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Sample records for andreas fault system

  1. Coulomb Stress Accumulation along the San Andreas Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bridget; Sandwell, David

    2003-01-01

    Stress accumulation rates along the primary segments of the San Andreas Fault system are computed using a three-dimensional (3-D) elastic half-space model with realistic fault geometry. The model is developed in the Fourier domain by solving for the response of an elastic half-space due to a point vector body force and analytically integrating the force from a locking depth to infinite depth. This approach is then applied to the San Andreas Fault system using published slip rates along 18 major fault strands of the fault zone. GPS-derived horizontal velocity measurements spanning the entire 1700 x 200 km region are then used to solve for apparent locking depth along each primary fault segment. This simple model fits remarkably well (2.43 mm/yr RMS misfit), although some discrepancies occur in the Eastern California Shear Zone. The model also predicts vertical uplift and subsidence rates that are in agreement with independent geologic and geodetic estimates. In addition, shear and normal stresses along the major fault strands are used to compute Coulomb stress accumulation rate. As a result, we find earthquake recurrence intervals along the San Andreas Fault system to be inversely proportional to Coulomb stress accumulation rate, in agreement with typical coseismic stress drops of 1 - 10 MPa. This 3-D deformation model can ultimately be extended to include both time-dependent forcing and viscoelastic response.

  2. Fracture surface energy of the Punchbowl fault, San Andreas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Judith S; Chester, Frederick M; Kronenberg, Andreas K

    2005-09-01

    Fracture energy is a form of latent heat required to create an earthquake rupture surface and is related to parameters governing rupture propagation and processes of slip weakening. Fracture energy has been estimated from seismological and experimental rock deformation data, yet its magnitude, mechanisms of rupture surface formation and processes leading to slip weakening are not well defined. Here we quantify structural observations of the Punchbowl fault, a large-displacement exhumed fault in the San Andreas fault system, and show that the energy required to create the fracture surface area in the fault is about 300 times greater than seismological estimates would predict for a single large earthquake. If fracture energy is attributed entirely to the production of fracture surfaces, then all of the fracture surface area in the Punchbowl fault could have been produced by earthquake displacements totalling <1 km. But this would only account for a small fraction of the total energy budget, and therefore additional processes probably contributed to slip weakening during earthquake rupture.

  3. New evidence on the state of stress of the san andreas fault system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M D; Zoback, M L; Mount, V S; Suppe, J; Eaton, J P; Healy, J H; Oppenheimer, D; Reasenberg, P; Jones, L; Raleigh, C B; Wong, I G; Scotti, O; Wentworth, C

    1987-11-20

    Contemporary in situ tectonic stress indicators along the San Andreas fault system in central California show northeast-directed horizontal compression that is nearly perpendicular to the strike of the fault. Such compression explains recent uplift of the Coast Ranges and the numerous active reverse faults and folds that trend nearly parallel to the San Andreas and that are otherwise unexplainable in terms of strike-slip deformation. Fault-normal crustal compression in central California is proposed to result from the extremely low shear strength of the San Andreas and the slightly convergent relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Preliminary in situ stress data from the Cajon Pass scientific drill hole (located 3.6 kilometers northeast of the San Andreas in southern California near San Bernardino, California) are also consistent with a weak fault, as they show no right-lateral shear stress at approximately 2-kilometer depth on planes parallel to the San Andreas fault.

  4. Mantle strength of the San Andreas fault system and the role of mantle-crust feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzaras, V.; Tikoff, B.; Newman, J.; Withers, A.C.; Drury, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    In lithospheric-scale strike-slip fault zones, upper crustal strength is well constrained from borehole observations and fault rock deformation experiments, but mantle strength is less well known. Using peridotite xenoliths, we show that the upper mantle below the San Andreas fault system

  5. Interseismic strain accumulation and the earthquake potential on the southern San Andreas fault system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, Yuri

    2006-06-22

    The San Andreas fault in California is a mature continental transform fault that accommodates a significant fraction of motion between the North American and Pacific plates. The two most recent great earthquakes on this fault ruptured its northern and central sections in 1906 and 1857, respectively. The southern section of the fault, however, has not produced a great earthquake in historic times (for at least 250 years). Assuming the average slip rate of a few centimetres per year, typical of the rest of the San Andreas fault, the minimum amount of slip deficit accrued on the southern section is of the order of 7-10 metres, comparable to the maximum co-seismic offset ever documented on the fault. Here I present high-resolution measurements of interseismic deformation across the southern San Andreas fault system using a well-populated catalogue of space-borne synthetic aperture radar data. The data reveal a nearly equal partitioning of deformation between the southern San Andreas and San Jacinto faults, with a pronounced asymmetry in strain accumulation with respect to the geologically mapped fault traces. The observed strain rates confirm that the southern section of the San Andreas fault may be approaching the end of the interseismic phase of the earthquake cycle.

  6. Update: San Andreas Fault experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite laser ranging techniques are used to monitor the broad motion of the tectonic plates comprising the San Andreas Fault System. The San Andreas Fault Experiment, (SAFE), has progressed through the upgrades made to laser system hardware and an improvement in the modeling capabilities of the spaceborne laser targets. Of special note is the launch of the Laser Geodynamic Satellite, LAGEOS spacecraft, NASA's only completely dedicated laser satellite in 1976. The results of plate motion projected into this 896 km measured line over the past eleven years are summarized and intercompared.

  7. Earthquake geology and paleoseismology of major strands of the San Andreas fault system: Chapter 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Thomas; Scharer, Katherine M.; Dawson, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system in California is one of the best-studied faults in the world, both in terms of the long-term geologic history and paleoseismic study of past surface ruptures. In this paper, we focus on the Quaternary to historic data that have been collected from the major strands of the San Andreas fault system, both on the San Andreas Fault itself, and the major subparallel strands that comprise the plate boundary, including the Calaveras-Hayward- Rogers Creek-Maacama fault zone and the Concord-Green Valley-Bartlett Springs fault zone in northern California, and the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults in southern California. The majority of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American lithospheric plates is accommodated by these faults, with the San Andreas slipping at about 34 mm/yr in central California, decreasing to about 20 mm/yr in northern California north of its juncture with the Calaveras and Concord faults. The Calaveras-Hayward-Rogers Creek-Maacama fault zone exhibits a slip rate of 10-15 mm/yr, whereas the rate along the Concord-Green Valley-Bartlett Springs fault zone is lower at about 5 mm/yr. In southern California, the San Andreas exhibits a slip rate of about 35 mm/yr along the Mojave section, decreasing to as low as 10-15 mm/yr along its juncture with the San Jacinto fault, and about 20 mm/yr in the Coachella Valley. The San Jacinto and Elsinore fault zones exhibit rates of about 15 and 5 mm/yr, respectively. The average recurrence interval for surface-rupturing earthquakes along individual elements of the San Andreas fault system range from 100-500 years and is consistent with slip rate at those sites: higher slip rates produce more frequent or larger earthquakes. There is also evidence of short-term variations in strain release (slip rate) along various fault sections, as expressed as “flurries” or clusters of earthquakes as well as periods of relatively fewer surface ruptures in these relatively short records. This

  8. Neotectonics of the San Andreas Fault system, basin and range province juncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, J. E.; Crowell, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The development, active processes, and tectonic interplay of the southern San Andreas fault system and the basin and range province were studied. The study consist of data acquisition and evaluation, technique development, and image interpretation and mapping. Potentially significant geologic findings are discussed.

  9. The accommodation of relative motion at depth on the San Andreas fault system in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, W. H.; Nur, A.

    1981-01-01

    Plate motion below the seismogenic layer along the San Andreas fault system in California is assumed to form by aseismic slip along a deeper extension of the fault or may result from lateral distribution of deformation below the seismogenic layer. The shallow depth of California earthquakes, the depth of the coseismic slip during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and the presence of widely separated parallel faults indicate that relative motion is distributed below the seismogenic zone, occurring by inelastic flow rather than by aseismic slip on discrete fault planes.

  10. Mechanical insights into tectonic reorganization of the southern San Andreas fault system at ca. 1.1-1.5 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattaruso, L.; Cooke, M. L.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Reorganization of active fault systems may result from changes in relative plate motion and evolving fault geometries. Between ~1.5 and 1.1 Ma the southern San Andreas fault system underwent a major reorganization that included initiation of the San Jacinto fault zone, termination of slip on the extensional West Salton detachment fault, and reorganization of structures in the Mecca Hills northeast of the San Andreas fault during a local change from transtension to transpression conditions with no known change in Pacific-North America relative plate motion. The active trace of the southern San Andreas fault itself also evolved during this time, with shifts in activity from the Mission Creek to Mill Creek to the present-day active fault geometry of the San Bernardino, Garnet Hill, and Banning strands of the San Andreas fault. Although there is a rich geologic record of these changes, the mechanisms that controlled abandonment of active faults, initiation of new strands, and shifting loci of uplift are poorly understood. We use three-dimensional mechanical Boundary Element Method models to investigate this major tectonic reorganization at ~1.1-1.5 Ma. Previous mechanical modeling studies have examined the evolution of the southern San Andreas fault geometry in the San Gorgonio Pass using a series of snapshot models of the succession of active fault geometries. We use the same approach to explore the role of fault interaction and tectonic loading in abandonment of the West Salton detachment fault and initiation of the San Jacinto fault. The snapshots include: (1) regional transtension with an active West Salton detachment fault and active Mission Creek strand of the San Andreas fault; (2) cessation of local extension in combination with initiation of the San Jacinto fault in which we explore both north-to-south propagation and simultaneous growth; (3) shift of activity to the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault; and (4) shift of activity to the present

  11. Variations in strength and slip rate along the san andreas fault system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C H; Wesnousky, S G

    1992-04-03

    Convergence across the San Andreas fault (SAF) system is partitioned between strike-slip motion on the vertical SAF and oblique-slip motion on parallel dip-slip faults, as illustrated by the recent magnitude M(s) = 6.0 Palm Springs, M(s) = 6.7 Coalinga, and M(s) = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquakes. If the partitioning of slip minimizes the work done against friction, the direction of slip during these recent earthquakes depends primarily on fault dip and indicates that the normal stress coefficient and frictional coefficient (micro) vary among the faults. Additionally, accounting for the active dip-slip faults reduces estimates of fault slip rates along the vertical trace of the SAF by about 50 percent in the Loma Prieta and 100 percent in the North Palm Springs segments.

  12. Seismic Evidence for Conjugate Slip and Block Rotation Within the San Andreas Fault System, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Craig; Seeber, Leonardo; Williams, Patrick; Sykes, Lynn R.

    1986-08-01

    The pattern of seismicity in southern California indicates that much of the activity is presently occurring on secondary structures, several of which are oriented nearly orthogonal to the strikes of the major through-going faults. Slip along these secondary transverse features is predominantly left-lateral and is consistent with the reactivation of conjugate faults by the current regional stress field. Near the intersection of the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults, however, these active left-lateral faults appear to define a set of small crustal blocks, which in conjunction with both normal and reverse faulting earthquakes, suggests contemporary clockwise rotation as a result of regional right-lateral shear. Other left-lateral faults representing additional rotating block systems are identified in adjacent areas from geologic and seismologic data. Many of these structures predate the modern San Andreas system and may control the pattern of strain accumulation in southern California. Geodetic and paleomagnetic evidence confirm that block rotation by strike-slip faulting is nearly ubiquitous, particularly in areas where shear is distributed, and that it accommodates both short-term elastic and long-term nonelastic strain. A rotating block model accounts for a number of structural styles characteristic of strike-slip deformation in California, including: variable slip rates and alternating transtensional and transpressional features observed along strike of major wrench faults; domains of evenly-spaced antithetic faults that terminate against major fault boundaries; continued development of bends in faults with large lateral displacements; anomalous focal mechanisms; and differential uplift in areas otherwise expected to experience extension and subsidence. Since block rotation requires a detachment surface at depth to permit rotational movement, low-angle structures like detachments, of either local or regional extent, may be involved in the contemporary strike

  13. Crustal Deformation along San Andreas Fault System revealed by GPS and Sentinel-1 InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2017-12-01

    We present a crustal deformation velocity map along the San Andreas Fault System by combining measurements from Sentinel-1 Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity models (CGM V1). We assembled 5 tracks of descending Sentinel-1 InSAR data spanning 2014.11-2017.02, and produced 545 interferograms, each of which covers roughly 250km x 420km area ( 60 bursts). These interferograms are unwrapped using SNAPHU [Chen & Zebker, 2002], with the 2Npi unwrapping ambiguity corrected with a sparse recovery method. We used coherence-based small baseline subset (SBAS) method [Tong & Schmidt, 2016] together with atmospheric correction by common-point stacking [Tymofyeyeva and Fialko, 2015] to construct deformation time series [Xu et. al., 2017]. Then we project the horizontal GPS model and vertical GPS data into satellite line-of-sight directions separately. We first remove the horizontal GPS model from InSAR measurements and perform elevation-dependent atmospheric phase correction. Then we compute the discrepancy between the remaining InSAR measurements and vertical GPS data. We interpolate this discrepancy and remove it from the residual InSAR measurements. Finally, we restore the horizontal GPS model. Preliminary results show that fault creep over the San Jacinto fault, the Elsinore fault, and the San Andreas creeping section is clearly resolved. During the period of drought, the Central Valley of California was subsiding at a high rate (up to 40 cm/yr), while the city of San Jose is uplifting due to recharge, with a quaternary fault acting as a ground water barrier. These findings will be reported during the meeting.

  14. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour

  15. Ruptures of the San Andreas fault system in San Gorgonio Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, D.; Sieh, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fault behavior models for the San Andreas fault system in San Gorgonio Pass hinge upon contrasting interpretations of the structural complexity and diffuse seismicity in the Pass region. One model maintains that the fault system can rupture through the Pass in ~ M 7.8 earthquakes that extend from the Salton Sea to the Mojave Desert. Another model argues that the structural complexity here arrests San Andreas ruptures as they approach from either side of the Pass and limits their size to ~ M 7.5. One way to test these models is to examine the paleoseismic record of active faults in the Pass. Work at the Burro Flats site, located where the San Bernardino strand feeds into San Gorgonio Pass from the north, reveals evidence for at least nine earthquakes in the last 2000 yrs. The average earthquake recurrence is about 200 yrs with the maximum and minimum intervals between earthquakes equal to about 550 and 80 yrs, respectively. The average recurrence is considered to be a maximum value because a hiatus in sedimentation during the Early Middle Ages may ‘hide’ one or more event during this time period. The maximum recurrence interval of 550 yrs is likely an overestimate owing to the large errors in the timing of one event ~1300 yrs ago. In general, the Burro Flats event record and average recurrence is very similar to those at sites in the San Bernardino and Coachella Valley regions. The most recent rupture at Burro Flats cuts strata that contain European-introduced pollen and is interpreted to record the southeastern extent of the 1812 Wrightwood earthquake, a possible example of a ‘Pass-as-a-barrier’, moderate-sized event. The timing of pre-1812 events at Burro Flats correlate with the timing of San Andreas events in the San Bernardino and Coachella Valley regions, possible examples of through going, larger-sized earthquakes. Work at the Cabezon site, located on a thrust segment of the San Gorgonio Pass fault zone, shows evidence for two ruptures since ~ AD 1300

  16. The San Andreas Fault 'Supersite' (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    An expanded and permanent Supersite has been proposed to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) for the San Andreas Fault system, based upon the successful initial Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Geohazard Supersite for the Los Angeles region from 2009-2013. As justification for the comprehensive San Andreas Supersite, consider the earthquake history of California, in particular the devastating M 7.8 San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which occurred along the San Andreas Fault, as did an earthquake of similar magnitude in 1857 in southern California. Los Angeles was only a small town then, but now the risk exposure has increased for both of California's megacities. Between the San Francisco and Los Angeles urban areas lies a section of the San Andreas Fault known to creep continually, so it has relatively less earthquake hazard. It used to be thought of as capable of stopping earthquakes entering it from either direction. Transitional behavior at either end of the creeping section is known to display a full range of seismic to aseismic slip events and accompanying seismicity and strain transient events. Because the occurrence of creep events is well documented by instrumental networks such as CISN and PBO, the San Andreas Supersite can be expected to be especially effective. A good baseline level of geodetic data regarding past events and strain accumulation and release exists. Many prior publications regarding the occurrence of geophysical phenomena along the San Andreas Fault system mean that in order to make novel contributions, state-of-the-art science will be required within this Supersite region. In more recent years, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake struck adjacent to the San Andreas Fault and caused the most damage along the western side of the San Francisco Bay Area. More recently, the concern has focused on the potential for future events along the Hayward Fault along the eastern side of San Francisco Bay. In Southern California, earthquakes

  17. Does paleoseismology forecast the historic rates of large earthquakes on the San Andreas fault system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasi, Glenn; Scharer, Katherine M.; Weldon, Ray; Dawson, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    The 98-year open interval since the most recent ground-rupturing earthquake in the greater San Andreas boundary fault system would not be predicted by the quasi-periodic recurrence statistics from paleoseismic data. We examine whether the current hiatus could be explained by uncertainties in earthquake dating. Using seven independent paleoseismic records, 100 year intervals may have occurred circa 1150, 1400, and 1700 AD, but they occur in a third or less of sample records drawn at random. A second method sampling from dates conditioned on the existence of a gap of varying length suggests century-long gaps occur 3-10% of the time. A combined record with more sites would lead to lower probabilities. Systematic data over-interpretation is considered an unlikely explanation. Instead some form of non-stationary behaviour seems required, perhaps through long-range fault interaction. Earthquake occurrence since 1000 AD is not inconsistent with long-term cyclicity suggested from long runs of earthquake simulators.

  18. Radon emanation on San Andreas Fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.-Y.

    1978-01-01

    It is stated that subsurface radon emanation monitored in shallow dry holes along an active segment of the San Andreas fault in central California shows spatially coherent large temporal variations that seem to be correlated with local seismicity. (author)

  19. Magnetic profiling of the San Andreas Fault using a dual magnetometer UAV aerial survey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, J. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Masongsong, E. V.; Yang, J.; Medina, H. R.; Moon, S.; Davis, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Aeromagnetic survey methods using planes are more time-effective than hand-held methods, but can be far more expensive per unit area unless large areas are covered. The availability of low cost UAVs and low cost, lightweight fluxgate magnetometers (FGMs) allows, with proper offset determination and stray fields correction, for low-cost magnetic surveys. Towards that end, we have developed a custom multicopter UAV for magnetic mapping using a dual 3-axis fluxgate magnetometer system: the GEOphysical Drone Enhanced Survey Instrument (GEODESI). A high precision sensor measures the UAV's position and attitude (roll, pitch, and yaw) and is recorded using a custom Arduino data processing system. The two FGMs (in-board and out-board) are placed on two ends of a vertical 1m boom attached to the base of the UAV. The in-board FGM is most sensitive to stray fields from the UAV and its signal is used, after scaling, to clean the signal of the out-board FGM from the vehicle noise. The FGMs record three orthogonal components of the magnetic field in the UAV body coordinates which are then transformed into a north-east-down coordinate system using a rotation matrix determined from the roll-pitch-yaw attitude data. This ensures knowledge of the direction of all three field components enabling us to perform inverse modeling of magnetic anomalies with greater accuracy than total or vertical field measurements used in the past. Field tests were performed at Dragon's Back Pressure Ridge in the Carrizo Plain of California, where there is a known crossing of the San Andreas Fault. Our data and models were compared to previously acquired LiDAR and hand-held magnetometer measurements. Further tests will be carried out to solidify our results and streamline our processing for educational use in the classroom and student field training.

  20. Break of slope in earthquake size distribution and creep rate along the San Andreas Fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, P.; Narteau, C.; Vorobieva, I.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal faults accommodate slip either by a succession of earthquakes or continuous slip, andin most instances, both these seismic and aseismic processes coexist. Recorded seismicity and geodeticmeasurements are therefore two complementary data sets that together document ongoing deformationalong active tectonic structures. Here we study the influence of stable sliding on earthquake statistics.We show that creep along the San Andreas Fault is responsible for a break of slope in the earthquake sizedistribution. This slope increases with an increasing creep rate for larger magnitude ranges, whereas itshows no systematic dependence on creep rate for smaller magnitude ranges. This is interpreted as a deficitof large events under conditions of faster creep where seismic ruptures are less likely to propagate. Theseresults suggest that the earthquake size distribution does not only depend on the level of stress but also onthe type of deformation.

  1. The Evergreen basin and the role of the Silver Creek fault in the San Andreas fault system, San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachens, Robert C.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Graymer, Russell W.; Williams, Robert; Ponce, David A.; Mankinen, Edward A.; Stephenson, William J.; Langenheim, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    The Evergreen basin is a 40-km-long, 8-km-wide Cenozoic sedimentary basin that lies mostly concealed beneath the northeastern margin of the Santa Clara Valley near the south end of San Francisco Bay (California, USA). The basin is bounded on the northeast by the strike-slip Hayward fault and an approximately parallel subsurface fault that is structurally overlain by a set of west-verging reverse-oblique faults which form the present-day southeastward extension of the Hayward fault. It is bounded on the southwest by the Silver Creek fault, a largely dormant or abandoned fault that splays from the active southern Calaveras fault. We propose that the Evergreen basin formed as a strike-slip pull-apart basin in the right step from the Silver Creek fault to the Hayward fault during a time when the Silver Creek fault served as a segment of the main route by which slip was transferred from the central California San Andreas fault to the Hayward and other East Bay faults. The dimensions and shape of the Evergreen basin, together with palinspastic reconstructions of geologic and geophysical features surrounding it, suggest that during its lifetime, the Silver Creek fault transferred a significant portion of the ∼100 km of total offset accommodated by the Hayward fault, and of the 175 km of total San Andreas system offset thought to have been accommodated by the entire East Bay fault system. As shown previously, at ca. 1.5–2.5 Ma the Hayward-Calaveras connection changed from a right-step, releasing regime to a left-step, restraining regime, with the consequent effective abandonment of the Silver Creek fault. This reorganization was, perhaps, preceded by development of the previously proposed basin-bisecting Mount Misery fault, a fault that directly linked the southern end of the Hayward fault with the southern Calaveras fault during extinction of pull-apart activity. Historic seismicity indicates that slip below a depth of 5 km is mostly transferred from the Calaveras

  2. A large mantle water source for the northern San Andreas Fault System: A ghost of subduction past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephen H.; Wang, Kelin; Brocher, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that the shallow mantle of the Cascadia subduction margin under near-coastal Pacific Northwest U.S. is cold and partially serpentinized, storing large quantities of water in this wedge-shaped region. Such a wedge probably formed to the south in California during an earlier period of subduction. We show by numerical modeling that after subduction ceased with the creation of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS), the mantle wedge warmed, slowly releasing its water over a period of more than 25 Ma by serpentine dehydration into the crust above. This deep, long-term water source could facilitate fault slip in San Andreas System at low shear stresses by raising pore pressures in a broad region above the wedge. Moreover, the location and breadth of the water release from this model gives insights into the position and breadth of the SAFS. Such a mantle source of water also likely plays a role in the occurrence of Non-Volcanic Tremor (NVT) that has been reported along the SAFS in central California. This process of water release from mantle depths could also mobilize mantle serpentinite from the wedge above the dehydration front, permitting upward emplacement of serpentinite bodies by faulting or by diapiric ascent. Specimens of serpentinite collected from tectonically emplaced serpentinite blocks along the SAFS show mineralogical and structural evidence of high fluid pressures during ascent from depth. Serpentinite dehydration may also lead to tectonic mobility along other plate boundaries that succeed subduction, such as other continental transforms, collision zones, or along present-day subduction zones where spreading centers are subducting.

  3. Two-Phase Exhumation of the Santa Rosa Mountains: Low- and High-Angle Normal Faulting During Initiation and Evolution of the Southern San Andreas Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Cody C.; Spotila, James A.; Axen, Gary; Dorsey, Rebecca J.; Luther, Amy; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2017-12-01

    Low-angle detachment fault systems are important elements of oblique-divergent plate boundaries, yet the role detachment faulting plays in the development of such boundaries is poorly understood. The West Salton Detachment Fault (WSDF) is a major low-angle normal fault that formed coeval with localization of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Salton Trough, CA. Apatite U-Th/He thermochronometry (AHe; n = 29 samples) and thermal history modeling of samples from the Santa Rosa Mountains (SRM) reveal that initial exhumation along the WSDF began at circa 8 Ma, exhuming footwall material from depths of >2 to 3 km. An uplifted fossil (Miocene) helium partial retention zone is present in the eastern SRM, while a deeper crustal section has been exhumed along the Pleistocene high-angle Santa Rosa Fault (SFR) to much higher elevations in the southwest SRM. Detachment-related vertical exhumation rates in the SRM were 0.15-0.36 km/Myr, with maximum fault slip rates of 1.2-3.0 km/Myr. Miocene AHe isochrons across the SRM are consistent with northeast crustal tilting of the SRM block and suggest that the post-WSDF vertical exhumation rate along the SRF was 1.3 km/Myr. The timing of extension initiation in the Salton Trough suggests that clockwise rotation of relative plate motions that began at 8 Ma is associated with initiation of the southern San Andreas system. Pleistocene regional tectonic reorganization was contemporaneous with an abrupt transition from low- to high-angle faulting and indicates that local fault geometry may at times exert a fundamental control on rock uplift rates along strike-slip fault systems.

  4. San andreas fault zone head waves near parkfield, california.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zion, Y; Malin, P

    1991-03-29

    Microearthquake seismograms from the borehole seismic network on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California, provide three lines of evidence that first P arrivals are "head" waves refracted along the cross-fault material contrast. First, the travel time difference between these arrivals and secondary phases identified as direct P waves scales linearly with the source-receiver distance. Second, these arrivals have the emergent wave character associated in theory and practice with refracted head waves instead of the sharp first breaks associated with direct P arrivals. Third, the first motion polarities of the emergent arrivals are reversed from those of the direct P waves as predicted by the theory of fault zone head waves for slip on the San Andreas fault. The presence of fault zone head waves in local seismic network data may help account for scatter in earthquake locations and source mechanisms. The fault zone head waves indicate that the velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault near Parkfield is approximately 4 percent. Further studies of these waves may provide a way of assessing changes in the physical state of the fault system.

  5. Continuity of the San Andreas Fault at San Gorgonio Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, S.; Suppe, J.

    2002-12-01

    Gorgonio Pass and Thousand Palms), and a normal regime to the W all the way to Cajon Pass. Considering the 3D geometry of the San Andreas fault system in this region, the only kind of rupture possible for the San Andreas is a complex rupture. The present-day stress field allows for such a rupture, involving both strike-slip and reverse faulting, to occur between the Coachella Valley and Banning. However, both 3D geometry and stress field can be an obstacle to further rupture propagation towards the W, between Banning and Cajon Pass.

  6. SAFOD Penetrates the San Andreas Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Zoback

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available SAFOD, the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (Fig. 1, completed an important milestone in July 2005 by drilling through the San Andreas Fault at seismogenic depth. SAFOD is one of three major components of EarthScope, a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF initiative being conducted in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS. The International Continental Scientific DrillingProgram (ICDP provides engineering and technical support for the project as well as online access to project data and information (http://www.icdp-online.de/sites/sanandreas/news/news1.html. In 2002, the ICDP, the NSF, and the USGS provided funding for a pilot hole project at the SAFOD site. Twenty scientifi c papers summarizing the results of the pilot hole project as well as pre-SAFOD site characterization studies were published in Geophysical Research Letters (Vol.31, Nos. 12 and 15, 2004.

  7. The morphology of strike-slip faults - Examples from the San Andreas Fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, Roger; King, Geoffrey

    1989-01-01

    The dilatational strains associated with vertical faults embedded in a horizontal plate are examined in the framework of fault kinematics and simple displacement boundary conditions. Using boundary element methods, a sequence of examples of dilatational strain fields associated with commonly occurring strike-slip fault zone features (bends, offsets, finite rupture lengths, and nonuniform slip distributions) is derived. The combinations of these strain fields are then used to examine the Parkfield region of the San Andreas fault system in central California.

  8. Synthetic seismicity for the San Andreas fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Ward

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Because historical catalogs generally span only a few repetition intervals of major earthquakes, they do not provide much constraint on how regularly earthquakes recur. In order to obtain better recurrence statistics and long-term probability estimates for events M ? 6 on the San Andreas fault, we apply a seismicity model to this fault. The model is based on the concept of fault segmentation and the physics of static dislocations which allow for stress transfer between segments. Constraints are provided by geological and seismological observations of segment lengths, characteristic magnitudes and long-term slip rates. Segment parameters slightly modified from the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities allow us to reproduce observed seismicity over four orders of magnitude. The model yields quite irregular earthquake recurrence patterns. Only the largest events (M ? 7.5 are quasi-periodic; small events cluster. Both the average recurrence time and the aperiodicity are also a function of position along the fault. The model results are consistent with paleoseismic data for the San Andreas fault as well as a global set of historical and paleoseismic recurrence data. Thus irregular earthquake recurrence resulting from segment interaction is consistent with a large range of observations.

  9. Change in failure stress on the southern san andreas fault system caused by the 1992 magnitude = 7.4 landers earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R S; King, G C; Lin, J

    1992-11-20

    The 28 June Landers earthquake brought the San Andreas fault significantly closer to failure near San Bernardino, a site that has not sustained a large shock since 1812. Stress also increased on the San Jacinto fault near San Bernardino and on the San Andreas fault southeast of Palm Springs. Unless creep or moderate earthquakes relieve these stress changes, the next great earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault is likely to be advanced by one to two decades. In contrast, stress on the San Andreas north of Los Angeles dropped, potentially delaying the next great earthquake there by 2 to 10 years.

  10. Toward Expanding Tremor Observations in the Northern San Andreas Fault System in the 1990s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiao, L. G.; Dreger, D. S.; Nadeau, R. M.; Taira, T.; Guilhem, A.; Luna, B.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    The connection between tremor activity and active fault processes continues to expand our understanding of deep fault zone properties and deformation, the tectonic process, and the relationship of tremor to the occurrence of larger earthquakes. Compared to tremors in subduction zones, known tremor signals in California are ~5 to ~10 smaller in amplitude and duration. These characteristics, in addition to scarce geographic coverage, lack of continuous data (e.g., before mid-2001 at Parkfield), and absence of instrumentation sensitive enough to monitor these events have stifled tremor detection. The continuous monitoring of these events over a relatively short time period in limited locations may lead to a parochial view of the tremor phenomena and its relationship to fault, tectonic, and earthquake processes. To help overcome this, we have embarked on a project to expand the geographic and temporal scope of tremor observation along the Northern SAF system using available continuous seismic recordings from a broad array of 100s of surface seismic stations from multiple seismic networks. Available data for most of these stations also extends back into the mid-1990s. Processing and analysis of tremor signal from this large and low signal-to-noise dataset requires a heavily automated, data-science type approach and specialized techniques for identifying and extracting reliable data. We report here on the automated, envelope based methodology we have developed. We finally compare our catalog results with pre-existing tremor catalogs in the Parkfield area.

  11. Deep-water turbidites as Holocene earthquake proxies: the Cascadia subduction zone and Northern San Andreas Fault systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Johnson

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available New stratigraphic evidence from the Cascadia margin demonstrates that 13 earthquakes ruptured the margin from Vancouver Island to at least the California border following the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama. These 13 events have occurred with an average repeat time of ?? 600 years since the first post-Mazama event ?? 7500 years ago. The youngest event ?? 300 years ago probably coincides with widespread evidence of coastal subsidence and tsunami inundation in buried marshes along the Cascadia coast. We can extend the Holocene record to at least 9850 years, during which 18 events correlate along the same region. The pattern of repeat times is consistent with the pattern observed at most (but not all localities onshore, strengthening the contention that both were produced by plate-wide earthquakes. We also observe that the sequence of Holocene events in Cascadia may contain a repeating pattern, a tantalizing look at what may be the long-term behavior of a major fault system. Over the last ?? 7500 years, the pattern appears to have repeated at least three times, with the most recent A.D. 1700 event being the third of three events following a long interval of 845 years between events T4 and T5. This long interval is one that is also recognized in many of the coastal records, and may serve as an anchor point between the offshore and onshore records. Similar stratigraphic records are found in two piston cores and one box core from Noyo Channel, adjacent to the Northern San Andreas Fault, which show a cyclic record of turbidite beds, with thirty- one turbidite beds above a Holocene/.Pleistocene faunal «datum». Thus far, we have determined ages for 20 events including the uppermost 5 events from these cores. The uppermost event returns a «modern» age, which we interpret is likely the 1906 San Andreas earthquake. The penultimate event returns an intercept age of A.D. 1664 (2 ?? range 1505- 1822. The third event and fourth event

  12. Fragmented Landscapes in the San Gorgonio Pass Region: Insights into Quaternary Strain History of the Southern San Andreas Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, K. J.; Matti, J. C.; Landis, G. P.; Alvarez, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region is a zone of structural complexity within the southern San Andreas Fault system that is characterized by (1) multiple strands of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), (2) intense and diverse microseismicity, (3) contraction within the SGP fault zone (SGPfz), and (4) complex and diverse landforms - all a consequence of structural complications in the vicinity of the southeastern San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). Multiple strands of the SAF zone in the SGP region partition the landscape into discrete geomorphic/geologic domains, including: San Gorgonio Mountain (SGM), Yucaipa Ridge (YR), Kitching Peak (KP), Pisgah Peak (PP), and Coachella Valley (CV) domains. The morphology of each domain reflects the tectonic history unique to that region. Development of the SGP knot in the Mission Creek strand of the SAF (SAFmi) led to westward deflection of the SAFmi, juxtaposition of the KP, PP, and SGM domains, initiation of uplift of YR domain along thrust faults in headwaters of San Gorgonio River, and development of the San Jacinto Fault. Slip on the SAF diminished as a result, thereby allowing integrated drainage systems to develop in the greater SGP region. San Gorgonio River, Whitewater River, and Mission Creek are discrete drainages that transport sediment across the SGM, YR, PP, KP, and CV domains into alluvial systems peripheral to the SGP region. There, depositional units (San Timoteo Formation, upper member, deformed gravels of Whitewater River) all contain clasts of SBM-type and San Gabriel Mountain-type basement, thus constraining slip on the SAF in the SGP region. Middle and late Pleistocene slip on the Mill Creek strand of the SAF (SAFm) in the SGP region has attempted to bypass the SGP knot, and has disrupted landscapes established during SAFmi quiescence. Restoration of right-slip on the SAFm is key to deciphering landscape history. Matti and others (1985, 1992) proposed that a bi-lobed alluvial deposit in the Raywood Flats area has been

  13. Chemical controls on fault behavior: weakening of serpentinite sheared against quartz-bearing rocks and its significance for fault creep in the San Andreas system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The serpentinized ultramafic rocks found in many plate-tectonic settings commonly are juxtaposed against crustal rocks along faults, and the chemical contrast between the rock types potentially could influence the mechanical behavior of such faults. To investigate this possibility, we conducted triaxial experiments under hydrothermal conditions (200-350°C), shearing serpentinite gouge between forcing blocks of granite or quartzite. In an ultramafic chemical environment, the coefficient of friction, µ, of lizardite and antigorite serpentinite is 0.5-0.6, and µ increases with increasing temperature over the tested range. However, when either lizardite or antigorite serpentinite is sheared against granite or quartzite, strength is reduced to µ ~ 0.3, with the greatest strength reductions at the highest temperatures (temperature weakening) and slowest shearing rates (velocity strengthening). The weakening is attributed to a solution-transfer process that is promoted by the enhanced solubility of serpentine in pore fluids whose chemistry has been modified by interaction with the quartzose wall rocks. The operation of this process will promote aseismic slip (creep) along serpentinite-bearing crustal faults at otherwise seismogenic depths. During short-term experiments serpentine minerals reprecipitate in low-stress areas, whereas in longer experiments new Mg-rich phyllosilicates crystallize in response to metasomatic exchanges across the serpentinite-crustal rock contact. Long-term shear of serpentinite against crustal rocks will cause the metasomatic mineral assemblages, which may include extremely weak minerals such as saponite or talc, to play an increasingly important role in the mechanical behavior of the fault. Our results may explain the distribution of creep on faults in the San Andreas system.

  14. Using surface creep rate to infer fraction locked for sections of the San Andreas fault system in northern California from alignment array and GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienkaemper, James J.; McFarland, Forrest S.; Simpson, Robert W.; Caskey, S. John

    2014-01-01

    Surface creep rate, observed along five branches of the dextral San Andreas fault system in northern California, varies considerably from one section to the next, indicating that so too may the depth at which the faults are locked. We model locking on 29 fault sections using each section’s mean long‐term creep rate and the consensus values of fault width and geologic slip rate. Surface creep rate observations from 111 short‐range alignment and trilateration arrays and 48 near‐fault, Global Positioning System station pairs are used to estimate depth of creep, assuming an elastic half‐space model and adjusting depth of creep iteratively by trial and error to match the creep observations along fault sections. Fault sections are delineated either by geometric discontinuities between them or by distinctly different creeping behaviors. We remove transient rate changes associated with five large (M≥5.5) regional earthquakes. Estimates of fraction locked, the ratio of moment accumulation rate to loading rate, on each section of the fault system provide a uniform means to inform source parameters relevant to seismic‐hazard assessment. From its mean creep rates, we infer the main branch (the San Andreas fault) ranges from only 20%±10% locked on its central creeping section to 99%–100% on the north coast. From mean accumulation rates, we infer that four urban faults appear to have accumulated enough seismic moment to produce major earthquakes: the northern Calaveras (M 6.8), Hayward (M 6.8), Rodgers Creek (M 7.1), and Green Valley (M 7.1). The latter three faults are nearing or past their mean recurrence interval.

  15. San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The 1,200-kilometer (800-mile)San Andreas is the longest fault in California and one of the longest in North America. This perspective view of a portion of the fault was generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew on NASA's Space Shuttle last February, and an enhanced, true-color Landsat satellite image. The view shown looks southeast along the San Andreas where it cuts along the base of the mountains in the Temblor Range near Bakersfield. The fault is the distinctively linear feature to the right of the mountains. To the left of the range is a portion of the agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley. In the background is the snow-capped peak of Mt. Pinos at an elevation of 2,692 meters (8,831 feet). The complex topography in the area is some of the most spectacular along the course of the fault. To the right of the fault is the famous Carrizo Plain. Dry conditions on the plain have helped preserve the surface trace of the fault, which is scrutinized by both amateur and professional geologists. In 1857, one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded in the United States occurred just north of the Carrizo Plain. With an estimated magnitude of 8.0, the quake severely shook buildings in Los Angeles, caused significant surface rupture along a 350-kilometer (220-mile) segment of the fault, and was felt as far away as Las Vegas, Nev. This portion of the San Andreas is an important area of study for seismologists. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60

  16. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  17. Active Fault Geometry and Crustal Deformation Along the San Andreas Fault System Through San Gorgonio Pass, California: The View in 3D From Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the 3D geometry and deformation style of the San Andreas fault (SAF) is critical to accurate dynamic rupture and ground motion prediction models. We use 3D alignments of hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal planes within a relocated earthquake catalog (1981-2011) [Hauksson et al., 2012] to develop improved 3D fault models for active strands of the SAF and adjacent secondary structures. Through San Gorgonio Pass (SGP), earthquakes define a mechanically layered crust with predominantly high-angle strike-slip faults in the upper ~10 km, while at greater depth, intersecting sets of strike-slip, oblique slip and low-angle thrust faults define a wedge-shaped volume deformation of the lower crust. In some places, this interface between upper and lower crustal deformation may be an active detachment fault, and may have controlled the down-dip extent of recent fault rupture. Alignments of hypocenters and nodal planes define multiple principal slip surfaces through SGP, including a through-going steeply-dipping predominantly strike-slip Banning fault strand at depth that upward truncates a more moderately dipping (40°-50°) blind, oblique North Palm Springs fault. The North Palm Springs fault may be the active down-dip extension of the San Gorgonio Pass thrust offset at depth by the principal, through-going Banning strand. In the northern Coachella Valley, seismicity indicates that the Garnet Hill and Banning fault strands are most likely sub-parallel and steeply dipping (~70°NE) to depths of 8-10 km, where they intersect and merge with a stack of moderately dipping to low-angle oblique thrust faults. Gravity and water well data confirm that these faults are sub-parallel and near vertical in the upper 2-3 km. Although the dense wedge of deep seismicity below SGP and largely south of the SAF contains multiple secondary fault sets of different orientations, the predominant fault set appears to be a series of en echelon NW-striking oblique strike-slip faults

  18. Crustal Density Variation Along the San Andreas Fault Controls Its Secondary Faults Distribution and Dip Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Moresi, L. N.

    2017-12-01

    The San Andreas fault forms a dominant component of the transform boundary between the Pacific and the North American plate. The density and strength of the complex accretionary margin is very heterogeneous. Based on the density structure of the lithosphere in the SW United States, we utilize the 3D finite element thermomechanical, viscoplastic model (Underworld2) to simulate deformation in the San Andreas Fault system. The purpose of the model is to examine the role of a big bend in the existing geometry. In particular, the big bend of the fault is an initial condition of in our model. We first test the strength of the fault by comparing the surface principle stresses from our numerical model with the in situ tectonic stress. The best fit model indicates the model with extremely weak fault (friction coefficient 200 kg/m3) than surrounding blocks. In contrast, the Mojave block is detected to find that it has lost its mafic lower crust by other geophysical surveys. Our model indicates strong strain localization at the jointer boundary between two blocks, which is an analogue for the Garlock fault. High density lower crust material of the Great Valley tends to under-thrust beneath the Transverse Range near the big bend. This motion is likely to rotate the fault plane from the initial vertical direction to dip to the southwest. For the straight section, north to the big bend, the fault is nearly vertical. The geometry of the fault plane is consistent with field observations.

  19. San Andreas tremor cascades define deep fault zone complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Weak seismic vibrations - tectonic tremor - can be used to delineate some plate boundary faults. Tremor on the deep San Andreas Fault, located at the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, is thought to be a passive indicator of slow fault slip. San Andreas Fault tremor migrates at up to 30 m s-1, but the processes regulating tremor migration are unclear. Here I use a 12-year catalogue of more than 850,000 low-frequency earthquakes to systematically analyse the high-speed migration of tremor along the San Andreas Fault. I find that tremor migrates most effectively through regions of greatest tremor production and does not propagate through regions with gaps in tremor production. I interpret the rapid tremor migration as a self-regulating cascade of seismic ruptures along the fault, which implies that tremor may be an active, rather than passive participant in the slip propagation. I also identify an isolated group of tremor sources that are offset eastwards beneath the San Andreas Fault, possibly indicative of the interface between the Monterey Microplate, a hypothesized remnant of the subducted Farallon Plate, and the North American Plate. These observations illustrate a possible link between the central San Andreas Fault and tremor-producing subduction zones.

  20. Lack of continuity of the San Andreas Fault in southern California: Three-dimensional fault models and earthquake scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, Sara; Suppe, John; Kao, Honn

    2004-04-01

    The 1200-km-long San Andreas Fault loses its apparent continuity in southern California near San Gorgonio Pass [, 1957], which raises significant questions given the dominant role of this fault in active California tectonics. What is the fundamental three-dimensional (3-D) geometry and kinematic behavior of the San Andreas fault system in this complex region? Is a throughgoing, if complex, San Andreas rupture from the Mojave Desert to the Coachella Valley possible? We have explored the issue of 3-D continuity by mapping over 60 faults in this region to depths of 15-20 km from hypocenter locations and focal mechanisms. We were able to constrain the 3-D geometry of the San Andreas fault zone (SAF) near San Gorgonio Pass from the 3-D geometry of the fault network surrounding it. The most likely configuration is for the San Andreas Fault to merge into the shallow-dipping San Gorgonio Pass thrust northwest of Indio. We concluded that there is no direct continuity at present but rather a network of faults, and the only kind of rupture possible for the SAF in this region is a complex rupture, involving both strike-slip and reverse faulting. GPS measurements also suggest that despite the fact that large motions must have occurred in the past based on offset geologic markers, only minor motion is occurring today in this area. Applying our findings about the fault geometry, we explored several simple earthquake scenarios to determine the most favorable conditions for a throughgoing rupture of the San Andreas fault system from the Mojave Desert to the Coachella Valley.

  1. Monitoring of crustal movements in the San Andreas fault zone by a satellite-borne ranging system. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.

    1976-01-01

    The Close Grid Geodynamic Measurement System is conceived as an orbiting ranging device with a ground base grid of reflectors or transponders (spacing 1.0 to 30 km), which are projected to be of low cost (maintenance free and unattended), and which will permit the saturation of a local area to obtain data useful to monitor crustal movements in the San Andreas fault zone. The system includes a station network of 75 stations covering an area between 36 deg N and 38 deg N latitudes, and 237 deg E and 239 deg E longitudes, with roughly half of the stations on either side of the faults. In addition, the simulation of crustal movements through the introduction of changes in the relative positions between grid stations, weather effect for intervisibility between satellite and station and loss of observations thereof, and comparative evaluation of various observational scheme-patterns have been critically studied.

  2. Low strength of deep San Andreas fault gouge from SAFOD core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, David A; Morrow, Carolyn; Moore, Diane; Hickman, Stephen

    2011-04-07

    The San Andreas fault accommodates 28-34 mm yr(-1) of right lateral motion of the Pacific crustal plate northwestward past the North American plate. In California, the fault is composed of two distinct locked segments that have produced great earthquakes in historical times, separated by a 150-km-long creeping zone. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a scientific borehole located northwest of Parkfield, California, near the southern end of the creeping zone. Core was recovered from across the actively deforming San Andreas fault at a vertical depth of 2.7 km (ref. 1). Here we report laboratory strength measurements of these fault core materials at in situ conditions, demonstrating that at this locality and this depth the San Andreas fault is profoundly weak (coefficient of friction, 0.15) owing to the presence of the smectite clay mineral saponite, which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates known. This Mg-rich clay is the low-temperature product of metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite blocks in the fault. These findings provide strong evidence that deformation of the mechanically unusual creeping portions of the San Andreas fault system is controlled by the presence of weak minerals rather than by high fluid pressure or other proposed mechanisms. The combination of these measurements of fault core strength with borehole observations yields a self-consistent picture of the stress state of the San Andreas fault at the SAFOD site, in which the fault is intrinsically weak in an otherwise strong crust. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  3. Stress diffusion along the san andreas fault at parkfield, california.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, P E; Alvarez, M G

    1992-05-15

    Beginning in January 1990, the epicenters of microearthquakes associated with a 12-month increase in seismicity near Parkfield, California, moved northwest to southeast along the San Andreas fault. During this sequence of events, the locally variable rate of cumulative seismic moment increased. This increase implies a local increase in fault slip. These data suggest that a southeastwardly diffusing stress front propagated along the San Andreas fault at a speed of 30 to 50 kilometers per year. Evidently, this front did not load the Parkfield asperities fast enough to produce a moderate earthquake; however, a future front might do so.

  4. GPS-derived strain in northwestern California: Termination of the San Andreas fault system and convergence of the Sierra Nevada Great Valley block contribute to southern Cascadia forearc contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd B.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    2006-02-01

    GPS-derived velocities (1993-2002) in northwestern California show that processes other than subduction are in part accountable for observed upper-plate contraction north of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ) region. After removing the component of elastic strain accumulation due to the Cascadia subduction zone from the station velocities, two additional processes account for accumulated strain in northern California. The first is the westward convergence of the Sierra Nevada-Great Valley (SNGV) block toward the coast and the second is the north-northwest impingement of the San Andreas fault system from the south on the northern California coastal region in the vicinity of Humboldt Bay. Sierra Nevada-Great Valley block motion is northwest toward the coast, convergent with the more northerly, north-northwest San Andreas transform fault-parallel motion. In addition to the westward-converging Sierra Nevada-Great Valley block, San Andreas transform-parallel shortening also occurs in the Humboldt Bay region. Approximately 22 mm/yr of distributed Pacific-SNGV motion is observed inland of Cape Mendocino across the northern projections of the Maacama and Bartlett Springs fault zones but station velocities decrease rapidly north of Cape Mendocino. The resultant 6-10 mm/yr of San Andreas fault-parallel shortening occurs above the southern edge of the subducted Gorda plate and at the latitude of Humboldt Bay. Part of the San Andreas fault-parallel shortening may be due to the viscous coupling of the southern edge of the Gorda plate to overlying North American plate. We conclude that significant portions of the upper-plate contraction observed north of the MTJ region are not solely a result of subduction of the Gorda plate but also a consequence of impingement of the western edge of the Sierra Nevada-Great Valley block and growth of the northernmost segments of the San Andreas fault system.

  5. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    subsequent tidal stress causes it to move lengthwise in one direction. Then tidal forces close the fault again, preventing the area from moving back to its original position. Daily tidal cycles produce a steady accumulation of lengthwise offset motions. Here on Earth, unlike Europa, large strike-slip faults like the San Andreas are set in motion by plate tectonic forces. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the top. The image, centered at 66 degrees south latitude and 195 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 300 by 203 kilometers(185 by 125 miles). The pictures were taken on September 26, 1998by Galileo's solid-state imaging system. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  6. New constraints on slip rates and locking depths of the San Andreas Fault System from Sentinel-1A InSAR and GAGE GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L. A.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Higa, J. T.; Xu, X.; Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2017-12-01

    After over a decade of operation, the EarthScope (GAGE) Facility has now accumulated a wealth of GPS and InSAR data, that when successfully integrated, make it possible to image the entire San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) with unprecedented spatial coverage and resolution. Resulting surface velocity and deformation time series products provide critical boundary conditions needed for improving our understanding of how faults are loaded across a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. Moreover, our understanding of how earthquake cycle deformation is influenced by fault zone strength and crust/mantle rheology is still developing. To further study these processes, we construct a new 4D earthquake cycle model of the SAFS representing the time-dependent 3D velocity field associated with interseismic strain accumulation, co-seismic slip, and postseismic viscoelastic relaxation. This high-resolution California statewide model, spanning the Cerro Prieto fault to the south to the Maacama fault to the north, is constructed on a 500 m spaced grid and comprises variable slip and locking depths along 42 major fault segments. Secular deep slip is prescribed from the base of the locked zone to the base of the elastic plate while episodic shallow slip is prescribed from the historical earthquake record and geologic recurrence intervals. Locking depths and slip rates for all 42 fault segments are constrained by the newest GAGE Facility geodetic observations; 3169 horizontal GPS velocity measurements, combined with over 53,000 line-of-sight (LOS) InSAR velocity observations from Sentinel-1A, are used in a weighted least-squares inversion. To assess slip rate and locking depth sensitivity of a heterogeneous rheology model, we also implement variations in crustal rigidity throughout the plate boundary, assuming a coarse representation of shear modulus variability ranging from 20-40 GPa throughout the (low rigidity) Salton Trough and Basin and Range and the (high rigidity) Central

  7. 4D stress evolution models of the San Andreas Fault System: Investigating time- and depth-dependent stress thresholds over multiple earthquake cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, L. M.; Smith-Konter, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    4D simulations of stress evolution provide a rare insight into earthquake cycle crustal stress variations at seismogenic depths where earthquake ruptures nucleate. Paleoseismic estimates of earthquake offset and chronology, spanning multiple earthquakes cycles, are available for many well-studied segments of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS). Here we construct new 4D earthquake cycle time-series simulations to further study the temporally and spatially varying stress threshold conditions of the SAFS throughout the paleoseismic record. Interseismic strain accumulation, co-seismic stress drop, and postseismic viscoelastic relaxation processes are evaluated as a function of variable slip and locking depths along 42 major fault segments. Paleoseismic earthquake rupture histories provide a slip chronology dating back over 1000 years. Using GAGE Facility GPS and new Sentinel-1A InSAR data, we tune model locking depths and slip rates to compute the 4D stress accumulation within the seismogenic crust. Revised estimates of stress accumulation rate are most significant along the Imperial (2.8 MPa/100yr) and Coachella (1.2 MPa/100yr) faults, with a maximum change in stress rate along some segments of 11-17% in comparison with our previous estimates. Revised estimates of earthquake cycle stress accumulation are most significant along the Imperial (2.25 MPa), Coachella (2.9 MPa), and Carrizo (3.2 MPa) segments, with a 15-29% decrease in stress due to locking depth and slip rate updates, and also postseismic relaxation from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. Because stress drops of major strike-slip earthquakes rarely exceed 10 MPa, these models may provide a lower bound on estimates of stress evolution throughout the historical era, and perhaps an upper bound on the expected recurrence interval of a particular fault segment. Furthermore, time-series stress models reveal temporally varying stress concentrations at 5-10 km depths, due to the interaction of neighboring fault

  8. A simulation of the San Andreas fault experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agreen, R. W.; Smith, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    The San Andreas fault experiment (Safe), which employs two laser tracking systems for measuring the relative motion of two points on opposite sides of the fault, has been simulated for an 8-yr observation period. The two tracking stations are located near San Diego on the western side of the fault and near Quincy on the eastern side; they are roughly 900 km apart. Both will simultaneously track laser reflector equipped satellites as they pass near the stations. Tracking of the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft has been simulated for these two stations during August and September for 8 consecutive years. An error analysis of the recovery of the relative location of Quincy from the data has been made, allowing for model errors in the mass of the earth, the gravity field, solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag, errors in the position of the San Diego site, and biases and noise in the laser systems. The results of this simulation indicate that the distance of Quincy from San Diego will be determined each year with a precision of about 10 cm. Projected improvements in these model parameters and in the laser systems over the next few years will bring the precision to about 1-2 cm by 1980.

  9. Correlation of data on strain accumulation adjacent to the San Andreas Fault with available models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies of deformation on strike slip faults were performed and the results applied to geodetic observations performed in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault in California. The initial efforts were devoted to an extensive series of finite element calculations of the deformation associated with cyclic displacements on a strike-slip fault. Measurements of strain accumulation adjacent to the San Andreas Fault indicate that the zone of strain accumulation extends only a few tens of kilometers away from the fault. There is a concern about the tendency to make geodetic observations along the line to the source. This technique has serious problems for strike slip faults since the vector velocity is also along the fault. Use of a series of stations lying perpendicular to the fault whose positions are measured relative to a reference station are suggested to correct the problem. The complexity of faulting adjacent to the San Andreas Fault indicated that the homogeneous elastic and viscoelastic approach to deformation had serious limitations. These limitation led to the proposal of an approach that assumes a fault is composed of a distribution of asperities and barriers on all scales. Thus, an earthquake on a fault is treated as a failure of a fractal tree. Work continued on the development of a fractal based model for deformation in the western United States. In order to better understand the distribution of seismicity on the San Andreas Fault system a fractal analog was developed. The fractal concept also provides a means of testing whether clustering in time or space is a scale-invariant process.

  10. Postseismic relaxation along the San Andreas fault at Parkfield from continuous seismological observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Hadziioannou, C; Shapiro, N M; Nadeau, R M; Larose, E

    2008-09-12

    Seismic velocity changes and nonvolcanic tremor activity in the Parkfield area in California reveal that large earthquakes induce long-term perturbations of crustal properties in the San Andreas fault zone. The 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes both reduced seismic velocities that were measured from correlations of the ambient seismic noise and induced an increased nonvolcanic tremor activity along the San Andreas fault. After the Parkfield earthquake, velocity reduction and nonvolcanic tremor activity remained elevated for more than 3 years and decayed over time, similarly to afterslip derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) measurements. These observations suggest that the seismic velocity changes are related to co-seismic damage in the shallow layers and to deep co-seismic stress change and postseismic stress relaxation within the San Andreas fault zone.

