribute to future studies concerning structure assignments of metabolites and accelerate the identification of related substances if distributed and/or illicitly used in the world of sport.

  17. Analysis of selective androgen receptor modulators by gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Thevis, Mario; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2010-02-01

    A gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometric (GC-microAPPI-MS) method was developed and used for the analysis of three 2-quinolinone-derived selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). SARMs were analyzed from spiked urine samples, which were hydrolyzed and derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide before analysis. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of SARMs formed both radical cations (M(+*)) and protonated molecules ([M + H](+)) in photoionization. Better signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) were obtained in MS/MS analysis using the M(+*) ions as precursor ions than using the [M + H](+) ions, and therefore the M(+*) ions were selected for the precursor ions in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. Limits of detection (LODs) with the method ranged from 0.01 to 1 ng/mL, which correspond to instrumental LODs of 0.2-20 pg. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.03 to 3 ng/mL. The mass spectrometric response to the analytes was linear (R > or = 0.995) from the LOQ concentration level up to 100 ng/mL concentration, and intra-day repeatabilities were 5%-9%. In addition to the GC-microAPPI-MS study, the proof-of-principle of gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-Orbitrap MS (GC-microAPCI-Orbitrap MS) was demonstrated. 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Androgen Receptor (AR Gene (CAGn and (GGNn Length Polymorphisms and Symptoms in Young Males With Long-Lasting Adverse Effects After Finasteride Use Against Androgenic Alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Cauci, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that short and/or long (CAGn and (GGNn repeats had different frequencies according to symptoms reported by patients with PFS, likely reflecting the vast array of genes modulated by the AR. This study showed a U-curvilinear profile of (CAGn repeats for skin dryness symptoms, where the two extremes exhibited a worse condition than medium repeats. Further studies are necessary to investigate the PFS pathophysiology using a precision medicine approach.

  19. FUMET: A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 1. (A): Visualization of one of the network modules by GeneMania for dataset 4 (B): Visualization of one of the network modules by GeneMania for dataset 1 (C): Visualization of one of the network modules by GeneMania for dataset 3.

  20. Safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effects of the selective androgen receptor modulator, GSK2881078, in healthy men and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Richard V; Walker, Ann C; Andrews, Susan; Turnbull, Philip; Wald, Jeffrey A; Magee, Mindy H

    2017-10-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) induce anabolic effects on muscle without the adverse effects of androgenic steroids. In this first-in-human study, we report the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics of the SARM GSK2881078. In Part A, healthy young men (n = 10) received a single dose of study drug (0 mg, 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg GSK2881078 or matching-placebo). In Part B, repeat-dose cohorts in men (n = 65) were 0.05 mg, 0.2 mg then 0.08 mg, 0.24 mg, 0.48 mg, 0.75 mg, or placebo; in women (n = 24) they were 0.24 mg, 0.35 mg, or placebo (7 days for 0.5 mg, 14 days for other doses). PK analysis showed dose-proportional increases in exposure and a long >100-h half-life. No significant effects on vital signs, electrocardiograms, cardiac telemetry or standard clinical laboratory studies were observed. A dose-response effect was observed on lowering both high-density lipoprotein and sex hormone-binding globulin. In females at 0.35 mg, differences from placebo were -0.518 (95% confidence interval: -0.703, -0.334) mmol l -1 and -39.1 (-48.5, -29.7) nmol l -1 , respectively. Women showed greater sensitivity to these parameters at lower doses than men. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) were mild. One woman developed a drug rash and was withdrawn. Two men had elevated creatine phosphokinase after physical exertion during follow-up. A serious AE occurred in a subject on placebo. These data demonstrate pharmacodynamic effects with acceptable tolerability and support further clinical evaluation of this SARM. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Structure-Based Approach To Identify 5-[4-Hydroxyphenyl]pyrrole-2-carbonitrile Derivatives as Potent and Tissue Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwalla, Ray; Mousseau, James J; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi O; Choi, Chulho; Parris, Kevin; Hu, Baihua; Kenney, Thomas; Chippari, Susan; McNally, Christopher; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Kilbourne, Edward; Thompson, Catherine; Nagpal, Sunil; Wrobel, Jay; Yudt, Matthew; Morris, Carl A; Powell, Dennis; Gilbert, Adam M; Chekler, Eugene L Piatnitski

    2017-07-27

    In an effort to find new and safer treatments for osteoporosis and frailty, we describe a novel series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Using a structure-based approach, we identified compound 7, a potent AR (ARE EC 50 = 0.34 nM) and selective (N/C interaction EC 50 = 1206 nM) modulator. In vivo data, an AR LBD X-ray structure of 7, and further insights from modeling studies of ligand receptor interactions are also presented.

  2. Androgen receptor gene polymorphisms and maximal fat oxidation in healthy men. A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce González, Jesús Gustavo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Rodríguez-González, Francisco Germán; Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; Rodríguez-García, Lorena; Díaz-Chico, Bonifacio Nicolás; López Calbet, José Antonio; Dorado, Cecilia

    2017-10-24

    Androgens play a major role in fat oxidation; however, the effects of androgens depend, among other factors, on the intrinsic characteristics of the androgen receptor (AR). Lower repetitions of CAG and GGN polymorphism appear to have a protective effect on fat accumulation in the transition from adolescent to mid-twenties. Whether a similar protective effect is present later in life remains unknown. The aims of this study were: a) to evaluate if extreme CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms of the androgen receptors influence body fat mass, its regional distribution, resting metabolic rate (RMR), maximal fat oxidation capacity (MFO) and serum leptin, free testosterone and osteocalcin in healthy adult men; and b) to determine the longitudinal effects on fat tissue accumulation after 6.4 years of follow-up. CAG and GGN repeats length were measured in 319 healthy men (mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 28.3 ± 7.6 years). From these, we selected the subjects with extreme short (CAGS or equal 24; n = 10) CAG repeats, and the subjects with short (GGNS or equal to 25; n = 10) GGN repeats. Body composition was assessed by DXA and serum levels of leptin, free testosterone and osteocalcin by ELISA. After 6.4 years of follow-up, DXA was repeated, and resting metabolic rate (RMR), MFO and VO2max determined by indirect calorimetry. CAGS and CAGL subjects had similar RMR and accumulated comparable amounts of fat tissue over 6.4 ± 1.0 years of follow-up. However, CAGL had higher MFO and total lean mass than CAGS (p fat mass than men with GGNL, particularly in the trunk region seven years later. This concurred with a greater MFO in the GGNL group (p fat mass. Free testosterone was associated with MFO in absolute values (r = 0.45; p fat oxidation capacity and may have a role in the accumulation of fat over the years.

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Part II: Optimization of 4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzonitrile derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Moriteru; Hitaka, Takenori; Imada, Takashi; Yamada, Masami; Morimoto, Megumi; Shinohara, Hiromi; Hara, Takahito; Yamaoka, Masuo; Santou, Takashi; Nakayama, Masaharu; Imai, Yumi; Habuka, Noriyuki; Yano, Jason; Wilson, Keith; Fujita, Hisashi; Hasuoka, Atsushi

    2017-05-01

    We recently reported a class of novel tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), represented by a naphthalene derivative A. However, their pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles were poor due to low metabolic stability. To improve the PK profiles, we modified the hydroxypyrrolidine and benzonitrile substituents of 4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzonitrile derivative B, which had a comparable potency as that of compound A. This optimization led us to further modifications, which improved metabolic stability while maintaining potent androgen agonistic activity. Among the synthesized compounds, (2S,3S)-2,3-dimethyl-3-hydroxylpyrrolidine derivative 1c exhibited a suitable PK profile and improved metabolic stability. Compound 1c demonstrated significant efficacy in levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate in an in vivo study. In addition, compound 1c showed agonistic activity in the CNS, which was detected using sexual behavior induction assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential modulation of androgen receptor transcriptional activity by the nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); A. Umar (Arzu); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); J. Trapman (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAntiandrogens are widely used agents in the treatment of prostate cancer, as inhibitors of AR (androgen receptor) action. Although the precise mechanism of antiandrogen action is not yet elucidated, recent studies indicate the involvement of nuclear receptor

  5. Environmental modulation of androgen levels and secondary sex characters in two populations of the peacock blenny Salaria pavo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, João L; Gonçalves, David M; Oliveira, Rui F

    2010-02-01

    Morphology and endocrinology were studied in two populations of the peacock blenny Salaria pavo, with different regimes of sexual selection imposed by differences in nest site availability. The peacock blenny is a small, sexually dimorphic benthic fish that presents exclusive paternal care of the clutch and inhabits rocky shores of the Mediterranean and adjacent Atlantic areas. In a population from the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic sea) inhabiting rocky shores where nest sites are abundant, male-male competition for nests is low, males court females and a low frequency of alternative reproductive tactics (small, parasitic female-mimicking sneaker males that change tactic into nest holders in subsequent breeding seasons) occurs. Conversely at Ria Formosa, a coastal lagoon in Southern Portugal, where nest sites are scarce and highly aggregated, male-male competition for nests is very high, there is sex-role reversal with female courtship and a high frequency of alternative reproductive tactics is observed. Concomitantly, at Ria Formosa nest holder males are larger and present more developed secondary sex characters and higher levels of 11KT than at the Gulf of Trieste. However, the gonads of nest holders and parasitic males were larger in the Gulf of Trieste population. Competition for nests at Ria Formosa seems to promote more developed secondary sex characters in nest site scarcity conditions, while competition for females at the Gulf of Trieste seems to be spurring sperm competition among males in populations where nest sites are more abundant. 11KT was thus associated with the development and expression of secondary sex characters in contrasting environments. These results exemplify how the modulation of behavioral plasticity and secondary sex characters by the social environment can be mediated by androgens. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Treadmill Slope Modulates Inflammation, Fiber Type Composition, Androgen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Skeletal Muscle of Overtrained Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Alisson L.; Pereira, Bruno C.; Teixeira, Giovana R.; Pinto, Ana P.; Frantz, Fabiani G.; Elias, Lucila L. K.; Lira, Fábio S.; Pauli, José R.; Cintra, Dennys E.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; de Moura, Leandro P.; Mekary, Rania A.; de Freitas, Ellen C.; da Silva, Adelino S. R.

    2017-01-01

    Overtraining (OT) may be defined as an imbalance between excessive training and adequate recovery period. Recently, a downhill running-based overtraining (OTR/down) protocol induced the nonfunctional overreaching state, which is defined as a performance decrement that may be associated with psychological and hormonal disruptions and promoted intramuscular and systemic inflammation. To discriminate the eccentric contraction effects on interleukin 1beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, IL-15, and SOCS-3, we compared the release of these cytokines in OTR/down with other two OT protocols with the same external load (i.e., the product between training intensity and volume), but performed in uphill (OTR/up) and without inclination (OTR). Also, we evaluated the effects of these OT models on the muscle morphology and fiber type composition, serum levels of fatigue markers and corticosterone, as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expressions. For extensor digitorum longus (EDL), OTR/down and OTR groups increased the cytokines and exhibited micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. While OTR/down group increased the cytokines in soleus muscle, OTR/up group only increased IL-6. All OT groups presented micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. In serum, while OTR/down and OTR/up protocols increased IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, OTR group increased IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, and corticosterone. The type II fibers in EDL and soleus, total and phosphorylated AR levels in soleus, and total GR levels in EDL and soleus were differentially modulated by the OT protocols. In summary, the proinflammatory cytokines were more sensitive for OTR/down than for OTR/up and OTR. Also, the specific treadmill inclination of each OT model influenced most of the other evaluated parameters. PMID:29163473

  7. Treadmill Slope Modulates Inflammation, Fiber Type Composition, Androgen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Skeletal Muscle of Overtrained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson L. da Rocha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Overtraining (OT may be defined as an imbalance between excessive training and adequate recovery period. Recently, a downhill running-based overtraining (OTR/down protocol induced the nonfunctional overreaching state, which is defined as a performance decrement that may be associated with psychological and hormonal disruptions and promoted intramuscular and systemic inflammation. To discriminate the eccentric contraction effects on interleukin 1beta (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-15, and SOCS-3, we compared the release of these cytokines in OTR/down with other two OT protocols with the same external load (i.e., the product between training intensity and volume, but performed in uphill (OTR/up and without inclination (OTR. Also, we evaluated the effects of these OT models on the muscle morphology and fiber type composition, serum levels of fatigue markers and corticosterone, as well as androgen receptor (AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressions. For extensor digitorum longus (EDL, OTR/down and OTR groups increased the cytokines and exhibited micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. While OTR/down group increased the cytokines in soleus muscle, OTR/up group only increased IL-6. All OT groups presented micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. In serum, while OTR/down and OTR/up protocols increased IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, OTR group increased IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, and corticosterone. The type II fibers in EDL and soleus, total and phosphorylated AR levels in soleus, and total GR levels in EDL and soleus were differentially modulated by the OT protocols. In summary, the proinflammatory cytokines were more sensitive for OTR/down than for OTR/up and OTR. Also, the specific treadmill inclination of each OT model influenced most of the other evaluated parameters.

  8. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...

  9. Estrogenic and androgenic activities in total plasma measured with reporter-gene bioassays: relevant exposure measures for endocrine disruptors in epidemiologic studies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, M.M.; Besselink, H.; Bretveld, R.W.; Anzion, R.B.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Brouwer, A.; Roeleveld, N.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of estrogenic and androgenic activities in total plasma with Chemically Activated LUciferase gene eXpression (CALUX(R)) bioassays could provide biologically relevant measures for exposure to endocrine disruptors in epidemiologic studies. The objective of this study was to explore the

  10. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morooka, Nobukatsu, E-mail: amorooka@gunma-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Ueguri, Kei [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Yee, Karen Kar Lye [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Human Resources Cultivation Center, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryushi, Gunma, 376-8515 (Japan); Yanase, Toshihiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. - Highlights: • DHT, non-aromatizable androgen suppresses Mcp-1 expression in adipocytes. • Mcp-1 transcription was negatively regulated by DHT-AR action. • DHT-AR selectively regulates Mcp-1 transcription through distinct NF-κB sites.

  11. A nanoparticle-based epigenetic modulator for efficient gene modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkulapa, Thanapat

    Modulation of gene expression through chromatin remodeling involves epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone acetylation. Acetylation is tightly regulated by two classes of enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Molecules that can regulate these enzymes by altering (activating or inhibiting) their functions have become a valuable tool for understanding cell development and diseases. HAT activators, i.e. N-(4-Chloro-(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-ethoxybenzamide (CTB), have shown a therapeutic potential for many diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration. However, these compounds encounter a solubility and a membrane permeability issue, which restricts their full potential for practical usage, especially for in vivo applications. To address this issue, in this work, we developed a nanoparticle-based HAT activator CTB, named Au-CTB, by incorporating a new CTB analogue onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) along with a poly(ethylene glycol) moiety and a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide to assist with solubility and membrane permeability. We found that our new CTB analogue and Au-CTB could activate HAT activity. Significantly, an increase in potency to activate HAT activity by Au-CTB proved the effectiveness of using the nanoparticle delivery platform. In addition, the versatility of Au-CTB platform permits the attachment of multiple ligands with tunable ratios on the nanoparticle surface via facile surface functionalization of gold nanoparticles. Due to its high delivery efficiency and versatility, Au-CTB can be a powerful platform for applications in epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  12. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated

  13. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat length as modifier of the association between Persistent Organohalogen Pollutant exposure markers and semen characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Aleksander; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed to inves......OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed...... to investigate whether the CAG and GGN polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene modify the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure on human sperm characteristics. METHODS: Semen and blood from 680 men [mean (SD) age 34 (10) years] from Greenland, Sweden, Warsaw (Poland) and Kharkiv (Ukraine......) were collected. Persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure was assessed by measuring serum levels of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE). Semen characteristics (volume, sperm concentration, total count, proportion of progressively motile...

  14. Genome-wide identification of key modulators of gene-gene interaction networks in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Li-Ju; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chuang, Eric Y; Chen, Yidong

    2017-10-03

    With the advances in high-throughput gene profiling technologies, a large volume of gene interaction maps has been constructed. A higher-level layer of gene-gene interaction, namely modulate gene interaction, is composed of gene pairs of which interaction strengths are modulated by (i.e., dependent on) the expression level of a key modulator gene. Systematic investigations into the modulation by estrogen receptor (ER), the best-known modulator gene, have revealed the functional and prognostic significance in breast cancer. However, a genome-wide identification of key modulator genes that may further unveil the landscape of modulated gene interaction is still lacking. We proposed a systematic workflow to screen for key modulators based on genome-wide gene expression profiles. We designed four modularity parameters to measure the ability of a putative modulator to perturb gene interaction networks. Applying the method to a dataset of 286 breast tumors, we comprehensively characterized the modularity parameters and identified a total of 973 key modulator genes. The modularity of these modulators was verified in three independent breast cancer datasets. ESR1, the encoding gene of ER, appeared in the list, and abundant novel modulators were illuminated. For instance, a prognostic predictor of breast cancer, SFRP1, was found the second modulator. Functional annotation analysis of the 973 modulators revealed involvements in ER-related cellular processes as well as immune- and tumor-associated functions. Here we present, as far as we know, the first comprehensive analysis of key modulator genes on a genome-wide scale. The validity of filtering parameters as well as the conservativity of modulators among cohorts were corroborated. Our data bring new insights into the modulated layer of gene-gene interaction and provide candidates for further biological investigations.

  15. An integrative approach to inferring biologically meaningful gene modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kai

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to construct biologically meaningful gene networks and modules is critical for contemporary systems biology. Though recent studies have demonstrated the power of using gene modules to shed light on the functioning of complex biological systems, most modules in these networks have shown little association with meaningful biological function. We have devised a method which directly incorporates gene ontology (GO annotation in construction of gene modules in order to gain better functional association. Results We have devised a method, Semantic Similarity-Integrated approach for Modularization (SSIM that integrates various gene-gene pairwise similarity values, including information obtained from gene expression, protein-protein interactions and GO annotations, in the construction of modules using affinity propagation clustering. We demonstrated the performance of the proposed method using data from two complex biological responses: 1. the osmotic shock response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and 2. the prion-induced pathogenic mouse model. In comparison with two previously reported algorithms, modules identified by SSIM showed significantly stronger association with biological functions. Conclusions The incorporation of semantic similarity based on GO annotation with gene expression and protein-protein interaction data can greatly enhance the functional relevance of inferred gene modules. In addition, the SSIM approach can also reveal the hierarchical structure of gene modules to gain a broader functional view of the biological system. Hence, the proposed method can facilitate comprehensive and in-depth analysis of high throughput experimental data at the gene network level.

  16. Ligand-specific allosteric regulation of coactivator functions of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sung Hee; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Welsbie, Derek; Chen, Charlie; Sawyers, Charles L.; Rose, David W.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    The androgen receptor not only mediates prostate development but also serves as a key regulator of primary prostatic cancer growth. Although initially responsive to selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), which cause recruitment of the nuclear receptor–corepressor (N-CoR) complex, resistance invariably occurs, perhaps in response to inflammatory signals. Here we report that dismissal of nuclear receptor–corepressor complexes by specific signals or androgen receptor overexpression results in recruitment of many of the cohorts of coactivator complexes that permits SARMs and natural ligands to function as agonists. SARM-bound androgen receptors appear to exhibit failure to recruit specific components of the coactivators generally bound by liganded nuclear receptors, including cAMP response element-binding protein (CBP)/p300 or coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) to the SARM-bound androgen receptor, although still causing transcriptional activation of androgen receptor target genes. SARM-bound androgen receptors use distinct LXXLL (L, leucine; X, any amino acid) helices in the p160 nuclear receptor interaction domains that may impose selective allosteric effects, providing a component of the molecular basis of differential responses to different classes of ligands by androgen receptor. PMID:16492776

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Reduces Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Patients Treated With Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Navesh K.; Li Tianyu; Chen, David Y.; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (AD) has been shown to increase late Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity when used concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicity by limiting the radiation dose received by the bowel and bladder. The present study compared the genitourinary and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in men treated with 3D-CRT+AD vs. IMRT+AD. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and July 2004, 293 men underwent 3D-CRT (n = 170) or IMRT (n = 123) with concurrent AD (<6 months, n = 123; ≥6 months, n = 170). The median radiation dose was 76 Gy for 3D-CRT (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements) and 76 Gy for IMRT (95% to the planning target volume). Toxicity was assessed by a patient symptom questionnaire that was completed at each visit and recorded using a Fox Chase Modified Late Effects Normal Tissue Task radiation morbidity scale. Results: The mean follow-up was 86 months (standard deviation, 29.3) for the 3D-CRT group and 40 months (standard deviation, 9.7) for the IMRT group. Acute GI toxicity (odds ratio, 4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-11.7; p = .005) was significantly greater with 3D-CRT than with IMRT and was independent of the AD duration (i.e., <6 vs. ≥6 months). The interval to the development of late GI toxicity was significantly longer in the IMRT group. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate for Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity was 20% for 3D-CRT and 8% for IMRT (p = .01). On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater late GI toxicity (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.3; p = .04) was more prevalent in the 3D-CRT patients. Conclusion: Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT significantly decreased the acute and late GI toxicity in patients treated with AD.

  18. Detection of the arylpropionamide-derived selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-4 (Andarine) in a black-market product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Kamber, Matthias; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2009-08-01

    Non-steroidal and tissue-selective anabolic agents such as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent a promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of various diseases such as sarcopenia or cancer cachexia. Advanced compounds of SARMs are based on an arylpropionamide-derived structure and leading drug candidates have successfully completed phase-II-clinical trials. Although none of these therapeutics have been approved, their performance-enhancing qualities and the black-market availability of these products makes them a viable target for misuse in the athletic community. In 2008, SARMs were added to the Prohibited List established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). That SARMs are the subject of misuse even without clinical approval was proved for the first time by the detection of the drug candidate Andarine (also referred to as S-4, S-3-(4-acetylamino-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide), advertised, sold and supplied via the Internet. The oily liquids, declared as green tea extracts and face moisturizer, were assayed using state-of-the-art analytical procedures and S-4 was found at concentrations of approximately 150 mg/mL. The authenticity of the product was demonstrated in comparison to reference material by liquid chromatography, high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry using positive and negative electrospray ionization, and comparison to reference material. Moreover, an impurity resulting from poor product purification was detected, accounting for approximately 10% of S-4. This consisted of 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenylamino)-propionamide. The ease of purchasing non-approved drug candidates that could potentially increase athletic performance demonstrates the need to operate proactively in the continued fight against doping. The early inclusion of emerging drugs into routine sports drug testing procedures is a key

  19. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubahn, D.B.; Simental, J.A.; Higgs, H.N.; Wilson, E.M.; French, F.S.; Brown, T.R.; Migeon, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. The authors have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46, XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development

  20. Sox2 is an androgen receptor-repressed gene that promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kregel

    Full Text Available Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR, has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways.

  1. Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Polymorphism Regulates the Metabolic Effects of Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Male Postsurgical Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Delli Muti, Nicola; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the independent role of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism on metabolic effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in male postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition frequently associated with hypopituitarism and in which the TRT-related metabolic effects are combined with those deriving from concomitant administration of metabolically active pituitary-function replacement therapies. Methods. 15 men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were evaluated before and after TRT. Cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), pituitary-dependent hormones, and AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism were considered. Results. Testosterone, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and estradiol were the only hormones, which varied significantly between the two phases. All CVRFs significantly improved after TRT. The number of CAG triplets was positively and significantly correlated with all the variations (Δ-) of CVRFs (except for a significant negative correlation with Δ-high-density lipoprotein); the opposite occurred between the latter and Δ-testosterone. No correlation between Δ-IGF-1 or estradiol and Δ-CVRFs was found. At multiple linear regression, after correction for Δ-testosterone, nearly all the associations between the number of CAG triplets and Δ-CVRFs were confirmed. Conclusions. In male postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, shorter AR gene CAG tract length seems to yield greater metabolic improvement after TRT, independently of the effects of concomitant pituitary-function replacement therapies.

  2. Testosterone treatment increases androgen receptor and aromatase gene expression in myotubes from patients with PCOS and controls, but does not induce insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun

    2014-01-01

    is conserved in cultured myotubes (in vitro) from patients with PCOS, but the effect of testosterone on this insulin sensitivity is unknown. We investigated the effect of 7days testosterone treatment (100nmol/l) on glucose transport and gene expression levels of hormone receptors and enzymes involved...... in the synthesis and conversion of testosterone (HSD17B1, HSD17B2, CYP19A1, SRD5A1-2, AR, ER-α, HSD17B6 and AKR1-3) in myotubes from ten patients with PCOS and ten matched controls. Testosterone treatment significantly increased aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression levels in patients and controls....... Glucose transport in myotubes was comparable in patients with PCOS vs. controls and was unchanged by testosterone treatment (p=0.21 PCOS vs. controls). These results suggest that testosterone treatment of myotubes increases the aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression without affecting insulin...

  3. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hu; Zhu, Chen; Qin, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Li, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ju, Xiaobing; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Gu, Min, E-mail: medzhao1980@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yin, Changjun, E-mail: drcjyin@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression.

  4. A common deletion in the uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UGT) 2B17 gene is a strong determinant of androgen excretion in healthy pubertal boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Sørensen, K; Aksglaede, L

    2008-01-01

    2B17 genotypes on urinary excretion of androgen metabolites in pubertal boys. STUDY DESIGN: A clinical study of 116 healthy boys aged 8-19 yr. UGT2B17 genotyping was performed using quantitative PCR. Serum FSH, LH, T, estradiol (E2), and SHBG were analyzed by immunoassays, and urinary levels......BACKGROUND: Testosterone (T) is excreted in urine as water-soluble glucuronidated and sulfated conjugates. The ability to glucuronidate T and other steroids depends on a number of different glucuronidases (UGT) of which UGT2B17 is essential. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of UGT...... of androgen metabolites were quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in all subjects. RESULTS: Ten of 116 subjects (9%) presented with a homozygote deletion of the UGT2B17 gene (del/del), whereas 52 and 54 boys were hetero- and homozygous carriers of the UGT2B17 gene (del/ins and ins...

  5. Indole-3-carbinol and 3’, 3’-diindolylmethane modulate androgen effect up-regulation on C-C chemokine ligand 2 and monocyte attraction to prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation has a role in prostate tumorigenesis. Recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the tumor site is mediated by C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) through binding to its receptor CCR2. We hypothesized that androgen could modulate CCL2 expression in hormone-responsive prostate cancer cells, and ...

  6. Androgen receptor and its splice variant, AR-V7, differentially regulate FOXA1 sensitive genes in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, William C; Shafi, Ayesha A; Nakka, Manjula; Weigel, Nancy L

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is an androgen-dependent disease, and tumors that are resistant to androgen ablation therapy often remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Among the contributors to castration-resistant PCa are AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Instead, they have small amounts of unique sequence derived from cryptic exons or from out of frame translation. The AR-V7 (or AR3) variant is constitutively active and is expressed under conditions consistent with CRPC. AR-V7 is reported to regulate a transcriptional program that is similar but not identical to that of AR. However, it is unknown whether these differences are due to the unique sequence in AR-V7, or simply to loss of the LBD. To examine transcriptional regulation by AR-V7, we have used lentiviruses encoding AR-V7 (amino acids 1-627 of AR with the 16 amino acids unique to the variant) to prepare a derivative of the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7. An additional cell line was generated with regulated expression of AR-NTD (amino acids 1-660 of AR); this mutant lacks the LBD but does not have the AR-V7 specific sequence. We find that AR and AR-V7 have distinct activities on target genes that are co-regulated by FOXA1. Transcripts regulated by AR-V7 were similarly regulated by AR-NTD, indicating that loss of the LBD is sufficient for the observed differences. Differential regulation of target genes correlates with preferential recruitment of AR or AR-V7 to specific cis-regulatory DNA sequences providing an explanation for some of the observed differences in target gene regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulating gene function with peptide nucleic acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2008-01-01

    A review on peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers as modulators of gene expression ranging from gene silencing at the mRNAor the dsDNA (antigene) level, and redirection of mRNA splicing to gene activation through transcription bubble mimicking. PNA chem., anti-infective agents, cellular delivery...

  8. Comparison of antiandrogenic activities of vinclozolin and D,L-camphorquinone in androgen receptor gene transcription assay in vitro and mouse in utero exposure assay in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Michiya; Kodaira, Kazuhisa; Kenichi, Hino; Ishimoto, Yoichi; Tamura, Hiroto; Iguchi, Taisen

    2002-05-24

    A chemical substance used as a photoinitiator for light-cure resin compositions, D,L-camphorquinone (CQN) was found to be weakly antiandrogenic in vitro. It competitively antagonized dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced transcriptional activity on the yeast-based androgen receptor gene transcription assay (YAA). Antiandrogenic activity of CQN was shown at higher concentration than 10(-4) M while the well-known antiandrogen, vinclozolin (VCZ) showed the activity at concentrations of 10(-6) M and above in YAA. The antiandrogenic activity of CQN was reconfirmed in the human cell line-based androgen receptor gene transcription assay (HCAA). To determine whether CQN affect male reproductive development, CQN or VCZ was administered to pregnant mice daily from gestational days 10 to 18 by gavage. In utero exposure to VCZ at 100 mg/kg/day caused a significant decrease in anogenital distance (AGD) of F1 neonates and reduced spermatogenesis in F1 males at 42 days of age. In contrast, maternal doses (100 and 300 mg/kg/day) of CQN had no affect on these endpoints in F1 offspring. Further, VCZ or CQN had no adverse affect on F1 male fertility. From these observations, CQN is potentially antagonistic to androgen receptor (AR) in vitro, but is estimated to be less antiandrogenic in vivo when it is administered to pregnant mice by gavage. Furthermore, these findings are the first to demonstrate that VCZ exerts significant antiandrogenic effects on reproductive tract development during gestation in mice.

  9. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-09-14

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors.

  10. Cystatin C is downregulated in prostate cancer and modulates invasion of prostate cancer cells via MAPK/Erk and androgen receptor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegiel, Barbara; Jiborn, Thomas; Abrahamson, Magnus; Helczynski, Leszek; Otterbein, Leo; Persson, Jenny Liao; Bjartell, Anders

    2009-11-23

    Cystatin C is believed to prevent tumor progression by inhibiting the activities of a family of lysosomal cysteine proteases. However, little is known about the precise mechanism of cystatin C function in prostate cancer. In the present study, we examined the expression of cystatin C and its association with matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP2) and androgen receptor (AR) in a tissue microarray comparing benign and malignant specimens from 448 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Cystatin C expression was significantly lower in cancer specimens than in benign tissues (pcystatin C and MMP2 (r(s) (2) = -0.056, p = 0.05). There was a clear trend that patients with decreased level of cystatin C had lower overall survival. Targeted inhibition of cystatin C using specific siRNA resulted in an increased invasiveness of PC3 cells, whereas induction of cystatin C overexpression greatly reduced invasion rate of PC3 in vitro. The effect of cystatin C on modulating the PC3 cell invasion was provoked by Erk2 inhibitor that specifically inhibited MAPK/Erk2 activity. This suggests that cystatin C may mediate tumor cell invasion by modulating the activity of MAPK/Erk cascades. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings that patients with low expression of cystatin C and high expression of androgen receptor (AR) tend to have worse overall survival than patients with high expression of cystatin C and high AR expression, induced overexpression of AR in PC3 cells expressing cystatin C siRNA greatly enhanced the invasiveness of PC3 cells. This suggests that there may be a crosstalk between cystatin C and AR-mediated pathways. Our study uncovers a novel role for cystatin C and its associated cellular pathways in prostate cancer invasion and metastasis.

  11. Cystatin C is downregulated in prostate cancer and modulates invasion of prostate cancer cells via MAPK/Erk and androgen receptor pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wegiel

    Full Text Available Cystatin C is believed to prevent tumor progression by inhibiting the activities of a family of lysosomal cysteine proteases. However, little is known about the precise mechanism of cystatin C function in prostate cancer. In the present study, we examined the expression of cystatin C and its association with matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP2 and androgen receptor (AR in a tissue microarray comparing benign and malignant specimens from 448 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Cystatin C expression was significantly lower in cancer specimens than in benign tissues (p<0.001 and there was a statistically significant inverse correlation between expression of cystatin C and MMP2 (r(s (2 = -0.056, p = 0.05. There was a clear trend that patients with decreased level of cystatin C had lower overall survival. Targeted inhibition of cystatin C using specific siRNA resulted in an increased invasiveness of PC3 cells, whereas induction of cystatin C overexpression greatly reduced invasion rate of PC3 in vitro. The effect of cystatin C on modulating the PC3 cell invasion was provoked by Erk2 inhibitor that specifically inhibited MAPK/Erk2 activity. This suggests that cystatin C may mediate tumor cell invasion by modulating the activity of MAPK/Erk cascades. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings that patients with low expression of cystatin C and high expression of androgen receptor (AR tend to have worse overall survival than patients with high expression of cystatin C and high AR expression, induced overexpression of AR in PC3 cells expressing cystatin C siRNA greatly enhanced the invasiveness of PC3 cells. This suggests that there may be a crosstalk between cystatin C and AR-mediated pathways. Our study uncovers a novel role for cystatin C and its associated cellular pathways in prostate cancer invasion and metastasis.

  12. Characterization of in vitro generated metabolites of the selective androgen receptor modulators S-22 and S-23 and in vivo comparison to post-administration canine urine specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Gerace, Enrico; Thomas, Andreas; Beuck, Simon; Geyer, Hans; Schlörer, Nils; Kearbey, Jeffrey D; Dalton, James T; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have great therapeutic potential in various diseases including cancer cachexia, sarcopenia, and osteoporosis, and the number of drug candidates has been growing over the last decade. The SARM drug candidates S-22 and S-23 belong to one of the most advanced groups of androgen receptor modulators and are based on an arylpropionamide-derived core structure. Due to their anabolic effects, SARMs have been prohibited in elite sports and have been a subject of sports drug testing programmes since January 2008. Consequently, the structure of analytically useful urinary metabolites should be elucidated to provide targets for sensitive and retrospective analysis. In the present study, the phase-I and -II metabolism of S-22 and S-23 was simulated using hepatic human enzymes, and resulting metabolites were characterized by means of state-of-the-art mass spectrometric approaches employing high resolution/high accuracy Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Subsequently, the newly defined target compounds including the glucuronic acid conjugates of S-22 and S-23, their corresponding monohydroxylated and bishydroxylated analogs, as well as their B-ring depleted counterparts were implemented into an existing routine doping control procedure, which was examined for its specificity for the added substances. In order to obtain proof-of-concept data for authentic urine specimens, canine urine samples collected up to 72 h after oral administration of S-22 to dogs were analyzed using the established approach outlining the capability of the presented assay to detect the glucuronide of S-22 as well as the B-ring-depleted metabolite (M3) in all samples following therapeutic (31.4 µg/kg) dosing. Finally, M3 was chemically synthesized, characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry, and chosen as primary target for future doping control analyses. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Influence of the glutation S-transferases T1 and M1 gene polymorphisms on androgenic status and semen quality after surgical treatment of varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to examine androgenic status in men after surgical treatment of varicocele; to investigate genotype GSTT1 and GSTM1 in patients with pathozoospermia. Thirty men after surgical treatment of varicocele were recruited to this study. All subjects were evaluated by history, physical examination, semen analysis, serum FSH, LH, E2, PL, inhibin B and total testosterone determination. GSTT1, CSTM1 gene polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction. Total testosterone and inhibin B levels were significantly lower in patients with pathozoospermia. Patients with the GSTM1(- genotype had lower sperm concentrations than those with the GSTM1(+ genotype.Our results suggest that the GSTM1(- genotype is risk factor for androgen deficiency and pathozoospermia.

  14. Influence of the glutation S-transferases T1 and M1 gene polymorphisms on androgenic status and semen quality after surgical treatment of varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to examine androgenic status in men after surgical treatment of varicocele; to investigate genotype GSTT1 and GSTM1 in patients with pathozoospermia. Thirty men after surgical treatment of varicocele were recruited to this study. All subjects were evaluated by history, physical examination, semen analysis, serum FSH, LH, E2, PL, inhibin B and total testosterone determination. GSTT1, CSTM1 gene polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction. Total testosterone and inhibin B levels were significantly lower in patients with pathozoospermia. Patients with the GSTM1(- genotype had lower sperm concentrations than those with the GSTM1(+ genotype.Our results suggest that the GSTM1(- genotype is risk factor for androgen deficiency and pathozoospermia.

  15. Systematic Identification of Genes Required for Expression of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    It has several advantages over the existing ones and one of them is the ability to make a very large number (tenth of thousands) of gene knockouts...each of reporters in LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells, respectively. See Task 2 To identify genes required for the full length AR or AR3, we took advantage of...splicing, and are important determinants of mRNA export , localization, translation, and stability [28]. Several members of this family have been

  16. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  17. Allele-specific expression at the androgen receptor alpha gene in a hybrid unisexual fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa is the result of a hybridization of the Atlantic molly (P. mexicana and the sailfin molly (P. latipinna approximately 120,000 years ago. As a gynogenetic species, P. formosa needs to copulate with heterospecific males including males from one of its bisexual ancestral species. However, the sperm only triggers embryogenesis of the diploid eggs. The genetic information of the sperm donor typically will not contribute to the next generation of P. formosa. Hence, P. formosa possesses generally one allele from each of its ancestral species at any genetic locus. This raises the question whether both ancestral alleles are equally expressed in P. formosa. Allele-specific expression (ASE has been previously assessed in various organisms, e.g., human and fish, and ASE was found to be important in the context of phenotypic variability and disease. In this study, we utilized Real-Time PCR techniques to estimate ASE of the androgen receptor alpha (arα gene in several distinct tissues of Amazon mollies. We found an allelic bias favoring the maternal ancestor (P. mexicana allele in ovarian tissue. This allelic bias was not observed in the gill or the brain tissue. Sequencing of the promoter regions of both alleles revealed an association between an Indel in a known CpG island and differential expression. Future studies may reveal whether our observed cis-regulatory divergence is caused by an ovary-specific trans-regulatory element, preferentially activating the allele of the maternal ancestor.

  18. Expression of two vitellogenin genes (vg1 and vg3) in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver in response to exposure to steroidal estrogens and androgens.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miracle, Ann L.; Ankley, Gerald; Lattier, David

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we describe the sequence for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) vitellogenin 3 gene (vg3), and compare the response of vg1 and vg3 following exposure to steroidal estrogens and androgens. The fathead minnow vg3 sequence is only the second nucleotide sequence described in teleosts, following the original description of this isoform in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Following a brief exposure (24 hours) to 2, 5, and 10 ng/L 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), both vg1and vg3 are upregulated in male liver. However, levels of vg3 induction are 4 orders of magnitude lower than induction of vg1. Suppression of vg in female liver following androgenic exposure with 50 or 500 ng/L 17 beta-trenbolone occurs at similar significance levels for both vg1 and vg3 isoforms. The results of this study confirm the use of vg1 as an indicator of estrogenic exposure in male fish, and present the potential for vg1 and /or vg3 for use as indicators of androgenic exposure.

