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Sample records for andes virus chi-7913

  1. Síndrome pulmonar por hantavirus Andes en Chile CARDIOPULMONARY SYNDROME DUE TO ANDES VIRUS IN CHILE

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    CONSTANZA CASTILLO H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde 1993 han ocurrido 204 casos de Síndrome Cardiopulmonar por Hantavirus (SCPH en Chile. Los brotes epidémicos comenzaron en el sur y avanzan hacia el norte del país. Los más afectados son varones jóvenes, obreros agrícolas o forestales. En Chile, el SCPH es causado por el virus Andes, cuyo reservorio es el Oligorizomys longicaudatus (ratón de cola larga, que se distribuye desde la III Región al sur. El cuadro clínico es similar al descrito en EE.UU., caracterizado por una fase prodrómica que simula un estado gripal o cuadro gastrointestinal febril y que agrava por la aparición de edema pulmonar agudo e inestabilidad hemodinámica (fase cardiopulmonar. Sin embargo, cursa con mayores alteraciones hemorragí-paras y compromiso renal. La mortalidad inicial fue sobre 50% y actualmente es de alrededor del 33,3%. La presente revisión incluye: historia de la enfermedad, reservorio, modos de transmisión, patogenia, cuadro clínico, diagnóstico, tratamiento y medidas de prevenciónSince 1993, 204 cases of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS occurred in Chile. Epidemic began in the south and moved thereafter to the northern regions. The disease affected predominantly young males, who worked in agricultural labours or as timber workers. The HCPS in Chile is caused by the Andes virus. The reservoir is the wild rat Oligoryzomis longicaudatus distributed from the III to the XII Region. The clinical features are similar to those described for Sin Nombre Virus. The disease has a prodromal stage characterised by fever, muscular pain, with or without gastrointestinal manifestations, followed by the rapid onset of respiratory insufficiency and haemodynamic unstability. Andes virus courses more often with haemorrhagic disorders and overt renal failure, than Sin Nombre Virus. The initial mortality was over 50% and declined to 33,3% in the last year. History of hantavirus-diseases, reservoir, and mode of contagion, pathogenesis, clinical

  2. Temporal Analysis of Andes Virus and Sin Nombre Virus Infections of Syrian Hamsters▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Chapman, Jennifer; Asher, Ludmila; Fisher, Robert; Zimmerman, Michael; Larsen, Tom; Hooper, Jay W.

    2007-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and Sin Nombre virus (SNV) are rodent-borne hantaviruses that cause a highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). There are no vaccines or specific drugs to prevent or treat HPS, and the pathogenesis is not understood. Syrian hamsters infected with ANDV, but not SNV, develop a highly lethal disease that closely resembles HPS in humans. Here, we performed a temporal pathogenesis study comparing ANDV and SNV infections in hamsters. SNV was nonpathogenic and viremia was not detected despite the fact that all animals were infected. ANDV was uniformly lethal with a mean time to death of 11 days. The first pathology detected was lymphocyte apoptosis starting on day 4. Animals were viremic and viral antigen was first observed in multiple organs by days 6 and 8, respectively. Levels of infectious virus in the blood increased 4 to 5 logs between days 6 and 8. Pulmonary edema was first detected ultrastructurally on day 6. Ultrastructural analysis of lung tissues revealed the presence of large inclusion bodies and substantial numbers of vacuoles within infected endothelial cells. Paraendothelial gaps were not observed, suggesting that fluid leakage was transcellular and directly attributable to infecting virus. Taken together, these data imply that HPS treatment strategies aimed at preventing virus replication and dissemination will have the greatest probability of success if administered before the viremic phase; however, because vascular leakage is associated with infected endothelial cells, a therapeutic strategy targeting viral replication might be effective even at later times (e.g., after disease onset). PMID:17475651

  3. Development of a minigenome system for Andes virus, a New World hantavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyle S; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-11-01

    The development of reverse genetics systems for negative-stranded RNA viruses is a rapidly evolving field that has greatly advanced the study of the many different aspects of the viral life cycle. Andes virus (ANDV) is a highly pathogenic hantavirus found in South America that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome but to date remains poorly characterized due to the lack of a reverse genetics system for genetic manipulation. Here, we describe the first successful minigenome system for a New World hantavirus, as well as many of the obstacles that still exist in the development of such a system.