  11. Geomorphic evidence of active tectonics in the San Gorgonio Pass region of the San Andreas Fault system: an example of discovery-based research in undergraduate teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinen, L. A.; Yule, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Student-conducted research in courses during the first two undergraduate years can increase learning and improve student self-confidence in scientific study, and is recommended for engaging and retaining students in STEM fields (PCAST, 2012). At Pomona College, incorporating student research throughout the geology curriculum tripled the number of students conducting research prior to their senior year that culminated in a professional conference presentation (Reinen et al., 2006). Here we present an example of discovery-based research in Neotectonics, a second-tier course predominantly enrolling first-and second-year students; describe the steps involved in the four week project; and discuss early outcomes of student confidence, engagement and retention. In the San Gorgonio Pass region (SGPR) in southern California, the San Andreas fault undergoes a transition from predominantly strike-slip to a complex system of faults with significant dip-slip, resulting in diffuse deformation and raising the question of whether a large earthquake on the San Andreas could propagate through the region (Yule, 2009). In spring 2014, seven students in the Neotectonics course conducted original research investigating quantifiable geomorphic evidence of tectonic activity in the SGPR. Students addressed questions of [1] unequal uplift in the San Bernardino Mountains, [2] fault activity indicated by stream knick points, [3] the role of fault style on mountain front sinuosity, and [4] characteristic earthquake slip determined via fault scarp degradation models. Students developed and revised individual projects, collaborated with each other on methods, and presented results in a public forum. A final class day was spent reviewing the projects and planning future research directions. Pre- and post-course surveys show increases in students' self-confidence in the design, implementation, and presentation of original scientific inquiries. 5 of 6 eligible students participated in research the

  12. Holocene slip rates along the San Andreas Fault System in the San Gorgonio Pass and implications for large earthquakes in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heermance, Richard V.; Yule, Doug

    2017-06-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) in southern California contains a 40 km long region of structural complexity where the San Andreas Fault (SAF) bifurcates into a series of oblique-slip faults with unknown slip history. We combine new 10Be exposure ages (Qt4: 8600 (+2100, -2200) and Qt3: 5700 (+1400, -1900) years B.P.) and a radiocarbon age (1260 ± 60 years B.P.) from late Holocene terraces with scarp displacement of these surfaces to document a Holocene slip rate of 5.7 (+2.7, -1.5) mm/yr combined across two faults. Our preferred slip rate is 37-49% of the average slip rates along the SAF outside the SGP (i.e., Coachella Valley and San Bernardino sections) and implies that strain is transferred off the SAF in this area. Earthquakes here most likely occur in very large, throughgoing SAF events at a lower recurrence than elsewhere on the SAF, so that only approximately one third of SAF ruptures penetrate or originate in the pass.Plain Language SummaryHow large are earthquakes on the southern San Andreas Fault? The answer to this question depends on whether or not the earthquake is contained only along individual fault sections, such as the Coachella Valley section north of Palm Springs, or the rupture crosses multiple sections including the area through the San Gorgonio Pass. We have determined the age and offset of faulted stream deposits within the San Gorgonio Pass to document slip rates of these faults over the last 10,000 years. Our results indicate a long-term slip rate of 6 mm/yr, which is almost 1/2 of the rates east and west of this area. These new rates, combined with faulted geomorphic surfaces, imply that large magnitude earthquakes must occasionally rupture a 300 km length of the San Andreas Fault from the Salton Sea to the Mojave Desert. Although many ( 65%) earthquakes along the southern San Andreas Fault likely do not rupture through the pass, our new results suggest that large >Mw 7.5 earthquakes are possible on the southern San Andreas Fault and likely

  13. Evidence for chaotic fault interactions in the seismicity of the San Andreas fault and Nankai trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Turcotte, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamical behavior introduced by fault interactions is examined here using a simple spring-loaded, slider-block model with velocity-weakening friction. The model consists of two slider blocks coupled to each other and to a constant-velocity driver by elastic springs. For an asymmetric system in which the frictional forces on the two blocks are not equal, the solutions exhibit chaotic behavior. The system's behavior over a range of parameter values seems to be generally analogous to that of weakly coupled segments of an active fault. Similarities between the model simulations and observed patterns of seismicity on the south central San Andreas fault in California and in the Nankai trough along the coast of southwestern Japan.

  14. Electromagnetic Imaging of Fluids in the San Andreas Fault; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martyn Unsworth

    2002-01-01

    OAK 270 - Magnetotelluric data were collected on six profiles across the san Andreas Fault at Cholame,Parkfield, and Hollister in Central California. On each profile, high electrical resistivities were imaged west of the fault, and are due to granitic rocks of the Salinian block. East of the fault, lower electrical resistivities are associated with rocks of the Fanciscan formation. On the seismically active Parkfield and Hollister segments, a region of low resistivity was found in the fault zone that extends to a depth of several kilometers. This is due to a zone of fracturing (the damaged zone) that has been infiltrated by saline ground water. The shallowest micro-earthquakers occur at a depth that is coincident with the base of the low resistivity wedge. This strongly suggests that above this depth, the fault rocks are too weak to accumulate sufficient stress for earthquake rupture to occur and fault motion is accommodated through aseismic creep

  15. Slip rates and spatially variable creep on faults of the northern San Andreas system inferred through Bayesian inversion of Global Positioning System data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jessica R.; Minson, Sarah E.; Svarc, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Fault creep, depending on its rate and spatial extent, is thought to reduce earthquake hazard by releasing tectonic strain aseismically. We use Bayesian inversion and a newly expanded GPS data set to infer the deep slip rates below assigned locking depths on the San Andreas, Maacama, and Bartlett Springs Faults of Northern California and, for the latter two, the spatially variable interseismic creep rate above the locking depth. We estimate deep slip rates of 21.5 ± 0.5, 13.1 ± 0.8, and 7.5 ± 0.7 mm/yr below 16 km, 9 km, and 13 km on the San Andreas, Maacama, and Bartlett Springs Faults, respectively. We infer that on average the Bartlett Springs fault creeps from the Earth's surface to 13 km depth, and below 5 km the creep rate approaches the deep slip rate. This implies that microseismicity may extend below the locking depth; however, we cannot rule out the presence of locked patches in the seismogenic zone that could generate moderate earthquakes. Our estimated Maacama creep rate, while comparable to the inferred deep slip rate at the Earth's surface, decreases with depth, implying a slip deficit exists. The Maacama deep slip rate estimate, 13.1 mm/yr, exceeds long-term geologic slip rate estimates, perhaps due to distributed off-fault strain or the presence of multiple active fault strands. While our creep rate estimates are relatively insensitive to choice of model locking depth, insufficient independent information regarding locking depths is a source of epistemic uncertainty that impacts deep slip rate estimates.

  16. Vertical deformation along the Indio Hills, San Andreas Fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, K. M.; Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Williams, P. L.; Johnson, K.

    2014-12-01

    Halfway between the Salton Sea and San Gorgonio Pass, the southernmost San Andreas Fault (SAF) bifurcates into the Mission Creek and Banning strands. These strands bound the Indio Hills (IH), and mark the first of a series of left-stepping branches that define the transpressional, southern Big Bend of the SAF. Between the fault strands, the Quaternary Ocotillo Formation is deformed with fold axis orientations consistent with dextral shear; structurally the IH are synclinal in the east, transitioning to a complex antiform with increased uplift suggested by exhumation of Tertiary units in the west. We report new long- and short-term erosion rates across the IH and uplift rates on the Banning strand, and we evaluate these measurements in terms of slip rates across the fault system and structural deformation within the IH. Two methods of catchment-averaged erosion rates provide minimum rates yield similar results, (0.08 to 0.34 mm/yr) across 6 catchments. The long-term rates are calculated from eroded volumes estimated from a 10-m DEM surface enveloping the Indio Hills and assume that all folding and uplift initiated ca. 500ka (the 750 ka Bishop ash is uplifted and warped within the IH). The short-term rates, determined from 10Be dating of alluvial sediments, increase gradually to the northwest. Similarity of the rates suggests steady state uplift over the history of the fold; ongoing structural analysis and dating needed to constrain the maximum rates will test this possibility. The new uplift rate for the Banning strand at the east end of the IH is determined from a 60 pts/m^2 DEM produced by structure from motion photogrammetry and U-series ages and cosmogenic dates that provide an age range of 20-76ka for a fan vertically offset by ~2.5 m. The resulting uplift rate on the fault (0.03-0.125 mm/yr) overlaps with the short-term catchment-averaged erosion rate for this location (0.08 mm/yr). Consequently, we interpret that vertical strain is partitioned onto both the

  17. Expression of San Andreas fault on Seasat radar image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabins, F. F., Jr.; Blom, R.; Elachi, C.

    1980-01-01

    A Seasat image (23.5 cm wavelength) of the Durmid Hills in southern California, the San Andreas Fault was analyzed. It is shown that a prominent southeast trending tonal lineament exists that is bright on the southwest side and dark on the northeast side. The cause of the contrasting signatures on opposite sides of the lineament was determined and the geologic signficance of the lineament was evaluated.

  18. A Three-Dimensional Numerical Investigation of San Andreas Fault Configuration Through the San Gorgonio Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dair, L.; Cooke, M.

    2007-12-01

    The partitioning of deformation among strands of the San Andreas Fault through the San Gorgonio pass depends on fault geometry. We investigate three alternative three-dimensional configurations of the San Andreas Fault to explore the influence of fault geometry on uplift patterns and slip rates. One model has the commonly used vertical geometry for the system. Another uses the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Fault Model to include two north-dipping, discontinuous, alternative stands. We developed a third model that smoothly connects the north-dipping faults to adjacent segments. Regional transform loading is applied as slip at the distal edges of a deep detachment as well as along the distal portions of the primary fault segments. The model with vertical faults fails to produce uplift in the San Bernardino Mountains. Both of the north-dipping models produce significant uplift that may correspond to observations of recent uplift in the San Bernardino Mountains (Spotila et al, 1998). The vertical model has faster strike-slip rates while the north-dipping, discontinuous system has the slowest strike-slip rates. While the vertical model has the greatest net slip and more efficiently transmits deformation through the pass, the north-dipping fault configurations better match uplift patterns. We altered the continuous and north-dipping model to explore the effects of slip partitioning among the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults and secondary faults to the model. Debate continues about the slip partitioning between the Coachella Valley segment of the SAF and the San Jacinto fault. Our study suggests that slip portioning between the two faults has less of an effect on the slip rates and off fault deformation than fault geometry. The addition of secondary faults to the model significantly increases uplift in the northern San Bernardino Mountains. The senses of slip along secondary faults in the model are consistent with geologic observations. Continuing

  19. Conductivity Structure of the San Andreas Fault, Parkfield, Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. K.; Roberts, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of samples of sedimentary rocks from the Parkfield syncline reveal resistivities as low as 1 ohm m when saturated with fluids comparable to those found in nearby wells. The syncline lies on the North American side of the San Andreas fault at Parkfield and plunges northwestward into the fault zone. A previous interpretation of a high resolution magnetotelluric profile across the San Andreas fault at Parkfield identified an anomalously conductive (1-3 ohm m) region just west of the fault and extending to depths of 3 km. These low resistivity rocks were inferred to be crushed rock in the fault zone that was saturated with brines. As an alternative to this interpretation, we suggest that this anomalous region is actually the Parkfield syncline and that the current trace of the San Andreas fault at Middle Mountain does not form the boundary between the Salinian block and the North American plate. Instead, that boundary is approximately 1 km west and collocated with current seismicity. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48 and supported specifically by the Office of Basic Energy Science. Additional support was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior, under USGS Award number 03HQGR0041. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the U.S. Government.

  20. Characterizing the Relationship Between Lithospheric Deformation and Seismic Anisotropy in the Basin and Range Province and San Andreas Fault System using Ps Receiver Function Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H. A.; Schnorr, E.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of complex and spatially variable anisotropy in many parts of the western U.S. has been tied to regional tectonic and dynamic processes that go beyond the (frequently) assumed plate motion oriented shear. In the Basin and Range, a well-imaged "swirl" of shear wave splitting observations has been explained via a number of different dynamic processes, including a lithospheric drip and toroidal flow. In central California, rapid variations in splitting direction across the plate boundary have been attributed to a relatively narrow, well-defined shear zone. Ambient noise tomography has further complicated the picture, indicating that some of the observed complexity can be explained by incorporating multiple layers of anisotropy. The goal of this study is to place firm constraints on vertical variations in anisotropy over two tectonically distinct, yet related, regions- the Basin and Range province and the San Andreas fault system, in order to better understand how deformation of the lithosphere is accommodated. To do this, radial and transverse component Ps receiver functions have been calculated for 14 stations within the two regions. Within both study areas, variability exists between most stations at crust and lithospheric mantle depths. This is particularly true for stations located near the San Andreas Fault system. These differences may be attributed to variations in the provenance of the lithospheric "packages" in some areas, however several stations are located near or within the plate boundary system and may be sampling multiple regions with varying deformation fabrics. To account for this, future work will include binning as a function of piercing point. One notable exception to the generally observed variability is along the western margin of the Basin and Range, where several stations show similarities in back azimuthal variations at lower crust and uppermost mantle depths. Preliminary forwarding modeling of two of these stations indicates that

  1. Remote triggering of fault-strength changes on the San Andreas fault at Parkfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Silver, Paul G; Niu, Fenglin; Nadeau, Robert M

    2009-10-01

    Fault strength is a fundamental property of seismogenic zones, and its temporal changes can increase or decrease the likelihood of failure and the ultimate triggering of seismic events. Although changes in fault strength have been suggested to explain various phenomena, such as the remote triggering of seismicity, there has been no means of actually monitoring this important property in situ. Here we argue that approximately 20 years of observation (1987-2008) of the Parkfield area at the San Andreas fault have revealed a means of monitoring fault strength. We have identified two occasions where long-term changes in fault strength have been most probably induced remotely by large seismic events, namely the 2004 magnitude (M) 9.1 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and the earlier 1992 M = 7.3 Landers earthquake. In both cases, the change possessed two manifestations: temporal variations in the properties of seismic scatterers-probably reflecting the stress-induced migration of fluids-and systematic temporal variations in the characteristics of repeating-earthquake sequences that are most consistent with changes in fault strength. In the case of the 1992 Landers earthquake, a period of reduced strength probably triggered the 1993 Parkfield aseismic transient as well as the accompanying cluster of four M > 4 earthquakes at Parkfield. The fault-strength changes produced by the distant 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake are especially important, as they suggest that the very largest earthquakes may have a global influence on the strength of the Earth's fault systems. As such a perturbation would bring many fault zones closer to failure, it should lead to temporal clustering of global seismicity. This hypothesis seems to be supported by the unusually high number of M >or= 8 earthquakes occurring in the few years following the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake.

  2. Periodic pulsing of characteristic microearthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Robert M; McEvilly, Thomas V

    2004-01-09

    Deep fault slip information from characteristically repeating microearthquakes reveals previously unrecognized patterns of extensive, large-amplitude, long-duration, quasiperiodic repetition of aseismic events along much of a 175-kilometer segment of the central San Andreas fault. Pulsing occurs both in conjunction with and independent of transient slip from larger earthquakes. It extends to depths of approximately 10 to 11 kilometers but may be deeper, and it may be related to similar phenomena occurring in subduction zones. Over much of the study area, pulse onset periods also show a higher probability of larger earthquakes, which may provide useful information for earthquake forecasting.

  3. Zoogeography of the San Andreas Fault system: Great Pacific Fracture Zones correspond with spatially concordant phylogeographic boundaries in western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottscho, Andrew D

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an ultimate tectonic explanation for several well-studied zoogeographic boundaries along the west coast of North America, specifically, along the boundary of the North American and Pacific plates (the San Andreas Fault system). By reviewing 177 references from the plate tectonics and zoogeography literature, I demonstrate that four Great Pacific Fracture Zones (GPFZs) in the Pacific plate correspond with distributional limits and spatially concordant phylogeographic breaks for a wide variety of marine and terrestrial animals, including invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. These boundaries are: (1) Cape Mendocino and the North Coast Divide, (2) Point Conception and the Transverse Ranges, (3) Punta Eugenia and the Vizcaíno Desert, and (4) Cabo Corrientes and the Sierra Transvolcanica. However, discussion of the GPFZs is mostly absent from the zoogeography and phylogeography literature likely due to a disconnect between biologists and geologists. I argue that the four zoogeographic boundaries reviewed here ultimately originated via the same geological process (triple junction evolution). Finally, I suggest how a comparative phylogeographic approach can be used to test the hypothesis presented here. © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  4. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    be filled in mostly by sedimentary and erosional material deposited from above. Comparisons between faults on Europa and Earth may generate ideas useful in the study of terrestrial faulting. One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. The tidal tension opens the fault; subsequent tidal stress causes it to move lengthwise in one direction. Then the tidal forces close the fault up again. This prevents the area from moving back to its original position. If it moves forward with the next daily tidal cycle, the result is a steady accumulation of these lengthwise offset motions. Unlike Europa, here on Earth, large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas are set in motion not by tidal pull, but by plate tectonic forces from the planet's mantle. North is to the top of the picture. The Earth picture (left) shows a LandSat Thematic Mapper image acquired in the infrared (1.55 to 1.75 micrometers) by LandSat5 on Friday, October 20th 1989 at 10:21 am. The original resolution was 28.5 meters per picture element. The Europa picture (right)is centered at 66 degrees south latitude and 195 degrees west longitude. The highest resolution frames, obtained at 40 meters per picture element with a spacecraft range of less than 4200 kilometers (2600 miles), are set in the context of lower resolution regional frames obtained at 200 meters per picture element and a range of 22,000 kilometers (13,600 miles). The images were taken on September 26, 1998 by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL HTTP://www.j

  5. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    be filled in mostly by sedimentary and erosional material deposited from above. Comparisons between faults on Europa and Earth may generate ideas useful in the study of terrestrial faulting. One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. The tidal tension opens the fault; subsequent tidal stress causes it to move lengthwise in one direction. Then the tidal forces close the fault up again. This prevents the area from moving back to its original position. If it moves forward with the next daily tidal cycle, the result is a steady accumulation of these lengthwise offset motions. Unlike Europa, here on Earth, large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas are set in motion not by tidal pull, but by plate tectonic forces from the planet's mantle. North is to the top of the picture. The Earth picture (left) shows a LandSat Thematic Mapper image acquired in the infrared (1.55 to 1.75 micrometers) by LandSat5 on Friday, October 20th 1989 at 10:21 am. The original resolution was 28.5 meters per picture element. The Europa picture (right)is centered at 66 degrees south latitude and 195 degrees west longitude. The highest resolution frames, obtained at 40 meters per picture element with a spacecraft range of less than 4200 kilometers (2600 miles), are set in the context of lower resolution regional frames obtained at 200 meters per picture element and a range of 22,000 kilometers (13,600 miles). The images were taken on September 26, 1998 by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL HTTP://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  6. The Eastern California Shear Zone as the northward extension of the southern San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Wayne R.; Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Cluster analysis offers an agnostic way to organize and explore features of the current GPS velocity field without reference to geologic information or physical models using information only contained in the velocity field itself. We have used cluster analysis of the Southern California Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field to determine the partitioning of Pacific-North America relative motion onto major regional faults. Our results indicate the large-scale kinematics of the region is best described with two boundaries of high velocity gradient, one centered on the Coachella section of the San Andreas Fault and the Eastern California Shear Zone and the other defined by the San Jacinto Fault south of Cajon Pass and the San Andreas Fault farther north. The ~120 km long strand of the San Andreas between Cajon Pass and Coachella Valley (often termed the San Bernardino and San Gorgonio sections) is thus currently of secondary importance and carries lesser amounts of slip over most or all of its length. We show these first order results are present in maps of the smoothed GPS velocity field itself. They are also generally consistent with currently available, loosely bounded geologic and geodetic fault slip rate estimates that alone do not provide useful constraints on the large-scale partitioning we show here. Our analysis does not preclude the existence of smaller blocks and more block boundaries in Southern California. However, attempts to identify smaller blocks along and adjacent to the San Gorgonio section were not successful.

  7. Deep permeability of the San Andreas Fault from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific borehole near Parkfield, California crosses two actively creeping shear zones at a depth of 2.7 km. Core samples retrieved from these active strands consist of a foliated, Mg-clay-rich gouge containing porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock. The adjacent damage zone and country rocks are comprised of variably deformed, fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. We conducted laboratory tests to measure the permeability of representative samples from each structural unit at effective confining pressures, Pe up to the maximum estimated in situ Pe of 120 MPa. Permeability values of intact samples adjacent to the creeping strands ranged from 10−18 to 10−21 m2 at Pe = 10 MPa and decreased with applied confining pressure to 10−20–10−22 m2 at 120 MPa. Values for intact foliated gouge samples (10−21–6 × 10−23 m2 over the same pressure range) were distinctly lower than those for the surrounding rocks due to their fine-grained, clay-rich character. Permeability of both intact and crushed-and-sieved foliated gouge measured during shearing at Pe ≥ 70 MPa ranged from 2 to 4 × 10−22 m2 in the direction perpendicular to shearing and was largely insensitive to shear displacement out to a maximum displacement of 10 mm. The weak, actively-deforming foliated gouge zones have ultra-low permeability, making the active strands of the San Andreas Fault effective barriers to cross-fault fluid flow. The low matrix permeability of the San Andreas Fault creeping zones and adjacent rock combined with observations of abundant fractures in the core over a range of scales suggests that fluid flow outside of the actively-deforming gouge zones is probably fracture dominated.

  8. A critical evaluation of crustal dehydration as the cause of an overpressured and weak San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, P.M.; Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many plate boundary faults, including the San Andreas Fault, appear to slip at unexpectedly low shear stress. One long-standing explanation for a "weak" San Andreas Fault is that fluid release by dehydration reactions during regional metamorphism generates elevated fluid pressures that are localized within the fault, reducing the effective normal stress. We evaluate this hypothesis by calculating realistic fluid production rates for the San Andreas Fault system, and incorporating them into 2-D fluid flow models. Our results show that for a wide range of permeability distributions, fluid sources from crustal dehydration are too small and short-lived to generate, sustain, or localize fluid pressures in the fault sufficient to explain its apparent mechanical weakness. This suggests that alternative mechanisms, possibly acting locally within the fault zone, such as shear compaction or thermal pressurization, may be necessary to explain a weak San Andreas Fault. More generally, our results demonstrate the difficulty of localizing large fluid pressures generated by regional processes within near-vertical fault zones. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Nonvolcanic tremors deep beneath the San Andreas Fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Robert M; Dolenc, David

    2005-01-21

    We have discovered nonvolcanic tremor activity (i.e., long-duration seismic signals with no clear P or S waves) within a transform plate boundary zone along the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, California, the inferred epicentral region of the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake (moment magnitude approximately 7.8). The tremors occur between 20 to 40 kilometers' depth, below the seismogenic zone (the upper approximately 15 kilometers of Earth's crust where earthquakes occur), and their activity rates may correlate with variations in local earthquake activity.

  10. Loading of the San Andreas fault by flood-induced rupture of faults beneath the Salton Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Daniel; Kilb, Debi; Luttrell, Karen; Driscoll, Neal W.; Kent, Graham

    2011-01-01

    The southern San Andreas fault has not experienced a large earthquake for approximately 300 years, yet the previous five earthquakes occurred at ~180-year intervals. Large strike-slip faults are often segmented by lateral stepover zones. Movement on smaller faults within a stepover zone could perturb the main fault segments and potentially trigger a large earthquake. The southern San Andreas fault terminates in an extensional stepover zone beneath the Salton Sea—a lake that has experienced periodic flooding and desiccation since the late Holocene. Here we reconstruct the magnitude and timing of fault activity beneath the Salton Sea over several earthquake cycles. We observe coincident timing between flooding events, stepover fault displacement and ruptures on the San Andreas fault. Using Coulomb stress models, we show that the combined effect of lake loading, stepover fault movement and increased pore pressure could increase stress on the southern San Andreas fault to levels sufficient to induce failure. We conclude that rupture of the stepover faults, caused by periodic flooding of the palaeo-Salton Sea and by tectonic forcing, had the potential to trigger earthquake rupture on the southern San Andreas fault. Extensional stepover zones are highly susceptible to rapid stress loading and thus the Salton Sea may be a nucleation point for large ruptures on the southern San Andreas fault.

  11. Resurvey of site stability quadrilaterals, Otay Mountain and Quincy, California. [San Andreas fault experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    Trilateration quadrilaterals established across two faults near the San Andreas Fault Experiment laser/satellite ranging sites were resurveyed after four years. No evidence of significant tectonic motion was found.

  12. Perspective view, Landsat overlay San Andreas Fault, Palmdale, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault. This segment of the fault lies near the city of Palmdale, California (the flat area in the right half of the image) about 60 kilometers (37 miles) north of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. The Lake Palmdale Reservoir, approximately 1.5 kilometers (0.9 miles) across, sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Highway 14 is the prominent linear feature starting at the lower left edge of the image and continuing along the far side of the reservoir. The patterns of residential and agricultural development around Palmdale are seen in the Landsat imagery in the right half of the image. SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics.This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  13. Correlation between deep fluids, tremor and creep along the central San Andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becken, Michael; Ritter, Oliver; Bedrosian, Paul A; Weckmann, Ute

    2011-11-30

    The seismicity pattern along the San Andreas fault near Parkfield and Cholame, California, varies distinctly over a length of only fifty kilometres. Within the brittle crust, the presence of frictionally weak minerals, fault-weakening high fluid pressures and chemical weakening are considered possible causes of an anomalously weak fault northwest of Parkfield. Non-volcanic tremor from lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths is most pronounced about thirty kilometres southeast of Parkfield and is thought to be associated with high pore-fluid pressures at depth. Here we present geophysical evidence of fluids migrating into the creeping section of the San Andreas fault that seem to originate in the region of the uppermost mantle that also stimulates tremor, and evidence that along-strike variations in tremor activity and amplitude are related to strength variations in the lower crust and upper mantle. Interconnected fluids can explain a deep zone of anomalously low electrical resistivity that has been imaged by magnetotelluric data southwest of the Parkfield-Cholame segment. Near Cholame, where fluids seem to be trapped below a high-resistivity cap, tremor concentrates adjacent to the inferred fluids within a mechanically strong zone of high resistivity. By contrast, subvertical zones of low resistivity breach the entire crust near the drill hole of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth, northwest of Parkfield, and imply pathways for deep fluids into the eastern fault block, coincident with a mechanically weak crust and the lower tremor amplitudes in the lower crust. Fluid influx to the fault system is consistent with hypotheses of fault-weakening high fluid pressures in the brittle crust.

  14. A case for historic joint rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults

    OpenAIRE

    Lozos, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is considered to be the primary plate boundary fault in southern California and the most likely fault to produce a major earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling to show that the San Jacinto fault is capable of rupturing along with the San Andreas in a single earthquake, and interpret these results along with existing paleoseismic data and historic damage reports to suggest that this has likely occurred in the historic past. In particular, I find that paleoseismic data...

  15. 1855 and 1991 Surveys of the San Andreas Fault: Implications for Fault Machanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lisa B.; Donnellan, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Two monuments from an 1855 survey that spans the San Andreas fault in the Carrizo Plain have been displaced 11.0+/-2.5m right-laterally by the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake and associated seismicity and afterslip by the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake and associated seismicity and afterslip.

  16. A look inside the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield through vertical seismic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarria, J Andres; Malin, Peter; Catchings, Rufus D; Shalev, Eylon

    2003-12-05

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby microearthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  17. Tilt Precursors before Earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M J; Mortensen, C E

    1974-12-13

    An array of 14 biaxial shallow-borehole tiltmeters (at 1O(-7) radian sensitivity) has been installed along 85 kilometers of the San Andreas fault during the past year. Earthquake-related changes in tilt have been simultaneously observed on up to four independent instruments. At earthquake distances greater than 10 earthquake source dimensions, there are few clear indications of tilt change. For the four instruments with the longest records (> 10 months), 26 earthquakes have occurred since July 1973 with at least one instrument closer than 10 source dimensions and 8 earthquakes with more than one instrument within that distance. Precursors in tilt direction have been observed before more than 10 earthquakes or groups of earthquakes, and no similar effect has yet been seen without the occurrence of an earthquake.

  18. Vibroseis Monitoring of San Andreas Fault in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, Valeri; Nadeau, Robert

    2004-06-11

    A unique data set of seismograms for 720 source-receiver paths has been collected as part of a controlled source Vibroseis experiment San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Parkfield. In the experiment, seismic waves repeatedly illuminated the epicentral region of the expected M6 event at Parkfield from June 1987 until November 1996. For this effort, a large shear-wave vibrator was interfaced with the 3-component (3-C) borehole High-Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN), providing precisely timed collection of data for detailed studies of changes in wave propagation associated with stress and strain accumulation in the fault zone (FZ). Data collected by the borehole network were examined for evidence of changes associated with the nucleation process of the anticipated M6 earthquake at Parkfield. These investigations reported significant traveltime changes in the S coda for paths crossing the fault zone southeast of the epicenter and above the rupture zone of the 1966 M6 earthquake. Analysis and modeling of these data and comparison with observed changes in creep, water level, microseismicity, slip-at-depth and propagation from characteristic repeating microearthquakes showed temporal variations in a variety of wave propagation attributes that were synchronous with changes in deformation and local seismicity patterns. Numerical modeling suggests 200 meters as an effective thickness of SAF. The observed variations can be explained by velocity 6 percent velocity variation within SAF core. Numerical modeling studies and a growing number of observations have argued for the propagation of fault-zone guided waves (FZGW) within a SAF zone that is 100 to 200 m wide at seismogenic depths and with 20 to 40 percent lower shear-wave velocity than the adjacent unfaulted rock. Guided wave amplitude tomographic inversion for SAF using microearthquakes, shows clearly that FZGW are significantly less attenuated in a well-defined region of the FZ. This region plunges to the northwest along the

  19. Stress near geometrically complex strike-slip faults - Application to the San Andreas fault at Cajon Pass, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Francois; Humphreys, Eugene; Weldon, Ray, II

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented to rationalize the state of stress near a geometrically complex major strike-slip fault. Slip on such a fault creates residual stresses that, with the occurrence of several slip events, can dominate the stress field near the fault. The model is applied to the San Andreas fault near Cajon Pass. The results are consistent with the geological features, seismicity, the existence of left-lateral stress on the Cleghorn fault, and the in situ stress orientation in the scientific well, found to be sinistral when resolved on a plane parallel to the San Andreas fault. It is suggested that the creation of residual stresses caused by slip on a wiggle San Andreas fault is the dominating process there.

  20. Complexities of the San Andreas fault near San Gorgonio Pass: Implications for large earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Doug; Sieh, Kerry

    2003-11-01

    Geologic relationships and patterns of crustal seismicity constrain the three-dimensional geometry of the active portions of San Andreas fault zone near San Gorgonio Pass, southern California. Within a 20-km-wide contractional stepover between two segments of the fault zone, the San Bernardino and Coachella Valley segments, folds, and dextral-reverse and dextral-normal faults form an east-west belt of active structures. The dominant active structure within the stepover is the San Gorgonio Pass-Garnet Hill faults, a dextral-reverse fault system that dips moderately northward. Within the hanging wall block of the San Gorgonio Pass-Garnet Hill fault system are subsidiary active dextral and dextral-normal faults. These faults relate in complex but understandable ways to the strike-slip faults that bound the stepover. The pattern of crustal seismicity beneath these structures includes a 5-8 km high east-west striking step in the base of crustal seismicity, which corresponds to the downdip limit of rupture of the 1986 North Palm Springs earthquake. We infer that this step has been produced by slip on the linked San Gorgonio Pass-Garnet Hill-Coachella Valley Banning (SGP-GH-CVB) fault. This association enables us to construct a structure contour map of the fault plane. The large step in the base of seismicity downdip from the SGP-GH-CVB fault system probably reflects a several kilometers offset of the midcrustal brittle-plastic transition. (U/Th)/He thermochronometry supports our interpretation that this south-under-north thickening of the crust has created the region's 3 km of topographic relief. We conclude that future large earthquakes generated along the San Andreas fault in this region will have a multiplicity of mostly specifiable sources having dimensions of 1-20 km. Two tasks in seismic hazard evaluation may now be attempted with greater confidence: first, the construction of synthetic seismograms that make useful predictions of ground shaking, and second

  1. Fault rocks from the SAFOD core samples : implications for weakening at shallow depths along the San Andreas Fault, California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holdsworth, R.E.; van Diggelen, E.W.E.; Spiers, C.J.; Bresser, J.H.P. de; Walker, R.J.; Bown, L.

    2011-01-01

    The drilling of a deep borehole across the actively creeping Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ), California, and collection of core materials permit direct geological study of fault zone processes at 2–3 km depth. The three drill cores sample both host and fault rocks and pass

  2. Earthquake Swarm Along the San Andreas Fault near Palmdale, Southern California, 1976 to 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, K C; Kanamori, H; Pechmann, J C; Fuis, G

    1978-09-01

    Between November 1976 and November 1977 a swarm of small earthquakes (local magnitude San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California. This swarm was the first observed along this section of the San Andreas since cataloging of instrumental data began in 1932. The activity followed partial subsidence of the 35-centimeter vertical crustal uplift known as the Palmdale bulge along this "locked" section of the San Andreas, which last broke in the great (surface-wave magnitude = 8(1/4)+) 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. The swarm events exhibit characteristics previously observed for some foreshock sequences, such as tight clustering of hypocenters and time-dependent rotations of stress axes inferred from focal mechanisms. However, because of our present lack of understanding of the processes that precede earthquake faulting, the implications of the swarm for future large earthquakes on the San Andreas fault are unknown.

  3. Cretaceous to Cenozoic sequential kinematics in the forearc-arc transition: effects of changing oblique plate convergence and the San Andreas system with implications for the La Paz fault (southern Baja California, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Frank; Pérez Venzor, José Antonio; Pérez Espinoza, Jesus Efraín; Rochin, Joel Hirales

    2010-01-01

    We studied metasediments and mylonitic arc granitoids from the forearc-arc transition of southern Baja California, Mexico. Thin section analyses and field evidence show that metamorphism of the forearc-arc transition is of the high T/P active margin type. The heat was provided by Cretaceous arc intrusions. Field observations and thin section analyses, including the time/temperature deformation path, demonstrate that the study area was first affected by dextral, ductile shearing followed by ductile, sinistral, possibly transpressive strike-slip parallel to the magmatic arc during the Cretaceous. Both intervals are related to changing oblique plate convergence and, thus, identified as trench-linked strike-slip effects. The geometric relationship between arc-dipping foliation, stretching lineation and shear sense indicates that the arc may have been pressed onto the rocks of the study area during sinistral shearing. The sinistral interval lasted up until regional cooling (Early Cenozoic?). Because the La Paz fault is closely associated with the forearc-arc transition, it must have the same Cretaceous to Early Cenozoic kinematic history. The northern segment of the La Paz fault is a modern, brittle, strike-slip fault interpreted as a dextral synthetic fault of the San Andreas system which opened the Gulf of California (Mar de Cortés/Golfo de California). We found no evidence for Miocene Basin and Range extension.

  4. Structural Mapping Along the Central San Andreas Fault-zone Using Airborne Electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio, K. D.; Bedrosian, P.; Ball, L. B.

    2017-12-01

    Investigations of active fault zones typically focus on either surface expressions or the associated seismogenic zones. However, the largely aseismic upper kilometer can hold significant insight into fault-zone architecture, strain partitioning, and fault-zone permeability. Geophysical imaging of the first kilometer provides a link between surface fault mapping and seismically-defined fault zones and is particularly important in geologically complex regions with limited surface exposure. Additionally, near surface imaging can provide insight into the impact of faulting on the hydrogeology of the critical zone. Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods offer a unique opportunity to collect a spatially-large, detailed dataset in a matter of days, and are used to constrain subsurface resistivity to depths of 500 meters or more. We present initial results from an AEM survey flown over a 60 kilometer long segment of the central San Andreas Fault (SAF). The survey is centered near Parkfield, California, the site of the SAFOD drillhole, which marks the transition between a creeping fault segment to the north and a locked zone to the south. Cross sections with a depth of investigation up to approximately 500 meters highlight the complex Tertiary and Mesozoic geology that is dismembered by the SAF system. Numerous fault-parallel structures are imaged across a more than 10 kilometer wide zone centered on the surface trace. Many of these features can be related to faults and folds within Plio-Miocene sedimentary rocks found on both sides of the fault. Northeast of the fault, rocks of the Mesozoic Franciscan and Great Valley complexes are extremely heterogeneous, with highly resistive volcanic rocks within a more conductive background. The upper 300 meters of a prominent fault-zone conductor, previously imaged to 1-3 kilometers depth by magnetotellurics, is restricted to a 20 kilometer long segment of the fault, but is up to 4 kilometers wide in places. Elevated fault

  5. Geomorphic and geologic evidence for slip along the San Bernardino strand of the San Andreas Fault System through the San Gorgonio Pass structural knot, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, K. J.; Matti, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region of southern California represents an extraordinarily complex section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) zone, often referred to as a structural knot. Complexity is expressed both structurally and geomorphically, and arises because multiple strands of the SAF have evolved here in Quaternary time. Our integration of geologic and geomorphic analyses led to recognition of multiple fault-bounded blocks characterized by crystalline rocks that have similar physical properties. Hence, any morphometric differences in hypsometric analysis, slope, slope distribution, texture, and stream-power measurements and discontinuities reflect landscape response to tectonic processes rather than differences in lithology. We propose that the differing morphometry of the two blocks on either side of the San Bernardino strand (SBS) of the SAF, the high-standing Kitching Peak block to the east and the lower, more subdued Pisgah Peak block to the west, strongly suggests that the blocks experienced different uplift histories. This difference in uplift histories, in turn suggests that dextral slip occurred over a long time interval on the SBS—despite long-lived controversy raised by the fact that, at the surface, a throughgoing trace of the SBS is not present at this location. A different tectonic history between the two blocks is consistent with the gravity data which indicate that low-density rocks underthrusting the Kitching Peak block are absent below the Pisgah Peak block (Langenheim et al., 2015). Throughgoing slip on the SBS implied by geomorphic differences between the two blocks is also consistent with displaced geologic and geomorphic features. We find compelling evidence for discrete offsets of between 0.6 and 6 km of dextral slip on the SBS, including offset of fluvial and landslide deposits, and beheaded drainages. Although we lack numerical age control for the offset features, the degree of soil development associated with displaced landforms

  6. Talc-bearing serpentinite and the creeping section of the San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Rymer, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The section of the San Andreas fault located between Cholame Valley and San Juan Bautista in central California creeps at a rate as high as 28 mm yr -1 (ref. 1), and it is also the segment that yields the best evidence for being a weak fault embedded in a strong crust. Serpentinized ultramafic rocks have been associated with creeping faults in central and northern California, and serpentinite is commonly invoked as the cause of the creep and the low strength of this section of the San Andreas fault. However, the frictional strengths of serpentine minerals are too high to satisfy the limitations on fault strength, and these minerals also have the potential for unstable slip under some conditions. Here we report the discovery of talc in cuttings of serpentinite collected from the probable active trace of the San Andreas fault that was intersected during drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) main hole in 2005. We infer that the talc is forming as a result of the reaction of serpentine minerals with silica-saturated hydrothermal fluids that migrate up the fault zone, and the talc commonly occurs in sheared serpentinite. This discovery is significant, as the frictional strength of talc at elevated temperatures is sufficiently low to meet the constraints on the shear strength of the fault, and its inherently stable sliding behaviour is consistent with fault creep. Talc may therefore provide the connection between serpentinite and creep in the San Andreas fault, if shear at depth can become localized along a talc-rich principal-slip surface within serpentinite entrained in the fault zone. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Talc-bearing serpentinite and the creeping section of the San Andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E; Rymer, Michael J

    2007-08-16

    The section of the San Andreas fault located between Cholame Valley and San Juan Bautista in central California creeps at a rate as high as 28 mm yr(-1) (ref. 1), and it is also the segment that yields the best evidence for being a weak fault embedded in a strong crust. Serpentinized ultramafic rocks have been associated with creeping faults in central and northern California, and serpentinite is commonly invoked as the cause of the creep and the low strength of this section of the San Andreas fault. However, the frictional strengths of serpentine minerals are too high to satisfy the limitations on fault strength, and these minerals also have the potential for unstable slip under some conditions. Here we report the discovery of talc in cuttings of serpentinite collected from the probable active trace of the San Andreas fault that was intersected during drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) main hole in 2005. We infer that the talc is forming as a result of the reaction of serpentine minerals with silica-saturated hydrothermal fluids that migrate up the fault zone, and the talc commonly occurs in sheared serpentinite. This discovery is significant, as the frictional strength of talc at elevated temperatures is sufficiently low to meet the constraints on the shear strength of the fault, and its inherently stable sliding behaviour is consistent with fault creep. Talc may therefore provide the connection between serpentinite and creep in the San Andreas fault, if shear at depth can become localized along a talc-rich principal-slip surface within serpentinite entrained in the fault zone.

  8. Local geomagnetic events associated with displacements on the san andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiner, S; Kovach, R L

    1967-10-06

    The piezomagnetic properties of rock suggest that a change in subsurface stress will manifest itself as a change in the magnetic susceptibility and remanent magnetization and hence the local geomagnetic field. A differential array of magnetometers has been operating since late 1965 on the San Andreas fault in the search for piezomagnetic signals under conditions involving active fault stress. Local changes in the geomagnetic field have been observed near Hollister, California, some tens of hours preceding the onset of abrupt creep displacement on the San Andreas fault.

  9. Irregular recurrence of large earthquakes along the san andreas fault: evidence from trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, G C; Sheppard, P R; Sieh, K E

    1988-07-08

    Old trees growing along the San Andreas fault near Wrightwood, California, record in their annual ring-width patterns the effects of a major earthquake in the fall or winter of 1812 to 1813. Paleoseismic data and historical information indicate that this event was the "San Juan Capistrano" earthquake of 8 December 1812, with a magnitude of 7.5. The discovery that at least 12 kilometers of the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault ruptured in 1812, only 44 years before the great January 1857 rupture, demonstrates that intervals between large earthquakes on this part of the fault are highly variable. This variability increases the uncertainty of forecasting destructive earthquakes on the basis of past behavior and accentuates the need for a more fundamental knowledge of San Andreas fault dynamics.

  10. Sawtooth segmentation and deformation processes on the southern San Andreas fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, R.; Williams, P.

    1985-01-01

    Five contiguous 12-13 km fault segments form a sawtooth geometry on the southernmost San Andreas fault. The kinematic and morphologic properties of each segment depend on fault strike, despite differences of strike between segments of as little as 3 degrees. Oblique slip (transpression) of fault segments within the Indio Hills, Mecca Hills and Durmid Hill results from an inferred 8:1 ratio of dextral slip to convergence across the fault zone. Triggered slip and creep are confined almost entirely to transpressive segments of the fault. Durmid Hill has been formed in the last 28 + or - 6 ka by uplift at an average rate of 3 + or - 1 mm/a.

  11. Evidence from precise earthquake hypocenters for segmentation of the San Andreas Fault in San Gorgonio Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistrale, Harold; Sanders, Christopher

    1996-02-01

    We use precise hypocenter patterns and focal mechanisms to investigate the presence or absence of a continuous strike-slip fault at depth connecting the San Bernardino strand of the San Andreas fault with the Coachella Valley segment of the Banning fault. We inverted 560,000 arrival times from 23,000 earthquakes (1981-1993) for high-quality hypocenters and three-dimensional P wave velocity structure in a 1° by 2° area centered on the San Gorgonio Pass. Cross-sectional plots of relocated earthquakes reveal an abrupt 5 to 7 km high step in the maximum depth of hypocenters. The step riser defines a near-vertical, locally curved surface that extends westerly more than 60 km from the Coachella Valley segment of the San Andreas fault to the San Jacinto fault. A hypothetical continuous vertical San Andreas fault through San Gorgonio Pass would cross the step at an oblique angle. We suggest that the step is the expression of the contact between different basement rock types juxtaposed by large-scale right-slip motion on the ancestral San Andreas fault. South of the step in Peninsular Ranges type basement (intrusives), brittle failure occurs down to about 20-km depth, while north of the step in San Bernardino type basement (Pelona schist), brittle failure occurs to only about 13-km depth. The step provides a piercing plane that should be offset about 3 km right laterally by an active, continuous, vertical San Andreas fault. Within the resolution of our mapping the step is not offset in this manner, implying either that there has not been a throughgoing vertical fault at depth, that a throughgoing fault has not experienced enough slip to offset the step, or that a throughgoing fault is not vertical and dips north over the top of the step. Hypocentral patterns and focal mechanisms indicate distributed deformation (thrust, normal, and strike-slip faulting) over a large volume in the San Gorgonio Pass region; there is no evidence of hypocenter or slip vector alignments that

  12. Correction to “Constraints on the stress state of the San Andreas Fault with analysis based on core and cuttings from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling phases 1 and 2”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembe, Sheryl; Lockner, David; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2010-01-01

    This article corrects: Constraints on the stress state of the San Andreas Fault with analysis based on core and cuttings from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling phases 1 and 2. Vol. 114, Issue B11, Article first published online: 5 NOV 2009.

  13. (U-Th)/He thermochronometry reveals Pleistocene punctuated deformation and synkinematic hematite mineralization in the Mecca Hills, southernmost San Andreas Fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Amy C.; Evans, James P.; Ault, Alexis K.; Janecke, Susanne U.; Bradbury, Kelly K.

    2017-10-01

    The timing, tempo, and processes of punctuated deformation in strike-slip fault systems are challenging to resolve in the rock record. Faults in the Mecca Hills, adjacent to the southernmost San Andreas Fault, California, accommodate active deformation and exhumation in the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary rocks and underlying crystalline basement. We document the spatiotemporal patterns of San Andreas Fault-related deformation as recorded in crystalline basement rocks of the Mecca Hills using fault microstructural observations, geochemical data, and hematite (n = 24) and apatite (n = 44) (U-Th)/He (hematite He, apatite He) thermochronometry data. Reproducible mean hematite He dates from minor hematite-coated fault surfaces in the Painted Canyon Fault damage zone range from ∼0.7-0.4 Ma and are younger than ∼1.2 Ma apatite He dates from adjacent crystalline basement host rock. These data reveal concomitant Pleistocene pulses of fault slip, fluid flow, and synkinematic hematite mineralization. Hematite textures, crystal morphology, and hematite He data patterns imply some damage zone deformation occurred via cyclic crack-seal and creep processes. Apatite He data from crystalline basement define distinct date-eU patterns and indicate cooling across discrete fault blocks in the Mecca Hills. Uniform ∼1.2 Ma apatite He dates regardless of eU are located exclusively between the Painted Canyon and Platform faults. Outside of this fault block, samples yield individual apatite He dates from ∼30-1 Ma that define a positive apatite He date-eU correlation. These patterns reveal focused exhumation away from the main trace of the San Andreas Fault at ∼1.2 Ma. Low-temperature thermochronometry of fault-related rocks provides an unprecedented window into the 105-106-yr record of San Andreas Fault-related deformation in the Mecca Hills and documents hematite deformation mechanisms that may be operative in other strike-slip faults world-wide.

  14. A case for historic joint rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozos, Julian C

    2016-03-01

    The San Andreas fault is considered to be the primary plate boundary fault in southern California and the most likely fault to produce a major earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling to show that the San Jacinto fault is capable of rupturing along with the San Andreas in a single earthquake, and interpret these results along with existing paleoseismic data and historic damage reports to suggest that this has likely occurred in the historic past. In particular, I find that paleoseismic data and historic observations for the ~M7.5 earthquake of 8 December 1812 are best explained by a rupture that begins on the San Jacinto fault and propagates onto the San Andreas fault. This precedent carries the implications that similar joint ruptures are possible in the future and that the San Jacinto fault plays a more significant role in seismic hazard in southern California than previously considered. My work also shows how physics-based modeling can be used for interpreting paleoseismic data sets and understanding prehistoric fault behavior.

  15. A case for historic joint rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozos, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is considered to be the primary plate boundary fault in southern California and the most likely fault to produce a major earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling to show that the San Jacinto fault is capable of rupturing along with the San Andreas in a single earthquake, and interpret these results along with existing paleoseismic data and historic damage reports to suggest that this has likely occurred in the historic past. In particular, I find that paleoseismic data and historic observations for the ~M7.5 earthquake of 8 December 1812 are best explained by a rupture that begins on the San Jacinto fault and propagates onto the San Andreas fault. This precedent carries the implications that similar joint ruptures are possible in the future and that the San Jacinto fault plays a more significant role in seismic hazard in southern California than previously considered. My work also shows how physics-based modeling can be used for interpreting paleoseismic data sets and understanding prehistoric fault behavior. PMID:27034977

  16. Migrating tremors illuminate complex deformation beneath the seismogenic San Andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R

    2010-02-04

    The San Andreas fault is one of the most extensively studied faults in the world, yet its physical character and deformation mode beneath the relatively shallow earthquake-generating portion remain largely unconstrained. Tectonic 'non-volcanic' tremor, a recently discovered seismic signal probably generated by shear slip on the deep extension of some major faults, can provide new insight into the deep fate of such faults, including that of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. Here I examine continuous seismic data from mid-2001 to 2008, identifying tremor and decomposing the signal into different families of activity based on the shape and timing of the waveforms at multiple stations. This approach allows differentiation between activities from nearby patches of the deep fault and begins to unveil rich and complex patterns of tremor occurrence. I find that tremor exhibits nearly continuous migration, with the most extensive episodes propagating more than 20 kilometres along fault strike at rates of 15-80 kilometres per hour. This suggests that the San Andreas fault remains a localized through-going structure, at least to the base of the crust, in this area. Tremor rates and recurrence behaviour changed markedly in the wake of the 2004 magnitude-6.0 Parkfield earthquake, but these changes were far from uniform within the tremor zone, probably reflecting heterogeneous fault properties and static and dynamic stresses decaying away from the rupture. The systematic recurrence of tremor demonstrated here suggests the potential to monitor detailed time-varying deformation on this portion of the deep San Andreas fault, deformation which unsteadily loads the shallower zone that last ruptured in the 1857 magnitude-7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake.

  17. Characterization of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California by fault-zone trapped waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Vidale, J.; Cochran, E.

    2003-04-01

    In October, 2002, coordinated by the Pre-EarthScope/SAFOD, we conducted an extensive seismic experiment at the San Andreas fault (SAF), Parkfield to record fault-zone trapped waves generated by explosions and microearthquakes using dense linear seismic arrays of 52 PASSCAL 3-channel REFTEKs deployed across and along the fault zone. We detonated 3 explosions within and out of the fault zone during the experiment, and also recorded other 13 shots of PASO experiment of UWM/RPI (Thurber and Roecker) detonated around the SAFOD drilling site at the same time. We observed prominent fault-zone trapped waves with large amplitudes and long duration following S waves at stations close to the main fault trace for sources located within and close to the fault zone. Dominant frequencies of trapped waves are 2-3 Hz for near-surface explosions and 4-5 Hz for microearthquakes. Fault-zone trapped waves are relatively weak on the north strand of SAF for same sources. In contrast, seismograms registered for both the stations and shots far away from the fault zone show a brief S wave and lack of trapped waves. These observations are consistent with previous findings of fault-zone trapped waves at the SAF [Li et al., 1990; 1997], indicating the existence of a well-developed low-velocity waveguide along the main fault strand (principal slip plan) of the SAF. The data from denser arrays and 3-D finite-difference simulations of fault-zone trapped waves allowed us to delineate the internal structure, segmentation and physical properties of the SAF with higher resolution. The trapped-wave inferred waveguide on the SAF Parkfield segment is ~150 m wide at surface and tapers to ~100 m at seismogenic depth, in which Q is 20-50 and S velocities are reduced by 30-40% from wall-rock velocities, with the greater velocity reduction at the shallow depth and to southeast of the 1966 M6 epicenter. We interpret this low-velocity waveguide on the SAF main strand as being the remnant of damage zone caused

  18. A nonlinear least-squares inverse analysis of strike-slip faulting with application to the San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles A.; Richardson, Randall M.

    1988-01-01

    A nonlinear weighted least-squares analysis was performed for a synthetic elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space model of strike-slip faulting. Also, an inversion of strain rate data was attempted for the locked portions of the San Andreas fault in California. Based on an eigenvector analysis of synthetic data, it is found that the only parameter which can be resolved is the average shear modulus of the elastic layer and viscoelastic half-space. The other parameters were obtained by performing a suite of inversions for the fault. The inversions on data from the northern San Andreas resulted in predicted parameter ranges similar to those produced by inversions on data from the whole fault.

  19. Analysis of regional deformation and strain accumulation data adjacent to the San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to the understanding of crustal deformation was developed under this grant. This approach combined aspects of fractals, chaos, and self-organized criticality to provide a comprehensive theory for deformation on distributed faults. It is hypothesized that crustal deformation is an example of comminution: Deformation takes place on a fractal distribution of faults resulting in a fractal distribution of seismicity. Our primary effort under this grant was devoted to developing an understanding of distributed deformation in the continental crust. An initial effort was carried out on the fractal clustering of earthquakes in time. It was shown that earthquakes do not obey random Poisson statistics, but can be approximated in many cases by coupled, scale-invariant fractal statistics. We applied our approach to the statistics of earthquakes in the New Hebrides region of the southwest Pacific because of the very high level of seismicity there. This work was written up and published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. This approach was also applied to the statistics of the seismicity on the San Andreas fault system.

  20. Implications for San Andreas Fault Ruptures Based on New Evidence from the Cabazon, CA Paleoseismic Site, San Gorgonio Pass Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, K. M.; Yule, D.; Humbert, L. R.; Witkowsky, R.

    2013-12-01

    The 10-km section of the San Gorgonio Pass fault zone (SGPFZ) between the Banning and San Bernardino strands of the San Andreas fault is composed of roughly orthogonal, alternating strike slip and thrust fault sections. In order to investigate whether the complexity of the fault system is a barrier to thoroughgoing ruptures and consequently a limit on earthquake magnitude, we excavated a mega-trench across a compressional section of the SGPFZ approximately 2 km northeast of Cabazon, CA. The mega-trench was located at the base of the San Bernardino Mountains and exposed Pleistocene Cabazon Formation in the hanging wall block, thrust over Holocene alluvial units. Sediments in the 9-m-deep trench consisted of boulder to cobble debris flow deposits and silty sand fluvial sequences, which buried and were interbedded with incipient soil horizons. We present evidence for five earthquakes in the mega-trench, determined by several generations of fault scarps buried by progressively younger sediments. Vertical separation for each event was small, on the order of 30 to 60 cm at the paleo-ground surfaces. Preliminary radiocarbon dating of charcoal collected from the deformed sediments constrains the five observed events to the past ~6000 years and the most recent event to ca. 500-700 years ago; additional dates are pending that will enable us to determine the age of each earthquake. Based on the existing age control, the average earthquake recurrence interval for the SGPFZ is ~1400 years, seven times longer than the average interval for neighboring sections on the southern San Andreas fault. If the earthquakes recorded at the Cabazon site record great San Andreas fault ruptures like those modeled in the 2008 ShakeOut Scenario, much of the vertical slip must occur within the bedrock in the hanging wall or in blind faults in the alluvium below the site. Alternatively, these earthquakes may represent more local, M6-M7 events that rupture the San Gorgonio Pass and possibly

  1. Strain on the san andreas fault near palmdale, california: rapid, aseismic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, J C; Prescott, W H; Lisowski, M; King, N E

    1981-01-02

    Frequently repeated strain measurements near Palmdale, California, during the period from 1971 through 1980 indicate that, in addition to a uniform accumulation of right-lateral shear strain (engineering shear, 0.35 microradian per year) across the San Andreas fault, a 1-microstrain contraction perpendicular to the fault that accumulated gradually during the interval 1974 through 1978 was aseismically released between February and November 1979. Subsequently (November 1979 to March 1980), about half of the contraction was recovered. This sequence of strain changes can be explained in terms of south-southwestward migration of a slip event consisting of the south-southwestward movement of the upper crust on a horizontal detachment surface at a depth of 10 to 30 kilometers. The large strain change in 1979 corresponds to the passage of the slip event beneath the San Andreas fault.

  2. Simulations of tremor-related creep reveal a weak crustal root of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Bradley, Andrew M.; Johnson, Kaj M.

    2013-01-01

    Deep aseismic roots of faults play a critical role in transferring tectonic loads to shallower, brittle crustal faults that rupture in large earthquakes. Yet, until the recent discovery of deep tremor and creep, direct inference of the physical properties of lower-crustal fault roots has remained elusive. Observations of tremor near Parkfield, CA provide the first evidence for present-day localized slip on the deep extension of the San Andreas Fault and triggered transient creep events. We develop numerical simulations of fault slip to show that the spatiotemporal evolution of triggered tremor near Parkfield is consistent with triggered fault creep governed by laboratory-derived friction laws between depths of 20–35 km on the fault. Simulated creep and observed tremor northwest of Parkfield nearly ceased for 20–30 days in response to small coseismic stress changes of order 104 Pa from the 2003 M6.5 San Simeon Earthquake. Simulated afterslip and observed tremor following the 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake show a coseismically induced pulse of rapid creep and tremor lasting for 1 day followed by a longer 30 day period of sustained accelerated rates due to propagation of shallow afterslip into the lower crust. These creep responses require very low effective normal stress of ~1 MPa on the deep San Andreas Fault and near-neutral-stability frictional properties expected for gabbroic lower-crustal rock.

  3. Activity of the Mill Creek and Mission Creek fault strands of the San Andreas fault through the San Gorgonio Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.; Valentine, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present new observations that constrain the recent slip history of the Mill Creek and Mission Creek strands of the San Andreas fault. These faults are the northern strands of a complex series of strike-slip and thrust faults through the San Gorgonio Pass stepover, an important structural barrier that affects seismic hazard in southern California. Understanding the activity on each of the faults in this complex region will reveal the potential for large, throughgoing San Andreas fault ruptures. The Mill Creek fault strand cuts the base of the upper Raywood Flat fill, a 50 m thick package of debris-flow deposits. However, the upper section of these deposits overlap, and are not cut by the fault. On the surface of this deposit, a 15 m-wide channel, flanked by bouldery debris-flow levees, crosses the projection of the Mill Creek fault without evidence of offset. We collected boulder-top samples for cosmogenic exposure age-dating of these levees and present preliminary results. Additionally, we mapped inset terraces along the incised channel of the East Fork Whitewater River drainage that also do not show evidence of fault offset, and we collected a depth profile through the uppermost Raywood Flat fill in order to further assess its age. Along the Mission Creek strand, newly devegetated B4 airborne lidar data reveals fault scarps cutting across hillslopes and alluvial fans between the San Bernardino strand and lower Raywood Flat for a distance of 4 km. We identify a lateral offset of 4-6 m in an alluvial fan deposit within a tributary of Banning canyon, and sampled a suite of boulders to estimate the age of this deposit. This site shows that the Mission Creek fault is active and could rupture through the San Gorgonio Pass, bypassing the structural complexity of the San Gorgonio Pass thrust to the south. Conversely, the Mill Creek fault appears to be inactive through the pass since the latest Pleistocene.

  4. Habitat information in the region on the underwater San Andreas Fault - Topic: Exploring the Undersea San Andreas Fault: Revealing the Past, Present, and Future at the Centennial of the Great 1906 Earthquake

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During this exploration, the first comprehensive high-resolution multi-beam sonar and seismic reflection survey of the Northern San Andreas Fault (NSAF) was...