  19. Inhibition of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer by Estrogenic Compounds Is Associated with Increased Expression of Immune-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilsa M. Coleman

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical utility of estrogens for treating prostate cancer (CaP was established in the 1940s by Huggins. The classic model of the anti-CaP activity of estrogens postulates an indirect mechanism involving the suppression of androgen production. However, clinical, preclinical studies have shown that estrogens exert growth-inhibitory effects on CaP under low-androgen conditions, suggesting additional modes whereby estrogens affect CaP cells and/or the microenvironment. Here we have investigated the activity of 17β estradiol (E2 against androgen-independent CaP, identified molecular alterations in tumors exposed to E2. E2 treatment inhibited the growth of all four androgen-independent CaP xenografts studied (LuCaP 35V, LuCaP 23.1AI, LuCaP 49, LuCaP 58 in castrated male mice. The molecular basis of growth suppression was studied by cDNA microarray analysis, which indicated that multiple pathways are altered by E2 treatment. Of particular interest are changes in transcripts encoding proteins that mediate immune responses, regulate androgen receptor signaling. In conclusion, our data show that estrogens have powerful inhibitory effects on CaP in vivo in androgendepleted environments, suggest novel mechanisms of estrogen-mediated antitumor activity. These results indicate that incorporating estrogens into CaP treatment protocols could enhance therapeutic efficacy even in cases of advanced disease.

  20. Cloning of genomic sequences of three crustacean hyperglycemic hormone superfamily genes and elucidation of their roles of regulating insulin-like androgenic gland hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fajun; Bai, Hongkun; Zhang, Wenyi; Fu, Hongtuo; Jiang, Fengwei; Liang, Guoxia; Jin, Shubo; Sun, Shengming; Qiao, Hui

    2015-04-25

    The insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) gene in crustaceans plays an important role in male sexual differentiation, metabolism, and growth. However, the upstream regulation of IAG signaling schemes remains poorly studied. In the present study, we cloned the 5' flanking sequence of IAG and full-length genomic sequences of gonad-inhibiting hormone (Mn-GIH), molt-inhibiting hormone (Mn-MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (Mn-CHH) in Macrobrachium nipponense. We identified the transcription factor-binding sites in the 5' flanking sequence of IAG and investigated the exon-intron patterns of the three CHH superfamily genes. Each CHH superfamily gene consisted of two introns separating three exons. Mn-GIH and Mn-MIH shared the same intron insertion sites, which differed from Mn-CHH. We provided DNA-level evidence for the type definition. We also identified two cAMP response elements in the 5' untranslated region. We further investigated the regulatory relationships between Mn-GIH, Mn-MIH, and Mn-CHH and IAG at the transcriptional level by injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). IAG transcription levels were significantly increased to 660.2%, 472.9%, and 112.4% of control levels in the Mn-GIH dsRNA, Mn-MIH dsRNA, and Mn-CHH dsRNA groups, respectively. The results clearly demonstrated that Mn-GIH and Mn-MIH, but not Mn-CHH, negatively regulate the expression of the IAG gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Amelioration of sexual behavior and motor activity deficits in a castrated rodent model with a selective androgen receptor modulator SARM-2f.

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    Megumi Morimoto

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia and cachexia present characteristic features of a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and strength, anorexia, and lack of motivation. Treatments for these diseases have not yet been established, although selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs are considered as therapeutic targets. We previously reported that a novel SARM compound, SARM-2f, exhibits anabolic effect on muscles, with less stimulatory effect on prostate weight compared with testosterone, in rat Hershberger assays and cancer cachexia models. In this study, we studied the mechanism of action for SARM-2f selectivity and also assessed whether the muscle increase by this compound might lead to improvement of muscle function and physical activity. First, we examined the tissue distribution of SARM-2f. Tissue concentration was 1.2-, 1.6-, and 1.9-fold as high as the plasma concentration in the levator ani muscle, brain, and prostate, respectively. This result showed that the tissue-selective pharmacological effect did not depend on SARM-2f concentration in the tissues. The ability of SARM-2f to influence androgen receptor (AR-mediated transcriptional activation was examined by reporter assays using human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC and skeletal muscle cells (SKMC. SARM-2f exerted higher activity against AR in SKMC than in PrEC. Mammalian two hybrid assays showed different co-factor recruitment patterns between SARM-2f and dihydrotestosterone. Next, we studied the effect of SARM-2f on motivation and physical functions such as sexual behavior and motor activities in castrated rat or mouse models. SARM-2f restored the sexual behavior that was lost by castration in male rats. SARM-2f also increased voluntary running distance and locomotor activities. These results suggest that tissue-specific AR regulation by SARM-2f, but not tissue distribution, might account for its tissue specific androgenic effect, and that the muscle mass increase by SARM-2f leads to improvement

  2. Amelioration of sexual behavior and motor activity deficits in a castrated rodent model with a selective androgen receptor modulator SARM-2f.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Megumi; Amano, Yuichiro; Oka, Masahiro; Harada, Ayako; Fujita, Hisashi; Hikichi, Yukiko; Tozawa, Ryuichi; Yamaoka, Masuo; Hara, Takahito

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia and cachexia present characteristic features of a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and strength, anorexia, and lack of motivation. Treatments for these diseases have not yet been established, although selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are considered as therapeutic targets. We previously reported that a novel SARM compound, SARM-2f, exhibits anabolic effect on muscles, with less stimulatory effect on prostate weight compared with testosterone, in rat Hershberger assays and cancer cachexia models. In this study, we studied the mechanism of action for SARM-2f selectivity and also assessed whether the muscle increase by this compound might lead to improvement of muscle function and physical activity. First, we examined the tissue distribution of SARM-2f. Tissue concentration was 1.2-, 1.6-, and 1.9-fold as high as the plasma concentration in the levator ani muscle, brain, and prostate, respectively. This result showed that the tissue-selective pharmacological effect did not depend on SARM-2f concentration in the tissues. The ability of SARM-2f to influence androgen receptor (AR)-mediated transcriptional activation was examined by reporter assays using human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and skeletal muscle cells (SKMC). SARM-2f exerted higher activity against AR in SKMC than in PrEC. Mammalian two hybrid assays showed different co-factor recruitment patterns between SARM-2f and dihydrotestosterone. Next, we studied the effect of SARM-2f on motivation and physical functions such as sexual behavior and motor activities in castrated rat or mouse models. SARM-2f restored the sexual behavior that was lost by castration in male rats. SARM-2f also increased voluntary running distance and locomotor activities. These results suggest that tissue-specific AR regulation by SARM-2f, but not tissue distribution, might account for its tissue specific androgenic effect, and that the muscle mass increase by SARM-2f leads to improvement of physical

  3. In vitro metabolism studies on the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) LG121071 and its implementation into human doping controls using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Andre; Krug, Oliver; Vincenti, Marco; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    LG121071 is a member of the tetrahydroquinolinone-based class of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) drug candidates. These nonsteroidal compounds are supposed to act as full anabolic agents with reduced androgenic properties. As SARMs provide an alternative to anabolic androgenic steroids, they represent an emerging class of potential doping substances abused by athletes for illicit performance enhancement. According to the World Anti-Doping Agency's regulations, SARMs are banned substances and part of the Prohibited List since 2008. In consideration of the increasing number of adverse analytical findings in doping controls caused by SARMs abuse, potential drug candidates such as LG121071 have been proactively investigated to enable a timely integration into routine testing procedures even though clinical trials are not yet complete. In the present approach, the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of LG121071 was characterized by means of electrospray ionization-high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry, MS(n), and isotope labeling experiments. Interestingly, the even-electron precursor ion [M + H](+) at m/z 297 was found to produce a radical cation at m/z 268 under CID conditions, violating the even-electron rule that commonly applies. For doping control purposes, metabolites were generated in vitro and a detection method for urine samples based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was established. The overall metabolic conversion of LG121071 was modest, yielding primarily mono-, bis- and trishydroxylated species. Notable, however, was the identification of a glucuronic acid conjugate of the intact drug, attributed to an N-glucuronide structure. The sample preparation procedure included the enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronides prior to liquid-liquid extraction, allowing intact LG121071 to be measured, as well as the corresponding phase-I metabolites. The method was characterized concerning inter alia lower limit of detection (0

  4. Proteome-wide muscle protein fractional synthesis rates predict muscle mass gain in response to a selective androgen receptor modulator in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; Shearer, Todd W; Stimpson, Stephen A; Turner, Scott M; King, Chelsea; Wong, Po-Yin Anne; Shen, Ying; Turnbull, Philip S; Kramer, Fritz; Clifton, Lisa; Russell, Alan; Hellerstein, Marc K; Evans, William J

    2016-03-15

    Biomarkers of muscle protein synthesis rate could provide early data demonstrating anabolic efficacy for treating muscle-wasting conditions. Androgenic therapies have been shown to increase muscle mass primarily by increasing the rate of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that the synthesis rate of large numbers of individual muscle proteins could serve as early response biomarkers and potentially treatment-specific signaling for predicting the effect of anabolic treatments on muscle mass. Utilizing selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) treatment in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat, we applied an unbiased, dynamic proteomics approach to measure the fractional synthesis rates (FSR) of 167-201 individual skeletal muscle proteins in triceps, EDL, and soleus. OVX rats treated with a SARM molecule (GSK212A at 0.1, 0.3, or 1 mg/kg) for 10 or 28 days showed significant, dose-related increases in body weight, lean body mass, and individual triceps but not EDL or soleus weights. Thirty-four out of the 94 proteins measured from the triceps of all rats exhibited a significant, dose-related increase in FSR after 10 days of SARM treatment. For several cytoplasmic proteins, including carbonic anhydrase 3, creatine kinase M-type (CK-M), pyruvate kinase, and aldolase-A, a change in 10-day FSR was strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.90-0.99) to the 28-day change in lean body mass and triceps weight gains, suggesting a noninvasive measurement of SARM effects. In summary, FSR of multiple muscle proteins measured by dynamics of moderate- to high-abundance proteins provides early biomarkers of the anabolic response of skeletal muscle to SARM. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Androgen Receptor Modulation Optimized for Response (ARMOR) Phase I and II Studies: Galeterone for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Bruce; Eisenberger, Mario A; Rettig, Matthew B; Chu, Franklin; Pili, Roberto; Stephenson, Joseph J; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Koletsky, Alan J; Nordquist, Luke T; Edenfield, William J; Mamlouk, Khalid; Ferrante, Karen J; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2016-03-15

    Galeterone is a selective, multitargeted agent that inhibits CYP17, antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), and reduces AR expression in prostate cancer cells by causing an increase in AR protein degradation. These open-label phase I and II studies [Androgen Receptor Modulation Optimized for Response-1 (ARMOR1) and ARMOR2 part 1] evaluated the efficacy and safety of galeterone in patients with treatment-naive nonmetastatic or metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and established a dose for further study. In ARMOR1, 49 patients received increasing doses (650-2,600 mg) of galeterone in capsule formulation; 28 patients in ARMOR2 part 1 received increasing doses (1,700-3,400 mg) of galeterone in tablet formulation for 12 weeks. Patients were evaluated biweekly for safety and efficacy, and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed. In ARMOR1, across all doses, 49.0% (24/49) achieved a ≥30% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA; PSA30) and 22.4% (11/49) demonstrated a ≥50% PSA decline (PSA50). In ARMOR2 part 1, across all doses, PSA30 was 64.0% (16/25) and PSA50 was 48.0% (12/25). In the 2,550-mg dose cohort, PSA30 was 72.7% (8/11) and PSA50 was 54.5% (6/11). Galeterone was well tolerated; the most common adverse events were fatigue, increased liver enzymes, gastrointestinal events, and pruritus. Most were mild or moderate in severity and required no action and there were no apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) events. The efficacy and safety from ARMOR1 and ARMOR2 part 1 and the pharmacokinetic results support the galeterone tablet dose of 2,550 mg/d for further study. Galeterone was well tolerated and demonstrated pharmacodynamic changes consistent with its selective, multifunctional AR signaling inhibition. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Identification of selected in vitro generated phase-I metabolites of the steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator MK-0773 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagojda, Andreas; Kuehne, Dirk; Krug, Oliver; Thomas, Andreas; Wigger, Tina; Karst, Uwe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Research into developing anabolic agents for various therapeutic purposes has been pursued for decades. As the clinical utility of anabolic-androgenic steroids has been found to be limited because of their lack of tissue selectivity and associated off-target effects, alternative drug entities have been designed and are commonly referred to as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). While most of these SARMs are of nonsteroidal structure, the drug candidate MK-0773 comprises a 4-aza-steroidal nucleus. Besides the intended therapeutic use, SARMs have been found to be illicitly distributed and misused as doping agents in sport, necessitating frequently updated doping control analytical assays. As steroidal compounds reportedly undergo considerable metabolic transformations, the phase-I metabolism of MK-0773 was simulated using human liver microsomal (HLM) preparations and electrochemical conversion. Subsequently, major metabolic products were identified and characterized employing liquid chromatography-high-resolution/high- accuracy tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. MK-0773 produced numerous phase-I metabolites under the chosen in vitro incubation reactions, mostly resulting from mono- and bisoxygenation of the steroid. HLM yielded at least 10 monooxygenated species, while electrochemistry-based experiments resulted predominantly in three monohydroxylated metabolites. Elemental composition data and product ion mass spectra were generated for these analytes, ESI/APCI measurements corroborated the formation of at least two N-oxygenated metabolites, and NMR data obtained from electrochemistry-derived products supported structures suggested for three monohydroxylated compounds. Hereby, the hydroxylation of the A-ring located N- bound methyl group was found to be of particular intensity. In the absence of controlled elimination studies, the

  7. Validation of a GC/MS method for the detection of two quinolinone-derived selective androgen receptor modulators in doping control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, E; Salomone, A; Fasano, F; Costa, R; Boschi, D; Di Stilo, A; Vincenti, M

    2011-04-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent an emerging class of drugs likely to be abused in sport. For clinical applications, these substances provide a promising alternative to testosterone-replacement therapies and their advantages include oral bioavailability, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the absence of steroid-related side effects. Although not yet commercially available, since January 2008 SARMs have been included on the prohibited list issued yearly by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), so control laboratories need to update their procedures to detect either the parent drugs or their metabolites. Within this context, two quinolinone SARM models were synthesized and automatically characterized to update the existing routine screening procedures. The conditions for the new target analytes are compatible with the existing laboratory protocols used for both in-competition and out-of-competition controls and can be included in them. Validation parameters according to ISO 17025 and WADA guidelines were successfully determined. For analytical determinations, spiked urine samples were hydrolyzed and extracted at pH 9.6 with 10 mL of tert-butyl methyl ether. Then, the analytes were subsequently converted into trimethylsilyl derivatives and detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The absence of interferents, together with excellent repeatability of both retention times and the relative abundances of diagnostic ions, allowed proper identification of all SARM analytes. The analytes' quantification was linear up to 500 ng/mL and precision criteria were satisfied (coefficient of variation less than 25% at 10 ng/mL). The limits of detection were 1 ng/mL for both SARMs, whereas recovery values were between 95.5 and 99.3%. The validated method can be efficiently used for urine screening of the 2-quinolinone-derived SARMs tested.

  8. Characterization of equine urinary metabolites of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) S1, S4 and S22 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Annelie; Knych, Heather; Stanley, Scott; Thevis, Mario; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators, SARMs, constitute a class of compounds with anabolic properties but with few androgenic side-effects. This makes them possible substances of abuse and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has banned the entire class of substances. There have been several cases of illicit use of aryl propionamide SARMs in human sports and in 2013, 13 cases were reported. These substances have been found to be extensively metabolized in humans, making detection of metabolites necessary for doping control. SARMs are also of great interest to equine doping control, but the in vivo metabolite pattern and thus possible analytical targets have not been previously studied in this species. In this study, the urinary metabolites of the SARMs S1, S4, and S22 in horses were studied after intravenous injection, using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF-MS). Eight different metabolites were found for SARM S1, nine for SARM S4, and seven for SARM S22. The equine urinary metabolite profiles differed significantly from those of humans. The parent compounds were only detected for SARMs S4 and S22 and only at the first sampling time point at 3 h post administration, making them unsuitable as target compounds. For all three SARMs tested, the metabolite yielding the highest response had undergone amide hydrolysis, hydroxylation and sulfonation. The resulting phase II metabolites (4-nitro-3-trifluoro-methyl-phenylamine sulfate for SARMs S1 and S4 and 4-cyano-3-trifluoro-methyl-phenylamine sulfate for SARM S22) are proposed as analytical targets for use in equine doping control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The novel non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator S-101479 has additive effects with bisphosphonate, selective estrogen receptor modulator, and parathyroid hormone on the bones of osteoporotic female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ohyabu, Yuki; Makino, Akito; Morikyu, Teruyuki; Ishige, Hirohide; Kuzutani, Kazuya; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-01

    We have studied non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) to develop anti-osteoporosis drugs for males and females. Many SARMs have been studied for their anabolic effects on bone or muscle with reduced virilizing effects in male animals. However, the tissue selectivities of these agents in female animals have not been fully evaluated. We evaluated the novel SARM S-101479 from tetrahydroquinoline libraries in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. S-101479 preferentially bound to the androgen receptor with nanomolar affinity among nuclear receptors. It increased the bone mineral density (BMD) of femurs and diminished the effects on the uterus and clitoral gland in OVX rats. We then compared the effect of S-101479 on bone with those of commercial anti-osteoporosis drugs such as alendronate, raloxifene, and teriparatide. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of combination treatments with these agents in OVX rats. After 16-week treatment, all agents significantly increased BMD, but the magnitude of bone mineral content (BMC) and/or bone size (projected bone area) were different. Alendronate, raloxifene, and teriparatide maintained BMC and bone size in this experimental dose. Only S-101479 increased BMC with bone size on single treatments. In combination treatment, S-101479 significantly increased BMC and bone size compared with single treatments of other agents. S-101479, like natural androgen, may have showed periosteal bone formation of the cortical area and indicated additive effects with commercial anti-osteoporosis drugs. These results indicate that S-101479 may be a useful anti-osteoporosis drug, particularly for patients with established severe osteoporosis.

  10. Dopamine D2 Receptors Act Upstream of AVP in the Latero-Anterior Hypothalamus to Modulate Adolescent Anabolic/Androgenic Steroid-Induced Aggression in Syrian Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    In pubertal male Syrian hamsters, exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence facilitates a high level of offensive aggression modulated by the enhanced development and activity of the vasopressin (AVP) and dopamine (DA) neural systems within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH), i.e., a brain region implicated in the control of aggression. The present studies provide a detailed report of the pharmacologic interactions between AVP and DA D2 receptor signaling within the LAH in the control of adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. Male Syrian hamsters were treated with AAS throughout adolescence and tested for aggression after local infusion of the DA D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride (ETIC) alone, or in combination with AVP in the LAH in an effort to determine the influence of DA D2 receptors relative to AVP-receptor mediated aggression mechanisms. As previously shown, ETIC infusion into the LAH suppressed adolescent AAS-induced aggressive responding; however, the AAS-induced aggressive phenotype was rescued by the co-infusion of AVP into the LAH. These behavioral data indicate that interactions between AVP and DA neural systems within the LAH modulate the control of aggression following adolescent exposure to AAS and that DA D2 receptor signaling functions upstream of AVP in the LAH to control this behavioral response. PMID:25798632

  11. Dopamine D2 receptors act upstream of AVP in the latero-anterior hypothalamus to modulate adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced aggression in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2015-04-01

    In pubertal male Syrian hamsters, exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence facilitates a high level of offensive aggression modulated by the enhanced development and activity of the vasopressin (AVP) and dopamine (DA) neural systems within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH), that is, a brain region implicated in the control of aggression. The present studies provide a detailed report of the pharmacologic interactions between AVP and DA D2 receptor signaling within the LAH in the control of adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. Male Syrian hamsters were treated with AAS throughout adolescence and tested for aggression after local infusion of the DA D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride (ETIC) alone, or in combination with AVP in the LAH in an effort to determine the influence of DA D2 receptors relative to AVP-receptor mediated aggression mechanisms. As previously shown, ETIC infusion into the LAH suppressed adolescent AAS-induced aggressive responding; however, the AAS-induced aggressive phenotype was rescued by the coinfusion of AVP into the LAH. These behavioral data indicate that interactions between AVP and DA neural systems within the LAH modulate the control of aggression following adolescent exposure to AAS and that DA D2 receptor signaling functions upstream of AVP in the LAH to control this behavioral response. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Polymorphic variation in the androgen receptor gene: association with risk of testicular germ cell cancer and metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Västermark, Åke; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg; Hagströmer, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    Increasing incidence of testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is most probably related to environment and lifestyle. However, an underlying genetic predisposition may play a role and since sex steroids are assumed to be important for the rise and progression of TGCC, a study of androgen receptor (AR...... of endocrine disruptors. From a biological point of view, our findings strengthen the hypothesis of the importance of androgen action in the aetiology and pathogenesis of testicular malignancy. Future studies should focus on the impact of sex hormones on foetal germ cell development and the interaction between...

  13. Androgens, body fat Distribution and Adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerradi, Mouna; Dereumetz, Julie; Boulet, Marie-Michèle; Tchernof, André

    2014-12-01

    Androgens are regulators of important adipocyte functions such as adipogenesis, lipid storage, and lipolysis. Through depot-specific impact on the cells of each fat compartment, androgens could modulate body fat distribution patterns in humans. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone have been shown to inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes to lipid-storing adipocytes in several models including primary cultures of human adipocytes from both men and women. Androgen effects have also been observed on some markers of lipid metabolism such as LPL activity, fatty acid uptake, and lipolysis. Possible depot-specific and sex-specific effects have been observed in some but not all models. Transformation of androgen precursors to active androgens or their inactivation by enzymes that are expressed and functional in adipose tissue may contribute to modulate the local availability of active hormones. These phenomena, along with putative depot-specific interactions with glucocorticoids may contribute to human body fat distribution patterns.

  14. Aberrant splicing of androgen receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G. G.; Faber, P. W.; Schweikert, H. U.; van Rooij, H. C.; Zegers, N. D.; Hodgins, M. B.; Degenhart, H. J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symptoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. We report a G----T mutation in the splice donor site of

  15. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  16. Transcriptome analysis of androgenic gland for discovery of novel genes from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, using Illumina Hiseq 2000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubo Jin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China, even in whole of Asia. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in sexual differentiation to maleness. This study is the first de novo M. nipponense transcriptome analysis using cDNA prepared from mRNA isolated from the androgenic gland. Illumina/Solexa was used for sequencing. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDING: The total volume of RNA sample was more than 5 ug. We generated 70,853,361 high quality reads after eliminating adapter sequences and filtering out low-quality reads. A total of 78,408 isosequences were obtained by clustering and assembly of the clean reads, producing 57,619 non-redundant transcripts with an average length of 1244.19 bp. In total 70,702 isosequences were matched to the Nr database, additional analyses were performed by GO (33,203, KEGG (17,868, and COG analyses (13,817, identifying the potential genes and their functions. A total of 47 sex-determination related gene families were identified from the M. nipponense androgenic gland transcriptome based on the functional annotation of non-redundant transcripts and comparisons with the published literature. Furthermore, a total of 40 candidate novel genes were found, that may contribute to sex-determination based on their extremely high expression levels in the androgenic compared to other sex glands,. Further, 437 SSRs and 65,535 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset from which 14 EST-SSR markers have been isolated. CONCLUSION: Our study provides new sequence information for M. nipponense, which will be the basis for further genetic studies on decapods crustaceans. More importantly, this study dramatically improves understanding of sex-determination mechanisms, and advances sex-determination research in all crustacean species. The huge number of potential SSR and SNP markers isolated from the transcriptome may shed the lights

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Androgenic Gland for Discovery of Novel Genes from the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, Using Illumina Hiseq 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shubo; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhou, Qiao; Sun, Shengming; Jiang, Sufei; Xiong, Yiwei; Gong, Yongsheng; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Wenyi

    2013-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China, even in whole of Asia. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in sexual differentiation to maleness. This study is the first de novo M. nipponense transcriptome analysis using cDNA prepared from mRNA isolated from the androgenic gland. Illumina/Solexa was used for sequencing. Methodology and Principal Finding The total volume of RNA sample was more than 5 ug. We generated 70,853,361 high quality reads after eliminating adapter sequences and filtering out low-quality reads. A total of 78,408 isosequences were obtained by clustering and assembly of the clean reads, producing 57,619 non-redundant transcripts with an average length of 1244.19 bp. In total 70,702 isosequences were matched to the Nr database, additional analyses were performed by GO (33,203), KEGG (17,868), and COG analyses (13,817), identifying the potential genes and their functions. A total of 47 sex-determination related gene families were identified from the M. nipponense androgenic gland transcriptome based on the functional annotation of non-redundant transcripts and comparisons with the published literature. Furthermore, a total of 40 candidate novel genes were found, that may contribute to sex-determination based on their extremely high expression levels in the androgenic compared to other sex glands,. Further, 437 SSRs and 65,535 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset from which 14 EST-SSR markers have been isolated. Conclusion Our study provides new sequence information for M. nipponense, which will be the basis for further genetic studies on decapods crustaceans. More importantly, this study dramatically improves understanding of sex-determination mechanisms, and advances sex-determination research in all crustacean species. The huge number of potential SSR and SNP markers isolated from the transcriptome may shed the lights on research in many

  18. Cooperative Epigenetic Modulation by Cancer Amplicon Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Lixin; Tolga Emre, N. C.; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Chung, Hye-Jung; Steidl, Christian; Slack, Graham; Wright, George W.; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu N.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Xu, Weihong; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Lamy, Laurence; Davis, R. Eric; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Maloney, David; Thomas, Craig J.; Möller, Peter; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Savage, Kerry; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Levens, David; Staudt, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome band 9p24 is frequently amplified in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). To identify oncogenes in this amplicon, we screened an RNA interference library targeting amplicon genes and thereby identified JAK2 and the histone demethylase JMJD2C as essential genes in these lymphomas. Inhibition of JAK2 and JMJD2C cooperated in killing these lymphomas by decreasing tyrosine 41 phosphorylation and increasing lysine 9 trimethylation of histone H3, promoting heterochromatin formation. MYC, a major target of JAK2-mediated histone phosphorylation, was silenced following JAK2 and JMJD2C inhibition, with a corresponding increase in repressive chromatin. Hence, JAK2 and JMJD2C cooperatively remodel the PMBL and HL epigenome, offering a mechanistic rationale for the development of JAK2 and JMJD2C inhibitors in these diseases. PMID:21156283

  19. Regulation of expression of Na+,K+-ATPase in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen); G.T.G. Chang; M. Steenbeek-Slotboom (M.); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); H.G. Swarts; J.J.H.H.M. de Pont (J. J H H M); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe β1-subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase was isolated and identified as an androgen down-regulated gene. Expression was observed at high levels in androgen-independent as compared to androgen-dependent (responsive) human prostate cancer cell lines and xenografts when grown in the presence of

  20. Central body fat changes in men affected by post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism undergoing testosterone replacement therapy are modulated by androgen receptor CAG polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, G; delli Muti, N; Buldreghini, E; Lenzi, A; Balercia, G

    2014-08-01

    Little is known about the effect of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism in conditioning body composition changes after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). In this study, we aimed to clarify this aspect by focussing our attention on male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition often associated with partial or total hypopituitarism. Fourteen men affected by post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and undergoing several replacement hormone therapies were evaluated before and after TRT. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)-derived body composition measurements, pituitary-dependent hormones and AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism were considered. While testosterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels increased after TRT, cortisol concentration decreased. No anthropometric or body composition parameters varied significantly, except for abdominal fat decrease. The number of CAG triplets was positively and significantly correlated with this abdominal fat decrease, while the opposite occurred between the latter and Δ-testosterone. No correlation of IGF-1 or cortisol variation (Δ-) with Δ-abdominal fat was found. At multiple linear regression, after correction for Δ-testosterone, the positive association between CAG triplet number and abdominal fat change was confirmed. In male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, shorter length of AR CAG repeat tract is independently associated with a more marked decrease of abdominal fat after TRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. GABA Neural Signaling in the Latero-Anterior Hypothalamus Modulates Aggressive Behavior in Adolescent Anabolic/Androgenic Steroid-Treated Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27–P56) display highly escalated and mature forms of offensive aggression correlated with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) afferent development as well as decreased GABAA receptors in the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) – an area of convergence for developmental and neuroplastic changes that underlie offensive aggressive behaviors in hamsters. This study investigated whether microinfusion of a GABAA receptor agonist (muscimol; 0.01 – 1.0 pM) or antagonist (bicuculline; 0.04 – 4.0 pM) directly into the LAH modulate adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. Activation of LAH GABAA receptors enhanced adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression, beginning at the 0.1pM dose, when compared with AAS-treated animals injected with saline into the LAH. Importantly, GABAA receptor agonism within the LAH significantly increased the frequency of belly/rear attacks, while simultaneously decreasing the frequency of frontal attacks. These data identify a neuroanatomical locus where GABAA receptor activation functions to enhance aggression in adolescent AAS-treated animals, while also promoting the display of mature forms of aggression and suppressing juvenile play behaviors. PMID:25171080

  2. Mass spectrometric characterization of urinary metabolites of the selective androgen receptor modulator S-22 to identify potential targets for routine doping controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Möller, Ines; Geyer, Hans; Dalton, James T; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2011-08-15

    Drugs that promote anabolic processes with limited undesirable effects are of considerable therapeutic interest; some notable examples include those for the treatment of cancer cachexia and muscle-wasting diseases. Anabolic properties are not only therapeutically beneficial to critically ill and debilitated patients, but are also desirable to athletes seeking artificial enhancements in endurance, strength and accelerated recovery. The use of anabolic agents in the clinical setting is being reconsidered with the emergence of a new class of drugs referred to as SARMs (selective androgen receptor modulators). SARMs have the potential to complement or even replace anabolic androgenic steroidal use with the benefit of a reduction of the undesirable side effects associated with steroid administration alone. Arylpropionamide-based SARMs such as andarine (S-4) and S-22 have shown promising therapeutic properties and have attracted the interest of elite and amateur athletes despite the absence of clinical approval, and evidence for trafficking and misuse in sport has been obtained by doping control authorities. In this communication, the elucidation of urinary metabolites of the SARM drug candidate S-22 is compared with earlier in vitro metabolism studies. Following oral administration of illicit S-22, urine samples were collected after 62 and 135 h and analyzed for the active drug and its major metabolic products. Liquid chromatography interfaced with high-resolution/high-accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry was used to identify and/or confirm the predicted target analytes for sports drug testing purposes. S-22 was detected in both specimens accompanied by its glucuronic acid conjugate. This was the B-ring hydroxylated derivative of S-22 plus the corresponding glucuronide (with the phase-II metabolites being the more abundant analytes). In addition, the samples collected 62 h post-administration also contained the phase-I metabolite hydroxylated at the methyl residue (C-20

  3. Transforming growth factor-β-stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22) is an androgen regulated gene that enhances apoptosis in prostate cancer following IGF-IR inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Cynthia C. T.; Haugk, Kathleen; Sun, Shihua; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Ludwig, Dale L.; Wu, Jennifer D.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Inhibition of IGF signaling using the human IGF-IR monoclonal antibody A12 is most effective at inducing apoptosis in prostate cancer xenografts in the presence of androgen. We undertook this study to determine mechanisms for increased apoptosis by A12 in the presence of androgens. Experimental Methods The castrate-resistant human xenograft LuCaP 35V was implanted into intact or castrate SCID mice and treated with A12 weekly. After six weeks of tumor growth animals were sacrificed and tumors removed and analyzed for cell cycle distribution/apoptosis and cDNA arrays were performed. Results In castrate mice the tumors were delayed in G2 with no apoptosis; in contrast tumors from intact mice underwent apoptosis with either a G1 or G2 delay. TSC-22 was significantly elevated in tumors from the intact mice compared to castrate mice, especially in those tumors with the highest levels of apoptosis. In order to further determine the function of TSC-22, we transfected various human prostate cancer cell lines with a plasmid expressing TSC-22. Cell lines overexpressing TSC-22 demonstrated an increase in apoptosis and a delay in G1. When these cell lines were placed subcutaneously in SCID mice a decreased number of animals formed tumors and the rate of tumor growth was decreased compared to control tumors. Conclusions These data indicate that IGF-IR inhibition in the presence of androgen has an enhanced effect on decreasing tumor growth, in part, through increased expression of the tumor suppressor gene TSC-22. PMID:19996218

  4. Low androgen induced penile maldevelopment involves altered gene expression of biomarkers of smooth muscle differentiation and a key enzyme regulating cavernous smooth muscle cell tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, Lilian A; Braden, Tim D; Vail, Krystal; Simon, Liz; Goyal, Hari Om

    2014-07-01

    We determined the effects of low androgens in the neonatal period on biomarkers of smooth muscle cell differentiation, Myh11 and Acta2, and on Pde5A expression in the penis. One-day-old pups were treated daily with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist antide with or without dihydrotestosterone for 1 to 6 days. Tissues were collected at age day 7 and at adulthood at age 120 days. Penes were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Testes were assayed for the intratesticular testosterone and steroidogenic enzymes Cyp17α1 and StAR. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist exposure suppressed the neonatal testicular testosterone surge 70% to 80%. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed 80% to 90% reductions in Cyp17α1 and StAR protein, and 40% to 60% reductions in Myh11 and ACTA2 as a result of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist compared to controls. Dihydrotestosterone co-administration mitigated these decreases. Western blot confirmed the Myh11 decrease at the protein level. Immunohistochemistry of Acta2 confirmed cavernous smooth muscle cell loss at the tissue level. Also, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist exposure decreased Pde5a expression and dihydrotestosterone co-administration mitigated the decrease. Comparison of data between 2 parts of the penis body (corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum) showed that antagonist induced decreases in Myh11, Acta2 and Pde5a expression occurred only in the corpora cavernosa, implying that the latter is the target site of low androgen action. As evidenced by gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist induced suppression of the neonatal testosterone surge and reduced steroidogenesis, low androgens in the neonatal period altered gene expression of biomarkers of smooth muscle cell differentiation. This led to loss of cavernous smooth muscle cells and consequently to penile maldevelopment. Copyright

  5. Association of Calpain (CAPN) 10 (UCSNP-43, rs3792267) gene polymorphism with elevated serum androgens in young women with the most severe phenotype of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasia, Karela; Koika, Vasiliki; Roupas, Nikolaos D; Armeni, Anastasia; Marioli, Dimitra; Panidis, Dimitrios; George, Adonakis; Georgopoulos, Neoklis A

    2015-01-01

    To highlight a possible association of Calpain (CAPN 10) gene UCSNP-43 polymorphism with hormonal and metabolic traits of young women with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS women were genotyped for the CAPN 10 gene UCSNP-43 polymorphism. A comparison of clinical and biochemical features of women with PCOS stratified on the basis of the CAPN 10 gene UCSNP-43 variants was assessed. Anthropometric, hormonal and biochemical measurements were carried out in 668 PCOS women and 200 healthy controls. Subjects were also genotyped for the CAPN 10 gene UCSNP-43 polymorphism. The genotype frequency distributions between groups and controls were compared using the chi-square test. The association of the polymorphism with the clinical and biochemical features of the study cohort was estimated as well. No association of the frequency of CAPN 10 gene UCSNP-43 polymorphism with PCOS was detected. No association of the polymorphism with the anthropometric, biochemical and hormonal features was detected both in PCOS and control women. The polymorphism was associated with serum Δ4 androstenedione (p = 0.018), as well as with 17-OH progesterone (17-hydroxyprogesterone) among women with PCOS phenotype A (p = 0.012). CAPN 10 gene polymorphism UCSNP-43 is deprived of a metabolic contribution to cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, due to its association with androgen excess in phenotype A, CAPN 10 gene polymorphism UCSNP-43 could be used as a genetic marker for CVD in young PCOS women.

  6. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the.

  7. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  8. FUMET: A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FUMET: A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene expression data. PRIYAKSHI MAHANTA, HASIN AFZAL AHMED, DHRUBA KUMAR BHATTACHARYYA and ASHISH GHOSH http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci. J. Biosci. 39(3), June 2014, 351–364, © Indian Academy of Sciences. Supplementary material ...

  9. A simple screening method for detection of Klinefelter syndrome and other X-chromosome aneuploidies based on copy number of the androgen receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Garn, I D; Aksglaede, L

    2007-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence and variable phenotype of patients with Klinefelter syndrome, there is a need for a robust and rapid screening method allowing early diagnosis. Here, we report on the development and detailed clinical validation of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based method...... of the copy number assessment of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, located to Xq11.2-q12. We analysed samples from 50 individuals, including a healthy male and female controls and patients with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY; 48,XXXY) (n = 28), mosaicisms (46,XX/47,XXY/48XXYY; 45,X/46,XY) (n = 3), other sex......-gene expression. The XIST-expression based assay was correct in only 29/36 samples (81%). Our findings demonstrated that the AR-qPCR technique is a simple and reliable screening method for diagnosis of patients with Klinefelter syndrome or other chromosomal disorders involving an aberrant number of X-chromosomes....

  10. Comparison of the pharmacological effects of a novel selective androgen receptor modulator, the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride, and the antiandrogen hydroxyflutamide in intact rats: new approach for benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D; Nair, Vipin A; Chung, Kiwon; Parlow, A F; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2004-12-01

    Tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) demonstrate tissue selectivity in both castrated and intact male rats, behaving as partial agonists in androgenic tissues (i.e. prostate and seminal vesicle), but full agonists in anabolic tissues (i.e. levator ani muscle). The partial agonist activity of SARMs (compounds S-1 and S-4) in the prostate of intact rats suggested that SARM could be used for androgen suppression in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). This study was designed to explore the mechanisms of action of SARM and to characterize the tissue selectivity of S-1 in intact male rats compared with that of hydroxyflutamide (antiandrogen) and finasteride (5alpha-reductase inhibitor), two major drugs used for androgen suppression treatment of BPH. In intact male rats, S-1 (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg) selectively decreased the prostate weight with similar efficacy to finasteride (5 mg/kg), without affecting the levator ani muscle or increasing the plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. Hydroxyflutamide (0.5, 1, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg), however, decreased both the prostate and levator ani muscle weights without any selectivity and increased plasma hormone levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, S-1 and S-4 showed very weak inhibitory effects toward transiently expressed type I and II human 5alpha-reductase (Ki, >20 microm) during in vitro assays. Therefore, although S-1 and finasteride showed very similar suppressive effects in the prostate of intact male rats, they decreased prostate size via different mechanisms of action. S-1 simply worked as androgen receptor partial agonist, whereas finasteride inhibited prostatic 5alpha-reductase. These studies indicate that SARMs may demonstrate clinical utility as single agent or combination therapy for BPH.