  4. Immune Serum Produced by DNA Vaccination Protects Hamsters against Lethal Respiratory Challenge with Andes Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    either a decrease in the number of infectious particles that gain access to replication-competent cells (i.e., a lower effective dose), a delay in...pulmonary syndrome in Argentina. Possibility of person to person transmission. Medicina (Buenos Aires) 56: 709–711. 8. Ferres, M., P. Vial, C. Marco, L...transmission of Andes virus. Medicina (Buenos Aires) 58(Suppl. 1):27–36. 20. Padula, P. J., A. Edelstein, S. D. Miguel, N. M. Lopez, C. M. Rossi, and R

  5. Modeling potential distribution of Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, the Andes virus (Genus: Hantavirus) reservoir, in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Verónica; Glass, Gregory; Shields, Timothy; Provensal, Cecilia; Polop, Jaime

    2011-09-01

    We constructed a model to predict the potential distribution of Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, the reservoir of Andes virus (Genus: Hantavirus), in Argentina. We developed an extensive database of occurrence records from published studies and our own surveys and compared two methods to model the probability of O. longicaudatus presence; logistic regression and MaxEnt algorithm. The environmental variables used were tree, grass and bare soil cover from MODIS imagery and, altitude and 19 bioclimatic variables from WorldClim database. The models performances were evaluated and compared both by threshold dependent and independent measures. The best models included tree and grass cover, mean diurnal temperature range, and precipitation of the warmest and coldest seasons. The potential distribution maps for O. longicaudatus predicted the highest occurrence probabilities along the Andes range, from 32°S and narrowing southwards. They also predicted high probabilities for the south-central area of Argentina, reaching the Atlantic coast. The Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome cases coincided with mean occurrence probabilities of 95 and 77% for logistic and MaxEnt models, respectively. HPS transmission zones in Argentine Patagonia matched the areas with the highest probability of presence. Therefore, colilargos presence probability may provide an approximate risk of transmission and act as an early tool to guide control and prevention plans.

  6. Pathogenesis and host response in Syrian hamsters following intranasal infection with Andes virus.

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    David Safronetz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS, also referred to as hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS, is a rare but frequently fatal disease caused by New World hantaviruses. In humans HPS is associated with severe pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock; however, the pathogenesis of this disease remains unclear largely due to a lack of suitable animal models for the study of disease progression. In this study we monitored clinical, virological, pathophysiological parameters and host immunological responses to decipher pathological factors and events in the lethal Syrian hamster model of HPS following intranasal inoculation of Andes virus. Transcriptional profiling of the host gene responses demonstrated a suppression of innate immune responses in most organs analyzed during the early stage of infection, except for in the lung which had low level activation of several pro-inflammatory genes. During this phase Andes virus established a systemic infection in hamsters, with viral antigen readily detectable in the endothelium of the majority of tissues analyzed by 7-8 days post-inoculation. Despite wide-spread infection, histological analysis confirmed pathological abnormalities were almost exclusively found in the lungs. Immediately preceding clinical signs of disease, intense activation of pro-inflammatory and Th1/Th2 responses were observed in the lungs as well as the heart, but not in peripheral organs, suggesting that localized immune-modulations by infection is paramount to pathogenesis. Throughout the course of infection a strong suppression of regulatory T-cell responses was noted and is hypothesized to be the basis of the aberrant immune activations. The unique and comprehensive monitoring of host immune responses to hantavirus infection increases our understanding of the immuno-pathogenesis of HPS and will facilitate the development of treatment strategies targeting deleterious host immunological responses.

  7. In vitro and in vivo activity of ribavirin against Andes virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Safronetz

    Full Text Available Pathogenic hantaviruses are a closely related group of rodent-borne viruses which are responsible for two distinct diseases in humans, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS, otherwise known as hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, HCPS. The antiviral effect of ribavirin against Old World hantaviruses, most notably Hantaan virus, is well documented; however, only a few studies have addressed its inhibitory effect on New World hantaviruses. In the present study, we demonstrate that ribavirin is highly active against Andes virus (ANDV, an important etiological agent of HPS, both in vitro and in vivo using a lethal hamster model of HPS. Treatment of ANDV infected Vero E6 cells with ribavirin resulted in dose-dependent reductions in viral RNA and protein as well as virus yields with a half maximal inhibitory concentration between 5 and 12.5 µg ml(-1. In hamsters, treatment with as little as 5 mg kg(-1 day(-1 was 100% effective at preventing lethal HPS disease when therapy was administered by intraperitoneal injection from day 1 through day 10 post-infection. Significant reductions were observed in ANDV RNA and antigen positive cells in lung and liver tissues. Ribavirin remained completely protective when administered by intraperitoneal injections up to three days post-infection. In addition, we show that daily oral ribavirin therapy initiated 1 day post-infection and continuing for ten days is also protective against lethal ANDV disease, even at doses of 5 mg kg(-1 day(-1. Our results suggest ribavirin treatment is beneficial for postexposure prophylaxis against HPS-causing hantaviruses and should be considered in scenarios where exposure to the virus is probable. The similarities between the results obtained in this study and those from previous clinical evaluations of ribavirin against HPS, further validate the hamster model of lethal HPS and demonstrate its usefulness in screening antiviral agents against