  5. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W.; England, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now

  6. Searching for geodetic transient slip signals along the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, B.; Burgmann, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault is at the transition between a segment locked since the 1857 Mw 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake to its south and a creeping segment to the north. It is particularly well instrumented since it is the many previous studies have focused on studying the coseismic and postseismic phases of the two most recent earthquake cycles, the interseismic phase is exhibiting interesting dynamics at the down-dip edge of the seismogenic zone, characterized by a very large number of low frequency earthquakes (LFE) with different behaviors depending on location. Interseismic fault creep rates appear to vary over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, from the Earth's surface to the base of crust. In this study, we take advantage of the dense Global Positioning System (GPS) network, with 77 continuous stations located within a circle of radius 80 km centered on Parkfield. We correct these time series for the co- and postseismic signals of the 2003 Mw 6.3 San Simeon and 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquakes. We then cross-correlate the residual time series with synthetic slow-slip templates following the approach of Rousset et al. (2017). Synthetic tests with transient events contained in GPS time series with realistic noise show the limit of detection of the method. In the application with real GPS time series, the highest correlation amplitudes are compared with micro-seismicity rates, as well as tremor and LFE observations.

  7. Low-altitude aerial color digital photographic survey of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David K.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Dearborn, David S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Ever since 1858, when Gaspard-Félix Tournachon (pen name Félix Nadar) took the first aerial photograph (Professional Aerial Photographers Association 2009), the scientific value and popular appeal of such pictures have been widely recognized. Indeed, Nadar patented the idea of using aerial photographs in mapmaking and surveying. Since then, aerial imagery has flourished, eventually making the leap to space and to wavelengths outside the visible range. Yet until recently, the availability of such surveys has been limited to technical organizations with significant resources. Geolocation required extensive time and equipment, and distribution was costly and slow. While these situations still plague older surveys, modern digital photography and lidar systems acquire well-calibrated and easily shared imagery, although expensive, platform-specific software is sometimes still needed to manage and analyze the data. With current consumer-level electronics (cameras and computers) and broadband internet access, acquisition and distribution of large imaging data sets are now possible for virtually anyone. In this paper we demonstrate a simple, low-cost means of obtaining useful aerial imagery by reporting two new, high-resolution, low-cost, color digital photographic surveys of selected portions of the San Andreas fault in California. All pictures are in standard jpeg format. The first set of imagery covers a 92-km-long section of the fault in Kern and San Luis Obispo counties and includes the entire Carrizo Plain. The second covers the region from Lake of the Woods to Cajon Pass in Kern, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino counties (151 km) and includes Lone Pine Canyon soon after the ground was largely denuded by the Sheep Fire of October 2009. The first survey produced a total of 1,454 oblique digital photographs (4,288 x 2,848 pixels, average 6 Mb each) and the second produced 3,762 nadir images from an elevation of approximately 150 m above ground level (AGL) on the

  8. Hydrogeologic Architecture of the San Andreas Fault near the Logan Quarry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Brodsky, E. E.; Erskine, J.; Fulton, P. M.; Carter, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogeologic properties of fault zones are critical to the faulting processes; however, they are not well understood and difficult to measure in situ. Recording the tidal response of water level is a useful method to measure the in-situ properties. We utilize an array of wells near the San Andreas Fault zone in the Logan Quarry to study the fault zone hydrogeologic architecture by measuring the water tidal response. The measured specific storage and permeability show that there is a localized zone near the fault with higher specific storage and larger permeability than the surrounding region. This change of properties might be related to the fault zone fracture distribution. Surprisingly, the change of the specific storage is the clearest signal. The inferred compliance contrast is consistent with prior estimates of elastic moduli change in the near-fault environment, but the hydrogeologic effects of the compliance change have never before been measured on a major active fault. The observed specific storage structure implies that the fault zone plays an important role in permeability enhancement by seismic shaking. In addition, the measured diffusivity is about 10-2 m2/s, which is comparable to the post-earthquake hydraulic diffusivity measured on the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault. This observed high diffusivity with little variability inside the fault zone might suggest the accumulated pore pressure during interseismic period distributes over a broad region.

  9. Steep-dip seismic imaging of the shallow San Andreas fault near Parkfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, J A; Catchings, R D; St Clair, K C; Rymer, M J; Okaya, D A; Carney, B J

    2001-11-16

    Seismic reflection and refraction images illuminate the San Andreas Fault to a depth of 1 kilometer. The prestack depth-migrated reflection image contains near-vertical reflections aligned with the active fault trace. The fault is vertical in the upper 0.5 kilometer, then dips about 70 degrees to the southwest to at least 1 kilometer subsurface. This dip reconciles the difference between the computed locations of earthquakes and the surface fault trace. The seismic velocity cross section shows strong lateral variations. Relatively low velocity (10 to 30%), high electrical conductivity, and low density indicate a 1-kilometer-wide vertical wedge of porous sediment or fractured rock immediately southwest of the active fault trace.

  10. Slip in the 1857 and earlier large earthquakes along the Carrizo Plain, San Andreas Fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Olaf; Arrowsmith, J Ramón; Grant Ludwig, Lisa; Akçiz, Sinan O

    2010-02-26

    The moment magnitude (Mw) 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857, with a approximately 350-kilometer-long surface rupture, was the most recent major earthquake along the south-central San Andreas Fault, California. Based on previous measurements of its surface slip distribution, rupture along the approximately 60-kilometer-long Carrizo segment was thought to control the recurrence of 1857-like earthquakes. New high-resolution topographic data show that the average slip along the Carrizo segment during the 1857 event was 5.3 +/- 1.4 meters, eliminating the core assumption for a linkage between Carrizo segment rupture and recurrence of major earthquakes along the south-central San Andreas Fault. Earthquake slip along the Carrizo segment may recur in earthquake clusters with cumulative slip of approximately 5 meters.

  11. Electrical resistivity variations associated with earthquakes on the san andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzella, A; Morrison, H F

    1974-09-06

    A 24 percent precursory change in apparent electrical resistivity was observed before a magnitude 3.9 earthquake of strike-slip nature on the San Andreas fault in central California. The experimental configuration and numerical calculations suggest that the change is associated with a volume at depth rather than some near-surface phenomenon. The character and duration of the precursor period agree well with those of other earthquake studies and support a dilatant earthquake mechanism model.

  12. Impulsive radon emanation on a creeping segment of the San Andreas fault, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.-Y.

    1984-01-01

    Radon emanation was continuously monitored for several months at two locations along a creeping segment of the San Andreas fault in central California. The recorded emanations showed several impulsive increases that lasted as much as five hours with amplitudes considerably larger than meteorologically induced diurnal variations. Some of the radon increases were accompanied or followed by earthquakes or fault-creep events. They were possibly the result of some sudden outbursts of relatively radon-rich ground gas, sometimes triggered by crustal deformation or vibration. (Auth.)

  13. Fault zone structure and kinematics from lidar, radar, and imagery: revealing new details along the creeping San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, S.; Donnellan, A.; Pickering, A.

    2017-12-01

    Aseismic fault creep, coseismic fault displacement, distributed deformation, and the relative contribution of each have important bearing on infrastructure resilience, risk reduction, and the study of earthquake physics. Furthermore, the impact of interseismic fault creep in rupture propagation scenarios, and its impact and consequently on fault segmentation and maximum earthquake magnitudes, is poorly resolved in current rupture forecast models. The creeping section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in Central California is an outstanding area for establishing methodology for future scientific response to damaging earthquakes and for characterizing the fine details of crustal deformation. Here, we describe how data from airborne and terrestrial laser scanning, airborne interferometric radar (UAVSAR), and optical data from satellites and UAVs can be used to characterize rates and map patterns of deformation within fault zones of varying complexity and geomorphic expression. We are evaluating laser point cloud processing, photogrammetric structure from motion, radar interferometry, sub-pixel correlation, and other techniques to characterize the relative ability of each to measure crustal deformation in two and three dimensions through time. We are collecting new and synthesizing existing data from the zone of highest interseismic creep rates along the SAF where a transition from a single main fault trace to a 1-km wide extensional stepover occurs. In the stepover region, creep measurements from alignment arrays 100 meters long across the main fault trace reveal lower rates than those in adjacent, geomorphically simpler parts of the fault. This indicates that deformation is distributed across the en echelon subsidiary faults, by creep and/or stick-slip behavior. Our objectives are to better understand how deformation is partitioned across a fault damage zone, how it is accommodated in the shallow subsurface, and to better characterize the relative amounts of fault creep

  14. Re-evaluating fault zone evolution, geometry, and slip rate along the restraining bend of the southern San Andreas Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisniuk, K.; Fosdick, J. C.; Balco, G.; Stone, J. O.

    2017-12-01

    This study presents new multi-proxy data to provide an alternative interpretation of the late -to-mid Quaternary evolution, geometry, and slip rate of the southern San Andreas fault zone, comprising of the Garnet Hill, Banning, and Mission Creek fault strands, along its restraining bend near the San Bernardino Mountains and San Gorgonio Pass. Present geologic and geomorphic studies in the region indicate that as the Mission Creek and Banning faults diverge from one another in the southern Indio Hills, the Banning Fault Strand accommodates the majority of lateral displacement across the San Andreas Fault Zone. In this currently favored kinematic model of the southern San Andreas Fault Zone, slip along the Mission Creek Fault Strand decreases significantly northwestward toward the San Gorgonio Pass. Along this restraining bend, the Mission Creek Fault Strand is considered to be inactive since the late -to-mid Quaternary ( 500-150 kya) due to the transfer of plate boundary strain westward to the Banning and Garnet Hills Fault Strands, the Jacinto Fault Zone, and northeastward, to the Eastern California Shear Zone. Here, we present a revised geomorphic interpretation of fault displacement, initial 36Cl/10Be burial ages, sediment provenance data, and detrital geochronology from modern catchments and displaced Quaternary deposits that improve across-fault correlations. We hypothesize that continuous large-scale translation of this structure has occurred throughout its history into the present. Accordingly, the Mission Creek Fault Strand is active and likely a primary plate boundary fault at this latitude.

  15. Elemental Geochemistry of Samples From Fault Segments of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) Drill Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourscher, S. N.; Schleicher, A. M.; van der Pluijm, B. A.; Warr, L. N.

    2006-12-01

    Elemental geochemistry of mudrock samples from phase 2 drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is presented from bore hole depths of 3066 m to 3169 m and from 3292 m to 3368 m, which contain a creeping section and main trace of the fault, respectively. In addition to preparation and analysis of whole rock sample, fault grains with neomineralized, polished surfaces were hand picked from well-washed whole rock samples, minimizing the potential contamination from drilling mud and steel shavings. The separated fractions were washed in deionized water, powdered using a mortar and pestle, and analyzed using an Inductively Coupled Plasma- Optical Emission Spectrometer for major and minor elements. Based on oxide data results, systematic differences in element concentrations are observed between the whole rock and fault rock. Two groupings of data points are distinguishable in the regions containing the main trace of the fault, a shallow part (3292- 3316 m) and a deeper section (3320-3368 m). Applying the isocon method, assuming Zr and Ti to be immobile elements in these samples, indicates a volume loss of more than 30 percent in the shallow part and about 23 percent in the deep part of the main trace. These changes are minimum estimates of fault-related volume loss, because the whole rock from drilling samples contains variable amount of fault rock as well. Minimum estimates for volume loss in the creeping section of the fault are more than 50 percent when using the isocon method, comparing whole rock to plucked fault rock. The majority of the volume loss in the fault rocks is due to the dissolution and loss of silica, potassium, aluminum, sodium and calcium, whereas (based on oxide data) the mineralized surfaces of fractures appear to be enriched in Fe and Mg. The large amount of element mobility within these fault traces suggests extensive circulation of hydrous fluids along fractures that was responsible for progressive dissolution and leaching

  16. Seismic trapped modes in the oroville and san andreas fault zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y G; Leary, P; Aki, K; Malin, P

    1990-08-17

    Three-component borehole seismic profiling of the recently active Oroville, California, normal fault and microearthquake event recording with a near-fault three-component borehole seismometer on the San Andreas fault at Parkfield, California, have shown numerous instances of pronounced dispersive wave trains following the shear wave arrivals. These wave trains are interpreted as fault zone-trapped seismic modes. Parkfield earthquakes exciting trapped modes have been located as deep as 10 kilometers, as shallow as 4 kilometers, and extend 12 kilometers along the fault on either side of the recording station. Selected Oroville and Parkfield wave forms are modeled as the fundamental and first higher trapped SH modes of a narrow low-velocity layer at the fault. Modeling results suggest that the Oroville fault zone is 18 meters wide at depth and has a shear wave velocity of 1 kilometer per second, whereas at Parkfield, the fault gouge is 100 to 150 meters wide and has a shear wave velocity of 1.1 to 1.8 kilometers per second. These low-velocity layers are probably the rupture planes on which earthquakes occur.

  17. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drillhole near Parkfield, California crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m-wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 ohm-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  18. Tidal triggering of earthquakes suggests poroelastic behavior on the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorey, Andrew; Van Der Elst, Nicholas; Johnson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tidal triggering of earthquakes is hypothesized to provide quantitative information regarding the fault's stress state, poroelastic properties, and may be significant for our understanding of seismic hazard. To date, studies of regional or global earthquake catalogs have had only modest successes in identifying tidal triggering. We posit that the smallest events that may provide additional evidence of triggering go unidentified and thus we developed a technique to improve the identification of very small magnitude events. We identify events applying a method known as inter-station seismic coherence where we prioritize detection and discrimination over characterization. Here we show tidal triggering of earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault. We find the complex interaction of semi-diurnal and fortnightly tidal periods exposes both stress threshold and critical state behavior. Our findings reveal earthquake nucleation processes and pore pressure conditions – properties of faults that are difficult to measure, yet extremely important for characterizing earthquake physics and seismic hazards.

  19. A 100-year average recurrence interval for the san andreas fault at wrightwood, california.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumal, T E; Schwartz, D P; Pezzopane, S K; Weldon, R J

    1993-01-08

    Evidence for five large earthquakes during the past five centuries along the San Andreas fault zone 70 kilometers northeast of Los Angeles, California, indicates that the average recurrence interval and the temporal variability are significantly smaller than previously thought. Rapid sedimentation during the past 5000 years in a 150-meter-wide structural depression has produced a greater than 21-meter-thick sequence of debris flow and stream deposits interbedded with more than 50 datable peat layers. Fault scarps, colluvial wedges, fissure infills, upward termination of ruptures, and tilted and folded deposits above listric faults provide evidence for large earthquakes that occurred in A.D. 1857, 1812, and about 1700, 1610, and 1470.

  20. Tidal triggering of earthquakes suggests poroelastic behavior on the San Andreas Fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorey, Andrew A.; Elst, Nicholas J. van der; Johnson, Paul Allan

    2016-01-01

    Tidal triggering of earthquakes is hypothesized to provide quantitative information regarding the fault's stress state, poroelastic properties, and may be significant for our understanding of seismic hazard. To date, studies of regional or global earthquake catalogs have had only modest successes in identifying tidal triggering. We posit that the smallest events that may provide additional evidence of triggering go unidentified and thus we developed a technique to improve the identification of very small magnitude events. We identify events applying a method known as inter-station seismic coherence where we prioritize detection and discrimination over characterization. Here we show tidal triggering of earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault. We find the complex interaction of semi-diurnal and fortnightly tidal periods exposes both stress threshold and critical state behavior. Lastly, our findings reveal earthquake nucleation processes and pore pressure conditions – properties of faults that are difficult to measure, yet extremely important for characterizing earthquake physics and seismic hazards.

  1. Geodetic measurement of deformation east of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Solomon, Sean C.; Lisowski, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The shear strain rates in the Diablo Range of California have been calculated, and the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in Central California have been estimated, on the basis of triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the western edge of the Great Valley and the San Andreas Fault. The orientation of the principal compressive strain predicted from the azimuth of the major structures in the region is N 25 deg E, leading to an average shear strain value that corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 4.5 + or - 2.4 mm/yr. It is inferred that the measured strain is due to compression across the fold of this area. The hypothesized uniform, fault-normal compression within the Coast Ranges is not supported by these results.

  2. Investigating the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault using ALOS PALSAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agram, P. S.; Wortham, C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, time-series InSAR techniques have been used to study the temporal characteristics of various geophysical phenomena that produce surface deformation including earthquakes and magma migration in volcanoes. Conventional InSAR and time-series InSAR techniques have also been successfully used to study aseismic creep across faults in urban areas like the Northern Hayward Fault in California [1-3]. However, application of these methods to studying the time-dependent creep across the Central San Andreas Fault using C-band ERS and Envisat radar satellites has resulted in limited success. While these techniques estimate the average long-term far-field deformation rates reliably, creep measurement close to the fault (J. Sukhatme, Slip along the Hayward fault, California, estimated from space-based synthetic aperture radar interferometry, Geology,26, 559-562, 1998. [2] Ferretti, A., C. Prati and F. Rocca, Permanent Scatterers in SAR Interferometry, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 39, 8-20, 2001. [3] Lanari, R.,F. Casu, M. Manzo, and P. Lundgren, Application of SBAS D- InSAR technique to fault creep: A case study of the Hayward Fault, California. Remote Sensing of Environment, 109(1), 20-28, 2007. [4] Shanker, A. P., and H. Zebker, Edgelist phase unwrapping algorithm for time-series InSAR. J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 37(4), 2010.

  3. Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Peter O.; Behr, Whitney M.; Rood, Dylan; Sharp, Warren D.; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Kendrick, Katherine; Salin, Aaron

    2015-08-01

    Northwest directed slip from the southern San Andreas Fault is transferred to the Mission Creek, Banning, and Garnet Hill fault strands in the northwestern Coachella Valley. How slip is partitioned between these three faults is critical to southern California seismic hazard estimates but is poorly understood. In this paper, we report the first slip rate measured for the Banning fault strand. We constrain the depositional age of an alluvial fan offset 25 ± 5 m from its source by the Banning strand to between 5.1 ± 0.4 ka (95% confidence interval (CI)) and 6.4 + 3.7/-2.1 ka (95% CI) using U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate clast coatings and 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating of surface clasts. We calculate a Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of 3.9 + 2.3/-1.6 mm/yr (median, 95% CI) to 4.9 + 1.0/-0.9 mm/yr (median, 95% CI). This rate represents only 25-35% of the total slip accommodated by this section of the southern San Andreas Fault, suggesting a model in which slip is less concentrated on the Banning strand than previously thought. In rejecting the possibility that the Banning strand is the dominant structure, our results highlight an even greater need for slip rate and paleoseismic measurements along faults in the northwestern Coachella Valley in order to test the validity of current earthquake hazard models. In addition, our comparison of ages measured with U-series and 10Be exposure dating demonstrates the importance of using multiple geochronometers when estimating the depositional age of alluvial landforms.

  4. Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Peter O.; Behr, Whitney M.; Rood, Dylan; Sharp, Warren D.; Rockwell, Thomas; Kendrick, Katherine J.; Salin, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Northwest directed slip from the southern San Andreas Fault is transferred to the Mission Creek, Banning, and Garnet Hill fault strands in the northwestern Coachella Valley. How slip is partitioned between these three faults is critical to southern California seismic hazard estimates but is poorly understood. In this paper, we report the first slip rate measured for the Banning fault strand. We constrain the depositional age of an alluvial fan offset 25 ± 5 m from its source by the Banning strand to between 5.1 ± 0.4 ka (95% confidence interval (CI)) and 6.4 + 3.7/−2.1 ka (95% CI) using U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate clast coatings and 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating of surface clasts. We calculate a Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of 3.9 + 2.3/−1.6 mm/yr (median, 95% CI) to 4.9 + 1.0/−0.9 mm/yr (median, 95% CI). This rate represents only 25–35% of the total slip accommodated by this section of the southern San Andreas Fault, suggesting a model in which slip is less concentrated on the Banning strand than previously thought. In rejecting the possibility that the Banning strand is the dominant structure, our results highlight an even greater need for slip rate and paleoseismic measurements along faults in the northwestern Coachella Valley in order to test the validity of current earthquake hazard models. In addition, our comparison of ages measured with U-series and 10Be exposure dating demonstrates the importance of using multiple geochronometers when estimating the depositional age of alluvial landforms.

  5. Geophysical Characterization of Groundwater-Fault Dynamics at San Andreas Oasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, D.; Polet, J.; Osborn, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The San Andreas Oasis has historically provided a reliable source of fresh water near the northeast margin of the Salton Sea, although since the recent completion of the Coachella Canal Lining Project and persistent drought in California, surface water at the site has begun to disappear. This may be an effect of the canal lining, however, the controls on groundwater are complicated by the presence of the Hidden Springs Fault (HSF), a northeast dipping normal fault that trends near the San Andreas Oasis. Its surface expression is apparent as a lineation against which all plant growth terminates, suggesting that it may form a partial barrier to subsurface groundwater flow. Numerous environmental studies have detailed the chemical evolution of waters resources at San Andreas Spring, although there remains a knowledge gap on the HSF and its relation to groundwater at the site. To better constrain flow paths and characterize groundwater-fault interactions, we have employed resistivity surveys near the surface trace of the HSF to generate profiles of lateral and depth-dependent variations in resistivity. The survey design is comprised of lines installed in Wenner Arrays, using an IRIS Syscal Kid, with 24 electrodes, at a maximum electrode spacing of 5 meters. In addition, we have gathered constraints on the geometry of the HSF using a combination of ground-based magnetic and gravity profiles, conducted with a GEM walking Proton Precession magnetometer and a Lacoste & Romberg gravimeter. Seventeen gravity measurements were acquired across the surface trace of the fault. Preliminary resistivity results depict a shallow conductor localized at the oasis and discontinuous across the HSF. Magnetic data reveal a large contrast in subsurface magnetic susceptibility that appears coincident with the surface trace and trend of the HSF, while gravity data suggests a shallow, relatively high density anomaly centered near the oasis. These data also hint at a second, previously

  6. Tremor-tide correlations and near-lithostatic pore pressure on the deep San Andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amanda M; Nadeau, Robert M; Bürgmann, Roland

    2009-12-24

    Since its initial discovery nearly a decade ago, non-volcanic tremor has provided information about a region of the Earth that was previously thought incapable of generating seismic radiation. A thorough explanation of the geologic process responsible for tremor generation has, however, yet to be determined. Owing to their location at the plate interface, temporal correlation with geodetically measured slow-slip events and dominant shear wave energy, tremor observations in southwest Japan have been interpreted as a superposition of many low-frequency earthquakes that represent slip on a fault surface. Fluids may also be fundamental to the failure process in subduction zone environments, as teleseismic and tidal modulation of tremor in Cascadia and Japan and high Poisson ratios in both source regions are indicative of pressurized pore fluids. Here we identify a robust correlation between extremely small, tidally induced shear stress parallel to the San Andreas fault and non-volcanic tremor activity near Parkfield, California. We suggest that this tremor represents shear failure on a critically stressed fault in the presence of near-lithostatic pore pressure. There are a number of similarities between tremor in subduction zone environments, such as Cascadia and Japan, and tremor on the deep San Andreas transform, suggesting that the results presented here may also be applicable in other tectonic settings.

  7. Application of Remote Sensing Data to Correlating Alluvial Fans along the southern San Andreas Fault at Devers Hill, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, A.; Behr, W. M.; Gold, P. O.

    2013-12-01

    The overall rate of motion along the Pacific-North American plate boundary is well constrained from GPS data, but the distribution of this motion among the various faults of the San Andreas Fault System is not well understood, particularly in southern California. An especially complex and poorly understood part of the southern San Andreas Fault (sSAF) in southern California is along the Banning strand at the northwest end of the Coachella Valley near San Gorgonio Pass. Presently, slip rates for this part of the sSAF are entirely unconstrained, but are critical to earthquake forecasting efforts. Here we examine several displaced features along the Banning strand of the sSAF at a site known as Devers Hill, focusing primarily on Quaternary alluvial fans of varying ages. A first step in accurately deriving a slip rate for this location is to correlate these fan segments across the fault. To compare and correlate different offset features, we use several forms of remote sensing, including 0.5-m-resolution LiDAR data from the B4 dataset, 2- to 5-m-resolution MODIS/ASTER (MASTER) multispectral imagery, and high-resolution aerial photographs. These datasets allow us to quantitatively determine a) surface roughness, b) drainage density and morphology, and c) boulder distributions, sizes and concentrations. The remote sensing data we collect will be compared to independent correlations of offset features based on cosmogenic Be-10 dating of boulder tops and cobbles, as well as field-based measurements of surface characteristics too subtle for remote sensing imagery (see Gold et al. abstract submitted to Session T009, this meeting). We also use the remote-sensing data sets to investigate other types of offset features at other sites along the sSAF.

  8. Detection of aseismic creep along the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California with ERS-1 radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Charles L.; Rosen, Paul; Hensley, Scott; Fielding, Eric; Buckley, Sean

    1997-01-01

    The differential interferometric analysis of ERS data from Parkfield (CA) observations revealed the wide area distribution of creep along the moving fault segment of the San Andreas fault over a 15 month interval. The removal of the interferometric phase related to the surface topography was carried out. The fault was clearly visible in the differential interferogram. The magnitude of the tropospheric water vapor phase distortions is greater than the signal and hinders quantitative analysis beyond order of magnitude calculations.

  9. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes.

  10. Fault Creep along the Southern San Andreas from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, Permanent Scatterers, and Stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Suzanne; Sandwell, David

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) provides a practical means of mapping creep along major strike-slip faults. The small amplitude of the creep signal (less than 10 mm/yr), combined with its short wavelength, makes it difficult to extract from long time span interferograms, especially in agricultural or heavily vegetated areas. We utilize two approaches to extract the fault creep signal from 37 ERS SAR images along the southem San Andreas Fault. First, amplitude stacking is utilized to identify permanent scatterers, which are then used to weight the interferogram prior to spatial filtering. This weighting improves correlation and also provides a mask for poorly correlated areas. Second, the unwrapped phase is stacked to reduce tropospheric and other short-wavelength noise. This combined processing enables us to recover the near-field (approximately 200 m) slip signal across the fault due to shallow creep. Displacement maps fiom 60 interferograms reveal a diffuse secular strain buildup, punctuated by localized interseismic creep of 4-6 mm/yr line of sight (LOS, 12-18 mm/yr horizontal). With the exception of Durmid Hill, this entire segment of the southern San Andreas experienced right-lateral triggered slip of up to 10 cm during the 3.5-year period spanning the 1992 Landers earthquake. The deformation change following the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake was much smaller (4 cm) and broader than for the Landers event. Profiles across the fault during the interseismic phase show peak-to-trough amplitude ranging from 15 to 25 mm/yr (horizontal component) and the minimum misfit models show a range of creeping/locking depth values that fit the data.

  11. Modeling of periodic great earthquakes on the San Andreas fault: Effects of nonlinear crustal rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Ze'ev; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the cycle of great earthquakes along the San Andreas fault with a finite element numerical model of deformation in a crust with a nonlinear viscoelastic rheology. The viscous component of deformation has an effective viscosity that depends exponentially on the inverse absolute temperature and nonlinearity on the shear stress; the elastic deformation is linear. Crustal thickness and temperature are constrained by seismic and heat flow data for California. The models are for anti plane strain in a 25-km-thick crustal layer having a very long, vertical strike-slip fault; the crustal block extends 250 km to either side of the fault. During the earthquake cycle that lasts 160 years, a constant plate velocity v(sub p)/2 = 17.5 mm yr is applied to the base of the crust and to the vertical end of the crustal block 250 km away from the fault. The upper half of the fault is locked during the interseismic period, while its lower half slips at the constant plate velocity. The locked part of the fault is moved abruptly 2.8 m every 160 years to simulate great earthquakes. The results are sensitive to crustal rheology. Models with quartzite-like rheology display profound transient stages in the velocity, displacement, and stress fields. The predicted transient zone extends about 3-4 times the crustal thickness on each side of the fault, significantly wider than the zone of deformation in elastic models. Models with diabase-like rheology behave similarly to elastic models and exhibit no transient stages. The model predictions are compared with geodetic observations of fault-parallel velocities in northern and central California and local rates of shear strain along the San Andreas fault. The observations are best fit by models which are 10-100 times less viscous than a quartzite-like rheology. Since the lower crust in California is composed of intermediate to mafic rocks, the present result suggests that the in situ viscosity of the crustal rock is orders of magnitude

  12. A rheologically layered three-dimensional model of the San Andreas fault in central and southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles A.; Richardson, Randall M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of rheological parameters and the fault slip distribution on the horizontal and vertical deformation in the vicinity of the fault are investigated using 3D kinematic finite element models of the San Andreas fault in central and southern California. It is shown that fault models with different rheological stratification schemes and slip distributions predict characteristic deformation patterns. Models that do not include aseismic slip below the fault locking depth predict deformation patterns that are strongly dependent on time since the last earthquake, while models that incorporate the aseismic slip below the locking depth depend on time to a significantly lesser degree.

  13. Evolution of the northern santa cruz mountains by advection of crust past a san andreas fault bend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R S

    1990-07-27

    The late Quaternary marine terraces near Santa Cruz, California, reflect uplift associated with the nearby restraining bend on the San Andreas fault. Excellent correspondence of the coseismic vertical displacement field caused by the 17 October 1989 magnitude 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake and the present elevations of these terraces allows calculation of maximum long-term uplift rates 1 to 2 kilometers west of the San Andreas fault of 0.8 millimeters per year. Over several million years, this uplift, in concert with the right lateral translation of the resulting topography, and with continual attack by geomorphic processes, can account for the general topography of the northern Santa Cruz Mountains.

  14. Fault zone structure from topography: signatures of en echelon fault slip at Mustang Ridge on the San Andreas Fault, Monterey County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Hilley, George E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Prentice, Carol

    2010-01-01

    We used high-resolution topography to quantify the spatial distribution of scarps, linear valleys, topographic sinks, and oversteepened stream channels formed along an extensional step over on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Mustang Ridge, California. This location provides detail of both creeping fault landform development and complex fault zone kinematics. Here, the SAF creeps 10–14 mm/yr slower than at locations ∼20 km along the fault in either direction. This spatial change in creep rate is coincident with a series of en echelon oblique-normal faults that strike obliquely to the SAF and may accommodate the missing deformation. This study presents a suite of analyses that are helpful for proper mapping of faults in locations where high-resolution topographic data are available. Furthermore, our analyses indicate that two large subsidiary faults near the center of the step over zone appear to carry significant distributed deformation based on their large apparent vertical offsets, the presence of associated sag ponds and fluvial knickpoints, and the observation that they are rotating a segment of the main SAF. Several subsidiary faults in the southeastern portion of Mustang Ridge are likely less active; they have few associated sag ponds and have older scarp morphologic ages and subdued channel knickpoints. Several faults in the northwestern part of Mustang Ridge, though relatively small, are likely also actively accommodating active fault slip based on their young morphologic ages and the presence of associated sag ponds.

  15. Holocene Geologic Slip Rate for the Banning Strand of the Southern San Andreas Fault near San Gorgonio Pass, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P. O.; Behr, W. M.; Rood, D. H.; Kendrick, K. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault in southern California. The southern San Andreas Fault splays into the sub-parallel Banning and Mission Creek strands in the northwestern Coachella Valley, and although it has long been surmised that the Banning strand eventually accommodates the majority of displacement and transfers it into San Gorgonio Pass, until now it has been uncertain how slip is actually partitioned between these two fault strands. Our new slip rate measurement, critically located at the northwestern end of the Banning strand, overlaps within errors with the published rate for the southern San Andreas Fault measured at Biskra Palms Oasis. This indicates that the majority of southern San Andreas Fault displacement transfers from the southeastern Mission Creek strand northwest to the Banning strand and into San Gorgonio Pass. Our result corroborates the UCERF3 hazard model, and is consistent with most previous interpretations of how slip is partitioned between the Banning and Mission Creek fault strands. To measure this slip rate, we used B4 airborne LiDAR to identify the apex of an alluvial fan offset laterally 30 ± 5 m from its source. We calculated the depositional age of the fan using 10Be in-situ cosmogenic exposure dating of 5 cobbles and a depth profile. We calculated a most probable fan age of 4.0 +2.0/-1.6 ka (1σ) by combining the inheritance-corrected cobble ages assuming Gaussian uncertainty. However, the probability density function yielded a multi-peaked distribution, which we attribute to variable 10Be inheritance in the cobbles, so we favor the depth profile age of 2.2-3.6 ka. Combined, these measurements yield a late Holocene slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault of 11.1 +3.1/-3.3 mm/yr. This slip rate does not preclude possibility that some slip transfers north along the Mission Creek strand and the Garnet Hill fault, but it does confirm

  16. Scientific Drilling Into the San Andreas Fault Zone —An Overview of SAFOD’s First Five Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Hickman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFODwas drilled to study the physical and chemical processes controlling faulting and earthquake generation along an active, plate-bounding fault at depth. SAFOD is located near Parkfield, California and penetrates a section of the fault that is moving due to a combination of repeating microearthquakes and fault creep. Geophysical logs define the SanAndreas Fault Zone to be relatively broad (~200 m, containing several discrete zones only 2–3 m wide that exhibit very low P- and S-wave velocities and low resistivity. Two of these zones have progressively deformed the cemented casing at measured depths of 3192 m and 3302 m. Cores from both deforming zones contain a pervasively sheared, cohesionless, foliated fault gouge that coincides with casing deformation and explains the observed extremely low seismic velocities and resistivity. These cores are being now extensivelytested in laboratories around the world, and their composition, deformation mechanisms, physical properties, and rheological behavior are studied. Downhole measurements show that within 200 m (maximum of the active fault trace, the direction of maximum horizontal stress remains at a high angle to the San Andreas Fault, consistent with other measurements. The results from the SAFOD Main Hole, together with the stress state determined in the Pilot Hole, are consistent with a strong crust/weak fault model of the San Andreas. Seismic instrumentation has been deployed to study physics of faulting—earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest—in order to test how laboratory-derived concepts scale up to earthquakes occurring in nature.

  17. Deformation mechanisms in the San Andreas Fault zone - a comparison between natural and experimentally deformed microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diggelen, Esther; Holdsworth, Robert; de Bresser, Hans; Spiers, Chris

    2010-05-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) in California marks the boundary between the Pacific plate and the North American plate. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is located 9 km northwest of the town of Parkfield, CA and provide an extensive set of samples through the SAF. The SAFOD drill hole encountered different lithologies, including arkosic sediments from the Salinian block (Pacific plate) and claystones and siltstones from the Great Valley block (North American plate). Fault deformation in the area is mainly by a combination of micro-earthquakes and fault creep. Deformation of the borehole casing indicated that the SAFOD drill hole cross cuts two actively deforming strands of the SAF. In order to determine the deformation mechanisms in the actively creeping fault segments, we have studied thin sections obtained from SAFOD phase 3 core material using optical and electron microscopy, and we have compared these natural SAFOD microstructures with microstructures developed in simulated fault gouges deformed in laboratory shear experiments. The phase 3 core material is divided in three different core intervals consisting of different lithologies. Core interval 1 consists of mildly deformed Salinian rocks that show evidence of cataclasis, pressure solution and reaction of feldspar to form phyllosilicates, all common processes in upper crustal rocks. Most of Core interval 3 (Great Valley) is also only mildly deformed and very similar to Core interval 1. Bedding and some sedimentary features are still visible, together with limited evidence for cataclasis and pressure solution, and reaction of feldspar to form phyllosilicates. However, in between the relatively undeformed rocks, Core interval 3 encountered a zone of foliated fault gouge, consisting mostly of phyllosilicates. This zone is correlated with one of the zones of localized deformation of the borehole casing, i.e. with an actively deforming strand of the SAF. The fault gouge zone shows a strong, chaotic

  18. Southern San Andreas Fault seismicity is consistent with the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Morgan T.; Felzer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The magnitudes of any collection of earthquakes nucleating in a region are generally observed to follow the Gutenberg-Richter (G-R) distribution. On some major faults, however, paleoseismic rates are higher than a G-R extrapolation from the modern rate of small earthquakes would predict. This, along with other observations, led to formulation of the characteristic earthquake hypothesis, which holds that the rate of small to moderate earthquakes is permanently low on large faults relative to the large-earthquake rate (Wesnousky et al., 1983; Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1984). We examine the rate difference between recent small to moderate earthquakes on the southern San Andreas fault (SSAF) and the paleoseismic record, hypothesizing that the discrepancy can be explained as a rate change in time rather than a deviation from G-R statistics. We find that with reasonable assumptions, the rate changes necessary to bring the small and large earthquake rates into alignment agree with the size of rate changes seen in epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) modeling, where aftershock triggering of large earthquakes drives strong fluctuations in the seismicity rates for earthquakes of all magnitudes. The necessary rate changes are also comparable to rate changes observed for other faults worldwide. These results are consistent with paleoseismic observations of temporally clustered bursts of large earthquakes on the SSAF and the absence of M greater than or equal to 7 earthquakes on the SSAF since 1857.

  19. Climate-modulated channel incision and rupture history of the San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Ludwig, Lisa; Akçiz, Sinan O; Noriega, Gabriela R; Zielke, Olaf; Arrowsmith, J Ramón

    2010-02-26

    The spatial and temporal distribution of fault slip is a critical parameter in earthquake source models. Previous geomorphic and geologic studies of channel offset along the Carrizo section of the south central San Andreas Fault assumed that channels form more frequently than earthquakes occur and suggested that repeated large-slip earthquakes similar to the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake illustrate typical fault behavior. We found that offset channels in the Carrizo Plain incised less frequently than they were offset by earthquakes. Channels have been offset by successive earthquakes with variable slip since ~1400. This nonuniform slip history reveals a more complex rupture history than previously assumed for the structurally simplest section of the San Andreas Fault.

  20. Long Return Periods for Earthquakes in San Gorgonio Pass and Implications for Large Ruptures of the San Andreas Fault in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, J.; McBurnett, P.; Ramzan, S.

    2011-12-01

    The largest discontinuity in the surface trace of the San Andreas fault occurs in southern California at San Gorgonio Pass. Here, San Andreas motion moves through a 20 km-wide compressive stepover on the dextral-oblique-slip thrust system known as the San Gorgonio Pass fault zone. This thrust-dominated system is thought to rupture during very large San Andreas events that also involve strike-slip fault segments north and south of the Pass region. A wealth of paleoseismic data document that the San Andreas fault segments on either side of the Pass, in the San Bernardino/Mojave Desert and Coachella Valley regions, rupture on average every ~100 yrs and ~200 yrs, respectively. In contrast, we report here a notably longer return period for ruptures of the San Gorgonio Pass fault zone. For example, features exposed in trenches at the Cabezon site reveal that the most recent earthquake occurred 600-700 yrs ago (this and other ages reported here are constrained by C-14 calibrated ages from charcoal). The rupture at Cabezon broke a 10 m-wide zone of east-west striking thrusts and produced a >2 m-high scarp. Slip during this event is estimated to be >4.5 m. Evidence for a penultimate event was not uncovered but presumably lies beneath ~1000 yr-old strata at the base of the trenches. In Millard Canyon, 5 km to the west of Cabezon, the San Gorgonio Pass fault zone splits into two splays. The northern splay is expressed by 2.5 ± 0.7 m and 5.0 ± 0.7 m scarps in alluvial terraces constrained to be ~1300 and ~2500 yrs old, respectively. The scarp on the younger, low terrace postdates terrace abandonment ~1300 yrs ago and probably correlates with the 600-700 yr-old event at Cabezon, though we cannot rule out that a different event produced the northern Millard scarp. Trenches excavated in the low terrace reveal growth folding and secondary faulting and clear evidence for a penultimate event ~1350-1450 yrs ago, during alluvial deposition prior to the abandonment of the low terrace

  1. Shallow structure and geomorphology, northern San Andreas fault, Bodega Bay to Fort Ross, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Hartwell, S. R.; Manson, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    We mapped a 35-km-long section of the northwest-trending San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ), extending through Bodega Bay, crossing the onshore Bodega Head isthmus, and continuing in the offshore to Fort Ross, California. Mapping is based on integrated analysis of high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (38 fault crossings), multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, onshore geology, seafloor-sediment samples, and digital camera and video imagery. In Bodega Bay, the SAFZ comprises multiple parallel to subparallel strands that extend through a 2-km-wide basin flanked by massive basement terranes, Cretaceous granitic rock on the southwest and Jurassic and Cretaceous Franciscan Complex on the northeast. Seismic profiles reveal the smooth basin seafloor is underlain by a thin (1 to 12 m) layer of latest Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and an underlying inferred Pleistocene unit characterized by faulted and folded reflections revealing numerous angular unconformities and channels. This geology suggests that Bodega Bay originated as a pull-apart basin formed by an eastern transfer of slip within the SAFZ. If so, the pervasive internal folding and faulting of the young basin fill suggests basin subsidence has largely ended and the basin fill is now being deformed. North of the Bodega Head isthmus, the SAFZ is relatively narrow (200 to 500 m wide) and cuts across relatively flat seafloor covered by sediments derived from the Russian River and Salmon Creek. Gentle fault bends and transfers of slip between subparallel strands have resulted in small fault-zone uplifts and four distinct, elongate (~ 500- to 2300-m long), narrow (~ 200- to 300-m wide) sag basins containing as much as 56 m of inferred latest Pleistocene to Holocene sediment. The offshore mapping suggests the presence of an important, previously unrecognized onshore SAFZ strand cutting across the Bodega Head isthmus about 800 m southwest of the only reported 1906 surface rupture in the map area. Onshore, this

  2. Frictional strength heterogeneity and surface heat flow: Implications for the strength of the creeping San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alessio, M. A.; Williams, C.F.; Burgmann, R.

    2006-01-01

    Heat flow measurements along much of the San Andreas fault (SAF) constrain the apparent coefficient of friction (??app) of the fault to 0.2 should be detectable even with the sparse existing observations, implying that ??app for the creeping section is as low as the surrounding SAF. Because the creeping section does not slip in large earthquakes, the mechanism controlling its weakness is not related to dynamic processes resulting from high slip rate earthquake ruptures. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Detecting Significant Stress Drop Variations in Large Micro-Earthquake Datasets: A Comparison Between a Convergent Step-Over in the San Andreas Fault and the Ventura Thrust Fault System, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A key parameter in engineering seismology and earthquake physics is seismic stress drop, which describes the relative amount of high-frequency energy radiation at the source. To identify regions with potentially significant stress drop variations, we perform a comparative analysis of source parameters in the greater San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) and Ventura basin (VB) in southern California. The identification of physical stress drop variations is complicated by large data scatter as a result of attenuation, limited recording bandwidth and imprecise modeling assumptions. In light of the inherently high uncertainties in single stress drop measurements, we follow the strategy of stacking large numbers of source spectra thereby enhancing the resolution of our method. We analyze more than 6000 high-quality waveforms between 2000 and 2014, and compute seismic moments, corner frequencies and stress drops. Significant variations in stress drop estimates exist within the SGP area. Moreover, the SGP also exhibits systematically higher stress drops than VB and shows more scatter. We demonstrate that the higher scatter in SGP is not a generic artifact of our method but an expression of differences in underlying source processes. Our results suggest that higher differential stresses, which can be deduced from larger focal depth and more thrust faulting, may only be of secondary importance for stress drop variations. Instead, the general degree of stress field heterogeneity and strain localization may influence stress drops more strongly, so that more localized faulting and homogeneous stress fields favor lower stress drops. In addition, higher loading rates, for example, across the VB potentially result in stress drop reduction whereas slow loading rates on local fault segments within the SGP region result in anomalously high stress drop estimates. Our results show that crustal and fault properties systematically influence earthquake stress drops of small and large events and should

  4. Aseismic slip and fault-normal strain along the central creeping section of the San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandone, F.; Burgmann, R.; Agnew, D.C.; Johanson, I.A.; Templeton, D.C.; d'Alessio, M. A.; Titus, S.J.; DeMets, C.; Tikoff, B.

    2008-01-01

    We use GPS data to measure the aseismic slip along the central San Andreas fault (CSAF) and the deformation across adjacent faults. Comparison of EDM and GPS data sets implies that, except for small-scale transients, the fault motion has been steady over the last 40 years. We add 42 new GPS, velocities along the CSAF to constrain the regional strain distribution. Shear strain rates are less than 0.083 ?? 0.010 ??strain/yr adjacent to the creeping SAF, with 1-4.5 mm/yr of contraction across the Coast Ranges. Dislocation modeling of the data gives a deep, long-term slip rate of 31-35 mm/yr and a shallow (0-12 km) creep rate of 28 mm/yr along the central portion of the CSAF, consistent with surface creep measurements. The lower shallow slip rate may be due to the effect of partial locking along the CSAF or reflect reduced creep rates late in the earthquake cycle of the adjoining SAF rupture zones. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Investigation of Quaternary slip rates along the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault near San Gorgonio Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P. O.; Behr, W. M.; Rood, D.; Kendrick, K. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2013-12-01

    Present-day Pacific-North American relative plate motion in southern California is shared primarily between the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults. At the north end of the Coachella Valley, the San Andreas fault splits into the Banning and Mission Creek strands, which are sub-parallel to each other within the Indio Hills. Northwest of the Indio Hills, the Mission Creek fault diverges from the Banning and continues northwest toward the southeastern San Bernardino Mountains, but loses surface expression beneath Quaternary alluvial deposits in Morongo Wash. The Banning fault, upon exiting the Indio Hills, is deflected toward the west and transitions into a structurally complex fault zone at San Gorgonio Pass, where it is delineated by thrust scarps in Holocene alluvium. The slip rates of the Banning and Mission Creek fault strands northwest of the Indio Hills and southeast of San Gorgonio Pass are presently unconstrained, but understanding how slip is partitioned between these two strands is critical to southern California earthquake forecasting efforts. Here we present preliminary slip rate data for the Banning fault ~2 km southeast of San Gorgonio Pass at Devers Hill. Using the B4 LiDAR as a base, we have mapped the extents of three truncated and offset alluvial fan deposits, which we have differentiated based on both field and remote (LiDAR- and air photo-based) observations of texture: in particular, the distribution of different clast sizes, pavement and soil development, and color and appearance. To confirm across-fault correlation of the displaced deposits, we have measured 26 cosmogenic Be-10 ages from boulders and cobble samples taken from each of the three fan surfaces on both sides of the fault. One debris flow deposit (Q2a) has been dated to ~80 ka, and appears to be offset 1.6-2.2 km, though confirming this reconstruction will depend on future excavations and uranium-series dating of soil carbonate. A second debris flow deposit (Q2b), for which ages are

  6. New slip rate estimates for the Mission Creek strand of the San Andreas fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisniuk, K.; Scharer, K. M.; Sharp, W. D.; Burgmann, R.; Rymer, M. J.; Williams, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    The potential for a large-magnitude earthquake (Mw ≥ 6.7) on the southern San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) is generally considered high (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 2007). However, the proportion of slip accommodated by each of its three major fault strands (Mission Creek, Banning, and Garnet Hill, from north to south) in the Indio Hills is poorly constrained. Each of these strands cut through San Gorgonio Pass west to the Los Angeles metropolitan region. To better assess the relative importance of these faults and their potential for a major earthquake, we dated offsets at two sites on the Mission Creek fault in the central Indio Hills, an offset channel at Pushawalla Canyon and an offset debris cone at a small unnamed canyon located ~1.5 km farther southeast. Previous work on this strand at Biskra Palms, in the southern Indio Hills, demonstrated a slip rate between 12 and 22 mm/yr, with a preferred rate of 14-17 mm/yr (Behr et al., GSAB, 2010). It is generally assumed that the slip rate on the Mission Creek fault decreases northwestwards from Biskra Palms (e.g. Fumal et al., BSSA, 2002) towards these two sites in the central Indio Hills. However, our initial results from uranium-series dating of pedogenic carbonate and 10Be cosmogenic exposure dating of surface clasts from deposits offset 1.3-1.6 km since ~70 ka and 44-50 m since ~2.5 ka indicate that during the late Pleistocene and Holocene slip on the Mission Creek fault in the central Indio Hills has occurred at a relatively constant and unexpectedly high rate of ~20 mm/yr. Combined with published paleoseismic studies for the Mission Creek fault, which show an average earthquake recurrence interval of 225 years for the past 5 events since 900 AD (Fumal et al., 2002), these data imply an average slip-per-event of ~4.5 m. The last earthquake to rupture this section of the Mission Creek fault occurred over 300 years ago (ca. 1690), which indicates that ca. 5.0 to 7.5 m of strain may have

  7. Inferring fault rheology from low-frequency earthquakes on the San Andreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Nicholas M.; Thomas, Amanda; Bürgmann, Roland; Shelly, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Families of recurring low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) within nonvolcanic tremor (NVT) on the San Andreas fault in central California show strong sensitivity to shear stress induced by the daily tidal cycle. LFEs occur at all levels of the tidal shear stress and are in phase with the very small, ~400 Pa, stress amplitude. To quantitatively explain the correlation, we use a model from the existing literature that assumes the LFE sources are small, persistent regions that repeatedly fail during shear of a much larger scale, otherwise aseismically creeping fault zone. The LFE source patches see tectonic loading, creep of the surrounding fault which may be modulated by the tidal stress, and direct tidal loading. If the patches are small relative to the surrounding creeping fault then the stressing is dominated by fault creep, and if patch failure occurs at a threshold stress, then the resulting seismicity rate is proportional to the fault creep rate or fault zone strain rate. Using the seismicity rate as a proxy for strain rate and the tidal shear stress, we fit the data with possible fault rheologies that produce creep in laboratory experiments at temperatures of 400 to 600°C appropriate for the LFE source depth. The rheological properties of rock-forming minerals for dislocation creep and dislocation glide are not consistent with the observed fault creep because strong correlation between small stress perturbations and strain rate requires perturbation on the order of the ambient stress. The observed tidal modulation restricts ambient stress to be at most a few kilopascal, much lower than rock strength. A purely rate dependent friction is consistent with the observations only if the product of the friction rate dependence and effective normal stress is ~ 0.5 kPa. Extrapolating the friction rate strengthening dependence of phyllosilicates (talc) to depth would require the effective normal stress to be ~50 kPa, implying pore pressure is lithostatic. If the LFE

  8. Periodic, chaotic, and doubled earthquake recurrence intervals on the deep San Andreas fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R

    2010-06-11

    Earthquake recurrence histories may provide clues to the timing of future events, but long intervals between large events obscure full recurrence variability. In contrast, small earthquakes occur frequently, and recurrence intervals are quantifiable on a much shorter time scale. In this work, I examine an 8.5-year sequence of more than 900 recurring low-frequency earthquake bursts composing tremor beneath the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. These events exhibit tightly clustered recurrence intervals that, at times, oscillate between approximately 3 and approximately 6 days, but the patterns sometimes change abruptly. Although the environments of large and low-frequency earthquakes are different, these observations suggest that similar complexity might underlie sequences of large earthquakes.

  9. Clustering and periodic recurrence of microearthquakes on the san andreas fault at parkfield, california.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, R M; Foxall, W; McEvilly, T V

    1995-01-27

    The San Andreas fault at Parkfield, California, apparently late in an interval between repeating magnitude 6 earthquakes, is yielding to tectonic loading partly by seismic slip concentrated in a relatively sparse distribution of small clusters (<20-meter radius) of microearthquakes. Within these clusters, which account for 63% of the earthquakes in a 1987-92 study interval, virtually identical small earthquakes occurred with a regularity that can be described by the statistical model used previously in forecasting large characteristic earthquakes. Sympathetic occurrence of microearthquakes in nearby clusters was observed within a range of about 200 meters at communication speeds of 10 to 100 centimeters per second. The rate of earthquake occurrence, particularly at depth, increased significantly during the study period, but the fraction of earthquakes that were cluster members decreased.

  10. Locating Very-Low-Frequency Earthquakes in the San Andreas Fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Castro, A. F.; Harrington, R. M.; Cochran, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    The portion of tectonic fault where rheological properties transtition from brittle to ductile hosts a variety of seismic signals suggesting a range of slip velocities. In subduction zones, the two dominantly observed seismic signals include very-low frequency earthquakes ( VLFEs), and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) or tectonic tremor. Tremor and LFE are also commonly observed in transform faults, however, VLFEs have been reported dominantly in subduction zone environments. Here we show some of the first known observations of VLFEs occurring on a plate boundary transform fault, the San Andreas Fault (SAF) between the Cholame-Parkfield segment in California. We detect VLFEs using both permanent and temporary stations in 2010-2011 within approximately 70 km of Cholame, California. We search continous waveforms filtered from 0.02-0.05 Hz, and remove time windows containing teleseismic events and local earthquakes, as identified in the global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) and the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) catalog. We estimate the VLFE locations by converting the signal into envelopes, and cross-correlating them for phase-picking, similar to procedures used for locating tectonic tremor. We first perform epicentral location using a grid search method and estimate a hypocenter location using Hypoinverse and a shear-wave velocity model when the epicenter is located close to the SAF trace. We account for the velocity contrast across the fault using separate 1D velocity models for stations on each side. Estimated hypocentral VLFE depths are similar to tremor catalog depths ( 15-30 km). Only a few VLFEs produced robust hypocentral locations, presumably due to the difficulty in picking accurate phase arrivals with such a low-frequency signal. However, for events for which no location could be obtained, the moveout of phase arrivals across the stations were similar in character, suggesting that other observed VLFEs occurred in close proximity.

  11. Slip on the San Andreas fault at Parkfield, California, over two earthquake cycles, and the implications for seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J.; Langbein, J.

    2006-01-01

    Parkfield, California, which experienced M 6.0 earthquakes in 1934, 1966, and 2004, is one of the few locales for which geodetic observations span multiple earthquake cycles. We undertake a comprehensive study of deformation over the most recent earthquake cycle and explore the results in the context of geodetic data collected prior to the 1966 event. Through joint inversion of the variety of Parkfield geodetic measurements (trilateration, two-color laser, and Global Positioning System), including previously unpublished two-color data, we estimate the spatial distribution of slip and slip rate along the San Andreas using a fault geometry based on precisely relocated seismicity. Although the three most recent Parkfield earthquakes appear complementary in their along-strike distributions of slip, they do not produce uniform strain release along strike over multiple seismic cycles. Since the 1934 earthquake, more than 1 m of slip deficit has accumulated on portions of the fault that slipped in the 1966 and 2004 earthquakes, and an average of 2 m of slip deficit exists on the 33 km of the fault southeast of Gold Hill to be released in a future, perhaps larger, earthquake. It appears that the fault is capable of partially releasing stored strain in moderate earthquakes, maintaining a disequilibrium through multiple earthquake cycles. This complicates the application of simple earthquake recurrence models that assume only the strain accumulated since the most recent event is relevant to the size or timing of an upcoming earthquake. Our findings further emphasize that accumulated slip deficit is not sufficient for earthquake nucleation.

  12. Relating seismicity to the velocity structure of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippoldt, Rachel; Porritt, Robert W.; Sammis, Charles G.

    2017-06-01

    The central section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) displays a range of seismic phenomena including normal earthquakes, low-frequency earthquakes (LFE), repeating microearthquakes (REQ) and aseismic creep. Although many lines of evidence suggest that LFEs are tied to the presence of fluids, their geological setting is still poorly understood. Here, we map the seismic velocity structures associated with LFEs beneath the central SAF using surface wave tomography from ambient seismic noise to provide constraints on the physical conditions that control LFE occurrence. Fault perpendicular sections show that the SAF, as revealed by lateral contrasts in relative velocities, is contiguous to depths of 50 km and appears to be relatively localized at depths between about 15 and 30 km. This is consistent with the hypothesis that LFEs are shear-slip events on a deep extension of the SAF. We find that along strike variations in seismic behaviour correspond to changes in the seismic structure, which support proposed connections between fluids and seismicity. LFEs and REQs occur within low-velocity structures, suggesting that the presence of fluids, weaker minerals, or hydrous phase minerals may play an important role in the generation of slow-slip phenomena.

  13. Investigating Strain Transfer Along the Southern San Andreas Fault: A Geomorphic and Geodetic Study of Block Rotation in the Eastern Transverse Ranges, Joshua Tree National Park, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guns, K. A.; Bennett, R. A.; Blisniuk, K.

    2017-12-01

    To better evaluate the distribution and transfer of strain and slip along the Southern San Andreas Fault (SSAF) zone in the northern Coachella valley in southern California, we integrate geological and geodetic observations to test whether strain is being transferred away from the SSAF system towards the Eastern California Shear Zone through microblock rotation of the Eastern Transverse Ranges (ETR). The faults of the ETR consist of five east-west trending left lateral strike slip faults that have measured cumulative offsets of up to 20 km and as low as 1 km. Present kinematic and block models present a variety of slip rate estimates, from as low as zero to as high as 7 mm/yr, suggesting a gap in our understanding of what role these faults play in the larger system. To determine whether present-day block rotation along these faults is contributing to strain transfer in the region, we are applying 10Be surface exposure dating methods to observed offset channel and alluvial fan deposits in order to estimate fault slip rates along two faults in the ETR. We present observations of offset geomorphic landforms using field mapping and LiDAR data at three sites along the Blue Cut Fault and one site along the Smoke Tree Wash Fault in Joshua Tree National Park which indicate recent Quaternary fault activity. Initial results of site mapping and clast count analyses reveal at least three stages of offset, including potential Holocene offsets, for one site along the Blue Cut Fault, while preliminary 10Be geochronology is in progress. This geologic slip rate data, combined with our new geodetic surface velocity field derived from updated campaign-based GPS measurements within Joshua Tree National Park will allow us to construct a suite of elastic fault block models to elucidate rates of strain transfer away from the SSAF and how that strain transfer may be affecting the length of the interseismic period along the SSAF.