  11. Comparison of the Pharmacological Effects of a Novel Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, the 5α-Reductase Inhibitor Finasteride, and the Antiandrogen Hydroxyflutamide in Intact Rats: New Approach for Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D.; Nair, Vipin A.; Chung, Kiwon; Parlow, A. F.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) demonstrate tissue selectivity in both castrated and intact male rats, behaving as partial agonists in androgenic tissues (i.e. prostate and seminal vesicle), but full agonists in anabolic tissues (i.e. levator ani muscle). The partial agonist activity of SARMs (compounds S-1 and S-4) in the prostate of intact rats suggested that SARM could be used for androgen suppression in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). This study was designed to explore the mechanisms of action of SARM and to characterize the tissue selectivity of S-1 in intact male rats compared with that of hydroxyflutamide (antiandrogen) and finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor), two major drugs used for androgen suppression treatment of BPH. In intact male rats, S-1 (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg) selectively decreased the prostate weight with similar efficacy to finasteride (5 mg/kg), without affecting the levator ani muscle or increasing the plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. Hydroxyflutamide (0.5, 1, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg), however, decreased both the prostate and levator ani muscle weights without any selectivity and increased plasma hormone levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, S-1 and S-4 showed very weak inhibitory effects toward transiently expressed type I and II human 5α-reductase (Ki, >20 µM) during in vitro assays. Therefore, although S-1 and finasteride showed very similar suppressive effects in the prostate of intact male rats, they decreased prostate size via different mechanisms of action. S-1 simply worked as androgen receptor partial agonist, whereas finasteride inhibited prostatic 5α-reductase. These studies indicate that SARMs may demonstrate clinical utility as single agent or combination therapy for BPH. PMID:15308613

  12. The Prognostic Role of Androgen Receptor in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Clinical and Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, Ivana; Zardavas, Dimitrios; Brohée, Sylvain; Ameye, Lieveke; Fumagalli, Debora; Ades, Felipe; de Azambuja, Evandro; Bareche, Yacine; Piccart, Martine; Paesmans, Marianne; Sotiriou, Christos

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Androgen receptor (AR) expression has been observed in about 70% of patients with breast cancer, but its prognostic role remains uncertain. Experimental Design: To assess the prognostic role of AR expression in early-stage breast cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of studies that evaluated the impact of AR at the protein and gene expression level on disease-free survival (DFS) and/or overall survival (OS). Eligible studies were identified by systematic review of electronic databases using the MeSH-terms "breast neoplasm" and "androgen receptor" and were selected after a qualitative assessment based on the REMARK criteria. A pooled gene expression analysis of 35 publicly available microarray data sets was also performed from patients with early-stage breast cancer with available gene expression and clinical outcome data. Results: Twenty-two of 33 eligible studies for the clinical meta-analysis, including 10,004 patients, were considered as evaluable for the current study after the qualitative assessment. AR positivity defined by IHC was associated with improved DFS in all patients with breast cancer [multivariate (M) analysis, HR 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37-0.58, P expression analysis. High AR mRNA levels were found to confer positive prognosis overall in terms of DFS (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.72-0.92; P = 0.0007) and OS (HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75-0.94; P = 0.02) only in univariate analysis. Conclusions: Our analysis, conducted among more than 17,000 women with early-stage breast cancer included in clinical and gene expression analysis, demonstrates that AR positivity is associated with favorable clinical outcome. Clin Cancer Res; 23(11); 2702-12. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanism from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-31

    except that no salmon sperm DNA was used as blocking reagent. The immunoprecipitated DNA and un- enriched input DNA were treated with RNase A and purified...A, Wang Y, Suzuki K, Mirosevich J, et al. (2005) Foxa1 and Foxa2 interact with the androgen receptor to regulate prostate and epididymal genes

  14. Network Diffusion-Based Prioritization of Autism Risk Genes Identifies Significantly Connected Gene Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Mosca

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is marked by a strong genetic heterogeneity, which is underlined by the low overlap between ASD risk gene lists proposed in different studies. In this context, molecular networks can be used to analyze the results of several genome-wide studies in order to underline those network regions harboring genetic variations associated with ASD, the so-called “disease modules.” In this work, we used a recent network diffusion-based approach to jointly analyze multiple ASD risk gene lists. We defined genome-scale prioritizations of human genes in relation to ASD genes from multiple studies, found significantly connected gene modules associated with ASD and predicted genes functionally related to ASD risk genes. Most of them play a role in synapsis and neuronal development and function; many are related to syndromes that can be in comorbidity with ASD and the remaining are involved in epigenetics, cell cycle, cell adhesion and cancer.

  15. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Min; Wu, Kai-Jie; Dang, Qiang; Shi, Qi; Gao, Yang; Guo, Peng; Xu, Shan; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin; Gong, Yong-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR) protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b). Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  16. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Min Ma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b. Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  17. Symbiont modulates expression of specific gene categories in Angomonas deanei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Loureiro Penha

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are parasites that cause disease in humans, animals, and plants. Most are non-pathogenic and some harbor a symbiotic bacterium. Endosymbiosis is part of the evolutionary process of vital cell functions such as respiration and photosynthesis. Angomonas deanei is an example of a symbiont-containing trypanosomatid. In this paper, we sought to investigate how symbionts influence host cells by characterising and comparing the transcriptomes of the symbiont-containing A. deanei (wild type and the symbiont-free aposymbiotic strains. The comparison revealed that the presence of the symbiont modulates several differentially expressed genes. Empirical analysis of differential gene expression showed that 216 of the 7625 modulated genes were significantly changed. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the largest categories of genes that downregulated in the absence of the symbiont were those involved in oxidation-reduction process, ATP hydrolysis coupled proton transport and glycolysis. In contrast, among the upregulated gene categories were those involved in proteolysis, microtubule-based movement, and cellular metabolic process. Our results provide valuable information for dissecting the mechanism of endosymbiosis in A. deanei.

  18. PSA and androgen-related gene (AR, CYP17, and CYP19) polymorphisms and the risk of adenocarcinoma at prostate biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Mattos; de Jesus, Carlos Márcio Nóbrega; Trindade Filho, José Carlos Souza

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of polymorphisms in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and androgen-related genes (AR, CYP17, and CYP19) on prostate cancer (PCa) risk in selected high-risk patients who underwent prostate biopsy. Blood samples and prostate tissues were obtained...... for DNA analysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 50-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the PSA (substitution A>G at position-158) and CYP17 (substitution T>C at 50-UTR) genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism assays. The CAG and TTTA repeats...... in the AR and CYP19 genes, respectively, were genotyped by PCR-based GeneScan analysis. Patients with the GG genotype of the PSA gene had a higher risk of PCa than those with the AG or AA genotype (OR=3.79, p=0.00138). The AA genotype was associated with lower PSA levels (6.44 +/- 1.64 ng=mL) compared...

  19. Investigation of the selective androgen receptor modulators S1, S4 and S22 and their metabolites in equine plasma using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Annelie; Knych, Heather; Stanley, Scott; Thevis, Mario; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2016-04-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are prohibited in sports due to their performance enhancing ability. It is important to investigate the metabolism to determine appropriate targets for doping control. This is the first study where the equine metabolites of SARMs S1, S4 (Andarine) and S22 (Ostarine) have been studied in plasma. Each SARM was administered to three horses as an intravenous bolus dose and plasma samples were collected. The samples were pretreated with protein precipitation using cold acetonitrile before separation by liquid chromatography. The mass spectrometric analysis was performed using negative electrospray, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry operated in MS(E) mode and triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry operated in selected reaction monitoring mode. For the quantification of SARM S1, a deuterated analogue was used as internal standard. The numbers of observed metabolites were eight, nine and four for the SARMs S1, S4 and S22, respectively. The major metabolite was formed by the same metabolic reactions for all three SARMs, namely amide hydrolysis, hydroxylation and sulfonation. The values of the determined maximum plasma concentrations were in the range of 97-170 ng/mL for SARM S1, 95-115 ng/mL for SARM S4 and 92-147 ng/mL for SARM S22 and the compounds could be detected for 96 h, 12 h and 18 h, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration of SARMs S1, S4 and S22 was measured in the first sample (5 min) after administration and they were eliminated fast from plasma. The proposed targets to be used in equine doping control are the parent compounds for all three SARMs, but with the metabolite yielding the highest response as a complementary target. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Androgenic Regulation of Male Sexual Behavior and Physiology in the Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus Auratus)

    OpenAIRE

    Piekarski, David John

    2012-01-01

    The androgen testosterone (T) and its metabolite, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), are released from the gonads and act in the brain and periphery to control many male-typical traits, including male sexual behavior (MSB). The classical model of androgenic action asserts that T, or DHT binds to a single species of intracellular androgen receptor (AR), that acts as a transcription factor to induce transactivation of androgen-regulated genes. Accordingly, androgens may take hours or days to assert t...

  1. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: gonadal androgen receptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulam, C.B.; Graham, M.L.; Spelsberg, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether abnormalities of the androgen receptor previously observed in skin fibroblasts from patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome also occur in the gonads of affected individuals, androgen receptor activity in the gonads of a patient with testicular feminization syndrome was investigated. Using conditions for optimal recovery of androgen receptor from human testes established by previous studies, we detected the presence of a high-affinity (dissociation constant . 3.2 X 10(-10) mol/L), low-capacity (4.2 X 10(-12) mol/mg DNA), androgen-binding protein when tritium-labeled R1881 was incubated at 4 degrees C with nuclear extracts from the gonads of control patients or from a patient with testicular feminization syndrome but not when incubated at 37 degrees C. Thus this patient has an androgen receptor with a temperature lability similar to that of receptors from normal persons

  2. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox SW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shea W Wilcox,1,4 Noel J Aherne,2,4 Linus C Benjamin,1 Bosco Wu,1 Thomaz de Campos Silva,3 Craig S McLachlan,4 Michael J McKay,3,5 Andrew J Last,1 Thomas P Shakespeare1–4 1North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 2North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 3North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 4The University of New South Wales, Rural Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT and ADT. Methods and materials: Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results: Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2

  3. Antioxidants Abrogate Alpha-Tocopherylquinone-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Androgen Receptor in Androgen-Responsive Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Fajardo

    Full Text Available Tocopherylquinone (TQ, the oxidation product of alpha-tocopherol (AT, is a bioactive molecule with distinct properties from AT. In this study, AT and TQ are investigated for their comparative effects on growth and androgenic activity in prostate cancer cells. TQ potently inhibited the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines (e.g., LAPC4 and LNCaP cells, whereas the growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (e.g., DU145 cells was not affected by TQ. Due to the growth inhibitory effects induced by TQ on androgen-responsive cells, the anti-androgenic properties of TQ were examined. TQ inhibited the androgen-induced activation of an androgen-responsive reporter and inhibited the release of prostate specific antigen from LNCaP cells. TQ pretreatment was also found to inhibit AR activation as measured using the Multifunctional Androgen Receptor Screening assay. Furthermore, TQ decreased androgen-responsive gene expression, including TM4SF1, KLK2, and PSA over 5-fold, whereas AT did not affect the expression of androgen-responsive genes. Of importance, the antiandrogenic effects of TQ on prostate cancer cells were found to result from androgen receptor protein down-regulation produced by TQ that was not observed with AT treatment. Moreover, none of the androgenic endpoints assessed were affected by AT. The down-regulation of androgen receptor protein by TQ was abrogated by co-treatment with antioxidants. Overall, the biological actions of TQ were found to be distinct from AT, where TQ was found to be a potent inhibitor of cell growth and androgenic activity in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells.

  4. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  5. Sequence Evolution and Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Other Pathway-Related Genes in a Unisexual Fish, the Amazon Molly, Poecilia formosa, and Its Bisexual Ancestors.

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    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa originated from a single hybridization of two bisexual ancestors, Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna. As a gynogenetic species, the Amazon molly needs to copulate with a heterospecific male, but the genetic information of the sperm-donor does not contribute to the next generation, as the sperm only acts as the trigger for the diploid eggs' embryogenesis. Here, we study the sequence evolution and gene expression of the duplicated genes coding for androgen receptors (ars and other pathway-related genes, i.e., the estrogen receptors (ers and cytochrome P450, family19, subfamily A, aromatase genes (cyp19as, in the Amazon molly, in comparison to its bisexual ancestors. Mollies possess-as most other teleost fish-two copies of the ar, er, and cyp19a genes, i.e., arα/arβ, erα/erβ1, and cyp19a1 (also referred as cyp19a1a/cyp19a2 (also referred to as cyp19a1b, respectively. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among the ancestral bisexual species were generally predicted not to alter protein function. Some derived substitutions in the P. mexicana and one in P. formosa are predicted to impact protein function. We also describe the gene expression pattern of the ars and pathway-related genes in various tissues (i.e., brain, gill, and ovary and provide SNP markers for allele specific expression research. As a general tendency, the levels of gene expression were lowest in gill and highest in ovarian tissues, while expression levels in the brain were intermediate in most cases. Expression levels in P. formosa were conserved where expression did not differ between the two bisexual ancestors. In those cases where gene expression levels significantly differed between the bisexual species, P. formosa expression was always comparable to the higher expression level among the two ancestors. Interestingly, erβ1 was expressed neither in brain nor in gill in the

  6. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

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    Marjorie S Morgan

    Full Text Available The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  7. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

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    Morgan, Marjorie S; Arlian, Larry G; Markey, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs) that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  8. Knock-out transmembrane prostate androgen-induced protein gene suppressed triple-negative breast cancer cell proliferation

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    Bantari W.K. Wardhani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC tends to grow more rapidly and has poorer prognosis compared to others. High expression of transmembrane prostate androgen-induced protein (TMEPAI correlates with poor prognosis in TNBC patients. However, the mechanistic role of TMEPAI in tumorigenic remains unknown. This study aimed to knock-out TMEPAI in TNBC cell line to determine its function further in cells proliferation.Methods: CRISPR-Cas9 has been used previously to knock-out TMEPAI in Hs857T TNBC cell line. Hs587T TNBC parental cell line (wild-type/WT and TMEPAI knock out Hs 586T cell lines were cultured in Dulbecco’s modified eagle medium (DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% penicillin-streptomycin and amphotericin B. Both cell lines were seeded in 24-well plates and counted every two days, then proliferation rates were plotted. Afterwards, total RNA were isolated from the cells and Ki-67, and TGF-β mRNA expression levels as proliferation markers were determined.Results: Cell proliferation rates as displayed in growth curve plots showed that WT-TMEPAI cell line grew more rapidly than KO-TMEPAI. In accordance, mRNA expression levels of  Ki-67 and TGF-β  were significantly decreased KO-TMEPAI as compare to TMEPAI-WT.Conclusion: Knock-out of TMEPAI attenuates cell proliferation in TNBC.

  9. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism independently influences recovery of male sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy in postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

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    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Delli Muti, Nicola; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Few and contradictory studies have evaluated the possible influence of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism on male sexual function. In this study we evaluated the role of AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism in the recovery of sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition which is often associated with hypopituitarism and in which the sexual benefits of TRT must be distinguished from those of pituitary-function replacement therapies. Fifteen men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT. Main outcome measures included sexual parameters as assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, levels of pituitary dependent hormones (total testosterone, free T3, free T4, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 [IGF-1], prolactin), and results of genetic analysis (AR gene CAG repeat number). Plasma concentrations of free T3, free T4, cortisol, and prolactin did not vary significantly between the two phases, while testosterone and IGF-1 increased significantly after TRT. A significant improvement in all sexual parameters studied was found. The number of CAG triplets was negatively and significantly correlated with changes in all the sexual parameters, while opposite correlations were found between changes in sexual parameters and changes in testosterone levels; no correlation of change in IGF1 with change in sexual parameters was reported. On multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for changes in testosterone, nearly all the associations between the number of CAG triplets and changes in sexual parameters were confirmed. Shorter length AR gene CAG repeat number is associated with the recovery of sexual function after TRT in postsurgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, independently of the effects of concomitant pituitary-replacement therapies. © 2014 International Society

  10. Liver X Receptor Genes Variants Modulate ALS Phenotype.

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    Mouzat, Kevin; Molinari, Nicolas; Kantar, Jovana; Polge, Anne; Corcia, Philippe; Couratier, Philippe; Clavelou, Pierre; Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Lobaccaro, Jean -Marc A; Raoul, Cedric; Lumbroso, Serge; Camu, William

    2018-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe motor neuron (MN) disorders in adults. Phenotype of ALS patients is highly variable and may be influenced by modulators of energy metabolism. Recent works have implicated the liver X receptors α and β (LXRs), either in the propagation process of ALS or in the maintenance of MN survival. LXRs are nuclear receptors activated by oxysterols, modulating cholesterol levels, a suspected modulator of ALS severity. In a cohort of 438 ALS patients and 330 healthy controls, the influence of LXR genes on ALS risk and phenotype was studied using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The two LXRα SNPs rs2279238 and rs7120118 were shown to be associated with age at onset in ALS patients. Consistently, homozygotes were twice more correlated than were heterozygotes to delayed onset. The onset was thus delayed by 3.9 years for rs2279238 C/T carriers and 7.8 years for T/T carriers. Similar results were obtained for rs7120118 (+2.1 years and +6.7 years for T/C and C/C genotypes, respectively). The LXRβ SNP rs2695121 was also shown to be associated with a 30% increase of ALS duration (p = 0.0055, FDR = 0.044). The tested genotypes were not associated with ALS risk. These findings add further evidence to the suspected implication of LXR genes in the disease process of ALS and might open new perspectives in ALS therapeutics.

  11. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA) & androgen receptor (AR) genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Sushant V; Maitra, Anurupa; Roy, Nobhojit; Chavan, Padma R

    2014-03-01

    Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR) genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG) repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (PPSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (PPSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (PPSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short) was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression.

  12. Localization of genes modulating the predisposition to schizophrenia: a revision

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    E.Z. Lopes-Machado

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetics of schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder has advanced greatly at the molecular level since the introduction of probes for the localization of specific genes. Research on gene candidates for susceptibility to schizophrenia can broadly be divided into two types, i.e., linkage studies, where a gene is found near a specific DNA marker on a specific chromosome, and association studies, when a condition is associated with a specific allele of a specific gene. This review covers a decade of publications in this area, from the 1988 works of Bassett et al. and Sherrington et al. on a gene localized on the long arm of chromosome 5 at the 5q11-13 loci, to the 1997 work of Lin et al. pointing to the 13q14.1-q32 loci of chromosome 13 and to the 1998 work of Wright et al. on an HLA DRB1 gene locus on chromosome 6 at 6p21-3. The most replicated loci were those in the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q12-q13.1 and on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p24-22. In this critical review of the molecular genetic studies involved in the localization of genes which modulate the predisposition to schizophrenia the high variability in the results obtained by different workers suggests that multiple loci are involved in the predisposition to this illness.A genética da esquizofrenia (como também do distúrbio bipolar teve grande avanço a partir da descoberta, a nível de genética molecular, da técnica de localização de genes com uso de sondas de DNA (Botstein et al., 1980. Os estudos que procuram "genes candidatos" a exercerem algum papel na susceptibilidade à esquizofrenia são, basicamente, de dois tipos: de ligação ("linkage" e de associação. Quando, à luz da genética molecular, um gene é localizado próximo a um marcador de DNA específico no cromossomo, fala-se em estudo "de ligação". Por outro lado, quando a doença é associada a um alelo específico de um determinado gene, fala-se em estudo "de associação". Esta revisão cobriu uma d

  13. The para substituent of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamides is a major structural determinant of in vivo disposition and activity of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyun; Wu, Di; Hwang, Dong Jin; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2005-10-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have many potential therapeutic applications, including male hypogonadism, osteoporosis, muscle-wasting diseases, sexual libido, and contraception. A series of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamides bearing a four-halogen substituent in the B-ring that displayed in vivo activity were identified in our previous study. Interestingly, in vivo pharmacological activity was not correlated with in vitro androgen receptor (AR) binding affinity. In this study, analysis of the area under the concentration-time curve-response relationship demonstrated that the discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activity of these halogen-substituted SARMs was due to differences in systemic exposure rather than intrinsic pharmacological activity. Studies also suggested that two simple criteria (i.e., Ki SARMs. We tested this hypothesis using a series of four compounds incorporating either a nitro or cyano substituent at the para-position of the A- and B-aromatic rings. The S-3-(4-nitrophenoxy) and S-3-(4-cyanophenoxy) 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluromethylphenyl) propionamides (S-19 and S-20, respectively) and S-3-(4-nitrophenoxy) and S-3-(4-cyanophenoxy) 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-cyano-3-trifluromethylphenyl) propionamides (S-21 and S-22, respectively) demonstrated high AR binding affinity, with Ki values ranging from 2.0 to 3.8 nM. Pharmacokinetic studies of selected compounds showed that the in vivo clearance of S-22 was the slowest followed sequentially by S-20, S-21, and S-19. The dose-response relationships for S-22 showed that S-22 exerted efficacious and selective activity in anabolic tissues at dose rates as low as 0.03 mg/day, indicative of the high potency of this compound in anabolic tissue (relative potency 4.41) and its potential for clinical use in androgen deficiency-related disorders.

  14. Omics for Investigating Chitosan as an Antifungal and Gene Modulator

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    Federico Lopez-Moya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a biopolymer with a wide range of applications. The use of chitosan in clinical medicine to control infections by fungal pathogens such as Candida spp. is one of its most promising applications in view of the reduced number of antifungals available. Chitosan increases intracellular oxidative stress, then permeabilizes the plasma membrane of sensitive filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and yeast. Transcriptomics reveals plasma membrane homeostasis and oxidative metabolism genes as key players in the response of fungi to chitosan. A lipase and a monosaccharide transporter, both inner plasma membrane proteins, and a glutathione transferase are main chitosan targets in N. crassa. Biocontrol fungi such as Pochonia chlamydosporia have a low content of polyunsaturated free fatty acids in their plasma membranes and are resistant to chitosan. Genome sequencing of P. chlamydosporia reveals a wide gene machinery to degrade and assimilate chitosan. Chitosan increases P. chlamydosporia sporulation and enhances parasitism of plant parasitic nematodes by the fungus. Omics studies allow understanding the mode of action of chitosan and help its development as an antifungal and gene modulator.

  15. Cystatin C Is Downregulated in Prostate Cancer and Modulates Invasion of Prostate Cancer Cells via MAPK/Erk and Androgen Receptor Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Wegiel, Barbara; Jiborn, Thomas; Abrahamson, Magnus; Helczynski, Leszek; Otterbein, Leo; Persson, Jenny Liao; Bjartell, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Cystatin C is believed to prevent tumor progression by inhibiting the activities of a family of lysosomal cysteine proteases. However, little is known about the precise mechanism of cystatin C function in prostate cancer. In the present study, we examined the expression of cystatin C and its association with matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP2) and androgen receptor (AR) in a tissue microarray comparing benign and malignant specimens from 448 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for loc...

  16. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Potentially harmful advantage to athletes: a putative connection between UGT2B17 gene deletion polymorphism and renal disorders with prolonged use of anabolic androgenic steroids

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    Barker James

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective With prolonged use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS, occasional incidents of renal disorders have been observed. Independently, it has also been established that there are considerable inter-individual and inter-ethnic differences, in particular with reference to the uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 2B17 (UGT2B17 gene, in metabolising these compounds. This report postulates the association of deletion polymorphism in the UGT2B17 gene with the occurrence of renal disorders on chronic exposure to AAS. Presentation of the hypothesis The major deactivation and elimination pathway of AASs is through glucuronide conjugation, chiefly catalyzed by the UGT2B17 enzyme, followed by excretion in urine. Excretion of steroids is affected in individuals with a deletion mutation in the UGT2B17 gene. We hypothesize that UGT2B17 deficient individuals are more vulnerable to developing renal disorders with prolonged use of AAS owing to increases in body mass index and possible direct toxic effects of steroids on the kidneys. Elevated serum levels of biologically active steroids due to inadequate elimination can lead to prolonged muscle build up. An increase in body mass index may cause renal injuries due to sustained elevated glomerular pressure and flow rate. Testing the hypothesis In the absence of controlled clinical trials in humans, observational studies can be carried out. Real time PCR with allelic discrimination should be employed to examine the prevalence of different UGT2B17 genotypes in patients with impaired renal function and AAS abuse. In individuals with the UGT2B17 deletion polymorphism, blood tests, biofluid analyses, urinalysis, and hair analyses following the administration of an anabolic steroid can be used to determine the fate of the substance once in the body. Implications of the hypothesis If the hypothesis is upheld, anabolic steroid users with a deletion mutation in the UGT2B17 gene may be

  18. Androgen regulation of prostate cancer: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, G; Baldi, E; Maggi, M

    2011-03-01

    Androgens play an essential role in the development and differentiation of the prostate gland; their contribution to pathological conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (PC), remains unclear. We reviewed relationships between androgens and the prostate both in physiological and pathological conditions. A systematic search of published evidence was performed using Medline (1969 to September 2010). Androgen-dependency of prostate growth is evident only in the hypogonadal condition, but not in the eugonadal state (the "saturation hypothesis"). There is unequivocal evidence that reducing androgen signaling to the hypogonadal range can reduce PC growth and patient symptoms. At physiological testosterone concentration there is no link between androgen levels and PC risk. In addition, different strategies of androgen deprivation (ADT) for advanced PC are only palliative and rarely cure patients. Preliminary evidence indicates that a low androgen milieu is associated with tumor aggressiveness. Transition to androgen-independence is complex and involves both selection and outgrowth of preexisting androgen resistant clones, as well as adaptative upregulation of genes that help the cancer cells to survive and grow after ADT. Because androgens are essential for the regulation of fat distribution, insulin sensitivity, and lipid and bone metabolism, recent publications have highlighted the concept that ADT may also be involved with an increase in overall, as well as cardiovascular, morbidity and mortality. While ADT still represents a cornerstone for the palliative therapy of a small fraction of aggressive PC, a "misuse and/or abuse" of ADT should be avoided.

  19. Molecular and Biochemical Effects of a Kola Nut Extract on Androgen Receptor-Mediated Pathways

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    Rajasree Solipuram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The low incidence of prostate cancer in Asians has been attributed to chemopreventative properties of certain chemicals found in their diet. This study characterized the androgenic and chemopreventative properties of the Jamaican bush tea “Bizzy,” using androgen receptor positive and negative cell lines. Exposure of prostate cells to Biz-2 resulted in a growth inhibition (GI50 of 15 ppm in LNCaP cells and 3.6 ppm in DU145 cells. Biz-2 elicited a 2-fold increase in the mRNA of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2, with a 10-fold increase in that of the proapoptotic gene Bax. We observed a 2.4- to 7.5-fold change in apoptotic cells in both cell lines. Biz-2 at 10 ppm elicited a time- and dose-dependent stimulation of both the protein and mRNA levels of several androgen-regulated genes. Biz-2 caused a 36% decrease in PSA secretion and a significant increase in PSA mRNA. The relative binding affinity (IC50 of Biz-2 for AR was 2- to 5-fold lower than that of the synthetic androgen R1881. Biz-2 was found to be a specific ligand for the AR in that the natural ligand, DHT, and the anti-androgen, flutamide, displaced Biz-2 bound to AR and inhibited Biz-2-induced transcription and PSA secretion. This study provided evidence that Biz-2 extract possesses the ability to modulate prostate cancer cell biology in an AR-dependent manner.

  20. Mental rotation in intellectually gifted boys is affected by the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Lakatošová, Silvia; Kubranská, Aneta; Laznibatová, Jolana; Ficek, Andrej; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone was shown to organize brain and modulate cognitive functions. It is currently unknown whether mental rotation is also associated with prenatal testosterone exposure and testosterone-related genetic polymorphisms. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between mental rotation performance, the actual testosterone levels, the prenatal testosterone level (expressed as 2D:4D ratio) and the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism in intellectually gifted boys. One hundred forty-seven boys aged 10-18 years with IQ>130 were enrolled. Saliva samples were collected and used for ELISA of actual levels of salivary testosterone. The 2D:4D finger length ratio as an indicator of prenatal testosterone was measured on both hands and averaged. Amthauer mental rotation test was used for the assessment of this spatial ability. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene was analyzed using PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Linear regression revealed that 2D:4D finger length ratio and the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene were associated with mental rotation. Actual levels of testosterone did not correlate significantly with mental rotation. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that after adjustment of age as a confounding variable, only the effect of the genetic polymorphism was significant. The results are in line with our previous genetic analysis of intellectually gifted boys showing the importance of CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene. Details of the interactions between androgen signaling, testosterone levels and its metabolism especially during the prenatal development of brain function remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dopamine Receptor Genes Modulate Associative Memory in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, Goran; Becker, Nina; Ferencz, Beata; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Laukka, Erika J; Bäckman, Lars; Brehmer, Yvonne

    2017-02-01

    Previous research shows that associative memory declines more than item memory in aging. Although the underlying mechanisms of this selective impairment remain poorly understood, animal and human data suggest that dopaminergic modulation may be particularly relevant for associative binding. We investigated the influence of dopamine (DA) receptor genes on item and associative memory in a population-based sample of older adults (n = 525, aged 60 years), assessed with a face-scene item associative memory task. The effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of DA D1 (DRD1; rs4532), D2 (DRD2/ANKK1/Taq1A; rs1800497), and D3 (DRD3/Ser9Gly; rs6280) receptor genes were examined and combined into a single genetic score. Individuals carrying more beneficial alleles, presumably associated with higher DA receptor efficacy (DRD1 C allele; DRD2 A2 allele; DRD3 T allele), performed better on associative memory than persons with less beneficial genotypes. There were no effects of these genes on item memory or other cognitive measures, such as working memory, executive functioning, fluency, and perceptual speed, indicating a selective association between DA genes and associative memory. By contrast, genetic risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) was associated with worse item and associative memory, indicating adverse effects of APOE ε4 and a genetic risk score for AD (PICALM, BIN1, CLU) on episodic memory in general. Taken together, our results suggest that DA may be particularly important for associative memory, whereas AD-related genetic variations may influence overall episodic memory in older adults without dementia.

  2. The paf gene product modulates asexual development in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Pócsi, Istvan; Marx, Florentine

    2011-06-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum secretes a low molecular weight, cationic and cysteine-rich protein (PAF). It has growth inhibitory activity against the model organism Aspergillus nidulans and numerous zoo- and phytopathogenic fungi but shows only minimal conditional antifungal activity against the producing organism itself. In this study we provide evidence for an additional function of PAF which is distinct from the antifungal activity against putative ecologically concurrent microorganisms. Our data indicate that PAF enhances conidiation in P. chrysogenum by modulating the expression of brlA, the central regulatory gene for mitospore development. A paf deletion strain showed a significant impairment of mitospore formation which sustains our hypothesis that PAF plays an important role in balancing asexual differentiation in P. chrysogenum. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Down-regulation of DcR2 sensitizes androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindrieux David

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of many apoptotic related genes and androgens are critical in the development, progression, and treatment of prostate cancer. The differential sensitivity of tumour cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis can be mediated by the modulation of surface TRAIL receptor expression related to androgen concentration. Our previous results led to the hypothesis that downregulation of TRAIL-decoy receptor DcR2 expression following androgen deprivation would leave hormone sensitive normal prostate cells vulnerable to the cell death signal generated by TRAIL via its pro-apoptotic receptors. We tested this hypothesis under pathological conditions by exploring the regulation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis related to their death and decoy receptor expression, as also to hormonal concentrations in androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer, LNCaP, cells. Results In contrast to androgen-insensitive PC3 cells, decoy (DcR2 and death (DR5 receptor protein expression was correlated with hormone concentrations and TRAIL-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. Silencing of androgen-sensitive DcR2 protein expression by siRNA led to a significant increase in TRAIL-mediated apoptosis related to androgen concentration in LNCaP cells. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that hormone modulation of DcR2 expression regulates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells, giving insight into cell death induction in apoptosis-resistant hormone-sensitive tumour cells from prostate cancer. TRAIL action and DcR2 expression modulation are potentially of clinical value in advanced tumour treatment.

  4. Conserved gene regulatory module specifies lateral neural borders across bilaterians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbin; Zhao, Di; Horie, Takeo; Chen, Geng; Bao, Hongcun; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Weihong; Horie, Ryoko; Liang, Tao; Dong, Biyu; Feng, Qianqian; Tao, Qinghua; Liu, Xiao

    2017-08-01

    The lateral neural plate border (NPB), the neural part of the vertebrate neural border, is composed of central nervous system (CNS) progenitors and peripheral nervous system (PNS) progenitors. In invertebrates, PNS progenitors are also juxtaposed to the lateral boundary of the CNS. Whether there are conserved molecular mechanisms determining vertebrate and invertebrate lateral neural borders remains unclear. Using single-cell-resolution gene-expression profiling and genetic analysis, we present evidence that orthologs of the NPB specification module specify the invertebrate lateral neural border, which is composed of CNS and PNS progenitors. First, like in vertebrates, the conserved neuroectoderm lateral border specifier Msx/vab-15 specifies lateral neuroblasts in Caenorhabditis elegans Second, orthologs of the vertebrate NPB specification module ( Msx/vab-15 , Pax3/7/pax-3 , and Zic/ref-2 ) are significantly enriched in worm lateral neuroblasts. In addition, like in other bilaterians, the expression domain of Msx/vab-15 is more lateral than those of Pax3/7/pax-3 and Zic/ref- 2 in C. elegans Third, we show that Msx/vab-15 regulates the development of mechanosensory neurons derived from lateral neural progenitors in multiple invertebrate species, including C. elegans , Drosophila melanogaster , and Ciona intestinalis We also identify a novel lateral neural border specifier, ZNF703/tlp-1 , which functions synergistically with Msx/vab- 15 in both C. elegans and Xenopus laevis These data suggest a common origin of the molecular mechanism specifying lateral neural borders across bilaterians.

  5. Prostate cancer: molecular biology of early progression to androgen independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadar, M D; Hussain, M; Bruchovsky, N

    1999-12-01

    To improve the therapy for prostate cancer, it will be necessary to address the problems of progression to androgen independence and the process of metastatic spread of tumour. The complexity of the latter condition is likely to mitigate against the immediate development of relevant therapeutic approaches. However, the basis of androgen independence appears to be a problem of simpler dimensions and more amenable to treatment with current therapeutic technology. Since early tumour progression can be detected by an incomplete prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to androgen withdrawal therapy, a study of the molecular biology of PSA gene regulation may well provide insight into new methods for preventing or delaying this problem. Mounting evidence suggests that ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor may be one underlying mechanism of androgen independence. In the absence of androgen, a compensatory increase in the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) enhances the ability of the androgen receptor to bind to the response elements regulating PSA gene expression. The activation of the androgen receptor through up-regulation of the PKA signal transduction pathway involves the amino-terminus of the androgen receptor, the function of which may be altered either by modifications such as phosphorylation, or through interactions with co-regulators or other proteins. Of therapeutic interest is the fact that this effect can be counteracted experimentally by the anti-androgen, bicalutamide, and clinically by several other similar agents. We speculate that the inhibition of PKA-activated androgen receptor might also be accomplished by decoy molecules that can bind to the relevant activated site on the amino-terminus or competitively interact with proteins recruited by the PKA pathway that are responsible for activating the receptor in the absence of androgen. Such molecules might include small mimetic substances or agents that can gain access to the

  6. A Gene Module-Based eQTL Analysis Prioritizing Disease Genes and Pathways in Kidney Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Qu Yang

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is the most common and most aggressive form of renal cell cancer (RCC. The incidence of RCC has increased steadily in recent years. The pathogenesis of renal cell cancer remains poorly understood. Many of the tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and dysregulated pathways in ccRCC need to be revealed for improvement of the overall clinical outlook of the disease. Here, we developed a systems biology approach to prioritize the somatic mutated genes that lead to dysregulation of pathways in ccRCC. The method integrated multi-layer information to infer causative mutations and disease genes. First, we identified differential gene modules in ccRCC by coupling transcriptome and protein-protein interactions. Each of these modules consisted of interacting genes that were involved in similar biological processes and their combined expression alterations were significantly associated with disease type. Then, subsequent gene module-based eQTL analysis revealed somatic mutated genes that had driven the expression alterations of differential gene modules. Our study yielded a list of candidate disease genes, including several known ccRCC causative genes such as BAP1 and PBRM1, as well as novel genes such as NOD2, RRM1, CSRNP1, SLC4A2, TTLL1 and CNTN1. The differential gene modules and their driver genes revealed by our study provided a new perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Moreover, we validated the results in independent ccRCC patient datasets. Our study provided a new method for prioritizing disease genes and pathways. Keywords: ccRCC, Causative mutation, Pathways, Protein-protein interaction, Gene module, eQTL

  7. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    hormones that play a critical role in stimulating prostate cancer growth . Androgens activate a protein called the androgen receptor (AR), which...variants, and evaluating if they block androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth . To understand how these molecule blocks AR function , we will...regulates genes involved in cell growth . Although powerful anti-androgen drugs can be administered to block AR action and have been used successfully to

  8. Complete direct sequencing of the entire AR gene in 45 unrelated patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome: Mutations identified in 32 patients (18 novel mutations), no mutation detected in 13 other patients (29%)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mebarki, F.; Forest, M.G.; Josso, N. [Hospital Debrousse, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The androgen insensivity syndrome (AIS) is a recessive X-linked disorder resulting from a deficient function of the androgen receptor (AR). The human AR gene has 3 functional domains: N-terminal encoded by exon 1, DNA-binding domain encoded by exons 2 and 3, and androgen-binding domain encoded by exons 4 to 8. In order to characterize the molecular defects of the AR gene in AIS, the entire coding regions and the intronic bording sequences of the AR gene were amplified by PCR before automatic direct sequencing in 45 patients. Twenty seven different point mutations were found in 32 unrelated AIS patients: 18 with a complete form (CAIS), 14 with a partial form (PAIS); 18 of these mutations are novel mutations, not published to date. Only 3 mutations were repeatedly found: R804H in 3 families; M780I in 3 families and R774C in 2 families. For 26 patients out of the 32 found to have a mutation, maternal DNA was collected and sequenced: 6 de novo mutations were detected (i.e. 23% of the cases). Finally, no mutation was detected in 13 patients (29%): 7 with CAIS and 6 familial severe PAIS. The latter all presented with perineal hypospadias, micropenis, 4 out of 6 being raised as girl. Diagnosis of AIS in these 13 families in whom no mutation was detected is supported by the following criteria: clinical data, familial history (2 or 3 index cases in the same family), familial segregation of the polymorphic CAG repeat of the AR gene. Mutations in intronic regions or the promoter of the AR gene could not explain all cases of AIS without mutations in the AR coding regions, because AR binding (performed in 9 out of 13) was normal in 6, suggesting the synthesis of an AR protein. This situation led us to speculate that another X-linked factor associated with the AR could be implicated in some cases of AIS.