  8. Temporal Analysis of Andes Virus and Sin Nombre Virus Infections of Syrian Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    organs on days 12 and 14 after challenge (Table 2). We hypothesize that fol- lowing inoculum input, virus gained access to the blood and hamsters. (D...Sout. Medicina (Buenos Aires) 64:43–46. (In Spanish.) 31. ProMED-mail. 2006. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome-Canada ex Bolivia. http://www.promedmail.org

  9. Adenovirus Vectors Expressing Hantavirus Proteins Protect Hamsters against Lethal Challenge with Andes Virus

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Hantaviruses infect humans following aerosolization from rodent feces and urine, producing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Due to the high rates of mortality and lack of therapies, vaccines are urgently needed. Nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad) vectors that express Andes hantavirus (ANDV) nucleocapsid protein (AdN) or glycoproteins (AdGN and AdGC) were constructed. Ad vectors were tested for their ability to protect Syrian hamsters from a lethal ANDV infe...

  10. Experimental Andes virus infection in deer mice: characteristics of infection and clearance in a heterologous rodent host.

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    Jessica R Spengler

    Full Text Available New World hantaviruses can cause hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome with high mortality in humans. Distinct virus species are hosted by specific rodent reservoirs, which also serve as the vectors. Although regional spillover has been documented, it is unknown whether rodent reservoirs are competent for infection by hantaviruses that are geographically separated, and known to have related, but distinct rodent reservoir hosts. We show that Andes virus (ANDV of South America, carried by the long tailed pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, infects and replicates in vitro and in vivo in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus, the reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV, found in North America. In experimentally infected deer mice, viral RNA was detected in the blood, lung, heart and spleen, but virus was cleared by 56 days post inoculation (dpi. All of the inoculated deer mice mounted a humoral immune response by 14 dpi, and produced measurable amounts of neutralizing antibodies by 21 dpi. An up-regulation of Ccl3, Ccl4, Ccl5, and Tgfb, a strong CD4⁺ T-cell response, and down-regulation of Il17, Il21 and Il23 occurred during infection. Infection was transient with an absence of clinical signs or histopathological changes. This is the first evidence that ANDV asymptomatically infects, and is immunogenic in deer mice, a non-natural host species of ANDV. Comparing the immune response in this model to that of the immune response in the natural hosts upon infection with their co-adapted hantaviruses may help clarify the mechanisms governing persistent infection in the natural hosts of hantaviruses.

  11. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

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    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  12. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaiza Fernández-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  13. Andes virus recognition of human and Syrian hamster beta3 integrins is determined by an L33P substitution in the PSI domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthys, Valery S; Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Mackow, Erich R

    2010-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes a fatal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in humans and Syrian hamsters. Human alpha(v)beta(3) integrins are receptors for several pathogenic hantaviruses, and the function of alpha(v)beta(3) integrins on endothelial cells suggests a role for alpha(v)beta(3) in hantavirus directed vascular permeability. We determined here that ANDV infection of human endothelial cells or Syrian hamster-derived BHK-21 cells was selectively inhibited by the high-affinity alpha(v)beta(3) integrin ligand vitronectin and by antibodies to alpha(v)beta(3) integrins. Further, antibodies to the beta(3) integrin PSI domain, as well as PSI domain polypeptides derived from human and Syrian hamster beta(3) subunits, but not murine or bovine beta(3), inhibited ANDV infection of both BHK-21 and human endothelial cells. These findings suggest that ANDV interacts with beta(3) subunits through PSI domain residues conserved in both Syrian hamster and human beta(3) integrins. Sequencing the Syrian hamster beta(3) integrin PSI domain revealed eight differences between Syrian hamster and human beta(3) integrins. Analysis of residues within the PSI domains of human, Syrian hamster, murine, and bovine beta(3) integrins identified unique proline substitutions at residues 32 and 33 of murine and bovine PSI domains that could determine ANDV recognition. Mutagenizing the human beta(3) PSI domain to contain the L33P substitution present in bovine beta(3) integrin abolished the ability of the PSI domain to inhibit ANDV infectivity. Conversely, mutagenizing either the bovine PSI domain, P33L, or the murine PSI domain, S32P, to the residue present human beta(3) permitted PSI mutants to inhibit ANDV infection. Similarly, CHO cells transfected with the full-length bovine beta(3) integrin containing the P33L mutation permitted infection by ANDV. These findings indicate that human and Syrian hamster alpha(v)beta(3) integrins are key receptors for ANDV and that specific residues within the