  14. Correlation of clayey gouge in a surface exposure of the San Andreas fault with gouge at depth from SAFOD: Implications for the role of serpentinite in fault mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Rymer, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium-rich clayey gouge similar to that comprising the two actively creeping strands of the San Andreas Fault in drill core from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) has been identified in a nearby outcrop of serpentinite within the fault zone at Nelson Creek. Each occurrence of the gouge consists of porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rocks dispersed in a fine-grained, foliated matrix of Mg-rich smectitic clays. The clay minerals in all three gouges are interpreted to be the product of fluid-assisted, shear-enhanced reactions between quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite that was tectonically entrained in the fault from a source in the Coast Range Ophiolite. We infer that the gouge at Nelson Creek connects to one or both of the gouge zones in the SAFOD core, and that similar gouge may occur at depths in between. The special significance of the outcrop is that it preserves the early stages of mineral reactions that are greatly advanced at depth, and it confirms the involvement of serpentinite and the Mg-rich phyllosilicate minerals that replace it in promoting creep along the central San Andreas Fault.

  15. Using low-frequency earthquake families on the San Andreas fault as deep creepmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Bletery, Q.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The San Andreas fault hosts tectonic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) similar to those in subduction zone environments. These LFEs are grouped into families based on waveform similarity and locate between 16 and 29 km depth along a 150-km-long section of the fault centered on Parkfield, CA. ­Within individual LFE families event occurrence is not steady. In some families, bursts of a few events recur on timescales of days while in other families there are nearly quiescent periods that often last for months followed by episodes where hundreds of events occur over the course of a few days. These two different styles of LFE occurrence are called continuous and episodic respectively. LFEs are often assumed to reflect persistent regions that periodically fail during the aseismic shear of the surrounding fault allowing them to be used as creepmeters. We test this idea by formalizing the definition of a creepmeter (the LFE occurrence rate is proportional to the local fault slip rate), determining whether this definition is consistent with the observations, and over what timescale. We use the recurrence intervals of LFEs within individual families to create a catalog of LFE bursts. For the episodic families, we consider both longer duration (multiday) inferred creep episodes (dubbed long-timescale episodic) as well as the frequent short-term bursts of events that occur many times during inferred creep episodes (dubbed short-timescale episodic). We then use the recurrence intervals of LFE bursts to estimate the timing, duration, recurrence interval, slip, and slip rate associated with inferred slow slip events. We find that continuous families and the short-timescale episodic families appear to be inconsistent with our definition of a creepmeter (defined on the recurrence interval timescale) because their estimated durations are not physically meaningful. A straight-forward interpretation of the frequent short-term bursts of the continuous and short

  16. Cradle of the Earthquake: Exploring the Underwater San Andreas Fault on the R/V Pacific Storm and the SRV Derek M. Baylis between 20100910 and 20101003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Over one hundred years after the devastating Great 1906 Earthquake that nearly destroyed San Francisco, this expedition explored the Northern San Andreas Fault, the...

  17. Constraints on the source parameters of low-frequency earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amanda M.; Beroza, Gregory C.; Shelly, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are small repeating earthquakes that occur in conjunction with deep slow slip. Like typical earthquakes, LFEs are thought to represent shear slip on crustal faults, but when compared to earthquakes of the same magnitude, LFEs are depleted in high-frequency content and have lower corner frequencies, implying longer duration. Here we exploit this difference to estimate the duration of LFEs on the deep San Andreas Fault (SAF). We find that the M ~ 1 LFEs have typical durations of ~0.2 s. Using the annual slip rate of the deep SAF and the average number of LFEs per year, we estimate average LFE slip rates of ~0.24 mm/s. When combined with the LFE magnitude, this number implies a stress drop of ~104 Pa, 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than ordinary earthquakes, and a rupture velocity of 0.7 km/s, 20% of the shear wave speed. Typical earthquakes are thought to have rupture velocities of ~80–90% of the shear wave speed. Together, the slow rupture velocity, low stress drops, and slow slip velocity explain why LFEs are depleted in high-frequency content relative to ordinary earthquakes and suggest that LFE sources represent areas capable of relatively higher slip speed in deep fault zones. Additionally, changes in rheology may not be required to explain both LFEs and slow slip; the same process that governs the slip speed during slow earthquakes may also limit the rupture velocity of LFEs.

  18. On Offset Stream Measurements and Recent Coseismic Surface Rupture in the Carrizo Section of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, B. A.; Hudnut, K. W.; Akciz, S. O.; Delano, J.; Glennie, C. L.; Prentice, C. S.; DeLong, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies using airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) topographic data have provoked debate about whether the Mw 7.9 Fort Tejon 1857 earthquake produced ~5m or ~10m of surface strike-slip displacement in the Carrizo section of the south-central San Andreas fault. Resolution of this discrepancy is important not only for understanding the proposed role of the Carrizo section in controlling repeated south-central San Andreas rupture but also for understanding the general utility of stream offset measurements for earthquake process studies. To explore if higher-resolution topographic data of the offset features would help reconcile the different interpretations, we used a mobile laser scanning (MLS) backpack-mounted system to survey 11 ~5m offset streams given 'high' quality rankings by previous studies. In our surveys, point density was on the order of 1000s pts/m^2 in comparison to 1-4 pts/m^2 for the ALSM data, enabling us to faithfully make digital elevation models with grid spacing smaller than 10cm. We adapt a geometric method that relies on a small number of user-dependent decisions to produce an offset estimate from a set of geomorphic markers (thalweg, channel margins, channel shoulders) from upstream and downstream locations. We typically derive an ensemble of at least 10 offset measurements per stream channel and from these calculate a mean and standard deviation. We also explore using gradient changes in long profiles of the offset stream reaches to diagnose the possibility of a ~10m channel experiencing 2 ~5m slip events. Preliminary results suggest a tendency towards the higher value offset estimates, although this does not necessarily preclude the possibility of two or more events causing the cumulative offset.

  19. Structural features of the San Andreas fault at Tejon Pass, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewers, T. A.; Reches, Z.; Brune, J. N.

    2002-12-01

    We mapped a 2 km belt along the San Andreas fault (SAF) in the Tejon Pass area where road cuts provide fresh exposures of the fault zone and surrounding rocks. Our 1:2,000 structural mapping is focused on analysis of faulting processes and is complementary to regional mapping at 1:12,000 scale by Ramirez (M.Sc., UC Santa Barbara, 1984). The dominant rock units are the Hungry Valley Formation of Pliocene age (clastic sediments) exposed south of the SAF, and the Tejon Lookout granite (Cretaceous) and Neenach Volcanic Formation exposed north of it. Ramirez (1983) deduced ~220 km of post-Miocene lateral slip. The local trend of the SAF is about N60W and it includes at least three main, subparallel segments that form a 200 m wide zone. The traces of the segments are quasi-linear, discontinuous, and they are stepped with respect to each other, forming at least five small pull-aparts and sag ponds in the mapping area. The three segments were not active semi-contemporaneously and the southern segment is apparently the oldest. The largest pull-apart, 60-70 m wide, displays young (Quaternary?) silt and shale layers. We found two rock bodies that are suspected as fault-rocks. One is a 1-2 m thick sheet-like body that separates the Tejon Lookout granite from young (Recent?) clastic rocks. In the field, it appears as a gouge zone composed of poorly cemented, dark clay size grains; however, the microstructure of this rock does not reveal clear shear features. The second body is the 80-120 m wide zone of Tejon Lookout granite that extends for less than 1 km along the SAF in the mapped area. It is characterized by three structural features: (1) pulverization into friable, granular material by multitude of grain-crossing fractures; (2) abundance of dip-slip small faults that are gently dipping toward and away from the SAF; and (3) striking lack of evidence for shear parallel to the SAF. The relationships between these features and the large right-lateral shear along the SAF are

  20. Southern San Andreas Fault evaluation field activity: approaches to measuring small geomorphic offsets--challenges and recommendations for active fault studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Salisbury, J. Barrett; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    In southern California, where fast slip rates and sparse vegetation contribute to crisp expression of faults and microtopography, field and high‐resolution topographic data (fault, analyze the offset values for concentrations or trends along strike, and infer that the common magnitudes reflect successive surface‐rupturing earthquakes along that fault section. Wallace (1968) introduced the use of such offsets, and the challenges in interpreting their “unique complex history” with offsets on the Carrizo section of the San Andreas fault; these were more fully mapped by Sieh (1978) and followed by similar field studies along other faults (e.g., Lindvall et al., 1989; McGill and Sieh, 1991). Results from such compilations spurred the development of classic fault behavior models, notably the characteristic earthquake and slip‐patch models, and thus constitute an important component of the long‐standing contrast between magnitude–frequency models (Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1984; Sieh, 1996; Hecker et al., 2013). The proliferation of offset datasets has led earthquake geologists to examine the methods and approaches for measuring these offsets, uncertainties associated with measurement of such features, and quality ranking schemes (Arrowsmith and Rockwell, 2012; Salisbury, Arrowsmith, et al., 2012; Gold et al., 2013; Madden et al., 2013). In light of this, the Southern San Andreas Fault Evaluation (SoSAFE) project at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) organized a combined field activity and workshop (the “Fieldshop”) to measure offsets, compare techniques, and explore differences in interpretation. A thorough analysis of the measurements from the field activity will be provided separately; this paper discusses the complications presented by such offset measurements using two channels from the San Andreas fault as illustrative cases. We conclude with best approaches for future data collection efforts based on input from the Fieldshop.

  1. San Andreas Fault, Southern California , Radar Image, Wrapped Color as Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic radar image vividly displays California's famous San Andreas Fault along the southwestern edge of the Mojave Desert, 75 kilometers (46 miles) north of downtown Los Angeles. The entire segment of the fault shown in this image last ruptured during the Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857. This was one of the greatest earthquakes ever recorded in the U.S., and it left an amazing surface rupture scar over 350 kilometers in length along the San Andreas. Were the Fort Tejon shock to happen today, the damage would run into billions of dollars, and the loss of life would likely be substantial, as the communities of Wrightwood, Palmdale, and Lancaster (among others) all lie upon or near the 1857 rupture area. The Lancaster/Palmdale area appears as bright patches just below the center of the image and the San Gabriel Mountains fill the lower left half of the image. At the extreme lower left is Pasadena. High resolution topographic data such as these are used by geologists to study the role of active tectonics in shaping the landscape, and to produce earthquake hazard maps.This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief.The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an

  2. Observations of strain accumulation across the san andreas fault near palmdale, california, with a two-color geodimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J O; Linker, M F; McGarr, A; Slater, L E

    1982-12-17

    Two-color laser ranging measurements during a 15-month period over a geodetic network spanning the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, indicate that the crust expands and contracts aseismically in episodes as short as 2 weeks. Shear strain parallel to the fault has accumulated monotonically since November 1980, but at a variable rate. Improvements in measurement precision and temporal resolution over those of previous geodetic studies near Palmdale have resulted in the definition of a time history of crustal deformation that is much more complex than formerly realized.

  3. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction: influence of serpentinite and the Coast Range Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Janet Tilden; Ponce, David A.; Graymer, Russell W.; Jachens, Robert C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    While an enormous amount of research has been focused on trying to understand the geologic history and neotectonics of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault (SAF-CF) junction, fundamental questions concerning fault geometry and mechanisms for slip transfer through the junction remain. We use potential-field, geologic, geodetic, and seismicity data to investigate the 3-D geologic framework of the SAF-CF junction and identify potential slip-transferring structures within the junction. Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Calaveras fault zones dip away from each other within the northern portion of the junction, bounding a triangular-shaped wedge of crust in cross section. This wedge changes shape to the south as fault geometries change and fault activity shifts between fault strands, particularly along the Calaveras fault zone (CFZ). Potential-field modeling and relocated seismicity suggest that the Paicines and San Benito strands of the CFZ dip 65° to 70° NE and form the southwest boundary of a folded 1 to 3 km thick tabular body of Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) within the Vallecitos syncline. We identify and characterize two steeply dipping, seismically active cross structures within the junction that are associated with serpentinite in the subsurface. The architecture of the SAF-CF junction presented in this study may help explain fault-normal motions currently observed in geodetic data and help constrain the seismic hazard. The abundance of serpentinite and related CRO in the subsurface is a significant discovery that not only helps constrain the geometry of structures but may also help explain fault behavior and the tectonic evolution of the SAF-CF junction.

  4. Fault tolerant computing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randell, B.

    1981-01-01

    Fault tolerance involves the provision of strategies for error detection damage assessment, fault treatment and error recovery. A survey is given of the different sorts of strategies used in highly reliable computing systems, together with an outline of recent research on the problems of providing fault tolerance in parallel and distributed computing systems. (orig.)

  5. Origin and spatial distribution of gas at seismogenic depths of the San Andreas Fault from drill-mud gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersberg, Thomas; Erzinger, Joerg

    2008-01-01

    Data are presented on the molecular composition of drill-mud gas from the lower sedimentary section (1800-3987 m) of the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) Main Hole measured on-line during drilling, as well as C and H isotope data from off-line mud gas samples. Hydrocarbons, H 2 and CO 2 are the most abundant non-atmospheric gases in drill-mud when drilling seismogenic zones. Gas influx into the well at depth is related to the lithology and permeability of the drilled strata: larger formation gas influx was detected when drilling through organic-rich shales and permeable sandstones. The SAF (San Andreas Fault), encountered between approximately 3100 m and 3450 m borehole depth, is generally low in gas, but is encompassed by two gas-rich zones (2700-2900 m and below 3550 m) at the fault margins with enhanced 222 Rn activities and distinct gas compositions. Within the fault, two interstratified gas-rich lenses (3150-3200 m and 3310-3340 m) consist of CO 2 and hydrocarbons (upper zone), but almost exclusively of hydrocarbons (lower zone). The isotopic composition indicates an organic source of hydrocarbons and CO 2 in the entire sedimentary section of the well. Hydrocarbons in sedimentary strata are partly of microbial origin down to ∼2500 m borehole depth. The contribution of thermogenic gas increases between ∼2500 m and 3200 m. Below ∼3200 m, hydrocarbons fully derive from thermal degradation of organic matter. The lack of H 2 in the center of the fault and the high concentration of H 2 in the fractured zones at the fault margins are consistent with H 2 formation by interaction of water with fresh silica mineral surfaces generated by tectonic activities, however, this needs to be verified by laboratory experiments. Based on these studies, it is concluded that the fault zone margins consist of strata with enhanced permeability, separated by a low-permeability fault center

  6. Tidal Sensitivity of Declustered Low Frequency Earthquake Families and Inferred Creep Episodes on the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, A.; Thomas, A.; Bletery, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are detected at depths of 16-30 km on a 150 km section of the San Andreas Fault centered at Parkfield, CA. The LFEs are divided into 88 families based on waveform similarity. Each family is thought to represent a brittle asperity on the fault surface that repeatedly slips during aseismic slip of the surrounding fault. LFE occurrence is irregular which allows families to be divided into continuous and episodic. In continuous families a burst of a few LFE events recurs every few days while episodic families experience essentially quiescent periods often lasting months followed by bursts of hundreds of events over a few days. The occurrence of LFEs has also been shown to be sensitive to extremely small ( 1kPa) tidal stress perturbations. However, the clustered nature of LFE occurrence could potentially bias estimates of tidal sensitivity. Here we re-evaluate the tidal sensitivity of LFE families on the deep San Andreas using a declustered catalog. In this catalog LFE bursts are isolated based on the recurrence intervals between individual LFE events for each family. Preliminary analysis suggests that declustered LFE families are still highly sensitive to tidal stress perturbations, primarily right-lateral shear stress (RLSS) and to a lesser extent fault normal stress (FNS). We also find inferred creep episodes initiate preferentially during times of positive RLSS.

  7. Velocity Gradient Across the San Andreas Fault and Changes in Slip Behavior as Outlined by Full non Linear Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarabba, C.; Giacomuzzi, G.; Piana Agostinetti, N.

    2017-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) near Parkfield is the best known fault section which exhibit a clear transition in slip behavior from stable to unstable. Intensive monitoring and decades of studies permit to identify details of these processes with a good definition of fault structure and subsurface models. Tomographic models computed so far revealed the existence of large velocity contrasts, yielding physical insight on fault rheology. In this study, we applied a recently developed full non-linear tomography method to compute Vp and Vs models which focus on the section of the fault that exhibit fault slip transition. The new tomographic code allows not to impose a vertical seismic discontinuity at the fault position, as routinely done in linearized codes. Any lateral velocity contrast found is directly dictated by the data themselves and not imposed by subjective choices. The use of the same dataset of previous tomographic studies allows a proper comparison of results. We use a total of 861 earthquakes, 72 blasts and 82 shots and the overall arrival time dataset consists of 43948 P- and 29158 S-wave arrival times, accurately selected to take care of seismic anisotropy. Computed Vp and Vp/Vs models, which by-pass the main problems related to linarized LET algorithms, excellently match independent available constraints and show crustal heterogeneities with a high resolution. The high resolution obtained in the fault surroundings permits to infer lateral changes of Vp and Vp/Vs across the fault (velocity gradient). We observe that stable and unstable sliding sections of the SAF have different velocity gradients, small and negligible in the stable slip segment, but larger than 15 % in the unstable slip segment. Our results suggest that Vp and Vp/Vs gradients across the fault control fault rheology and the attitude of fault slip behavior.

  8. Evaluation of hypotheses for right-lateral displacement of Neogene strata along the San Andreas Fault between Parkfield and Maricopa, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Richard G.; Barron, John A.; Powell, Charles L.

    2017-12-22

    We used geological field studies and diatom biostratigraphy to test a published hypothesis that Neogene marine siliceous strata in the Maricopa and Parkfield areas, located on opposite sides of the San Andreas Fault, were formerly contiguous and then were displaced by about 80–130 kilometers (km) of right-lateral slip along the fault. In the Maricopa area on the northeast side of the San Andreas Fault, the upper Miocene Bitterwater Creek Shale consists of hard, siliceous shale with dolomitic concretions and turbidite sandstone interbeds. Diatom assemblages indicate that the Bitterwater Creek Shale was deposited about 8.0–6.7 million years before present (Ma) at the same time as the uppermost part of the Monterey Formation in parts of coastal California. In the Parkfield area on the southwest side of the San Andreas Fault, the upper Miocene Pancho Rico Formation consists of soft to indurated mudstone and siltstone and fossiliferous, bioturbated sandstone. Diatom assemblages from the Pancho Rico indicate deposition about 6.7–5.7 Ma (latest Miocene), younger than the Bitterwater Creek Shale and at about the same time as parts of the Sisquoc Formation and Purisima Formation in coastal California. Our results show that the Bitterwater Creek Shale and Pancho Rico Formation are lithologically unlike and of different ages and therefore do not constitute a cross-fault tie that can be used to estimate rightlateral displacement along the San Andreas Fault.In the Maricopa area northeast of the San Andreas Fault, the Bitterwater Creek Shale overlies conglomeratic fan-delta deposits of the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation, which in turn overlie siliceous shale of the Miocene Monterey Formation from which we obtained a diatom assemblage dated at about 10.0–9.3 Ma. Previous investigations noted that the Santa Margarita Formation in the Maricopa area contains granitic and metamorphic clasts derived from sources in the northern Gabilan Range, on the opposite side of

  9. San Andreas Fault, Southern California, Shaded relief, wrapped color as height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic image vividly displays California's famous San Andreas Fault along the southwestern edge of the Mojave Desert, 75 kilometers (46 miles) north of downtown Los Angeles. The entire segment of the fault shown in this image last ruptured during the Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857. This was one of the greatest earthquakes ever recorded in the U.S., and it left an amazing surface rupture scar over 350 kilometers in length along the San Andreas. Were the Fort Tejon shock to happen today, the damage would run into billions of dollars, and the loss of life would likely be substantial, as the communities of Wrightwood, Palmdale, and Lancaster (among others) all lie upon or near the 1857 rupture area. The San Gabriel Mountains fill the lower left half of the image. At the extreme lower left is Pasadena. High resolution topographic data such as these are used by geologists to study the role of active tectonics in shaping the landscape, and to produce earthquake hazard maps.This image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. For the shading, a computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three

  10. Looking for Off-Fault Deformation and Measuring Strain Accumulation During the Past 70 years on a Portion of the Locked San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadman, M.; Bemis, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    Even at high tectonic rates, detection of possible off-fault plastic/aseismic deformation and variability in far-field strain accumulation requires high spatial resolution data and likely decades of measurements. Due to the influence that variability in interseismic deformation could have on the timing, size, and location of future earthquakes and the calculation of modern geodetic estimates of strain, we attempt to use historical aerial photographs to constrain deformation through time across a locked fault. Modern photo-based 3D reconstruction techniques facilitate the creation of dense point clouds from historical aerial photograph collections. We use these tools to generate a time series of high-resolution point clouds that span 10-20 km across the Carrizo Plain segment of the San Andreas fault. We chose this location due to the high tectonic rates along the San Andreas fault and lack of vegetation, which may obscure tectonic signals. We use ground control points collected with differential GPS to establish scale and georeference the aerial photograph-derived point clouds. With a locked fault assumption, point clouds can be co-registered (to one another and/or the 1.7 km wide B4 airborne lidar dataset) along the fault trace to calculate relative displacements away from the fault. We use CloudCompare to compute 3D surface displacements, which reflect the interseismic strain accumulation that occurred in the time interval between photo collections. As expected, we do not observe clear surface displacements along the primary fault trace in our comparisons of the B4 lidar data against the aerial photograph-derived point clouds. However, there may be small scale variations within the lidar swath area that represent near-fault plastic deformation. With large-scale historical photographs available for the Carrizo Plain extending back to at least the 1940s, we can potentially sample nearly half the interseismic period since the last major earthquake on this portion of

  11. The Ash of Ohlson Ranch: A well-dated Stratigraphic Marker for Constraining Deformation Across the Northern San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R. J.; Vazquez, J. A.; Fleck, R. J.; DeLong, S.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Wan, E.; Powell, C., II; Prentice, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The marine to non-marine transgressional - regressional Ohlson Ranch Formation of northern California was deposited mainly east of the San Andreas Fault and the Gualala structural block during Pliocene sea level high stands. The formation transitions eastward from marine to fluvial deposits and the marine strata are deposited on a mildly warped, pholad-bored erosional surface cut near Pliocene sea level (probably above storm wave-base), on rocks of the Coastal and Central belts of the Franciscan Complex. West of the San Andreas fault near Point Arena, a right-laterally displaced remnant of the wave-cut surface occurs at ca. 100m above modern sea level. East of the fault this surface varies in elevation from ca. 200-350m and a 12-15 cm thick light gray silicic tephra, the ash of Ohlson Ranch (AOR) locally occurs ~10m above the base of the marine section. The AOR consists of very fine-grained glass shards with conspicuous brown biotite in the upper 2 cm and rare co-magmatic clinopyroxene, hornblende and euhedral, weakly zoned zircons. The zircons are relatively uniform in size and little abraded, suggesting they are primary and not re-worked. The fine-grained nature of the AOR deposit suggests it is water lain and chemical analysis of the volcanic glass indicates that the eruptive source was in the southern Cascade Range. We analyzed both polished section mounts of zircon crystals and unpolished rims by ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) and LA-ICPMS in order to establish a precise U-Pb age for the AOR. Ages were adjusted for initial 230Th deficiency in the U-Pb chain using Th/U measured in zircon and host glass shards. Thirty-two zircon grains measured by LA-ICPMS at the University of Arizona LaserChron Center yield a mean U-Pb age of 4.58 ± 0.30 Ma (2σ , MSWD=0.53, n=23). SHRIMP analyses of zircon interiors exposed in polished epoxy-mounts yield a mean U-Pb age of 4.36 ± 0.11 Ma (2σ, MSWD 0.72, n=19). To further refine the likely eruption age of the AOR, the SHRIMP was

  12. Fault Tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, S. A.

    This thesis considered the development of fault tolerant control systems. The focus was on the category of automated processes that do not necessarily comprise a high number of identical sensors and actuators to maintain safe operation, but still have a potential for improving immunity to component...... failures. It is often feasible to increase availability for these control loops by designing the control system to perform on-line detection and reconfiguration in case of faults before the safety system makes a close-down of the process. A general development methodology is given in the thesis...... that carried the control system designer through the steps necessary to consider fault handling in an early design phase. It was shown how an existing control loop with interface to the plant wide control system could be extended with three additional modules to obtain fault tolerance: Fault detection...

  13. Structure of the 1906 near-surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault, San Francisco Peninsula segment, near Woodside, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, C.M.; Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Grove, Karen; Goldman, M.R.

    2016-07-08

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and refraction images of the 1906 surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault near Woodside, California reveal evidence for one or more additional near-surface (within about 3 meters [m] depth) fault strands within about 25 m of the 1906 surface rupture. The 1906 surface rupture above the groundwater table (vadose zone) has been observed in paleoseismic trenches that coincide with our seismic profile and is seismically characterized by a discrete zone of low P-wave velocities (Vp), low S-wave velocities (Vs), high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios. A second near-surface fault strand, located about 17 m to the southwest of the 1906 surface rupture, is inferred by similar seismic anomalies. Between these two near-surface fault strands and below 5 m depth, we observed a near-vertical fault strand characterized by a zone of high Vp, low Vs, high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios on refraction tomography images and near-vertical diffractions on seismic-reflection images. This prominent subsurface zone of seismic anomalies is laterally offset from the 1906 surface rupture by about 8 m and likely represents the active main (long-term) strand of the San Andreas Fault at 5 to 10 m depth. Geometries of the near-surface and subsurface (about 5 to 10 m depth) fault zone suggest that the 1906 surface rupture dips southwestward to join the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at about 5 to 10 m below the surface. The 1906 surface rupture forms a prominent groundwater barrier in the upper 3 to 5 m, but our interpreted secondary near-surface fault strand to the southwest forms a weaker barrier, suggesting that there has been less or less-recent near-surface slip on that strand. At about 6 m depth, the main strand of the San Andreas Fault consists of water-saturated blue clay (collected from a hand-augered borehole), which is similar to deeply weathered serpentinite observed within the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at

  14. Changes in state of stress on the southern san andreas fault resulting from the california earthquake sequence of april to june 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumé, S C; Sykes, L R

    1992-11-20

    The April to June 1992 Landers earthquake sequence in southern California modified the state of stress along nearby segments of the San Andreas fault, causing a 50-kilometer segment of the fault to move significantly closer to failure where it passes through a compressional bend near San Gorgonio Pass. The decrease in compressive normal stress may also have reduced fluid pressures along that fault segment. As pressures are reequilibrated by diffusion, that fault segment should move closer to failure with time. That fault segment and another to the southeast probably have not ruptured in a great earthquake in about 300 years.

  15. Solar system fault detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  16. Bimaterial interfaces in the south San Andreas Fault with opposite velocity contrasts NW and SE from San Gorgonio Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, Pieter-Ewald; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of fault zone head waves indicates the existence of two deep large-scale bimaterial interfaces in the structure of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) with opposite sense of velocity contrast. One interface extends from the Cajon Pass area to the San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region and is associated with a slower seismic velocity on the southwest side of the SAF. The second interface extends from the SGP region to the Coachella Valley and involves a slower seismic velocity on the northeast side. Tomographic imaging of alternating velocity structures supports the velocity contrast reversal across the SAF. The observations and expected properties of bimaterial ruptures suggest that earthquakes nucleating slightly to the NW and SE of SGP tend to propagate along the SAF in the opposite along-strike directions. This is consistent with geological and seismological evidence in the Mojave and southernmost sections of the SAF.

  17. Slip deficit on the san andreas fault at parkfield, california, as revealed by inversion of geodetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, P; Harris, R

    1986-09-26

    A network of geodetic lines spanning the San Andreas fault near the rupture zone of the 1966 Parkfield, California, earthquake (magnitude M = 6) has been repeatedly surveyed since 1959. In the study reported here the average rates of line-length change since 1966 were inverted to determine the distribution of interseismic slip rate on the fault. These results indicate that the Parkfield rupture surface has not slipped significantly since 1966. Comparison of the geodetically determined seismic moment of the 1966 earthquake with the interseismic slip-deficit rate suggests that the strain released by the latest shock will most likely be restored between 1984 and 1989, although this may not occur until 1995. These results lend independent support to the earlier forecast of an M = 6 earthquake near Parkfield within 5 years of 1988.

  18. Interaction of the san jacinto and san andreas fault zones, southern california: triggered earthquake migration and coupled recurrence intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C O

    1993-05-14

    Two lines of evidence suggest that large earthquakes that occur on either the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ) or the San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) may be triggered by large earthquakes that occur on the other. First, the great 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake in the SAFZ seems to have triggered a progressive sequence of earthquakes in the SJFZ. These earthquakes occurred at times and locations that are consistent with triggering by a strain pulse that propagated southeastward at a rate of 1.7 kilometers per year along the SJFZ after the 1857 earthquake. Second, the similarity in average recurrence intervals in the SJFZ (about 150 years) and in the Mojave segment of the SAFZ (132 years) suggests that large earthquakes in the northern SJFZ may stimulate the relatively frequent major earthquakes on the Mojave segment. Analysis of historic earthquake occurrence in the SJFZ suggests little likelihood of extended quiescence between earthquake sequences.

  19. Scientific drilling into the San Andreas fault and site characterization research: Planning and coordination efforts. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoback, M.D.

    1998-08-30

    The fundamental scientific issue addressed in this proposal, obtaining an improved understanding of the physical and chemical processes responsible for earthquakes along major fault zones, is clearly of global scientific interest. By sampling the San Andreas fault zone and making direct measurements of fault zone properties to 4.0 km at Parkfield they will be studying an active plate-boundary fault at a depth where aseismic creep and small earthquakes occur and where a number of the scientific questions associated with deeper fault zone drilling can begin to be addressed. Also, the technological challenges associated with drilling, coring, downhole measurements and borehole instrumentation that may eventually have to be faced in deeper drilling can first be addressed at moderate depth and temperature in the Parkfield hole. Throughout the planning process leading to the development of this proposal they have invited participation by scientists from around the world. As a result, the workshops and meetings they have held for this project have involved about 350 scientists and engineers from about a dozen countries.

  20. Deformed Fluvial Terraces of Little Rock Creek Capture Off-Fault Strain Adjacent to the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, A.; Scharer, K. M.; Cowgill, E.

    2017-12-01

    Examining discrepancies between geodetic and geomorphic slip-rates along major strike-slip faults is essential for understanding both fault behavior and seismic hazard. Recent work on major strike-slip faults has highlighted off-fault deformation and its potential impact on fault slip rates. However, the extent of off-fault deformation along the San Andreas Fault (SAF) remains largely uncharacterized. Along the Mojave section of the SAF, Little Rock Creek drains from south to north across the fault and has cut into alluvial terraces abandoned between 15 and 30 ka1. The surfaces offer a rare opportunity to both characterize how right-lateral slip has accumulated along the SAF over hundreds of seismic cycles, and investigate potential off-fault deformation along secondary structures, where strain accumulates at slower rates. Here we use both field observations and DEM analysis of B4 lidar data to map alluvial and tectonic features, including 9 terrace treads that stand up to 80 m above the modern channel. We interpret the abandonment and preservation of the fluvial terraces to result from episodic capture of Little Rock Creek through gaps in a shutter ridge north of the fault, followed by progressive right deflection of the river course during dextral slip along the SAF. Piercing lines defined by fluvial terrace risers suggest that the amount of right slip since riser formation ranges from 400m for the 15-ka-riser to 1200m for the 30-ka-riser. Where they are best-preserved NE of the SAF, terraces are also cut by NE-facing scarps that trend parallel to the SAF in a zone extending up to 2km from the main fault. Exposures indicate these are fault scarps, with both reverse and normal stratigraphic separation. Geomorphic mapping reveals deflections of both channel and terrace risers (up to 20m) along some of those faults suggesting they could have accommodated a component of right-lateral slip. We estimated the maximum total amount of strike-slip motion recorded by the

  1. Fault detection and isolation in systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem of fault detection and isolation of parametric faults is considered in this paper. A fault detection problem based on parametric faults are associated with internal parameter variations in the dynamical system. A fault detection and isolation method for parametric faults is formulated...... in a standard setup and a synthesis method for fault detectors is given. Further, fault detection problems with both parametric faults and faults described by external input signals are also shortly considered....

  2. Paleoearthquakes at Frazier Mountain, California delimit extent and frequency of past San Andreas Fault ruptures along 1857 trace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Weldon, Ray; Streig, Ashley; Fumal, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Large earthquakes are infrequent along a single fault, and therefore historic, well-characterized earthquakes exert a strong influence on fault behavior models. This is true of the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake (estimated M7.7–7.9) on the southern San Andreas Fault (SSAF), but an outstanding question is whether the 330 km long rupture was typical. New paleoseismic data for six to seven ground-rupturing earthquakes on the Big Bend of the SSAF restrict the pattern of possible ruptures on the 1857 stretch of the fault. In conjunction with existing sites, we show that over the last ~650 years, at least 75% of the surface ruptures are shorter than the 1857 earthquake, with estimated rupture lengths of 100 to <300 km. These results suggest that the 1857 rupture was unusual, perhaps leading to the long open interval, and that a return to pre-1857 behavior would increase the rate of M7.3–M7.7 earthquakes.

  3. Stratigraphic record of Pliocene-Pleistocene basin evolution and deformation within the Southern San Andreas Fault Zone, Mecca Hills, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, James C.; Dorsey, Rebecca J.; Housen, Bernard A.; Dimitroff, Cassidy W.; Messé, Graham T.

    2017-11-01

    A thick section of Pliocene-Pleistocene nonmarine sedimentary rocks exposed in the Mecca Hills, California, provides a record of fault-zone evolution along the Coachella Valley segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF). Geologic mapping, measured sections, detailed sedimentology, and paleomagnetic data document a 3-5 Myr history of deformation and sedimentation in this area. SW-side down offset on the Painted Canyon fault (PCF) starting 3.7 Ma resulted in deposition of the Mecca Conglomerate southwest of the fault. The lower member of the Palm Spring Formation accumulated across the PCF from 3.0 to 2.6 Ma during regional subsidence. SW-side up slip on the PCF and related transpressive deformation from 2.6 to 2.3 Ma created a time-transgressive angular unconformity between the lower and upper members of the Palm Spring Formation. The upper member accumulated in discrete fault-bounded depocenters until initiation of modern deformation, uplift, and basin inversion starting at 0.7 Ma. Some spatially restricted deposits can be attributed to the evolution of fault-zone geometric complexities. However, the deformation events at ca. 2.6 Ma and 0.7 Ma are recorded regionally along 80 km of the SAF through Coachella Valley, covering an area much larger than mapped fault-zone irregularities, and thus require regional explanations. We therefore conclude that late Cenozoic deformation and sedimentation along the SAF in Coachella Valley has been controlled by a combination of regional tectonic drivers and local deformation due to dextral slip through fault-zone complexities. We further propose a kinematic link between the 2.6-2.3 Ma angular unconformity and a previously documented but poorly dated reorganization of plate-boundary faults in the northern Gulf of California at 3.3-2.0 Ma. This analysis highlights the potential for high-precision chronologies in deformed terrestrial deposits to provide improved understanding of local- to regional-scale structural controls on basin

  4. Along-strike variations in fault frictional properties along the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, California from joint earthquake and low-frequency earthquake relocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Griffiths, Emily M.; Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of low‐frequency earthquakes (LFEs) and tectonic tremor along the Parkfield–Cholame segment of the San Andreas fault suggest slow‐slip earthquakes occur in a transition zone between the shallow fault, which accommodates slip by a combination of aseismic creep and earthquakes (fault, which accommodates slip by stable sliding (>35  km depth). However, the spatial relationship between shallow earthquakes and LFEs remains unclear. Here, we present precise relocations of 34 earthquakes and 34 LFEs recorded during a temporary deployment of 13 broadband seismic stations from May 2010 to July 2011. We use the temporary array waveform data, along with data from permanent seismic stations and a new high‐resolution 3D velocity model, to illuminate the fine‐scale details of the seismicity distribution near Cholame and the relation to the distribution of LFEs. The depth of the boundary between earthquakes and LFE hypocenters changes along strike and roughly follows the 350°C isotherm, suggesting frictional behavior may be, in part, thermally controlled. We observe no overlap in the depth of earthquakes and LFEs, with an ∼5  km separation between the deepest earthquakes and shallowest LFEs. In addition, clustering in the relocated seismicity near the 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquake hypocenter and near the northern boundary of the 1857 Mw 7.8 Fort Tejon rupture may highlight areas of frictional heterogeneities on the fault where earthquakes tend to nucleate.

  5. The ShakeOut scenario: A hypothetical Mw7.8 earthquake on the Southern San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, K.; Jones, L.; Cox, D.; Goltz, J.; Hudnut, K.; Mileti, D.; Perry, S.; Ponti, D.; Reichle, M.; Rose, A.Z.; Scawthorn, C.R.; Seligson, H.A.; Shoaf, K.I.; Treiman, J.; Wein, A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, an earthquake-planning scenario document was released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and California Geological Survey that hypothesizes the occurrence and effects of a Mw7.8 earthquake on the southern San Andreas Fault. It was created by more than 300 scientists and engineers. Fault offsets reach 13 m and up to 8 m at lifeline crossings. Physics-based modeling was used to generate maps of shaking intensity, with peak ground velocities of 3 m/sec near the fault and exceeding 0.5 m/sec over 10,000 km2. A custom HAZUS??MH analysis and 18 special studies were performed to characterize the effects of the earthquake on the built environment. The scenario posits 1,800 deaths and 53,000 injuries requiring emergency room care. Approximately 1,600 fires are ignited, resulting in the destruction of 200 million square feet of the building stock, the equivalent of 133,000 single-family homes. Fire contributes $87 billion in property and business interruption loss, out of the total $191 billion in economic loss, with most of the rest coming from shakerelated building and content damage ($46 billion) and business interruption loss from water outages ($24 billion). Emergency response activities are depicted in detail, in an innovative grid showing activities versus time, a new format introduced in this study. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  6. Geomorphological expression of a complex structural region: San Andreas Fault through the San Gorgonio Pass, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, K. J.; Matti, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region of southern California is a locus of extensive Quaternary deformation surrounding a complex section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) zone. The geomorphology of the SGP region reflects the complicated history of geologic events in the formation of this structural 'knot'. Critical questions remain in assessing earthquake hazard for this region: What is the likelihood that rupture will propagate through the SGP? If rupture is able to propagate, what pathway will connect the various fault strands? To address these questions, we focus on the geology and geomorphology of the SGP region. We have identified fault-bounded blocks, and focus on three that are developed within crystalline bedrock: the Yucaipa Ridge block (YRB) block, the Kitching Peak block (KPB), and the Pisgah Peak block (PPB). The latter two blocks are positioned south of the YRB, and partially separated from each other by the San Bernardino strand; this strand cannot be mapped at the surface as an active connection between fault strands. Both KPB and PPB are bounded to the south by the San Gorgonio Pass Fault Zone. Morphometric analyses consistently demonstrate distinctions between KPB and PPB, though the bedrock lithologies are the same. Geologic mapping of the region highlights the differences in Quaternary units within the blocks. These geomorphic and geologic distinctions lead to our interpretation that KPB and PPB have experienced markedly different uplift histories that constrain the history of dextral slip on the SAF through SGP. Specifically, although the latest Quaternary geologic setting of SGP raises questions about modern slip transfer through the Pass, the contrasting uplift histories of KPB and PPB strongly suggest that earlier in Quaternary time SGP was not a barrier to slip transfer between the Coachella Valley to the SE and the San Bernardino Basin to the NW.

  7. Geomorphology, denudation rates, and stream channel profiles reveal patterns of mountain building adjacent to the San Andreas fault in northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Hilley, George E.; Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Yokelson, Intan N.

    2017-01-01

    Relative horizontal motion along strike-slip faults can build mountains when motion is oblique to the trend of the strike-slip boundary. The resulting contraction and uplift pose off-fault seismic hazards, which are often difficult to detect because of the poor vertical resolution of satellite geodesy and difficulty of locating offset datable landforms in active mountain ranges. Sparse geomorphic markers, topographic analyses, and measurement of denudation allow us to map spatiotemporal patterns of uplift along the northern San Andreas fault. Between Jenner and Mendocino, California, emergent marine terraces found southwest of the San Andreas fault record late Pleistocene uplift rates between 0.20 and 0.45 mm yr–1 along much of the coast. However, on the northeast side of the San Andreas fault, a zone of rapid uplift (0.6–1.0 mm yr–1) exists adjacent to the San Andreas fault, but rates decay northeastward as the coast becomes more distant from the San Andreas fault. A newly dated 4.5 Ma shallow-marine deposit located at ∼500 m above sea level (masl) adjacent to the San Andreas fault is warped down to just 150 masl 15 km northeast of the San Andreas fault, and it is exposed at just 60–110 masl to the west of the fault. Landscape denudation rates calculated from abundance of cosmogenic radionuclides in fluvial sediment northeast of, and adjacent to, the San Andreas fault are 0.16–0.29 mm yr–1, but they are only 0.03–0.07 mm yr–1 west of the fault. Basin-average channel steepness and the denudation rates can be used to infer the erosive properties of the underlying bedrock. Calibrated erosion rates can then be estimated across the entire landscape using the spatial distribution of channel steepness with these erosive properties. The lower-elevation areas of this landscape that show high channel steepness (and hence calibrated erosion rate) are distinct from higher-elevation areas with systematically lower channel steepness and denudation rates

  8. Imaging Active Faults From Earthquakes in the San Gorgonio Pass - San Bernardino Mountains-San Jacinto Region, California and the Deep Continuity of the San Jacinto and San Andreas Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, L.; Carena, S.; Suppe, J.; Kao, H.

    2001-12-01

    We imaged and mapped in 3-D over 50 active faults and fault segments using earthquake locations and focal mechanisms. The majority of these faults are previously unknown or unnamed. The 3-D fault maps better define the active structure of this complex region marked by profound uncertainties over the fundamental structural framework, including the subsurface continuity and geometry of the first-order San Andreas and San Jacinto faults, as well as the existence and role of major blind faults. We used the catalog of 43,500 relocated 1975-1998 earthquakes of Richards-Dinger and Shearer (2000), separating them into coplanar clusters associated with different faults and fault strands and fitting optimized surfaces to them. A clustering algorithm was applied to the relocated earthquakes in order to obtain tighter earthquake clouds and thus better-defined fault surfaces. We used the catalog of 13,000 focal mechanisms of Hauksson (2000) to confirm the nature of the mapped faults. Examples of our results are as follows: [1] The major San Jacinto strike-slip fault is offset by an east-dipping thrust fault near Anza at a depth of 11-15 km, and a similar fault geometry may exist near San Bernardino. [2] We do not see any seismic illumination of an active through-going San Andreas fault at depth in the San Gorgonio Pass area, but we can place several constraints on its possible location and geometry on the basis of the 3-D geometry and distribution of other faults. Between 5 and 20 km depth, this area is dominated by closely spaced faults trending SE-NW, which in map view occupy a triangle delimited by the Mission Creek fault to the N, the San Jacinto fault zone to the E, and the San Jacinto Mountains to the S. To the E, some of these faults terminate against an E-W trending fault. These faults do not show any sign of having been displaced by an intersecting fault. Some of the faults we imaged have a surface area comparable to the size of the rupture on the Northridge thrust

  9. A Quantitative Assessment of DInSAR Measurements of Interseismic Deformation: The Southern San Andreas Fault Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Mariarosaria; Fialko, Yuri; Casu, Francesco; Pepe, Antonio; Lanari, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the capabilities and limitations of the Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) techniques, in particular of the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach, to measure surface deformation in active seismogenetic areas. The DInSAR analysis of low-amplitude, long-wavelength deformation, such as that due to interseismic strain accumulation, is limited by intrinsic trade-offs between deformation signals and orbital uncertainties of SAR platforms in their contributions to the interferometric phases, the latter being typically well approximated by phase ramps. Such trade-offs can be substantially reduced by employing auxiliary measurements of the long-wavelength velocity field. We use continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a properly distributed set of stations to perform a pre-filtering operation of the available DInSAR interferograms. In particular, the GPS measurements are used to estimate the secular velocity signal, approximated by a spatial ramp within the azimuth-range radar imaging plane; the phase ramps derived from the GPS data are then subtracted from the available set of DInSAR interferograms. This pre-filtering step allows us to compensate for the major component of the long-wavelength range change that, within the SBAS procedure, might be wrongly interpreted and filtered out as orbital phase ramps. With this correction, the final results are obtained by simply adding the pre-filtered long-wavelength deformation signal to the SBAS retrieved time series. The proposed approach has been applied to a set of ERS-1/2 SAR data acquired during the 1992-2006 time interval over a 200 × 200 km area around the Coachella Valley section of the San Andreas Fault in Southern California, USA. We present results of the comparison between the SBAS and the Line Of Sight (LOS)—projected GPS time series of the USGC/PBO network, as well as the mean LOS velocity fields derived using SBAS, GPS and stacking techniques. Our

  10. Fault detection and isolation in systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem of fault detection and isolation of parametric faults is considered in this paper. A fault detection problem based on parametric faults are associated with internal parameter variations in the dynamical system. A fault detection and isolation method for parametric faults is formulated...

  11. The transtensional offshore portion of the northern San Andreas fault: Fault zone geometry, late Pleistocene to Holocene sediment deposition, shallow deformation patterns, and asymmetric basin growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Jeffrey W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Goldfinger, Chris

    2017-01-01

    We mapped an ~120 km offshore portion of the northern San Andreas fault (SAF) between Point Arena and Point Delgada using closely spaced seismic reflection profiles (1605 km), high-resolution multibeam bathymetry (~1600 km2), and marine magnetic data. This new data set documents SAF location and continuity, associated tectonic geomorphology, shallow stratigraphy, and deformation. Variable deformation patterns in the generally narrow (∼1 km wide) fault zone are largely associated with fault trend and with transtensional and transpressional fault bends.We divide this unique transtensional portion of the offshore SAF into six sections along and adjacent to the SAF based on fault trend, deformation styles, seismic stratigraphy, and seafloor bathymetry. In the southern region of the study area, the SAF includes a 10-km-long zone characterized by two active parallel fault strands. Slip transfer and long-term straightening of the fault trace in this zone are likely leading to transfer of a slice of the Pacific plate to the North American plate. The SAF in the northern region of the survey area passes through two sharp fault bends (∼9°, right stepping, and ∼8°, left stepping), resulting in both an asymmetric lazy Z–shape sedimentary basin (Noyo basin) and an uplifted rocky shoal (Tolo Bank). Seismic stratigraphic sequences and unconformities within the Noyo basin correlate with the previous 4 major Quaternary sea-level lowstands and record basin tilting of ∼0.6°/100 k.y. Migration of the basin depocenter indicates a lateral slip rate on the SAF of 10–19 mm/yr for the past 350 k.y.Data collected west of the SAF on the south flank of Cape Mendocino are inconsistent with the presence of an offshore fault strand that connects the SAF with the Mendocino Triple Junction. Instead, we suggest that the SAF previously mapped onshore at Point Delgada continues onshore northward and transitions to the King Range thrust.

  12. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Pulverized Granitic Rock Adjacent to the San Andreas, Garlock and San Jacinto Faults: Implications for Earthquake Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, T. K.; Sisk, M.; Stillings, M.; Girty, G.; Dor, O.; Wechsler, N.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We present new detailed analyses of pulverized granitic rocks from sections adjacent to the San Andreas, Garlock and San Jacinto faults in southern California. Along the San Andreas and Garlock faults, the Tejon Lookout Granite is pulverized in all exposures within about 100 m of both faults. Along the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault in Horse Canyon, the pulverization of granitic rocks is highly asymmetric, with a much broader zone of pulverization along the southwest side of the Clark fault. In areas where the granite is injected as dyke rock into schist, only the granitic rock shows pulverization, demonstrating the control of rock type on the pulverization process. Chemical analyses indicate little or no weathering in the bulk of the rock, although XRD analysis shows the presence of smectite, illite, and minor kaolinite in the clay-sized fraction. Weathering products may dominate in the less than 1 micron fraction. The average grain size in all samples of pulverized granitic rock range between about 20 and 200 microns (silt to fine sand), with the size distribution in part a function of proximity to the primary slip zone. The San Andreas fault samples are generally finer than those collected from along the Garlock or San Jacinto faults. The particle size distribution for all samples is non-fractal, with a distinct slope break in the 60-100 micron range, which suggests that pulverization is not a consequence of direct shear. This average particle size is quite coarser than previous reports, which we attribute to possible measurement errors in the prior work. Our data and observations suggest that dynamic fracturing in the wall rock of these three major faults only accounts for 1% or less of the earthquake energy budget.

  13. Hydrothermal frictional strengths of rock and mineral samples relevant to the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    We compare frictional strengths in the temperature range 25–250 °C of fault gouge from SAFOD (CDZ and SDZ) with quartzofeldspathic wall rocks typical of the central creeping section of the San Andreas Fault (Great Valley sequence and Franciscan Complex). The Great Valley and Franciscan samples have coefficients of friction, μ > 0.35 at all experimental conditions. Strength is unchanged between 25° and 150 °C, but μ increases at higher temperatures, exceeding 0.50 at 250 °C. Both samples are velocity strengthening at room temperature but show velocity-weakening behavior beginning at 150 °C and stick-slip motion at 250 °C. These rocks, therefore, have the potential for unstable seismic slip at depth. The CDZ gouge, with a high saponite content, is weak (μ = 0.09–0.17) and velocity strengthening in all experiments, and μ decreases at temperatures above 150 °C. Behavior of the SDZ is intermediate between the CDZ and wall rocks: μ < 0.2 and does not vary with temperature. Although saponite is probably not stable at depths greater than ∼3 km, substitution of the frictionally similar minerals talc and Mg-rich chlorite for saponite at higher temperatures could potentially extend the range of low strength and stable slip down to the base of the seismogenic zone.

  14. Creep avalanches on San Andreas Fault and their underlying mechanism from 19 years of InSAR and seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshmanesh, M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent seismic and geodetic observations indicate that interseismic creep rate varies in both time and space. The spatial extent of creep determines the earthquake potential, while its temporal evolution, known as slow slip events (SSE), may trigger earthquakes. Although the conditions promoting fault creep are well-established, the mechanism for initiating self-sustaining and sometimes cyclic creep events is enigmatic. Here we investigate a time series of 19 years of surface deformation measured by radar interferometry between 1992 and 2011 along the Central San Andreas Fault (CSAF) to constrain the temporal evolution of creep. We show that the creep rate along the CSAF has a sporadic behavior, quantified with a Gumbel-like probability distribution characterized by longer tail toward the extreme positive rates, which is signature of burst-like creep dynamics. Defining creep avalanches as clusters of isolated creep with rates exceeding the shearing rate of tectonic plates, we investigate the statistical properties of their size and length. We show that, similar to the frequency-magnitude distribution of seismic events, the distribution of potency estimated for creep avalanches along the CSAF follows a power law, dictated by the distribution of their along-strike lengths. We further show that an ensemble of concurrent creep avalanches which aseismically rupture isolated fault compartments form the semi-periodic SSEs observed along the CSAF. Using a rate and state friction model, we show that normal stress is temporally variable on the fault, and support this using seismic observations. We propose that, through a self-sustaining fault-valve behavior, compaction induced elevation of pore pressure within hydraulically isolated fault compartments, and subsequent frictional dilation is the cause for the observed episodic SSEs. We further suggest that the 2004 Parkfield Mw6 earthquake may have been triggered by the SSE on adjacent creeping segment, which increased Coulomb

  15. Three-Dimensional Investigation of a 5 m Deflected Swale along the San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain

    KAUST Repository

    Akciz, S. O.

    2014-10-21

    Topographic maps produced from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data are useful for paleoseismic and neotectonic research because they provide submeter representation of faulting-related surface features. Offset measurements of geomorphic features, made in the field or on a remotely sensed imagery, commonly assume a straight or smooth (i.e., undeflected) pre-earthquake geometry. Here, we present results from investigation of an ∼20 cm deep and >5 m wide swale with a sharp bend along the San Andreas fault (SAF) at the Bidart fan site in the Carrizo Plain, California. From analysis of LiDAR topography images and field measurements, the swale was initially interpreted as a channel tectonically offset ∼4:7 m. Our observations from exposures in four backhoe excavations and 25 hand-dug trenchettes show that even though a sharp bend in the swale coincides with the trace of the A.D. 1857 fault rupture, the swale formed after the 1857 earthquake and was not tectonically offset. Subtle fractures observed within a surficial gravel unit overlying the 1857 rupture trace are similar to fractures previously documented at the Phelan fan and LY4 paleoseismic sites 3 and 35 km northwest of Bidart fan, respectively. Collectively, the fractures suggest that a post-1857 moderate-magnitude earthquake caused ground cracking in the Carrizo and Cholame stretches of the SAF. Our observations emphasize the importance of excavation at key locations to validate remote and ground-based measurements, and we advocate more geomorphic characterization for each site if excavation is not possible.

  16. Holocene geologic slip rate for the Mission Creek strand of the Southern San Andreas Fault, northern Coachella Valley, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, J. J.; Behr, W. M.; Sharp, W. D.; Fryer, R.; Gold, P. O.

    2016-12-01

    Slip on the southern San Andreas fault in the northwestern Coachella Valley in Southern California is partitioned between three strands, the Mission Creek, Garnet Hill, and Banning strands. In the vicinity of the Indio Hills, the NW striking Mission Creek strand extends from the Indio Hills into the San Bernardino Mountains, whereas the Banning and Garnet Hill strands strike WNW and transfer slip into the San Gorgonio Pass region. Together, these three faults accommodate 20 mm/yr of right-lateral motion. Determining which strand accommodates the majority of fault slip and how slip rates on these strands have varied during the Quaternary is critical to seismic hazard assessment for the southern California region. Here we present a new Holocene geologic slip rate from an alluvial fan offset along the Mission Creek strand at the Three Palms site in the Indio Hills. Field mapping and remote sensing using the B4 LiDAR data indicates that the Three Palms fan is offset 57 +/- 3 meters. U-series dating on pedogenic carbonate rinds collected at 25-100 cm depth within the fan deposit constrain the minimum depositional age to 3.49 +/- 0.92 ka, yielding a maximum slip rate of 16 +6.1/-3.8 mm/yr. This Holocene maximum slip rate overlaps within errors with a previously published late Pleistocene slip rate of 12-22 mm/yr measured at Biskra Palms, a few kilometers to the south. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure samples were also collected from the fan surface to bracket the maximum depositional age. These samples have been processed and are currently awaiting AMS measurement.

  17. Northern San Andreas Fault slip rates on the Santa Cruz Mountain section: 10Be dating of an offset alluvial fan complex, Sanborn County Park, Saratoga, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guns, K. A.; Prentice, C. S.; DeLong, S. B.; Kiefer, K.; Blisniuk, K.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    To better assess seismic hazard and fault behavior along the southern peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area on the Santa Cruz Mountain section of the San Andreas Fault, we combine field observations and high-resolution lidar topography data with 10Be exposure dating on offset landforms to estimate geologic fault slip rates. Our mapping at Sanborn County Park near Saratoga reveals a progression of alluvial fans and debris flows offset from their upstream sources by dextral slip on the San Andreas Fault. These upstream sources are 3 drainages, Todd Creek, Service Road Creek and Aubry Creek. Coarse alluvial deposits from each of these creeks contain large Tertiary sandstone boulders of varying size and abundance, derived from the Vaqueros Formation, that allow us to constrain the provenance of offset alluvial deposits to their upstream sources. Initial reconstruction, based on clast-count data on lithology and size from Todd Creek (n=68), Service Road Creek (N=32) and the offset deposits (n=68), suggest ≥140 m of dextral fault movement. Initial 10Be cosmogenic dating of sandstone boulders on an offset deposit from Service Road Creek yields a maximum date of 8 ka, a date uncorrected for hillslope residence and fluvial transport of inherited 10Be concentrations. These data suggest a minimum slip rate of at least 17 mm/yr on the Santa Cruz Mountain section of the San Andreas Fault in the peninsula. Ongoing analysis will refine this fault slip rate. Our preliminary data underscore the potential of this site to provide geologic slip rate estimates, and therefore answer a question critical to seismic hazard assessment, in a region where steep terrain, mass wasting, vegetation and urban development have generally made slip rate estimates challenging to obtain.

  18. Fault tolerant control for uncertain systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2006-01-01

    A fault tolerant control (FTC) architecture based on active fault diagnosis (AFD) and the YJBK (Youla, Jarb, Bongiorno and Kucera)parameterization is applied in this paper. Based on the FTC architecture, fault tolerant control of uncertain systems with slowly varying parametric faults...... is investigated. Conditions are given for closed-loop stability in case of false alarms or missing fault detection/isolation....

  19. Fault management and systems knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Pilots are asked to manage faults during flight operations. This leads to the training question of the type and depth of system knowledge required to respond to these faults. Based on discussions with multiple airline operators, there is agreement th...