  9. Modulation of Tryptophan and Serotonin Metabolism as a Biochemical Basis of the Behavioral Effects of Use and Withdrawal of Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids and Other Image- and Performance-Enhancing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2018-01-01

    Modulation of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism may underpin the behavioral effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) and associated image and performance enhancers. Euphoria, arousal, and decreased anxiety observed with moderate use and exercise may involve enhanced cerebral serotonin synthesis and function by increased release of albumin-bound Trp and estrogen-mediated liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition and enhancement of serotonin function. Aggression, anxiety, depression, personality disorders, and psychosis, observed on withdrawal of AAS or with use of large doses, can be caused by decreased serotonin synthesis due to TDO induction on withdrawal, excess Trp inhibiting the 2 enzymes of serotonin synthesis, and increased cerebral levels of neuroactive kynurenines. Exercise and excessive protein and branched-chain amino acid intakes may aggravate the effects of large AAS dosage. The hypothesis is testable in humans and experimental animals by measuring parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related metabolic processes. PMID:29487480

  10. Modulation of Tryptophan and Serotonin Metabolism as a Biochemical Basis of the Behavioral Effects of Use and Withdrawal of Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids and Other Image- and Performance-Enhancing Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A-B Badawy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of tryptophan (Trp metabolism may underpin the behavioral effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS and associated image and performance enhancers. Euphoria, arousal, and decreased anxiety observed with moderate use and exercise may involve enhanced cerebral serotonin synthesis and function by increased release of albumin-bound Trp and estrogen-mediated liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO inhibition and enhancement of serotonin function. Aggression, anxiety, depression, personality disorders, and psychosis, observed on withdrawal of AAS or with use of large doses, can be caused by decreased serotonin synthesis due to TDO induction on withdrawal, excess Trp inhibiting the 2 enzymes of serotonin synthesis, and increased cerebral levels of neuroactive kynurenines. Exercise and excessive protein and branched-chain amino acid intakes may aggravate the effects of large AAS dosage. The hypothesis is testable in humans and experimental animals by measuring parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related metabolic processes.

  11. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  12. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, A. O.; Kuiper, G. G.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; van Rooij, H. C.; Romalo, G.; Trifiro, M.; Mulder, E.; Pinsky, L.; Schweikert, H. U.; Trapman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of the genomic organization of the

  13. Androgen receptor phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMany physiological processes in organisms are regulated by a relatively small number of steroid honnones. Androgens are the so-called male sex steroid hormones which control growth, differentiation and functions of male reproductive and accessory sex tissues. Androgens are mainly

  14. Whole exome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses to identify germline alterations in genes associated with testosterone metabolism in a patient with androgen insensitivity syndrome and early-onset colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disciglio, Vittoria; Devecchi, Andrea; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Penso, Donata; Milione, Massimo; Valle, Giorgio; Pierotti, Marco Alessandro; Vitellaro, Marco; Bertario, Lucio; Canevari, Silvana; Signoroni, Stefano; De Cecco, Loris

    2016-06-07

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), a disorder of sexual development in 46, XY individuals, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. A variety of tumors have been reported in association with AIS, but no cases with colorectal cancer (CRC) have been described. Here, we present a male patient with AIS who developed multiple early-onset CRCs and his pedigree. His first cousin was diagnosed with AIS and harbored the same AR gene mutation, but with no signs of CRC. The difference in clinical management for the two patients was that testosterone treatment was given to the proband for a much longer time compared with the cousin. The CRC family history was negative, and no germline mutations in well-known CRC-related genes were identified. A single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed a microduplication on chromosome 22q11.22 that encompassed a microRNA potentially related to CRC pathogenesis. In the proband, whole exome sequencing identified a polymorphism in an oncogene and 13 rare loss-of-function variants, of which two were in CRC-related genes and four were in genes associated with other human cancers. By pathway analysis, all inherited germline genetic events were connected in a unique network whose alteration in the proband, together with continuous testosterone stimulation, may have played a role in CRC pathogenesis.

  15. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Presenting with Gynecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast caused by the proliferation of glandular breast tissue. Determining the various causes of gynecomastia such as physiological causes, drugs, systemic diseases, and endocrine disorders is important. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare endocrine disorder presenting with gynecomastia and is a disorder of male sexual differentiation caused by mutations within the androgen receptor gene. All individuals with AIS have the 46 XY karyotype, although AIS phenotypes can be classified as mild, partial or complete and can differ among both males and females including ambiguous genitalia or infertility in males. We experienced a case of partial AIS presenting with gynecomastia and identified the androgen receptor gene mutation.

  16. Nonsteroidal Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators and Selective Estrogen Receptor β Agonists Moderate Cognitive Deficits and Amyloid-β Levels in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Decreases of the sex steroids, testosterone and estrogen, are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Testosterone and estrogen supplementation improves cognitive deficits in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease. Sex hormones play a role in the regulation of amyloid-β via induction of the amyloid-β degrading enzymes neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme. To mimic the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), we administered a selective androgen receptor agonist, ACP-105, alone and in combination with the selective estrogen receptor β (ERβ) agonist AC-186 to male gonadectomized triple transgenic mice. We assessed long-term spatial memory in the Morris water maze, spontaneous locomotion, and anxiety-like behavior in the open field and in the elevated plus maze. We found that ACP-105 given alone decreases anxiety-like behavior. Furthermore, when ACP-105 is administered in combination with AC-186, they increase the amyloid-β degrading enzymes neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme and decrease amyloid-β levels in the brain as well as improve cognition. Interestingly, the androgen receptor level in the brain was increased by chronic treatment with the same combination treatment, ACP-105 and AC-186, not seen with DHT or ACP-105 alone. Based on these results, the beneficial effect of the selective ERβ agonist as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease warrants further investigation. PMID:24020966

  17. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghotbaddini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  18. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, A.; Jenster, G.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; van der Korput, H.; Brüggenwirth, H.; Boehmer, A.; Trapman, J.

    1996-01-01

    Male sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. In the X-linked androgen insensitivity syndrome, defects in the

  19. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases.

  20. A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene expression data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... organization. 1.25e−9. Regulation of neurological system process. 1.76e−9. Protein tyrosine kinase activity. 8.22e−9. Protein autophosphorylation. 2.78e−8. Table 9. Q-value of one of the network modules of Dataset 1. Module. GO annotation. Q-value. Module 1. Anatomical structure formation involved.

  1. Nonsteroidal mycotoxin alternariol is a full androgen agonist in the yeast reporter androgen bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypuła-Trębas, Sylwia; Minta, Maria; Radko, Lidia; Jedziniak, Piotr; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Alternariol (AOH) is a toxic metabolite of phytopathogenic fungi of the Alternaria spp. and important contaminant of agricultural commodities. According to the recent studies, AOH has a potential to modulate the endocrine system of humans and animals. In the view of these reports, our study addressed the effects of AOH on human estrogen receptor (hERα) and androgen receptor (hAR) signaling with the use of the yeast estrogen and androgen reporter bioassays. Our results show that, apart from a weak estrogenic response, AOH induces full androgenic response of the bioassay with the EC50 of 269.4μM. The androgenic potency of AOH relative to testosterone (T) is 0.046%. Moreover, in the presence of T, AOH at 5μM acts as a weak antiandrogen, whereas at higher concentrations AOH sum up with the androgenic activity of T in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting additive effect. To our knowledge it is the first report of the androgenic potency of natural, nonsteroidal substance and may have the impact on the direction of the further studies. Further research is warranted to clarify the role of AOH in disruption of AR signaling in humans and animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II and Androgen Signaling Pathways Modulate MEF2 Activity in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Duran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone is known to induce cardiac hypertrophy through androgen receptor (AR-dependent and -independent pathways, but the molecular underpinnings of the androgen action remain poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII and myocyte-enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 play key roles in promoting cardiac myocyte growth. In order to gain mechanistic insights into the action of androgens on the heart, we investigated how testosterone affects CaMKII and MEF2 in cardiac myocyte hypertrophy by performing studies on cultured rat cardiac myocytes and hearts obtained from adult male orchiectomized (ORX rats. In cardiac myocytes, MEF2 activity was monitored using a luciferase reporter plasmid, and the effects of CaMKII and AR signaling pathways on MEF2C were examined by using siRNAs and pharmacological inhibitors targeting these two pathways. In the in vivo studies, ORX rats were randomly assigned to groups that were administered vehicle or testosterone (125 mg⋅kg-1⋅week-1 for 5 weeks, and plasma testosterone concentrations were determined using ELISA. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by measuring well-characterized hypertrophy markers. Moreover, western blotting was used to assess CaMKII and phospholamban (PLN phosphorylation, and MEF2C and AR protein levels in extracts of left-ventricle tissue from control and testosterone-treated ORX rats. Whereas testosterone treatment increased the phosphorylation levels of CaMKII (Thr286 and phospholambam (PLN (Thr17 in cardiac myocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, testosterone-induced MEF2 activity and cardiac myocyte hypertrophy were prevented upon inhibition of CaMKII, MEF2C, and AR signaling pathways. Notably, in the hypertrophied hearts obtained from testosterone-administered ORX rats, both CaMKII and PLN phosphorylation levels and AR and MEF2 protein levels were increased. Thus, this study presents the first evidence indicating that

  3. Network statistics of genetically-driven gene co-expression modules in mouse crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier eScott-Boyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In biology, networks are used in different contexts as ways to represent relationships between entities, such as for instance interactions between genes, proteins or metabolites. Despite progress in the analysis of such networks and their potential to better understand the collective impact of genes on complex traits, one remaining challenge is to establish the biologic validity of gene co-expression networks and to determine what governs their organization. We used WGCNA to construct and analyze seven gene expression datasets from several tissues of mouse recombinant inbred strains (RIS. For six out of the 7 networks, we found that linkage to module QTLs (mQTLs could be established for 29.3% of gene co-expression modules detected in the several mouse RIS. For about 74.6% of such genetically-linked modules, the mQTL was on the same chromosome as the one contributing most genes to the module, with genes originating from that chromosome showing higher connectivity than other genes in the modules. Such modules (that we considered as genetically-driven had network statistic properties (density, centralization and heterogeneity that set them apart from other modules in the network. Altogether, a sizeable portion of gene co-expression modules detected in mouse RIS panels had genetic determinants as their main organizing principle. In addition to providing a biologic interpretation validation for these modules, these genetic determinants imparted on them particular properties that set them apart from other modules in the network, to the point that they can be predicted to a large extent on the basis of their network statistics.

  4. The value of integrating pre-clinical data to predict nausea and vomiting risk in humans as illustrated by AZD3514, a novel androgen receptor modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Claire; Ewart, Lorna; Muthas, Daniel; Deavall, Damian; Smith, Simon A.; Clack, Glen; Newham, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are components of a complex mechanism that signals food avoidance and protection of the body against the absorption of ingested toxins. This response can also be triggered by pharmaceuticals. Predicting clinical nausea and vomiting liability for pharmaceutical agents based on pre-clinical data can be problematic as no single animal model is a universal predictor. Moreover, efforts to improve models are hampered by the lack of translational animal and human data in the public domain. AZD3514 is a novel, orally-administered compound that inhibits androgen receptor signaling and down-regulates androgen receptor expression. Here we have explored the utility of integrating data from several pre-clinical models to predict nausea and vomiting in the clinic. Single and repeat doses of AZD3514 resulted in emesis, salivation and gastrointestinal disturbances in the dog, and inhibited gastric emptying in rats after a single dose. AZD3514, at clinically relevant exposures, induced dose-responsive “pica” behaviour in rats after single and multiple daily doses, and induced retching and vomiting behaviour in ferrets after a single dose. We compare these data with the clinical manifestation of nausea and vomiting encountered in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer receiving AZD3514. Our data reveal a striking relationship between the pre-clinical observations described and the experience of nausea and vomiting in the clinic. In conclusion, the emetic nature of AZD3514 was predicted across a range of pre-clinical models, and the approach presented provides a valuable framework for predicition of clinical nausea and vomiting. - Highlights: • Integrated pre-clinical data can be used to predict clinical nausea and vomiting. • Data integrated from standard toxicology studies is sufficient to make a prediction. • The use of the nausea algorithm developed by Parkinson (2012) aids the prediction. • Additional pre-clinical studies can be used

  5. LPS-induced modules of co-expressed genes in equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacholewska, Alicja; Marti, Eliane; Leeb, Tosso; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Gerber, Vincent

    2017-01-05

    Lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin, LPS) is a strong inducer of the innate immune response. It is widespread in our environment, e.g. in house dust and contributes to asthma. Compared to humans, horses are even more sensitive to LPS. However, data on LPS effects on the equine transcriptome are very limited. Using RNA-seq we analysed LPS-induced differences in the gene expression in equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells at the gene and gene-network level in two half-sib families and one group of unrelated horses. 24 h-LPS challenge of equine immune cells resulted in substantial changes in the transcriptomic profile (1,265 differentially expressed genes) showing partial overlap with human data. One of the half-sib families showed a specific response different from the other two groups of horses. We also identified co-expressed gene modules that clearly differentiated 24 h-LPS- from non-stimulated samples. These modules consisted of 934 highly interconnected genes and included genes involved in the immune response (e.g. IL6, CCL22, CXCL6, CXCL2), however, none of the top ten hub genes of the modules have been annotated as responsive to LPS in gene ontology. Using weighted gene co-expression network analysis we identified ten co-expressed gene modules significantly regulated by in vitro stimulation with LPS. Apart from 47 genes (5%) all other genes highly interconnected within the most up- and down-regulated modules were also significantly differentially expressed (FDR LPS-regulated module hub genes have not yet been described as having a role in the immune response to LPS (e.g. VAT1 and TTC25).

  6. Computational identification of genes modulating stem height-diameter allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Libo; Ye, Meixia; Zhu, Sheng; Zhai, Yi; Xu, Meng; Huang, Minren; Wu, Rongling

    2016-12-01

    The developmental variation in stem height with respect to stem diameter is related to a broad range of ecological and evolutionary phenomena in trees, but the underlying genetic basis of this variation remains elusive. We implement a dynamic statistical model, functional mapping, to formulate a general procedure for the computational identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control stem height-diameter allometry during development. Functional mapping integrates the biological principles underlying trait formation and development into the association analysis of DNA genotype and endpoint phenotype, thus providing an incentive for understanding the mechanistic interplay between genes and development. Built on the basic tenet of functional mapping, we explore two core ecological scenarios of how stem height and stem diameter covary in response to environmental stimuli: (i) trees pioneer sunlit space by allocating more growth to stem height than diameter and (ii) trees maintain their competitive advantage through an inverse pattern. The model is equipped to characterize 'pioneering' QTLs (piQTLs) and 'maintaining' QTLs (miQTLs) which modulate these two ecological scenarios, respectively. In a practical application to a mapping population of full-sib hybrids derived from two Populus species, the model has well proven its versatility by identifying several piQTLs that promote height growth at a cost of diameter growth and several miQTLs that benefit radial growth at a cost of height growth. Judicious application of functional mapping may lead to improved strategies for studying the genetic control of the formation mechanisms underlying trade-offs among quantities of assimilates allocated to different growth parts. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Ovarian overproduction of androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ovarian or adrenal tumor. Outlook (Prognosis) Treatment success depends on the cause of excess androgen production. ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  8. Androgens and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, L P

    2009-12-01

    The cessation of ovarian sex steroidigenesis, either as result as surgical extirpation, certain medical therapies or the gradual cessation of ovarian function, leads to menopause with all its associated physiological, physical and lifestyle changes. The changing hormonal milieu of menopause is most commonly associated with declining levels of estrogens. However, ovarian senescence also results in declining levels of androgens. Indeed, it is the loss of physiological levels of estrogens and androgens that result in the varied signs and symptoms of menopause including vasomotor symptoms, bone mineral density loss, reduced interest in sex, alterations in mood and energy and hair loss, among others. This paper will provide a review of the role of androgens in the menopause and assess the potential of androgen therapies in the management of the menopause.

  9. Computational integration of homolog and pathway gene module expression reveals general stemness signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Koeva

    Full Text Available The stemness hypothesis states that all stem cells use common mechanisms to regulate self-renewal and multi-lineage potential. However, gene expression meta-analyses at the single gene level have failed to identify a significant number of genes selectively expressed by a broad range of stem cell types. We hypothesized that stemness may be regulated by modules of homologs. While the expression of any single gene within a module may vary from one stem cell type to the next, it is possible that the expression of the module as a whole is required so that the expression of different, yet functionally-synonymous, homologs is needed in different stem cells. Thus, we developed a computational method to test for stem cell-specific gene expression patterns from a comprehensive collection of 49 murine datasets covering 12 different stem cell types. We identified 40 individual genes and 224 stemness modules with reproducible and specific up-regulation across multiple stem cell types. The stemness modules included families regulating chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and Wnt signaling. Strikingly, the majority of modules represent evolutionarily related homologs. Moreover, a score based on the discovered modules could accurately distinguish stem cell-like populations from other cell types in both normal and cancer tissues. This scoring system revealed that both mouse and human metastatic populations exhibit higher stemness indices than non-metastatic populations, providing further evidence for a stem cell-driven component underlying the transformation to metastatic disease.

  10. Improving functional modules discovery by enriching interaction networks with gene profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Saeed

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in proteomic and transcriptomic technologies resulted in the accumulation of vast amount of high-throughput data that span multiple biological processes and characteristics in different organisms. Much of the data come in the form of interaction networks and mRNA expression arrays. An important task in systems biology is functional modules discovery where the goal is to uncover well-connected sub-networks (modules). These discovered modules help to unravel the underlying mechanisms of the observed biological processes. While most of the existing module discovery methods use only the interaction data, in this work we propose, CLARM, which discovers biological modules by incorporating gene profiles data with protein-protein interaction networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CLARM on Yeast and Human interaction datasets, and gene expression and molecular function profiles. Experiments on these real datasets show that the CLARM approach is competitive to well established functional module discovery methods.

  11. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, M.L.; Verschure, P.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  12. Epigenetic Editing : targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  13. Modulation and Expression of Tumor Suppressor Genes by Environmental Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrander, Gary Kent

    1996-01-01

    ... in the retinoblastoma gene in retinoblastoma and hepatocarcinomas following induction with known environmental carcinogens. Studies to date suggest the retinoblastoma gene/protein may play a role in oncogenesis in the medaka.

  14. Protein modulator of multidrug efflux gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Denis M; Cao, Lily; Fraud, Sebastien; Wilke, Mark S; Pacey, Angela; Klinoski, Rachael; Strynadka, Natalie C; Dean, Charles R; Poole, Keith

    2007-08-01

    nalC multidrug-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa show enhanced expression of the mexAB-oprM multidrug efflux system as a direct result of the production of a ca. 6,100-Da protein, PA3719, in these mutants. Using a bacterial two-hybrid system, PA3719 was shown to interact in vivo with MexR, a repressor of mexAB-oprM expression. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies confirmed a high-affinity interaction (equilibrium dissociation constant [K(D)], 158.0 +/- 18.1 nM) of PA3719 with MexR in vitro. PA3719 binding to and formation of a complex with MexR obviated repressor binding to its operator, which overlaps the efflux operon promoter, suggesting that mexAB-oprM hyperexpression in nalC mutants results from PA3719 modulation of MexR repressor activity. Consistent with this, MexR repression of mexA transcription in an in vitro transcription assay was alleviated by PA3719. Mutations in MexR compromising its interaction with PA3719 in vivo were isolated and shown to be located internally and distributed throughout the protein, suggesting that they impacted PA3719 binding by altering MexR structure or conformation rather than by having residues interacting specifically with PA3719. Four of six mutant MexR proteins studied retained repressor activity even in a nalC strain producing PA3719. Again, this is consistent with a PA3719 interaction with MexR being necessary to obviate MexR repressor activity. The gene encoding PA3719 has thus been renamed armR (antirepressor for MexR). A representative "noninteracting" mutant MexR protein, MexR(I104F), was purified, and ITC confirmed that it bound PA3719 with reduced affinity (5.4-fold reduced; K(D), 853.2 +/- 151.1 nM). Consistent with this, MexR(I104F) repressor activity, as assessed using the in vitro transcription assay, was only weakly compromised by PA3719. Finally, two mutations (L36P and W45A) in ArmR compromising its interaction with MexR have been isolated and mapped to a putative C-terminal alpha

  15. Gene set-based module discovery in the breast cancer transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Michael Q

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although microarray-based studies have revealed global view of gene expression in cancer cells, we still have little knowledge about regulatory mechanisms underlying the transcriptome. Several computational methods applied to yeast data have recently succeeded in identifying expression modules, which is defined as co-expressed gene sets under common regulatory mechanisms. However, such module discovery methods are not applied cancer transcriptome data. Results In order to decode oncogenic regulatory programs in cancer cells, we developed a novel module discovery method termed EEM by extending a previously reported module discovery method, and applied it to breast cancer expression data. Starting from seed gene sets prepared based on cis-regulatory elements, ChIP-chip data, and gene locus information, EEM identified 10 principal expression modules in breast cancer based on their expression coherence. Moreover, EEM depicted their activity profiles, which predict regulatory programs in each subtypes of breast tumors. For example, our analysis revealed that the expression module regulated by the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 is downregulated in triple negative breast cancers, suggesting similarity of transcriptional programs between stem cells and aggressive breast cancer cells. We also found that the activity of the PRC2 expression module is negatively correlated to the expression of EZH2, a component of PRC2 which belongs to the E2F expression module. E2F-driven EZH2 overexpression may be responsible for the repression of the PRC2 expression modules in triple negative tumors. Furthermore, our network analysis predicts regulatory circuits in breast cancer cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the gene set-based module discovery approach is a powerful tool to decode regulatory programs in cancer cells.

  16. Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) did not affect cell viability despite increased androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, P; Cardenas, H; Orihuela, P A

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether aqueous extract of Lepidium meyenii (red Maca) could inhibit growth, potentiate apoptotic activity of two anticancer drugs Taxol and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) or change mRNA expression for the androgen target genes, androgen receptor (Ar) and prostate-specific antigen (Psa) in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Red Maca aqueous extract at 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml was added to LNCaP cells, and viability was evaluated by the MTS assay at 24 or 48 hr after treatment. Furthermore, LNCaP cells were treated with 80 μg/ml of red Maca plus Taxol or 2ME 5 μM and viability was assessed 48 hr later. Finally, LNCaP cells were treated with red Maca 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml, and 12 hr later, mRNA level for Ar or Psa was assessed by real-time PCR. Treatment with red Maca did not affect viability of LNCaP cells. Apoptotic activity induced by Taxol and 2ME in LNCaP cells was not altered with red Maca treatment. Relative expression of the mRNA for Ar and Psa increased with red Maca 20 and 40 μg/ml, but not at 80 μg/ml. We conclude that red Maca aqueous extract does not have toxic effects, but stimulates androgen signalling in LNCaP cells. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo-[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one], an orally available nonsteroidal-selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Eric G; López, Francisco J; Rix, Peter; Hill, Robert; Chen, Yanling; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; O'Brien, Z; Chang, William Y; Meglasson, Martin D; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2009-02-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a new class of molecules in development to treat a variety of diseases. SARMs maintain the beneficial effects of androgens, including increased muscle mass and bone density, while having reduced activity on unwanted side effects. The mechanisms responsible for the tissue-selective activity of SARMs are not fully understood, and the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships are poorly described. Tissue-specific compound distribution potentially could be a mechanism responsible for apparent tissue selectivity. We examined the PK/PD relationship of a novel SARM, LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one], in a castrated rat model of androgen deficiency. LGD-3303 has potent activity on levator ani muscle but is a partial agonist on the preputial gland and ventral prostate. LGD-3303 never stimulated ventral prostate above intact levels despite increasing plasma concentrations of compound. Tissue-selective activity was maintained when LGD-3303 was dosed orally or by continuous infusion, two routes of administration with markedly different time versus exposure profiles. Despite the greater muscle activity relative to prostate activity, local tissue concentrations of LGD-3303 were higher in the prostate than in the levator ani muscle. LGD-3303 has SARM properties that are independent of its pharmacokinetic profile, suggesting that the principle mechanism for tissue-selective activity is the result of altered molecular interactions at the level of the androgen receptor.

  18. Spearmint induced hypothalamic oxidative stress and testicular anti-androgenicity in male rats - altered levels of gene expression, enzymes and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Kural, Mool Raj; Pereira, B M J; Roy, Partha

    2008-12-01

    Mentha spicata Labiatae, commonly known as spearmint, can be used for various kinds of illnesses in herbal medicines and food industries. One of the prominent functions of this plant extract is its anti-androgenic activity. The present study investigated the probable correlation between oxidative stress in hypothalamic region and anti-androgenic action of this plant's aqueous extract on rats. Decreased activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in hypothalamus of treated rats indicated spearmint induced oxidative stress. Further RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated the decreased expression of some of the steroidogenic enzymes, cytochrome P450scc, cytochrome P450C17, 3beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD), 17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) and other related proteins like, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, androgen receptor and scavenger receptor class B-1. Further, in vitro enzyme assays demonstrated depressed activities of testicular 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD enzymes. Histopathology indicated a decreased sperm density in cauda epididymis and degeneration of ductus deference. Our study suggested that spearmint probably induced oxidative stress in hypothalamus resulting in decreased synthesis of LH and FSH which in turn down-regulated the production of testicular testosterone through the disruption of a number of intermediate cascades.

  19. Radiation-modulated gene expression in C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.A.; Bayeta, E.; Perez, C.; Lloyd, E.; Jones, T.; Smith, A.; Tian, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We use the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation with emphasis effects of charged particle radiation and have described the fluence vs. response relationships for mutation, chromosome aberration and certain developmental errors. These endpoints quantify the biological after repair and compensation pathways have completed their work. In order to address the control of these reactions we have turned to gene expression profiling to identify genes that uniquely respond to high LET species or respond differentially as a function of radiation properties. We have employed whole genome microarray methods to map gene expression following exposure to gamma rays, protons and accelerated iron ions. We found that 599 of 17871 genes analyzed showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of at least one radiation types. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated, and 90% were affected by only one species of radiation. Genes whose transcription levels responded significantly mapped to definite statistical clusters that were unique for each radiation type. We are now trying to establish the functional relationships of the genes their relevance to mitigation of radiation-induced damage. Three approaches are being used. First, bioinformatics tools are being used to determine the roles of genes in co-regulated gene sets. Second, we are applying the technique of RNA interference to determine whether our radiation-induced genes affect cell survival (measured in terms of embryo survival) and chromosome aberration (intestinal anaphase bridges). Finally we are focussing on the response of the most strongly-regulated gene in our data set. This is the autosomal gene, F36D3.9, whose predicted structure is that of a cysteine protease resembling cathepsin B. An enzymological approach is being used to characterize this gene at the protein level. This work was supported by NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC9-149

  20. Prioritization of gene regulatory interactions from large-scale modules in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bringas Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of groups of co-regulated genes and their transcription factors, called transcriptional modules, has been a focus of many studies about biological systems. While methods have been developed to derive numerous modules from genome-wide data, individual links between regulatory proteins and target genes still need experimental verification. In this work, we aim to prioritize regulator-target links within transcriptional modules based on three types of large-scale data sources. Results Starting with putative transcriptional modules from ChIP-chip data, we first derive modules in which target genes show both expression and function coherence. The most reliable regulatory links between transcription factors and target genes are established by identifying intersection of target genes in coherent modules for each enriched functional category. Using a combination of genome-wide yeast data in normal growth conditions and two different reference datasets, we show that our method predicts regulatory interactions with significantly higher predictive power than ChIP-chip binding data alone. A comparison with results from other studies highlights that our approach provides a reliable and complementary set of regulatory interactions. Based on our results, we can also identify functionally interacting target genes, for instance, a group of co-regulated proteins related to cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we report novel conserved binding sites of a glycoprotein-encoding gene, CIS3, regulated by Swi6-Swi4 and Ndd1-Fkh2-Mcm1 complexes. Conclusion We provide a simple method to prioritize individual TF-gene interactions from large-scale transcriptional modules. In comparison with other published works, we predict a complementary set of regulatory interactions which yields a similar or higher prediction accuracy at the expense of sensitivity. Therefore, our method can serve as an alternative approach to prioritization for

  1. Clock Genes: Critical Modulators of Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kennaway, David J; Butler, Lisa M; Tilley, Wayne D

    2005-01-01

    .... Circadian rhythms are regulated by a panel of specific transcription factors, called clock genes, and our current understanding of endogenous cellular rhythmicity is that both positive and negative...

  2. Specific characterization of non-steroidal selective androgen peceptor modulators using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to ion-mobility mass spectrometry: application to the detection of enobosarm in bovine urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucher, Laure; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Cesbron, Nora; Penot, Mylène; Gicquiau, Audrey; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    Currently under development for therapeutic purposes in human medicine, non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (non-steroidal SARMs) are also known to impact growth associated pathways. As such, they present a potential for abuse in sports and food-producing animals as interesting alternative anabolic substances. Forbidden since 2008 by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) these compounds are however easily available and could be (mis)used in livestock production as growth promoters. To prevent such practices, dedicated analytical strategies have to be developed for specific and sensitive detection of these compounds in biological matrices. Using an innovative analytical platform constituted of supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to ion mobility-mass spectrometry, the present study enabled efficient separation and identification in urine of 4 of these drugs (andarine, bicalutamide, hydroxyflutamide, and enobosarm) in accordance with European Union criteria (Commission Decision 2002/657/EC). Besides providing information about compounds structure and behaviour in gas phase, such a coupling enabled reaching low limits of detection (LOD < 0.05 ng.mL -1 for andarine and limits of detection < 0.005 ng.mL -1 for the three others) in urine with good repeatability (CV < 21 %). The workflow has been applied to quantitative determination of enobosarm elimination in urine of treated bovine (200 mg, oral). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) Part III: Discovery of 4-(5-oxopyrrolidine-1-yl)benzonitrile derivative 2f as a clinical candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Katsuji; Asano, Moriteru; Ono, Koji; Habuka, Noriyuki; Yano, Jason; Wilson, Keith; Fujita, Hisashi; Kandori, Hitoshi; Hara, Takahito; Morimoto, Megumi; Santou, Takashi; Yamaoka, Masuo; Nakayama, Masaharu; Hasuoka, Atsushi

    2017-07-01

    We previously reported that 4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzonitrile derivative 1b was a selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that exhibited anabolic effects on organs such as muscles and the central nervous system (CNS), but neutral effects on the prostate. From further modification, we identified that 4-(5-oxopyrrolidine-1-yl)benzonitrile derivative 2a showed strong AR binding affinity with improved metabolic stabilities. Based on these results, we tried to enhance the AR agonistic activities by modifying the substituents of the 5-oxopyrrolidine ring. As a consequence, we found that 4-[(2S,3S)-2-ethyl-3-hydroxy-5-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl]-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (2f) had ideal SARM profiles in Hershberger assay and sexual behavior induction assay. Furthermore, 2f showed good pharmacokinetic profiles in rats, dogs, monkeys, excellent nuclear selectivity and acceptable toxicological profiles. We also determined its binding mode by obtaining the co-crystal structures with AR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellane R Cleys

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR. Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders.

  5. PHARMACOKINETICS AND METABOLISM OF A SELECTIVE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATOR IN RATS: IMPLICATION OF MOLECULAR PROPERTIES AND INTENSIVE METABOLIC PROFILE TO INVESTIGATE IDEAL PHARMACOKINETIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROPANAMIDE IN PRECLINICAL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Wu, Zengru; Yang, Jun; Nair, Vipin A.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    S-1 [3-(4-fluorophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-[4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-propanamide] is one member of a series of potent selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that are being explored and developed for androgen-dependent diseases. Recent studies showed that S-1 holds great promise as a novel therapeutic agent for benign hyperplasia [W. Gao, J. D. Kearbey, V. A. Nair, K. Chung, A. F. Parlow, D. D. Miller, and J. T. Dalton (2004) Endocrinology 145:5420–5428]. We examined the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of S-1 in rats as a component of our preclinical development of this compound and continued interest in structure-activation relationships for SARM action. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to treatment groups and received either an i.v. or a p.o. dose of S-1 at a dose level of 0.1, 1, 10, or 30 mg/kg. S-1 demonstrated a low clearance (range, 3.6–5.2 ml/min/kg), a moderate volume of distribution (range, 1460–1560 ml/kg), and a terminal half-life ranging from 3.6 to 5.2 h after i.v. doses. The oral bioavailability of S-1 ranged from 55% to 60%. Forty phase I and phase II metabolites of S-1 were identified in the urine and feces of male Sprague-Dawley rats dosed at 50 mg/kg via the i.v. route. The two major urinary metabolites of S-1 were a carboxylic acid and a sulfate-conjugate of 4-nitro-3-trifluoromethylphenylamine. Phase I metabolites arising from A-ring nitro reduction to an aromatic amine and B-ring hydroxylation were also identified in the urinary and fecal samples of rats. Furthermore, a variety of phase II metabolites through sulfation, glucuronidation, and methylation were also found. These studies demonstrate that S-1 is rapidly absorbed, slowly cleared, moderately distributed, and extensively metabolized in rats. PMID:16381665

  6. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance.Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials.

  7. Highly preserved consensus gene modules in human papilloma virus 16 positive cervical cancer and head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglan; Cha, In-Ho; Kim, Ki-Yeol

    2017-12-26

    In this study, we investigated the consensus gene modules in head and neck cancer (HNC) and cervical cancer (CC). We used a publicly available gene expression dataset, GSE6791, which included 42 HNC, 14 normal head and neck, 20 CC and 8 normal cervical tissue samples. To exclude bias because of different human papilloma virus (HPV) types, we analyzed HPV16-positive samples only. We identified 3824 genes common to HNC and CC samples. Among these, 977 genes showed high connectivity and were used to construct consensus modules. We demonstrated eight consensus gene modules for HNC and CC using the dissimilarity measure and average linkage hierarchical clustering methods. These consensus modules included genes with significant biological functions, including ATP binding and extracellular exosome. Eigengen network analysis revealed the consensus modules were highly preserved with high connectivity. These findings demonstrate that HPV16-positive head and neck and cervical cancers share highly preserved consensus gene modules with common potentially therapeutic targets.

  8. Gene Networks in the Wild: Identifying Transcriptional Modules that Mediate Coral Resistance to Experimental Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Noah H; Seneca, Francois O; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-12-28

    Organisms respond to environmental variation partly through changes in gene expression, which underlie both homeostatic and acclimatory responses to environmental stress. In some cases, so many genes change in expression in response to different influences that understanding expression patterns for all these individual genes becomes difficult. To reduce this problem, we use a systems genetics approach to show that variation in the expression of thousands of genes of reef-building corals can be explained as variation in the expression of a small number of coexpressed "modules." Modules were often enriched for specific cellular functions and varied predictably among individuals, experimental treatments, and physiological state. We describe two transcriptional modules for which expression levels immediately after heat stress predict bleaching a day later. One of these early "bleaching modules" is enriched for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, particularly E26 transformation-specific (ETS)-family transcription factors. The other module is enriched for extracellular matrix proteins. These classes of bleaching response genes are clear in the modular gene expression analysis we conduct but are much more difficult to discern in single gene analyses. Furthermore, the ETS-family module shows repeated differences in expression among coral colonies grown in the same common garden environment, suggesting a heritable genetic or epigenetic basis for these expression polymorphisms. This finding suggests that these corals harbor high levels of gene-network variation, which could facilitate rapid evolution in the face of environmental change. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Mutational Pleiotropy and the Strength of Stabilizing Selection Within and Between Functional Modules of Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Julie M; McGuigan, Katrina; Allen, Scott L; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Blows, Mark W

    2018-02-01

    Variational modules, sets of pleiotropically covarying traits, affect phenotypic evolution, and therefore are predicted to reflect functional modules, such that traits within a variational module also share a common function. Such an alignment of function and pleiotropy is expected to facilitate adaptation by reducing the deleterious effects of mutations, and allowing coordinated evolution of functionally related sets of traits. Here, we adopt a high-dimensional quantitative genetic approach using a large number of gene expression traits in Drosophila serrata to test whether functional grouping, defined by GO terms, predicts variational modules. Mutational or standing genetic covariance was significantly greater than among randomly grouped sets of genes for 38% of our functional groups, indicating that GO terms can predict variational modularity to some extent. We estimated stabilizing selection acting on mutational covariance to test the prediction that functional pleiotropy would result in reduced deleterious effects of mutations within functional modules. Stabilizing selection within functional modules was weaker than that acting on randomly grouped sets of genes in only 23% of functional groups indicating that functional alignment can reduce deleterious effects of pleiotropic mutation, but typically does not. Our analyses also revealed the presence of variational modules that spanned multiple functions. Copyright © 2018, Genetics.

  10. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  11. The Integrative Method Based on the Module-Network for Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguo Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in next-generation sequencing(NGS technologies, a large number of multiple types of high-throughput genomics data are available. A great challenge in exploring cancer progression is to identify the driver genes from the variant genes by analyzing and integrating multi-types genomics data. Breast cancer is known as a heterogeneous disease. The identification of subtype-specific driver genes is critical to guide the diagnosis, assessment of prognosis and treatment of breast cancer. We developed an integrated frame based on gene expression profiles and copy number variation (CNV data to identify breast cancer subtype-specific driver genes. In this frame, we employed statistical machine-learning method to select gene subsets and utilized an module-network analysis method to identify potential candidate driver genes. The final subtype-specific driver genes were acquired by paired-wise comparison in subtypes. To validate specificity of the driver genes, the gene expression data of these genes were applied to classify the patient samples with 10-fold cross validation and the enrichment analysis were also conducted on the identified driver genes. The experimental results show that the proposed integrative method can identify the potential driver genes and the classifier with these genes acquired better performance than with genes identified by other methods.