  14. Andes Hantavirus-Infection of a 3D Human Lung Tissue Model Reveals a Late Peak in Progeny Virus Production Followed by Increased Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and VEGF-A.

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    Sundström, Karin B; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Gupta, Shawon; Ahlm, Clas; Svensson, Mattias; Klingström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), a severe acute disease with a 40% case fatality rate. Humans are infected via inhalation, and the lungs are severely affected during HPS, but little is known regarding the effects of ANDV-infection of the lung. Using a 3-dimensional air-exposed organotypic human lung tissue model, we analyzed progeny virus production and cytokine-responses after ANDV-infection. After a 7-10 day period of low progeny virus production, a sudden peak in progeny virus levels was observed during approximately one week. This peak in ANDV-production coincided in time with activation of innate immune responses, as shown by induction of type I and III interferons and ISG56. After the peak in ANDV production a low, but stable, level of ANDV progeny was observed until 39 days after infection. Compared to uninfected models, ANDV caused long-term elevated levels of eotaxin-1, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and VEGF-A that peaked 20-25 days after infection, i.e., after the observed peak in progeny virus production. Notably, eotaxin-1 was only detected in supernatants from infected models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that ANDV replication in lung tissue elicits a late proinflammatory immune response with possible long-term effects on the local lung cytokine milieu. The change from an innate to a proinflammatory response might be important for the transition from initial asymptomatic infection to severe clinical disease, HPS.

  15. History of Lake Andes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Information about the history and management of Lake Andes is compiled in this report. It is intended to help future refuge managers become acquainted with the...

  16. Andes hantavirus variant in rodents, southern Amazon Basin, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razuri, Hugo; Tokarz, Rafal; Ghersi, Bruno M; Salmon-Mulanovich, Gabriela; Guezala, M Claudia; Albujar, Christian; Mendoza, A Patricia; Tinoco, Yeny O; Cruz, Christopher; Silva, Maria; Vasquez, Alicia; Pacheco, Víctor; Ströher, Ute; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Cannon, Deborah; Nichol, Stuart T; Hirschberg, David L; Lipkin, W Ian; Bausch, Daniel G; Montgomery, Joel M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated hantaviruses in rodents in the southern Amazon Basin of Peru and identified an Andes virus variant from Neacomys spinosus mice. This finding extends the known range of this virus in South America and the range of recognized hantaviruses in Peru. Further studies of the epizoology of hantaviruses in this region are warranted.

  17. Trees in the Andes:

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, François Paul

    2017-01-01

    High mountain regions including the Andean region are very sensitive to climate change. Farmers in the central Andes of Peru are increasingly being exposed to the impacts of climate variability. This transdisciplinary research uses field laboratories, combining the farming system and the sustainable livelihood approaches, to carry out social, ecological, and financial assessments so as to identify sustainable and resilient livelihood strategies for small-scale Andean farmers. The first r...

  18. Charles Darwin in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; Bizzo, Luis Eduardo Maestrelli

    2006-01-01

    Considering geological time as an important epistemological obstacle to the construction of ideas on biological evolution, a study was carried out on the so-called "Darwin Papers". The conclusion was that Charles Darwin's excursion in the Andes during March-April 1835 was a crucial step in this regard. An expedition was carried out in…

  19. The Andes: A Geographical Portrait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bebbington

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: The Andes: A Geographical Portrait. By Axel Borsdorf and Christoph Stadel. Translated by Brigitte Scott and Christoph Stadel. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2015. xiv + 368 pp. US$ 139.00. Also available as an e-book. ISBN 978-3-319-03529-1.