  20. Experimental constraints on the relationship between clay abundance, clay fabric, and frictional behavior for the Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojatschke, Jasmaria; Scuderi, Marco M.; Warr, Laurence N.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Saffer, Demian; Marone, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The presence of smectite (saponite) in fault gouge from the Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, CA has been linked to low mechanical strength and aseismic slip. However, the precise relationship between clay mineral structure, fabric development, fault strength, and the stability of frictional sliding is not well understood. We address these questions through the integration of laboratory friction tests and FIB-SEM analysis of fault rock recovered from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole. Intact fault rock was compared with experimentally sheared fault gouge and different proportions of either quartz clasts or SAFOD clasts extracted from the sample. Nano-textural measurements show the development of localized clay particle alignment along shear folia developed within synthetic gouges; such slip planes have multiples of random distribution (MRD) values of 3.0-4.9. The MRD values measured are higher than previous estimates (MRD 1.5) that show lower degrees of shear localization and clay alignment averaged over larger volumes. The intact fault rock exhibits less well-developed nano-clay fabrics than the experimentally sheared materials, and MRD values decrease with smectite content. We show that the abundance, strength, and shape of clasts all influence fabric evolution via strain localization: quartz clasts yield more strongly developed clay fabrics than serpentine-dominated SAFOD clasts. Our results suggest that (1) both clay abundance and the development of nano-scale fabrics play a role in fault zone weakening and (2) aseismic creep is promoted by slip along clay shears with >20 wt % smectite content and MRD values ≥2.7.

  1. Southern San Andreas Fault Slip History Refined Using Pliocene Colorado River Deposits in the Western Salton Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, R. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Housen, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of Pacific-North America plate motion in the Salton Trough region (Bennett et al., 2016) are constrained by: (1) late Miocene volcanic rocks that record 255 +/-10 km of transform offset across the northern Gulf of California since 6 Ma (average 42 mm/yr; Oskin and Stock, 2003); and (2) GPS data that show modern rates of 50-52 mm/yr between Pacific and North America plates, and 46-48 mm/yr between Baja California (BC) and North America (NAM) (Plattner et al., 2007). New data from Pliocene Colorado River deposits in the Salton Trough provide an important additional constraint on the geologic history of slip on the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF). The Arroyo Diablo Formation (ADF) in the San Felipe Hills SW of the Salton Sea contains abundant cross-bedded channel sandstones deformed in the dextral Clark fault zone. The ADF ranges in age from 4.3 to 2.8 Ma in the Fish Creek-Vallecito basin, and in the Borrego Badlands its upper contact with the Borrego Formation is 2.9 Ma based on our new magnetostratigraphy. ADF paleocurrent data from a 20-km wide, NW-oriented belt near Salton City record overall transport to the SW (corrected for bedding dip, N=165), with directions ranging from NW to SE. Spatial domain analysis reveals radial divergence of paleoflow to the: W and NW in the NW domain; SW in the central domain; and S in the SE domain. Data near Borrego Sink, which restores to south of Salton City after removing offset on the San Jacinto fault zone, show overall transport to the SE. Pliocene patterns of radial paleoflow divergence strongly resemble downstream bifurcation of fluvial distributary channels on the modern Colorado River delta SW of Yuma, and indicate that Salton City has translated 120-130 km NW along the SAF since 3 Ma. We propose a model in which post-6 Ma BC-NAM relative motion gradually accelerated to 50 mm/yr by 4 Ma, continued at 50 mm/yr from 4-1 Ma, and decreased to 46 mm/yr from 1-0 Ma (split equally between the SAF and

  2. Photomosaics and event evidence from the Frazier Mountain paleoseismic site, trench 1, cuts 5–24, San Andreas Fault Zone, southern California (2010–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Fumal, Tom E.; Weldon, Ray J.; Streig, Ashley R.

    2015-08-24

    The Frazier Mountain paleoseismic site is located within the northern Big Bend of the southern San Andreas Fault (lat 34.8122° N., lon 118.9034° W.), in a small structural basin formed by the fault (fig. 1). The site has been the focus of over a decade of paleoseismic study due to high stratigraphic resolution and abundant dateable material. Trench 1 (T1) was initially excavated as a 50-m long, fault-perpendicular trench crossing the northern half of the basin (Lindvall and others, 2002; Scharer and others, 2014a). Owing to the importance of a high-resolution trench site at this location on a 200-km length of the fault with no other long paleoseismic records, later work progressively lengthened and deepened T1 in a series of excavations, or cuts, that enlarged the original excavation. Scharer and others (2014a) provide the photomosaics and event evidence for the first four cuts, which largely show the upper section of the site, represented by alluvial deposits that date from about A.D. 1500 to present. Scharer and others (2014b) discuss the earthquake evidence and dating at the site within the context of prehistoric rupture lengths and magnitudes on the southern San Andreas Fault. Here we present the photomosaics and event evidence for a series of cuts from the lower section, covering sediments that were deposited from about A.D. 500 to 1500 (fig. 2).

  3. A 15 year catalog of more than 1 million low-frequency earthquakes: Tracking tremor and slip along the deep San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are small, rapidly recurring slip events that occur on the deep extensions of some major faults. Their collective activation is often observed as a semicontinuous signal known as tectonic (or nonvolcanic) tremor. This manuscript presents a catalog of more than 1 million LFEs detected along the central San Andreas Fault from 2001 to 2016. These events have been detected via a multichannel matched-filter search, cross-correlating waveform templates representing 88 different LFE families with continuous seismic data. Together, these source locations span nearly 150 km along the central San Andreas Fault, ranging in depth from 16 to 30 km. This accumulating catalog has been the source for numerous studies examining the behavior of these LFE sources and the inferred slip behavior of the deep fault. The relatively high temporal and spatial resolutions of the catalog have provided new insights into properties such as tremor migration, recurrence, and triggering by static and dynamic stress perturbations. Collectively, these characteristics are inferred to reflect a very weak fault likely under near-lithostatic fluid pressure, yet the physical processes controlling the stuttering rupture observed as tremor and LFE signals remain poorly understood. This paper aims to document the LFE catalog assembly process and associated caveats, while also updating earlier observations and inferred physical constraints. The catalog itself accompanies this manuscript as part of the electronic supplement, with the goal of providing a useful resource for continued future investigations.

  4. Incipient Evolution of the Eastern California Shear Zone through a Transpressional Zone along the San Andreas Fault in the San Bernardino Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, W. J.; Spotila, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring long-term accumulation of strike-slip displacements and transpressional uplift is difficult where strain is accommodated across wide shear zones, as opposed to a single major fault. The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) in southern California accommodates dextral shear across several strike-slip faults, and is potentially migrating and cutting through a formerly convergent zone of the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). The advection of crust along the San Andreas fault to the SE has forced these two tectonic regimes into creating a nexus of interacting strike-slip faults north of San Gorgonio Pass. These elements make this region ideal for studying complex fault interactions, evolving fault geometries, and deformational overprinting within a wide shear zone. Using high-resolution topography and field mapping, this study aims to test whether diffuse, poorly formed strike-slip faults within the uplifted SBM block are nascent elements of the ECSZ. Topographic resolution of ≤ 1m was achieved using both lidar and UAV surveys along two Quaternary strike-slip faults, namely the Lake Peak fault and Lone Valley faults. Although the Lone Valley fault cuts across Quaternary alluvium, the geomorphic expression is obscured, and may be the result of slow slip rates. In contrast, the Lake Peak fault is located high elevations north of San Gorgonio Peak in the SBM, and displaces Quaternary glacial deposits. The deposition of large boulders along the escarpment also obscures the apparent magnitude of slip along the fault. Although determining fault offset is difficult, the Lake Peak fault does display evidence for minor right-lateral displacement, where the magnitude of slip would be consistent with individual faults within the ECSZ (i.e. ≤ 1 mm/yr). Compared to the preservation of displacement along strike-slip faults located within the Mojave Desert, the upland region of the SBM adds complexity for measuring fault offset. The distribution of strain across the entire

  5. Determining on-fault magnitude distributions for a connected, multi-fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E. L.; Parsons, T.

    2017-12-01

    A new method is developed to determine on-fault magnitude distributions within a complex and connected multi-fault system. A binary integer programming (BIP) method is used to distribute earthquakes from a 10 kyr synthetic regional catalog, with a minimum magnitude threshold of 6.0 and Gutenberg-Richter (G-R) parameters (a- and b-values) estimated from historical data. Each earthquake in the synthetic catalog can occur on any fault and at any location. In the multi-fault system, earthquake ruptures are allowed to branch or jump from one fault to another. The objective is to minimize the slip-rate misfit relative to target slip rates for each of the faults in the system. Maximum and minimum slip-rate estimates around the target slip rate are used as explicit constraints. An implicit constraint is that an earthquake can only be located on a fault (or series of connected faults) if it is long enough to contain that earthquake. The method is demonstrated in the San Francisco Bay area, using UCERF3 faults and slip-rates. We also invoke the same assumptions regarding background seismicity, coupling, and fault connectivity as in UCERF3. Using the preferred regional G-R a-value, which may be suppressed by the 1906 earthquake, the BIP problem is deemed infeasible when faults are not connected. Using connected faults, however, a solution is found in which there is a surprising diversity of magnitude distributions among faults. In particular, the optimal magnitude distribution for earthquakes that participate along the Peninsula section of the San Andreas fault indicates a deficit of magnitudes in the M6.0- 7.0 range. For the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault combination, there is a deficit in the M6.0- 6.6 range. Rather than solving this as an optimization problem, we can set the objective function to zero and solve this as a constraint problem. Among the solutions to the constraint problem is one that admits many more earthquakes in the deficit magnitude ranges for both faults

  6. Active Fault Isolation in MIMO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    Active fault isolation of parametric faults in closed-loop MIMO system s are considered in this paper. The fault isolation consists of two steps. T he first step is group- wise fault isolation. Here, a group of faults is isolated from other pos sible faults in the system. The group-wise fault...... isolation is based directly on the input/output s ignals applied for the fault detection. It is guaranteed that the fault group includes the fault that had occurred in the system. The second step is individual fault isolation in the fault group . Both types of isolation are obtained by applying dedicated...

  7. Model heat flow and magnetotellurics for the San Andreas and oceanic transform faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricard, Y.; Froidevaux, C.; Hermance, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Two-dimensional temperature structures are computed for a lithospheric shear zone in order to predict the geometry of the hot anomalous region caused by shear heating. The results are compatible with earlier one-dimensional models. The comparison with the heat flow data from California is quite satisfactory. It requires to take into account the geometrical constraints corresponding to the migration of the Mendocino triple point. This is obtained by solving the time dependent heat equation. The possibility to probe the existence of a sub-Moho hot window by magnetotelluric sounding is then examined. A drop in apparent resistivity by a factor 2 to 4 is predicted. However, the presence of conductive sedimentary basins at the surface may hide this effect in California. In this respect the ocean floor transform faults might offer a somewhat simpler site for field observations

  8. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: Observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Mühle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-02-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (Cre; ∼30 fmol kg-1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1-9 times Cre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10-980 times Cre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20-100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3- 1) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼ 7.5 ×104km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019- 3.2) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial-interglacial transitions.

  9. Arc fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  10. A reevaluation of the Pallett Creek earthquake chronology based on new AMS radiocarbon dates, San Andreas fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, K.M.; Biasi, G.P.; Weldon, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Pallett Creek paleoseismic record occupies a keystone position in most attempts to develop rupture histories for the southern San Andreas fault. Previous estimates of earthquake ages at Pallett Creek were determined by decay counting radiocarbon methods. That method requires large samples which can lead to unaccounted sources of uncertainty in radiocarbon ages because of the heterogeneous composition of organic layers. In contrast, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates may be obtained from small samples that have known carbon sources and also allow for a more complete sampling of the section. We present 65 new AMS radiocarbon dates that span nine ground-rupturing earthquakes at Pallett Creek. Overall, the AMS dates are similar to and reveal no dramatic bias in the conventional dates. For many layers, however, individual charcoal samples were younger than the conventional dates, leading to earthquake ages that are overall slightly younger than previously reported. New earthquake ages are determined by Bayesian refinement of the layer ages based on stratigraphic ordering and sedimentological constraints. The new chronology is more regular than previously published records in large part due to new samples constraining the age of event R. The closed interval from event C to 1857 has a mean recurrence of 135years (?? = 83.2 years) and a quasiperiodic coefficient of variation (COV) of 0.61. We show that the new dates and resultant earthquake chronology have a stronger effect on COV than the specific membership of this long series and dating precision improvements from sedimentation rates. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. 100 Years of Accumulated Deformation at Depth Observed in the Elizabeth Lake Tunnel, Southern San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Tayyebi, A.; Hudnut, K. W.; Davis, C. A.; Glennie, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Elizabeth Lake Tunnel was completed in 1911 to convey water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles, CA. The tunnel is approximately 8-km long and crosses the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at a depth of 90 m below the surface, measured near the tunnel mid-point. If present, a tectonic signal recorded by warping or offset of this tunnel could provide an opportunity to examine the deformation at depth in this location during the 100 years since the tunnel was constructed. A temporary closure of the tunnel for inspection and repair allowed the entire 8-km length to be surveyed using terrestrial laser scanning, providing a complete high-resolution 3D model of the tunnel. Since a high-resolution survey of the tunnel after its construction is not available for comparison, we assume that the tunnel was originally straight; this assumption is substantiated by records that indicate that the two halves of the tunnel, dug from opposite ends, met within 2.9 cm in the XY-plane and 1.6 cm in the Z-direction, at an off-fault location. Our results show 20 cm of right-lateral horizontal deformation near the estimated location of the tunnel's intersection with SAF, which agrees with the SAF sense of motion. The zone of deviation is approximately 300 m south of the SAF surface trace, and is about 350 m south of where the two tunneling crews met. This observed offset is consistent with either steady-state creep of about 2 mm/yr or possibly residual afterslip following the 1857 earthquake (that may be negligible at present). The full tectonic strain accumulation at this location would be five to ten times higher than observed, so clearly the observed deformation is only part of the expected full tectonic signal. In addition to the 20 cm short-wavelength deflection, we are examining for possible subtle longer wavelength deformation of the tunnel. The lidar model also shows significantly higher density of apparent cracking in the tunnel walls near this intercept point.

  12. Ground-rupturing earthquakes on the northern Big Bend of the San Andreas Fault, California, 800 A.D. to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Weldon, Ray; Biasi, Glenn; Streig, Ashley; Fumal, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Paleoseismic data on the timing of ground-rupturing earthquakes constrain the recurrence behavior of active faults and can provide insight on the rupture history of a fault if earthquakes dated at neighboring sites overlap in age and are considered correlative. This study presents the evidence and ages for 11 earthquakes that occurred along the Big Bend section of the southern San Andreas Fault at the Frazier Mountain paleoseismic site. The most recent earthquake to rupture the site was the Mw7.7–7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857. We use over 30 trench excavations to document the structural and sedimentological evolution of a small pull-apart basin that has been repeatedly faulted and folded by ground-rupturing earthquakes. A sedimentation rate of 0.4 cm/yr and abundant organic material for radiocarbon dating contribute to a record that is considered complete since 800 A.D. and includes 10 paleoearthquakes. Earthquakes have ruptured this location on average every ~100 years over the last 1200 years, but individual intervals range from ~22 to 186 years. The coefficient of variation of the length of time between earthquakes (0.7) indicates quasiperiodic behavior, similar to other sites along the southern San Andreas Fault. Comparison with the earthquake chronology at neighboring sites along the fault indicates that only one other 1857-size earthquake could have occurred since 1350 A.D., and since 800 A.D., the Big Bend and Mojave sections have ruptured together at most 50% of the time in Mw ≥ 7.3 earthquakes.

  13. Shallow deformation of the San Andreas fault 5 years following the 2004 Parkfield earthquake (Mw6) combining ERS2 and Envisat InSAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacques, Guillaume; de Michele, Marcello; Raucoules, Daniel; Aochi, Hideo; Rolandone, Frédérique

    2018-04-16

    This study focuses on the shallow deformation that occurred during the 5 years following the Parkfield earthquake (28/09/2004, Mw 6, San Andreas Fault, California). We use Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry (InSAR) to provide precise measurements of transient deformations after the Parkfield earthquake between 2005 and 2010. We propose a method to combine both ERS2 and ENVISAT interferograms to increase the temporal data sampling. Firstly, we combine 5 years of available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions including both ERS-2 and Envisat. Secondly, we stack selected interferograms (both from ERS2 and Envisat) for measuring the temporal evolution of the ground velocities at given time intervals. Thanks to its high spatial resolution, InSAR could provide new insights on the surface fault motion behavior over the 5 years following the Parkfield earthquake. As a complement to previous studies in this area, our results suggest that shallow transient deformations affected the Creeping-Parkfield-Cholame sections of the San Andreas Fault after the 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake.

  14. Imaging Stress Transients and Fault Zone Processes with Crosswell Continuous Active-Source Seismic Monitoring at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, F.; Taira, T.; Daley, T. M.; Marchesini, P.; Robertson, M.; Wood, T.

    2017-12-01

    Recent field and laboratory experiments identify seismic velocity changes preceding microearthquakes and rock failure (Niu et al., 2008, Nature; Scuderi et al., 2016, NatureGeo), which indicates that a continuous monitoring of seismic velocity might provide a mean of understanding of the earthquake nucleation process. Crosswell Continuous Active-Source Seismic Monitoring (CASSM) using borehole sources and sensors has proven to be an effective tool for measurements of seismic velocity and its temporal variation at seismogenic depth (Silver, et al, 2007, BSSA; Daley, et al, 2007, Geophysics). To expand current efforts on the CASSM development, in June 2017 we have begun to conduct a year-long CASSM field experiment at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) in which the preceding field experiment detected the two sudden velocity reductions approximately 10 and 2 hours before microearthquakes (Niu et al., 2008, Nature). We installed a piezoelectric source and a three-component accelerometer at the SAFOD pilot and main holes ( 1 km depth) respectively. A seismic pulse was fired from the piezoelectric source four times per second. Each waveform was recorded 150-ms-long data with a sampling rate of 48 kHz. During this one-year experiment, we expect to have 10-15 microearthquakes (magnitude 1-3) occurring near the SAFOD site, and the data collected from the new experiment would allow us to further explore a relation between velocity changes and the Parkfield seismicity. Additionally, the year-long data provide a unique opportunity to study long-term velocity changes that might be related to seasonal stress variations at Parkfield (Johnson et al., 2017, Science). We will report on initial results of the SAFOD CASSM experiment and operational experiences of the CASSM development.

  15. Photomosaics and event evidence from the Frazier Mountain paleoseismic site, trench 1, cuts 1–4, San Andreas Fault Zone, southern California (2007–2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Fumal, Tom E.; Weldon, Ray J.; Streig, Ashley R.

    2014-01-01

    The Frazier Mountain paleoseismic site is located at the northwest end of the Mojave section of the San Andreas Fault, in a small, closed depression at the base of Frazier Mountain near Tejon Pass, California (lat 34.8122° N., long 118.9034° W.). The site was known to contain a good record of earthquakes due to previous excavations by Lindvall and others (2002). This report provides data resulting from four nested excavations, or cuts, along trench 1 (T1) in 2007 and 2009 at the Frazier Mountain site. The four cuts were excavated progressively deeper and wider in an orientation perpendicular to the San Andreas Fault, exposing distal fan and marsh sediments deposited since ca. A.D. 1200. The results of the trenching show that earthquakes that ruptured the site have repeatedly produced a small depression or sag on the surface, which is subsequently infilled with sand and silt deposits. This report provides high-resolution photomosaics and logs for the T1 cuts, a detailed stratigraphic column for the deposits, and a table summarizing all of the evidence for ground rupturing paleoearthquakes logged in the trenches.

  16. Quaternary landscape development, alluvial fan chronology and erosion of the Mecca Hills at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harrison J.; Owen, Lewis A.; Dietsch, Craig; Beck, Richard A.; Caffee, Marc A.; Finkelman, Robert B.; Mahan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative geomorphic analysis combined with cosmogenic nuclide 10Be-based geochronology and denudation rates have been used to further the understanding of the Quaternary landscape development of the Mecca Hills, a zone of transpressional uplift along the southern end of the San Andreas Fault, in southern California. The similar timing of convergent uplifts along the San Andreas Fault with the initiation of the sub-parallel San Jacinto Fault suggest a possible link between the two tectonic events. The ages of alluvial fans and the rates of catchment-wide denudation have been integrated to assess the relative influence of climate and tectonic uplift on the development of catchments within the Mecca Hills. Ages for major geomorphic surfaces based on 10Be surface exposure dating of boulders and 10Be depth profiles define the timing of surface stabilization to 2.6 +5.6/–1.3 ka (Qyf1 surface), 67.2 ± 5.3 ka (Qvof2 surface), and 280 ± 24 ka (Qvof1 surface). Comparison of 10Be measurements from active channel deposits (Qac) and fluvial terraces (Qt) illustrate a complex history of erosion, sediment storage, and sediment transport in this environment. Beryllium-10 catchment-wide denudation rates range from 19.9 ± 3.2 to 149 ± 22.5 m/Ma and demonstrate strong correlations with mean catchment slope and with total active fault length normalized by catchment area. The lack of strong correlation with other geomorphic variables suggests that tectonic uplift and rock weakening have the greatest control. The currently measured topography and denudation rates across the Mecca Hills may be most consistent with a model of radial topographic growth in contrast to a model based on the rapid uplift and advection of crust.

  17. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Muhle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (CreCre; ∼30 fmol kg−1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1–9 times CreCre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10–980 times CreCre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20–100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3–1)×10−1 kg(0.3–1)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼7.5×104 km2∼7.5×104 km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg(0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial–interglacial transitions.

  18. Row fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  19. Fault tolerant control for switched linear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Dongsheng; Shi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This book presents up-to-date research and novel methodologies on fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for switched linear systems. It provides a unified yet neat framework of filtering, fault detection, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control of switched systems. It can therefore serve as a useful textbook for senior and/or graduate students who are interested in knowing the state-of-the-art of filtering, fault detection, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control areas, as well as recent advances in switched linear systems.  

  20. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas fault in southern California: Results from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) and strong ground motion expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuis, Gary S.; Bauer, Klaus; Goldman, Mark R.; Ryberg, Trond; Langenheim, Victoria; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Rymer, Michael J.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Graves, Robert; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2017-01-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) is one of the most studied strike‐slip faults in the world; yet its subsurface geometry is still uncertain in most locations. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken to image the structure surrounding the SAF and also its subsurface geometry. We present SSIP studies at two locations in the Coachella Valley of the northern Salton trough. On our line 4, a fault‐crossing profile just north of the Salton Sea, sedimentary basin depth reaches 4 km southwest of the SAF. On our line 6, a fault‐crossing profile at the north end of the Coachella Valley, sedimentary basin depth is ∼2–3  km">∼2–3  km and centered on the central, most active trace of the SAF. Subsurface geometry of the SAF and nearby faults along these two lines is determined using a new method of seismic‐reflection imaging, combined with potential‐field studies and earthquakes. Below a 6–9 km depth range, the SAF dips ∼50°–60°">∼50°–60° NE, and above this depth range it dips more steeply. Nearby faults are also imaged in the upper 10 km, many of which dip steeply and project to mapped surface fault traces. These secondary faults may join the SAF at depths below about 10 km to form a flower‐like structure. In Appendix D, we show that rupture on a northeast‐dipping SAF, using a single plane that approximates the two dips seen in our study, produces shaking that differs from shaking calculated for the Great California ShakeOut, for which the southern SAF was modeled as vertical in most places: shorter‐period (TTfault.

  1. Fault Detection for Nonlinear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a general method for designing fault detection and isolation (FDI) systems for nonlinear processes. For a rich class of nonlinear systems, a nonlinear FDI system can be designed using convex optimization procedures. The proposed method is a natural extension of methods based o...

  2. Expert System Detects Power-Distribution Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Jerry L.; Quinn, Todd M.

    1994-01-01

    Autonomous Power Expert (APEX) computer program is prototype expert-system program detecting faults in electrical-power-distribution system. Assists human operators in diagnosing faults and deciding what adjustments or repairs needed for immediate recovery from faults or for maintenance to correct initially nonthreatening conditions that could develop into faults. Written in Lisp.

  3. Andrea Cambini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten, Pia Schwarz

    2014-01-01

    Andrea Cambinis biografi (1445-1527) samt beskrivelse og analyse af værket 'Della origine de’ Turchi et imperio delli Ottomanni' (1529).......Andrea Cambinis biografi (1445-1527) samt beskrivelse og analyse af værket 'Della origine de’ Turchi et imperio delli Ottomanni' (1529)....

  4. The Elizabeth Lake paleoseismic site: Rupture pattern constraints for the past ~800 years for the Mojave section of the south-central San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, Sean; Scharer, Katherine M.; Dolan, James F.; Rhodes, Ed

    2016-01-01

    The southern San Andreas Fault in California has hosted two historic surface-rupturing earthquakes, the ~M7 1812 Wrightwood earthquake and the ~M7.9 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake (e.g., Sieh, 1978; Jacoby et al., 1988). Numerous paleoseismic studies have established chronologies of historic and prehistoric earthquakes at sites along the full length of the 1857 rupture (e.g., Sieh, 1978; Scharer et al., 2014). These studies provide an unparalleled opportunity to examine patterns of recent ruptures; however, at least two significant spatial gaps in high-quality paleoseismic sites remain. At ~100 km long each, these gaps contribute up to 100 km of uncertainty to paleo-rupture lengths and could also permit a surface rupture from an earthquake up to ~M7.2 to go undetected [using scaling relationships of Wells and Coppersmith (1994)]. Given the known occurrence of an ~M7 earthquake on this portion of the SAF (1812), it is critical to fill these gaps in order to better constrain paleo-rupture lengths and to increase the probability of capturing the full spatial record of surface rupturing earthquakes.   In this study, we target a new site within the 100 km long stretch of the San Andreas Fault between the Frazier Mountain and Pallett Creek paleoseismic sites (Figure 1), near Elizabeth Lake, California. Prior excavations at the site during 1998-1999 encountered promising stratigraphy but these studies were hindered by shallow groundwater throughout the site. We began our current phase of investigations in 2012, targeting the northwestern end of a 40 x 350 m fault-parallel depression that defines the site (Figure 2). Subsequent investigations in 2013 and 2014 focused on the southeastern end of the depression where the fault trace is constrained between topographic highs and is proximal to an active drainage. In total, our paleoseismic investigations consist of 10 fault-perpendicular trenches that cross the depression (Figure 2) and expose a >2000 year depositional record

  5. Fractal properties and simulation of micro-seismicity for seismic hazard analysis: a comparison of North Anatolian and San Andreas Fault Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naside Ozer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed statistical properties of earthquakes in western Anatolia as well as the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ in terms of spatio-temporal variations of fractal dimensions, p- and b-values. During statistically homogeneous periods characterized by closer fractal dimension values, we propose that occurrence of relatively larger shocks (M >= 5.0 is unlikely. Decreases in seismic activity in such intervals result in spatial b-value distributions that are primarily stable. Fractal dimensions decrease with time in proportion to increasing seismicity. Conversely, no spatiotemporal patterns were observed for p-value changes. In order to evaluate failure probabilities and simulate earthquake occurrence in the western NAFZ, we applied a modified version of the renormalization group method. Assuming an increase in small earthquakes is indicative of larger shocks, we apply the mentioned model to micro-seismic (M<= 3.0 activity, and test our results using San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ data. We propose that fractal dimension is a direct indicator of material heterogeneity and strength. Results from a model suggest simulated and observed earthquake occurrences are coherent, and may be used for seismic hazard estimation on creeping strike-slip fault zones.

  6. Late Quaternary slip history of the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault in San Gorgonio Pass, southern California: The role of a subsidiary left-lateral fault in strand switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Katherine J.; Matti, Jonathan; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The fault history of the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault (SAF) in the San Gorgonio Pass region, along with the reconstructed geomorphology surrounding this fault strand, reveals the important role of the left-lateral Pinto Mountain fault in the regional fault strand switching. The Mill Creek strand has 7.1–8.7 km total slip. Following this displacement, the Pinto Mountain fault offset the Mill Creek strand 1–1.25 km, as SAF slip transferred to the San Bernardino, Banning, and Garnet Hill strands. An alluvial complex within the Mission Creek watershed can be linked to palinspastic reconstruction of drainage segments to constrain slip history of the Mill Creek strand. We investigated surface remnants through detailed geologic mapping, morphometric and stratigraphic analysis, geochronology, and pedogenic analysis. The degree of soil development constrains the duration of surface stability when correlated to other regional, independently dated pedons. This correlation indicates that the oldest surfaces are significantly older than 500 ka. Luminescence dates of 106 ka and 95 ka from (respectively) 5 and 4 m beneath a younger fan surface are consistent with age estimates based on soil-profile development. Offset of the Mill Creek strand by the Pinto Mountain fault suggests a short-term slip rate of ∼10–12.5 mm/yr for the Pinto Mountain fault, and a lower long-term slip rate. Uplift of the Yucaipa Ridge block during the period of Mill Creek strand activity is consistent with thermochronologic modeled uplift estimates.

  7. Fault detection and isolation for complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chan Shi; Bayuaji, Luhur; Samad, R.; Mustafa, M.; Abdullah, N. R. H.; Zain, Z. M.; Pebrianti, Dwi

    2017-07-01

    Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) is a method to monitor, identify, and pinpoint the type and location of system fault in a complex multiple input multiple output (MIMO) non-linear system. A two wheel robot is used as a complex system in this study. The aim of the research is to construct and design a Fault Detection and Isolation algorithm. The proposed method for the fault identification is using hybrid technique that combines Kalman filter and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The Kalman filter is able to recognize the data from the sensors of the system and indicate the fault of the system in the sensor reading. Error prediction is based on the fault magnitude and the time occurrence of fault. Additionally, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is another algorithm used to determine the type of fault and isolate the fault in the system.

  8. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  9. Architecting Fault-Tolerant Software Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sözer, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of software systems makes it hard to prevent or remove all possible faults. Faults that remain in the system can eventually lead to a system failure. Fault tolerance techniques are introduced for enabling systems to recover and continue operation when they are

  10. S-wave triggering of tremor beneath the Parkfield, California, section of the San Andreas fault by the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake: observations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Peng, Zhigang; Shelly, David R.; Aiken, Chastity

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic stresses that are associated with the energetic seismic waves generated by the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan triggered bursts of tectonic tremor beneath the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault (SAF) at an epicentral distance of ∼8200  km. The onset of tremor begins midway through the ∼100‐s‐period S‐wave arrival, with a minor burst coinciding with the SHSH arrival, as recorded on the nearby broadband seismic station PKD. A more pronounced burst coincides with the Love arrival, followed by a series of impulsive tremor bursts apparently modulated by the 20‐ to 30‐s‐period Rayleigh wave. The triggered tremor was located at depths between 20 and 30 km beneath the surface trace of the fault, with the burst coincident with the S wave centered beneath the fault 30 km northwest of Parkfield. Most of the subsequent activity, including the tremor coincident with the SHSH arrival, was concentrated beneath a stretch of the fault extending from 10 to 40 km southeast of Parkfield. The seismic waves from the Tohoku epicenter form a horizontal incidence angle of ∼14°, with respect to the local strike of the SAF. Computed peak dynamic Coulomb stresses on the fault at tremor depths are in the 0.7–10 kPa range. The apparent modulation of tremor bursts by the small, strike‐parallel Rayleigh‐wave stresses (∼0.7  kPa) is likely enabled by pore pressure variations driven by the Rayleigh‐wave dilatational stress. These results are consistent with the strike‐parallel dynamic stresses (δτs) associated with the S, SHSH, and surface‐wave phases triggering small increments of dextral slip on the fault with a low friction (μ∼0.2). The vertical dynamic stresses δτd do not trigger tremor with vertical or oblique slip under this simple Coulomb failure model.

  11. Rupture Propagation through the Big Bend of the San Andreas Fault: A Dynamic Modeling Case Study of the Great Earthquake of 1857

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozos, J.

    2017-12-01

    The great San Andreas Fault (SAF) earthquake of 9 January 1857, estimated at M7.9, was one of California's largest historic earthquakes. Its 360 km rupture trace follows the Carrizo and Mojave segments of the SAF, including the 30° compressional Big Bend in the fault. If 1857 were a characteristic rupture, the hazard implications for southern California would be dire, especially given the inferred 150 year recurrence interval for this section of the fault. However, recent paleoseismic studies in this region suggest that 1857-type events occur less frequently than single-segment Carrizo or Mojave ruptures, and that the hinge of the Big Bend is a barrier to through-going rupture. Here, I use 3D dynamic rupture modeling to attempt to reproduce the rupture length and surface slip distribution of the 1857 earthquake, to determine which physical conditions allow rupture to negotiate the Big Bend of the SAF. These models incorporate the nonplanar geometry of the SAF, an observation-based heterogeneous regional velocity structure (SCEC CVM), and a regional stress field from seismicity literature. Under regional stress conditions, I am unable to produce model events that both match the observed surface slip on the Carrizo and Mojave segments of the SAF and include rupture through the hinge of the Big Bend. I suggest that accumulated stresses at the bend hinge from multiple smaller Carrizo or Mojave ruptures may be required to allow rupture through the bend — a concept consistent with paleoseismic observations. This study may contribute to understanding the cyclicity of hazard associated with the southern-central SAF.

  12. Integration of Ground-based Magnetics and Vertical Deformation Measurements for the Characterization of the San Andreas Fault at the Durmid Hill Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, K.; Polet, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Durmid Hill region is located near the termination of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Bombay Beach. This section of the fault has not experienced any major earthquakes for at least the last three centuries. During a 6 year study, Sylvester et al. (1993) collected vertical deformation measurements at Durmid Hill from monuments they installed along a 2.37 km leveling line normal to the SAF. They concluded that interseismic processes account for most of the growth at Durmid Hill and estimated more than 9 mm of uplift within the leveling line, with uniform tilt at distances greater than 500 m from the fault. Langenheim et al. (2014) created a model based on ground-based magnetic data that they collected in the same area and found a complex magnetic structure with a broad band magnetic anomaly present on the northeast side of SAF and a prominent magnetic high along the main mapped trace of the SAF. A primary objective of our study is to reoccupy the leveling line from Sylvester et al. (1993), across the SAF at Durmid Hill. Additionally, we will utilize subsurface geophysical techniques to enhance our understanding of the fault geometry along the southernmost end of the SAF and its relationship to the aseismic deformation at Durmid Hill. Elevation profiles are measured using Nikon Nivo 5C total stations and magnetic field intensity measurements are made by a GSM-19TGW v7.0 walking magnetometer, with a VLF (Very Low requency) attachment. We will present preliminary results from data sets gathered in March and May of 2017, as well as additional surveys that will be carried out in October and November. The preliminary maps produced from the results of the first magnetic surveys show two significant and distinct magnetic anomalies consistent with earlier studies. Initial monument elevation comparisons could only be made for monuments located at the north-eastern end of the leveling line, at a distance of about 1.5 km behind Bat Cave Buttes. There appear to be sections of

  13. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  14. Managing Space System Faults: Coalescing NASA's Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brian; Fesq, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Managing faults and their resultant failures is a fundamental and critical part of developing and operating aerospace systems. Yet, recent studies have shown that the engineering "discipline" required to manage faults is not widely recognized nor evenly practiced within the NASA community. Attempts to simply name this discipline in recent years has been fraught with controversy among members of the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM), Fault Management (FM), Fault Protection (FP), Hazard Analysis (HA), and Aborts communities. Approaches to managing space system faults typically are unique to each organization, with little commonality in the architectures, processes and practices across the industry.

  15. Release fault: A variety of cross fault in linked extensional fault systems, in the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro, Nivaldo

    1995-05-01

    Two types of cross faults are herein recognized: transfer faults and the newly termed release faults. Transfer faults form where cross faults connect distinct normal faults and horizontal displacements predominate over vertical ones. In contrast, release faults form where cross faults associated with individual normal faults die out within the hangingwall before connecting to other normal faults, and have predominantly vertical displacements. Release faults are geometrically required to accommodate variable displacements along the strike of a normal fault. Thus, they form to release the bending stresses in the hangingwall, and do not cut normal fault planes nor detachment surfaces at depth. Release faults have maximum throws adjacent to normal faults, and may be nearly perpendicular or obliquely oriented to the strike of the latter. Such geometry appears not to depend upon pre-existing weaknesses, but such variable orientation to normal faults is an inherent property of release faults. Release faults commonly appear as simple normal faults in seismic sections, without implying extension along the strike of rift and basins. Three-dimensional strain deformation occurs in the hangingwall only between the terminations of an individual normal fault, but regionally, release faulting is associated with plane strain deformation in linked extensional fault systems.

  16. Fault trees for diagnosis of system fault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, H.E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1977-01-01

    Methods for generating repair checklists on the basis of fault tree logic and probabilistic importance are presented. A one-step-ahead optimization procedure, based on the concept of component criticality, minimizing the expected time to diagnose system failure is outlined. Options available to the operator of a nuclear power plant when system fault conditions occur are addressed. A low-pressure emergency core cooling injection system, a standby safeguard system of a pressurized water reactor power plant, is chosen as an example illustrating the methods presented

  17. Delayed dynamic triggering of deep tremor along the Parkfield-Cholame section of the San Andreas Fault following the 2014 M6.0 South Napa earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhigang; Shelly, David R.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Large, distant earthquakes are known to trigger deep tectonic tremor along the San Andreas Fault and in subduction zones. However, there are relatively few observations of triggering from regional distance earthquakes. Here we show that a small tremor episode about 12–18 km NW of Parkfield was triggered during and immediately following the passage of surface waves from the 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa main shock. More notably, a major tremor episode followed, beginning about 12 h later, and centered SE of Parkfield near Cholame. This major episode is one of the largest seen over the past several years, containing intense activity for ~3 days and taking more than 3 weeks to return to background levels. This episode showed systematic along-strike migration at ~5 km/d, suggesting that it was driven by a slow-slip event. Our results suggest that moderate-size earthquakes are capable of triggering major tremor and deep slow slip at regional distances.

  18. Sierran affinity (?) metasedimentary rocks beneath the Coast Range Ophiolite of the Sierra Azul block east of the San Andreas fault, Santa Clara County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R. J.; Dumitru, T. A.; Ernst, W. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Loma Prieta slate (LPS) is a Ernst, 2008, GSA Special Paper 438). Weighted mean age calculations indicate a youngest zircon age cluster at about 152.5±2 Ma for the LPS, which indicates its maximum depositional age. The large number of zircons in the youngest LPS age cluster (31 out of 87) may reflect a contemporaneous volcanic source, consistent with the petrography. Zircon data for the MFS indicate earliest possible deposition at about 152 ± 1 Ma. Zircon ages >200 Ma are generally similar in the LPS and MFS, with minor age groupings at roughly 950-1450 and 1750-2100 Ma. As with the MFS, the LPS data suggest a major influence from sources in the Sierra Nevada arc, with minimal influences from sources in the Klamath Mountains and Nevada miogeocline. Available detrital zircon data require Cretaceous or younger maximum depositional ages for metaclastic terranes of the Franciscan Complex. The LPS detrital zircon data thus, are in reasonable agreement with the MFS data and permit interpretation of the LPS as displaced northward by the San Andreas and Hayward-Calaveras faults from the southwestern Great Valley margin.

  19. Synthesis of Fault-Tolerant Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eles, Petru; Izosimov, Viacheslav; Pop, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This work addresses the issue of design optimization for fault- tolerant hard real-time systems. In particular, our focus is on the handling of transient faults using both checkpointing with rollback recovery and active replication. Fault tolerant schedules are generated based on a conditional...... process graph representation. The formulated system synthesis approaches decide the assignment of fault-tolerance policies to processes, the optimal placement of checkpoints and the mapping of processes to processors, such that multiple transient faults are tolerated, transparency requirements...

  20. Active fault detection in MIMO systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on active fault detection (AFD) for MIMO systems with parametric faults. The problem of design of auxiliary inputs with respect to detection of parametric faults is investigated. An analysis of the design of auxiliary inputs is given based on analytic transfer functions...... from auxiliary input to residual outputs. The analysis is based on a singular value decomposition of these transfer functions Based on this analysis, it is possible to design auxiliary input as well as design of the associated residual vector with respect to every single parametric fault in the system...... such that it is possible to detect these faults....

  1. Structure of the San Bernardino Basin Along Two Seismic Transects: Rialto-Colton Fault to the San Andreas Fault and Along the I-215 Freeway (I-10 to SR30)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.; Steedman, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    show internal consistency and consistency with other existing geophysical data. Collectively, the data suggest that the I-215 freeway trends along the faulted edge of a pull-apart basin, within a zone where the principal slip of the San Jacinto Fault is transferred to the San Andreas Fault. Because the I-215 freeway trends at low angles to these flower-structure faults, both primary and numerous secondary faults are apparent between the I-10 exchange and State Road-30, suggesting that much of the 8-km-long segment of the I-215 freeway could experience movement along primary or secondary faults.

  2. Integrating geology and geomorphology; the key to unlocking Quaternary tectonic framework of the San Andreas Fault zone in the San Gorgonio Pass region, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, K. J.; Matti, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region of southern California is a locus of long-continued Quaternary deformation and landscape evolution within a structural complexity, colloquially referred to as a knot in the San Andreas Fault (SAF) zone. The geomorphology of the SGP region reflects the complex history of geologic events involved in the formation and resolution of this structural knot. We recognize five morphologically distinct terrains in and around SGP; the San Gorgonio Block (SGB), Yucaipa Ridge (YRB), Pisgah Peak (PPB), Kitching Peak (KPB), and Devil's Garden blocks (DGB). Morphometric analyses, including drainage density, hypsometry, topographic profiles, and stream-power measurements and discontinuities, consistently demonstrate distinctions between the blocks. Our focus in this study is on the KPB and PPB terrains, both developed in crystalline rocks of San Gabriel Mountains type. KPB is bounded on the north by the Mission Creek strand of the SAF and on the east by the Whitewater Fault; PPB is bounded on the north by the San Bernardino strand of the SAF, which continues southeastward into the core of SGP and there separates PPB from KPB. KPB has significantly greater topographic relief than PPB, and the two blocks have internal morphometric and geologic characteristics that differ significantly. Canyons in KPB lack thick Quaternary alluvial fills, and hillslopes have shed numerous bedrock landslides. Canyons in PPB contain large volumes of Middle-Pleistocene through Holocene alluvium, associated with areally extensive relict geomorphic surfaces. We use the geomorphic differences, along with geologic factors, to reconstruct tectonically driven landscape evolution over the last 100-200 Ka years. The KPB and PPB both are bounded southward by contractional structures of the San Gorgonio Pass Fault zone (SGPFZ), but geologic complexity within this zone differs markedly south of each block. South of KPB, the SGPFZ consists of multiple thrust-fault strands, some

  3. From fault classification to fault tolerance for multi-agent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Potiron, Katia; Taillibert, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Faults are a concern for Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) designers, especially if the MAS are built for industrial or military use because there must be some guarantee of dependability. Some fault classification exists for classical systems, and is used to define faults. When dependability is at stake, such fault classification may be used from the beginning of the system's conception to define fault classes and specify which types of faults are expected. Thus, one may want to use fault classification for MAS; however, From Fault Classification to Fault Tolerance for Multi-Agent Systems argues that

  4. Satellite Geodetic Constraints On Earthquake Processes: Implications of the 1999 Turkish Earthquakes for Fault Mechanics and Seismic Hazards on the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilinger, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Our principal activities during the initial phase of this project include: 1) Continued monitoring of postseismic deformation for the 1999 Izmit and Duzce, Turkey earthquakes from repeated GPS survey measurements and expansion of the Marmara Continuous GPS Network (MAGNET), 2) Establishing three North Anatolian fault crossing profiles (10 sitedprofile) at locations that experienced major surface-fault earthquakes at different times in the past to examine strain accumulation as a function of time in the earthquake cycle (2004), 3) Repeat observations of selected sites in the fault-crossing profiles (2005), 4) Repeat surveys of the Marmara GPS network to continue to monitor postseismic deformation, 5) Refining block models for the Marmara Sea seismic gap area to better understand earthquake hazards in the Greater Istanbul area, 6) Continuing development of models for afterslip and distributed viscoelastic deformation for the earthquake cycle. We are keeping close contact with MIT colleagues (Brad Hager, and Eric Hetland) who are developing models for S. California and for the earthquake cycle in general (Hetland, 2006). In addition, our Turkish partners at the Marmara Research Center have undertaken repeat, micro-gravity measurements at the MAGNET sites and have provided us estimates of gravity change during the period 2003 - 2005.

  5. Earthquake epicenters and fault intersections in central and southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator); Silverstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identifed the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery provided evidence for the existence of short transverse fault segments lodged between faults of the San Andreas system in the Coast Ranges, California. They indicate that an early episode of transverse shear has affected the Coast Ranges prior to the establishment of the present San Andreas fault. The fault has been offset by transverse faults of the Transverse Ranges. It appears feasible to identify from ERTS-1 imagery geomorphic criteria of recent fault movements. Plots of historic earthquakes in the Coast Ranges and western Transverse Ranges show clusters in areas where structures are complicated by interaction of tow active fault systems. A fault lineament apparently not previously mapped was identified in the Uinta Mountains, Utah. Part of the lineament show evidence of recent faulting which corresponds to a moderate earthquake cluster.

  6. Fault isolability conditions for linear systems with additive faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we shall show that an unlimited number of additive single faults can be isolated under mild conditions if a general isolation scheme is applied. Multiple faults are also covered. The approach is algebraic and is based on a set representation of faults, where all faults within a set...... can occur simultaneously, whereas faults belonging to different fault sets appear disjoint in time. The proposed fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme consists of three steps. A fault detection (FD) step is followed by a fault set isolation (FSI) step. Here the fault set is isolated wherein...... the faults have occurred. The last step is a fault isolation (FI) of the faults occurring in a specific fault set, i.e. equivalent with the standard FI step....

  7. San Andreas Fault dip, Peninsular Ranges mafic lower crust and partial melt in the Salton Trough, Southern California, from ambient-noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Shahar; Klemperer, Simon L.; Lawrence, Jesse F.

    2015-11-01

    We use ambient-noise tomography to improve CVM-H11.9, a community velocity model of southern California. Our new 3-D shear-velocity model with 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks reveals new structure beneath the San Andreas Fault (SAF), Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB), southern Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB), and the Salton Trough (ST). We use 4 years of data recorded on 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies and including our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40 station transect across the ST, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the United States. Mean lower crust and upper mantle wave speeds (3.6 km/s at 20 km, 4.2 km/s at 40 km) are low by global standards. Across the SAF, southeast of San Gorgonio Pass, we observe vertical to steeply dipping lateral velocity contrasts that extend beneath the Moho. Beneath the western PRB and westernmost southern SNB, we observe relatively high shear velocities (≥3.8 km/s) in the lower crust that we interpret as the mafic roots of the overlying arc. Relatively high-velocity upper mantle (up to ˜4.5 km/s) may be part of the intact arc, or possibly a remnant of the Farallon plate. Beneath the ST, we observe zones of low shear-velocity in the lower crust and upper mantle which permit up to ˜4.5% melt in the lower crust and up to ˜6% melt in the upper mantle, depending on the assumed composition and pore geometry. Our results preclude the existence of older continental crust beneath the ST and support the creation of new crust beneath the ST.

  8. Using a modified time-reverse imaging technique to locate low-frequency earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Tobias; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to locate low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) within tectonic tremor episodes based on time-reverse imaging techniques. The modified time-reverse imaging technique presented here is the first method that locates individual LFEs within tremor episodes within 5 km uncertainty without relying on high-amplitude P-wave arrivals and that produces similar hypocentral locations to methods that locate events by stacking hundreds of LFEs without having to assume event co-location. In contrast to classic time-reverse imaging algorithms, we implement a modification to the method that searches for phase coherence over a short time period rather than identifying the maximum amplitude of a superpositioned wavefield. The method is independent of amplitude and can help constrain event origin time. The method uses individual LFE origin times, but does not rely on a priori information on LFE templates and families.We apply the method to locate 34 individual LFEs within tremor episodes that occur between 2010 and 2011 on the San Andreas Fault, near Cholame, California. Individual LFE location accuracies range from 2.6 to 5 km horizontally and 4.8 km vertically. Other methods that have been able to locate individual LFEs with accuracy of less than 5 km have mainly used large-amplitude events where a P-phase arrival can be identified. The method described here has the potential to locate a larger number of individual low-amplitude events with only the S-phase arrival. Location accuracy is controlled by the velocity model resolution and the wavelength of the dominant energy of the signal. Location results are also dependent on the number of stations used and are negligibly correlated with other factors such as the maximum gap in azimuthal coverage, source–station distance and signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Evidence for Cyclic Brittle-Ductile Deformation from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) Phase 3 Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. C.; Kennedy, L.

    2010-12-01

    Microstructural development in core retrieved from SAFOD Phase 3 drilling has been examined in three locations utilizing light, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM): (1) within the Salinian Terrane near its contact with the presumed Great Valley sequence (Hole E-Run 1-Section 4 & 6); (2) proximal to the Southwest Deformation Zone (SDZ) with which are associated casing deformation and seismic aftershocks indicative of active faulting (Hole G-Run-1-Section 2 & Hole G-Run 2-Section 3); and (3) within the Central Deformation Zone (CDZ) in the centre of the damage zone identified in Phase 2 drilling (Hole G-Run 4-Section 2). The sampling locations translate to an across-strike distance from outside the damage zone to its centre of approximately 125 meters, and a change in current measured depth from 2610 m to 2685m. Common to all cores are: (1) a significant fractional volume (quartz and perthitic feldspar clasts that locally form slightly foliated cataclasite. The matrix is commonly chloritic with very fine-grained aggregates and zones of quartz and/or feldspar. Microbrecciation is ubiquitous. There are both fluid-corroded clasts, particularly of quartz, and globular infillings of calcite with sutured contacts. Quartz and feldspar grains are coated by chlorite. Amorphous silica and secondary Ti-Fe oxides occur within cataclasite. Foliated siltstone-shale cataclasites (G12, G23) at the edge of the damage zone close to the SDZ exhibit brecciation and cataclasis at different scales; deformation is episodic as there are distinct overprinting relationships. The fine-grained matrix exhibits a strong SPO of phyllosilicates and cryptocrystalline quartz (quartz is introduced as fine stringer veins that are progressively incorporated into the overall fabric. Similar thin calcite veins form parallel to the cataclastic foliation, suggestive of fault parallel hydraulic fracture. Coarser grained phyllosilicate zones develop C-S type fabrics with dextral

  10. Advanced cloud fault tolerance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumangali, K.; Benny, Niketa

    2017-11-01

    Cloud computing has become a prevalent on-demand service on the internet to store, manage and process data. A pitfall that accompanies cloud computing is the failures that can be encountered in the cloud. To overcome these failures, we require a fault tolerance mechanism to abstract faults from users. We have proposed a fault tolerant architecture, which is a combination of proactive and reactive fault tolerance. This architecture essentially increases the reliability and the availability of the cloud. In the future, we would like to compare evaluations of our proposed architecture with existing architectures and further improve it.

  11. Faults and Diagnosis Systems in Power Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo-Beum; Choi, Uimin

    2014-01-01

    efforts have been put into making these systems better in terms of reliability in order to achieve high power source availability, reduce the cost of energy and also increase the reliability of overall systems. Among the components used in power converters, a power device and a capacitor fault occurs most...... frequently. Therefore, it is important to monitor the power device and capacitor fault to increase the reliability of power electronics. In this chapter, the diagnosis methods for power device fault will be discussed by dividing into open- and short-circuit faults. Then, the condition monitoring methods...

  12. Fault analysis of multichannel spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Lollar, Louis F.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center proposes to implement computer-controlled fault injection into an electrical power system breadboard to study the reactions of the various control elements of this breadboard. Elements under study include the remote power controllers, the algorithms in the control computers, and the artificially intelligent control programs resident in this breadboard. To this end, a study of electrical power system faults is being performed to yield a list of the most common power system faults. The results of this study will be applied to a multichannel high-voltage DC spacecraft power system called the large autonomous spacecraft electrical power system (LASEPS) breadboard. The results of the power system fault study and the planned implementation of these faults into the LASEPS breadboard are described.

  13. How fault evolution changes strain partitioning and fault slip rates in Southern California: Results from geodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiyang; Liu, Mian

    2017-08-01

    In Southern California, the Pacific-North America relative plate motion is accommodated by the complex southern San Andreas Fault system that includes many young faults (faults and their impact on strain partitioning and fault slip rates are important for understanding the evolution of this plate boundary zone and assessing earthquake hazard in Southern California. Using a three-dimensional viscoelastoplastic finite element model, we have investigated how this plate boundary fault system has evolved to accommodate the relative plate motion in Southern California. Our results show that when the plate boundary faults are not optimally configured to accommodate the relative plate motion, strain is localized in places where new faults would initiate to improve the mechanical efficiency of the fault system. In particular, the Eastern California Shear Zone, the San Jacinto Fault, the Elsinore Fault, and the offshore dextral faults all developed in places of highly localized strain. These younger faults compensate for the reduced fault slip on the San Andreas Fault proper because of the Big Bend, a major restraining bend. The evolution of the fault system changes the apportionment of fault slip rates over time, which may explain some of the slip rate discrepancy between geological and geodetic measurements in Southern California. For the present fault configuration, our model predicts localized strain in western Transverse Ranges and along the dextral faults across the Mojave Desert, where numerous damaging earthquakes occurred in recent years.

  14. Explaining the current geodetic field with geological models: A case study of the Haiyuan fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daout, S.; Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.; Barbot, S.; Peltzer, G.; Tapponnier, P.

    2015-12-01

    Oblique convergence across Tibet leads to slip partitioning with the co-existence of strike-slip, normal and thrust motion in major fault systems. While such complexity has been shown at the surface, the question is to understand how faults interact and accumulate strain at depth. Here, we process InSAR data across the central Haiyuan restraining bend, at the north-eastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau and show that the surface complexity can be explained by partitioning of a uniform deep-seated convergence rate. We construct a time series of ground deformation, from Envisat radar data spanning from 2001-2011 period, across a challenging area because of the high jump in topography between the desert environment and the plateau. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we used the latest Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry methodology, such as Global Atmospheric Models (ERA Interim) and Digital Elevation Model errors corrections before unwrapping. We then developed a new Bayesian approach, jointly inverting our InSAR time series together with published GPS displacements. We explore fault system geometry at depth and associated slip rates and determine a uniform N86±7E° convergence rate of 8.45±1.4 mm/yr across the whole fault system with a variable partitioning west and east of a major extensional fault-jog. Our 2D model gives a quantitative understanding of how crustal deformation is accumulated by the various branches of this thrust/strike-slip fault system and demonstrate the importance of the geometry of the Haiyuan Fault, controlling the partitioning or the extrusion of the block motion. The approach we have developed would allow constraining the low strain accumulation along deep faults, like for example for the blind thrust faults or possible detachment in the San Andreas "big bend", which are often associated to a poorly understood seismic hazard.

  15. Software fault tolerance in computer operating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Lee, Inhwan

    1994-01-01

    This chapter provides data and analysis of the dependability and fault tolerance for three operating systems: the Tandem/GUARDIAN fault-tolerant system, the VAX/VMS distributed system, and the IBM/MVS system. Based on measurements from these systems, basic software error characteristics are investigated. Fault tolerance in operating systems resulting from the use of process pairs and recovery routines is evaluated. Two levels of models are developed to analyze error and recovery processes inside an operating system and interactions among multiple instances of an operating system running in a distributed environment. The measurements show that the use of process pairs in Tandem systems, which was originally intended for tolerating hardware faults, allows the system to tolerate about 70% of defects in system software that result in processor failures. The loose coupling between processors which results in the backup execution (the processor state and the sequence of events occurring) being different from the original execution is a major reason for the measured software fault tolerance. The IBM/MVS system fault tolerance almost doubles when recovery routines are provided, in comparison to the case in which no recovery routines are available. However, even when recovery routines are provided, there is almost a 50% chance of system failure when critical system jobs are involved.

  16. Cell boundary fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  17. Fault detection and fault-tolerant control for nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Linlin Li addresses the analysis and design issues of observer-based FD and FTC for nonlinear systems. The author analyses the existence conditions for the nonlinear observer-based FD systems to gain a deeper insight into the construction of FD systems. Aided by the T-S fuzzy technique, she recommends different design schemes, among them the L_inf/L_2 type of FD systems. The derived FD and FTC approaches are verified by two benchmark processes. Contents Overview of FD and FTC Technology Configuration of Nonlinear Observer-Based FD Systems Design of L2 nonlinear Observer-Based FD Systems Design of Weighted Fuzzy Observer-Based FD Systems FTC Configurations for Nonlinear Systems< Application to Benchmark Processes Target Groups Researchers and students in the field of engineering with a focus on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control fields The Author Dr. Linlin Li completed her dissertation under the supervision of Prof. Steven X. Ding at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany...

  18. Energy-efficient fault-tolerant systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Jimson; Pradhan, Dhiraj K

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the state-of-the-art in energy efficient, fault-tolerant embedded systems. It covers the entire product lifecycle of electronic systems design, analysis and testing and includes discussion of both circuit and system-level approaches. Readers will be enabled to meet the conflicting design objectives of energy efficiency and fault-tolerance for reliability, given the up-to-date techniques presented.

  19. Electrical conductivity images of active and fossil fault zones

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Ritter; A. Hoffmann-Rothe; P. A. Bedrosian; Ute Weckmann; V. Haak;  ;  

    2005-01-01

    We compare recent magnetotelluric investigations of four large fault systems: (i) the actively deforming, ocean-continent interplate San Andreas Fault (SAF), (ii) the actively deforming, continent-continent interplate Dead Sea Transform (DST), (iii) the currently inactive, trench-linked intraplate West Fault (WF) in northern Chile, and (iv) the Waterberg Fault/Omaruru Lineament (WF/OL) in Namibia, a fossilized intraplate shear zone formed during early Proterozoic continental collision. These ...