  12. Androgen secreting adrenocortical tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthers, O D; Cameron, F J; Scheimberg, I; Honour, J W; Hindmarsh, P C; Savage, M O; Stanhope, R G; Brook, C G

    1999-01-01

    Androgen secreting adrenocortical tumours are rare in children and the determination of their malignant potential can be difficult. To assess the presentation, histology, and clinical behaviour of these tumours. Two tertiary referral centres. Retrospective analysis of children diagnosed with an androgen secreting adrenocortical tumour between 1976 and 1996. Twenty three girls and seven boys aged 0-14 years. Pubic hair was observed in all children, clitoromegaly or growth of the phallus in 23 children, acceleration of linear growth in 22 children, and advanced bone age (> 1.5 years) in 18 children. Hypersecretion of androgens was detected by assessment of serum androgen concentrations alone in four patients and by 24 hour urine steroid excretion profiles in 22 patients. All 16 tumours measuring 10 cm were malignant. Histological slides were available for reassessment in 25 children. Although mitoses and necrosis were more characteristic of tumours with malignant behaviour, no exclusive histological features of malignancy were seen. Histological criteria for malignancy are not reliable, whereas tumour size is important in assessing malignant potential.

  13. Therapeutic potential of the SARMs: revisiting the androgen receptor for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T

    2006-04-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMS) bind to the androgen receptor and demonstrate anabolic activity in a variety of tissues; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents are able to induce bone and muscle growth, as well as shrinking the prostate. The potential of SARMS is to maximise the positive attributes of steroidal androgens as well as minimising negative effects, thus providing therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty and hypogonadism. This review summarises androgen physiology, the current status of the R&D of SARMS and potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs.

  14. Predictability of Genetic Interactions from Functional Gene Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Young

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing genetic interactions is crucial to understanding cellular and organismal response to gene-level perturbations. Such knowledge can inform the selection of candidate disease therapy targets, yet experimentally determining whether genes interact is technically nontrivial and time-consuming. High-fidelity prediction of different classes of genetic interactions in multiple organisms would substantially alleviate this experimental burden. Under the hypothesis that functionally related genes tend to share common genetic interaction partners, we evaluate a computational approach to predict genetic interactions in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By leveraging knowledge of functional relationships between genes, we cross-validate predictions on known genetic interactions and observe high predictive power of multiple classes of genetic interactions in all three organisms. Additionally, our method suggests high-confidence candidate interaction pairs that can be directly experimentally tested. A web application is provided for users to query genes for predicted novel genetic interaction partners. Finally, by subsampling the known yeast genetic interaction network, we found that novel genetic interactions are predictable even when knowledge of currently known interactions is minimal.

  15. Gamma-Tocotrienol Modulated Gene Expression in Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts as Revealed by Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Makpol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of γ-tocotrienol, a vitamin E isomer, in modulating gene expression in cellular aging of human diploid fibroblasts was studied. Senescent cells at passage 30 were incubated with 70 μM of γ-tocotrienol for 24 h. Gene expression patterns were evaluated using Sentrix HumanRef-8 Expression BeadChip from Illumina, analysed using GeneSpring GX10 software, and validated using quantitative RT-PCR. A total of 100 genes were differentially expressed (P<0.001 by at least 1.5 fold in response to γ-tocotrienol treatment. Amongst the genes were IRAK3, SelS, HSPA5, HERPUD1, DNAJB9, SEPR1, C18orf55, ARF4, RINT1, NXT1, CADPS2, COG6, and GLRX5. Significant gene list was further analysed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA, and the Normalized Enrichment Score (NES showed that biological processes such as inflammation, protein transport, apoptosis, and cell redox homeostasis were modulated in senescent fibroblasts treated with γ-tocotrienol. These findings revealed that γ-tocotrienol may prevent cellular aging of human diploid fibroblasts by modulating gene expression.

  16. Modulation of microfilament protein composition by transfected cytoskeletal actin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, S.Y.; Erba, H.; Latter, G.; Kedes, L.; Leavitt, J.

    1988-04-01

    HuT-14T is a highly tumorigenic fibroblast cell line which exhibits a reduced steady-state level of ..beta..-actin due to coding mutations in one of two ..beta..-actin alleles. The normal rate of total actin synthesis could be restored in some clones of cells following transfection of the functional ..beta..-actin gene but not following transfection of the functional ..gamma..-actin gene. In ..gamma..-actin gene-transfected substrains that have increased rates of ..gamma..-actin synthesis, ..beta..-actin synthesis is further reduced in a manner consistent with an autoregulatory mechanism, resulting in abnormal ratios of actin isoforms. Thus, both ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin proteins can apparently regulate the synthesis of their coexpressed isoforms. In addition, decreased synthesis of normal ..beta..-actin seems to correlate with a concomitant down-regulation of tropomyosin isoforms.

  17. Assessment of citalopram and escitalopram on neuroblastoma cell lines: Cell toxicity and gene modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Delétage, Nathalie; Chalus, Maryse; Aissouni, Youssef; Sylvain-Vidal, Valérie; Gobron, Stéphane; Coll, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are common antidepressants which cytotoxicity has been assessed in cancers notably colorectal carcinomas and glioma cell lines. We assessed and compared the cytotoxicity of 2 SSRI, citalopram and escitalopram, on neuroblastoma cell lines. The study was performed on 2 non-MYCN amplified cell lines (rat B104 and human SH-SY5Y) and 2 human MYCN amplified cell lines (IMR32 and Kelly). Citalopram and escitalopram showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity on all cell lines. Citalopram was more cytotoxic than escitalopram. IMR32 was the most sensitive cell line. The absence of toxicity on human primary Schwann cells demonstrated the safety of both molecules for myelin. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity were explored using gene-expression profiles and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Citalopram modulated 1 502 genes and escitalopram 1 164 genes with a fold change ≥ 2. 1 021 genes were modulated by both citalopram and escitalopram; 481 genes were regulated only by citalopram while 143 genes were regulated only by escitalopram. Citalopram modulated 69 pathways (KEGG) and escitalopram 42. Ten pathways were differently modulated by citalopram and escitalopram. Citalopram drastically decreased the expression of MYBL2, BIRC5 and BARD1 poor prognosis factors of neuroblastoma with fold-changes of -107 (pescitalopram. PMID:28467792

  18. Assessment of citalopram and escitalopram on neuroblastoma cell lines. Cell toxicity and gene modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Delétage, Nathalie; Chalus, Maryse; Aissouni, Youssef; Sylvain-Vidal, Valérie; Gobron, Stéphane; Coll, Guillaume

    2017-06-27

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are common antidepressants which cytotoxicity has been assessed in cancers notably colorectal carcinomas and glioma cell lines. We assessed and compared the cytotoxicity of 2 SSRI, citalopram and escitalopram, on neuroblastoma cell lines. The study was performed on 2 non-MYCN amplified cell lines (rat B104 and human SH-SY5Y) and 2 human MYCN amplified cell lines (IMR32 and Kelly). Citalopram and escitalopram showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity on all cell lines. Citalopram was more cytotoxic than escitalopram. IMR32 was the most sensitive cell line. The absence of toxicity on human primary Schwann cells demonstrated the safety of both molecules for myelin. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity were explored using gene-expression profiles and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Citalopram modulated 1 502 genes and escitalopram 1 164 genes with a fold change ≥ 2. 1 021 genes were modulated by both citalopram and escitalopram; 481 genes were regulated only by citalopram while 143 genes were regulated only by escitalopram. Citalopram modulated 69 pathways (KEGG) and escitalopram 42. Ten pathways were differently modulated by citalopram and escitalopram. Citalopram drastically decreased the expression of MYBL2, BIRC5 and BARD1 poor prognosis factors of neuroblastoma with fold-changes of -107 (pescitalopram.

  19. ANDROGENS REGULATE T47D CELLS MOTILITY AND INVASION THROUGH ACTIN CYTOSKELETON REMODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Montt-Guevara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgens receptor (AR is expressed in approximately 70% to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodelling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER, while the non aromatizable androgen – DHT only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer, and eventually to develop new strategies for treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Androgens Regulate T47D Cells Motility and Invasion through Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Shortrede, Jorge Eduardo; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Russo, Eleonora; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in approximately 70 to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple-negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodeling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER), while the non-aromatizable androgen - DHT - only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer and, eventually, to develop new strategies for breast cancer treatment.

  1. Isolated micropenis reveals partial androgen insensitivity syndrome confirmed by molecular analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhangoo, Amrit; Paris, Francoise; Philibert, Pascal; Audran, Francoise; Ten, Svetlana; Sultan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) is the milder variant of androgen receptor (AR) defects. The subtle effects of AR mutations present in a patient with micropenis, peno-scrotal hypospadias, infertility, clitoromegaly and posterior labial fusion. We studied the association of isolated micropenis with the genetic defects resulting in androgen resistance, that is, AR gene defects and 5-α reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) deficiency. We describe two cases of isolated micropenis: one in a 14-...

  2. Meta-analysis of peripheral blood gene expression modules for COPD phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Reinhold

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD occurs typically in current or former smokers, but only a minority of people with smoking history develops the disease. Besides environmental factors, genetics is an important risk factor for COPD. However, the relationship between genetics, environment and phenotypes is not well understood. Sample sizes for genome-wide expression studies based on lung tissue have been small due to the invasive nature of sample collection. Increasing evidence for the systemic nature of the disease makes blood a good alternative source to study the disease, but there have also been few large-scale blood genomic studies in COPD. Due to the complexity and heterogeneity of COPD, examining groups of interacting genes may have more relevance than identifying individual genes. Therefore, we used Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis to find groups of genes (modules that are highly connected. However, module definitions may vary between individual data sets. To alleviate this problem, we used a consensus module definition based on two cohorts, COPDGene and ECLIPSE. We studied the relationship between the consensus modules and COPD phenotypes airflow obstruction and emphysema. We also used these consensus module definitions on an independent cohort (TESRA and performed a meta analysis involving all data sets. We found several modules that are associated with COPD phenotypes, are enriched in functional categories and are overrepresented for cell-type specific genes. Of the 14 consensus modules, three were strongly associated with airflow obstruction (meta p ≤ 0.0002, and two had some association with emphysema (meta p ≤ 0.06; some associations were stronger in the case-control cohorts, and others in the cases-only subcohorts. Gene Ontology terms that were overrepresented included "immune response" and "defense response." The cell types whose type-specific genes were overrepresented in modules (p < 0.05 included

  3. Revealing targeted therapy for human cancer by gene module maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, David J.; Nuyten, Dimitry S. A.; Regev, Aviv; Lin, Meihong; Adler, Adam S.; Segal, Eran; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2008-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is to match specific therapies to molecular targets in cancer. Genome-scale expression profiling has identified new subtypes of cancer based on consistent patterns of variation in gene expression, leading to improved prognostic predictions. However, how these new

  4. A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene expression data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... tion. Therefore, in this study, the structural properties of the co-expression network inferred from gene expression microarray data were compared with the topological prop- erties of the known, well-established network data of the same organism. We use a Web application called. topoGSA (Glaab et al.

  5. Coronavirus gene 7 counteracts host defenses and modulates virus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jazmina L G; Sola, Isabel; Becares, Martina; Alberca, Berta; Plana, Joan; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2011-06-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) genome contains three accessory genes: 3a, 3b and 7. Gene 7 is only present in members of coronavirus genus a1, and encodes a hydrophobic protein of 78 aa. To study gene 7 function, a recombinant TGEV virus lacking gene 7 was engineered (rTGEV-Δ7). Both the mutant and the parental (rTGEV-wt) viruses showed the same growth and viral RNA accumulation kinetics in tissue cultures. Nevertheless, cells infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus showed an increased cytopathic effect caused by an enhanced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. Macromolecular synthesis analysis showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus infection led to host translational shut-off and increased cellular RNA degradation compared with rTGEV-wt infection. An increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation and an enhanced nuclease, most likely RNase L, activity were observed in rTGEV-Δ7 virus infected cells. These results suggested that the removal of gene 7 promoted an intensified dsRNA-activated host antiviral response. In protein 7 a conserved sequence motif that potentially mediates binding to protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c), a key regulator of the cell antiviral defenses, was identified. We postulated that TGEV protein 7 may counteract host antiviral response by its association with PP1c. In fact, pull-down assays demonstrated the interaction between TGEV protein 7, but not a protein 7 mutant lacking PP1c binding motif, with PP1. Moreover, the interaction between protein 7 and PP1 was required, during the infection, for eIF2α dephosphorylation and inhibition of cell RNA degradation. Inoculation of newborn piglets with rTGEV-Δ7 and rTGEV-wt viruses showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus presented accelerated growth kinetics and pathology compared with the parental virus. Overall, the results indicated that gene 7 counteracted host cell defenses, and modified TGEV persistence increasing TGEV survival. Therefore, the acquisition of

  6. Coronavirus gene 7 counteracts host defenses and modulates virus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmina L G Cruz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV genome contains three accessory genes: 3a, 3b and 7. Gene 7 is only present in members of coronavirus genus a1, and encodes a hydrophobic protein of 78 aa. To study gene 7 function, a recombinant TGEV virus lacking gene 7 was engineered (rTGEV-Δ7. Both the mutant and the parental (rTGEV-wt viruses showed the same growth and viral RNA accumulation kinetics in tissue cultures. Nevertheless, cells infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus showed an increased cytopathic effect caused by an enhanced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. Macromolecular synthesis analysis showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus infection led to host translational shut-off and increased cellular RNA degradation compared with rTGEV-wt infection. An increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α phosphorylation and an enhanced nuclease, most likely RNase L, activity were observed in rTGEV-Δ7 virus infected cells. These results suggested that the removal of gene 7 promoted an intensified dsRNA-activated host antiviral response. In protein 7 a conserved sequence motif that potentially mediates binding to protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c, a key regulator of the cell antiviral defenses, was identified. We postulated that TGEV protein 7 may counteract host antiviral response by its association with PP1c. In fact, pull-down assays demonstrated the interaction between TGEV protein 7, but not a protein 7 mutant lacking PP1c binding motif, with PP1. Moreover, the interaction between protein 7 and PP1 was required, during the infection, for eIF2α dephosphorylation and inhibition of cell RNA degradation. Inoculation of newborn piglets with rTGEV-Δ7 and rTGEV-wt viruses showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus presented accelerated growth kinetics and pathology compared with the parental virus. Overall, the results indicated that gene 7 counteracted host cell defenses, and modified TGEV persistence increasing TGEV survival. Therefore, the

  7. Investigation of epigenetic gene regulation in Arabidopsis modulated by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Myung Jin; Lee, Dong Joon; Kim, Young Min; Jung, Joon Yong; Han, Wan Keun; Kang, Soo Jin

    2011-12-01

    To investigate epigenetic gene regulation in Arabidopsis modulated by gamma radiation, we examined the changes in DNA methylation and histone modification after gamma radiation and investigated the effects of gamma radiation on epigenetic information and gene expression. We have selected 14 genes with changes in DNA methylation by gamma radiation, analyzed the changes of histone modification in the selected genes to reveal the relationship between DNA methylation and histone modification by gamma radiation. We have also analyzed the effects of gamma radiation on gene expression to investigate the relationship between epigenetic information and gene expression by gamma radiation. The results will be useful to reveal the effects of gamma radiation on DNA methylation, histone modification and gene expression. We anticipate that the information generated in this proposal will help to find out the mechanism underlying the changes in epigenetic information by gamma radiation

  8. Differential modulation of expression of nuclear receptor mediated genes by tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) on early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiyuan, E-mail: zhiyuan_nju@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Yu, Yijun, E-mail: yjun.yu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Tang, Song [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Liu, Hongling, E-mail: hlliu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Su, Guanyong; Xie, Yuwei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Hecker, Markus [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Yu, Hongxia [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects of TBOEP on expression of genes of several nuclear hormone receptors and their relationship with adverse effect pathways in zebrafish. • TBOEP was neither an agonist nor antagonist of AR or AhR as determined by use of in vitro mammalian cell-based receptor transactivation assays. • Modulation of ER- and MR-dependent pathways allowed for development of feasible receptor-mediated, critical mechanisms of toxic action. - Abstract: As one substitute for phased-out brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is frequently detected in aquatic organisms. However, knowledge about endocrine disrupting mechanisms associated with nuclear receptors caused by TBOEP remained restricted to results from in vitro studies with mammalian cells. In the study, results of which are presented here, embryos/larvae of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0.02, 0.1 or 0.5 μM TBOEP to investigate expression of genes under control of several nuclear hormone receptors (estrogen receptors (ERs), androgen receptor (AR), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and pregnane × receptor (P × R)) pathways at 120 hpf. Exposure to 0.5 μM TBOEP significantly (p < 0.05, one-way analysis of variance) up-regulated expression of estrogen receptors (ERs, er1, er2a, and er2b) genes and ER-associated genes (vtg4, vtg5, pgr, ncor, and ncoa3), indicating TBOEP modulates the ER pathway. In contrast, expression of most genes (mr, 11βhsd, ube2i,and adrb2b) associated with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro mammalian cell-based (MDA-kb2 and H4IIE-luc) receptor transactivation assays, were also conducted to investigate possible agonistic or antagonistic effects on AR- and AhR-mediated pathways. In mammalian cells, none of these pathways were

  9. Thoughts modulate the expression of inflammatory genes and may improve the coronary blood flow in patients after a myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Dal Lin

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The RR helps to advantageously modulate the expression of inflammatory genes through a cascade of NEI messengers improving, over time, microvascular function and the arteriosclerotic process.

  10. Analysis of Gene Expression in Human Dermal Fibroblasts Treated with Senescence-Modulating COX Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong A. Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that NS-398, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2–selective inhibitor, inhibited replicative cellular senescence in human dermal fibroblasts and skin aging in hairless mice. In contrast, celecoxib, another COX-2–selective inhibitor, and aspirin, a non-selective COX inhibitor, accelerated the senescence and aging. To figure out causal factors for the senescence-modulating effect of the inhibitors, we here performed cDNA microarray experiment and subsequent Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The data showed that several senescence-related gene sets were regulated by the inhibitor treatment. NS-398 up-regulated gene sets involved in the tumor necrosis factor β receptor pathway and the fructose and mannose metabolism, whereas it down-regulated a gene set involved in protein secretion. Celecoxib up-regulated gene sets involved in G2M checkpoint and E2F targets. Aspirin up-regulated the gene set involved in protein secretion, and down-regulated gene sets involved in RNA transcription. These results suggest that COX inhibitors modulate cellular senescence by different mechanisms and will provide useful information to understand senescence-modulating mechanisms of COX inhibitors.

  11. Liquid chromatography-high resolution/ high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry-based identification of in vivo generated metabolites of the selective androgen receptor modulator ACP-105 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Piper, Thomas; Krug, Oliver; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent an emerging class of therapeutics which have been prohibited in sport as anabolic agents according to the regulations of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) since 2008. Within the past three years, numerous adverse analytical findings with SARMs in routine doping control samples have been reported despite missing clinical approval of these substances. Hence, preventive doping research concerning the metabolism and elimination of new therapeutic entities of the class of SARMs are vital for efficient and timely sports drug testing programs as banned compounds are most efficiently screened when viable targets (for example, characteristic metabolites) are identified. In the present study, the metabolism of ACP-105, a novel SARM drug candidate, was studied in vivo in rats. Following oral administration, urine samples were collected over a period of seven days and analyzed for metabolic products by Liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry. Samples were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis prior to liquid-liquid extraction and a total of seven major phase-I metabolites were detected, three of which were attributed to monohydroxylated and four to bishydroxylated ACP-105. The hydroxylation sites were assigned by means of diagnostic product ions and respective dissociation pathways of the analytes following positive or negative ionization and collisional activation as well as selective chemical derivatization. The identified metabolites were used as target compounds to investigate their traceability in a rat elimination urine samples study and monohydroxylated and bishydroxylated species were detectable for up to four and six days post-administration, respectively.

  12. Hormone Treatment and Muscle Anabolism during Aging: Androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, E. Lichar; Durham, William J.; Urban, Randall J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in circulating testosterone concentrations and decreased musculature in men. While testosterone administration is often considered when symptoms of hypogonadism are presented, the long-term effects of androgen use on muscle physiology are not yet fully understood. The definition of hypogonadism in men remains obscure but is generally indicated by total testosterone concentrations less than a threshold value of 300-500 ng/dL. Androgen replacement therapy is generally safe in men and women with low endogenous testosterone concentrations. The development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide additional options in treatment of hypogonadism while lowering the potential of side effects often associated with long-term androgen use. Androgen administration, either alone or in combination with other treatments, can be successful in improving muscle mass by increasing protein anabolism and reducing protein catabolism in men and women. Further research is necessary to optimize the anabolic and anticatabolic properties of androgens for treatment and prevention of muscle loss in men and women. PMID:20452103

  13. Critical genes of hepatocellular carcinoma revealed by network and module analysis of RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M-R; Zhang, Y; Wu, X-X; Chen, W

    2016-10-01

    RNA-seq data of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was analyzed to identify critical genes related to the pathogenesis and prognosis. Three RNA-seq datasets of HCC (GSE69164, GSE63863 and GSE55758) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), while another dataset including 54 HCC cases with survival time was obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by significant analysis of microarrays (SAM) method using package samr of R. As followed, we constructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network based on the information in Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). Modules in the PPI network were identified with MCODE method using plugin clusterViz of CytoScape. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis were performed with DAVID. The difference in survival curves was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier (K-M) method using package survival. A total of 2572 DEGs were identified in the 3 datasets from GEO (GSE69164, GSE63863 and GSE55758). The PPI network was constructed including 660 nodes and 1008 edges, and 4 modules were disclosed in the network. Module A (containing 244 DEGs) was found to related to HCC closely, which genes were involved in transcription factor binding, protein metabolism as well as regulation of apoptosis. Nine hub genes were identified in the module A, including PRKCA, YWHAZ, KRT18, NDRG1, HSPA1A, HSP90AA1, HSF1, IKGKB and UBE21. The network provides the protein-protein interaction of these critical genes, which were implicated in the pathogenesis of HCC. Survival analysis showed that there is a significant difference between two groups classified by the genes in module A. Further Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that 72 genes were associated with survival time significantly, such as NPM1, PRKDC, SPARC, HMGA1, COL1A1 and COL1A2. Nine critical genes related to the pathogenesis and 72 potential prognostic markers were revealed in HCC by the network and module

  14. Gene Network for Identifying the Entropy Changes of Different Modules in Pediatric Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pediatric sepsis is a disease that threatens life of children. The incidence of pediatric sepsis is higher in developing countries due to various reasons, such as insufficient immunization and nutrition, water and air pollution, etc. Exploring the potential genes via different methods is of significance for the prevention and treatment of pediatric sepsis. This study aimed to identify potential genes associated with pediatric sepsis utilizing analysis of gene network and entropy. Methods: The mRNA expression in the blood samples collected from 20 septic children and 30 healthy controls was quantified by using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarray. Two condition-specific protein-protein interaction networks (PINs, one for the healthy control and the other one for the children with sepsis, were deduced by combining the fundamental human PINs with gene expression profiles in the two phenotypes. Subsequently, distinct modules from the two conditional networks were extracted by adopting a maximal clique-merging approach. Delta entropy (ΔS was calculated between sepsis and control modules. Results: Then, key genes displaying changes in gene composition were identified by matching the control and sepsis modules. Two objective modules were obtained, in which ribosomal protein RPL4 and RPL9 as well as TOP2A were probably considered as the key genes differentiating sepsis from healthy controls. Conclusion: According to previous reports and this work, TOP2A is the potential gene therapy target for pediatric sepsis. The relationship between pediatric sepsis and RPL4 and RPL9 needs further investigation.

  15. Chloroquine mediated modulation of Anopheles gambiae gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Abrantes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium development in the mosquito is crucial for malaria transmission and depends on the parasite's interaction with a variety of cell types and specific mosquito factors that have both positive and negative effects on infection. Whereas the defensive response of the mosquito contributes to a decrease in parasite numbers during these stages, some components of the blood meal are known to favor infection, potentiating the risk of increased transmission. The presence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine in the mosquito's blood meal has been associated with an increase in Plasmodium infectivity for the mosquito, which is possibly caused by chloroquine interfering with the capacity of the mosquito to defend against the infection.In this study, we report a detailed survey of the Anopheles gambiae genes that are differentially regulated by the presence of chloroquine in the blood meal, using an A. gambiae cDNA microarray. The effect of chloroquine on transcript abundance was evaluated separately for non-infected and Plasmodium berghei-infected mosquitoes. Chloroquine was found to affect the abundance of transcripts that encode proteins involved in a variety of processes, including immunity, apoptosis, cytoskeleton and the response to oxidative stress. This pattern of differential gene expression may explain the weakened mosquito defense response which accounts for the increased infectivity observed in chloroquine-treated mosquitoes.The results of the present study suggest that chloroquine can interfere with several putative mosquito mechanisms of defense against Plasmodium at the level of gene expression and highlight the need for a better understanding of the impacts of antimalarial agents on parasite transmission.

  16. The WWOX Gene Modulates HDL and Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatan, Iulia; Choi, Hong Y.; Ruel, Isabelle; Linga Reddy, M.V. Prasad; Kil, Hyunsuk; Lee, Jaeho; Abu Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Nikkola, Elina; Civelek, Mete; Awan, Zuhier; Croce, Carlo M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Pajukanta, Päivi; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; Genest, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) constitutes a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recent studies from our group reported a genetic association between the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene and HDL-C levels. Here, through next-generation resequencing, in vivo functional studies and gene microarray analyses, we investigated the role of WWOX in HDL and lipid metabolism. Methods and Results Using next-generation resequencing of the WWOX region, we first identified 8 variants significantly associated and perfectly segregating with the low-HDL trait in two multi-generational French Canadian dyslipidemic families. To understand in vivo functions of WWOX, we used liver-specific Wwoxhep−/− and total Wwox−/− mice models, where we found decreased ApoA-I and ABCA1 levels in hepatic tissues. Analyses of lipoprotein profiles in Wwox−/−, but not Wwox hep−/− littermates, also showed marked reductions in serum HDL-C concentrations, concordant with the low-HDL findings observed in families. We next obtained evidence of a gender-specific effect in female Wwoxhep−/− mice, where an increase in plasma triglycerides and altered lipid metabolic pathways by microarray analyses were observed. We further identified a significant reduction in ApoA-I and LPL, and upregulation in Fas, Angptl4 and Lipg, suggesting that the effects of Wwox involve multiple pathways, including cholesterol homeostasis, ApoA-I/ABCA1 pathway, and fatty acid biosynthesis/triglyceride metabolism. Conclusions Our data indicate that WWOX disruption alters HDL and lipoprotein metabolism through several mechanisms and may account for the low-HDL phenotype observed in families expressing the WWOX variants. These findings thus describe a novel gene involved in cellular lipid homeostasis, which effects may impact atherosclerotic disease development. PMID:24871327

  17. Genetics Home Reference: androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allow cells to respond to androgens, which are hormones (such as testosterone ) that direct male sexual development. Androgens and androgen receptors also have other important functions in both males and females, such as regulating ...

  18. IκBα mediates prostate cancer cell death induced by combinatorial targeting of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Sarah Louise; Centenera, Margaret Mary; Tilley, Wayne Desmond; Selth, Luke Ashton; Butler, Lisa Maree

    2016-01-01

    Combining different clinical agents to target multiple pathways in prostate cancer cells, including androgen receptor (AR) signaling, is potentially an effective strategy to improve outcomes for men with metastatic disease. We have previously demonstrated that sub-effective concentrations of an AR antagonist, bicalutamide, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, act synergistically when combined to cause death of AR-dependent prostate cancer cells. In this study, expression profiling of human prostate cancer cells treated with bicalutamide or vorinostat, alone or in combination, was employed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergistic action. Cell viability assays and quantitative real time PCR were used to validate identified candidate genes. A substantial proportion of the genes modulated by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat were androgen regulated. Independent pathway analysis identified further pathways and genes, most notably NFKBIA (encoding IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB and p53 signaling), as targets of this combinatorial treatment. Depletion of IκBα by siRNA knockdown enhanced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells, while ectopic overexpression of IκBα markedly suppressed cell death induced by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat. These findings implicate IκBα as a key mediator of the apoptotic action of this combinatorial AR targeting strategy and a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2188-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  19. Transcriptional Modulation of Squalene Synthase Genes in Barley Treated with PGPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anam eYousaf

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytosterol contents and food quality of plant produce is directly associated with transcription of gene Squalene Synthase (SS. In current study, barley plants were treated with different rhizobacterial strains under semi controlled (27±3°C greenhouse conditions in order to modulate expression of SS gene. Plant samples were analysed through semi-quantitative PCR to evaluate effect of rhizobacterial application on transcriptional status of squalene synthase. Results revealed that among four SS genes (i.e. SSA, SS1, SS2 and SS3, the most expressive gene was SSA; while, SS2 was screened out as the second best induced gene due to Acetobacter aceti. The most efficient bacterial strain which recorded maximum gene expression was A. aceti AC8. Moreover, AC7 was reported as the least efficient bacterial species for inducing SS gene expression. AC8 enhanced the share of SSA and SS2 up to 43% and 31%, respectively. The study also described ribosomal sequence of the most efficient bacterial strain AC8, which was used to determine its phylogenetic relationships with other microbial strains. The study would be helpful to improve quality of plant produce by modulating transcription of SS genes.

  20. Transcriptional modulation of squalene synthase genes in barley treated with PGPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Phytosterol contents and food quality of plant produce is directly associated with transcription of gene squalene synthase (SS). In current study, barley plants were treated with different rhizobacterial strains under semi controlled (27 ± 3°C) greenhouse conditions in order to modulate expression of SS gene. Plant samples were analyzed through semi-quantitative PCR to evaluate effect of rhizobacterial application on transcriptional status of SS. Results revealed that among four SS genes (i.e., SSA, SS1, SS2, and SS3), the most expressive gene was SSA; while, SS2 was screened out as the second best induced gene due to Acetobacter aceti. The most efficient bacterial strain which recorded maximum gene expression was A. aceti AC8. Moreover, AC7 was reported as the least efficient bacterial species for inducing SS gene expression. AC8 enhanced the share of SSA and SS2 up to 43 and 31%, respectively. The study also described ribosomal sequence of the most efficient bacterial strain AC8, which was used to determine its phylogenetic relationships with other microbial strains. The study would be helpful to improve quality of plant produce by modulating transcription of SS genes. PMID:26388880

  1. Metabolic syndrome in androgenic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Hima; Upadya, Gatha M

    2016-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in various studies. The relationship between androgenic alopecia and metabolic syndrome, a known risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is still poorly understood. To study the association between metabolic syndrome and early-onset androgenic alopecia. A hospital-based analytical cross-sectional study was done on men in the age group of 18-55 years. Eighty five clinically diagnosed cases with early-onset (alopecia of Norwood grade III or above, and 85 controls without androgenic alopecia were included. Data collected included anthropometric measurements, arterial blood pressure and history of chronic diseases. Fasting blood and lipid profile were determined. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed as per the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.00. Metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 (22.4%) patients with androgenic alopecia and 8 (9.4%) controls (P = 0.021). Abdominal obesity, hypertension and lowered high-density lipoprotein were significantly higher in patients with androgenic alopecia versus their respective controls. The limitations of our study include small sample size in subgroups and the lack of evidence of a temporal relationship between metabolic syndrome and androgenic alopecia. A higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome is seen in men with early-onset androgenic alopecia. Early screening for metabolic syndrome and its components is beneficial in patients with early-onset androgenic alopecia.

  2. Systems Genetics Analysis to Identify the Genetic Modulation of a Glaucoma-Associated Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, Sumana R; Jablonski, Monica M

    2017-01-01

    Loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is one of the hallmarks of retinal neurodegenerative diseases, glaucoma being one of the most common. Recently, γ-synuclein (SNCG) was shown to be highly expressed in the somas and axons of RGCs. In various mouse models of glaucoma, downregulation of Sncg gene expression correlates with RGC loss. To investigate the regulation of Sncg in RGCs, we used a systems genetics approach to identify a gene that modulates the expression of Sncg, followed by confirmatory studies in both healthy and diseased retinas. We found that chromosome 1 harbors an eQTL that modulates the expression of Sncg in the mouse retina and identified Pfdn2 as the candidate upstream modulator of Sncg expression. Downregulation of Pfdn2 in enriched RGCs causes a concomitant reduction in Sncg. In this chapter, we describe our strategy and methods for identifying and confirming a genetic modulation of a glaucoma-associated gene. A similar method can be applied to other genes expressed in other tissues.

  3. Nigribactin, a Novel Siderophore from Vibrio nigripulchritudo, Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen that employs a number of virulence factors as part of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to explore marine bacteria as a source of compounds that modulate virulence gene expression in S. aureus. During the global marine Galathe...

  4. Global analysis of the human pathophenotypic similarity gene network merges disease module components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Rodríguez-López, Rocío; Ranea, Juan A G; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Sánchez Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The molecular complexity of genetic diseases requires novel approaches to break it down into coherent biological modules. For this purpose, many disease network models have been created and analyzed. We highlight two of them, "the human diseases networks" (HDN) and "the orphan disease networks" (ODN). However, in these models, each single node represents one disease or an ambiguous group of diseases. In these cases, the notion of diseases as unique entities reduces the usefulness of network-based methods. We hypothesize that using the clinical features (pathophenotypes) to define pathophenotypic connections between disease-causing genes improve our understanding of the molecular events originated by genetic disturbances. For this, we have built a pathophenotypic similarity gene network (PSGN) and compared it with the unipartite projections (based on gene-to-gene edges) similar to those used in previous network models (HDN and ODN). Unlike these disease network models, the PSGN uses semantic similarities. This pathophenotypic similarity has been calculated by comparing pathophenotypic annotations of genes (human abnormalities of HPO terms) in the "Human Phenotype Ontology". The resulting network contains 1075 genes (nodes) and 26197 significant pathophenotypic similarities (edges). A global analysis of this network reveals: unnoticed pairs of genes showing significant pathophenotypic similarity, a biological meaningful re-arrangement of the pathological relationships between genes, correlations of biochemical interactions with higher similarity scores and functional biases in metabolic and essential genes toward the pathophenotypic specificity and the pleiotropy, respectively. Additionally, pathophenotypic similarities and metabolic interactions of genes associated with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) have been used to merge into a coherent pathological module.Our results indicate that pathophenotypes contribute to identify underlying co-dependencies among disease

  5. The clinical and molecular spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O.; Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Holterhus, P.M.; Nitsche, E.M.; Kruse, K. [Medical Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-05-03

    Androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) are due to end-organ resistance to androgenic steroids in males leading to defective virilization of the external genitalia. The phenotype encompasses a wide array of genital ambiguity and may range from completely female to undervirilized but unequivocally male with infertility. This disorder is caused by mutations of the androgen receptor and is an X-linked recessive trait. We have studied 47 patients with AIS and have characterized the underlying molecular abnormality in the androgen receptor gene. Twenty patients had complete AIS and twenty-seven had partial AIS. Of the latter, 11 were of predominantly female phenotypic appearance and gender was assigned accordingly, while 16 were raised as males. Within the group of complete AIS, two patients had gross deletions within the gene, one had a small deletion, and one had an insertion. In the other patients with complete AIS, as well as all individuals with partial AIS, single nucleotide substitutions within the coding region were detected, each leading to an amino acid alteration. Seven codons were involved in more than one mutation in different cases. In addition, in one patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, an elongation of a glutamine-repeat was characterized. We conclude that mutations in the androgen receptor gene may be present throughout the whole coding region. However, our study provides evidence that several mutational hot spots exist. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Molecular evolution constraints in the floral organ specification gene regulatory network module across 18 angiosperm genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila-Velderrain, Jose; Servin-Marquez, Andres; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2014-03-01

    The gene regulatory network of floral organ cell fate specification of Arabidopsis thaliana is a robust developmental regulatory module. Although such finding was proposed to explain the overall conservation of floral organ types and organization among angiosperms, it has not been confirmed that the network components are conserved at the molecular level among flowering plants. Using the genomic data that have accumulated, we address the conservation of the genes involved in this network and the forces that have shaped its evolution during the divergence of angiosperms. We recovered the network gene homologs for 18 species of flowering plants spanning nine families. We found that all the genes are highly conserved with no evidence of positive selection. We studied the sequence conservation features of the genes in the context of their known biological function and the strength of the purifying selection acting upon them in relation to their placement within the network. Our results suggest an association between protein length and sequence conservation, evolutionary rates, and functional category. On the other hand, we found no significant correlation between the strength of purifying selection and gene placement. Our results confirm that the studied robust developmental regulatory module has been subjected to strong functional constraints. However, unlike previous studies, our results do not support the notion that network topology plays a major role in constraining evolutionary rates. We speculate that the dynamical functional role of genes within the network and not just its connectivity could play an important role in constraining evolution.

  7. Androgens and androgen receptor action in skin and hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Julieta María; Leirós, Gustavo José; Balañá, María Eugenia

    2018-04-15

    Beyond sexual functions, androgens exert their action in skin physiology and pathophysiology. Skin cells are able to synthesize most active androgens from gonadal or adrenal precursors and the enzymes involved in skin steroidogenesis are implicated both in normal or pathological processes. Even when the role of androgens and androgen receptor (AR) in skin pathologies has been studied for decades, their molecular mechanisms in skin disorders remain largely unknown. Here, we analyze recent studies of androgens and AR roles in several skin-related disorders, focusing in the current understanding of their molecular mechanisms in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). We review the molecular pathophysiology of type 2 5α-reductase, AR coactivators, the paracrine factors deregulated in dermal papillae (such as TGF-β, IGF 1, WNTs and DKK-1) and the crosstalk between AR and Wnt signaling in order to shed some light on new promising treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of gene expression in heart and liver of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim B; Goropashnaya, Anna V; Tøien, Øivind; Stewart, Nathan C; Chang, Celia; Wang, Haifang; Yan, Jun; Showe, Louise C; Showe, Michael K; Barnes, Brian M

    2011-03-31

    Hibernation is an adaptive strategy to survive in highly seasonal or unpredictable environments. The molecular and genetic basis of hibernation physiology in mammals has only recently been studied using large scale genomic approaches. We analyzed gene expression in the American black bear, Ursus americanus, using a custom 12,800 cDNA probe microarray to detect differences in expression that occur in heart and liver during winter hibernation in comparison to summer active animals. We identified 245 genes in heart and 319 genes in liver that were differentially expressed between winter and summer. The expression of 24 genes was significantly elevated during hibernation in both heart and liver. These genes are mostly involved in lipid catabolism and protein biosynthesis and include RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3), which enhances protein synthesis at mildly hypothermic temperatures. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes suggests induction of translation that may be related to adaptive mechanisms reducing cardiac and muscle atrophies over extended periods of low metabolism and immobility during hibernation in bears. Coordinated reduction of transcription of genes involved in amino acid catabolism suggests redirection of amino acids from catabolic pathways to protein biosynthesis. We identify common for black bears and small mammalian hibernators transcriptional changes in the liver that include induction of genes responsible for fatty acid β oxidation and carbohydrate synthesis and depression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbohydrate catabolism, cellular respiration and detoxification pathways. Our findings show that modulation of gene expression during winter hibernation represents molecular mechanism of adaptation to extreme environments.