  20. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability... conservation plan and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife...

  1. The ANDES Deep Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Bertou, X

    2013-01-01

    ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) is a unique opportunity to build a deep underground laboratory in the southern hemisphere. It will be built in the Agua Negra tunnel planned between Argentina and Chile, and operated by the CLES, a Latin American consortium. With 1750m of rock overburden, and no close- by nuclear power plant, it will provide an extremely radiation quiet environment for neutrino and dark matter experiments. In particular, its location in the southern hemisphere should play a major role in understanding dark matter modulation signals.

  2. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1995 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins...

  3. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : Updated- 2003 annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins...

  4. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1994 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins...

  5. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1997 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins...

  6. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 2002 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2002 calendar year. The report begins...

  7. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1998 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins...

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1999 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 2001 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2001 calendar year. The report begins...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1996 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins...

  11. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1979. General water uses are discussed for 1979 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  12. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1987. General water uses are discussed for 1987 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  13. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1984. General water uses are discussed for 1984 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  14. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1985. General water uses are discussed for 1985 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  15. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1983. General water uses are discussed for 1983 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  16. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1986. General water uses are discussed for 1986 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  17. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1958. The report highlights the weather, water, habitat, and wildlife conditions for the year of...

  18. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1982. General water uses are discussed for 1982 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  19. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1971. General water uses are discussed for 1971 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  20. Formalized morphostructural zoning of the mountain zone of the Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielov, A.M.; Gvishiani, A.D.; Zhidkov, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    A plan is presented for morphostructural zoning of the Andes compiled according to formalized signs for purposes of seismic forecasting. Characteristics are presented for the basic morphostructural subdivisions of the Andes.

  1. Fish Population Investigation: Lake Andes, Charles Mix County

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brief background on Lake Andes fishing history, and data on current fish populations. Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an...

  2. Recreational Fishery Management Plan for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Current condition of lake Andes (1996) and highlights potential problems and recommendations for improving the lake as a hatchery. Lake Andes was a much larger body...

  3. Fishery Management Plan for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an artificial outlet structure that lowered the water level by 13 feet. Since Lake Andes is...

  4. Andes Altiplano, Northwest Argentina, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This view of the Andes Altiplano in northwest Argentina (25.5S, 68.0W) is dominated by heavily eroded older and inactive volcano peaks. The altiplano is a high altitude cold desert like the Tibetan Plateau but smaller in area. It is an inland extension of the hyperarid Atacama Desert of the west coast of South America and includes hundreds of volcanic edifices (peaks, cinder cones, lava flows, debris fields, lakes and dry lake beds (salars).

  5. Changing Student Attitudes using Andes, An Intelligent Homework System

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Brett; Vanlehn, Kurt; Treacy, Don; Shelby, Bob; Wintersgill, Mary

    2007-03-01

    The size of introductory physics lectures often inhibits personal homework assistance and timely corrective feedback. Andes, an intelligent homework help system designed for two semesters of introductory physics, can fill this need by encouraging students to use sound problem solving techniques and providing immediate feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes provides principles-based hints based on previous student actions. A multi-year study at the U.S. Naval Academy demonstrates that students using Andes perform better than students working the same problems as graded pencil and paper homeworks. In addition, student attitude surveys show that Andes is preferred over other homework systems. These findings have implications for student attitudes toward, and mastery of, physics. See http://www.andes.pitt.edu for more information.

  6. Interferon Antagonism as a Common Virulence Factor of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), respectively. Our approach and goals are to (1) determine if the viruses evade host innate immunity; (2) to identify viral genes...HPS-causing viruses , Andes virus (ANDV) and NY-1 virus (NY-1V) can inhibit activation of two important innate immune pathways, double stranded RNA...Virulence Factor of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Adolfo Garcia Sastre, Ph.D

  7. Annual narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, and Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Calendar year 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This collection of monthly activity reports summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR during the 1975 calendar year. Resource...