  20. Fault detection and diagnosis of photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing

    The rapid growth of the solar industry over the past several years has expanded the significance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. One of the primary aims of research in building-integrated PV systems is to improve the performance of the system's efficiency, availability, and reliability. Although much work has been done on technological design to increase a photovoltaic module's efficiency, there is little research so far on fault diagnosis for PV systems. Faults in a PV system, if not detected, may not only reduce power generation, but also threaten the availability and reliability, effectively the "security" of the whole system. In this paper, first a circuit-based simulation baseline model of a PV system with maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is developed using MATLAB software. MATLAB is one of the most popular tools for integrating computation, visualization and programming in an easy-to-use modeling environment. Second, data collection of a PV system at variable surface temperatures and insolation levels under normal operation is acquired. The developed simulation model of PV system is then calibrated and improved by comparing modeled I-V and P-V characteristics with measured I--V and P--V characteristics to make sure the simulated curves are close to those measured values from the experiments. Finally, based on the circuit-based simulation model, a PV model of various types of faults will be developed by changing conditions or inputs in the MATLAB model, and the I--V and P--V characteristic curves, and the time-dependent voltage and current characteristics of the fault modalities will be characterized for each type of fault. These will be developed as benchmark I-V or P-V, or prototype transient curves. If a fault occurs in a PV system, polling and comparing actual measured I--V and P--V characteristic curves with both normal operational curves and these baseline fault curves will aid in fault diagnosis.

  1. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2005-01-01

    Active fault diagnosis (AFD) of parametric faults is considered in connection with closed loop feedback systems. AFD involves auxiliary signals applied on the closed loop system. A fault signature matrix is introduced in connection with AFD and it is shown that if a limited number of faults can...... occur in the system, a fault separation in the fault signature matrix can be obtained. Then the single elements in the matrix only depend of a reduced number of parametric faults. This can directly be applied for fault isolation. If it is not possible to obtain this separation, it is shown how the fault...... signature matrix can be applied for a dynamical fault isolation, i.e. fault isolation based on the dynamic characteristic of the fault signature matrix as function of the different parametric faults....

  2. Surface deformation measured with interferometric synthetic aperture radar: Case studies of basin and range and Garlock-San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Fernando

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used to detect ground deformation from varieties of geophysical origins. However, most studies lack the spatial and temporal resolutions to better characterize such observations. The purpose of this research is to use multi-track satellite radar imagery to generate time series to study and monitor vertical ground deformation over large regions such as the Nevada portion of the Basin and Range Province and the western end of the Mojave Desert. We developed an innovative method to remove horizontal movements from InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) observations using a GPS velocity field and subsequently combine the multi-track imagery resulting in one single high spatial resolution map of observed vertical crustal and surface movements. By implementing this technique we detect vertical deformation signals with short and intermediate wavelength signals associated to tectonic processes such as interseismic and postseismic deformation. In Central Nevada Seismic Belt we detect in three independent orbits a broad area of uplift that confirms results of previous studies that associate the origin of this signal to post-seimic deformation of the historic earthquakes at this region. In south-central Nevada we detect several valleys that show a gradual eastward tilt of the valley floors due to deep geodynamical processes. The valleys located at the eastern side of Ruby Mountains show a range decrease that could indicate uplift related to magma intrusion or post-seismic deformation due to older, unrecognized earthquakes. In the Big Bend segment in southern California we detect vertical uplift as expected by mechanical models of interseismic deformation. Additionaly all our velocity maps reveal small wavelength deformation signals of anthropogenic origin.

  3. Robust Fault Diagnosis Design for Linear Multiagent Systems with Incipient Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingping Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a robust fault estimation observer is studied for linear multiagent systems subject to incipient faults. By considering the fact that incipient faults are in low-frequency domain, the fault estimation of such faults is proposed for discrete-time multiagent systems based on finite-frequency technique. Moreover, using the decomposition design, an equivalent conclusion is given. Simulation results of a numerical example are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  4. Statistical fault detection in photovoltaic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Garoudja, Elyes

    2017-05-08

    Faults in photovoltaic (PV) systems, which can result in energy loss, system shutdown or even serious safety breaches, are often difficult to avoid. Fault detection in such systems is imperative to improve their reliability, productivity, safety and efficiency. Here, an innovative model-based fault-detection approach for early detection of shading of PV modules and faults on the direct current (DC) side of PV systems is proposed. This approach combines the flexibility, and simplicity of a one-diode model with the extended capacity of an exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control chart to detect incipient changes in a PV system. The one-diode model, which is easily calibrated due to its limited calibration parameters, is used to predict the healthy PV array\\'s maximum power coordinates of current, voltage and power using measured temperatures and irradiances. Residuals, which capture the difference between the measurements and the predictions of the one-diode model, are generated and used as fault indicators. Then, the EWMA monitoring chart is applied on the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the one-diode model to detect and identify the type of fault. Actual data from the grid-connected PV system installed at the Renewable Energy Development Center, Algeria, are used to assess the performance of the proposed approach. Results show that the proposed approach successfully monitors the DC side of PV systems and detects temporary shading.

  5. H infinity Integrated Fault Estimation and Fault Tolerant Control of Discrete-time Piecewise Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Seyed Mojtaba; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    , the estimate of fault is used to compensate for the effect of the fault. Hence, using the estimate of fault, a fault tolerant controller using a piecewise linear static output feedback is designed such that it stabilizes the system and provides an upper bound on the H∞ performance of the faulty system......In this paper we consider the problem of fault estimation and accommodation for discrete time piecewise linear systems. A robust fault estimator is designed to estimate the fault such that the estimation error converges to zero and H∞ performance of the fault estimation is minimized. Then....... Sufficient conditions for the existence of robust fault estimator and fault tolerant controller are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Upper bounds on the H∞ performance can be minimized by solving convex optimization problems with linear matrix inequality constraints. The efficiency...

  6. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop uncertain systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Fault diagnosis of parametric faults in closed-loop uncertain systems by using an auxiliary input vector is considered in this paper, i.e. active fault diagnosis (AFD). The active fault diagnosis is based directly on the socalled fault signature matrix, related to the YJBK (Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno...

  7. Maxwell: A semi-analytic 4D code for earthquake cycle modeling of transform fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David; Smith-Konter, Bridget

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a semi-analytic approach (and computational code) for rapidly calculating 3D time-dependent deformation and stress caused by screw dislocations imbedded within an elastic layer overlying a Maxwell viscoelastic half-space. The maxwell model is developed in the Fourier domain to exploit the computational advantages of the convolution theorem, hence substantially reducing the computational burden associated with an arbitrarily complex distribution of force couples necessary for fault modeling. The new aspect of this development is the ability to model lateral variations in shear modulus. Ten benchmark examples are provided for testing and verification of the algorithms and code. One final example simulates interseismic deformation along the San Andreas Fault System where lateral variations in shear modulus are included to simulate lateral variations in lithospheric structure.

  8. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop uncertain systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Fault diagnosis of parametric faults in closed-loop uncertain systems by using an auxiliary input vector is considered in this paper, i.e. active fault diagnosis (AFD). The active fault diagnosis is based directly on the socalled fault signature matrix, related to the YJBK (Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno...... and Kucera) parameterization. Conditions are given for exact detection and isolation of parametric faults in closed-loop uncertain systems....

  9. Fault Detection for Quantized Networked Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Che

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fault detection problem in the finite frequency domain for networked control systems with signal quantization is considered. With the logarithmic quantizer consideration, a quantized fault detection observer is designed by employing a performance index which is used to increase the fault sensitivity in finite frequency domain. The quantized measurement signals are dealt with by utilizing the sector bound method, in which the quantization error is treated as sector-bounded uncertainty. By using the Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov (GKYP Lemma, an iterative LMI-based optimization algorithm is developed for designing the quantized fault detection observer. And a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Fault tolerant control of systems with saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents framework for fault tolerant controllers (FTC) that includes input saturation. The controller architecture known from FTC is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization is extended to handle input saturation. Applying this controller architecture in connec......This paper presents framework for fault tolerant controllers (FTC) that includes input saturation. The controller architecture known from FTC is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization is extended to handle input saturation. Applying this controller architecture...... in connection with faulty systems including input saturation gives an additional YJBK transfer function related to the input saturation. In the fault free case, this additional YJBK transfer function can be applied directly for optimizing the feedback loop around the input saturation. In the faulty case......, the design problem is a mixed design problem involved both parametric faults and input saturation....

  11. A fast fault classification technique for power systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nouri, H.; Wang, C.; Power Systems, Electronics and Control Research Lab

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a fast fault classification technique using three phase current signals for power systems. Digital Fourier Transform, the ‘Least Square’ method or the Kalman Filtering technique are used to extract fundamental frequency components of three phase fault currents. Fast fault classification can be achieved using the fault probability of three phases. Results from simulation work on EMTP have validated the proposed fault classification technique. The response time of the fault ...

  12. Analysis of nonvolcanic tremor on the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, CA using U.S. Geological Survey Parkfield Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon B.; Baker, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    Reports by Nadeau and Dolenc (2005) that tremor had been detected near Cholame Valley spawned an effort to use UPSAR (U. S. Geological Survey Parkfield Seismic Array) to study characteristics of tremor. UPSAR was modified to record three channels of velocity at 40–50 sps continuously in January 2005 and ran for about 1 month, during which time we recorded numerous episodes of tremor. One tremor, on 21 January at 0728, was recorded with particularly high signal levels as well as another episode 3 days later. Both events were very emergent, had a frequency content between 2 and 8 Hz, and had numerous high-amplitude, short-duration arrivals within the tremor signal. Here using the first episode as an example, we discuss an analysis procedure, which yields azimuth and apparent velocity of the tremor at UPSAR. We then provide locations for both tremor episodes. The emphasis here is how the tremor episode evolves. Twelve stations were operating at the time of recording. Slowness of arrivals was determined using cross correlation of pairs of stations; the same method used in analyzing the main shock data from 28 September 2004. A feature of this analysis is that 20 s of the time series were used at a time to calculate correlation; the longer windows resulted in more consistent estimates of slowness, but lower peak correlations. These values of correlation (peaks of about 0.25), however, are similar to that obtained for the S wave of a microearthquake. Observed peaks in slowness were traced back to source locations assumed to lie on the San Andreas fault. Our inferred locations for the two tremor events cluster near the locations of previously observed tremor, south of the Cholame Valley. Tremor source depths are in the 14–24 km range, which is below the seismogenic brittle zone, but above the Moho. Estimates of error do not preclude locations below the Moho, however. The tremor signal is very emergent but contains packets that are several times larger than the

  13. Identifying Fault Connections of the Southern Pacific-North American Plate Boundary Using Triggered Slip and Crustal Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, A.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Rundle, J. B.; Parker, J. W.; Granat, R.; Heflin, M. B.; Pierce, M. E.; Wang, J.; Gunson, M.; Lyzenga, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquake caused extensive triggering of slip on faults proximal to the Salton Trough in southern California. Triggered slip and postseismic motions that have continued for over five years following the earthquake highlight connections between the El Mayor - Cucapah rupture and the network of faults that branch out along the southern Pacific - North American Plate Boundary. Coseismic triggering follows a network of conjugate faults from the northern end of the rupture to the Coachella segment of the southernmost San Andreas fault. Larger aftershocks and postseismic motions favor connections to the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults further west. The 2012 Brawley Swarm can be considered part of the branching on the Imperial Valley or east side of the plate boundary. Cluster analysis of long-term GPS velocities using Lloyds Algorithm, identifies bifurcation of the Pacific - North American plate boundary; The San Jacinto fault joins with the southern San Andreas fault, and the Salton Trough and Coachella segment of the San Andreas fault join with the Eastern California Shear Zone. The clustering analysis does not identify throughgoing deformation connecting the Coachella segment of the San Andreas fault with the rest of the San Andreas fault system through the San Gorgonio Pass. This observation is consistent with triggered slip from both the 1992 Landers and 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquakes that follows the plate boundary bifurcation and with paleoseismic evidence of smaller earthquakes in the San Gorgonio Pass.

  14. Earthquake fault superhighways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. P.; Das, S.; Searle, M. P.

    2010-10-01

    Motivated by the observation that the rare earthquakes which propagated for significant distances at supershear speeds occurred on very long straight segments of faults, we examine every known major active strike-slip fault system on land worldwide and identify those with long (> 100 km) straight portions capable not only of sustained supershear rupture speeds but having the potential to reach compressional wave speeds over significant distances, and call them "fault superhighways". The criteria used for identifying these are discussed. These superhighways include portions of the 1000 km long Red River fault in China and Vietnam passing through Hanoi, the 1050 km long San Andreas fault in California passing close to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and San Francisco, the 1100 km long Chaman fault system in Pakistan north of Karachi, the 700 km long Sagaing fault connecting the first and second cities of Burma, Rangoon and Mandalay, the 1600 km Great Sumatra fault, and the 1000 km Dead Sea fault. Of the 11 faults so classified, nine are in Asia and two in North America, with seven located near areas of very dense populations. Based on the current population distribution within 50 km of each fault superhighway, we find that more than 60 million people today have increased seismic hazards due to them.

  15. Fault diagnosis for dynamic power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thabet, A.; Abdelkrim, M.N.; Boutayeb, M.; Didier, G.; Chniba, S.

    2011-01-01

    The fault diagnosis problem for dynamic power systems is treated, the nonlinear dynamic model based on a differential algebraic equations is transformed with reduced index to a simple dynamic model. Two nonlinear observers are used for generating the fault signals for comparison purposes, one of them being an extended Kalman estimator and the other a new extended kalman filter with moving horizon with a study of convergence based on the choice of matrix of covariance of the noises of system and measurements. The paper illustrates a simulation study applied on IEEE 3 buses test system.

  16. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilledcores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System.

  17. Fault Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control of Modular Multi-level Converter High-voltage DC System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    device fault, DC line faults as well as AC grid faults. Special attention is given to the comparison of the corresponding fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control approaches. Further, focus is dedicated to control/protection strategies and topologies with fault ride-though capability for MMC...... of failures and lower the reliability of the MMC-HVDC system. Therefore, research on the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of MMC-HVDC system is of great significance in order to enhance the reliability of the system. This paper provides a comprehensive review of fault diagnosis and fault handling...... strategies of MMC-HVDC systems for the most common faults happened in MMC-HVDC systems covering MMC faults, DC side faults as well as AC side faults. An important part of this paper is devoted to a discussion of the vulnerable spots as well as failure mechanism of the MMC-HVDC system covering switching...

  18. Fault Detection for Shipboard Monitoring and Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajic, Zoran; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a basic idea of a fault-tolerant monitoring and decision support system will be explained. Fault detection is an important part of the fault-tolerant design for in-service monitoring and decision support systems for ships. In the paper, a virtual example of fault detection...... will be presented for a containership with a real decision support system onboard. All possible faults can be simulated and detected using residuals and the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) algorithm....

  19. The Morelia-Acambay Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez Bucio, M.; Soria-Caballero, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V.; Mennella, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the most actives and representative zones of Mexico geologically speaking. Research carried out in this area gives stratigraphic, seismologic and historical evidence of its recent activity during the quaternary (Martinez and Nieto, 1990). Specifically the Morelia-Acambay faults system (MAFS) consist in a series of normal faults of dominant direction E - W, ENE - WSW y NE - SW which is cut in center west of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This fault system appeared during the early Miocene although the north-south oriented structures are older and have been related to the activity of the tectonism inherited from the "Basin and Range" system, but that were reactivated by the east- west faults. It is believed that the activity of these faults has contributed to the creation and evolution of the longed lacustrine depressions such as: Chapala, Zacapu, Cuitzeo, Maravatio y Acambay also the location of monogenetic volcanoes that conformed the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF) and tend to align in the direction of the SFMA dominant effort. In a historical time different segments of the MAFS have been the epicenter of earthquakes from moderated to strong magnitude like the events of 1858 in Patzcuaro, Acambay in 1912, 1979 in Maravatio and 2007 in Morelia, among others. Several detailed analysis and semi-detailed analysis through a GIS platform based in the vectorial archives and thematic charts 1:50 000 scaled from the data base of the INEGI which has allowed to remark the influence of the MAFS segments about the morphology of the landscape and the identification of other structures related to the movement of the existent faults like fractures, alignments, collapses and others from the zone comprehended by the northwest of Morelia in Michoacán to the East of Acambay, Estado de México. Such analysis suggests that the fault segments possess a normal displacement plus a left component. In addition it can be

  20. Fault prediction for nonlinear stochastic system with incipient faults based on particle filter and nonlinear regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bo; Fang, Huajing

    2017-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the fault prediction for the nonlinear stochastic system with incipient faults. Based on the particle filter and the reasonable assumption about the incipient faults, the modified fault estimation algorithm is proposed, and the system state is estimated simultaneously. According to the modified fault estimation, an intuitive fault detection strategy is introduced. Once each of the incipient fault is detected, the parameters of which are identified by a nonlinear regression method. Then, based on the estimated parameters, the future fault signal can be predicted. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by the simulations of the Three-tank system. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Expert system structures for fault detection in spaceborne power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Karan; Russell, B. Don; Hackler, Irene

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for an expert system structure suitable for use with power system fault detection algorithms. The system described is not for the purpose of reacting to faults which have occurred, but rather for the purpose of performing on-line diagnostics and parameter evaluation to determine potential or incipient fault conditions. The system is also designed to detect high impedance or arcing faults which cannot be detected by conventional protection devices. This system is part of an overall monitoring computer hierarchy which would provide a full evaluation of the status of the power system and react to both incipient and catastrophic faults. An approximate hardware structure is suggested and software requirements are discussed. Modifications to CLIPS software, to capitalize on features offered by expert systems, are presented. It is suggested that such a system would have significant advantages over existing protection philosophy.

  2. A master system for power system fault phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Myung Ho; Jang, Sang Ho; Hong, Joon Hee; Min, Wan Ki; Yoo, Chang Hwan [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center

    1995-12-31

    This report includes as follows - Real time digital simulator - Remote measuring, analyzing and reproducing system of power system fault data -Power system reduction method program using EMTP -Test system for protection device. (author). 22 refs., 38 figs.

  3. Evolution of the Rodgers Creek–Maacama right-lateral fault system and associated basins east of the northward-migrating Mendocino Triple Junction, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wagner, David L.; Fleck, Robert J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, Robert C.; Clahan, Kevin; Allen, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Rodgers Creek–Maacama fault system in the northern California Coast Ranges (United States) takes up substantial right-lateral motion within the wide transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, over a slab window that has opened northward beneath the Coast Ranges. The fault system evolved in several right steps and splays preceded and accompanied by extension, volcanism, and strike-slip basin development. Fault and basin geometries have changed with time, in places with younger basins and faults overprinting older structures. Along-strike and successional changes in fault and basin geometry at the southern end of the fault system probably are adjustments to frequent fault zone reorganizations in response to Mendocino Triple Junction migration and northward transit of a major releasing bend in the northern San Andreas fault. The earliest Rodgers Creek fault zone displacement is interpreted to have occurred ca. 7 Ma along extensional basin-forming faults that splayed northwest from a west-northwest proto-Hayward fault zone, opening a transtensional basin west of Santa Rosa. After ca. 5 Ma, the early transtensional basin was compressed and extensional faults were reactivated as thrusts that uplifted the northeast side of the basin. After ca. 2.78 Ma, the Rodgers Creek fault zone again splayed from the earlier extensional and thrust faults to steeper dipping faults with more north-northwest orientations. In conjunction with the changes in orientation and slip mode, the Rodgers Creek fault zone dextral slip rate increased from ∼2–4 mm/yr 7–3 Ma, to 5–8 mm/yr after 3 Ma. The Maacama fault zone is shown from several data sets to have initiated ca. 3.2 Ma and has slipped right-laterally at ∼5–8 mm/yr since its initiation. The initial Maacama fault zone splayed northeastward from the south end of the Rodgers Creek fault zone, accompanied by the opening of several strike-slip basins, some of which were later uplifted and compressed

  4. Guideliness for system modeling: fault tree [analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Hwan; Yang, Joon Eon; Kang, Dae Il; Hwang, Mee Jeong

    2004-07-01

    This document, the guidelines for system modeling related to Fault Tree Analysis(FTA), is intended to provide the guidelines with the analyzer to construct the fault trees in the level of the capability category II of ASME PRA standard. Especially, they are to provide the essential and basic guidelines and the related contents to be used in support of revising the Ulchin 3 and 4 PSA model for risk monitor within the capability category II of ASME PRA standard. Normally the main objective of system analysis is to assess the reliability of system modeled by Event Tree Analysis (ETA). A variety of analytical techniques can be used for the system analysis, however, FTA method is used in this procedures guide. FTA is the method used for representing the failure logic of plant systems deductively using AND, OR or NOT gates. The fault tree should reflect all possible failure modes that may contribute to the system unavailability. This should include contributions due to the mechanical failures of the components, Common Cause Failures (CCFs), human errors and outages for testing and maintenance. This document identifies and describes the definitions and the general procedures of FTA and the essential and basic guidelines for reving the fault trees. Accordingly, the guidelines for FTA will be capable to guide the FTA to the level of the capability category II of ASME PRA standard.

  5. Passive Fault-tolerant Control of Discrete-time Piecewise Affine Systems against Actuator Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Seyed Mojtaba; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for passive fault-tolerant control of discrete time piecewise affine systems. Actuator faults are considered. A reliable piecewise linear quadratic regulator (LQR) state feedback is designed such that it can tolerate actuator faults. A sufficient condition...

  6. Fault morphology of the lyo Fault, the Median Tectonic Line Active Fault System

    OpenAIRE

    後藤, 秀昭

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the various fault features of the lyo fault and depicted fault lines or detailed topographic map. The results of this paper are summarized as follows; 1) Distinct evidence of the right-lateral movement is continuously discernible along the lyo fault. 2) Active fault traces are remarkably linear suggesting that the angle of fault plane is high. 3) The lyo fault can be divided into four segments by jogs between left-stepping traces. 4) The mean slip rate is 1.3 ~ ...

  7. Fast fault detection for power distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Öhrström, Magnus

    2003-01-01

    The main topic of this licentiate thesis is fast faultdetection. The thesis summaries the work performed in theproject“Fast fault detection for distributionsystems”. In the first chapters of the thesis the term“fast”is used in a general manner. The term is laterdefined based upon considerations and conclusions made in thefirst chapters and then related to a specific time. To be able to understand and appreciate why fast faultdetection is necessary, power system faults and theirconsequences ar...

  8. Dead sea transform fault system reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Garfunkel, Zvi; Kagan, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    The Dead Sea transform is an active plate boundary connecting the Red Sea seafloor spreading system to the Arabian-Eurasian continental collision zone. Its geology and geophysics provide a natural laboratory for investigation of the surficial, crustal and mantle processes occurring along transtensional and transpressional transform fault domains on a lithospheric scale and related to continental breakup. There have been many detailed and disciplinary studies of the Dead Sea transform fault zone during the last?20 years and this book brings them together.This book is an updated comprehensive coverage of the knowledge, based on recent studies of the tectonics, structure, geophysics, volcanism, active tectonics, sedimentology and paleo and modern climate of the Dead Sea transform fault zone. It puts together all this new information and knowledge in a coherent fashion.

  9. Fault isolatability conditions for linear systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we shall show that an unlimited number of additive single faults can be isolated under mild conditions if a general isolation scheme is applied. Multiple faults are also covered. The approach is algebraic and is based on a set representation of faults, where all faults within a set...... can occur simultaneously, whereas faults belonging to different fault sets appear disjoint in time. The proposed fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme consists of three steps. A fault detection (FD) step is followed by a fault set isolation (FSI) step. Here the fault set is isolated wherein...... the faults have occurred. The last step is a fault isolation (FI) of the faults occurring in a specific fault set, i.e. equivalent with the standard FI step. A simple example demonstrates how to turn the algebraic necessary and sufficient conditions into explicit algorithms for designing filter banks, which...

  10. Fault diagnosis in sparse multiprocessor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blough, Douglas M.; Sullivan, Gregory F.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of fault diagnosis in multiprocessor systems is considered under a uniformly probabilistic model in which processors are faulty with probability p. This work focuses on minimizing the number of tests that must be conducted in order to correctly diagnose the state of every processor in the system with high probability. A diagnosis algorithm that can correctly diagnose the state of every processor with probability approaching one in a class of systems performing slightly greater than a linear number of tests is presented. A nearly matching lower bound on the number of tests required to achieve correct diagnosis in arbitrary systems is also proven. The number of tests required under this probabilistic model is shown to be significantly less than under a bounded-size fault set model. Because the number of tests that must be conducted is a measure of the diagnosis overhead, these results represent a dramatic improvement in the performance of system-level diagnosis technique.

  11. Guaranteed Cost Fault-Tolerant Control for Networked Control Systems with Sensor Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixin Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the large scale and complicated structure of networked control systems, time-varying sensor faults could inevitably occur when the system works in a poor environment. Guaranteed cost fault-tolerant controller for the new networked control systems with time-varying sensor faults is designed in this paper. Based on time delay of the network transmission environment, the networked control systems with sensor faults are modeled as a discrete-time system with uncertain parameters. And the model of networked control systems is related to the boundary values of the sensor faults. Moreover, using Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequalities (LMI approach, the guaranteed cost fault-tolerant controller is verified to render such networked control systems asymptotically stable. Finally, simulations are included to demonstrate the theoretical results.

  12. Simultaneous Sensor and Process Fault Diagnostics for Propellant Feed System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, J.; Kwan, C.; Figueroa, F.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to extract fault features from sensor faults and process faults by using advanced fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithms. A tank system that has some common characteristics to a NASA testbed at Stennis Space Center was used to verify our proposed algorithms. First, a generic tank system was modeled. Second, a mathematical model suitable for FDI has been derived for the tank system. Third, a new and general FDI procedure has been designed to distinguish process faults and sensor faults. Extensive simulations clearly demonstrated the advantages of the new design.

  13. Active tectonic deformation of the western Indian plate boundary: A case study from the Chaman Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupa, Wanda E.; Khan, Shuhab D.; Huang, Jingqiu; Khan, Abdul S.; Kasi, Aimal

    2017-10-01

    Collision of the Eurasian and Indian plates has resulted in two spatially offset subduction zones, the Makran subduction zone to the south and the Himalayan convergent margin to the north. These zones are linked by a system of left-lateral strike-slip faults known as the Chaman Fault System, ∼1200 km, which spans along western Pakistan. Although this is one of the greatest strike-slip faults, yet temporal and spatial variation in displacement has not been adequately defined along this fault system. This study conducted geomorphic and geodetic investigations along the Chaman Fault in a search for evidence of spatial variations in motion. Four study areas were selected over the span of the Chaman Fault: (1) Tarnak-Rud area over the Tarnak-Rud valley, (2) Spinatizha area over the Spinatizha Mountain Range, (3) Nushki area over the Nushki basin, and (4) Kharan area over the northern tip of the Central Makran Mountains. Remote sensing data allowed for in depth mapping of different components and faults within the Kohjak group. Wind and water gap pairs along with offset rivers were identified using high-resolution imagery and digital-elevation models to show displacement for the four study areas. The mountain-front-sinuosity ratio, valley height-to-width-ratio, and the stream-length-gradient index were calculated and used to determine the relative tectonic activity of each area. These geomorphic indices suggest that the Kharan area is the most active and the Tarnak-Rud area is the least active. GPS data were processed into a stable Indian plate reference frame and analyzed. Fault parallel velocity versus fault normal distance yielded a ∼8-10 mm/yr displacement rate along the Chaman Fault just north of the Spinatizha area. InSAR data were also integrated to assess displacement rates along the fault system. Geodetic data support that ultra-slow earthquakes similar to those that strike along other major strike-slip faults, such as the San Andreas Fault System, are

  14. Abstractions for Fault-Tolerant Distributed System Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Lee S.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Miner, Paul S.; Geser, Alfons

    2004-01-01

    Four kinds of abstraction for the design and analysis of fault tolerant distributed systems are discussed. These abstractions concern system messages, faults, fault masking voting, and communication. The abstractions are formalized in higher order logic, and are intended to facilitate specifying and verifying such systems in higher order theorem provers.

  15. Neotectonics of the San Andreas fault system: Basin and range province juncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, J. E.; Crowell, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Several new details regarding the surficial patterns of neotectonic activity of the Eastern Transverse Ranges and vicinity were discovered. Additionally a number of data display and analysis techniques were developed. These findings will be useful both in the continued development of neotectonic models for southern California and for the future application of remote sensing methodologies elsewhere.

  16. FAULT-TOLERANT DESIGN FOR ADVANCED DIVERSE PROTECTION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG GYUN OH

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available For the improvement of APR1400 Diverse Protection System (DPS design, the Advanced DPS (ADPS has recently been developed to enhance the fault tolerance capability of the system. Major fault masking features of the ADPS compared with the APR1400 DPS are the changes to the channel configuration and reactor trip actuation equipment. To minimize the fault occurrences within the ADPS, and to mitigate the consequences of common-cause failures (CCF within the safety I&C systems, several fault avoidance design features have been applied in the ADPS. The fault avoidance design features include the changes to the system software classification, communication methods, equipment platform, MMI equipment, etc. In addition, the fault detection, location, containment, and recovery processes have been incorporated in the ADPS design. Therefore, it is expected that the ADPS can provide an enhanced fault tolerance capability against the possible faults within the system and its input/output equipment, and the CCF of safety systems.

  17. Zemětřesná aktivita na zlomu San Andreas

    OpenAIRE

    Voroňáková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY: This work deals with the San Andreas fault as a tectonically active area. It includes basic information about the fracture, its origins and history. The work shows, as scientists are now trying to combat the risk of impending earthquakes. Project of San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth and individual predictions of the next earthquake rupture are described.

  18. Impedance based fault location in power distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Ke

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents an investigation into impedance based fault location methods which directly use the fault transient as an excitation source to provide fast and accurate fault locations in small distribution systems such as the modem marine and aircraft power systems which have Integrated Power System (IPS) configuration. Fast and accurate fault location on un-exposed power distribution lines is of vital importance to expedite service restoration and improving the reliability of the power...

  19. FAULT-TOLERANT DESIGN FOR ADVANCED DIVERSE PROTECTION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    YANG GYUN OH; JIN KWON JEONG; CHANG JAE LEE; YOON HEE LEE; SEUNG MIN BAEK; SANG JEONG LEE

    2013-01-01

    For the improvement of APR1400 Diverse Protection System (DPS) design, the Advanced DPS (ADPS) has recently been developed to enhance the fault tolerance capability of the system. Major fault masking features of the ADPS compared with the APR1400 DPS are the changes to the channel configuration and reactor trip actuation equipment. To minimize the fault occurrences within the ADPS, and to mitigate the consequences of common-cause failures (CCF) within the safety I&C systems, several fault avo...

  20. Estimation of Parametric Fault in Closed-loop Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a method for estimation of parametric faults in closed-loop systems. The key technology applied in this paper is coprime factorization of both the dynamic system as well as the feedback controller. Using the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization......, it is shown that a certain matrix transfer function, the fault signature matrix, is an LFT (linear fractional transformation) of the parametric faults. Further, for limit parametric faults, the fault signature matrix transfer function can be approximated with a linear matrix function of the parametric faults....

  1. Paleoseismology of silent faults in the Central Apennines (Italy: the Campo Imperatore Fault (Gran Sasso Range Fault System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Paleoseismological analyses were performed along the Campo Imperatore Fault (part of the Gran Sasso Range Fault System in order to define the seismogenic behaviour (recurrence interval for surface faulting events, elapsed time since the last activation, maximum expected magnitude. Four trenches were excavated across secondary faults which are related to the main fault zone. The youngest event (E1 occurred after 3480-3400 years BP; a previous event (E2 occurred between 7155-7120/7035-6790 years BP and 5590-5565/5545-5475 years BP, while the oldest one (E3 has a Late Pleistocene age. The chronological interval between the last two displacement events ranges between 1995 and 6405 years. The minimum elapsed time since the last activation is 800 years, due to the absence of historical earthquakes which may have been caused by the Campo Imperatore Fault and based on the completeness of the historical catalogues for the large magnitude events in the last eight centuries. Based on the length of the fault surficial expression, earthquakes with M 6.95 may be expected from the activation of the entire Gran Sasso Range Fault System. The effects of the fault activation were investigated through the simulation of a damage scenario obtained by means of the FaCES computer code, made by the National Seismic Survey for civil protection purposes. The damage scenario shows that the activation of the Gran Sasso Range Fault System may be responsible for an earthquake with epicentral intensity I0 10.5 MCS, with a number of collapsed buildings ranging between 7900 and 31100 and a number of damaged buildings ranging between 99 000 and 234 000. The investigated case defines, therefore, a high risk level for the region affected by the Campo Imperatore Fault.

  2. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulation Across a Complex Fault System: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes ruptures sometimes take place on a secondary fault and surprisingly do not activate an adjacent major one. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is a classic case where rupture occurred on a blind thrust while the adjacent San Andreas Fault was not triggered during the process. Similar to Loma Prieta, the Mw7.0, January 12 2010, Haiti earthquake also ruptured a secondary blind thrust, the Léogâne fault, adjacent to the main plate boundary, the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, which did not rupture during this event. Aftershock relocalizations delineate the Léogâne rupture with two north dipping segments with slightly different dip, where the easternmost segment had mostly dip-slip motion and the westernmost one had mostly strike-slip motion. In addition, an offshore south dipping structure inferred from the aftershocks to the west of the rupture zone coincides with the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault, a region of increase in Coulomb stress increase. In this study, we investigate the rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake in a complex fault system of multiple segments identified by the aftershock relocations. We suppose a background stress regime that is consistent with the type of motion of each fault and with the regional tectonic regime. We initiate a nucleation on the east segment of the Léogâne fault by defining a circular region with a 2 km radius where shear stress is slightly greater than the yield stress. By varying friction on faults and background stress, we find a range of plausible scenarios. In the absence of near-field seismic records of the event, we score the different models against the static deformation field derived from GPS and InSAR at the surface. All the plausible simulations show that the rupture propagates from the eastern to the western segment along the Léogâne fault, but not on the Enriquillo fault nor on the Trois Baies fault. The best-fit simulation shows a significant increase of shear stresses on the Trois Baies

  3. Data-based fault-tolerant control for affine nonlinear systems with actuator faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chun-Hua; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the fault-tolerant control (FTC) problem for unknown nonlinear systems with actuator faults including stuck, outage, bias and loss of effectiveness. The upper bounds of stuck faults, bias faults and loss of effectiveness faults are unknown. A new data-based FTC scheme is proposed. It consists of the online estimations of the bounds and a state-dependent function. The estimations are adjusted online to compensate automatically the actuator faults. The state-dependent function solved by using real system data helps to stabilize the system. Furthermore, all signals in the resulting closed-loop system are uniformly bounded and the states converge asymptotically to zero. Compared with the existing results, the proposed approach is data-based. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Remote online machine fault diagnostic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min-Chun; Li, Po-Ching

    2004-07-01

    The study aims at implementing a remote online machine fault diagnostic system built up in the architecture of both the BCB software-developing environment and Internet transmission communication. Variant signal-processing computation schemes for signal analysis and pattern recognition purposes are implemented in the BCB graphical user interface. Hence, machine fault diagnostic capability can be extended by using the socket application program interface as the TCP/IP protocol. In the study, the effectiveness of the developed remote diagnostic system is validated by monitoring a transmission-element test rig. A complete monitoring cycle includes data acquisition, signal processing, feature extraction, pattern recognition through the ANNs, and online video monitoring, is demonstrated.

  5. Fault-tolerant system for catastrophic faults in AMR sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano Constantini, A.C.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    Anisotropic Magnetoresistance angle sensors are widely used in automotive applications considered to be safety-critical applications. Therefore dependability is an important requirement and fault-tolerant strategies must be used to guarantee the correct operation of the sensors even in case of

  6. Estimation of Faults in DC Electrical Power System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper demonstrates a novel optimizationbased approach to estimating fault states in a DC power system. The model includes faults changing the circuit topology...

  7. Fault Adaptive Control of Overactuated Systems Using Prognostic Estimation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Most fault adaptive control research addresses the preservation of system stability or functionality in the presence of a specific failure (fault). This paper...

  8. Results of an electrical power system fault study (CDDF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal-Whitehead, N. R.; Johnson, Y. B.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives the results of an electrical power system fault study which has been conducted over the last 2 and one-half years. First, the results of the literature search into electrical power system faults in space and terrestrial power system applications are reported. A description of the intended implementations of the power system faults into the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System (LASEPS) breadboard is then presented. Then, the actual implementation of the faults into the breadboard is discussed along with a discussion describing the LASEPS breadboard. Finally, the results of the injected faults and breadboard failures are discussed.

  9. Dynamic characteristics of a 20 kHz resonant power system - Fault identification and fault recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasynczuk, O.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed simulation of a dc inductor resonant driver and receiver is used to demonstrate the transient characteristics of a 20 kHz resonant power system during fault and overload conditions. The simulated system consists of a dc inductor resonant inverter (driver), a 50-meter transmission cable, and a dc inductor resonant receiver load. Of particular interest are the driver and receiver performance during fault and overload conditions and on the recovery characteristics following removal of the fault. The information gained from these studies sets the stage for further work in fault identification and autonomous power system control.

  10. Data-driven design of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Steven X

    2014-01-01

    Data-driven Design of Fault Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control Systems presents basic statistical process monitoring, fault diagnosis, and control methods, and introduces advanced data-driven schemes for the design of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control systems catering to the needs of dynamic industrial processes. With ever increasing demands for reliability, availability and safety in technical processes and assets, process monitoring and fault-tolerance have become important issues surrounding the design of automatic control systems. This text shows the reader how, thanks to the rapid development of information technology, key techniques of data-driven and statistical process monitoring and control can now become widely used in industrial practice to address these issues. To allow for self-contained study and facilitate implementation in real applications, important mathematical and control theoretical knowledge and tools are included in this book. Major schemes are presented in algorithm form and...

  11. Fault tolerant architecture for artificial olfactory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfivand, Nasser; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar; Abdolzadeh, Vida

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, to cover and mask the faults that occur in the sensing unit of an artificial olfactory system, a novel architecture is offered. The proposed architecture is able to tolerate failures in the sensors of the array and the faults that occur are masked. The proposed architecture for extracting the correct results from the output of the sensors can provide the quality of service for generated data from the sensor array. The results of various evaluations and analysis proved that the proposed architecture has acceptable performance in comparison with the classic form of the sensor array in gas identification. According to the results, achieving a high odor discrimination based on the suggested architecture is possible. (paper)

  12. Interface For Fault-Tolerant Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Charles; Williamson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Interface unit and controller emulator developed for research on electronic helicopter-flight-control systems equipped with artificial intelligence. Interface unit interrupt-driven system designed to link microprocessor-based, quadruply-redundant, asynchronous, ultra-reliable, fault-tolerant control system (controller) with electronic servocontrol unit that controls set of hydraulic actuators. Receives digital feedforward messages from, and transmits digital feedback messages to, controller through differential signal lines or fiber-optic cables (thus far only differential signal lines have been used). Analog signals transmitted to and from servocontrol unit via coaxial cables.

  13. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  14. Fault displacement along the Naruto-South fault, the Median Tectonic Line active fault system in the eastern part of Shikoku, southwestern Japan

    OpenAIRE

    高田, 圭太; 中田, 高; 後藤, 秀昭; 岡田, 篤正; 原口, 強; 松木, 宏彰

    1998-01-01

    The Naruto-South fault is situated of about 1000m south of the Naruto fault, the Median Tectonic Line active fault system in the eastern part of Shikoku. We investigated fault topography and subsurface geology of this fault by interpretation of large scale aerial photographs, collecting borehole data and Geo-Slicer survey. The results obtained are as follows; 1) The Naruto-South fault runs on the Yoshino River deltaic plain at least 2.5 km long with fault scarplet. the Naruto-South fault is o...

  15. Distributed Fault-Tolerant Control of Networked Uncertain Euler-Lagrange Systems Under Actuator Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Song, Yongduan; Lewis, Frank L

    2016-05-03

    This paper investigates the distributed fault-tolerant control problem of networked Euler-Lagrange systems with actuator and communication link faults. An adaptive fault-tolerant cooperative control scheme is proposed to achieve the coordinated tracking control of networked uncertain Lagrange systems on a general directed communication topology, which contains a spanning tree with the root node being the active target system. The proposed algorithm is capable of compensating for the actuator bias fault, the partial loss of effectiveness actuation fault, the communication link fault, the model uncertainty, and the external disturbance simultaneously. The control scheme does not use any fault detection and isolation mechanism to detect, separate, and identify the actuator faults online, which largely reduces the online computation and expedites the responsiveness of the controller. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, a test-bed of multiple robot-arm cooperative control system is developed for real-time verification. Experiments on the networked robot-arms are conduced and the results confirm the benefits and the effectiveness of the proposed distributed fault-tolerant control algorithms.

  16. Robust Parametric Fault Estimation in a Hopper System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    The ability of diagnosis of the possible faults is a necessity for satellite launch vehicles during their mission. In this paper, a structural analysis method is employed to divide the complex propulsion system into simpler subsystems for fault diagnosis filter design. A robust fault diagnosis...

  17. Study on seismic hazard assessment of large active fault systems. Evolution of fault systems and associated geomorphic structures: fault model test and field survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, Keichi; Inoue, Daiei; Miyakoshi, Katsuyoshi; Miyagawa, Kimio; Miura, Daisuke

    2003-01-01

    Sandbox experiments and field surveys were performed to investigate fault system evolution and fault-related deformation of ground surface, the Quaternary deposits and rocks. The summary of the results is shown below. 1) In the case of strike-slip faulting, the basic fault sequence runs from early en echelon faults and pressure ridges through linear trough. The fault systems associated with the 2000 western Tottori earthquake are shown as en echelon pattern that characterize the early stage of wrench tectonics, therefore no thoroughgoing surface faulting was found above the rupture as defined by the main shock and aftershocks. 2) Low-angle and high-angle reverse faults commonly migrate basinward with time, respectively. With increasing normal fault displacement in bedrock, normal fault develops within range after reverse fault has formed along range front. 3) Horizontal distance of surface rupture from the bedrock fault normalized by the height of the Quaternary deposits agrees well with those of model tests. 4) Upward-widening damage zone, where secondary fractures develop, forms in the handing wall side of high-angle reverse fault at the Kamioka mine. (author)

  18. Fault detection in finite frequency domain for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the fault detection (FD) problem in finite frequency domain for continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults. Some finite-frequency performance indices are initially introduced to measure the fault/reference input sensitivity and disturbance robustness. Based on these performance indices, an effective FD scheme is then presented such that the generated residual is designed to be sensitive to both fault and reference input for faulty cases, while robust against the reference input for fault-free case. As the additional reference input sensitivity for faulty cases is considered, it is shown that the proposed method improves the existing FD techniques and achieves a better FD performance. The theory is supported by simulation results related to the detection of sensor faults in a tunnel-diode circuit.

  19. Fault detection for discrete-time switched systems with sensor stuck faults and servo inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guang-Xin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses the fault detection problem of switched systems with servo inputs and sensor stuck faults. The attention is focused on designing a switching law and its associated fault detection filters (FDFs). The proposed switching law uses only the current states of FDFs, which guarantees the residuals are sensitive to the servo inputs with known frequency ranges in faulty cases and robust against them in fault-free case. Thus, the arbitrarily small sensor stuck faults, including outage faults can be detected in finite-frequency domain. The levels of sensitivity and robustness are measured in terms of the finite-frequency H- index and l2-gain. Finally, the switching law and FDFs are obtained by the solution of a convex optimization problem. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dependability evaluation of computing systems - physical faults, design faults, malicious faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaaniche, Mohamed

    1999-01-01

    The research summarized in this report focuses on the dependability of computer systems. It addresses several complementary, theoretical as well as experimental, issues that are grouped into four topics. The first topic concerns the definition of efficient methods that aim to assist the users in the construction and validation of complex dependability analysis and evaluation models. The second topic deals with the modeling of reliability and availability growth that mainly result from the progressive removal of design faults. A method is also defined to support the application of software reliability evaluation studies in an industrial context. The third topic deals with the development and experimentation of a new approach for the quantitative evaluation of operational security. This approach aims to assist the system administrators in the monitoring of operational security, when modifications, that are likely to introduce new vulnerabilities, occur in the system configuration, the applications, the user behavior, etc. Finally, the fourth topic addresses: a) the definition of a development model focused at the production of dependable systems, and b) the development of assessment criteria to obtain justified confidence that a system will achieve, during its operation and up to its decommissioning, its dependability objectives. (author) [fr

  1. Fault Diagnosis for Electrical Distribution Systems using Structural Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Blanke, Mogens; Østergaard, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Fault-tolerance in electrical distribution relies on the ability to diagnose possible faults and determine which components or units cause a problem or are close to doing so. Faults include defects in instrumentation, power generation, transformation and transmission. The focus of this paper...... is the design of efficient diagnostic algorithms, which is a prerequisite for fault-tolerant control of power distribution. Diagnosis in a grid depend on available analytic redundancies, and hence on network topology. When topology changes, due to earlier fault(s) or caused by maintenance, analytic redundancy...... analysis of power systems, it demonstrates detection and isolation of failures in a network, and shows how typical faults are diagnosed. Nonlinear fault simulations illustrate the results....

  2. Power system reliability analysis using fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkanovski, A.; Cepin, M.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    The power system reliability analysis method is developed from the aspect of reliable delivery of electrical energy to customers. The method is developed based on the fault tree analysis, which is widely applied in the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The method is adapted for the power system reliability analysis. The method is developed in a way that only the basic reliability parameters of the analysed power system are necessary as an input for the calculation of reliability indices of the system. The modeling and analysis was performed on an example power system consisting of eight substations. The results include the level of reliability of current power system configuration, the combinations of component failures resulting in a failed power delivery to loads, and the importance factors for components and subsystems. (author)

  3. Method and system for environmentally adaptive fault tolerant computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Jason L. (Inventor); Jeremy, Ramos (Inventor); Wolfe, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Brenner, Dean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for adapting fault tolerant computing. The method includes the steps of measuring an environmental condition representative of an environment. An on-board processing system's sensitivity to the measured environmental condition is measured. It is determined whether to reconfigure a fault tolerance of the on-board processing system based in part on the measured environmental condition. The fault tolerance of the on-board processing system may be reconfigured based in part on the measured environmental condition.

  4. Bond graph model-based fault diagnosis of hybrid systems

    CERN Document Server

    Borutzky, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a bond graph model-based approach to fault diagnosis in mechatronic systems appropriately represented by a hybrid model. The book begins by giving a survey of the fundamentals of fault diagnosis and failure prognosis, then recalls state-of-art developments referring to latest publications, and goes on to discuss various bond graph representations of hybrid system models, equations formulation for switched systems, and simulation of their dynamic behavior. The structured text: • focuses on bond graph model-based fault detection and isolation in hybrid systems; • addresses isolation of multiple parametric faults in hybrid systems; • considers system mode identification; • provides a number of elaborated case studies that consider fault scenarios for switched power electronic systems commonly used in a variety of applications; and • indicates that bond graph modelling can also be used for failure prognosis. In order to facilitate the understanding of fault diagnosis and the presented...

  5. Investigation of fault interaction and growth in Mygdonia basin (Greece) fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkarlaouni, Charikleia; Kilias, Adamantios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Karakostas, Vasileios

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays there is a scientific debate upon the strong correlation that exists between the earthquake clusters and the active seismogenic fault systems since they both constitute populations that participate in processes that include different states of initiation, interaction and coalescence. Since faults grow by the increase in their displacement and their length, the degree of fault interaction between two neighbour segments is expressed by scaling laws describing the fault dimensions, such as the displacement and the length. The distribution of the displacement along the fault trace, follows a bell-shaped pattern according to Dugdale model and is often a key to quantify the degree of interaction between two different fault segments since it gives an insight to the stage of growth and linkage between faults. In our case the fault attributes of Mygdonia basin that is located in the northern part of the Greek mainland are investigated under the prism of the scaling properties of its major active faults. Important seismogenic fault segments such as Lagina - Agios Vasilios, Gerakarou - Stivos and Sohos fault that define the boundaries of the basin and have generated important earthquakes in the past are investigated. Displacement - length profiles were constrained for the major fault segments, using digital elevation models (DEMs) since intense tectonics is etched upon the topography of the area such as to provide valuable seismotectonic information. In our case scarp heights are used for the approximation of fault displacement. Structural information, concerning displacement measurements on active fault scarps, and slip lineaments onto fault expressions are collected in-situ from field surveys. The information based on the field observations, justify the results coming out from the D.E.M. analysis. The final results are compared to conclusions derived from the investigation of different fault systems and the influence on the hazard assessment is discussed. This work

  6. Fault Diagnosis of Power Systems Using Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James A.; Oliver, Walter E. , Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The power system operator's need for a reliable power delivery system calls for a real-time or near-real-time Al-based fault diagnosis tool. Such a tool will allow NASA ground controllers to re-establish a normal or near-normal degraded operating state of the EPS (a DC power system) for Space Station Alpha by isolating the faulted branches and loads of the system. And after isolation, re-energizing those branches and loads that have been found not to have any faults in them. A proposed solution involves using the Fault Diagnosis Intelligent System (FDIS) to perform near-real time fault diagnosis of Alpha's EPS by downloading power transient telemetry at fault-time from onboard data loggers. The FDIS uses an ANN clustering algorithm augmented with a wavelet transform feature extractor. This combination enables this system to perform pattern recognition of the power transient signatures to diagnose the fault type and its location down to the orbital replaceable unit. FDIS has been tested using a simulation of the LeRC Testbed Space Station Freedom configuration including the topology from the DDCU's to the electrical loads attached to the TPDU's. FDIS will work in conjunction with the Power Management Load Scheduler to determine what the state of the system was at the time of the fault condition. This information is used to activate the appropriate diagnostic section, and to refine if necessary the solution obtained. In the latter case, if the FDIS reports back that it is equally likely that the faulty device as 'start tracker #1' and 'time generation unit,' then based on a priori knowledge of the system's state, the refined solution would be 'star tracker #1' located in cabinet ITAS2. It is concluded from the present studies that artificial intelligence diagnostic abilities are improved with the addition of the wavelet transform, and that when such a system such as FDIS is coupled to the Power Management Load Scheduler, a faulty device can be located and isolated

  7. Quantitative evaluation of fault coverage for digitalized systems in NPPs using simulated fault injection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Joon

    2004-02-01

    Even though digital systems have numerous advantages such as precise processing of data, enhanced calculation capability over the conventional analog systems, there is a strong restriction on the application of digital systems to the safety systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This is because we do not fully understand the reliability of digital systems, and therefore we cannot guarantee the safety of digital systems. But, as the need for introduction of digital systems to safety systems in NPPs increasing, the need for the quantitative analysis on the safety of digital systems is also increasing. NPPs, which are quite conservative in terms of safety, require proving the reliability of digital systems when applied them to the NPPs. Moreover, digital systems which are applied to the NPPs are required to increase the overall safety of NPPs. however, it is very difficult to evaluate the reliability of digital systems because they include the complex fault processing mechanisms at various levels of the systems. Software is another obstacle in reliability assessment of the systems that requires ultra-high reliability. In this work, the fault detection coverage for the digital system is evaluated using simulated fault injection method. The target system is the Local Coincidence Logic (LCL) processor in Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS). However, as the LCL processor is difficult to design equally for evaluating the fault detection coverage, the LCL system has to be simplified. The simulations for evaluating the fault detection coverage of components are performed by dividing into two cases and the failure rates of components are evaluated using MIL-HDBK-217F. Using these results, the fault detection coverage of simplified LCL system is evaluated. In the experiments, heartbeat signals were just emitted at regular interval after executing logic without self-checking algorithm. When faults are injected into the simplified system, fault occurrence can be detected by

  8. Fault Detection and Isolation for Wind Turbine Electric Pitch System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiangsheng; Ma, Kuichao; Hajizadeh, Amin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based fault detection and isolation scheme applied on electric pitch system of wind turbines. Pitch system is one of the most critical components due to its effect on the operational safety and the dynamics of wind turbines. Faults in this system should be precisely...... detected to prevent failures and decrease downtime. To detect faults of electric pitch actuators and sensors, an extended kalman filter (EKF) based multiple model adaptive estimation (MMAE) designed to estimate the states of the system. The proposed method is demonstrated in case studies. The simulation...... results show that the proposed method detects different fault scenarios of wind turbines under the stochastic external condition....

  9. Observer-Based Fault Estimation and Accomodation for Dynamic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ke; Shi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing security and reliability demand of actual industrial process control systems, the study on fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control of dynamic systems has received considerable attention. Fault accommodation (FA) is one of effective methods that can be used to enhance system stability and reliability, so it has been widely and in-depth investigated and become a hot topic in recent years. Fault detection is used to monitor whether a fault occurs, which is the first step in FA. On the basis of fault detection, fault estimation (FE) is utilized to determine online the magnitude of the fault, which is a very important step because the additional controller is designed using the fault estimate. Compared with fault detection, the design difficulties of FE would increase a lot, so research on FE and accommodation is very challenging. Although there have been advancements reported on FE and accommodation for dynamic systems, the common methods at the present stage have design difficulties, whi...

  10. Computer aided fault tree construction for electrical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fussell, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    A technique is presented for automated construction of the Boolean failure logic diagram, called the fault tree, for electrical systems. The method is a technique for synthesizing a fault tree from system-independent component characteristics. Terminology is defined and heuristic examples are given for all phases of the model. The computer constructed fault trees are in conventional format, use conventional symbols, and are deductively constructed from the main failure of interest to the individual component failures. The synthesis technique is generally applicable to automated fault tree construction for other types of systems

  11. Reconfigurability of Piecewise Affine Systems Against Actuator Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Seyed Mojtaba; Gholami, Mehdi; Bak, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of recongurability of peicewise ane (PWA) systems. Actuator faults are considered. A system subject to a fault is considered as recongurable if it can be stabilized by a state feedback controller and the optimal cost of the performance of the systems...

  12. Active Fault Diagnosis in Sampled-data Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on active fault diagnosis (AFD) in closed-loop sampleddata systems. Applying the same AFD architecture as for continuous-time systems does not directly result in the same set of closed-loop matrix transfer functions. For continuous-time systems, the LFT (linear fractional...... transformation) structure in the connection between the parametric faults and the matrix transfer function (also known as the fault signature matrix) applied for AFD is not directly preserved for sampled-data system. As a consequence of this, the AFD methods cannot directly be applied for sampled-data systems....... Two methods are considered in this paper to handle the fault signature matrix for sampled-data systems such that standard AFD methods can be applied. The first method is based on a discretization of the system such that the LFT structure is preserved resulting in the same LFT structure in the fault...

  13. Fault-tolerant power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volp, Jeffrey A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A fault-tolerant power distribution system which includes a plurality of power sources and a plurality of nodes responsive thereto for supplying power to one or more loads associated with each node. Each node includes a plurality of switching circuits, each of which preferably uses a power field effect transistor which provides a diode operation when power is first applied to the nodes and which thereafter provides bi-directional current flow through the switching circuit in a manner such that a low voltage drop is produced in each direction. Each switching circuit includes circuitry for disabling the power field effect transistor when the current in the switching circuit exceeds a preselected value.

  14. Fault diagnostics of dynamic system operation using a fault tree based method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurdle, E.E.; Bartlett, L.M.; Andrews, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    For conventional systems, their availability can be considerably improved by reducing the time taken to restore the system to the working state when faults occur. Fault identification can be a significant proportion of the time taken in the repair process. Having diagnosed the problem the restoration of the system back to its fully functioning condition can then take place. This paper expands the capability of previous approaches to fault detection and identification using fault trees for application to dynamically changing systems. The technique has two phases. The first phase is modelling and preparation carried out offline. This gathers information on the effects that sub-system failure will have on the system performance. Causes of the sub-system failures are developed in the form of fault trees. The second phase is application. Sensors are installed on the system to provide information about current system performance from which the potential causes can be deduced. A simple system example is used to demonstrate the features of the method. To illustrate the potential for the method to deal with additional system complexity and redundancy, a section from an aircraft fuel system is used. A discussion of the results is provided.

  15. Model-based fault diagnosis in PEM fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobet, T.; de Lira, S.; Puig, V.; Quevedo, J. [Automatic Control Department (ESAII), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Rambla Sant Nebridi 10, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Feroldi, D.; Riera, J.; Serra, M. [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (IRI), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) Parc Tecnologic de Barcelona, Edifici U, Carrer Llorens i Artigas, 4-6, Planta 2, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In this work, a model-based fault diagnosis methodology for PEM fuel cell systems is presented. The methodology is based on computing residuals, indicators that are obtained comparing measured inputs and outputs with analytical relationships, which are obtained by system modelling. The innovation of this methodology is based on the characterization of the relative residual fault sensitivity. To illustrate the results, a non-linear fuel cell simulator proposed in the literature is used, with modifications, to include a set of fault scenarios proposed in this work. Finally, it is presented the diagnosis results corresponding to these fault scenarios. It is remarkable that with this methodology it is possible to diagnose and isolate all the faults in the proposed set in contrast with other well known methodologies which use the binary signature matrix of analytical residuals and faults. (author)

  16. Fault Tolerant Controllers for Sampled-data Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, H.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    A general compensator architecture for fault tolerant control (FTC) for sampled-data systems is proposed. The architecture is based on the YJBK parameterization of all stabilizing controllers, and uses the dual YJBK parameterization to quantify the performance of the fault tolerant system. The FT...

  17. Fault tolerant controllers for sampled-data systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    A general compensator architecture for fault tolerant control (FTC) for sampled-data systems is proposed. The architecture is based on the YJBK parameterization of all stabilizing controllers, and uses the dual YJBK parameterization to quantify the performance of the fault tolerant system. The FTC...