  9. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limtrakul, Pornngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Buddhasukh, Duang

    2004-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170), thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin) decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents

  10. Combining sequence and Gene Ontology for protein module detection in the Weighted Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Jie; Feng, Nuan; Song, Bo; Zheng, Zeyu

    2017-01-07

    Studies of protein modules in a Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network contribute greatly to the understanding of biological mechanisms. With the development of computing science, computational approaches have played an important role in locating protein modules. In this paper, a new approach combining Gene Ontology and amino acid background frequency is introduced to detect the protein modules in the weighted PPI networks. The proposed approach mainly consists of three parts: the feature extraction, the weighted graph construction and the protein complex detection. Firstly, the topology-sequence information is utilized to present the feature of protein complex. Secondly, six types of the weighed graph are constructed by combining PPI network and Gene Ontology information. Lastly, protein complex algorithm is applied to the weighted graph, which locates the clusters based on three conditions, including density, network diameter and the included angle cosine. Experiments have been conducted on two protein complex benchmark sets for yeast and the results show that the approach is more effective compared to five typical algorithms with the performance of f-measure and precision. The combination of protein interaction network with sequence and gene ontology data is helpful to improve the performance and provide a optional method for protein module detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression predicts for a poorer outcome in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated by external beam radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation androgen ablation: results based on RTOG study 86-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Grignon, David; Caplan, Richard; Sarkar, Fazlul; Forman, Jeffrey; Mesic, John; Fu, Karen K.; Abrams, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish the effect of the abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene on the results of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation. Materials and Methods: Patients evaluated were part of a RTOG phase III multi-institutional trial. This trial assessed the value of pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation on patients with locally advanced disease (bulky stage B and stage C). Of the 471 patients registered, pre-treatment pathological material was available for 129 patients. P-53 status was determined immunohistochemically utilizing a commercially available antibody (D07). Clinical endpoints evaluated were overall survival and development of metastases. Results: Twenty-three of the 129 patients had abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene. Presence of this abnormal expression significantly correlated with lower overall survival (p=0.03) and the development of distant metastases (p=0.03). Abnormal expression of the P-53 gene was an independent prognostic indicator when evaluated against clinical stage and Gleason score. Conclusion: This data from patients entered on a phase III multi-institutional, randomized clinical trial shows that abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression as determined immunohistochemically is an independent predictor of poorer survival and the development of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation

  12. Modulating polyplex-mediated gene transfection by small-molecule regulators of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao; Panus, David; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2015-03-02

    Nonviral gene transfection mediated by cationic polymer/DNA polyplexes often imposes stress and toxicity to cells. To better understand the relationship between cellular stress responses and polyplex-mediated transfection, polyplex-induced early autophagy in mouse fibroblasts was characterized and the impact of autophagy modulation on transgene expression evaluated. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of double-membraned autophagosome in the cytoplasm of polyplex-transfected cells. Immunofluorescence staining and microscopy revealed intracellular LC3 punctation that was characteristic of early autophagy activation. Elevated expression of autophagosome-associated LC3 II protein was also detected by Western blot. When cells were treated with small-molecule modulators of autophagy, polyplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency was significantly affected. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), an early autophagy inhibitor, reduced transfection efficiency, whereas rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, enhanced transgene expression. Importantly, the observed functional impact on gene transfection by autophagy modulation was decoupled from that of other modes of cellular stress response (apoptosis/necrosis). Treatment of cells by 3-MA or rapamycin did not affect the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) but did decrease or increase, respectively, nuclear localization of polyplex-delivered plasmid DNA. These findings suggest new possibilities of enhancing polyplex-mediated gene delivery by codelivery of small-molecule regulators of autophagy.

  13. Histone H2B monoubiquitination facilitates the rapid modulation of gene expression during Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Bourbousse

    Full Text Available Profiling of DNA and histone modifications has recently allowed the establishment of reference epigenomes from several model organisms. This identified a major chromatin state for active genes that contains monoubiquitinated H2B (H2Bub, a mark linked to transcription elongation. However, assessment of dynamic chromatin changes during the reprogramming of gene expression in response to extrinsic or developmental signals has been more difficult. Here we used the major developmental switch that Arabidopsis thaliana plants undergo upon their initial perception of light, known as photomorphogenesis, as a paradigm to assess spatial and temporal dynamics of monoubiquitinated H2B (H2Bub and its impact on transcriptional responses. The process involves rapid and extensive transcriptional reprogramming and represents a developmental window well suited to studying cell division-independent chromatin changes. Genome-wide H2Bub distribution was determined together with transcriptome profiles at three time points during early photomorphogenesis. This revealed de novo marking of 177 genes upon the first hour of illumination, illustrating the dynamic nature of H2Bub enrichment in a genomic context. Gene upregulation was associated with H2Bub enrichment, while H2Bub levels generally remained stable during gene downregulation. We further report that H2Bub influences the modulation of gene expression, as both gene up- and downregulation were globally weaker in hub1 mutant plants that lack H2Bub. H2Bub-dependent regulation notably impacted genes with fast and transient light induction, and several circadian clock components whose mRNA levels are tightly regulated by sharp oscillations. Based on these findings, we propose that H2B monoubiquitination is part of a transcription-coupled, chromatin-based mechanism to rapidly modulate gene expression.

  14. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satwant Kaur

    Full Text Available Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT, under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  15. ANDROGEN LEVELS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Valadan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. Several independent investigators have demonstrated the association of androgens with hypertension. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether maternal levels of sex hormones, especially testosterone, are higher in patients with preeclampsia than in matched normotensive control subjects. Serum levels of testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S and estradiol were measured in 60 subjects in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy with documented preeclampsia (including 30 cases of mild and 30 cases of severe preeclampsia and 60 healthy normotensive women with similar maternal and gestational ages and body mass index (BMI and neonatal sex. All subjects were primigravid with singleton pregnancies. Cases of polycystic ovary (PCO, diabetes, chronic hypertension and chronic systemic diseases such as lupus and patients using steroid hormones and anti-hypertensive drugs were excluded. Levels of testosterone, DHEA-S and estradiol were not higher in primigravid women with preeclampsia than in normotensive women with similar gestational and maternal ages, BMI and neonatal sex. There were no significant differences in sex hormones measured between groups of mild and severe preeclampsia and normotensive women. There were also no significant differences in sex hormone levels according to neonatal sex. These findings are against the hypothesis of mediating or amplifying role of high androgen levels in pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  16. Gene Profiling of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells under Elevated Pressure Conditions: Modulation of Inflammatory Gene Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Warnock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify mechanosensitive pathways and gene networks that are stimulated by elevated cyclic pressure in aortic valve interstitial cells (VICs and lead to detrimental tissue remodeling and/or pathogenesis. Porcine aortic valve leaflets were exposed to cyclic pressures of 80 or 120 mmHg, corresponding to diastolic transvalvular pressure in normal and hypertensive conditions, respectively. Linear, two-cycle amplification of total RNA, followed by microarray was performed for transcriptome analysis (with qRT-PCR validation. A combination of systems biology modeling and pathway analysis identified novel genes and molecular mechanisms underlying the biological response of VICs to elevated pressure. 56 gene transcripts related to inflammatory response mechanisms were differentially expressed. TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-1β were key cytokines identified from the gene network model. Also of interest was the discovery that pentraxin 3 (PTX3 was significantly upregulated under elevated pressure conditions (41-fold change. In conclusion, a gene network model showing differentially expressed inflammatory genes and their interactions in VICs exposed to elevated pressure has been developed. This system overview has detected key molecules that could be targeted for pharmacotherapy of aortic stenosis in hypertensive patients.

  17. IGF-I Gene Therapy in Aging Rats Modulates Hippocampal Genes Relevant to Memory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Joaquín; Abba, Martin C; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Ogundele, Olalekan M; Paiva, Isabel; Morel, Gustavo R; Outeiro, Tiago F; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2018-03-14

    In rats, learning and memory performance decline during normal aging, which makes this rodent species a suitable model to evaluate therapeutic strategies. In aging rats, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), is known to significantly improve spatial memory accuracy as compared to control counterparts. A constellation of gene expression changes underlie the hippocampal phenotype of aging but no studies on the effects of IGF-I on the hippocampal transcriptome of old rodents have been documented. Here, we assessed the effects of IGF-I gene therapy on spatial memory performance in old female rats and compared them with changes in the hippocampal transcriptome. In the Barnes maze test, experimental rats showed a significantly higher exploratory frequency of the goal hole than controls. Hippocampal RNA-sequencing showed that 219 genes are differentially expressed in 28-month-old rats intracerebroventricularly injected with an adenovector expressing rat IGF-I as compared with placebo adenovector-injected counterparts. From the differentially expressed genes, 81 were down and 138 upregulated. From those genes, a list of functionally relevant genes, concerning hippocampal IGF-I expression, synaptic plasticity as well as neuronal function was identified. Our results provide an initial glimpse at the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective actions of IGF-I in the aging brain.

  18. Dietary lutein modulates growth and survival genes in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Gokarn, Sarita V; Krueger, Eric G; Bright, John J

    2015-02-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid pigment present in fruits and vegetables that has anti-inflammatory and antitumor properties. In this study, we examined the effect of lutein on proliferation and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer (PC-3) cells. We found that in vitro culture of PC-3 cells with lutein induced mild decrease in proliferation that improved in combination treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists and other chemotherapeutic agents. Flow cytometry analyses showed that lutein improved drug-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer. Gene array and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that lutein altered the expression of growth and apoptosis-associated biomarker genes in PC-3 cells. These findings highlight that lutein modulates the expression of growth and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer cells.

  19. Blue Light Modulates Murine Microglial Gene Expression in the Absence of Optogenetic Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kevin P; Kiernan, Elizabeth A; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Williams, Justin C; Watters, Jyoti J

    2016-02-17

    Neural optogenetic applications over the past decade have steadily increased; however the effects of commonly used blue light paradigms on surrounding, non-optogenetic protein-expressing CNS cells are rarely considered, despite their simultaneous exposure. Here we report that blue light (450 nm) repetitively delivered in both long-duration boluses and rapid optogenetic bursts gene-specifically altered basal expression of inflammatory and neurotrophic genes in immortalized and primary murine wild type microglial cultures. In addition, blue light reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression in microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide. These results demonstrate previously unreported, off-target effects of blue light in cells not expressing optogenetic constructs. The unexpected gene modulatory effects of blue light on wild type CNS resident immune cells have novel and important implications for the neuro-optogenetic field. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic utility of blue light modulation of the wild type CNS.

  20. Blue Light Modulates Murine Microglial Gene Expression in the Absence of Optogenetic Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kevin P.; Kiernan, Elizabeth A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural optogenetic applications over the past decade have steadily increased; however the effects of commonly used blue light paradigms on surrounding, non-optogenetic protein-expressing CNS cells are rarely considered, despite their simultaneous exposure. Here we report that blue light (450 nm) repetitively delivered in both long-duration boluses and rapid optogenetic bursts gene-specifically altered basal expression of inflammatory and neurotrophic genes in immortalized and primary murine wild type microglial cultures. In addition, blue light reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression in microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide. These results demonstrate previously unreported, off-target effects of blue light in cells not expressing optogenetic constructs. The unexpected gene modulatory effects of blue light on wild type CNS resident immune cells have novel and important implications for the neuro-optogenetic field. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic utility of blue light modulation of the wild type CNS. PMID:26883795

  1. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis of expression data of monozygotic twins identifies specific modules and hub genes related to BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Weijing; Jiang, Wenjie; Hou, Lin

    2017-01-01

    and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to identify significant genes and specific modules related to BMI based on gene expression profile data of 7 discordant monozygotic twins. RESULTS: In the differential gene expression analysis, it appeared that 32 differentially expressed genes (DEGs......) were with a trend of up-regulation in twins with higher BMI when compared to their siblings. Categories of positive regulation of nitric-oxide synthase biosynthetic process, positive regulation of NF-kappa B import into nucleus, and peroxidase activity were significantly enriched within GO database...... and NF-kappa B signaling pathway within KEGG database. DEGs of NAMPT, TLR9, PTGS2, HBD, and PCSK1N might be associated with obesity. In the WGCNA, among the total 20 distinct co-expression modules identified, coral1 module (68 genes) had the strongest positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.56, P = 0...

  2. From phenotype to gene: detecting disease-specific gene functional modules via a text-based human disease phenotype network construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Chao; Li, Xia; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Wei; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yu-Qing

    2010-08-20

    Currently, some efforts have been devoted to the text analysis of disease phenotype data, and their results indicated that similar disease phenotypes arise from functionally related genes. These related genes work together, as a functional module, to perform a desired cellular function. We constructed a text-based human disease phenotype network and detected 82 disease-specific gene functional modules, each corresponding to a different phenotype cluster, by means of graph-based clustering and mapping from disease phenotype to gene. Since genes in such gene functional modules are functionally related and cause clinically similar diseases, they may share common genetic origin of their associated disease phenotypes. We believe the investigation may facilitate the ultimate understanding of the common pathophysiologic basis of associated diseases. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerosolimo Germano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system. Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 with both the Huh-7 parental cells and the 21-5 cured (21-5c cells. In these latter, the HCV RNA has been eliminated by IFN-α treatment. To confirm data, we also analyzed microarray results from both the 21-5 and two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7, compared to the Huh-7 cells. The study was carried out by using the Applied Biosystems (AB Human Genome Survey Microarray v1.0 which provides 31,700 probes that correspond to 27,868 human genes. Microarray analysis revealed a specific transcriptional program induced by HCV in replicon cells respect to both IFN-α-cured and Huh-7 cells. From the original datasets of differentially expressed genes, we selected by Venn diagrams a final list of 38 genes modulated by HCV in all clones. Most of the 38 genes have never been described before and showed high fold-change associated with significant p-value, strongly supporting data reliability. Classification of the 38 genes by Panther System identified functional categories that were significantly enriched in this gene set, such as histones and ribosomal proteins as well as extracellular matrix and intracellular protein traffic. The dataset also included new genes involved in lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal network, which may be critical for HCV replication and pathogenesis. Conclusion Our data provide a comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression induced by HCV replication and reveal modulation of new genes potentially useful

  4. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress.

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    Isidoro Feliciello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes' transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions.

  5. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  6. H-ferritin-regulated microRNAs modulate gene expression in K562 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Biamonte

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that the silencing of the heavy subunit (FHC offerritin, the central iron storage molecule in the cell, is accompanied by a modification in global gene expression. In this work, we explored whether different FHC amounts might modulate miRNA expression levels in K562 cells and studied the impact of miRNAs in gene expression profile modifications. To this aim, we performed a miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in K562 silenced for FHC (K562shFHC comparing it with K562 transduced with scrambled RNA (K562shRNA. Four miRNAs, namely hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7f, hsa-let-7i and hsa-miR-125b, were significantly up-regulated in silenced cells. The remarkable down-regulation of these miRNAs, following FHC expression rescue, supports a specific relation between FHC silencing and miRNA-modulation. The integration of target predictions with miRNA and gene expression profiles led to the identification of a regulatory network which includes the miRNAs up-regulated by FHC silencing, as well as91 down-regulated putative target genes. These genes were further classified in 9 networks; the highest scoring network, "Cell Death and Survival, Hematological System Development and Function, Hematopoiesis", is composed by 18 focus molecules including RAF1 and ERK1/2. We confirmed that, following FHC silencing, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is severely impaired and that RAF1 mRNA is significantly down-regulated. Taken all together, our data indicate that, in our experimental model, FHC silencing may affect RAF1/pERK1/2 levels through the modulation of a specific set of miRNAs and add new insights in to the relationship among iron homeostasis and miRNAs.

  7. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  8. Modulation of gene expression in heart and liver of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibernation is an adaptive strategy to survive in highly seasonal or unpredictable environments. The molecular and genetic basis of hibernation physiology in mammals has only recently been studied using large scale genomic approaches. We analyzed gene expression in the American black bear, Ursus americanus, using a custom 12,800 cDNA probe microarray to detect differences in expression that occur in heart and liver during winter hibernation in comparison to summer active animals. Results We identified 245 genes in heart and 319 genes in liver that were differentially expressed between winter and summer. The expression of 24 genes was significantly elevated during hibernation in both heart and liver. These genes are mostly involved in lipid catabolism and protein biosynthesis and include RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3, which enhances protein synthesis at mildly hypothermic temperatures. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes suggests induction of translation that may be related to adaptive mechanisms reducing cardiac and muscle atrophies over extended periods of low metabolism and immobility during hibernation in bears. Coordinated reduction of transcription of genes involved in amino acid catabolism suggests redirection of amino acids from catabolic pathways to protein biosynthesis. We identify common for black bears and small mammalian hibernators transcriptional changes in the liver that include induction of genes responsible for fatty acid β oxidation and carbohydrate synthesis and depression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbohydrate catabolism, cellular respiration and detoxification pathways. Conclusions Our findings show that modulation of gene expression during winter hibernation represents molecular mechanism of adaptation to extreme environments.

  9. Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna; Dragani, Tommaso A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1 neo67/+ mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1 neo67/+ mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1 neo67/+ mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis

  10. Misoprostol modulates the gene expression prostaglandin E2 and oxidative stress markers in myometrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Cristine Kolling; Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Cadoná, Francine Carla; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Dornelles, Eduardo Bortoluzzi; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2016-11-01

    Misoprostol, prostaglandin E1 analogue, used for labour induction. However, one-third of patients who have labour induced with prostaglandins do not reach vaginal delivery. The differential expression of prostaglandin receptors in myometrial cells could account for this differential response. Since delivery physiology also involves modulation of oxidative metabolism that can be potentially affected by pharmacological drugs, in the present investigation the role of misoprostol on expression of prostaglandin receptors, and oxidative markers of myometrial cells was evaluated. Samples of myometrial tissues procured from women with spontaneous (SL) and nonspontaneous (NSL) labours were cultured in vitro and exposed to different concentrations of misoprostol. Gene expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and oxidative biomarkers were evaluated by spectrophotometric and fluorometric analysis. Cells from SL women presented greater responsiveness to misoprostol, since an upregulation of genes related to increased muscle contraction was observed. Otherwise, cells from NSL women had low responsiveness to misoprostol exposure or even a suppressive effect on the expression of these genes. Oxidative biomarkers that previously have been related to labour physiology were affected by misoprostol treatment: lipoperoxidation and protein carbonylation (PC). However, a decrease in lipoperoxidation was observed only in SL cells treated with low concentrations of misoprostol, whereas a decrease of PC occurred in all samples treated with different misoprostol concentrations. The results suggest a pharmacogenetic effect of misoprostol in labour induction involving differential regulation of EP receptor genes, as well as some minor differential modulation of oxidative metabolism in myometrial cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Development of an endogenous androgen receptor-mediated luciferase expression assay (AR-LUX) for interactive androgenic action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was aimed at developing an in vitro cell-based reporter gene system applicable to the detection of the illegal use of androgenic growth promoters in cattle, and the presence of potential endocrine disrupters present in surface waters and interfering with

  12. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Pinilla, Mabel G. [Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C. [Department of Physiopathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); McNerney, Eileen M. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Onate, Sergio A., E-mail: sergio.onate@udec.cl [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Urology, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  13. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A.; Pinilla, Mabel G.; Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C.; McNerney, Eileen M.; Onate, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  14. ANDROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN POSTMENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2008-12-01

    Scientific studies and clinical experiences have not provided until now the answers to thequestion: »Whom to treat, when, why and for how long should androgens be used for HRTin postmenopausal women?«

  15. bc-GenExMiner 3.0: new mining module computes breast cancer gene expression correlation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jézéquel, Pascal; Frénel, Jean-Sébastien; Campion, Loïc; Guérin-Charbonnel, Catherine; Gouraud, Wilfried; Ricolleau, Gabriel; Campone, Mario

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed a user-friendly web-based application called bc-GenExMiner (http://bcgenex.centregauducheau.fr), which offered the possibility to evaluate prognostic informativity of genes in breast cancer by means of a 'prognostic module'. In this study, we develop a new module called 'correlation module', which includes three kinds of gene expression correlation analyses. The first one computes correlation coefficient between 2 or more (up to 10) chosen genes. The second one produces two lists of genes that are most correlated (positively and negatively) to a 'tested' gene. A gene ontology (GO) mining function is also proposed to explore GO 'biological process', 'molecular function' and 'cellular component' terms enrichment for the output lists of most correlated genes. The third one explores gene expression correlation between the 15 telomeric and 15 centromeric genes surrounding a 'tested' gene. These correlation analyses can be performed in different groups of patients: all patients (without any subtyping), in molecular subtypes (basal-like, HER2+, luminal A and luminal B) and according to oestrogen receptor status. Validation tests based on published data showed that these automatized analyses lead to results consistent with studies' conclusions. In brief, this new module has been developed to help basic researchers explore molecular mechanisms of breast cancer. DATABASE URL: http://bcgenex.centregauducheau.fr

  16. Cigarette smoke modulates expression of human rhinovirus-induced airway epithelial host defense genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Proud

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes.

  17. Cigarette smoke modulates expression of human rhinovirus-induced airway epithelial host defense genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, David; Hudy, Magdalena H; Wiehler, Shahina; Zaheer, Raza S; Amin, Minaa A; Pelikan, Jonathan B; Tacon, Claire E; Tonsaker, Tabitha O; Walker, Brandie L; Kooi, Cora; Traves, Suzanne L; Leigh, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes.

  18. Gene-disease network analysis reveals functional modules in mendelian, complex and environmental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I

    2011-01-01

    Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and environmental factors, such as drugs, contribute to diseases. The

  19. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - a fully automated, miniaturized instrument for measuring gene expression in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio; Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kianoosh

    2012-07-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecrafts opens the doors to a large number of experiments on the influence of space environment on biological systems that will profoundly impact our ability to conduct safe and effective space travel, and might also shed light on terrestrial physiology or biological function and human disease and aging processes. Measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, determine metabolic basis of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance, test our ability to sustain and grow in space organisms that can be used for life support and in situ resource utilization during long-duration space exploration, and monitor both the spacecraft environment and crew health. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology and medicine. Accordingly, supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measuring microbial expression of thousands of genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing bacterial cell walls, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing it on a microarray and (4) providing electrochemical readout, all in a microfluidics cartridge. The prototype under development is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by the NASA Small Spacecraft Office. The first target application is to cultivate and measure gene expression of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, i.e. a cyanobacterium known to exhibit remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions

  20. Ekspresi Gen CYP19 Aromatase, Estrogen, Androgen pada penderita Periodontitis Agresif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia Herawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kepadatan tulang tubuh ditentukan oleh gen CYP19 aromatase, hormon estrogen dan androgen. Pada periodontitis agresif terjadi perkembangan cepat kerusakan tulang alveolar, dan kerusakan tulang alveoler tersebut tidak diimbangioleh regenerasi tulang. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menunjukkan ekspresi gen CYP19 aromatase, estrogen, androgen pada penderita periodontitis agresif agar dapat untuk menjadi pertimbangan pada saat melakukan perawatan periodontal. Metode penelitian, pemeriksaan ekspresi gen aromatse CYP19 berasal dari spesimen tulang alveolar menggunakan imunohistokimia, pengukuran hormon estrogen dan androgen dari serum menggunakan Vidas: Elfa. Hasil penelitian ekspresi gene CYP19 aromatase pada periodontitis agresif menunjukkan gambaran lebih rendah densitasnya dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Estrogen dan androgen pad aperiodontitis agresif ada kecenderungan lebih rendah dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Kesimpulan regenerasi tulang alveoler pad a periodontitis agresif terhambat karena sedikitnya gen CYP19 aromatase dan hormon estrogen dan androgen yang berperan pada pembentukan tulang alveoler kurang memadai.

  1. A modest but significant effect of CGB5 gene promoter polymorphisms in modulating the risk of recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rull, Kristiina; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne; Nagirnaja, Liina

    2013-01-01

    To confirm the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) genes in modulating the susceptibility to recurrent miscarriage (RM) in Danes and in a meta-analysis across Danes and the discovery samples from Estonia and Finland.......To confirm the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) genes in modulating the susceptibility to recurrent miscarriage (RM) in Danes and in a meta-analysis across Danes and the discovery samples from Estonia and Finland....

  2. Study Design and Rationale for the Phase 3 Clinical Development Program of Enobosarm, a Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, for the Prevention and Treatment of Muscle Wasting in Cancer Patients (POWER Trials).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jeffrey; Prado, Carla M M; Johnston, Mary Ann; Gralla, Richard J; Taylor, Ryan P; Hancock, Michael L; Dalton, James T

    2016-06-01

    Muscle wasting in cancer is a common and often occult condition that can occur prior to overt signs of weight loss and before a clinical diagnosis of cachexia can be made. Muscle wasting in cancer is an important and independent predictor of progressive functional impairment, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality. Although several therapeutic agents are currently in development for the treatment of muscle wasting or cachexia in cancer, the majority of these agents do not directly inhibit muscle loss. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have the potential to increase lean body mass (LBM) and hence muscle mass, without the untoward side effects seen with traditional anabolic agents. Enobosarm, a nonsteroidal SARM, is an agent in clinical development for prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in patients with cancer (POWER 1 and 2 trials). The POWER trials are two identically designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, and multinational phase 3 trials to assess the efficacy of enobosarm for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in subjects initiating first-line chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To assess enobosarm's effect on both prevention and treatment of muscle wasting, no minimum weight loss is required. These pivotal trials have pioneered the methodological and regulatory fields exploring a therapeutic agent for cancer-associated muscle wasting, a process hereby described. In each POWER trial, subjects will receive placebo (n = 150) or enobosarm 3 mg (n = 150) orally once daily for 147 days. Physical function, assessed as stair climb power (SCP), and LBM, assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), are the co-primary efficacy endpoints in both trials assessed at day 84. Based on extensive feedback from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the co-primary endpoints will be analyzed as a responder analysis. To be considered a physical function responder, a

  3. Modulation of gene expression in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exposed to bronchoalveolar fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul G Lone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, is an important pathogen of swine throughout the world. It must rapidly overcome the innate pulmonary immune defenses of the pig to cause disease. To better understand this process, the objective of this study was to identify genes that are differentially expressed in a medium that mimics the lung environment early in the infection process. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Since bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF contains innate immune and other components found in the lungs, we examined gene expression of a virulent serovar 1 strain of A. pleuropneumoniae after a 30 min exposure to BALF, using DNA microarrays and real-time PCR. The functional classes of genes found to be up-regulated most often in BALF were those encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism, especially anaerobic metabolism, and in cell envelope, DNA, and protein biosynthesis. Transcription of a number of known virulence genes including apxIVA and the gene for SapF, a protein which is involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptides, was also up-regulated in BALF. Seventy-nine percent of the genes that were up-regulated in BALF encoded a known protein product, and of these, 44% had been reported to be either expressed in vivo and/or involved in virulence. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that in early stages of infection, A. pleuropneumoniae may modulate expression of genes involved in anaerobic energy generation and in the synthesis of proteins involved in cell wall biogenesis, as well as established virulence factors. Given that many of these genes are thought to be expressed in vivo or involved in virulence, incubation in BALF appears, at least partially, to simulate in vivo conditions and may provide a useful medium for the discovery of novel vaccine or therapeutic targets.

  4. Oleocanthal Modulates Estradiol-Induced Gene Expression Involving Estrogen Receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiler, Annekathrin Martina; Djiogue, Sefirin; Ehrhardt, Tino; Zierau, Oliver; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Halabalaki, Maria; Vollmer, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Oleocanthal is a bioactive compound from olive oil. It has attracted considerable attention as it is anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Delineated from its polyphenolic structure, the aim of this study was to characterize oleocanthal towards estrogenic properties. This might contribute to partly explain the beneficial effects described for the Mediterranean diet. Estrogenic properties of oleocanthal were assessed by different methods: a) stimulation of reporter gene activity in MVLN or RNDA cells either expressing estrogen receptor α or β, b) stimulation of luciferase reporter gene activity in U2OS osteosarcoma cells expressing estrogen receptor α or β, and c) elucidation of the impact on estradiol-induced gene expression in U2OS cells transduced with both estrogen receptors. Depending on the cell line origin, oleocanthal inhibited luciferase activity (MVLN, U2OS-estrogen receptor β) or weakly induced reporter gene activity at 10 µM in U2OS-estrogen receptor α cells. However, oleocanthal inhibited stimulation of luciferase activity by estradiol from both estrogen receptors. Oleocanthal, if given alone, did not stimulate gene expression in U2OS cells, but it significantly modulated the response of estradiol. Oleocanthal enhanced the effect of estradiol on the regulation of those genes, which are believed to be regulated through heterodimeric estrogen receptors. As the estrogenic response pattern of oleocanthal is rather unique, we compared the results obtained with oleacein. Oleocanthal binds to both estrogen receptors inducing estradiol-agonistic or antiagonistic effects depending on the cell line. Regarding regulation of gene expression in U2OS-estrogen receptor α/β cells, oleocanthal and oleacein enhanced estradiol-mediated regulation of heterodimer-regulated genes. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. The endogenous retroviral insertion in the human complement C4 gene modulates the expression of homologous genes by antisense inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P M; Witzel-Schlömp, K; Rittner, C; Zhang, L

    2001-02-01

    Intron 9 contains the complete endogenous retrovirus HERV-K(C4) as a 6.4-kb insertion in 60% of human C4 genes. The retroviral insertion is in reverse orientation to the C4 coding sequence. Therefore, expression of C4 could lead to the transcription of an antisense RNA, which might protect against exogenous retroviral infections. To test this hypothesis, open reading frames from the HERV sequence were subcloned in sense orientiation into a vector allowing expression of a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. Mouse L cells which had been stably transfected with either the human C4A or C4B gene both carrying the HERV insertion (LC4 cells), and L(Tk-) cells without the C4 gene were transiently transfected either with a retroviral construct or with the wild-type vector. Expression was monitored using an enzymatic assay. We demonstrated that (1) HERV-K(C4) antisense mRNA transcripts are present in cells constitutively expressing C4, (2) expression of retroviral-like constructs is significantly downregulated in cells expressing C4, and (3) this downregulation is further modulated in a dose-dependent fashion following interferon-gamma stimulation of C4 expression. These results support the hypothesis of a genomic antisense strategy mediated by the HERV-K(C4) insertion as a possible defense mechanism against exogenous retroviral infections.

  6. Selection for tameness modulates the expression of heme related genes in silver foxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilà Carles

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic and molecular mechanisms of tameness are largely unknown. A line of silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes selected for non-aggressive behavior has been used in Russia since the 1960's to study the effect of domestication. We have previously compared descendants of these selected (S animals with a group of non-selected (NS silver foxes kept under identical conditions, and showed that changes in the brain transcriptome between the two groups are small. Unexpectedly, many of the genes showing evidence of differential expression between groups were related to hemoproteins. Results In this study, we use quantitative RT-PCR to demonstrate that the activity of heme related genes differ between S and NS foxes in three regions of the brain. Furthermore, our analyses also indicate that changes in mRNA levels of heme related genes can be well described by an additive polygenic effect. We also show that the difference in genetic background between the two lines of foxes is limited, as estimated by mitochondrial DNA divergence. Conclusion Our results indicate that selection for tameness can modify the expression of heme related genes in canid brain regions known to modulate emotions and behavior. The possible involvement of heme related genes in behavior is surprising. It is possible that hemoglobin modulates the behavior of canids by interaction with CO and NO signaling. Another possibility is that hemorphins, known to be produced after enzymatic cleavage of hemoglobin, are responsible for behavioral alterations. Thus, we hypothesize that hemoglobin metabolism can be a functionally relevant aspect of the domestic phenotype in foxes selected for tameness.

  7. Modulation of Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement of the PA4857 Gene Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Miao; Zhao, Jingru; Kang, Huaping; Kong, Weina; Zhao, Yuanyu; Wu, Min; Liang, Haihua

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious acute or chronic infections in humans. Acute infections typically involve the type III secretion systems (T3SSs) and bacterial motility, whereas chronic infections are often associated with biofilm formation and the type VI secretion system. To identify new genes required for pathogenesis, a transposon mutagenesis library was constructed and the gene PA4857, named tspR, was found to modulate T3SS gene expression. Deletion of P. aeruginosa tspR reduced the virulence in a mouse acute lung infection model and diminished cytotoxicity. Suppression of T3SS gene expression in the tspR mutant resulted from compromised translation of the T3SS master regulator ExsA. TspR negatively regulated two small RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, which control RsmA. Our data demonstrated that defects in T3SS expression and biofilm formation in retS mutant could be partially restored by overexpression of tspR. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the newly identified retS-tspR pathway is coordinated with the retS-gacS system, which regulates the genes associated with acute and chronic infections and controls the lifestyle choice of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26858696

  8. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis of expression data of monozygotic twins identifies specific modules and hub genes related to BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijing; Jiang, Wenjie; Hou, Lin; Duan, Haiping; Wu, Yili; Xu, Chunsheng; Tan, Qihua; Li, Shuxia; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2017-11-13

    The therapeutic management of obesity is challenging, hence further elucidating the underlying mechanisms of obesity development and identifying new diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets are urgent and necessary. Here, we performed differential gene expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to identify significant genes and specific modules related to BMI based on gene expression profile data of 7 discordant monozygotic twins. In the differential gene expression analysis, it appeared that 32 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were with a trend of up-regulation in twins with higher BMI when compared to their siblings. Categories of positive regulation of nitric-oxide synthase biosynthetic process, positive regulation of NF-kappa B import into nucleus, and peroxidase activity were significantly enriched within GO database and NF-kappa B signaling pathway within KEGG database. DEGs of NAMPT, TLR9, PTGS2, HBD, and PCSK1N might be associated with obesity. In the WGCNA, among the total 20 distinct co-expression modules identified, coral1 module (68 genes) had the strongest positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.56, P = 0.04) and disease status (r = 0.56, P = 0.04). Categories of positive regulation of phospholipase activity, high-density lipoprotein particle clearance, chylomicron remnant clearance, reverse cholesterol transport, intermediate-density lipoprotein particle, chylomicron, low-density lipoprotein particle, very-low-density lipoprotein particle, voltage-gated potassium channel complex, cholesterol transporter activity, and neuropeptide hormone activity were significantly enriched within GO database for this module. And alcoholism and cell adhesion molecules pathways were significantly enriched within KEGG database. Several hub genes, such as GAL, ASB9, NPPB, TBX2, IL17C, APOE, ABCG4, and APOC2 were also identified. The module eigengene of saddlebrown module (212 genes) was also significantly

  9. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michaël; Antonio, Leen; Sinnesael, Mieke; Dubois, Vanessa; Gielen, Evelien; Classens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2) by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution) peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refined our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen deficiency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the field of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis. PMID:24385015

  10. IBTK Differently Modulates Gene Expression and RNA Splicing in HeLa and K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Fiume

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein interactions, IBTKα could exert expanded regulatory roles, including interaction with transcription regulators. To verify the effects of IBTKα on gene expression, we analyzed HeLa and K562 cell transcriptomes by RNA-Sequencing before and after IBTK knock-down by shRNA transduction. In HeLa cells, 1285 (2.03% of 63,128 mapped transcripts were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, as compared to cells treated with control-shRNA, with 587 upregulated (45.7% and 698 downregulated (54.3% RNAs. In K562 cells, 1959 (3.1% of 63128 mapped RNAs were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, including 1053 upregulated (53.7% and 906 downregulated (46.3%. Only 137 transcripts (0.22% were commonly deregulated by IBTK silencing in both HeLa and K562 cells, indicating that most IBTKα effects on gene expression are cell type-specific. Based on gene ontology classification, the genes responsive to IBTK are involved in different biological processes, including in particular chromatin and nucleosomal organization, gene expression regulation, and cellular traffic and migration. In addition, IBTK RNA interference affected RNA maturation in both cell lines, as shown by the evidence of alternative 3′- and 5′-splicing, mutually exclusive exons, retained introns, and skipped exons. Altogether, these results indicate that IBTK differently modulates gene expression and RNA splicing in HeLa and K562 cells, demonstrating a novel biological role of this protein.

  11. IBTK Differently Modulates Gene Expression and RNA Splicing in HeLa and K562 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Rizzo, Francesca; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Laudanna, Carmelo; Albano, Francesco; Golino, Gaetanina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pontoriero, Marilena; Mimmi, Selena; Ceglia, Simona; Pisano, Antonio; Iaccino, Enrico; Palmieri, Camillo; Paduano, Sergio; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Weisz, Alessandro; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2016-11-07

    The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein interactions, IBTKα could exert expanded regulatory roles, including interaction with transcription regulators. To verify the effects of IBTKα on gene expression, we analyzed HeLa and K562 cell transcriptomes by RNA-Sequencing before and after IBTK knock-down by shRNA transduction. In HeLa cells, 1285 (2.03%) of 63,128 mapped transcripts were differentially expressed in IBTK -shRNA-transduced cells, as compared to cells treated with control-shRNA, with 587 upregulated (45.7%) and 698 downregulated (54.3%) RNAs. In K562 cells, 1959 (3.1%) of 63128 mapped RNAs were differentially expressed in IBTK -shRNA-transduced cells, including 1053 upregulated (53.7%) and 906 downregulated (46.3%). Only 137 transcripts (0.22%) were commonly deregulated by IBTK silencing in both HeLa and K562 cells, indicating that most IBTKα effects on gene expression are cell type-specific. Based on gene ontology classification, the genes responsive to IBTK are involved in different biological processes, including in particular chromatin and nucleosomal organization, gene expression regulation, and cellular traffic and migration. In addition, IBTK RNA interference affected RNA maturation in both cell lines, as shown by the evidence of alternative 3'- and 5'-splicing, mutually exclusive exons, retained introns, and skipped exons. Altogether, these results indicate that IBTK differently modulates gene expression and RNA splicing in HeLa and K562 cells, demonstrating a novel biological role of this protein.

  12. Androgens and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Carolyn A; McLachlan, Robert I

    2010-06-01

    As testosterone levels are frequently reduced in obesity, an understanding of the relationship between serum testosterone and adiposity is necessary in the clinical evaluation of these men, in particular when considering testosterone therapy. Population and interventional data suggest a bi-directional relationship exists between testosterone and obesity in men, with lower total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (and to a lesser extent free testosterone) levels than their nonobese peers; obesity having an impact at least as important as ageing. Abnormalities in the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis are seen with increasing obesity. Weight loss in massive obesity increases testosterone levels but its role in mild-moderate obesity is unclear. Testosterone supplementation reduces total body fat in hypogonadal and ageing men although the effects on regional fat distribution are less well described. Favourable changes in total body fat and regional fat distribution suggest a potential role for testosterone in obesity. However, lifestyle advice to achieve sustained weight loss should be the mainstay of management. Obese men with confirmed androgen deficiency can be offered treatment, whereas in those with low-normal testosterone levels more research is needed.