  18. Research on Fault Diagnostic System in CVT Based on UDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiande Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A communication model of diagnostic network and implementation of unified diagnostic services (UDS based on controller area network (CAN bus are presented in this paper, and fault diagnostic function of transmission control unit (TCU, USB- (universal serial bus- CAN hardware and software modules, and fault diagnostic software based on personal computer (PC are designed. Model diagnostic method is applied on ratio control, and fault diagnostic system is tested in vehicle.

  19. Non deterministic finite automata for power systems fault diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LINDEN, R.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an application based on finite non-deterministic automata for power systems diagnosis. Automata for the simpler faults are presented and the proposed system is compared with an established expert system.

  20. Neuroadaptive Fault-Tolerant Control of Nonlinear Systems Under Output Constraints and Actuation Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Song, Yongduan; Shen, Zhixi

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a neuroadaptive fault-tolerant tracking control method is proposed for a class of time-delay pure-feedback systems in the presence of external disturbances and actuation faults. The proposed controller can achieve prescribed transient and steady-state performance, despite uncertain time delays and output constraints as well as actuation faults. By combining a tangent barrier Lyapunov-Krasovskii function with the dynamic surface control technique, the neural network unit in the developed control scheme is able to take its action from the very beginning and play its learning/approximating role safely during the entire system operational envelope, leading to enhanced control performance without the danger of violating compact set precondition. Furthermore, prescribed transient performance and output constraints are strictly ensured in the presence of nonaffine uncertainties, external disturbances, and undetectable actuation faults. The control strategy is also validated by numerical simulation.

  1. Fault Severity Evaluation and Improvement Design for Mechanical Systems Using the Fault Injection Technique and Gini Concordance Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fault injection and Gini concordance based method has been developed for fault severity analysis for multibody mechanical systems concerning their dynamic properties. The fault tree analysis (FTA is employed to roughly identify the faults needed to be considered. According to constitution of the mechanical system, the dynamic properties can be achieved by solving the equations that include many types of faults which are injected by using the fault injection technique. Then, the Gini concordance is used to measure the correspondence between the performance with faults and under normal operation thereby providing useful hints of severity ranking in subsystems for reliability design. One numerical example and a series of experiments are provided to illustrate the application of the new method. The results indicate that the proposed method can accurately model the faults and receive the correct information of fault severity. Some strategies are also proposed for reliability improvement of the spacecraft solar array.

  2. Expert systems for real-time monitoring and fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S. J.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for building real-time onboard expert systems were investigated, and the use of expert systems technology was demonstrated in improving the performance of current real-time onboard monitoring and fault diagnosis applications. The potential applications of the proposed research include an expert system environment allowing the integration of expert systems into conventional time-critical application solutions, a grammar for describing the discrete event behavior of monitoring and fault diagnosis systems, and their applications to new real-time hardware fault diagnosis and monitoring systems for aircraft.

  3. Fault-weighted quantification method of fault detection coverage through fault mode and effect analysis in digital I&C systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Lee, Seung Jun, E-mail: sjlee420@unist.ac.kr; Jung, Wondea

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • We developed the fault-weighted quantification method of fault detection coverage. • The method has been applied to specific digital reactor protection system. • The unavailability of the module had 20-times difference with the traditional method. • Several experimental tests will be effectively prioritized using this method. - Abstract: The one of the most outstanding features of a digital I&C system is the use of a fault-tolerant technique. With an awareness regarding the importance of thequantification of fault detection coverage of fault-tolerant techniques, several researches related to the fault injection method were developed and employed to quantify a fault detection coverage. In the fault injection method, each injected fault has a different importance because the frequency of realization of every injected fault is different. However, there have been no previous studies addressing the importance and weighting factor of each injected fault. In this work, a new method for allocating the weighting to each injected fault using the failure mode and effect analysis data was proposed. For application, the fault-weighted quantification method has also been applied to specific digital reactor protection system to quantify the fault detection coverage. One of the major findings in an application was that we may estimate the unavailability of the specific module in digital I&C systems about 20-times smaller than real value when we use a traditional method. The other finding was that we can also classify the importance of the experimental case. Therefore, this method is expected to not only suggest an accurate quantification procedure of fault-detection coverage by weighting the injected faults, but to also contribute to an effective fault injection experiment by sorting the importance of the failure categories.

  4. Integrated system fault diagnostics utilising digraph and fault tree-based approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, L.M.; Hurdle, E.E.; Kelly, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    With the growing intolerance to failures within systems, the issue of fault diagnosis has become ever prevalent. Information concerning these possible failures can help to minimise the disruption to the functionality of the system by allowing quick rectification. Traditional approaches to fault diagnosis within engineering systems have focused on sequential testing procedures and real-time mechanisms. Both methods have been predominantly limited to single fault causes. Latest approaches also consider the issue of multiple faults in reflection to the characteristics of modern day systems designed for high reliability. In addition, a diagnostic capability is required in real time and for changeable system functionality. This paper focuses on two approaches which have been developed to cater for the demands of diagnosis within current engineering systems, namely application of the fault tree analysis technique and the method of digraphs. Both use a comparative approach to consider differences between actual system behaviour and that expected. The procedural guidelines are discussed for each method, with an experimental aircraft fuel system used to test and demonstrate the features of the techniques. The effectiveness of the approaches is compared and their future potential highlighted

  5. A fault-tolerant software strategy for digital systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, E. F.; Webb, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques developed for producing fault-tolerant software are described. Tolerance is required because of the impossibility of defining fault-free software. Faults are caused by humans and can appear anywhere in the software life cycle. Tolerance is effected through error detection, damage assessment, recovery, and fault treatment, followed by return of the system to service. Multiversion software comprises two or more versions of the software yielding solutions which are examined by a decision algorithm. Errors can also be detected by extrapolation from previous results or by the acceptability of results. Violations of timing specifications can reveal errors, or the system can roll back to an error-free state when a defect is detected. The software, when used in flight control systems, must not impinge on time-critical responses. Efforts are still needed to reduce the costs of developing the fault-tolerant systems.

  6. Fault-tolerant Control of a Cyber-physical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxana, Rusu-Both; Eva-Henrietta, Dulf

    2017-10-01

    Cyber-physical systems represent a new emerging field in automatic control. The fault system is a key component, because modern, large scale processes must meet high standards of performance, reliability and safety. Fault propagation in large scale chemical processes can lead to loss of production, energy, raw materials and even environmental hazard. The present paper develops a multi-agent fault-tolerant control architecture using robust fractional order controllers for a (13C) cryogenic separation column cascade. The JADE (Java Agent DEvelopment Framework) platform was used to implement the multi-agent fault tolerant control system while the operational model of the process was implemented in Matlab/SIMULINK environment. MACSimJX (Multiagent Control Using Simulink with Jade Extension) toolbox was used to link the control system and the process model. In order to verify the performance and to prove the feasibility of the proposed control architecture several fault simulation scenarios were performed.

  7. Fault-tolerant dead reckoning system for a modular vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masafumi; Oba, Fuminori; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2005-12-01

    A fault-tolerant dead reckoning system is presented for a modular vehicle, which consists of one chassis unit and several wheel units. The units locally estimate the vehicle position based on their own internal sensors. The local estimates are exchanged among the units via an inter-communication system, and they are fused in a decentralized manner. The units can then determine the vehicle position accurately. The decentralized dead reckoning algorithm is formulated based on the information filter and the covariance Intersection method. For enhancing the reliability of the dead reckoning a multi-model based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of the internal sensors is incorporated into the dead reckoning system. The units diagnose their sensors with the FDD system, and they apply only the normal sensors for the vehicle localization. In this paper two fault modes (hard fault and noise fault modes) of the sensors are handled; on the hard fault the sensor output is stuck at a constant value. On the noise fault it is disturbed by a large noise. The FDD algorithm is based on the variable structure interacting multiple-model estimator. The fault-tolerant dead reckoning algorithm was implemented on our indoor test-vehicle, which consists of one chassis unit and four wheel units. Experimental results show that our dead reckoning provided better localization accuracy than the conventional one (i.e., the dead reckoning without sensor FDD system) did even though the sensors partially failed.

  8. A study of tectonic activity in the Basin-Range Province and on the San Andreas Fault. No. 1: Kinematics of Basin-Range intraplate extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddington, P. K.; Smith, R. B.; Renggli, C.

    1986-01-01

    Strain rates assessed from brittle fracture and total brittle-ductile deformation measured from geodetic data were compared to estimates of paleo-strain from Quaternary geology for the intraplate Great Basin part of the Basin-Range, western United States. These data provide an assessment of the kinematics and mode of lithospheric extension that the western U.S. Cordillera has experienced from the past few million years to the present. Strain and deformation rates were determined by the seismic moment tensor method using historic seismicity and fault plane solutions for sub-regions of homogeneous strain. Contemporary deformation in the Great Basin occurs principally along the active seismic zones. The integrated opening rate across the entire Great Basin is accommodated by E-E extension at 8 to 10 mm/a in the north that diminishes to NW-SE extension of 3.5 mm/a in the south. Zones of maximum lithospheric extension correspond to belts of thin crust, high heat flow, and Quaternary basaltic volcanism, suggesting that these parameters are related through mechanism of extension such as a stress relaxation, allowing bouyant uplift and ascension of magmas.

  9. Geophysical Characterization of the Hilton Creek Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, A. K.; Macy, K. P.; De Cristofaro, J. L.; Polet, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Long Valley Caldera straddles the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada Batholith and the western edge of the Basin and Range Province, and represents one of the largest caldera complexes on Earth. The caldera is intersected by numerous fault systems, including the Hartley Springs Fault System, the Round Valley Fault System, the Long Valley Ring Fault System, and the Hilton Creek Fault System, which is our main region of interest. The Hilton Creek Fault System appears as a single NW-striking fault, dipping to the NE, from Davis Lake in the south to the southern rim of the Long Valley Caldera. Inside the caldera, it splays into numerous parallel faults that extend toward the resurgent dome. Seismicity in the area increased significantly in May 1980, following a series of large earthquakes in the vicinity of the caldera and a subsequent large earthquake swarm which has been suggested to be the result of magma migration. A large portion of the earthquake swarms in the Long Valley Caldera occurs on or around the Hilton Creek Fault splays. We are conducting an interdisciplinary geophysical study of the Hilton Creek Fault System from just south of the onset of splay faulting, to its extension into the dome of the caldera. Our investigation includes ground-based magnetic field measurements, high-resolution total station elevation profiles, Structure-From-Motion derived topography and an analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms and statistics. Preliminary analysis of topographic profiles, of approximately 1 km in length, reveals the presence of at least three distinct fault splays within the caldera with vertical offsets of 0.5 to 1.0 meters. More detailed topographic mapping is expected to highlight smaller structures. We are also generating maps of the variation in b-value along different portions of the Hilton Creek system to determine whether we can detect any transition to more swarm-like behavior towards the North. We will show maps of magnetic anomalies, topography

  10. Results of an electrical power system fault study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Johnson, Yvette B.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall conducted a study of electrical power system faults with a view to the development of AI control systems for a spacecraft power system breadboard. The results of this study have been applied to a multichannel high voltage dc spacecraft power system, the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System (LASEPS) breadboard. Some of the faults encountered in testing LASEPS included the shorting of a bus an a falloff in battery cell capacity.

  11. Navigation System Fault Diagnosis for Underwater Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thomas; Gregersen, Rene Tavs; Blanke, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates fault diagnosis on unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) based on analysis of structure of the nonlinear dynamics. Residuals are generated using dierent approaches in structural analysis followed by statistical change detection. Hypothesis testing thresholds are made signal...... based to cope with non-ideal properties seen in real data. Detection of both sensor and thruster failures are demonstrated. Isolation is performed using the residual signature of detected faults and the change detection algorithm is used to assess severity of faults by estimating their magnitude...

  12. Fault-tolerant Actuator System for Electrical Steering of Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Sandberg; Blanke, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    Being critical to the safety of vehicles, the steering system is required to maintain the vehicles ability to steer until it is brought to halt, should a fault occur. With electrical steering becoming a cost-effective candidate for electrical powered vehicles, a fault-tolerant architecture...

  13. System assessment using modular logic fault tree methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncoso Fleitas, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the process of a Probabilistic Safety analysis (PSA) study a large number of fault trees are generated by different specialist. Modular Logic Fault Tree Methodology pave the way the way to systematize the procedures and to unify the criteria in the process of systems modulation. An example of of the application of this methodology is shown

  14. All-to-all sequenced fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-11-02

    An apparatus, program product and method enable nodal fault detection by sequencing communications between all system nodes. A master node may coordinate communications between two slave nodes before sequencing to and initiating communications between a new pair of slave nodes. The communications may be analyzed to determine the nodal fault.

  15. Reconfigurable Control of Input Affine Nonlinear Systems under Actuator Fault

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Mojtaba; Galeazzi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a fault tolerant control method for input-affine nonlinear systems using a nonlinear reconfiguration block (RB). The basic idea of the method is to insert the RB between the plant and the nominal controller such that fault tolerance is achieved without re-designing the nominal...

  16. Estimation of Faults in DC Electrical Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinevsky, Dimitry; Boyd, Stephen; Poll, Scott

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel optimization-based approach to estimating fault states in a DC power system. Potential faults changing the circuit topology are included along with faulty measurements. Our approach can be considered as a relaxation of the mixed estimation problem. We develop a linear model of the circuit and pose a convex problem for estimating the faults and other hidden states. A sparse fault vector solution is computed by using 11 regularization. The solution is computed reliably and efficiently, and gives accurate diagnostics on the faults. We demonstrate a real-time implementation of the approach for an instrumented electrical power system testbed, the ADAPT testbed at NASA ARC. The estimates are computed in milliseconds on a PC. The approach performs well despite unmodeled transients and other modeling uncertainties present in the system.

  17. Fault diagnosis system for tapped power transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, E.A.; Talaat, H.A. [Elect. Power and Machines Dept., Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt); Khamis, E.A. [EEA, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a design for a fault diagnosis system (FDS) for tapped HV/EHV power transmission lines. These lines have two different protection zones. The proposed approach reduces the cost and the complexity of the FDS for these types of lines. The FDS consists basically of fifteen artificial neural networks (ANNs). The FDS basic objectives are mainly: (1) the detection of the system fault; (2) the localization of the faulted zone; (3) the classification of the fault type; and finally (4) the identification of the faulted phase. This FDS is structured in a three hierarchical levels. In the first level, a preprocessing unit to the input data is performed. An ANN, in the second level, is designed in order to detect and zone localize the line faults. In the third level, two zone diagnosis systems (ZDS) are designed. Each ZDS is dedicated to one zone and consists of seven parallel-cascaded ANN's. Four-parallel ANN's are designed in order to achieve the fault type classification. While, the other three cascaded ANN's are designed mainly for the selection of the faulted phase. A smoothing unit is also configured to smooth out the output response of the proposed FDS. The proposed FDS is designed and evaluated using the local measurements of the three-phase voltage and current samples acquired at only one side. The sampling rate was taken 16 samples per cycle of the power frequency. Data window of 4 samples was utilized. These samples were generated using the EMTP simulation program, applied to the High-Dam/Cairo 500 kV tapped transmission line. All possible shunt fault types were considered. The effect of fault location and fault incipience time were also included. Moreover, the effect of load and capacitor switchings on the FDS performance was investigated. Testing results have proved the capability as well as the effectiveness of the proposed FDS. (author)

  18. Fault-Tolerant Control For A Robotic Inspection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Kam Sing

    1995-01-01

    Report describes first phase of continuing program of research on fault-tolerant control subsystem of telerobotic visual-inspection system. Goal of program to develop robotic system for remotely controlled visual inspection of structures in outer space.

  19. High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

  20. Communication-based fault handling scheme for ungrounded distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Lim, S.I.; Lee, S.J.; Choi, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    The requirement for high quality and highly reliable power supplies has been increasing as a result of increasing demand for power. At the time of a fault occurrence in a distribution system, some protection method would be dedicated to fault section isolation and service restoration. However, if there are many outage areas when the protection method is performed, it is an inconvenience to the customer. A conventional method to determine a fault section in ungrounded systems requires many successive outage invocations. This paper proposed an efficient fault section isolation method and service restoration method for single line-to-ground fault in an ungrounded distribution system that was faster than the conventional one using the information exchange between connected feeders. The proposed algorithm could be performed without any power supply interruption and could decrease the number of switching operations, so that customers would not experience outages very frequently. The method involved the use of an intelligent communication method and a sequential switching control scheme. The proposed algorithm was also applied in both a single-tie and multi-tie distribution system. This proposed algorithm has been verified through fault simulations in a simple model of ungrounded multi-tie distribution system. The method proposed in this paper was proven to offer more efficient fault identification and much less outage time than the conventional method. The proposed method could contribute to a system design since it is valid in multi-tie systems. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  1. Fault-Tolerant Onboard Monitoring and Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajic, Zoran

    The purpose of this research project is to improve current onboard decision support systems. Special focus is on the onboard prediction of the instantaneous sea state. In this project a new approach to increasing the overall reliability of a monitoring and decision support system has been...... advice regarding speed and course changes to decrease the wave-induced loads. The SeaSense system is based on the combined use of a mathematical model and measurements from a set of sensors. The overall dependability of a shipboard monitoring and decision support system such as the SeaSense system can...... of a fault. A supervisory function determines the severity of the fault once its origin has been isolated and its magnitude estimated. Fault-tolerant Sensor Fusion means that the monitoring and decision support system can accommodate faults so that the overall system continues to satisfy its goal...

  2. Incipient fault detection and power system protection for spaceborne systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B. Don; Hackler, Irene M.

    1987-01-01

    A program was initiated to study the feasibility of using advanced terrestrial power system protection techniques for spacecraft power systems. It was designed to enhance and automate spacecraft power distribution systems in the areas of safety, reliability and maintenance. The proposed power management/distribution system is described as well as security assessment and control, incipient and low current fault detection, and the proposed spaceborne protection system. It is noted that the intelligent remote power controller permits the implementation of digital relaying algorithms with both adaptive and programmable characteristics.

  3. Comparing Different Fault Identification Algorithms in Distributed Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaabi, Salim

    A power system is a huge complex system that delivers the electrical power from the generation units to the consumers. As the demand for electrical power increases, distributed power generation was introduced to the power system. Faults may occur in the power system at any time in different locations. These faults cause a huge damage to the system as they might lead to full failure of the power system. Using distributed generation in the power system made it even harder to identify the location of the faults in the system. The main objective of this work is to test the different fault location identification algorithms while tested on a power system with the different amount of power injected using distributed generators. As faults may lead the system to full failure, this is an important area for research. In this thesis different fault location identification algorithms have been tested and compared while the different amount of power is injected from distributed generators. The algorithms were tested on IEEE 34 node test feeder using MATLAB and the results were compared to find when these algorithms might fail and the reliability of these methods.

  4. PCA Fault Feature Extraction in Complex Electric Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG, J.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric power system is one of the most complex artificial systems in the world. The complexity is determined by its characteristics about constitution, configuration, operation, organization, etc. The fault in electric power system cannot be completely avoided. When electric power system operates from normal state to failure or abnormal, its electric quantities (current, voltage and angles, etc. may change significantly. Our researches indicate that the variable with the biggest coefficient in principal component usually corresponds to the fault. Therefore, utilizing real-time measurements of phasor measurement unit, based on principal components analysis technology, we have extracted successfully the distinct features of fault component. Of course, because of the complexity of different types of faults in electric power system, there still exists enormous problems need a close and intensive study.

  5. Fault Location in Power Electrical Traction Line System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Zhou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, methods of fault location are discussed in electrical traction single-end direct power supply network systems. Based on the distributed parameter model of the system, the position of the short-circuit fault can be located with the aid of the current and voltage value at the measurement end of the electrical traction line. Furthermore, the influence of the transient resistance, the position of the locomotive, locomotive load for fault location are also discussed. MATLAB simulation tool is used for the simulation experiments. Simulation results are proved the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  6. Active Fault Tolerant Control of Livestock Stable Ventilation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    degraded performance even in the faulty case. In this thesis, we have designed such controllers for climate control systems for livestock buildings in three steps: Deriving a model for the climate control system of a pig-stable. Designing a active fault diagnosis (AFD) algorithm for different kinds...... of the hybrid model are estimated by a recursive estimation algorithm, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), using experimental data which was provided by an equipped laboratory. Two methods for active fault diagnosis are proposed. The AFD methods excite the system by injecting a so-called excitation input. In both...... methods, the input is designed off-line based on a sensitivity analysis in order to improve the precision of estimation of parameters associated with faults. Two different algorithm, the EKF and a new adaptive filter, are used to estimate the parameters of the system. The fault is detected and isolated...

  7. Rule - based Fault Diagnosis Expert System for Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xiao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the trend of increasing installed capacity of wind power, the intelligent fault diagnosis of wind turbine is of great significance to the safe and efficient operation of wind farms. Based on the knowledge of fault diagnosis of wind turbines, this paper builds expert system diagnostic knowledge base by using confidence production rules and expert system self-learning method. In Visual Studio 2013 platform, C # language is selected and ADO.NET technology is used to access the database. Development of Fault Diagnosis Expert System for Wind Turbine. The purpose of this paper is to realize on-line diagnosis of wind turbine fault through human-computer interaction, and to improve the diagnostic capability of the system through the continuous improvement of the knowledge base.

  8. Fault Injection and Monitoring Capability for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Computation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Yates, Amy M.; Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2010-01-01

    The Configurable Fault-Injection and Monitoring System (CFIMS) is intended for the experimental characterization of effects caused by a variety of adverse conditions on a distributed computation system running flight control applications. A product of research collaboration between NASA Langley Research Center and Old Dominion University, the CFIMS is the main research tool for generating actual fault response data with which to develop and validate analytical performance models and design methodologies for the mitigation of fault effects in distributed flight control systems. Rather than a fixed design solution, the CFIMS is a flexible system that enables the systematic exploration of the problem space and can be adapted to meet the evolving needs of the research. The CFIMS has the capabilities of system-under-test (SUT) functional stimulus generation, fault injection and state monitoring, all of which are supported by a configuration capability for setting up the system as desired for a particular experiment. This report summarizes the work accomplished so far in the development of the CFIMS concept and documents the first design realization.

  9. Multi-directional fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-06-29

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  10. All row, planar fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian Edward

    2013-07-23

    An apparatus, program product and method for detecting nodal faults may simultaneously cause designated nodes of a cell to communicate with all nodes adjacent to each of the designated nodes. Furthermore, all nodes along the axes of the designated nodes are made to communicate with their adjacent nodes, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  11. Multi-directional fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2009-03-17

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  12. Intelligent fault isolation and diagnosis for communication satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallo, Donald P.; Durkin, John; Petrik, Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is a prototype diagnosis expert system to provide the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) System with autonomous diagnosis capability. The system, the Fault Isolation and Diagnosis EXpert (FIDEX) system, is a frame-based system that uses hierarchical structures to represent such items as the satellite's subsystems, components, sensors, and fault states. This overall frame architecture integrates the hierarchical structures into a lattice that provides a flexible representation scheme and facilitates system maintenance. FIDEX uses an inexact reasoning technique based on the incrementally acquired evidence approach developed by Shortliffe. The system is designed with a primitive learning ability through which it maintains a record of past diagnosis studies.

  13. Soft-Fault Detection Technologies Developed for Electrical Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, partner universities, and defense contractors are working to develop intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) technologies for future spacecraft and launch vehicles. The goals are to provide higher performance (efficiency, transient response, and stability), higher fault tolerance, and higher reliability through the application of digital control and communication technologies. It is also expected that these technologies will eventually reduce the design, development, manufacturing, and integration costs for large, electrical power systems for space vehicles. The main focus of this research has been to incorporate digital control, communications, and intelligent algorithms into power electronic devices such as direct-current to direct-current (dc-dc) converters and protective switchgear. These technologies, in turn, will enable revolutionary changes in the way electrical power systems are designed, developed, configured, and integrated in aerospace vehicles and satellites. Initial successes in integrating modern, digital controllers have proven that transient response performance can be improved using advanced nonlinear control algorithms. One technology being developed includes the detection of "soft faults," those not typically covered by current systems in use today. Soft faults include arcing faults, corona discharge faults, and undetected leakage currents. Using digital control and advanced signal analysis algorithms, we have shown that it is possible to reliably detect arcing faults in high-voltage dc power distribution systems (see the preceding photograph). Another research effort has shown that low-level leakage faults and cable degradation can be detected by analyzing power system parameters over time. This additional fault detection capability will result in higher reliability for long-lived power systems such as reusable launch vehicles and space exploration missions.

  14. Statistical Feature Extraction for Fault Locations in Nonintrusive Fault Detection of Low Voltage Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Hsien Chang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes statistical feature extraction methods combined with artificial intelligence (AI approaches for fault locations in non-intrusive single-line-to-ground fault (SLGF detection of low voltage distribution systems. The input features of the AI algorithms are extracted using statistical moment transformation for reducing the dimensions of the power signature inputs measured by using non-intrusive fault monitoring (NIFM techniques. The data required to develop the network are generated by simulating SLGF using the Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP in a test system. To enhance the identification accuracy, these features after normalization are given to AI algorithms for presenting and evaluating in this paper. Different AI techniques are then utilized to compare which identification algorithms are suitable to diagnose the SLGF for various power signatures in a NIFM system. The simulation results show that the proposed method is effective and can identify the fault locations by using non-intrusive monitoring techniques for low voltage distribution systems.

  15. Hybrid fault diagnosis of nonlinear systems using neural parameter estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani-Tehrani, E; Talebi, H A; Khorasani, K

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a novel integrated hybrid approach for fault diagnosis (FD) of nonlinear systems taking advantage of both the system's mathematical model and the adaptive nonlinear approximation capability of computational intelligence techniques. Unlike most FD techniques, the proposed solution simultaneously accomplishes fault detection, isolation, and identification (FDII) within a unified diagnostic module. At the core of this solution is a bank of adaptive neural parameter estimators (NPEs) associated with a set of single-parameter fault models. The NPEs continuously estimate unknown fault parameters (FPs) that are indicators of faults in the system. Two NPE structures, series-parallel and parallel, are developed with their exclusive set of desirable attributes. The parallel scheme is extremely robust to measurement noise and possesses a simpler, yet more solid, fault isolation logic. In contrast, the series-parallel scheme displays short FD delays and is robust to closed-loop system transients due to changes in control commands. Finally, a fault tolerant observer (FTO) is designed to extend the capability of the two NPEs that originally assumes full state measurements for systems that have only partial state measurements. The proposed FTO is a neural state estimator that can estimate unmeasured states even in the presence of faults. The estimated and the measured states then comprise the inputs to the two proposed FDII schemes. Simulation results for FDII of reaction wheels of a three-axis stabilized satellite in the presence of disturbances and noise demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed FDII solutions under partial state measurements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Diagnostic System for Speed-Varying Motor Rotary Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwan-Lu Tseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed an intelligent rotary fault diagnostic system for motors. A sensorless rotational speed detection method and an improved dynamic structural neural network are used. Moreover, to increase the convergence speed of training, a terminal attractor method and a hybrid discriminant analysis are also adopted. The proposed method can be employed to detect the rotary frequencies of motors with varying speeds and can enhance the discrimination of motor faults. To conduct the experiments, this study used wireless sensor nodes to transmit vibration data and employed MATLAB to write codes for functional modules, including the signal processing, sensorless rotational speed estimation, neural network, and stochastic process control chart. Additionally, Visual Basic software was used to create an integrated human-machine interface. The experimental results regarding the test of equipment faults indicated that the proposed novel diagnostic system can effectively estimate rotational speeds and provide superior ability of motor fault discrimination with fast training convergence.

  17. PV System Component Fault and Failure Compilation and Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Lavrova, Olga; Gooding, Renee Lynne

    2018-02-01

    This report describes data collection and analysis of solar photovoltaic (PV) equipment events, which consist of faults and fa ilures that occur during the normal operation of a distributed PV system or PV power plant. We present summary statistics from locations w here maintenance data is being collected at various intervals, as well as reliability statistics gathered from that da ta, consisting of fault/failure distributions and repair distributions for a wide range of PV equipment types.

  18. Robust filtering and fault detection of switched delay systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Switched delay systems appear in a wide field of applications including networked control systems, power systems, memristive systems. Though the large amount of ideas with respect to such systems have generated, until now, it still lacks a framework to focus on filter design and fault detection issues which are relevant to life safety and property loss. Beginning with the comprehensive coverage of the new developments in the analysis and control synthesis for switched delay systems, the monograph not only provides a systematic approach to designing the filter and detecting the fault of switched delay systems, but it also covers the model reduction issues. Specific topics covered include: (1) Arbitrary switching signal where delay-independent and delay-dependent conditions are presented by proposing a linearization technique. (2) Average dwell time where a weighted Lyapunov function is come up with dealing with filter design and fault detection issues beside taking model reduction problems. The monograph is in...

  19. A Fault Recognition System for Gearboxes of Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiling; Huang, Haiyue; Yin, Zidong

    2017-12-01

    Costs of maintenance and loss of power generation caused by the faults of wind turbines gearboxes are the main components of operation costs for a wind farm. Therefore, the technology of condition monitoring and fault recognition for wind turbines gearboxes is becoming a hot topic. A condition monitoring and fault recognition system (CMFRS) is presented for CBM of wind turbines gearboxes in this paper. The vibration signals from acceleration sensors at different locations of gearbox and the data from supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system are collected to CMFRS. Then the feature extraction and optimization algorithm is applied to these operational data. Furthermore, to recognize the fault of gearboxes, the GSO-LSSVR algorithm is proposed, combining the least squares support vector regression machine (LSSVR) with the Glowworm Swarm Optimization (GSO) algorithm. Finally, the results show that the fault recognition system used in this paper has a high rate for identifying three states of wind turbines’ gears; besides, the combination of date features can affect the identifying rate and the selection optimization algorithm presented in this paper can get a pretty good date feature subset for the fault recognition.

  20. Fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies for non-linear systems analytical and soft computing approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Witczak, Marcin

    2014-01-01

      This book presents selected fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies for non-linear systems in a unified framework. In particular, starting from advanced state estimation strategies up to modern soft computing, the discrete-time description of the system is employed Part I of the book presents original research results regarding state estimation and neural networks for robust fault diagnosis. Part II is devoted to the presentation of integrated fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant systems. It starts with a general fault-tolerant control framework, which is then extended by introducing robustness with respect to various uncertainties. Finally, it is shown how to implement the proposed framework for fuzzy systems described by the well-known Takagi–Sugeno models. This research monograph is intended for researchers, engineers, and advanced postgraduate students in control and electrical engineering, computer science,as well as mechanical and chemical engineering.

  1. A New Approach to Fault Diagnosis of Power Systems Using Fuzzy Reasoning Spiking Neural P Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Guojiang; Shi, Dongyuan; Zhu, Lin; Duan, Xianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Fault diagnosis of power systems is an important task in power system operation. In this paper, fuzzy reasoning spiking neural P systems (FRSN P systems) are implemented for fault diagnosis of power systems for the first time. As a graphical modeling tool, FRSN P systems are able to represent fuzzy knowledge and perform fuzzy reasoning well. When the cause-effect relationship between candidate faulted section and protective devices is represented by the FRSN P systems, the diagnostic conclusi...

  2. Fault Tolerant Emergency Control to Preserve Power System Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Andreas Søndergaard; Richter, Jan H.; Tabatabaeipour, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for fault-masking and system reconfiguration in power transmission systems. The paper demonstrates how faults are handled by reconfiguring remaining controls through utilisation of wide-area measurement in real time. It is shown how reconfiguration can be obtained...... using a virtual actuator concept, which covers Lure-type systems. The paper shows the steps needed to calculate a virtual actuator, which relies on the solution of a linear matrix inequality. The solution is shown to work with existing controls by adding a compensation signal. Simulation results...... of a benchmark system show ability of the reconfiguration to maintain stability...

  3. Systems and Methods for Determining Inertial Navigation System Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Raj Mohan (Inventor); Bageshwar, Vibhor L. (Inventor); Kim, Kyusung (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An inertial navigation system (INS) includes a primary inertial navigation system (INS) unit configured to receive accelerometer measurements from an accelerometer and angular velocity measurements from a gyroscope. The primary INS unit is further configured to receive global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals from a GNSS sensor and to determine a first set of kinematic state vectors based on the accelerometer measurements, the angular velocity measurements, and the GNSS signals. The INS further includes a secondary INS unit configured to receive the accelerometer measurements and the angular velocity measurements and to determine a second set of kinematic state vectors of the vehicle based on the accelerometer measurements and the angular velocity measurements. A health management system is configured to compare the first set of kinematic state vectors and the second set of kinematic state vectors to determine faults associated with the accelerometer or the gyroscope based on the comparison.

  4. Shallow to intermediate resistivity features of the Colfiorito Fault System inferred by DC and MT survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Siniscalchi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade electromagnetic (EM measurements have provided new constraints on the upper-crustal structure of the major fault zones in the world, both when they act as conduit and as a barrier, due to strong sensitivity of resistivity to fluids circulation and mineralization. On the track of a high impact magnetotelluric (MT study performed across the San Andreas Fault, high resolution EM data were collected in the Colfiorito epicentral area along profiles crossing some main fault lineaments. Being the study focussed both on shallow that on intermediate resistivity distribution in the brittle upper-crust, a MT profile was integrated by several electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT. The latter were successful in locating faults even where the structures are buried by a wide covering of Quaternary deposits and in the recognition of different electrical signatures of the faults. MT resistivity model crossing Mt. Prefoglio normal fault clearly imaged the typical thrust structures of the area and a high conductive zone spatially related to the fault. Seismicity seems to be located outside such conductive area, whose behaviour suggests a fluidised and altered zone incapable of supporting significant stress internally.

  5. Fault detection for nonlinear systems - A standard problem approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a general method for designing (nonlinear) fault detection and isolation (FDI) systems for nonlinear processes. For a rich class of nonlinear systems, a nonlinear FDI system can be designed using convex optimization procedures. The proposed method is a natural extension of met...

  6. A study of fault injection in multichannel spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Johnson, Yvette B.

    1991-01-01

    NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center proposes to implement fault injection into an electrical power system breadboard to study the reactions of the various control elements of this breadboard. Among the elements to be studied are the remote power controllers, the algorithms in the control computers, and the artificially intelligent control programs resident in this breadboard. To this end, a study of electrical power is being performed to yield a list of the most common power system faults. The results of this study are being applied to a multichannel high-voltage DC spacecraft power system called the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System Breadboard. Some of the reactions of the breadboard to some of the faults which have been encountered are presented along with the results of this study.

  7. A study of fault injection in multichannel spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Johnson, Yvette B.

    NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center proposes to implement fault injection into an electrical power system breadboard to study the reactions of the various control elements of this breadboard. Among the elements to be studied are the remote power controllers, the algorithms in the control computers, and the artificially intelligent control programs resident in this breadboard. To this end, a study of electrical power is being performed to yield a list of the most common power system faults. The results of this study are being applied to a multichannel high-voltage DC spacecraft power system called the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System Breadboard. Some of the reactions of the breadboard to some of the faults which have been encountered are presented along with the results of this study.

  8. A system view of the No Fault Found (NFF) phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederholm, Peter

    2007-01-01

    When a unit is tested outside a technical system, it has normally been removed due to a fault. However, in some cases the external test may not discover any fault and a No Fault Found (NFF) event may occur. The NFF phenomenon is a major problem when dealing with complex technical systems, and its consequences may be manifested in decreased safety and dependability and increased life cycle costs. There are multiple interacting causes of NFF, demanding tough requirements for successful solutions. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phenomenon of NFF and to highlight possible improvements for the prevention of causes of NFF and the reduction of its consequences. The study was performed as an explorative literature study, and the analysis was based on a holistic system view. The identified causes and solutions are related to life cycle stages, availability performance factors, and system stakeholders

  9. Wavelet and neuro-fuzzy based fault location for combined transmission systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, C.K.; Kim, K.H.; Lee, J.B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Wonkwang University, 344-2, Shinyong-dong, Iksan (Korea); Kloeckl, Bernd [High Voltage Laboratory, ETH, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    This paper describes the fault location algorithm using neuro-fuzzy systems in combined transmission lines with underground power cables. The neuro-fuzzy system consists of two parts to perform different tasks. One is to discriminate the fault section between overhead and underground using the detailed coefficients obtained by wavelet transform. The other system calculates fault location. The algorithm for fault location again is divided into two parts: one to calculate the fault location on the overhead lines, the other one for the underground cable section. This system shows excellent results for discrimination of fault section and calculation of fault location. (author)

  10. Design of fault tolerant control system for steam generator using

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Ki; Seo, Mi Ro [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A controller and sensor fault tolerant system for a steam generator is designed with fuzzy logic. A structure of the proposed fault tolerant redundant system is composed of a supervisor and two fuzzy weighting modulators. A supervisor alternatively checks a controller and a sensor induced performances to identify which part, a controller or a sensor, is faulty. In order to analyze controller induced performance both an error and a change in error of the system output are chosen as fuzzy variables. The fuzzy logic for a sensor induced performance uses two variables : a deviation between two sensor outputs and its frequency. Fuzzy weighting modulator generates an output signal compensated for faulty input signal. Simulations show that the proposed fault tolerant control scheme for a steam generator regulates well water level by suppressing fault effect of either controllers or sensors. Therefore through duplicating sensors and controllers with the proposed fault tolerant scheme, both a reliability of a steam generator control and sensor system and that of a power plant increase even more. 2 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  11. Paleoseismology of Sinistral-Slip Fault System, Focusing on the Mae Chan Fault, on the Shan Plateau, SE Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtiss, E. R.; Weldon, R. J.; Wiwegwin, W.; Weldon, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Shan Plateau, which includes portions of Myanmar, China, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam lies between the dextral NS-trending Sagaing and SE-trending Red River faults and contains 14 active E-W sinistral-slip faults, including the Mae Chan Fault (MCF) in northern Thailand. The last ground-rupturing earthquake to occur on the broader sinistral fault system was the M6.8 Tarlay earthquake in Myanmar in March 2011 on the Nam Ma fault immediately north of the MCF the last earthquake to occur on the MCF was a M4.0 in the 5th century that destroyed the entire city of Wiang Yonok (Morley et al., 2011). We report on a trenching study of the MCF, which is part of a broader study to create a regional seismic hazard map of the entire Shan Plateau. By studying the MCF, which appears to be representative of the sinistral faults, and easy to work on, we hope to characterize both it and the other unstudied faults in the system. As part of a paleoseismology training course we dug two trenches at the Pa Tueng site on the MCF, within an offset river channel and the trenches exposed young sediment with abundant charcoal (in process of dating), cultural artifacts, and evidence for the last two (or three) ground-rupturing earthquakes on the fault. We hope to use the data from this site to narrow the recurrence interval, which is currently to be 2,000-4,000 years and the slip rate of 1-2 mm/year, being developed at other sites on the fault. By extrapolating the data of the MCF to the other faults we will have a better understanding of the whole fault system. Once we have characterized the MCF, we plan to use geomorphic offsets and strain rates from regional GPS to relatively estimate the activity of the other faults in this sinistral system.

  12. Iterative Self Organized Data Algorithm for Fault Classification of Mechanical System

    OpenAIRE

    Jayamala K. Patil; P. B. Ghewari; S. S. Nagtilak

    2011-01-01

    The challenging issue for mechanical industry is to develop fast & reliable fault diagnosis systems before total breakdown of machine. Fault diagnosis & classification of faults of mechanical systems is a difficult task. It improves productivity & reduces cost of production. This paper presents an approach for classification of commonly observed faults in gears of mechanical system. These faults include weared gear, gear with one tooth broken & gear with crack on one tooth. The Power Spectral...

  13. Effect analysis of faults in digital I and C systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Jun

    2014-01-01

    A reliability analysis of digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants has been introduced as one of the important elements of a probabilistic safety assessment because of the unique characteristics of digital I and C systems. Digital I and C systems have various features distinguishable from those of analog I and C systems such as software and fault-tolerant techniques. In this work, the faults in a digital I and C system were analyzed and a model for representing the effects of the faults was developed. First, the effects of the faults in a system were analyzed using fault injection experiments. A software-implemented fault injection technique in which faults can be injected into the memory was used based on the assumption that all faults in a system are reflected in the faults in the memory. In the experiments, the effect of a fault on the system output was observed. In addition, the success or failure in detecting the fault by fault-tolerant functions included in the system was identified. Second, a fault tree model for representing that a fault is propagated to the system output was developed. With the model, it can be identified how a fault is propagated to the output or why a fault is not detected by fault-tolerant techniques. Based on the analysis results of the proposed method, it is possible to not only evaluate the system reliability but also identify weak points of fault-tolerant techniques by identifying undetected faults. The results can be reflected in the designs to improve the capability of fault-tolerant techniques. (author)

  14. Clouds: A support architecture for fault tolerant, distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, P.; Leblanco, R. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Clouds is a distributed operating system providing support for fault tolerance, location independence, reconfiguration, and transactions. The implementation paradigm uses objects and nested actions as building blocks. Subsystems and applications that can be supported by Clouds to further enhance the performance and utility of the system are also discussed.

  15. Rapid Transient Fault Insertion in Large Digital Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohani, A.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    This paper presents a technique for rapidtransientfault injection, regarding the CPU time, to perform simulation-based fault-injection in complex System-on-Chip Systems (SoCs). The proposed approach can be applied to complex circuits, as it is not required to modify the top-level modules of a

  16. Fault Diagnosis in Dynamic Systems Using Fuzzy Interacting Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolesov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of fault diagnosis in dynamic systems based on a fuzzy approach is proposed. The new method possesses two basic specific features which distinguish it from the other known fuzzy methods based on the application of fuzzy logic and a bank of state observers. First, this method uses a bank of interacting observers instead of traditional independent observers. The second specific feature of the proposed method is the assumption that there is no strict boundary between the serviceable and disabled technical states of the system, which makes it possible to specify a decision making rule for fault diagnosis.

  17. Managing systems faults on the commercial flight deck: Analysis of pilots' organization and prioritization of fault management information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William H.

    1993-01-01

    In rare instances, flight crews of commercial aircraft must manage complex systems faults in addition to all their normal flight tasks. Pilot errors in fault management have been attributed, at least in part, to an incomplete or inaccurate awareness of the fault situation. The current study is part of a program aimed at assuring that the types of information potentially available from an intelligent fault management aiding concept developed at NASA Langley called 'Faultfinde' (see Abbott, Schutte, Palmer, and Ricks, 1987) are an asset rather than a liability: additional information should improve pilot performance and aircraft safety, but it should not confuse, distract, overload, mislead, or generally exacerbate already difficult circumstances.

  18. Chaos Synchronization Based Novel Real-Time Intelligent Fault Diagnosis for Photovoltaic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Tsung Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional solar photovoltaic fault diagnosis system needs two to three sets of sensing elements to capture fault signals as fault features and many fault diagnosis methods cannot be applied with real time. The fault diagnosis method proposed in this study needs only one set of sensing elements to intercept the fault features of the system, which can be real-time-diagnosed by creating the fault data of only one set of sensors. The aforesaid two points reduce the cost and fault diagnosis time. It can improve the construction of the huge database. This study used Matlab to simulate the faults in the solar photovoltaic system. The maximum power point tracker (MPPT is used to keep a stable power supply to the system when the system has faults. The characteristic signal of system fault voltage is captured and recorded, and the dynamic error of the fault voltage signal is extracted by chaos synchronization. Then, the extension engineering is used to implement the fault diagnosis. Finally, the overall fault diagnosis system only needs to capture the voltage signal of the solar photovoltaic system, and the fault type can be diagnosed instantly.

  19. FADES: A tool for automated fault analysis of complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.

    1990-01-01

    FADES is an Expert System for performing fault analyses on complex connected systems. By using a graphical editor to draw components and link them together the FADES system allows the analyst to describe a given system. The knowledge base created is used to qualitatively simulate the system behaviour. By inducing all possible component failures in the system and determining their effects, a set of facts is built up. These facts are then used to create Fault Trees, or FMEA tables. The facts may also be used for explanation effects and to generate diagnostic rules allowing system instrumentation to be optimised. The prototype system has been built and tested and is preently undergoing testing by users. All comments from these trials will be used to tailor the system to the requirements of the user so that the end product performs the exact task required

  20. Fault trees for decision making in systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    The application of fault tree analysis (FTA) to system safety and reliability is presented within the framework of system safety analysis. The concepts and techniques involved in manual and automated fault tree construction are described and their differences noted. The theory of mathematical reliability pertinent to FTA is presented with emphasis on engineering applications. An outline of the quantitative reliability techniques of the Reactor Safety Study is given. Concepts of probabilistic importance are presented within the fault tree framework and applied to the areas of system design, diagnosis and simulation. The computer code IMPORTANCE ranks basic events and cut sets according to a sensitivity analysis. A useful feature of the IMPORTANCE code is that it can accept relative failure data as input. The output of the IMPORTANCE code can assist an analyst in finding weaknesses in system design and operation, suggest the most optimal course of system upgrade, and determine the optimal location of sensors within a system. A general simulation model of system failure in terms of fault tree logic is described. The model is intended for efficient diagnosis of the causes of system failure in the event of a system breakdown. It can also be used to assist an operator in making decisions under a time constraint regarding the future course of operations. The model is well suited for computer implementation. New results incorporated in the simulation model include an algorithm to generate repair checklists on the basis of fault tree logic and a one-step-ahead optimization procedure that minimizes the expected time to diagnose system failure. (80 figures, 20 tables)

  1. A System for Fault Management and Fault Consequences Analysis for NASA's Deep Space Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombano, Silvano; Spirkovska, Liljana; Baskaran, Vijaykumar; Aaseng, Gordon; McCann, Robert S.; Ossenfort, John; Smith, Irene; Iverson, David L.; Schwabacher, Mark

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration program envisions the utilization of a Deep Space Habitat (DSH) for human exploration of the space environment in the vicinity of Mars and/or asteroids. Communication latencies with ground control of as long as 20+ minutes make it imperative that DSH operations be highly autonomous, as any telemetry-based detection of a systems problem on Earth could well occur too late to assist the crew with the problem. A DSH-based development program has been initiated to develop and test the automation technologies necessary to support highly autonomous DSH operations. One such technology is a fault management tool to support performance monitoring of vehicle systems operations and to assist with real-time decision making in connection with operational anomalies and failures. Toward that end, we are developing Advanced Caution and Warning System (ACAWS), a tool that combines dynamic and interactive graphical representations of spacecraft systems, systems modeling, automated diagnostic analysis and root cause identification, system and mission impact assessment, and mitigation procedure identification to help spacecraft operators (both flight controllers and crew) understand and respond to anomalies more effectively. In this paper, we describe four major architecture elements of ACAWS: Anomaly Detection, Fault Isolation, System Effects Analysis, and Graphic User Interface (GUI), and how these elements work in concert with each other and with other tools to provide fault management support to both the controllers and crew. We then describe recent evaluations and tests of ACAWS on the DSH testbed. The results of these tests support the feasibility and strength of our approach to failure management automation and enhanced operational autonomy

  2. A distributed fault-detection and diagnosis system using on-line parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, T.-H.; Merrill, W.; Duyar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a model-based fault-detection and diagnosis system (FDD) is reviewed. The system can be used as an integral part of an intelligent control system. It determines the faults of a system from comparison of the measurements of the system with a priori information represented by the model of the system. The method of modeling a complex system is described and a description of diagnosis models which include process faults is presented. There are three distinct classes of fault modes covered by the system performance model equation: actuator faults, sensor faults, and performance degradation. A system equation for a complete model that describes all three classes of faults is given. The strategy for detecting the fault and estimating the fault parameters using a distributed on-line parameter identification scheme is presented. A two-step approach is proposed. The first step is composed of a group of hypothesis testing modules, (HTM) in parallel processing to test each class of faults. The second step is the fault diagnosis module which checks all the information obtained from the HTM level, isolates the fault, and determines its magnitude. The proposed FDD system was demonstrated by applying it to detect actuator and sensor faults added to a simulation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The simulation results show that the proposed FDD system can adequately detect the faults and estimate their magnitudes.

  3. Fault-diagnosis applications. Model-based condition monitoring. Acutators, drives, machinery, plants, sensors, and fault-tolerant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isermann, Rolf [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (DE). Inst. fuer Automatisierungstechnik (IAT)

    2011-07-01

    Supervision, condition-monitoring, fault detection, fault diagnosis and fault management play an increasing role for technical processes and vehicles in order to improve reliability, availability, maintenance and lifetime. For safety-related processes fault-tolerant systems with redundancy are required in order to reach comprehensive system integrity. This book is a sequel of the book ''Fault-Diagnosis Systems'' published in 2006, where the basic methods were described. After a short introduction into fault-detection and fault-diagnosis methods the book shows how these methods can be applied for a selection of 20 real technical components and processes as examples, such as: Electrical drives (DC, AC) Electrical actuators Fluidic actuators (hydraulic, pneumatic) Centrifugal and reciprocating pumps Pipelines (leak detection) Industrial robots Machine tools (main and feed drive, drilling, milling, grinding) Heat exchangers Also realized fault-tolerant systems for electrical drives, actuators and sensors are presented. The book describes why and how the various signal-model-based and process-model-based methods were applied and which experimental results could be achieved. In several cases a combination of different methods was most successful. The book is dedicated to graduate students of electrical, mechanical, chemical engineering and computer science and for engineers. (orig.)

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Fault Diagnosis Methods for Aluminum Electrolytic Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-jia Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper established the fault diagnosis system of aluminum electrolysis, according to the characteristics of the faults in aluminum electrolysis. This system includes two subsystems; one is process fault subsystem and the other is fault subsystem. Process fault subsystem includes the subneural network layer and decision fusion layer. Decision fusion neural network verifies the diagnosis result of the subneural network by the information transferring over the network and gives the decision of fault synthetically. EMD algorithm is used for data preprocessing of current signal in stator of the fault subsystem. Wavelet decomposition is used to extract feature on current signal in the stator; then, the system inputs the feature to the rough neural network for fault diagnosis and fault classification. The rough neural network gives the results of fault diagnosis. The simulation results verify the feasibility of the method.

  5. Geologic investigations of Australian earthquakes: Paleoseismicity and the recurrence of surface faulting in the stable regions of continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machette, Michael; Crone, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes that occur in the stable regions of continents are very rare compared to those that occur along plate margins, such as the San Andreas fault system of western California. Worldwide, only 11 historic earthquakes in stable continental regions are known to have produced surface ruptures. Five of these have occurred in Australia since 1968 (see map, next page).

  6. Fault-tolerant design of picture archiving and communication systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, R.K.; Chan, K.K.; Stewart, B.K.; Weinberg, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Reliability is perhaps the most important attribute of a PACS. Any downtime of the system may seriously affect patient care. This paper describes fault-tolerant measures employed in the design of a hospital-wide PACS. Six fault-tolerant measures have been implemented: hardware redundance (networks and archives), data-base backups, monitoring routines for local host processes and network status; uninterruptible power supplied, structured software design techniques, and in-service training of all radiology technologists. A PACS consisting of 13 acquisition nodes, two optical archiving nodes, two data-base server nodes, and five workstation nodes has been developed

  7. Nondestructive detection system of faults in fuses using radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, D.

    1973-01-01

    A system is developed to show the viability of non-destructive detection of the faults of explosive safety fuses which are manufactured by Fabrica da Estrela do Ministerio do Exercito. The faults are detected by an ion-chamber based on the variation of the intensity of the beta particles that penetrate the fuse which passes through a collimator. The beta particles are emitted by Strontium-90 + Yttrium-90 encapsulated in either stainless steel or aluminum. The concept of 'bucking Voltage' is applied to differentiate electronically the signal generated by the ion-chamber. (author)

  8. Fault-tolerant clock synchronization validation methodology. [in computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Johnson, Sally C.

    1987-01-01

    A validation method for the synchronization subsystem of a fault-tolerant computer system is presented. The high reliability requirement of flight-crucial systems precludes the use of most traditional validation methods. The method presented utilizes formal design proof to uncover design and coding errors and experimentation to validate the assumptions of the design proof. The experimental method is described and illustrated by validating the clock synchronization system of the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer. The design proof of the algorithm includes a theorem that defines the maximum skew between any two nonfaulty clocks in the system in terms of specific system parameters. Most of these parameters are deterministic. One crucial parameter is the upper bound on the clock read error, which is stochastic. The probability that this upper bound is exceeded is calculated from data obtained by the measurement of system parameters. This probability is then included in a detailed reliability analysis of the system.

  9. Sequential fault diagnosis for mechatronics system using diagnostic hybrid bond graph and composite harmony search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a sequential fault diagnosis method to handle asynchronous distinct faults using diagnostic hybrid bond graph and composite harmony search. The faults under consideration include fault mode, abrupt fault, and intermittent fault. The faults can occur in different time instances, which add to the difficulty of decision making for fault diagnosis. This is because the earlier occurred fault can exhibit fault symptom which masks the fault symptom of latter occurred fault. In order to solve this problem, a sequential identification algorithm is developed in which the identification task is reactivated based on two conditions. The first condition is that the latter occurred fault has at least one inconsistent coherence vector element which is consistent in coherence vector of the earlier occurred fault, and the second condition is that the existing fault coherence vector has the ability to hide other faults and the second-level residual exceeds the threshold. A new composite harmony search which is capable of handling continuous variables and binary variables simultaneously is proposed for identification purpose. Experiments on a mobile robot system are conducted to assess the proposed sequential fault diagnosis algorithm.

  10. A Ship Propulsion System Model for Fault-tolerant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Blanke, M.

    This report presents a propulsion system model for a low speed marine vehicle, which can be used as a test benchmark for Fault-Tolerant Control purposes. The benchmark serves the purpose of offering realistic and challenging problems relevant in both FDI and (autonomous) supervisory control area...

  11. Performance-Oriented Fault Tolerance in Computing Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borodin, D.

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation we address the overhead reduction of fault tolerance (FT) techniques. Due to technology trends such as decreasing feature sizes and lowering voltage levels, FT is becoming increasingly important in modern computing systems. FT techniques are based on some form of redundancy. It

  12. A Fault tolerant Control Supervisory System development Procedurefor Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard

    The paper presents a stepwise procedure to develop a fault tolerant control system for small satellites. The procedure is illustrated through implementation on the AAUSAT-II spacecraft. As it is shown the presented procedure requires expertise from several disciplines that are nevertheless...

  13. Dynamic Observers for Fault Diagnosis of Timed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cassez, Franck

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we extend the work on \\emph{dynamic ob\\-servers} for fault diagnosis to timed automata. We study sensor minimization problems with static observers and then address the problem of computing the most permissive dynamic observer for a system given by a timed automaton.

  14. Fault Ride Through Capability Enhancement of a Large-Scale PMSG Wind System with Bridge Type Fault Current Limiters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALAM, M. S.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, bridge type fault current limiter (BFCL is proposed as a potential solution to the fault problems of permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG based large-scale wind energy system. As PMSG wind system is more vulnerable to disturbances, it is essential to guarantee the stability during severe disturbances by enhancing the fault ride through capability. BFCL controller has been designed to insert resistance and inductance during the inception of system disturbances in order to limit fault current. Constant capacitor voltage has been maintained by the grid voltage source converter (GVSC controller while current extraction or injection has been achieved by machine VSC (MVSC controller. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults have been applied in the system to show the effectiveness of the proposed BFCL solution. PMSG wind system, BFCL and their controllers have been implemented by real time hardware in loop (RTHIL setup with real time digital simulator (RTDS and dSPACE. Another significant feature of this work is that the performance of the proposed BFCL is compared with that of series dynamic braking resistor (SDBR. Comparative RTHIL implementation results show that the proposed BFCL is very efficient in improving system fault ride through capability by limiting the fault current and outperforms SDBR.

  15. Fault Diagnosis for Actuators in a Class of Nonlinear Systems Based on an Adaptive Fault Detection Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runxia Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of actuators’ fault diagnosis is pursued for a class of nonlinear control systems that are affected by bounded measurement noise and external disturbances. A novel fault diagnosis algorithm has been proposed by combining the idea of adaptive control theory and the approach of fault detection observer. The asymptotical stability of the fault detection observer is guaranteed by setting the adaptive adjusting law of the unknown fault vector. A theoretically rigorous proof of asymptotical stability has been given. Under the condition that random measurement noise generated by the sensors of control systems and external disturbances exist simultaneously, the designed fault diagnosis algorithm is able to successfully give specific estimated values of state variables and failures rather than just giving a simple fault warning. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is very simple and concise and is easy to be applied to practical engineering. Numerical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the fault diagnosis algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed diagnostic strategy has a satisfactory estimation effect.

  16. Measurements of soil gas radon in active fault systems: A case study along the North and East anatolian fault systems in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inceoez, Murat [Faculty of Eng. Dept. of Geological Eng, University of Firat, 23119, Elazig (Turkey); Baykara, Oktay [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Firat, 23169, Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: obaykara@firat.edu.tr; Aksoy, Ercan [Faculty of Eng. Dept. of Geological Eng, University of Firat, 23119, Elazig (Turkey); Dogru, Mahmut [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Firat, 23169, Elazig (Turkey)

    2006-03-15

    We have used solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) in order to determine the profile of the soil radon in district areas of the North and East Anatolian active fault systems in Turkey. It has been shown that the radon anomalies among the fault zones are relatively high in the fault line while dramatically decreases by going away from the lines. Radon concentrations in both active fault systems ranged from 4.3 to 9.8kBqm{sup -3}. The average radon concentration levels in the North Anatolian Fault System are relatively higher than the East Anatolian Fault System. Radon measurement technique is proved to be a good tool for detection and mapping of the active fault zone, and also in the case of continuous monitoring of radon anomalies connected with earthquake events.

  17. Measurements of soil gas radon in active fault systems: A case study along the North and East anatolian fault systems in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inceoez, Murat; Baykara, Oktay; Aksoy, Ercan; Dogru, Mahmut

    2006-01-01

    We have used solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) in order to determine the profile of the soil radon in district areas of the North and East Anatolian active fault systems in Turkey. It has been shown that the radon anomalies among the fault zones are relatively high in the fault line while dramatically decreases by going away from the lines. Radon concentrations in both active fault systems ranged from 4.3 to 9.8kBqm -3 . The average radon concentration levels in the North Anatolian Fault System are relatively higher than the East Anatolian Fault System. Radon measurement technique is proved to be a good tool for detection and mapping of the active fault zone, and also in the case of continuous monitoring of radon anomalies connected with earthquake events

  18. Development and Evaluation of Fault-Tolerant Flight Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong D.; Gupta, Kajal (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The research is concerned with developing a new approach to enhancing fault tolerance of flight control systems. The original motivation for fault-tolerant control comes from the need for safe operation of control elements (e.g. actuators) in the event of hardware failures in high reliability systems. One such example is modem space vehicle subjected to actuator/sensor impairments. A major task in flight control is to revise the control policy to balance impairment detectability and to achieve sufficient robustness. This involves careful selection of types and parameters of the controllers and the impairment detecting filters used. It also involves a decision, upon the identification of some failures, on whether and how a control reconfiguration should take place in order to maintain a certain system performance level. In this project new flight dynamic model under uncertain flight conditions is considered, in which the effects of both ramp and jump faults are reflected. Stabilization algorithms based on neural network and adaptive method are derived. The control algorithms are shown to be effective in dealing with uncertain dynamics due to external disturbances and unpredictable faults. The overall strategy is easy to set up and the computation involved is much less as compared with other strategies. Computer simulation software is developed. A serious of simulation studies have been conducted with varying flight conditions.

  19. Application Research of Fault Tree Analysis in Grid Communication System Corrective Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Yang, Zhenwei; Kang, Mei

    2018-01-01

    This paper attempts to apply the fault tree analysis method to the corrective maintenance field of grid communication system. Through the establishment of the fault tree model of typical system and the engineering experience, the fault tree analysis theory is used to analyze the fault tree model, which contains the field of structural function, probability importance and so on. The results show that the fault tree analysis can realize fast positioning and well repairing of the system. Meanwhile, it finds that the analysis method of fault tree has some guiding significance to the reliability researching and upgrading f the system.

  20. Fault Self-Diagnosis for Modular Robotic Systems Using M-Lattice Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Enguang Guan; Jian Fei; Gen Pan; Zhuang Fu; Weixin Yan; Yanzheng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    In the domain of modular robotic systems, self-configuration, self-diagnosis and self-repair are known to be highly challenging tasks. This paper presents a novel fault self-diagnosis strategy which consists of two parts: fault detection and fault message transmission. In fault detection, a bionic synchronization ‘healthy heartbeat’ method is used to guarantee the high efficiency of the exogenous detection strategy. For fault message transmission, the Dijkstra method is modified to be capable...

  1. Methods for Fault Diagnosability Analysis of a Class of Affine Nonlinear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiafu Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fault diagnosability analysis for a given model, before developing a diagnosis algorithm, can be used to answer questions like “can the fault fi be detected by observed states?” and “can it separate fault fi from fault fj by observed states?” If not, we should redesign the sensor placement. This paper deals with the problem of the evaluation of detectability and separability for the diagnosability analysis of affine nonlinear system. First, we used differential geometry theory to analyze the nonlinear system and proposed new detectability criterion and separability criterion. Second, the related matrix between the faults and outputs of the system and the fault separable matrix are designed for quantitative fault diagnosability calculation and fault separability calculation, respectively. Finally, we illustrate our approach to exemplify how to analyze diagnosability by a certain nonlinear system example, and the experiment results indicate the effectiveness of the fault evaluation methods.

  2. Reliable, fault tolerant control systems for nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, T.O.; Olmstead, R.A.; Schafer, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two operational features of CANDU Nuclear Power Stations provide for high plant availability. First, the plant re-fuels on-line, thereby eliminating the need for periodic and lengthy refuelling 'outages'. Second, the all plants are controlled by real-time computer systems. Later plants are also protected using real-time computer systems. In the past twenty years, the control systems now operating in 21 plants have achieved an availability of 99.8%, making significant contributions to high CANDU plant capacity factors. This paper describes some of the features that ensure the high degree of system fault tolerance and hence high plant availability. The emphasis will be placed on the fault tolerant features of the computer systems included in the latest reactor design - the CANDU 3 (450MWe). (author)

  3. Reliability modeling of digital component in plant protection system with various fault-tolerant techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kang, Hyun Gook; Kim, Hee Eun; Lee, Seung Jun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated fault coverage is introduced for reflecting characteristics of fault-tolerant techniques in the reliability model of digital protection system in NPPs. • The integrated fault coverage considers the process of fault-tolerant techniques from detection to fail-safe generation process. • With integrated fault coverage, the unavailability of repairable component of DPS can be estimated. • The new developed reliability model can reveal the effects of fault-tolerant techniques explicitly for risk analysis. • The reliability model makes it possible to confirm changes of unavailability according to variation of diverse factors. - Abstract: With the improvement of digital technologies, digital protection system (DPS) has more multiple sophisticated fault-tolerant techniques (FTTs), in order to increase fault detection and to help the system safely perform the required functions in spite of the possible presence of faults. Fault detection coverage is vital factor of FTT in reliability. However, the fault detection coverage is insufficient to reflect the effects of various FTTs in reliability model. To reflect characteristics of FTTs in the reliability model, integrated fault coverage is introduced. The integrated fault coverage considers the process of FTT from detection to fail-safe generation process. A model has been developed to estimate the unavailability of repairable component of DPS using the integrated fault coverage. The new developed model can quantify unavailability according to a diversity of conditions. Sensitivity studies are performed to ascertain important variables which affect the integrated fault coverage and unavailability

  4. Implementing Fault-Tolerant Services in Goal-Oriented Multi-Agent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORA, S.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, findings and analysis detail the implementation of fault tolerance services into a goal-oriented multi-agent systems development platform. Fault tolerance services are used to provide replication-based fault tolerance policies (i.e. static and adaptive to multi-agent systems. This approach provided flexibility and reusability to multi-agent systems because fault tolerance policies were implemented as reusable plan structures. Thus, whenever an agent was needed to be made fault-tolerant, plans for fault tolerance policies were simply activated by sending a request message.

  5. Systems analysis approach to probabilistic modeling of fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.J.; Qualls, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    A method of probabilistic modeling of fault tree logic combined with stochastic process theory (Markov modeling) has been developed. Systems are then quantitatively analyzed probabilistically in terms of their failure mechanisms including common cause/common mode effects and time dependent failure and/or repair rate effects that include synergistic and propagational mechanisms. The modeling procedure results in a state vector set of first order, linear, inhomogeneous, differential equations describing the time dependent probabilities of failure described by the fault tree. The solutions of this Failure Mode State Variable (FMSV) model are cumulative probability distribution functions of the system. A method of appropriate synthesis of subsystems to form larger systems is developed and applied to practical nuclear power safety systems

  6. Architecture and Fault Identification of Wide-area Protection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxue Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Wide-area protection system (WAPS is widely studied for the purpose of improvng the performance of conventional backup protection. In this paper, the system architecture of WAPS is proposed and its key technologies are discussed in view of engineering projects. So a mixed structurecentralized-distributed structure which is more suitable for WAPS in limited power grid region, is obtained based on the advantages of the centralized structure and distributed structure. Furthermore, regional distance protection algorithm was taken as an example to illustrate the functions of the constituent units. Faulted components can be detected based on multi-source imformation fuse in the algorithm. And the algorithm cannot only improve the selectivity, the rapidity, and the reliability of relaying protection but also has high fault tolerant capability. A simulation of 220 kV grid systems in Easter Hubei province shows the effectiveness of the wide-area protection system presented by this paper.

  7. Doubly Fed Induction Generator Wind Turbine Systems Subject to Recurring Symmetrical Grid Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Blaabjerg, Frede; Zhu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    New grid codes demand the wind turbine systems to ride through recurring grid faults. In this paper, the performance of the doubly Ffed induction generator (DFIG) wind turbine system under recurring symmetrical grid faults is analyzed. The mathematical model of the DFIG under recurring symmetrical...... grid faults is established. The analysis is based on the DFIG wind turbine system with the typical low-voltage ride-through strategy-with rotor-side crowbar. The stator natural flux produced by the voltage recovery after the first grid fault may be superposed on the stator natural flux produced...... by the second grid fault, so that the transient rotor and stator current and torque fluctuations under the second grid fault may be influenced by the characteristic of the first grid fault, including the voltage dips level and the grid fault angle, as well as the duration between two faults. The mathematical...

  8. Fault Detection and Performance Monitoring in PV Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vasco Brogueira Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Given the exponential growth of the PV sector in recent years and the market?s overall need for new PV monitoring solutions, this dissertation aims at creating an automatic fault detection tool for PV systems, more specifically for shading and soiling situations. By detecting deviations in the measured PV systems? data patterns, this tool aims at providing essential information for the deployment of the right maintenance strategy for each situation.

  9. Estimating Rates of Fault Insertion and Test Effectiveness in Software Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikora, A.; Munson, J.

    1998-01-01

    In developing a software system, we would like to estimate the total number of faults inserted into a software system, the residual fault content of that system at any given time, and the efficacy of the testing activity in executing the code containing the newly inserted faults.

  10. EKF-based fault detection for guided missiles flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gang; Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Yongjin

    2017-03-01

    The guided missiles flight control system is essential for guidance accuracy and kill probability. It is complicated and fragile. Since actuator faults and sensor faults could seriously affect the security and reliability of the system, fault detection for missiles flight control system is of great significance. This paper deals with the problem of fault detection for the closed-loop nonlinear model of the guided missiles flight control system in the presence of disturbance. First, set up the fault model of flight control system, and then design the residual generation based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) for the Eulerian-discrete fault model. After that, the Chi-square test was selected for the residual evaluation and the fault detention task for guided missiles closed-loop system was accomplished. Finally, simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the approach proposed in the case of elevator fault separately.

  11. Fault recovery for real-time, multi-tasking computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Richard (Inventor); Kelly, Gerald B. (Inventor); Rogers, Randy (Inventor); Stange, Kent A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    System and methods for providing a recoverable real time multi-tasking computer system are disclosed. In one embodiment, a system comprises a real time computing environment, wherein the real time computing environment is adapted to execute one or more applications and wherein each application is time and space partitioned. The system further comprises a fault detection system adapted to detect one or more faults affecting the real time computing environment and a fault recovery system, wherein upon the detection of a fault the fault recovery system is adapted to restore a backup set of state variables.

  12. Four-Dimensional Transform Fault Processes: Evolution of Step-Overs and Bends at Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, J.; Hengesh, J. V.; Sawyer, T. L.

    2002-12-01

    Many bends or step-overs along strike-slip faults may evolve by propagation of the strike-slip fault on one side of the structure and progressive shut off of the strike-slip fault on the other side. In such a process, new transverse structures form, old ones become inactive, and the bend or step-over region migrates with respect to materials that were once affected by it. This process is the progressive asymmetric development of a strike-slip duplex. Consequences of this type of step-over evolution include the following: 1. the amount of vertical structural relief in restraining step-over or bend regions is less than expected (apatite fission track ages associated with these step-over regions predate the strike-slip faulting); 2. pull-apart basin deposits are left outside of the active basin and commonly subjected to contractional deformation and uplift; and 3. local basin inversion occurs that is not linked to regional plate motion changes. This type of evolution of step-overs and bends may be common along the dextral San Andreas fault system of California. Examples of pull-apart basin deposits related to migrating releasing () bends or step-overs are the Plio-Pleistocene Merced Formation (tens of km along strike), the Pleistocene Olema Creek Formation (several km along strike) along the San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay area, and an inverted colluvial graben exposed in a paleoseismic trench across the Miller Creek fault (meters to tens of meters along strike) in the eastern San Francisco Bay area. Examples of migrating restraining bends or step-overs include the transfer of slip from the Calaveras to Hayward fault in the Mission Peak area, and the Greenville to the Concord fault at Mount Diablo (10 km or more along strike), the offshore San Gregorio fold and thrust belt (40 km along strike), and the progressive transfer of slip from the eastern faults of the San Andreas system to the migrating Mendocino triple junction (over 150 km along strike). Another

  13. Advanced monitoring, fault diagnostics, and maintenance of cryogenic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Girone, Mario; Pezzetti, Marco

    In this Thesis, advanced methods and techniques of monitoring, fault diagnostics, and predictive maintenance for cryogenic processes and systems are described. In particular, in Chapter 1, mainstreams in research on measurement systems for cryogenic processes are reviewed with the aim of dening key current trends and possible future evolutions. Then, in Chapter 2, several innovative methods are proposed. A transducer based on a virtual ow meter is presented for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators [1]. Furthermore, a comprehensive metrological analysis of the proposed transducer for verifying the metrological performance and pointing out most critical uncertainty sources is described [2]. A model-based method for fault detection and early-stage isolation, able to work with few records of Frequency Response Function (FRF) on an unfaulty compressor, is then proposed [3]. To enrich the proposal, a distributed diagnostic procedure, based on a micro-genetic...

  14. Fault tolerant aggregation for power system services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, Anna Magdalena; Gehrke, Oliver; Kullmann, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Exploiting the flexibility in distributed energy resources (DER) is seen as an important contribution to allow high penetrations of renewable generation in electrical power systems. However, the present control infrastructure in power systems is not well suited for the integration of a very large...... number of small units. A common approach is to aggregate a portfolio of such units together and expose them to the power system as a single large virtual unit. In order to realize the vision of a Smart Grid, concepts for flexible, resilient and reliable aggregation infrastructures are required...

  15. Structural Design of Systems with Safe Behavior under Single and Multiple Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Staroswiecki, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Handling of multiple simultaneous faults is a complex issue in fault-tolerant control. The design task is particularly made difficult by to the numerous different cases that need be analyzed. Aiming at safe fault-handling, this paper shows how structural analysis can be applied to find...... the analytical redundancy relations for all relevant combinations of faults, and can cope with the complexity and size of a real system. Being essential for fault-tolerant control schemes that shall handle particular cases of faults/failures, fault isolation is addressed. The paper introduces an extension...... to structural analysis to disclose which faults could be isolated from a structural point of view using active fault isolation. Results from application on a marine control system illustrate the concepts....

  16. Neural Network Expert System in the Application of Tower Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Xia, Zhongwu; Tao, Zhiyong; Zhao, Zhenlian

    For the corresponding fuzzy relationship between the fault symptoms and the fault causes in the process of tower crane operation, this paper puts forward a kind of rapid new method of fast detection and diagnosis for common fault based on neural network expert system. This paper makes full use of expert system and neural network advantages, and briefly introduces the structure, function, algorithm and realization of the adopted system. Results show that the new algorithm is feasible and can achieve rapid faults diagnosis.

  17. Fault Detection Coverage Quantification of Automatic Test Functions of Digital I and C System in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Gyun; Lee, Seung Jun; Hur, Seop; Lee, Young Jun; Jang, Seung Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Recently, analog instrument and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been replaced with digital systems for safer and more efficient operations. Digital I and C systems have adopted various fault-tolerant techniques that help the system correctly and safely perform the specific required functions in spite of the presence of faults. Each fault-tolerant technique has a different inspection period from real-time monitoring to monthly testing. The range covered by each fault-tolerant technique is also different. The digital I and C system, therefore, adopts multiple barriers consisting of various fault-tolerant techniques to increase total fault detection coverage. Even though these fault-tolerant techniques are adopted to ensure and improve the safety of a system, their effects have not been properly considered yet in most PSA models. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an evaluation method that can describe these features of a digital I and C system. Several issues must be considered in the fault coverage estimation of a digital I and C system, and two of them were handled in this work. The first is to quantify the fault coverage of each fault-tolerant technique implemented in the system, and the second is to exclude the duplicated effect of fault-tolerant techniques implemented simultaneously at each level of the system's hierarchy, as a fault occurring in a system might be detected by one or more fault-tolerant techniques. For this work, fault injection experiment was used to obtain the exact relations between faults and multiple barriers of fault-tolerant techniques. This experiment was applied to a bistable processor (BP) of a reactor protection system

  18. Probabilistic Fault Diagnosis in Electrical Power Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrical power systems play a critical role in spacecraft and aircraft. This paper discusses our development of a diagnostic capability for an electrical power...

  19. A distributed expert system for fault diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardozo, E.; Talukdar, S.N.

    1988-05-01

    This paper describes a hybrid approach to synthesizing solutions for diagnosis and set covering problems from the area of power system operations. The approach combines expert systems written in a rule-based language (OPS5) with algorithmic programs written in C and Lisp. An environment called DPSK has been developed to allow these programs to be run in parallel in a network of computers. Speeds sufficient for real-time applications can thereby be obtained.

  20. Fault Risk Assessment of Underwater Vehicle Steering System Based on Virtual Prototyping and Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Deyu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the risks of steering system faults in underwater vehicles is a human-machine-environment (HME systematic safety field that studies faults in the steering system itself, the driver’s human reliability (HR and various environmental conditions. This paper proposed a fault risk assessment method for an underwater vehicle steering system based on virtual prototyping and Monte Carlo simulation. A virtual steering system prototype was established and validated to rectify a lack of historic fault data. Fault injection and simulation were conducted to acquire fault simulation data. A Monte Carlo simulation was adopted that integrated randomness due to the human operator and environment. Randomness and uncertainty of the human, machine and environment were integrated in the method to obtain a probabilistic risk indicator. To verify the proposed method, a case of stuck rudder fault (SRF risk assessment was studied. This method may provide a novel solution for fault risk assessment of a vehicle or other general HME system.

  1. A Fault-tolerant Development Methodology for Industrial Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Thybo, C.

    2004-01-01

    Developing advanced detection schemes is not the lone factor for obtaining a successful fault diagnosis performance. Acquiring significant achievements in applying Fault-tolerance in industrial development requires that fault diagnosis and recovery schemes are developed in a consistent and logica......Developing advanced detection schemes is not the lone factor for obtaining a successful fault diagnosis performance. Acquiring significant achievements in applying Fault-tolerance in industrial development requires that fault diagnosis and recovery schemes are developed in a consistent...

  2. Meteoric water in normal fault systems: Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic phases in brittle fault rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S. H.; Anderson, R.; Mulch, A.; Solum, J. G.; Valley, J. W.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of fluid circulation systems in normal fault systems is fundamental to understanding the nature of fluid movement within the upper crust, and has important implications for the on-going controversy about the strength of faults. Authigenic phases in clay gouges and fault breccias record the isotopic signature of the fluids they formed in equilibrium with, and can be used to understand the ‘plumbing system’ of brittle fault environments. We obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic illite and/or smectite in clay gouge from normal faults in two geologic environments, 1.) low-angle normal faults (Ruby Mountains detachment, NV; Badwater Turtleback, CA; Panamint range-front detachment; CA; Amargosa detachment; CA; Waterman Hills detachment, CA), and 2.) An intracratonic high-angle normal fault (Moab Fault, UT). All authigenic phases in these clay gouges are moderately light isotopically with respect to oxygen (illite δ18O -2.0 - + 11.5 ‰ SMOW, smectite δ18O +3.6 and 17.9 ‰) and very light isotopically with respect to hydrogen (illite δD -148 to -98 ‰ SMOW, smectite δD -147 to -92 ‰). Fluid compositions calculated from the authigenic clays at temperatures of 50 - 130 ○C (as indicated by clay mineralogy) indicate that both illite and smectite in normal fault clay gouge formed in the presence of near-pristine to moderately-evolved meteoric fluids and that igneous or metamorphic fluids are not involved in clay gouge formation in these normal fault settings. We also obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on chlorites derived from footwall chlorite breccias in 4 low-angle normal fault detachment systems (Badwater and Mormon Point Turtlebacks, CA, the Chemehuevi detachment, CA, and the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment, AZ). All chlorites are isotopically light to moderately light with respect to oxygen (δ18O +0.29 to +8.1 ‰ SMOW) and very light with respect to hydrogen (δD -97 to -113 ‰) and indicate

  3. A fault isolation method based on the incidence matrix of an augmented system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changxiong; Chen, Liping; Ding, Jianwan; Wu, Yizhong

    2018-03-01

    A new approach is proposed for isolating faults and fast identifying the redundant sensors of a system in this paper. By introducing fault signal as additional state variable, an augmented system model is constructed by the original system model, fault signals and sensor measurement equations. The structural properties of an augmented system model are provided in this paper. From the viewpoint of evaluating fault variables, the calculating correlations of the fault variables in the system can be found, which imply the fault isolation properties of the system. Compared with previous isolation approaches, the highlights of the new approach are that it can quickly find the faults which can be isolated using exclusive residuals, at the same time, and can identify the redundant sensors in the system, which are useful for the design of diagnosis system. The simulation of a four-tank system is reported to validate the proposed method.

  4. Experimental Approach of Fault Movement on an Engineered Barrier System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minsoo; Choi, Heuijoo; Kim, Heuna

    2012-01-01

    Safety evaluation of an engineered barrier system against fault movement at underground disposal region for high level waste (HLW) is tried using a miniature bore-shear apparatus. For the purpose, a miniature bore-shear apparatus simulating an EBS (engineered barrier system) was manufactured in 1/30 scale. And using the developed apparatus, bore-shear tests were performed twice. During the tests, pressure variations were checked at 6 points around buffer zone, and then a rotational angle of the test vessel was checked. The achieved pressure data were compared with those from analytical modeling, which is based on Drucker-Prager model. At initial shearing step, high pressure was recorded at some point but it decreased rapidly. For the better understanding of fault movement, the modification of an analytical model and the accumulation of experimental experience were required

  5. Experimental Approach of Fault Movement on an Engineered Barrier System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minsoo; Choi, Heuijoo; Kim, Heuna [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Safety evaluation of an engineered barrier system against fault movement at underground disposal region for high level waste (HLW) is tried using a miniature bore-shear apparatus. For the purpose, a miniature bore-shear apparatus simulating an EBS (engineered barrier system) was manufactured in 1/30 scale. And using the developed apparatus, bore-shear tests were performed twice. During the tests, pressure variations were checked at 6 points around buffer zone, and then a rotational angle of the test vessel was checked. The achieved pressure data were compared with those from analytical modeling, which is based on Drucker-Prager model. At initial shearing step, high pressure was recorded at some point but it decreased rapidly. For the better understanding of fault movement, the modification of an analytical model and the accumulation of experimental experience were required.

  6. Spatial Heterogeneity in Earthquake Fault-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemian, J.; Dominguez, R.; Tiampo, K. F.; Klein, W.

    2015-08-01

    The inhomogeneity of materials with different physical properties is responsible for a wide variety of spatial and temporal behavior. In this work, we studied an earthquake fault model based on the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown cellular automata models with particular aspects of spatial heterogeneities and long-range stress interactions. In our model some localized stress accumulators were added into the system by converting a percentage of randomly selected sites into stronger sites that are called `asperity cells'. These asperity cells support much higher failure stresses than the surrounding regular lattice sites but eventually rupture when applied stress reaches their threshold stress. We found that changing the spatial configuration of those stronger sites generally increased the ability of the fault system to generate larger events, but that the total percentage of asperities is important as well. We also observed an increasing number of larger events associated with the total number of asperities in the lattice.

  7. A proposal of surveying and evaluating system of active faults for earthquake assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakoshi, Katsuyoshi; Ueta, Keiichi; Hataya; Ryuta; Abe, Shintaro; Miura, Daisuke; Hamada, Takaomi; Aoyagi, Yasuhira; Inoue, Daiei

    2004-01-01

    1. Paleoseismology of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system: We investigated co-seismic faulting activity of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system (ISTL) to clarify behavioral segmentation of long and massive faults. Geomorphologic and geologic surveys, trench excavation, and seismic reflection survey in the southern to central parts of ISTL revealed paleoseismologic faulting events occurred in the last thousands years and characteristics of geometric, structural, and geomorphologic segments. Each paleoseismic event, co-seismic displacement of deposit, average slip rate, and recurrence intervals suggest that the latest paleo-earthquake occurred in 1700 cal y BP and involved multiple segments in the Okaya to the Shimotsuburai faults. The estimated surface rupture length for this event is up to 77 km or possibly up to 94 km long. The another latest event occurred after 1200 cal y BP at the Ichinose fault and adjacent active faults. In addition, ca. 1200 cal y BP event at the Gofukuji fault occurred and involved multiple segments in the northern ISTL. Behavioral boundaries of these distinctive paleoseismic events were present in segment boundaries of geometric characters and slip rate variation. In the ISTL, geometric segmentation and slip-rate variation likely coincide with the estimated behavioral segmentation. Therefore, this finding suggests that geometric segment and slip-rate variation play an important role to determine the size of the maximum behavioral segment. 2. Active fault study on the 1999 Taiwan Chichi Earthquake area: The earthquake fault was appeared along the Chelungpu Fault while the 1999 Chichi Earthquake has occurred. The N-S striking fault has been recognized as an active fault, however E-W direction earthquake fault has not been described before the earthquake as an active fault. The later fault appeared just beneath the Shihkang Dam and the dam was destroyed by the fault. This study revealed that the E

  8. Logic-Dynamic Approach to Fault Diagnosis in Mechatronic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Filaretov

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a problem of fault detection and isolation (FDI in mechatronic systems described by nonlinear dynamic models with such types of no differentiable nonlinearities as saturation, Coulomb friction, backlash, and hysteresis. To solve this problem, so-called logic-dynamic approach is suggested. This approach consists of three main steps: replacing the initial nonlinear system by certain linear logic-dynamic system, obtaining the bank of linear logic-dynamic observers, and transforming these observes into the nonlinear ones. Logic-dynamic approach allows one to use the linear FDI methods for diagnosis in nonlinear mechatronic systems.

  9. Development of a component centered fault monitoring and diagnosis knowledge based system for space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. C.; Lollar, Louis F.

    1988-01-01

    The overall approach currently being taken in the development of AMPERES (Autonomously Managed Power System Extendable Real-time Expert System), a knowledge-based expert system for fault monitoring and diagnosis of space power systems, is discussed. The system architecture, knowledge representation, and fault monitoring and diagnosis strategy are examined. A 'component-centered' approach developed in this project is described. Critical issues requiring further study are identified.

  10. Vehicle fault diagnostics and management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Jagadeesh; Gowthamsachin

    2017-11-01

    This project is a kind of advanced automatic identification technology, and is more and more widely used in the fields of transportation and logistics. It looks over the main functions with like Vehicle management, Vehicle Speed limit and Control. This system starts with authentication process to keep itself secure. Here we connect sensors to the STM32 board which in turn is connected to the car through Ethernet cable, as Ethernet in capable of sending large amounts of data at high speeds. This technology involved clearly shows how a careful combination of software and hardware can produce an extremely cost-effective solution to a problem.

  11. Fault Analysis of Space Station DC Power Systems-Using Neural Network Adaptive Wavelets to Detect Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun; Dolce, James L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the application of neural network adaptive wavelets for fault diagnosis of space station power system. The method combines wavelet transform with neural network by incorporating daughter wavelets into weights. Therefore, the wavelet transform and neural network training procedure become one stage, which avoids the complex computation of wavelet parameters and makes the procedure more straightforward. The simulation results show that the proposed method is very efficient for the identification of fault locations.

  12. Fault Estimation for Fuzzy Delay Systems: A Minimum Norm Least Squares Solution Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Juan; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2017-09-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the problem of fault estimation for a class of Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with state delays. A minimum norm least squares solution (MNLSS) approach is first introduced to establish a fault estimation compensator, which is able to optimize the fault estimator. Compared with most of the existing fault estimation methods, the MNLSS-based fault estimation method can effectively decrease the effect of state errors on the accuracy of fault estimation. Finally, three examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and merits of the proposed method.

  13. Active fault tolerant control of piecewise affine systems with reference tracking and input constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, M.; Cocquempot, V.; Schiøler, H.

    2014-01-01

    performance of the faulty system are held. The design of the supervisory scheme is not considered here. The set of controllers is composed of a normal controller for the fault-free case, an active fault detection and isolation controller for isolation and identification of the faults, and a set of passive......An active fault tolerant control (AFTC) method is proposed for discrete-time piecewise affine (PWA) systems. Only actuator faults are considered. The AFTC framework contains a supervisory scheme, which selects a suitable controller in a set of controllers such that the stability and an acceptable...... fault tolerant controllers (PFTCs) modules designed to be robust against a set of actuator faults. In this research, the piecewise nonlinear model is approximated by a PWA system. The PFTCs are state feedback laws. Each one is robust against a fixed set of actuator faults and is able to track...

  14. Reliable H∞ control of discrete-time systems against random intermittent faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuan; Shen, Dong; Fang, Mengqi; Wang, Youqing

    2016-07-01

    A passive fault-tolerant control strategy is proposed for systems subject to a novel kind of intermittent fault, which is described by a Bernoulli distributed random variable. Three cases of fault location are considered, namely, sensor fault, actuator fault, and both sensor and actuator faults. The dynamic feedback controllers are designed not only to stabilise the fault-free system, but also to guarantee an acceptable performance of the faulty system. The robust H∞ performance index is used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. In terms of linear matrix inequality, the sufficient conditions of the existence of controllers are given. An illustrative example indicates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control method.

  15. Expert system application to fault diagnosis and procedure synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, B.K.; Hashemi, S.; Bhatnagar, R.; Miller, D.W.; Stasenko, J.

    1987-01-01

    Two knowledge based systems have been developed to detect plant faults, to validate sensor data in a nuclear power plant, and to synthesize procedures to assure safety goals are met when a transient occurs. These two systems are being combined into a single system through a Plant Status Monitoring System (PSMS) and a common data base accessed by all the components of the integrated system. The system is designed to sit on top of an existing Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS), and to use the existing data acquisition and data control software of the SPDS. The integrated system will communicate with the SPDS software through a single database. This database will receive sensor values and equipment status indications in a form acceptable to the knowledge based system and according to an update plan designed specifically for the system

  16. Fault Identification in an Unbalanced Distribution System Using Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophi Shilpa Gururajapathy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fast and effective fault location in distribution system is important to improve the power system reliability. Most of the researches rarely mention about effective fault location consisting of faulted phase, fault type, faulty section and fault distance identification. This work presents a method using support vector machine to identify the faulted phase, fault type, faulty section and distance at the same time. Support vector classification and regression analysis are performed to locate fault. The method uses the voltage sag data during fault condition measured at the primary substation. The faulted phase and the fault type are identified using three-dimensional support vector classification. The possible faulty sections are identified by matching voltage sag at fault condition to the voltage sag in database and the possible sections are ranked using shortest distance principle. The fault distance for the possible faulty sections isthen identified using support vector regression analysis. The performance of the proposed method was tested on an unbalanced distribution system from SaskPower, Canada. The results show that the accuracy of the proposed method is satisfactory.

  17. How is tectonic slip partitioned from the Alpine Fault to the Marlborough Fault System? : results from the Hope Fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langridge, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains data from research undertaken by the author on the Hope Fault from 2000-2004. This report provides an opportunity to include data that was additional to or newer than work that was published in other places. New results from studies along the Hurunui section of the Hope Fault, additional to that published in Langridge and Berryman (2005) are presented here. This data includes tabulated data of fault location and description measurements, a graphical representation of this data in diagrammatic form along the length of the fault and new radiocarbon dates from the current EQC funded project. The new data show that the Hurunui section of the Hope Fault has the capability to yield further data on fault slip rate, earthquake displacements, and paleoseismicity. New results from studies at the Greenburn Stream paleoseismic site additional to that published in Langridge et al. (2003) are presented here. This includes a new log of the deepened west wall of Trench 2, a log of the west wall of Trench 1, and new radiocarbon dates from the second phase of dating undertaken at the Greenburn Stream site. The new data show that this site has the capability to yield further data on the paleoseismicity of the Conway segment of the Hope Fault. Through a detailed analysis of all three logged walls at the site and the new radiocarbon dates, it may, in combination with data from the nearby Clarence Reserve site of Pope (1994), be possible to develop a good record of the last 5 events on the Conway segment. (author). 12 refs., 12 figs

  18. Sensor and Actuator Fault-Hiding Reconfigurable Control Design for a Four-Tank System Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hameed, Ibrahim; El-Madbouly, Esam I; Abdo, Mohamed I

    2015-01-01

    Fault detection and compensation plays a key role to fulfill high demands for performance and security in today's technological systems. In this paper, a fault-hiding (i.e., tolerant) control scheme that detects and compensates for actuator and sensor faults in a four-tank system benchmark...... Invariant (LTI) system where virtual sensors and virtual actuators are used to correct faulty performance through the use of a pre-fault performance. Simulation results showed that the developed approach can handle different types of faults and able to completely and instantly recover the original system...

  19. A new fault diagnosis algorithm for AUV cooperative localization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongyang; Miao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Multiple AUVs cooperative localization as a new kind of underwater positioning technology, not only can improve the positioning accuracy, but also has many advantages the single AUV does not have. It is necessary to detect and isolate the fault to increase the reliability and availability of the AUVs cooperative localization system. In this paper, the Extended Multiple Model Adaptive Cubature Kalmam Filter (EMMACKF) method is presented to detect the fault. The sensor failures are simulated based on the off-line experimental data. Experimental results have shown that the faulty apparatus can be diagnosed effectively using the proposed method. Compared with Multiple Model Adaptive Extended Kalman Filter and Multi-Model Adaptive Unscented Kalman Filter, both accuracy and timelines have been improved to some extent.

  20. Fault Isolation for Nonlinear Systems Using Flexible Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While support vector regression is widely used as both a function approximating tool and a residual generator for nonlinear system fault isolation, a drawback for this method is the freedom in selecting model parameters. Moreover, for samples with discordant distributing complexities, the selection of reasonable parameters is even impossible. To alleviate this problem we introduce the method of flexible support vector regression (F-SVR, which is especially suited for modelling complicated sample distributions, as it is free from parameters selection. Reasonable parameters for F-SVR are automatically generated given a sample distribution. Lastly, we apply this method in the analysis of the fault isolation of high frequency power supplies, where satisfactory results have been obtained.

  1. Study of Intelligent Photovoltaic System Fault Diagnostic Scheme Based on Chaotic Signal Synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Tsung Hsieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As the photovoltaic system consists of many equipment components, manual inspection will be very costly. This study proposes the photovoltaic system fault diagnosis based on chaotic signal synchronization. First, MATLAB was used to simulate the fault conditions of solar system, and the maximum power point tracking (MPPT was used to ensure the system's stable power and capture and record the system fault feature signals. The dynamic errors of various fault signals were extracted by chaotic signal synchronization, and the dynamic error data of various fault signals were recorded completely. In the photovoltaic system, the captured output voltage signal was used as the characteristic values for fault recognition, and the extension theory was used to create the joint domain and classical domain of various fault conditions according to the collected feature data. The matter-element model of extension engineering was constructed. Finally, the whole fault diagnosis system is only needed to capture the voltage signal of the solar photovoltaic system, so as to know the exact fault condition effectively and rapidly. The proposed fault diagnostor can be implemented by embedded system and be combined with ZigBee wireless network module in the future, thus reducing labor cost and building a complete portable renewable energy system fault diagnostor.

  2. Fuzzy Timing Petri Net for Fault Diagnosis in Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Tavakholi Ghainani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A model-based system for fault diagnosis in power system is presented in this paper. It is based on fuzzy timing Petri net (FTPN. The ordinary Petri net (PN tool is used to model the protective components, relays, and circuit breakers. In addition, fuzzy timing is associated with places (token/transition to handle the uncertain information of relays and circuits breakers. The received delay time information of relays and breakers is mapped to fuzzy timestamps, π(τ, as initial marking of the backward FTPN. The diagnosis process starts by marking the backward sub-FTPNs. The final marking is found by going through the firing sequence, σ, of each sub-FTPN and updating fuzzy timestamp in each state of σ. The final marking indicates the estimated fault section. This information is then in turn used in forward FTPN to evaluate the fault hypothesis. The FTPN will increase the speed of the inference engine because of the ability of Petri net to describe parallel processing, and the use of time-tag data will cause the inference procedure to be more accurate.

  3. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrova, Olga [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flicker, Jack David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  4. Online fault location on crossbonded AC cables in underground transmission systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Jensen, Christian; Bak, Claus Leth; Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a fault locator system specifically designed for crossbonded cables is described. Electromagnetic wave propagation theory for crossbonded cables with focus on fault location purposes is discussed. Based on this, the most optimal modal component and input signal to the fault locator...... to changes in the fault inception angle, fault resistance and fault location. It is shown that the fault location can be estimated very accurately using the proposed system and the system will be used to monitor Danish crossbonded transmission cables in the future....... of a 245 kV crossbonded cable system, connecting the newly installed 400 MW Danish offshore wind farm Anholt to the main grid, are obtained and used to verify the proposed system. Furthermore, extensive simulation data created in PSCAD/EMTDC is used in order to examine the robustness of the system...

  5. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, William [Brooks Engineering, Vacaville, CA (United States); Basso, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Coddington, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  6. A System for Fault Management for NASA's Deep Space Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombano, Silvano P.; Spirkovska, Liljana; Aaseng, Gordon B.; Mccann, Robert S.; Baskaran, Vijayakumar; Ossenfort, John P.; Smith, Irene Skupniewicz; Iverson, David L.; Schwabacher, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration program envisions the utilization of a Deep Space Habitat (DSH) for human exploration of the space environment in the vicinity of Mars and/or asteroids. Communication latencies with ground control of as long as 20+ minutes make it imperative that DSH operations be highly autonomous, as any telemetry-based detection of a systems problem on Earth could well occur too late to assist the crew with the problem. A DSH-based development program has been initiated to develop and test the automation technologies necessary to support highly autonomous DSH operations. One such technology is a fault management tool to support performance monitoring of vehicle systems operations and to assist with real-time decision making in connection with operational anomalies and failures. Toward that end, we are developing Advanced Caution and Warning System (ACAWS), a tool that combines dynamic and interactive graphical representations of spacecraft systems, systems modeling, automated diagnostic analysis and root cause identification, system and mission impact assessment, and mitigation procedure identification to help spacecraft operators (both flight controllers and crew) understand and respond to anomalies more effectively. In this paper, we describe four major architecture elements of ACAWS: Anomaly Detection, Fault Isolation, System Effects Analysis, and Graphic User Interface (GUI), and how these elements work in concert with each other and with other tools to provide fault management support to both the controllers and crew. We then describe recent evaluations and tests of ACAWS on the DSH testbed. The results of these tests support the feasibility and strength of our approach to failure management automation and enhanced operational autonomy.

  7. Application of three fault growth criteria to the Puente Hills thrust system, Los Angeles, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik L.; Cooke, Michele L.

    2005-10-01

    Three-dimensional mechanical models are used to evaluate the performance of different fault growth criteria in predicting successive growth of three échelon thrust faults similar to the segments of the Puente Hills thrust system of the Los Angeles basin, California. Four sequential Boundary Element Method models explore the growth of successive échelon faults within the system by simulating snapshots of deformation at different stages of development. These models use three criteria, (1) energy release rate, (2) strain energy density, and (3) Navier-Coulomb stress, to characterize the lateral growth of the fault system. We simulate the growth of an échelon thrust fault system to evaluate the suitability of each of these criteria for assessing fault growth. Each of these three factors predicts a portion of the incipient fault geometry (i.e. location or orientation); however, each provides different information. In each model, energy release rate along the westernmost (leading) tip of the Puente Hills thrust drops with growth of the next neighboring fault; this result supports the overall lateral development of successive échelon segments. Within each model, regions of high strain energy density and Navier-Coulomb stress envelope at least a portion of the next fault to develop, although the strain energy density has stronger correlation than Navier-Coulomb stress to the location of incipient faulting. In each model, one of the two predicted planes of maximum Navier-Coulomb stress ahead of the leading fault tip matches the strike but not the dip of the incipient fault plane recreating part of the fault orientation. The incipient fault dip is best predicted by the orientation of the strain energy density envelopes around the leading fault tip. Furthermore, the energy release rate and pattern of strain energy density can be used to characterize potential soft linkage (overlap) or hard linkage (connection) of échelon faults within the system.

  8. Automated fault diagnosis in nonlinear multivariable systems using a learning methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, A B; Polycarpou, M M

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a robust fault diagnosis scheme for detecting and approximating state and output faults occurring in a class of nonlinear multiinput-multioutput dynamical systems. Changes in the system dynamics due to a fault are modeled as nonlinear functions of the control input and measured output variables. Both state and output faults can be modeled as slowly developing (incipient) or abrupt, with each component of the state/output fault vector being represented by a separate time profile. The robust fault diagnosis scheme utilizes on-line approximators and adaptive nonlinear filtering techniques to obtain estimates of the fault functions. Robustness with respect to modeling uncertainties, fault sensitivity and stability properties of the learning scheme are rigorously derived and the theoretical results are illustrated by a simulation example of a fourth-order satellite model.

  9. Robust fault diagnosis of disturbed linear systems via a sliding mode high order differentiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Francisco Javier; Figueroa, Maricela; Pacheco, Jaime; Rubio, José de Jesus

    2012-06-01

    A fault estimator for linear systems affected by disturbances is proposed. Faults appearing explicitly in the state equation and in the system output (actuator faults and sensor faults) are considered. With this design neither the estimation of the state vector nor the estimation of the disturbances is required, implying that the structural conditions are less restrictive than the ones required to design an unknown input observer. Furthermore, the number of unknown inputs (faults plus disturbances) may be greater than the number of outputs. The faults are written as an algebraic expression of a high-order derivative of a function depending on the output. Thus, the reconstruction of the fault signals is carried out by means of a sliding mode high-order differentiator, which requires the derivative of the faults to have a bounded norm.

  10. A fault diagnosis system for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohga, Yukiharu; Hayashi, Yoshiharu; Yuchi, Hiroyuki; Utena, Shunsuke; Maeda, Akihiko

    2002-01-01

    A fault diagnosis system has been developed to support operators in nuclear power plants. In the system various methods are combined to get a diagnosis result which provides better detection sensitivity and result reliability. The system is composed of an anomaly detection part with diagnosis modules, an integration part which obtains the diagnosis result by combining results from each diagnosis module, and a prediction part with state prediction and estimation modules. For the anomaly detection part, three kinds of modules are prepared: plant signal processing, early fault detection and event identification modules. The plant signal processing module uses wavelet transform and chaos technologies as well as fast Fourier transform (FFT) to analyze vibration sensor signals and to detect signal anomaly. The early fault detection module uses the neural network model of a plant subprocess to estimate the process variable values assuming normal conditions, and to detect an anomaly by comparing the measured and estimated values. The event identification module identifies the kind of occurring event by using the neural network and knowledge processing. In the integration part the diagnosis is performed by using knowledge processing. The knowledge for diagnosis is structured based on the means-ends abstraction hierarchy to simplify knowledge input and maintenance. In the prediction part, the prediction module predicts the future changes of process variables and plant interlock statuses and the estimation module estimates the values of unmeasurable variables. A prototype system has been developed and the system performance was evaluated. The evaluation results show that the developed technologies are effective to improve the human-machine system for plant operation. (author)

  11. Towards fault-tolerant decision support systems for ship operator guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Lajic, Zoran; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2012-01-01

    Fault detection and isolation are very important elements in the design of fault-tolerant decision support systems for ship operator guidance. This study outlines remedies that can be applied for fault diagnosis, when the ship responses are assumed to be linear in the wave excitation. A novel num...

  12. Fault Tolerant Software: a Multi Agent System Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caponetti, Fabio; Bergantino, Nicola; Longhi, Sauro

    2009-01-01

    Development of high dependable systems remains a labour intensive task. This paper explores recent advances on the adaptation of the software agent architecture for control application while looking to dependability issues. Multiple agent systems theory will be reviewed giving methods to supervise...... it. Software ageing is shown to be the most common problem and rejuvenation its counteract. The paper will show how an agent population can be monitored, faulty agents isolated and reloaded in a healthy state, hence rejuvenated. The aim is to propose an architecture as basis for the design of control...... software able to tolerate faults and residual bugs without the need of maintenance stops....

  13. Automated Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Recovery in Spacecraft Power Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fault detection and isolation (FDI) in spacecraft's electrical power system (EPS) has always received special attention. However, the power systems health management...

  14. [Andreas Vesalius and surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R

    1993-01-01

    By publishing De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem in 1543, Andries van Wesel (1514-1564) gave surgical science an immense impulse. The revolutionary renovation in the knowledge of man's anatomical structure changed slowly and progressively into topographical and physiological understanding of surgical diseases. At the same time, this made better aimed and more secure operations possible. Apart from the importance of this anatomical publication, Andreas Vesalius also won his spurs as a surgeon. He taught surgery in Padua for many years. He was appointed court physician and surgeon at the Habsburg Court of Charles V and Philip II. He personally performed lots of operations known at the time as major ones. He not only quickly adopted the surgical innovations of his fellow-surgeon Ambroise Paré, but he even performed operations that had been forgotten during several centuries, among which thoracocentesis for pleural empyema. His clinical perspicacity in discovering the indication for some operations was staggering and was appreciated by all great monarchs of Europe in the 16th century. In his several consilia, numerous pieces of advice were given for the treatment of surgical patients. The surgical practice which Vesalius had in Brussels for many years, consequently became most successful. Many publications by Vesalius about surgery and blood-letting are well-known. His Chirurgia magna in septem Libros digesta still remains controversial; these books were published by Prospero Borgarruccio (1560) in 1568 by the Venetian editor Valgrisi. This book gives an excellent survey of surgical pathology as it was taught and treated in the 16th century. The scientific method that Vesalius used, not only in his anatomical studies but also in his surgical practice, deserves not only our full appraisal but should still be studied in our own time.

  15. Industrial Cost-Benefit Assessment for Fault-tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, C.; Blanke, M.

    1998-01-01

    Economic aspects are decisive for industrial acceptance of research concepts including the promising ideas in fault tolerant control. Fault tolerance is the ability of a system to detect, isolate and accommodate a fault, such that simple faults in a sub-system do not develop into failures...... at a system level. In a design phase for an industrial system, possibilities span from fail safe design where any single point failure is accommodated by hardware, over fault-tolerant design where selected faults are handled without extra hardware, to fault-ignorant design where no extra precaution is taken...... against failure. The paper describes the assessments needed to find the right path for new industrial designs. The economic decisions in the design phase are discussed: cost of different failures, profits associated with available benefits, investments needed for development and life-time support...

  16. ISHM-oriented adaptive fault diagnostics for avionics based on a distributed intelligent agent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiuping; Zhong, Zhengqiang; Xu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, an integrated system health management-oriented adaptive fault diagnostics and model for avionics is proposed. With avionics becoming increasingly complicated, precise and comprehensive avionics fault diagnostics has become an extremely complicated task. For the proposed fault diagnostic system, specific approaches, such as the artificial immune system, the intelligent agents system and the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, are used to conduct deep fault avionics diagnostics. Through this proposed fault diagnostic system, efficient and accurate diagnostics can be achieved. A numerical example is conducted to apply the proposed hybrid diagnostics to a set of radar transmitters on an avionics system and to illustrate that the proposed system and model have the ability to achieve efficient and accurate fault diagnostics. By analyzing the diagnostic system's feasibility and pragmatics, the advantages of this system are demonstrated.

  17. Calculation of critical fault recovery time for nonlinear systems based on region of attraction analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Mojtaba; Blanke, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    In safety critical systems, the control system is composed of a core control system with a fault detection and isolation scheme together with a repair or a recovery strategy. The time that it takes to detect, isolate, and recover from the fault (fault recovery time) is a critical factor in safety...... of a system. It must be guaranteed that the trajectory of a system subject to fault remains in the region of attraction (ROA) of the post-fault system during this time. This paper proposes a new algorithm to compute the critical fault recovery time for nonlinear systems with polynomial vector elds using sum...... of squares programming. The proposed algorithm is based on computation of ROA of the recovered system and nite-time stability of the faulty system....

  18. Broadband Ground Motion Simulations for the Puente Hills Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    Recent geologic studies have identified the seismic potential of the Puente Hills fault system. This system is comprised of multiple blind thrust segments, a portion of which ruptured in the Mw 5.9 Whittier-Narrows earthquake. Rupture of the entire system could generate a Mw 7.2 (or larger) earthquake. To assess the potential hazard posed by the fault system, we have simulated the response for several earthquake scenarios. These simulations are unprecedented in scope and scale. Broadband (0-10 Hz) ground motions are computed at 66,000 sites, covering most of the LA metropolitan region. Low frequency (f 1 Hz) motions are calculated using a stochastic approach. We consider scenarios ranging from Mw 6.7 to Mw 7.2, including both high and low stress drop events. Finite-fault rupture models for these scenarios are generated following a wavenumber filtering technique (K-2 model) that has been calibrated against recent earthquakes. In all scenarios, strong rupture directivity channels large amplitude pulses of motion directly into the Los Angeles basin, which then propagate southward as basin surface waves. Typically, the waveforms near downtown Los Angeles are dominated by a strong, concentrated pulse of motion. At Long Beach (across the LA basin from the rupture) the waveforms are dominated by late arriving longer period surface waves. The great density of sites used in the calculation allows the construction of detailed maps of various ground motion parameters (PGA, PGV, SA), as well as full animations of the propagating broadband wave field. Additionally, the broadband time histories are available for use in non-linear response analyses of built structures.

  19. Characteristics of earth faults in power systems with a compensated or an unearthed neutral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, S.; Lehtonen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Antila, E. [ABB Transmit Oy (Finland); Stroem, J. [Espoo Electricity Co (Finland); Ingman, S. [Vaasa Electricity Co (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    The most common fault type in the electrical distribution networks is the single phase to earth fault. For instance in the Nordic countries, about 80 % of all faults are of this type. To develop the protection and fault location systems, it is important to obtain real case data of disturbances and faults which occurred in the networks. Therefore, data of fault occurrences have been recorded and analyzed in the medium voltage distribution networks (20 kV) at two substations, of which one has an isolated and the other a compensated neutral. In the occurring disturbances, the traces of phase currents and neutral currents in the beginning of two feeder and the traces of phase voltages and neutral voltage from the voltage measuring bay were recorded. In addition to the measured data, other information of the fault occurrences was also collected (data of the line, cause and location of permanent faults and so on)

  20. Subsurface structure identification of active fault based on magnetic anomaly data (Case study: Toru fault in Sumatera fault system)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanjuntak, Andrean V. H.; Husni, Muhammad; Syirojudin, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Toru segment, which is one of the active faults and located in the North of Sumatra, broke in 1984 ago on Pahae Jahe's earthquake with a magnitude 6.4 at the northern part of the fault which has a length of 23 km, and also broke again at the same place in 2008. The event of recurrence is very fast, which only 25 years old have repeatedly returned. However, in the elastic rebound theory, it probably happen with a fracture 50 cm and an average of the shear velocity 20 mm/year. The average focus of the earthquake sourced at a depth of 10 km and 23 km along its fracture zones, which can generate enough shaking 7 MMI and could breaking down buildings and create landslides on the cliff. Due to its seismic activity, this study was made to identify the effectiveness of this fault with geophysical methods. Geophysical methods such as gravity, geomagnetic and seismology are powerful tools for detecting subsurface structures of local, regional as well as of global scales. This study used to geophysical methods to discuss about total intensity of the geomagnetic anomaly data, resulted in the distribution of susceptibility values corresponding to the fault movement. The geomagnetic anomalies data was obtained from Geomag, such as total intensity measured by satellite. Data acquisition have been corrected for diurnal variations and reduced by IGRF. The study of earthquake records can be used for differentiating the active and non active fault elements. Modeling has been done using several methods, such as pseudo-gravity, reduce to pole, and upward or downward continuation, which is used to filter the geomagnetic anomaly data because the data has not fully representative of the fault structure. The results indicate that rock layers of 0 - 100 km depth encountered the process of intrusion and are dominated by sedimentary rocks that are paramagnetic, and that the ones of 100 - 150 km depth experienced the activity of subducting slab consisting of basalt and granite which are

  1. An Autonomous Distributed Fault-Tolerant Local Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a fault-tolerant, GPS-independent (Global Positioning System) distributed autonomous positioning system for static/mobile objects and present solutions for providing highly-accurate geo-location data for the static/mobile objects in dynamic environments. The reliability and accuracy of a positioning system fundamentally depends on two factors; its timeliness in broadcasting signals and the knowledge of its geometry, i.e., locations and distances of the beacons. Existing distributed positioning systems either synchronize to a common external source like GPS or establish their own time synchrony using a scheme similar to a master-slave by designating a particular beacon as the master and other beacons synchronize to it, resulting in a single point of failure. Another drawback of existing positioning systems is their lack of addressing various fault manifestations, in particular, communication link failures, which, as in wireless networks, are increasingly dominating the process failures and are typically transient and mobile, in the sense that they typically affect different messages to/from different processes over time.

  2. Doubly fed induction generator based wind turbine systems subject to recurring grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Blaabjerg, Frede; Zhu, Nan

    2014-01-01

    New grid codes demand the wind turbine systems to ride through recurring grid faults. In this paper, the performance of the Doubly Fed Induction Generator wind turbine system under recurring grid faults is analyzed. The stator natural flux produced by the voltage recovery after the first grid fault...... may be superposed on the stator natural flux produced by the second grid fault, and it may result in large current and voltage transient. The damping of the stator natural flux can be accelerated with a rotor natural current in its opposite direction after voltage recovery, but larger torque....... The performance of DFIG under recurring grid faults is verified by the simulation and experiments....

  3. Fault current reduction by SFCL in a distribution system with PV using fuzzy logic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounika, M.; Lingareddy, P.

    2017-07-01

    In the modern power system, as the utilization of electric power is very wide, there is a frequent occurring of any fault or disturbance in power system. It causes a high short circuit current. Due to this fault, high currents occurs results to large mechanical forces, these forces cause overheating of the equipment. If the large size equipment are used in power system then they need a large protection scheme for severe fault conditions. Generally, the maintenance of electrical power system reliability is more important. But the elimination of fault is not possible in power systems. So the only alternate solution is to minimize the fault currents. For this the Super Conducting Fault Current Limiter using fuzzy logic technique is the best electric equipment which is used for reducing the severe fault current levels. In this paper, we simulated the unsymmetrical and symmetrical faults with fuzzy based superconducting fault current limiter. In our analysis it is proved that, fuzzy logic based super conducting fault current limiter reduces fault current quickly to a lower value.

  4. Design of fault diagnosis system for inertial navigation system based on virtual technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Baiqing; Wang, Boxiong; Li, An; Zhang, Mingzhao; Qin, Fangjun; Pan, Hua

    2006-11-01

    With regard to the complex structure of the inertial navigation system and the low rate of fault detection with BITE (built-in test equipment), a fault diagnosis system for INS based on virtual technologies (virtual instrument and virtual equipment) is proposed in this paper. The hardware of the system is a PXI computer with highly stable performance and strong extensibility. In addition to the basic functions of digital multimeter, oscilloscope and cymometer, it can also measure the attitude of the ship in real-time, connect and control the measurement instruments with digital interface. The software is designed with the languages of Measurement Studio for VB, JAVA, and CULT3D. Using the extensively applied fault-tree reasoning and fault cases makes fault diagnosis. To suit the system to the diagnosis for various navigation electronic equipments, the modular design concept is adopted for the software programming. Knowledge of the expert system is digitally processed and the parameters of the system's interface and the expert diagnosis knowledge are stored in the database. The application shows that system is stable in operation, easy to use, quick and accurate in fault diagnosis.

  5. Map and Data for Quaternary Faults and Fault Systems on the Island of Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Eric C.; Burgmann, Roland; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Dart, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report and digitally prepared, GIS-based map is one of a series of similar products covering individual states or regions of United States that show the locations, ages, and activity rates of major earthquake-related features such as faults and fault-related folds. It is part of a continuing the effort to compile a comprehensive Quaternary fault and fold map and database for the United States, which is supported by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program. Guidelines for the compilation of the Quaternary fault and fold maps for the United States were published by Haller and others (1993) at the onset of this project. This compilation of Quaternary surface faulting and folding in Hawai`i is one of several similar state and regional compilations that were planned for the United States. Reports published to date include West Texas (Collins and others, 1996), New Mexico (Machette and others, 1998), Arizona (Pearthree, 1998), Colorado (Widmann and others, 1998), Montana (Stickney and others, 2000), Idaho (Haller and others, 2005), and Washington (Lidke and others, 2003). Reports for other states such as California and Alaska are still in preparation. The primary intention of this compilation is to aid in seismic-hazard evaluations. The report contains detailed information on the location and style of faulting, the time of most recent movement, and assigns each feature to a slip-rate category (as a proxy for fault activity). It also contains the name and affiliation of the compiler, date of compilation, geographic and other paleoseismologic parameters, as well as an extensive set of references for each feature. The map (plate 1) shows faults, volcanic rift zones, and lineaments that show evidence of Quaternary surface movement related to faulting, including data on the time of most recent movement, sense of movement, slip rate, and continuity of surface expression. This compilation is presented as a digitally prepared map product

  6. Observer-based Fault Detection and Isolation for Nonlinear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lootsma, T.F.

    systems. It consists of four different contributions. First, it presents a review of the idea and the theory behind the geometric approach for FDI. Starting from the original solution for linear systems up to the latest results for input-affine