  13. Gene-to-gene interactions regulate endogenous pain modulation in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls—antagonistic effects between opioid and serotonin-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Jeanette; Löfgren, Monika; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Gerdle, Björn; Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Bjersing, Jan; Martin, Ingvar; Ernberg, Malin; Schalling, Martin; Kosek, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain is associated with dysfunctional endogenous pain modulation, involving both central opioid and serotonergic (5-HT) signaling. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and reduced exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). In this study, we assessed the effects of 3 functional genetic polymorphisms on EIH in 130 patients with FM and 132 healthy controls. Subjects were genotyped regarding the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene (rs1799971), the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene (5-HTTLPR/rs25531), and the serotonin-1a receptor (5-HT1a) gene (rs6296). The patients with FM had increased pain sensitivity and reduced EIH compared with healthy controls. None of the polymorphisms had an effect on EIH on their own. We found significant gene-to-gene interactions between OPRM1 x 5-HTT and OPRM1 x 5-HT1a regarding activation of EIH, with no statistically significant difference between groups. Better EIH was found in individuals with genetically inferred strong endogenous opioid signaling (OPRM1 G) in combination with weak 5-HT tone (5-HTT low/5-HT1a G), compared with strong 5-HT tone (5-HTT high/5-HT1a CC). Based on the proposed mechanisms of these genetic variants, the findings indicate antagonistic interactions between opioid and serotonergic mechanisms during EIH. Moreover, despite different baseline pain level, similar results were detected in FM and controls, not supporting an altered interaction between opioid and 5-HT mechanisms as the basis for dysfunction of EIH in patients with FM. In summary, our results suggest that, by genetic association, the mu-opioid receptor interacts with 2 major serotonergic structures involved in 5-HT reuptake and release, to modulate EIH. PMID:28282362

  14. Gene-to-gene interactions regulate endogenous pain modulation in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls-antagonistic effects between opioid and serotonin-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Jeanette; Löfgren, Monika; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Gerdle, Björn; Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Bjersing, Jan; Martin, Ingvar; Ernberg, Malin; Schalling, Martin; Kosek, Eva

    2017-07-01

    Chronic pain is associated with dysfunctional endogenous pain modulation, involving both central opioid and serotonergic (5-HT) signaling. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and reduced exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). In this study, we assessed the effects of 3 functional genetic polymorphisms on EIH in 130 patients with FM and 132 healthy controls. Subjects were genotyped regarding the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene (rs1799971), the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene (5-HTTLPR/rs25531), and the serotonin-1a receptor (5-HT1a) gene (rs6296). The patients with FM had increased pain sensitivity and reduced EIH compared with healthy controls. None of the polymorphisms had an effect on EIH on their own. We found significant gene-to-gene interactions between OPRM1 x 5-HTT and OPRM1 x 5-HT1a regarding activation of EIH, with no statistically significant difference between groups. Better EIH was found in individuals with genetically inferred strong endogenous opioid signaling (OPRM1 G) in combination with weak 5-HT tone (5-HTT low/5-HT1a G), compared with strong 5-HT tone (5-HTT high/5-HT1a CC). Based on the proposed mechanisms of these genetic variants, the findings indicate antagonistic interactions between opioid and serotonergic mechanisms during EIH. Moreover, despite different baseline pain level, similar results were detected in FM and controls, not supporting an altered interaction between opioid and 5-HT mechanisms as the basis for dysfunction of EIH in patients with FM. In summary, our results suggest that, by genetic association, the mu-opioid receptor interacts with 2 major serotonergic structures involved in 5-HT reuptake and release, to modulate EIH.

  15. ConGEMs: Condensed Gene Co-Expression Module Discovery Through Rule-Based Clustering and Its Application to Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurav Mallik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For transcriptomic analysis, there are numerous microarray-based genomic data, especially those generated for cancer research. The typical analysis measures the difference between a cancer sample-group and a matched control group for each transcript or gene. Association rule mining is used to discover interesting item sets through rule-based methodology. Thus, it has advantages to find causal effect relationships between the transcripts. In this work, we introduce two new rule-based similarity measures—weighted rank-based Jaccard and Cosine measures—and then propose a novel computational framework to detect condensed gene co-expression modules ( C o n G E M s through the association rule-based learning system and the weighted similarity scores. In practice, the list of evolved condensed markers that consists of both singular and complex markers in nature depends on the corresponding condensed gene sets in either antecedent or consequent of the rules of the resultant modules. In our evaluation, these markers could be supported by literature evidence, KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and Gene Ontology annotations. Specifically, we preliminarily identified differentially expressed genes using an empirical Bayes test. A recently developed algorithm—RANWAR—was then utilized to determine the association rules from these genes. Based on that, we computed the integrated similarity scores of these rule-based similarity measures between each rule-pair, and the resultant scores were used for clustering to identify the co-expressed rule-modules. We applied our method to a gene expression dataset for lung squamous cell carcinoma and a genome methylation dataset for uterine cervical carcinogenesis. Our proposed module discovery method produced better results than the traditional gene-module discovery measures. In summary, our proposed rule-based method is useful for exploring biomarker modules from transcriptomic data.

  16. Establishment of the methods for searching eukaryotic gene cis-regulatory modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Zhang, Zhen-shu; Liu, Yu-hu; Zheng, Guo-qing; Liu, Xiao-yi; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Gui-jun; Xu, An-long

    2004-02-01

    On the basis of the knowledge of eukaryotic gene regulation, we modified the method in three aspects: (1) Searching the cis-regulatory modules (CRM) according Fasta or Blast sequence with multiple sequence and low E value, followed by mutual scoring of these sequence with Smith-Waterman algorithms and finally by clustering analysis; (2) Searching the transcription factor-binding site using International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Position-Weight Matrix(PWM) and Dyed method; (3) Designing and implementation of data analysis based on the software in Windows 2000 and UNIX using object-oriented technology. The results of analysis of the major histocompatibility complex gene family show that this procedure may accurately locate the regions that contain some of the CRMs.

  17. Modulation of biofilm exopolysaccharides by the Streptococcus mutans vicX gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans effectively utilizes dietary sucrose for the synthesis of exopolysaccharide, which act as a scaffold for its biofilm, thus contributing to its pathogenicity, environmental stress tolerance, and antimicrobial resistance. The two-component system VicRK of S. mutans regulates a group of virulence genes that are associated with biofilm matrix synthesis. Knockout of vicX affects biofilm formation, oxidative stress tolerance, and transformation of S. mutans. However, little is known regarding the vicX-modulated structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharides underlying the biofilm formation and the phenotypes of the vicX mutants. Here, we identified the role of vicX in the structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharide matrix and biofilm physiology. The vicX mutant (SmuvicX biofilms seemingly exhibited desertification with architecturally impaired exopolysaccharide-enmeshed cell clusters, compared with the UA159 strain (S. mutans wild type strain. Concomitantly, SmuvicX showed a decrease in water-insoluble glucan (WIG synthesis and in WIG/water-soluble glucan (WSG ratio. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC showed that the WIG isolated from the SmuvicX biofilms had a much lower molecular weight compared with the UA159 strain indicating differences in polysaccharide chain lengths. A monosaccharide composition analysis demonstrated the importance of the vicX gene in the glucose metabolism. We performed metabolite profiling via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that several chemical shifts were absent in both WSG and WIG of SmuvicX biofilms compared with the UA159 strain. Thus, the modulation of structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide by vicX provides new insights into the interaction between the exopolysaccharide structure, gene functions, and cariogenicity. Our results suggest that vicX gene modulates the structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide associated with

  18. Male patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, Philip; Christiansen, Peter; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2012-01-01

    To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.......To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome....

  19. Compound A, a Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Modulator, Enhances Heat Shock Protein Hsp70 Gene Promoter Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ilse M.; Drebert, Zuzanna J.; Hoya-Arias, Ruben; Bahar, Ali A.; Devos, Michael; Clarisse, Dorien; Desmet, Sofie; Bougarne, Nadia; Ruttens, Bart; Gossye, Valerie; Denecker, Geertrui; Lievens, Sam; Bracke, Marc; Tavernier, Jan; Declercq, Wim; Gevaert, Kris; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Haegeman, Guy; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2013-01-01

    Compound A possesses glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent anti-inflammatory properties. Just like classical GR ligands, Compound A can repress NF-κB-mediated gene expression. However, the monomeric Compound A-activated GR is unable to trigger glucocorticoid response element-regulated gene expression. The heat shock response potently activates heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), upregulates Hsp70, a known GR chaperone, and also modulates various aspects of inflammation. We found that the selective GR modulator Compound A and heat shock trigger similar cellular effects in A549 lung epithelial cells. With regard to their anti-inflammatory mechanism, heat shock and Compound A are both able to reduce TNF-stimulated IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. We established an interaction between Compound A-activated GR and Hsp70, but remarkably, although the presence of the Hsp70 chaperone as such appears pivotal for the Compound A-mediated inflammatory gene repression, subsequent novel Hsp70 protein synthesis is uncoupled from an observed CpdA-induced Hsp70 mRNA upregulation and hence obsolete in mediating CpdA’s anti-inflammatory effect. The lack of a Compound A-induced increase in Hsp70 protein levels in A549 cells is not mediated by a rapid proteasomal degradation of Hsp70 or by a Compound A-induced general block on translation. Similar to heat shock, Compound A can upregulate transcription of Hsp70 genes in various cell lines and BALB/c mice. Interestingly, whereas Compound A-dependent Hsp70 promoter activation is GR-dependent but HSF1-independent, heat shock-induced Hsp70 expression alternatively occurs in a GR-independent and HSF1-dependent manner in A549 lung epithelial cells. PMID:23935933

  20. The expression of melanopsin and clock genes in Xenopus laevis melanophores and their modulation by melatonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, A.P.C.; Obeid, N.N.; Castrucci, A.M.L.; Visconti, M.A. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-25

    Vertebrates have a central clock and also several peripheral clocks. Light responses might result from the integration of light signals by these clocks. The dermal melanophores of Xenopus laevis have a photoreceptor molecule denominated melanopsin (OPN4x). The mechanisms of the circadian clock involve positive and negative feedback. We hypothesize that these dermal melanophores also present peripheral clock characteristics. Using quantitative PCR, we analyzed the pattern of temporal expression of Opn4x and the clock genes Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Clock in these cells subjected to a 14-h light:10-h dark (14L:10D) regime or constant darkness (DD). Also, in view of the physiological role of melatonin in the dermal melanophores of X. laevis, we determined whether melatonin modulates the expression of these clock genes. These genes show a time-dependent expression pattern when these cells are exposed to 14L:10D, which differs from the pattern observed under DD. Cells kept in DD for 5 days exhibited overall increased mRNA expression for Opn4x and Clock, and a lower expression for Per1, Per2, and Bmal1. When the cells were kept in DD for 5 days and treated with melatonin for 1 h, 24 h before extraction, the mRNA levels tended to decrease for Opn4x and Clock, did not change for Bmal1, and increased for Per1 and Per2 at different Zeitgeber times (ZT). Although these data are limited to one-day data collection, and therefore preliminary, we suggest that the dermal melanophores of X. laevis might have some characteristics of a peripheral clock, and that melatonin modulates, to a certain extent, melanopsin and clock gene expression.

  1. The expression of melanopsin and clock genes in Xenopus laevis melanophores and their modulation by melatonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, A.P.C.; Obeid, N.N.; Castrucci, A.M.L.; Visconti, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrates have a central clock and also several peripheral clocks. Light responses might result from the integration of light signals by these clocks. The dermal melanophores of Xenopus laevis have a photoreceptor molecule denominated melanopsin (OPN4x). The mechanisms of the circadian clock involve positive and negative feedback. We hypothesize that these dermal melanophores also present peripheral clock characteristics. Using quantitative PCR, we analyzed the pattern of temporal expression of Opn4x and the clock genes Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Clock in these cells subjected to a 14-h light:10-h dark (14L:10D) regime or constant darkness (DD). Also, in view of the physiological role of melatonin in the dermal melanophores of X. laevis, we determined whether melatonin modulates the expression of these clock genes. These genes show a time-dependent expression pattern when these cells are exposed to 14L:10D, which differs from the pattern observed under DD. Cells kept in DD for 5 days exhibited overall increased mRNA expression for Opn4x and Clock, and a lower expression for Per1, Per2, and Bmal1. When the cells were kept in DD for 5 days and treated with melatonin for 1 h, 24 h before extraction, the mRNA levels tended to decrease for Opn4x and Clock, did not change for Bmal1, and increased for Per1 and Per2 at different Zeitgeber times (ZT). Although these data are limited to one-day data collection, and therefore preliminary, we suggest that the dermal melanophores of X. laevis might have some characteristics of a peripheral clock, and that melatonin modulates, to a certain extent, melanopsin and clock gene expression

  2. Pitx2 modulates a Tbx5-dependent gene regulatory network to maintain atrial rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Broman, Michael T; Boukens, Bastiaan; Mazurek, Stefan R; Yang, Xinan; van den Boogaard, Malou; Bekeny, Jenna; Gadek, Margaret; Ward, Tarsha; Zhang, Min; Qiao, Yun; Martin, James F; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jon; Christoffels, Vincent; Efimov, Igor R; McNally, Elizabeth M; Weber, Christopher R; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2016-08-31

    Cardiac rhythm is extremely robust, generating 2 billion contraction cycles during the average human life span. Transcriptional control of cardiac rhythm is poorly understood. We found that removal of the transcription factor gene Tbx5 from the adult mouse caused primary spontaneous and sustained atrial fibrillation (AF). Atrial cardiomyocytes from the Tbx5-mutant mice exhibited action potential abnormalities, including spontaneous depolarizations, which were rescued by chelating free calcium. We identified a multitiered transcriptional network that linked seven previously defined AF risk loci: TBX5 directly activated PITX2, and TBX5 and PITX2 antagonistically regulated membrane effector genes Scn5a, Gja1, Ryr2, Dsp, and Atp2a2 In addition, reduced Tbx5 dose by adult-specific haploinsufficiency caused decreased target gene expression, myocardial automaticity, and AF inducibility, which were all rescued by Pitx2 haploinsufficiency in mice. These results defined a transcriptional architecture for atrial rhythm control organized as an incoherent feed-forward loop, driven by TBX5 and modulated by PITX2. TBX5/PITX2 interplay provides tight control of atrial rhythm effector gene expression, and perturbation of the co-regulated network caused AF susceptibility. This work provides a model for the molecular mechanisms underpinning the genetic implication of multiple AF genome-wide association studies loci and will contribute to future efforts to stratify patients for AF risk by genotype. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression.

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    Ariadna Amador

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression.

  4. A fungal symbiont of plant-roots modulates mycotoxin gene expression in the pathogen Fusarium sambucinum.

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    Youssef Ismail

    Full Text Available Fusarium trichothecenes are fungal toxins that cause disease on infected plants and, more importantly, health problems for humans and animals that consume infected fruits or vegetables. Unfortunately, there are few methods for controlling mycotoxin production by fungal pathogens. In this study, we isolated and characterized sixteen Fusarium strains from naturally infected potato plants in the field. Pathogenicity tests were carried out in the greenhouse to evaluate the virulence of the strains on potato plants as well as their trichothecene production capacity, and the most aggressive strain was selected for further studies. This strain, identified as F. sambucinum, was used to determine if trichothecene gene expression was affected by the symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF Glomus irregulare. AMF form symbioses with plant roots, in particular by improving their mineral nutrient uptake and protecting plants against soil-borne pathogens. We found that that G. irregulare significantly inhibits F. sambucinum growth. We also found, using RT-PCR assays to assess the relative expression of trichothecene genes, that in the presence of the AMF G. irregulare, F. sambucinum genes TRI5 and TRI6 were up-regulated, while TRI4, TRI13 and TRI101 were down-regulated. We conclude that AMF can modulate mycotoxin gene expression by a plant fungal pathogen. This previously undescribed effect may be an important mechanism for biological control and has fascinating implications for advancing our knowledge of plant-microbe interactions and controlling plant pathogens.

  5. Apple juice intervention modulates expression of ARE-dependent genes in rat colon and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyalan, Bülent; Minn, Jutta; Schmitz, Hans J; Schrenk, Dieter; Will, Frank; Dietrich, Helmut; Baum, Matthias; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine

    2011-03-01

    The risk of cancer and other degenerative diseases is inversely correlated with consumption of fruits and vegetables. This beneficial effect is mainly attributed to secondary plant constituents such as polyphenols, supposed to play a major role in protection against ROS (reactive oxygen species)-associated toxicity. To elucidate the potential of differently manufactured apple juices (clear AJ/cloudy AJ/smoothie, in comparison with a polyphenol-free control juice) to modulate expression of ARE-dependent genes. In male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8/group; 10d juice intervention, 4d wash-out; 4 treatment cycles), expression of target genes (superoxide dismutase, SOD1/SOD2; glutathione peroxidase, GPX1/GPX2; γ-glutamylcysteine ligase, GCLC/GCLM; glutathione reductase, GSR; catalase, CAT; NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, NQO1 and transcription factor erythroid-derived 2-like-2, Nrf2) was quantified with duplex RT-PCR, using glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as control. In colon and liver of rats consuming polyphenol-free control juice, rather similar basic expressions were observed (relative GAPDH ratios ranging from 2 to 0.7 and 2.5-0.3, respectively). In the distal colon, apple juice intervention slightly but significantly induced most genes (e.g. GPX2, GSR, CAT, Nrf2; p target genes were not affected or down-regulated (SOD1, SOD2, GCLC/M, GSR), concomitant with the absence of Nrf2 induction. Induction of antioxidant gene expression differed with juice type (cloudy AJ > clear AJ ~ smoothie). Taken together, the results underline the potential of polyphenol-rich apple juice to increase the expression of ARE-dependent antioxidant genes.

  6. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew DL O'Connell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well-tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies.

  7. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Matthew DL; Wu, Frederick CW

    2014-01-01

    Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well–tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies. PMID:24457838

  8. Induction of mitotic gene conversion by browning reaction products and its modulation by naturally occurring agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, M P; Stich, H F; Powrie, W D; Wu, C H

    1982-05-01

    Mitotic gene conversion in the D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was significantly enhanced by exposure to non-enzymatic browning reaction products. These products were formed during the heating of sugar (caramelization reaction) or sugar-amino acid mixtures (Maillard reaction) at temperatures normally used during the cooking of food. Several modulating factors of this convertogenic activity were identified. These factors included two main groups: (1) trace metals which are widely distributed in the environment; and (2) several cellular enzymatic systems. The convertogenic activities of a heated glucose-lysine mixture and a commercial caramel powder were completely suppresses when yeast were concurrently exposed to these products and to either FeIII or CuII. Equimolar concentrations of MnII or sodium selenite had no effect on the convertogenic activity of the products of either model system. Horse-radish peroxidase, beef liver catalase and rat liver S9 preparations each decreased the frequency of gene conversion induced by the caramel powder and the heated glucose-lysine products. This modulating activity of the enzymes was lost if they were heat-inactivated. These studies indicate the presence of a variety of protective mechanisms which can modify genotoxic components in complex food mixtures.

  9. Nigribactin, a Novel Siderophore from Vibrio nigripulchritudo, Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone Gram

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen that employs a number of virulence factors as part of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to explore marine bacteria as a source of compounds that modulate virulence gene expression in S. aureus. During the global marine Galathea 3 expedition, a strain collection was established comprising bacteria that express antimicrobial activity against Vibrio anguillarum and/or Staphylococcus aureus. Within this collection we searched colony material, culture supernatants, and cell extracts for virulence modulating activity showing that 68 out of 83 marine bacteria (affiliated with the Vibrionaceae and Pseudoalteromonas sp. influenced expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin toxin and/or spa encoding Protein A. The isolate that upon initial screening showed the highest degree of interference (crude ethyl acetate extract was a Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Extraction, purification and structural elucidation revealed a novel siderophore, designated nigribactin, which induces spa transcription. The effect of nigribactin on spa expression is likely to be independent from its siderophore activity, as another potent siderophore, enterobactin, failed to influence S. aureus virulence gene expression. This study shows that marine microorganisms produce compounds with potential use in therapeutic strategies targeting virulence rather than viability of human pathogens.

  10. RANK ligand signaling modulates the matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene expression during osteoclast differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, Kumaran; Nishimura, Riko; Senn, Joseph; Youssef, Rimon F.; London, Steven D.; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2007-01-01

    the absence of RANKL. Taken together, our results suggest that RANKL signals through TRAF6 and that NFATc1 is a downstream effector of RANKL signaling to modulate MMP-9 gene expression during osteoclast differentiation

  11. Gene-Disease Network Analysis Reveals Functional Modules in Mendelian, Complex and Environmental Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A.; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. Principal Findings We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. Conclusions For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and environmental factors

  12. Gene-disease network analysis reveals functional modules in mendelian, complex and environmental diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bauer-Mehren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and

  13. The mPer2 clock gene modulates cocaine actions in the mouse circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brager, Allison J; Stowie, Adam C; Prosser, Rebecca A; Glass, J David

    2013-04-15

    Cocaine is a potent disruptor of photic and non-photic pathways for circadian entrainment of the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These actions of cocaine likely involve its modulation of molecular (clock gene) components for SCN clock timekeeping. At present, however, the physiological basis of such an interaction is unclear. To address this question, we compared photic and non-photic phase-resetting responses between wild-type (WT) and Per2 mutant mice expressing nonfunctional PER2 protein to systemic and intra-SCN cocaine administrations. In the systemic trials, cocaine was administered i.p. (20 mg/kg) either at midday or prior to a light pulse in the early night to assess its non-photic and photic behavioral phase-resetting actions, respectively. In the intra-SCN trial, cocaine was administered by reverse microdialysis at midday to determine if the SCN is a direct target for its non-photic phase-resetting action. Non-photic phase-advancing responses to i.p. cocaine at midday were significantly (∼3.5-fold) greater in Per2 mutants than WTs. However, the phase-advancing action of intra-SCN cocaine perfusion at midday did not differ between genotypes. In the light pulse trial, Per2 mutants exhibited larger photic phase-delays than did WTs, and the attenuating action of cocaine on this response was proportionately larger than in WTs. These data indicate that the Per2 clock gene is a potent modulator of cocaine's actions in the circadian system. With regard to non-photic phase-resetting, the SCN is confirmed as a direct target of cocaine action; however, Per2 modulation of this effect likely occurs outside of the SCN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Autotaxin–Lysophosphatidic Acid Axis Modulates Histone Acetylation and Gene Expression during Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Natalie A.; Lister, James A.

    2015-01-01

    During development, oligodendrocytes (OLGs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, undergo a stepwise progression during which OLG progenitors, specified from neural stem/progenitor cells, differentiate into fully mature myelinating OLGs. This progression along the OLG lineage is characterized by well synchronized changes in morphology and gene expression patterns. The latter have been found to be particularly critical during the early stages of the lineage, and they have been well described to be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, especially by the activity of the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2. The data presented here identify the extracellular factor autotaxin (ATX) as a novel upstream signal modulating HDAC1/2 activity and gene expression in cells of the OLG lineage. Using the zebrafish as an in vivo model system as well as rodent primary OLG cultures, this functional property of ATX was found to be mediated by its lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which has been well characterized to generate the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). More specifically, the lysoPLD activity of ATX was found to modulate HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during a time window coinciding with the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG. In contrast, HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during the transition from neural stem/progenitor to OLG progenitor appeared unaffected by ATX and its lysoPLD activity. Thus, together, our data suggest that an ATX–LPA–HDAC1/2 axis regulates OLG differentiation specifically during the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG and via a molecular mechanism that is evolutionarily conserved from at least zebrafish to rodent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The formation of the axon insulating and supporting myelin sheath by differentiating oligodendrocytes (OLGs) in the CNS is considered an essential step during vertebrate development. In addition, loss and/or dysfunction of the myelin sheath has

  15. Identification of Gene Modules Associated with Low Temperatures Response in Bambara Groundnut by Network-Based Analysis.

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    Venkata Suresh Bonthala

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. is an African legume and is a promising underutilized crop with good seed nutritional values. Low temperature stress in a number of African countries at night, such as Botswana, can effect the growth and development of bambara groundnut, leading to losses in potential crop yield. Therefore, in this study we developed a computational pipeline to identify and analyze the genes and gene modules associated with low temperature stress responses in bambara groundnut using the cross-species microarray technique (as bambara groundnut has no microarray chip coupled with network-based analysis. Analyses of the bambara groundnut transcriptome using cross-species gene expression data resulted in the identification of 375 and 659 differentially expressed genes (p<0.01 under the sub-optimal (23°C and very sub-optimal (18°C temperatures, respectively, of which 110 genes are commonly shared between the two stress conditions. The construction of a Highest Reciprocal Rank-based gene co-expression network, followed by its partition using a Heuristic Cluster Chiseling Algorithm resulted in 6 and 7 gene modules in sub-optimal and very sub-optimal temperature stresses being identified, respectively. Modules of sub-optimal temperature stress are principally enriched with carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes, while most of the modules of very sub-optimal temperature stress are significantly enriched with responses to stimuli and various metabolic processes. Several transcription factors (from MYB, NAC, WRKY, WHIRLY & GATA classes that may regulate the downstream genes involved in response to stimulus in order for the plant to withstand very sub-optimal temperature stress were highlighted. The identified gene modules could be useful in breeding for low-temperature stress tolerant bambara groundnut varieties.

  16. Identification of Gene Modules Associated with Low Temperatures Response in Bambara Groundnut by Network-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonthala, Venkata Suresh; Mayes, Katie; Moreton, Joanna; Blythe, Martin; Wright, Victoria; May, Sean Tobias; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean; Twycross, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an African legume and is a promising underutilized crop with good seed nutritional values. Low temperature stress in a number of African countries at night, such as Botswana, can effect the growth and development of bambara groundnut, leading to losses in potential crop yield. Therefore, in this study we developed a computational pipeline to identify and analyze the genes and gene modules associated with low temperature stress responses in bambara groundnut using the cross-species microarray technique (as bambara groundnut has no microarray chip) coupled with network-based analysis. Analyses of the bambara groundnut transcriptome using cross-species gene expression data resulted in the identification of 375 and 659 differentially expressed genes (p<0.01) under the sub-optimal (23°C) and very sub-optimal (18°C) temperatures, respectively, of which 110 genes are commonly shared between the two stress conditions. The construction of a Highest Reciprocal Rank-based gene co-expression network, followed by its partition using a Heuristic Cluster Chiseling Algorithm resulted in 6 and 7 gene modules in sub-optimal and very sub-optimal temperature stresses being identified, respectively. Modules of sub-optimal temperature stress are principally enriched with carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes, while most of the modules of very sub-optimal temperature stress are significantly enriched with responses to stimuli and various metabolic processes. Several transcription factors (from MYB, NAC, WRKY, WHIRLY & GATA classes) that may regulate the downstream genes involved in response to stimulus in order for the plant to withstand very sub-optimal temperature stress were highlighted. The identified gene modules could be useful in breeding for low-temperature stress tolerant bambara groundnut varieties.

  17. Mesoderm/mesenchyme homeobox gene l promotes vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Yun-He; Zhang, You-En; Zheng, Fei; Yang, Jian-Ye; Guo, Ling-Yun; Li, Xing-Yuan; Wang, Lu; Tang, Jun-Ming; Chen, Shi-You; Wang, Jia-Ning

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the role of mesoderm/mesenchyme homeobox gene l (Meox1) in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) phenotypic modulation during vascular remodeling. By using immunostaining, Western blot, and histological analyses, we found that Meox1 was up-regulated in PDGF-BB-treated SMCs in vitro and balloon injury-induced arterial SMCs in vivo. Meox1 knockdown by shRNA restored the expression of contractile SMCs phenotype markers including smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and calponin. In contrast, overexpression of Moex1 inhibited α-SMA and calponin expressions while inducing the expressions of synthetic SMCs phenotype markers such as matrix gla protein, osteopontin, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Mechanistically, Meox1 mediated the SMCs phenotypic modulation through FAK-ERK1/2 signaling, which appears to induce autophagy in SMCs. In vivo, knockdown of Meox1 attenuated injury-induced neointima formation and promoted SMCs contractile proteins expressions. Meox1 knockdown also reduced the number of proliferating SMCs, suggesting that Meox1 was important for SMCs proliferation in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of Meox1 attenuated ERK1/2 signaling and autophagy markers expressions, suggesting that Meox1 may promote SMCs phenotypic modulation via ERK1/2 signaling-autophagy in vivo. Our data indicated that Meox1 promotes SMCs phenotypic modulation and injury-induced vascular remodeling by regulating the FAK-ERK1/2-autophagy signaling cascade. Thus, targeting Meox1 may be an attractive approach for treating proliferating vascular diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Hypogonadal men share a variety of signs and symptoms such as decreased muscle mass, osteopoenia, increased fat mass, fatigue, decreased libido and cognitive dysfunctions. Controlled trials have demonstrated favourable effects of androgen substitution therapy on these signs and symptoms in men...... with severe primary or secondary hypogonadism. Thus, androgen substitution therapy is warranted in men with true hypogonadism at all ages. Symptoms experienced by otherwise healthy ageing males are non-specific and vague, although some may be similar to symptoms of hypogonadism. Therefore, the term...

  19. The endocannabinoid gene faah2a modulates stress-associated behavior in zebrafish.

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    Randall G Krug

    Full Text Available The ability to orchestrate appropriate physiological and behavioral responses to stress is important for survival, and is often dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disorders that account for leading causes of global disability burden. Numerous studies have shown that the endocannabinoid neurotransmitter system is able to regulate stress responses and could serve as a therapeutic target for the management of these disorders. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions to show that genes encoding enzymes that synthesize (abhd4, gde1, napepld, enzymes that degrade (faah, faah2a, faah2b, and receptors that bind (cnr1, cnr2, gpr55-like endocannabinoids are expressed in zebrafish (Danio rerio. These genes are conserved in many other vertebrates, including humans, but fatty acid amide hydrolase 2 has been lost in mice and rats. We engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases to create zebrafish with mutations in cnr1 and faah2a to test the role of these genes in modulating stress-associated behavior. We showed that disruption of cnr1 potentiated locomotor responses to hyperosmotic stress. The increased response to stress was consistent with rodent literature and served to validate the use of zebrafish in this field. Moreover, we showed for the first time that disruption of faah2a attenuated the locomotor responses to hyperosmotic stress. This later finding suggests that FAAH2 may be an important mediator of stress responses in non-rodent vertebrates. Accordingly, FAAH and FAAH2 modulators could provide distinct therapeutic options for stress-aggravated disorders.

  20. Recreational music-making modulates the human stress response: a preliminary individualized gene expression strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittman, Barry; Berk, Lee; Shannon, Mark; Sharaf, Muhammad; Westengard, Jim; Guegler, Karl J; Ruff, David W

    2005-02-01

    A central component of the complex human biological stress response is the modulation of the neuro-endocrine-immune system with its intricate feedback loops that support homeostatic regulation. Well-documented marked gene expression variability among human and animal subjects coupled with sample collection timing and delayed effects, as well as a host of molecular detection challenges renders the quest for deciphering the human biological stress response challenging from many perspectives. A novel Recreational Music-Making (RMM) program was used in combination with a new strategy for peripheral blood gene expression analysis to assess individualized genomic stress induction signatures. The expression of 45 immune response-related genes was determined using a multiplex preamplification step prior to conventional quantitative Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) mRNA analysis to characterize the multidimensional biological impact of a 2-phase controlled stress induction/amelioration experimental protocol in 32 randomly assigned individuals. In subjects performing the RMM activity following a 1-hour stress induction protocol, 19 out of 45 markers demonstrated reversal with significant (P = 0.05) Pearson correlations in contrast to 6 out of 45 markers in the resting control group and 0 out of 45 in the ongoing stressor group. The resultant amelioration of stress-induced genomic expression supports the underlying premise that RMM warrants additional consideration as a rational choice within our armamentarium of stress reduction strategies. Modulation of individualized genomic stress induction signatures in peripheral blood presents a new opportunity for elucidating the dynamics of the human stress response.

  1. Arabidopsis ATRX Modulates H3.3 Occupancy and Fine-Tunes Gene Expression

    KAUST Repository

    Duc, Céline

    2017-07-07

    Histones are essential components of the nucleosome, the major chromatin subunit that structures linear DNA molecules and regulates access of other proteins to DNA. Specific histone chaperone complexes control the correct deposition of canonical histones and their variants to modulate nucleosome structure and stability. In this study, we characterize the Arabidopsis Alpha Thalassemia-mental Retardation X-linked (ATRX) ortholog and show that ATRX is involved in histone H3 deposition. Arabidopsis ATRX mutant alleles are viable, but show developmental defects and reduced fertility. Their combination with mutants of the histone H3.3 chaperone HIRA (Histone Regulator A) results in impaired plant survival, suggesting that HIRA and ATRX function in complementary histone deposition pathways. Indeed, ATRX loss of function alters cellular histone H3.3 pools and in consequence modulates the H3.1/H3.3 balance in the cell. H3.3 levels are affected especially at genes characterized by elevated H3.3 occupancy, including the 45S ribosomal DNA (45S rDNA) loci, where loss of ATRX results in altered expression of specific 45S rDNA sequence variants. At the genome-wide scale, our data indicate that ATRX modifies gene expression concomitantly to H3.3 deposition at a set of genes characterized both by elevated H3.3 occupancy and high expression. Altogether, our results show that ATRX is involved in H3.3 deposition and emphasize the role of histone chaperones in adjusting genome expression.

  2. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti Bhismadev

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC. However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking. Methods A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Results Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380 were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. Conclusions These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing

  3. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2011-06-29

    From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC). However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust) faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking). A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females) from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380) were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust) faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing, such as ASC.

  4. Synthetic lethality between androgen receptor signalling and the PARP pathway in prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Asim, Mohammad; Tarish, Firas; Zecchini, Heather I; Sanjiv, Kumar; Gelali, Eleni; Massie, Charles Edward; Baridi, Ajoeb; Warren, Anne Y; Zhao, Wanfeng; Ogris, Christoph; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Mascalchi, Patrice; Shaw, Greg; Dev, Harveer; Wadhwa, Karan

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data demonstrate homologous recombination (HR) defects in castration resistant prostate cancers, rendering these tumours sensitive to PARP inhibition. Here, we demonstrate a direct requirement for the androgen receptor (AR) to maintain HR gene expression and HR activity in prostate cancer. We show that PARP-mediated repair pathways are upregulated in prostate cancer following androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Furthermore, upregulation of PARP activity is essential for the survival...

  5. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Module Anchored Network Inference: A Sequential Module-Based Approach to Novel Gene Network Construction from Genomic Expression Data on Human Disease Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamalai Muthiah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different computational approaches have been examined and compared for inferring network relationships from time-series genomic data on human disease mechanisms under the recent Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM challenge. Many of these approaches infer all possible relationships among all candidate genes, often resulting in extremely crowded candidate network relationships with many more False Positives than True Positives. To overcome this limitation, we introduce a novel approach, Module Anchored Network Inference (MANI, that constructs networks by analyzing sequentially small adjacent building blocks (modules. Using MANI, we inferred a 7-gene adipogenesis network based on time-series gene expression data during adipocyte differentiation. MANI was also applied to infer two 10-gene networks based on time-course perturbation datasets from DREAM3 and DREAM4 challenges. MANI well inferred and distinguished serial, parallel, and time-dependent gene interactions and network cascades in these applications showing a superior performance to other in silico network inference techniques for discovering and reconstructing gene network relationships.

  7. A simple screening method for detection of Klinefelter syndrome and other X-chromosome aneuploidies based on copy number of the androgen receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Garn, I D; Aksglaede, L

    2007-01-01

    -gene expression. The XIST-expression based assay was correct in only 29/36 samples (81%). Our findings demonstrated that the AR-qPCR technique is a simple and reliable screening method for diagnosis of patients with Klinefelter syndrome or other chromosomal disorders involving an aberrant number of X-chromosomes.......Due to the high prevalence and variable phenotype of patients with Klinefelter syndrome, there is a need for a robust and rapid screening method allowing early diagnosis. Here, we report on the development and detailed clinical validation of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based method...... chromosome abnormalities (46,XX males; 47,XYY)(n = 4) and normal karyotypes (46,XY) (n = 13). The reference range for the AR-copy number was established as 0.8-1.2 for one copy and 1.7-2.3 for two copies. The qPCR results were within the reference range in 17/18 samples (94%) or 30/31 (97%) samples with one...

  8. IKKε modulates RSV-induced NF-κB-dependent gene transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical IκB kinase (IKK)ε in modulating RSV-induced NF-κB activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKKε activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKKε results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-κB phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-κB transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKKε regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  9. Veratramine modulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription by directly binding to programmable DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fang; Liu, Kangdong; Li, Huiliang; Wang, Jiawei; Zhu, Junsheng; Hao, Pei; Zhu, Lili; Zhang, Shoude; Shan, Lei; Ma, Weiya; Bode, Ann M; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Honglin; Dong, Zigang

    2018-01-25

    Because the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) regulates a variety of protein-encoding genes, it is a participant in many cellular functions, including proliferation, transformation, epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), and apoptosis. Inhibitors targeting AP-1 have potential use in the treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we identify veratramine as a potent natural modulator of AP-1, which selectively binds to a specific site (TRE 5'-TGACTCA-3') of the AP-1 target DNA sequence and regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription without interfering with cystosolic signaling cascades that might lead to AP-1 activation. Moreover, RNA-seq experiments demonstrate that veratramine does not act on the Hedgehog signaling pathway in contrast to its analogue, cyclopamine, and likely does not harbor the same teratogenicity and toxicity. Additionally, veratramine effectively suppresses EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation and transformation of JB6 P+ cells. Finally, we demonstrate that veratramine inhibits solar-ultraviolet-induced AP-1 activation in mice. The identification of veratramine and new findings in its specific regulation of AP-1 down stream genes pave ways to discovering and designing regulators to regulate transcription factor. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. The clock gene Per2 influences the glutamatergic system and modulates alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanagel, Rainer; Pendyala, Gurudutt; Abarca, Carolina; Zghoul, Tarek; Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Lascorz, Jesús; Depner, Martin; Holzberg, David; Soyka, Michael; Schreiber, Stefan; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Lathrop, Mark; Schumann, Gunter; Albrecht, Urs

    2005-01-01

    Period (Per) genes are involved in regulation of the circadian clock and are thought to modulate several brain functions. We demonstrate that Per2(Brdm1) mutant mice, which have a deletion in the PAS domain of the Per2 protein, show alterations in the glutamatergic system. Lowered expression of the glutamate transporter Eaat1 is observed in these animals, leading to reduced uptake of glutamate by astrocytes. As a consequence, glutamate levels increase in the extracellular space of Per2(Brdm1) mutant mouse brains. This is accompanied by increased alcohol intake in these animals. In humans, variations of the PER2 gene are associated with regulation of alcohol consumption. Acamprosate, a drug used to prevent craving and relapse in alcoholic patients is thought to act by dampening a hyper-glutamatergic state. This drug reduced augmented glutamate levels and normalized increased alcohol consumption in Per2(Brdm1) mutant mice. Collectively, these data establish glutamate as a link between dysfunction of the circadian clock gene Per2 and enhanced alcohol intake.

  11. Micro-fluidic module for blood cell separation for gene expression radiobiological assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brengues, Muriel; Gu, Jian; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular techniques have improved discovery of biomarkers associated with radiation exposure. Gene expression techniques have been demonstrated as effective tools for biodosimetry, and different assay platforms with different chemistries are now available. One of the main challenges is to integrate the sample preparation processing of these assays into micro-fluidic platforms to be fully automated for point-of-care medical countermeasures in the case of a radiological event. Most of these assays follow the same workflow processing that comprises first the collection of blood samples followed by cellular and molecular sample preparation. The sample preparation is based on the specific reagents of the assay system and depends also on the different subsets of cells population and the type of biomarkers of interest. In this article, the authors present a module for isolation of white blood cells from peripheral blood as a prerequisite for automation of gene expression assays on a micro-fluidic cartridge. For each sample condition, the gene expression platform can be adapted to suit the requirements of the selected assay chemistry (authors)

  12. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  13. Combinational Spinal GAD65 Gene Delivery and Systemic GABA-Mimetic Treatment for Modulation of Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinohana, Osamu; Hefferan, Michael P.; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Nejime, Tetsuya; Marsala, Silvia; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Kucharova, Karolina; Strnadel, Jan; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Lazar, Peter; Galik, Jan; Vinay, Laurent; Marsala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Loss of GABA-mediated pre-synaptic inhibition after spinal injury plays a key role in the progressive increase in spinal reflexes and the appearance of spasticity. Clinical studies show that the use of baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with major side effects such as general sedation and progressive tolerance development. The goal of the present study was to assess if a combined therapy composed of spinal segment-specific upregulation of GAD65 (glutamate decarboxylase) gene once combined with systemic treatment with tiagabine (GABA uptake inhibitor) will lead to an antispasticity effect and whether such an effect will only be present in GAD65 gene over-expressing spinal segments. Methods/Principal Findings Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to transient spinal ischemia (10 min) to induce muscle spasticity. Animals then received lumbar injection of HIV1-CMV-GAD65 lentivirus (LVs) targeting ventral α-motoneuronal pools. At 2–3 weeks after lentivirus delivery animals were treated systemically with tiagabine (4, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg or vehicle) and the degree of spasticity response measured. In a separate experiment the expression of GAD65 gene after spinal parenchymal delivery of GAD65-lentivirus in naive minipigs was studied. Spastic SD rats receiving spinal injections of the GAD65 gene and treated with systemic tiagabine showed potent and tiagabine-dose-dependent alleviation of spasticity. Neither treatment alone (i.e., GAD65-LVs injection only or tiagabine treatment only) had any significant antispasticity effect nor had any detectable side effect. Measured antispasticity effect correlated with increase in spinal parenchymal GABA synthesis and was restricted to spinal segments overexpressing GAD65 gene. Conclusions/Significance These data show that treatment with orally bioavailable GABA-mimetic drugs if combined with spinal-segment-specific GAD65 gene overexpression can represent a novel

  14. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    not have an andropause. As large placebo-controlled studies of androgen treatment in elderly males are lacking, proper risk assessment of adverse effects such as prostate cancer following testosterone treatment in elderly males is completely lacking. In the future, testosterone therapy may prove beneficial...

  15. Androgenic switch in barley microspores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Faria Maraschin, Simone

    2005-01-01

    Barley androgenesis represents an attractive system to study stress-induced cell differentiation and is a valuable tool for efficient plant breeding. The switch from the pollen developmental pathway towards an androgenic route involves several well-described morphological changes. However, little is

  16. Towards the identification of protein complexes and functional modules by integrating PPI network and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of protein complexes and functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI networks is crucial to understanding the principles of cellular organization and predicting protein functions. In the past few years, many computational methods have been proposed. However, most of them considered the PPI networks as static graphs and overlooked the dynamics inherent within these networks. Moreover, few of them can distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules. Results In this paper, a new framework is proposed to distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules by integrating gene expression data into protein-protein interaction (PPI data. A series of time-sequenced subnetworks (TSNs is constructed according to the time that the interactions were activated. The algorithm TSN-PCD was then developed to identify protein complexes from these TSNs. As protein complexes are significantly related to functional modules, a new algorithm DFM-CIN is proposed to discover functional modules based on the identified complexes. The experimental results show that the combination of temporal gene expression data with PPI data contributes to identifying protein complexes more precisely. A quantitative comparison based on f-measure reveals that our algorithm TSN-PCD outperforms the other previous protein complex discovery algorithms. Furthermore, we evaluate the identified functional modules by using “Biological Process” annotated in GO (Gene Ontology. The validation shows that the identified functional modules are statistically significant in terms of “Biological Process”. More importantly, the relationship between protein complexes and functional modules are studied. Conclusions The proposed framework based on the integration of PPI data and gene expression data makes it possible to identify protein complexes and functional modules more effectively. Moveover, the proposed new framework and

  17. Ocean acidification modulates expression of genes and physiological performance of a marine diatom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yahe; Zhuang, Shufang; Wu, Yaping; Ren, Honglin; Chen, Fangyi; Lin, Xin; Wang, Kejian; Beardall, John; Gao, Kunshan

    2017-01-01

    Ocean Acidification (OA) is known to affect various aspects of physiological performances of diatoms, but little is known about the underlining molecular mechanisms involved. Here, we show that in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the expression of key genes associated with photosynthetic light harvesting as well as those encoding Rubisco, carbonic anhydrase, NADH dehydrogenase and nitrite reductase, are modulated by OA (1000 μatm, pHnbs 7.83). Growth and photosynthetic carbon fixation were enhanced by elevated CO2. OA treatment decreased the expression of β-carbonic anhydrase (β-ca), which functions in balancing intracellular carbonate chemistry and the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM). The expression of the genes encoding fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c protein (lhcf type (fcp)), mitochondrial ATP synthase (mtATP), ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit gene (rbcl) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ndh2), were down-regulated during the first four days (< 8 generations) after the cells were transferred from LC (cells grown under ambient air condition; 390 μatm; pHnbs 8.19) to OA conditions, with no significant difference between LC and HC treatments with the time elapsed. The expression of nitrite reductase (nir) was up-regulated by the OA treatment. Additionally, the genes for these proteins (NiR, FCP, mtATP synthase, β-CA) showed diel expression patterns. It appeared that the enhanced photosynthetic and growth rates under OA could be attributed to stimulated nitrogen assimilation, increased CO2 availability or saved energy from down-regulation of the CCM and consequently lowered cost of protein synthesis versus that of non-nitrogenous cell components. PMID:28192486

  18. Modulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression in the central nervous system visualized by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berod, A.; Biguet, N.F.; Dumas, S.; Bloch, B.; Mallet, J.

    1987-01-01

    cDNA probe was used for in situ hybridization studies on histological sections through the locus coeruleus, substantia nigra, and the ventral tegmental area of the rat brain. Experimental conditions were established that yielded no background and no signal when pBR322 was used as control probe. Using the tyrosine hydroxylase probe, the authors ascertained the specificity of the labeling over catecholaminergic cells by denervation experiments and comparison of the hybridization pattern with that of immunoreactivity. The use of 35 S-labeled probe enabled the hybridization signal to be resolved at the cellular level. A single injection of reserpine into the rat led to an increase of the intensity of the autoradiographic signal over the locus coeruleus area, confirming an RNA gel blot analysis. The potential of in situ hybridization to analyze patterns of modulation of gene activity as a result of nervous activity is discussed

  19. SCARA5 and Suprabasin are Hub Genes of Co-expression Network Modules Associated with Peripheral Vein Graft Patency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenagy, Richard D; Civelek, M; Kikuchi, Shinsuke; Chen, Lihua; Grieff, A; Sobel, Michael; Lusis, Aldons J; Clowes, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    Objective About 30% of autogenous vein grafts develop luminal narrowing and fail because of intimal hyperplasia or negative remodeling. We previously found that vein graft cells from patients that later develop stenosis proliferate more in vitro in response to growth factors than cells from patients that maintain patent grafts. To discover novel determinants of vein graft outcome we have analyzed gene expression profiles of these cells using a systems biology approach to cluster the genes into modules based on their co-expression patterns and to correlate the results with growth data from our prior study and with new studies of migration and matrix remodeling. Methods RNA from 4 hour serum- or PDGF-BB-stimulated human saphenous vein cells obtained from the outer vein wall (20 cell lines), was used for microarray analysis of gene expression followed by weighted gene co-expression network analysis. Cell migration in microchemotaxis chambers in response to PDGF-BB and cell-mediated collagen gel contraction in response to serum were also determined. Gene function was determined using siRNA to inhibit gene expression before subjecting cells to growth or collagen gel contraction assays. These cells were derived from samples of the vein grafts obtained at surgery, and the long term fate of these bypass grafts was known. Results Neither migration nor cell-mediated collagen gel contraction showed a correlation with graft outcome. While 1,188 and 1,340 genes were differentially expressed in response to treatment with serum and PDGF, respectively, no single gene was differentially expressed in cells isolated from patients whose grafts stenosed compared to those that remained patent. Network analysis revealed 4 unique groups of genes, which we term modules, associated with PDGF responses, and 20 unique modules associated with serum responses. The “Yellow” and “Skyblue” modules, from PDGF and serum analyses respectively, both correlated with later graft stenosis (P=.005

  20. Neuropeptide S receptor gene variation modulates anterior cingulate cortex Glx levels during CCK-4 induced panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruland, Tillmann; Domschke, Katharina; Schütte, Valerie; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Notzon, Swantje; Vennewald, Nadja; Ohrmann, Patricia; Arolt, Volker; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Zwanzger, Peter

    2015-10-01

    An excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmitter dysbalance has been suggested in pathogenesis of panic disorder. The neuropeptide S (NPS) system has been implicated in modulating GABA and glutamate neurotransmission in animal models and to genetically drive altered fear circuit function and an increased risk of panic disorder in humans. Probing a multi-level imaging genetic risk model of panic, in the present magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study brain glutamate+glutamine (Glx) levels in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during a pharmacological cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) panic challenge were assessed depending on the functional neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) rs324981 A/T variant in a final sample of 35 healthy male subjects. The subjective panic response (Panic Symptom Scale; PSS) as well as cortisol and ACTH levels were ascertained throughout the experiment. CCK-4 injection was followed by a strong panic response. A significant time×genotype interaction was detected (p=.008), with significantly lower ACC Glx/Cr levels in T allele carriers as compared to AA homozygotes 5min after injection (p=.003). CCK-4 induced significant HPA axis stimulation, but no effect of genotype was discerned. The present pilot data suggests NPSR1 gene variation to modulate Glx levels in the ACC during acute states of stress and anxiety, with blunted, i.e. possibly maladaptive ACC glutamatergic reactivity in T risk allele carriers. Our results underline the notion of a genetically driven rapid and dynamic response mechanism in the neural regulation of human anxiety and further strengthen the emerging role of the NPS system in anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA-Eluting Surfaces for the Modulation of Gene Expression as A Novel Stent Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Koenig

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Presently, a new era of drug-eluting stents is continuing to improve late adverse effects such as thrombosis after coronary stent implantation in atherosclerotic vessels. The application of gene expression–modulating stents releasing specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs or messenger RNAs (mRNAs to the vascular wall might have the potential to improve the regeneration of the vessel wall and to inhibit adverse effects as a new promising therapeutic strategy. Different poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA resomers for their ability as an siRNA delivery carrier against intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 with a depot effect were tested. Biodegradability, hemocompatibility, and high cell viability were found in all PLGAs. We generated PLGA coatings with incorporated siRNA that were able to transfect EA.hy926 and human vascular endothelial cells. Transfected EA.hy926 showed significant siICAM-1 knockdown. Furthermore, co-transfection of siRNA and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP mRNA led to the expression of eGFP as well as to the siRNA transfection. Using our PLGA and siRNA multilayers, we reached high transfection efficiencies in EA.hy926 cells until day six and long-lasting transfection until day 20. Our results indicate that siRNA and mRNA nanoparticles incorporated in PLGA films have the potential for the modulation of gene expression after stent implantation to achieve accelerated regeneration of endothelial cells and to reduce the risk of restenosis.

  2. Role of neurodevelopment involved genes in psychiatric comorbidities and modulation of inflammatory processes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Stefano; Crisafulli, Concetta; Donato, Luigi; Calabrò, Marco; Politis, Antonis; Liappas, Ioannis; Albani, Diego; Atti, Anna Rita; Salfi, Raffaele; Raimondi, Ilaria; Forloni, Gianluigi; Papadimitriou, George N; De Ronchi, Diana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-11-15

    With the increase of the population's average age, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming one of the most disabling diseases worldwide. Recently, neurodevelopment processes have been involved in the AD etiopathogenesis. Genetic studies in this field could contribute to our knowledge and suggest new molecular targets for possible treatments. Our primary aim was to investigate the associations among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within neurodevelopment related genes (BDNF, ST8SIA2, C15orf32, NCAPG2, ESYT2, WDR60, LOC154822, VIPR2, GSK3B, NR1I2, ZNF804A, SP4) and AD. A number of exploratory analyses was also performed to evaluate the associations with the presence of behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as with variations in hematological parameters. Two independent samples were investigated, one of 228 Greek subjects and one sample of 229 Italian subjects, including 156Alzheimer's Disease patients CE patients and 301 healthy controls. All patients were affected by late onset AD (LOAD). None of the analyzed SNPs was associated with AD in our samples. In the exploratory analyses, several genetic variants were associated with inflammation parameters in the Greek sample and in the merged one, suggesting a relationship among these genes and the modulation of inflammation and the immune response. Other exploratory analyses showed associations among several SNPs and psychiatric symptomatology in the Greek sample, suggesting a possible modulation of these variants on psychiatric comorbidities in AD. Although we failed to find a direct relationship between AD and the genetic variants investigated, possible connections with inflammation and psychiatric symptoms were suggested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental factors as modulators of neurodegeneration: insights from gene-environment interactions in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Christina; Hannan, Anthony J; Renoir, Thibault

    2015-05-01

    Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases with established gene-environment interactions, Huntington's disease (HD) is viewed as a disorder governed by genetics. The cause of the disease is a highly penetrant tandem repeat expansion encoding an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. In the year 2000, a pioneering study showed that the disease could be delayed in transgenic mice by enriched housing conditions. This review describes subsequent human and preclinical studies identifying environmental modulation of motor, cognitive, affective and other symptoms found in HD. Alongside the behavioral observations we also discuss potential mechanisms and the relevance to other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In mouse models of HD, increased sensorimotor and cognitive stimulation can delay or ameliorate various endophenotypes. Potential mechanisms include increased trophic support, synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, and other forms of experience-dependent cellular plasticity. Subsequent clinical investigations support a role for lifetime activity levels in modulating the onset and progression of HD. Stress can accelerate memory and olfactory deficits and exacerbate cellular dysfunctions in HD mice. In the absence of effective treatments to slow the course of HD, environmental interventions offer feasible approaches to delay the disease, however further preclinical and human studies are needed in order to generate clinical recommendations. Environmental interventions could be combined with future pharmacological therapies and stimulate the identification of enviromimetics, drugs which mimic or enhance the beneficial effects of cognitive stimulation and physical activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Modulation of Cholesterol-Related Gene Expression by Dietary Fiber Fractions from Edible Mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caz, Víctor; Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Largo, Carlota; Tabernero, María; Santamaría, Mónica; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Marín, Francisco R; Reglero, Guillermo; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2015-08-26

    Mushrooms are a source of dietary fiber (DF) with a cholesterol-lowering effect. However, their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effect of DF-enriched fractions from three mushrooms species on cholesterol-related expression was studied in vitro. The Pleurotus ostreatus DF fraction (PDF) was used in mice models to assess its potential palliative or preventive effect against hypercholesterolemia. PDF induced a transcriptional response in Caco-2 cells, suggesting a possible cholesterol-lowering effect. In the palliative setting, PDF reduced hepatic triglyceride likely because Dgat1 was downregulated. However, cholesterol-related biochemical data showed no changes and no relation with the observed transcriptional modulation. In the preventive setting, PDF modulated cholesterol-related genes expression in a manner similar to that of simvastatin and ezetimibe in the liver, although no changes in plasma and liver biochemical data were induced. Therefore, PDF may be useful reducing hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Because it induced a molecular response similar to hypocholesterolemic drugs in liver, further dose-dependent studies should be carried out.

  5. Circadian modulation of gene expression, but not glutamate uptake, in mouse and rat cortical astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Beaulé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks control daily rhythms including sleep-wake, hormone secretion, and metabolism. These clocks are based on intracellular transcription-translation feedback loops that sustain daily oscillations of gene expression in many cell types. Mammalian astrocytes display circadian rhythms in the expression of the clock genes Period1 (Per1 and Period2 (Per2. However, a functional role for circadian oscillations in astrocytes is unknown. Because uptake of extrasynaptic glutamate depends on the presence of Per2 in astrocytes, we asked whether glutamate uptake by glia is circadian.We measured glutamate uptake, transcript and protein levels of the astrocyte-specific glutamate transporter, Glast, and the expression of Per1 and Per2 from cultured cortical astrocytes and from explants of somatosensory cortex. We found that glutamate uptake and Glast mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced in Clock/Clock, Per2- or NPAS2-deficient glia. Uptake was augmented when the medium was supplemented with dibutyryl-cAMP or B27. Critically, glutamate uptake was not circadian in cortical astrocytes cultured from rats or mice or in cortical slices from mice.We conclude that glutamate uptake levels are modulated by CLOCK, PER2, NPAS2, and the composition of the culture medium, and that uptake does not show circadian variations.

  6. Molecular switch of Cre/loxP for radiation modulated gene therapy on hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Y.-J.; Chen, Fu-Du; Wang, F.H.; Ke, C.C.; Wang, H.-E.; Liu, R.-S.

    2007-01-01

    For the purpose of enhancement of AFP promoter for the use of radiation modulated gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we combined hepatitis B virus (HBV) enhancer II with AFP promoter which shows the selectivity to the target cells to control the Cre/loxP system. Different gene constructs, pE4luc, pE4Tk, EIIAPA-Cre, E4CMV-STOP-Tk and chimeric promoters combined with HBV enhancer were constructed and transfected into HepG2, HeLa and NIH-3T3 cell lines. Cell experiments revealed that E4 enhancer responses to radiation best after 60 h irradiation at a dose range of 5-7 Gy in HepG2 stable clone. The EIIAPA promoter provided high specificity to hepatoma and activated the Cre downstream and removed the stop cassette only in hepatoma cells. After removal of the stop cassette, the E4 response to radiation could encode more Tk protein and kill more tumor cells. In summary, the chimeric EIIAPA promoter can stringently control the expression of Cre recombinase only in HCC. The radiation effect of the EIIAPA-Cre and E4CMV-STOP-Tk system shows promising results in terms of cell survival of HCC

  7. BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fangyan; Lee, Hyemin; Zhang, Yilei; Zhuang, Li; Yao, Hui; Xi, Yuanxin; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; You, M James; Li, Wei; Su, Xiaoping; Gan, Boyi

    2017-03-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here we show that BAP1 inhibits cell death induced by unresolved metabolic stress. This prosurvival role of BAP1 depends on its de-ubiquitinating activity and correlates with its ability to dampen the metabolic stress-induced UPR transcriptional network. BAP1 inhibits glucose deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion, two cellular events contributing to the ER stress-induced cell death. In line with this, Bap1 KO mice are more sensitive to tunicamycin-induced renal damage. Mechanically, we show that BAP1 represses metabolic stress-induced UPR and cell death through activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and reveal that BAP1 binds to ATF3 and CHOP promoters and inhibits their transcription. Taken together, our results establish a previously unappreciated role of BAP1 in modulating the cellular adaptability to metabolic stress and uncover a pivotal function of BAP1 in the regulation of the ER stress gene-regulatory network. Our study may also provide new conceptual framework for further understanding BAP1 function in cancer.

  8. Red Light Modulates Ultraviolet-Induced Gene Expression in the Epidermis of Hairless Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Stadler, Istvan; Polesskaya, Oksana; Motiwala, Alifiya S; Nardia, Frances Barg; Mintz, Benjamin; Baranova, Ancha; Zavislan, James; Lanzafame, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether low-level light therapy (LLLT) was capable of modulating expression of ultraviolet (UV) light-responsive genes in vivo. The effects of 670 nm light-emitting diode (LED) array irradiation were investigated in a hairless SHK-1 mouse epidermis model. Mice were given a single dose of UVA/UVB light, or three doses of red light (670 nm @ 8 mW/cm(2) x 312 sec, 2.5 J/cm(2) per session) spread over 24 h along with combinations of pre- and post-UV treatment with red light. Levels of 14 UV-responsive mRNAs were quantified 24 h after UV irradiation by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The transcription of mRNAs encoding for cluster of differentiation molecule 11b (CD11b) (p light alone, whereas expression level of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (p light either. Pretreatment with red light significantly modified response of Fos to UV exposure (p light in reducing the transcription levels of CD11b (p light LLLT more often than not causes opposite gene expression changes or reduces those caused by moderate UVA-UVB irradiation.

  9. Maternal Diet Modulates Placenta Growth and Gene Expression in a Mouse Model of Diabetic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, Claudia; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Salbaum, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Unfavorable maternal diet during pregnancy can predispose the offspring to diseases later in life, such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. However, the molecular basis for this phenomenon of “developmental programming” is poorly understood. We have recently shown that a diet nutritionally optimized for pregnancy can nevertheless be harmful in the context of diabetic pregnancy in the mouse, associated with a high incidence of neural tube defects and intrauterine growth restriction. We hypothesized that placental abnormalities may contribute to impaired fetal growth in these pregnancies, and therefore investigated the role of maternal diet in the placenta. LabDiet 5015 diet was associated with reduced placental growth, commencing at midgestation, when compared to pregnancies in which the diabetic dam was fed LabDiet 5001 maintenance chow. Furthermore, by quantitative RT-PCR we identify 34 genes whose expression in placenta at midgestation is modulated by diet, diabetes, or both, establishing biomarkers for gene-environment interactions in the placenta. These results implicate maternal diet as an important factor in pregnancy complications and suggest that the early phases of placenta development could be a critical time window for developmental origins of adult disease. PMID:22701643

  10. Molecular switch of Cre/loxP for radiation modulated gene therapy on hepatoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Chen, Fu-Du; Wang, Fu Hui; Ke, Chien Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2007-02-01

    For the purpose of enhancement of AFP promoter for the use of radiation modulated gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we combined hepatitis B virus (HBV) enhancer II with AFP promoter which shows the selectivity to the target cells to control the Cre/loxP system. Different gene constructs, pE4luc, pE4Tk, EIIAPA-Cre, E4CMV-STOP-Tk and chimeric promoters combined with HBV enhancer were constructed and transfected into HepG2, HeLa and NIH-3T3 cell lines. Cell experiments revealed that E4 enhancer responses to radiation best after 60 h irradiation at a dose range of 5-7 Gy in HepG2 stable clone. The EIIAPA promoter provided high specificity to hepatoma and activated the Cre downstream and removed the stop cassette only in hepatoma cells. After removal of the stop cassette, the E4 response to radiation could encode more Tk protein and kill more tumor cells. In summary, the chimeric EIIAPA promoter can stringently control the expression of Cre recombinase only in HCC. The radiation effect of the EIIAPA-Cre and E4CMV-STOP-Tk system shows promising results in terms of cell survival of HCC.

  11. A new strategy for exploring the hierarchical structure of cancers by adaptively partitioning functional modules from gene expression network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junmei; Jing, Runyu; Liu, Yuan; Dong, Yongcheng; Wen, Zhining; Li, Menglong

    2016-06-28

    The interactions among the genes within a disease are helpful for better understanding the hierarchical structure of the complex biological system of it. Most of the current methodologies need the information of known interactions between genes or proteins to create the network connections. However, these methods meet the limitations in clinical cancer researches because different cancers not only share the common interactions among the genes but also own their specific interactions distinguished from each other. Moreover, it is still difficult to decide the boundaries of the sub-networks. Therefore, we proposed a strategy to construct a gene network by using the sparse inverse covariance matrix of gene expression data, and divide it into a series of functional modules by an adaptive partition algorithm. The strategy was validated by using the microarray data of three cancers and the RNA-sequencing data of glioblastoma. The different modules in the network exhibited specific functions in cancers progression. Moreover, based on the gene expression profiles in the modules, the risk of death was well predicted in the clustering analysis and the binary classification, indicating that our strategy can be benefit for investigating the cancer mechanisms and promoting the clinical applications of network-based methodologies in cancer researches.

  12. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length Is Associated With Body Fat and Serum SHBG in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Longer androgen receptor gene CAG trinucleotide repeats, AR (CAG)n, have been associated with reduced sensitivity of the androgen receptor (AR) in vitro as well as in humans. Furthermore, short AR (CAG)n have been associated with premature adrenarche. Objective: The aim of the study...... was to evaluate associations between the AR (CAG)n polymorphism and development of pubic hair, levels of androgens, and body fat content in healthy boys. Methods: A longitudinal study of 78 healthy boys (age 6.2-12.4 years at inclusion) from the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study was conducted with clinical examinations...... accumulation and serum SHBG concentrations indicate that this genetic polymorphism may influence the androgen-dependent fine-tuning of metabolic and reproductive factors at a young age....

  13. PPARα gene polymorphisms modulate the association between physical activity and cardiometabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, I; Champlin, J; Sheu, L; Goodpaster, B H; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Muldoon, M F

    2014-07-01

    Habitual physical activity is understood to help prevent type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease via beneficial effects on both metabolism and the vascular system. However, individuals do not have uniform cardiometabolic responses to physical activity. Here we explore the extent to which variation in the proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) gene, which modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, vascular function, and inflammation, predicts the overall cardiometabolic risk (CMR) profile of individuals engaging in various levels of physical activity. 917 unrelated, community volunteers (52% female, of Non-Hispanic European ancestry) aged 30-54 years, participated in the cross-sectional study. Subjects were genotyped for 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PPARα gene, from which common haplotypes were defined. A continuous measure of CMR was calculated as an aggregate of 5 traditional risk factors: waist circumference, resting blood pressure, fasting serum triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and glucose. Regression models were used to examine the main and interactive effects of physical activity and genetic variation on CMR. One common PPARα haplotype (H-23) was associated with a higher CMR. This association was moderated by daily physical activity (B = -0.11, SE = 0.053, t = -2.05, P = 0.04). Increased physical activity was associated with a steeper reduction of CMR in persons carrying the otherwise detrimental H-23 haplotype. Variations in the PPARα gene appear to magnify the cardiometabolic benefits of habitual physical activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase DDX3X Modulates Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadivjam, Bita; Stegen, Camille; Hogue-Racine, Marc-Aurèle; El Bilali, Nabil; Döhner, Katinka; Sodeik, Beate; Lippé, Roger

    2017-04-15

    The human protein DDX3X is a DEAD box ATP-dependent RNA helicase that regulates transcription, mRNA maturation, and mRNA export and translation. DDX3X concomitantly modulates the replication of several RNA viruses and promotes innate immunity. We previously showed that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a human DNA virus, incorporates DDX3X into its mature particles and that DDX3X is required for optimal HSV-1 infectivity. Here, we show that viral gene expression, replication, and propagation depend on optimal DDX3X protein levels. Surprisingly, DDX3X from incoming viral particles was not required for the early stages of the HSV-1 infection, but, rather, the protein controlled the assembly of new viral particles. This was independent of the previously reported ability of DDX3X to stimulate interferon type I production. Instead, both the lack and overexpression of DDX3X disturbed viral gene transcription and thus subsequent genome replication. This suggests that in addition to its effect on RNA viruses, DDX3X impacts DNA viruses such as HSV-1 by an interferon-independent pathway. IMPORTANCE Viruses interact with a variety of cellular proteins to complete their life cycle. Among them is DDX3X, an RNA helicase that participates in most aspects of RNA biology, including transcription, splicing, nuclear export, and translation. Several RNA viruses and a limited number of DNA viruses are known to manipulate DDX3X for their own benefit. In contrast, DDX3X is also known to promote interferon production to limit viral propagation. Here, we show that DDX3X, which we previously identified in mature HSV-1 virions, stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and, consequently, virion assembly by a process that is independent of its ability to promote the interferon pathway. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Musashi1 modulates cell proliferation genes in the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Jaclyn Y

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1 is an RNA binding protein with a central role during nervous system development and stem cell maintenance. High levels of Msi1 have been reported in several malignancies including brain tumors thereby associating Msi1 and cancer. Methods We used the human medulloblastoma cell line Daoy as model system in this study to knock down the expression of Msi1 and determine the effects upon soft agar growth and neurophere formation. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to evaluate the expression of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Msi1 depleted Daoy cells. Results We observed that MSI1 expression was elevated in Daoy cells cultured as neurospheres compared to those grown as monolayer. These data indicated that Msi1 might be involved in regulating proliferation in cancer cells. Here we show that shRNA mediated Msi1 depletion in Daoy cells notably impaired their ability to form colonies in soft agar and to grow as neurospheres in culture. Moreover, differential expression of a group of Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathway related genes including MYCN, FOS, NOTCH2, SMO, CDKN1A, CCND2, CCND1, and DKK1, was also found in the Msi1 knockdown, demonstrating that Msi1 modulated the expression of a subset of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Daoy. Conclusion Our data suggested that Msi1 may promote cancer cell proliferation and survival as its loss seems to have a detrimental effect in the maintenance of medulloblastoma cancer cells. In this regard, Msi1 might be a positive regulator of tumor progression and a potential target for therapy.

  16. Fresh Frozen Plasma Modulates Brain Gene Expression in a Swine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury and Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) decreases brain lesion size and swelling in a swine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that brain gene expression profiles after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock would be modulated by FFP resu...

  17. Dissection of a QTL hotspot on mouse distal chromosome 1 that modulates neurobehavioral phenotypes and gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khyobeni Mozhui

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A remarkably diverse set of traits maps to a region on mouse distal chromosome 1 (Chr 1 that corresponds to human Chr 1q21-q23. This region is highly enriched in quantitative trait loci (QTLs that control neural and behavioral phenotypes, including motor behavior, escape latency, emotionality, seizure susceptibility (Szs1, and responses to ethanol, caffeine, pentobarbital, and haloperidol. This region also controls the expression of a remarkably large number of genes, including genes that are associated with some of the classical traits that map to distal Chr 1 (e.g., seizure susceptibility. Here, we ask whether this QTL-rich region on Chr 1 (Qrr1 consists of a single master locus or a mixture of linked, but functionally unrelated, QTLs. To answer this question and to evaluate candidate genes, we generated and analyzed several gene expression, haplotype, and sequence datasets. We exploited six complementary mouse crosses, and combed through 18 expression datasets to determine class membership of genes modulated by Qrr1. Qrr1 can be broadly divided into a proximal part (Qrr1p and a distal part (Qrr1d, each associated with the expression of distinct subsets of genes. Qrr1d controls RNA metabolism and protein synthesis, including the expression of approximately 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Qrr1d contains a tRNA cluster, and this is a functionally pertinent candidate for the tRNA synthetases. Rgs7 and Fmn2 are other strong candidates in Qrr1d. FMN2 protein has pronounced expression in neurons, including in the dendrites, and deletion of Fmn2 had a strong effect on the expression of few genes modulated by Qrr1d. Our analysis revealed a highly complex gene expression regulatory interval in Qrr1, composed of multiple loci modulating the expression of functionally cognate sets of genes.

  18. Gene Transfer and Modulation for the Production of Food with Enhanced Quali-Quantitative Values: Potentials, Promises and Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Karbarz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the research and achievements of applications of molecular tools based on gene transfer and gene modulation (gene knock-down and knock-out, aimed at enhancing food production, improving food properties and producing various valuable compounds for human nutrition. Selected cases of genetically manipulated plants (biofortification and allergene silencing and animals (fish and livestock are examined. Promises and accomplishments are considered when giving topic examples of the potentials offered by some applications of molecular biology for obtaining goods, among them milk, with enhanced value, and of their impact on society at large.

  19. Dihydrotestostenone increase the gene expression of androgen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HNTEP cells were grown in basal medium and treated with DHT in different conditions. HNTEP cells under treatment with DHT (10-13 M) induced an increase in FHL-2 expression. In turn, high DHT concentrations (10-8 M) induced an increase in the expression SHP-1. The present data suggest that the SHP-1 and FHL-2 ...

  20. Systems toxicology of chemically induced liver and kidney injuries: histopathology‐associated gene co‐expression modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te, Jerez A.; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Organ injuries caused by environmental chemical exposures or use of pharmaceutical drugs pose a serious health risk that may be difficult to assess because of a lack of non‐invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ‐specific histopathology outcomes via biomarkers will provide a foundation for designing precise and robust diagnostic tests. We identified co‐expressed genes (modules) specific to injury endpoints using the Open Toxicogenomics Project‐Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System (TG‐GATEs) – a toxicogenomics database containing organ‐specific gene expression data matched to dose‐ and time‐dependent chemical exposures and adverse histopathology assessments in Sprague–Dawley rats. We proposed a protocol for selecting gene modules associated with chemical‐induced injuries that classify 11 liver and eight kidney histopathology endpoints based on dose‐dependent activation of the identified modules. We showed that the activation of the modules for a particular chemical exposure condition, i.e., chemical‐time‐dose combination, correlated with the severity of histopathological damage in a dose‐dependent manner. Furthermore, the modules could distinguish different types of injuries caused by chemical exposures as well as determine whether the injury module activation was specific to the tissue of origin (liver and kidney). The generated modules provide a link between toxic chemical exposures, different molecular initiating events among underlying molecular pathways and resultant organ damage. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26725466

  1. Mouse Obox and Crxos modulate preimplantation transcriptional profiles revealing similarity between paralogous mouse and human homeobox genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy H. Royall

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ETCHbox genes are eutherian-specific homeobox genes expressed during preimplantation development at a time when the first cell lineage decisions are being made. The mouse has an unusual repertoire of ETCHbox genes with several gene families lost in evolution and the remaining two, Crxos and Obox, greatly divergent in sequence and number. Each has undergone duplication to give a double homeodomain Crxos locus and a large cluster of over 60 Obox loci. The gene content differences between species raise important questions about how evolution can tolerate loss of genes implicated in key developmental events. Results We find that Crxos internal duplication occurred in the mouse lineage, while Obox duplication was stepwise, generating subgroups with distinct sequence and expression. Ectopic expression of three Obox genes and a Crxos transcript in primary mouse embryonic cells followed by transcriptome sequencing allowed investigation into their functional roles. We find distinct transcriptomic influences for different Obox subgroups and Crxos, including modulation of genes related to zygotic genome activation and preparation for blastocyst formation. Comparison with similar experiments performed using human homeobox genes reveals striking overlap between genes downstream of mouse Crxos and genes downstream of human ARGFX. Conclusions Mouse Crxos and human ARGFX homeobox genes are paralogous rather than orthologous, yet they have evolved to regulate a common set of genes. This suggests there was compensation of function alongside gene loss through co-option of a different locus. Functional compensation by non-orthologous genes with dissimilar sequences is unusual but may indicate underlying distributed robustness. Compensation may be driven by the strong evolutionary pressure for successful early embryo development.

  2. Anogenital distance plasticity in adulthood: implications for its use as a biomarker of fetal androgen action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rod T; Mungall, Will; McKinnell, Chris; Sharpe, Richard M; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Milne, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-01-01

    Androgen action during the fetal masculinization programming window (MPW) determines the maximum potential for growth of androgen-dependent organs (eg, seminal vesicles, prostate, penis, and perineum) and is reflected in anogenital distance (AGD). As such, determining AGD in postnatal life has potential as a lifelong easily accessible biomarker of overall androgen action during the MPW. However, whether the perineum remains androgen responsive in adulthood and thus responds plastically to perturbed androgen drive remains unexplored. To determine this, we treated adult male rats with either the antiandrogen flutamide or the estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) for 5 weeks, followed by a 4-week washout period of no treatment. We determined AGD and its correlate anogenital index (AGI) (AGD relative to body weight) at weekly intervals across this period and compared these with normal adult rats (male and female), castrated male rats, and appropriate vehicle controls. These data showed that, in addition to reducing circulating testosterone and seminal vesicle weight, castration significantly reduced AGD (by ∼17%), demonstrating that there is a degree of plasticity in AGD in adulthood. Flutamide treatment increased circulating testosterone yet also reduced seminal vesicle weight due to local antagonism of androgen receptor. Despite this suppression, surprisingly, flutamide treatment had no effect on AGD at any time point. In contrast, although DES treatment suppressed circulating testosterone and reduced seminal vesicle weight, it also induced a significant reduction in AGD (by ∼11%), which returned to normal 1 week after cessation of DES treatment. We conclude that AGD in adult rats exhibits a degree of plasticity, which may be mediated by modulation of local androgen/estrogen action. The implications of these findings regarding the use of AGD as a lifelong clinical biomarker of fetal androgen action are discussed.

  3. Spatial abilities are not related to testosterone levels and variation in the androgen receptor in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubranská, Aneta; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Androgens modulate brain functions such as cognition, emotions and ability. Several studies have shown a correlation between testosterone levels and mental rotation. The aim of the present study was to confirm the influence of salivary testosterone levels, 2D/4D ratio (such as a putative marker of prenatal testosterone), and sensitivity of androgen receptor on the mental rotation in healthy young men. Seventy-five healthy young men (age, 21.86 year) volunteered in this study. Mental rotation scores of our subjects were assessed using the Vandenberg and Kuse Mental Rotation Test. The 2D/4D finger length ratio as an indicator of prenatal testosterone was used as an average measurement of both hands. Correlation analysis revealed no correlation between salivary testosterone levels and mental rotation. However, we have observed a trend towards a negative correlation. There were no statistically significant results between 2D/4D ratio and mental rotation or between polymorphic three-nucleotide (CAG) repeats and mental rotation tests. Future studies should focus on other genetic determinants of spatial abilities, potentially genes i