  8. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Lake Andes NWR Complex for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  9. The Glaciation of the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Carlos

    This pleasing book fills the gap in the knowledge about Pleistocene and recent glaciation between Colombia and Peru. A significant amount of data exists already for Colombia and Venezuela and for Peru, Bolivia, and, particularly, Chile. Hastenrath has now given us a description of glaciers and glaciation underneath the equator in the Andes.The book begins with brief summaries of the physiography and the atmospheric circulation, which give the general setting of Ecuador. Then follow detailed descriptions of the glaciers and glacial morphology of all the important mountains of the Western and Eastern Cordilleras. These are well illustrated, and a particularly useful feature is the comparison of old photographs and paintings of glaciers with modern photographs, many taken by the author. All illustrate the spectacular retreat of the glaciers in the Ecuadorian Andes during the last century and correlate quite well with observations elsewhere. This retreat is snown quantitatively in Table 4, in terms of decrease in glacier-covered area since the glacial advance of moraine stage III. The area of present-day glaciers is about 10% of the area during that stage (compared with about 1.5% in the Sierra Nevada de Mérida, Venezuela). A series of maps show the glacial morphology of the mountains (unfortunately, some of the maps have been included within the binding, thus losing some information; they could have been reduced somewhat to fit a single page or, if too large, could have been included in the pocket, together with the map of Chimborazo-Carihuairazo).

  10. Seismological Parameters in the Northern Andes, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Palme de Osechas, C.; Choy, J. E.; Morandi S., M. T.; Campo, M.; Granado Ruiz, C.

    2001-12-01

    Venezuelas tectonic setting as part of the plate boundary between the Caribbean and the South American plate causes two major seismologically active fault systems: the roughly west - east trending strike slip fault system along the coast with numerous sub-parallel faults and the Bocono fault system, which dominates the Venezuelan southwest - northeast striking Andes. The main Bocono fault reaches a total length of about 500 km and has a width of approximately 100 km between the southern and northern baseline of the mountain slopes which are marked by inverse faults. This is believed to be due to strain partitioning, a concept which seems to apply as well to the Bocono fault system. The whole fault system is characterized by a high seismicity rate of small scale and intermediate event magnitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.3 in the last fifty years. In this study we would like to present an investigation on 39 focal mechanism solutions and a b-value mapping of the Andean region with the main goal to throw light on the stess and strain situation. For recompiling the focal memchanisms calculated from first motion polarities, various sources had to been used: seismograms from stations of the local and regional networks of the Seismological Center of ULA, the national seismic network operated by FUNVISIS, the seismic network Lago Maracaibo of PDVSA and the local seismic network of DESURCA. For the b-value mapping we used the two catalogues of ULA and DESURCA of which the last one registered more than 6500 events from 1994 to 1999. The set of focal mechanism solutions studied showed normal, strike slip, and reverse faulting mechanisms concentrated in distinct areas of the Bocono fault system and thus resulting in a zonation also supported by the determinations of the azimuths of the maximum horizontal stress SHmax. This hypothesis of the zonation of the Andes region is strongly supported by the results of the b-value mapping. The zonation as seen in the varying major stress

  11. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report...

  12. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report...

  13. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins...

  14. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins...

  15. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins...

  16. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report...

  17. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report...

  18. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report...

  19. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report...

  20. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report...

  1. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report...

  2. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report...

  3. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report...

  4. The first ANDES elements: 9-DOF plate bending triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    New elements are derived to validate and assess the assumed natural deviatoric strain (ANDES) formulation. This is a brand new variant of the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements, which has recently attracted attention as an effective method for constructing high-performance elements for linear and nonlinear analysis. The ANDES formulation is based on an extended parametrized variational principle developed in recent publications. The key concept is that only the deviatoric part of the strains is assumed over the element whereas the mean strain part is discarded in favor of a constant stress assumption. Unlike conventional ANS elements, ANDES elements satisfy the individual element test (a stringent form of the patch test) a priori while retaining the favorable distortion-insensitivity properties of ANS elements. The first application of this formulation is the development of several Kirchhoff plate bending triangular elements with the standard nine degrees of freedom. Linear curvature variations are sampled along the three sides with the corners as gage reading points. These sample values are interpolated over the triangle using three schemes. Two schemes merge back to conventional ANS elements, one being identical to the Discrete Kirchhoff Triangle (DKT), whereas the third one produces two new ANDES elements. Numerical experiments indicate that one of the ANDES element is relatively insensitive to distortion compared to previously derived high-performance plate-bending elements, while retaining accuracy for nondistorted elements.

  5. Person-to-person household and nosocomial transmission of andes hantavirus, Southern Chile, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Valdebenito, Constanza; Calvo, Mario; Vial, Cecilia; Mansilla, Rita; Marco, Claudia; Palma, R Eduardo; Vial, Pablo A; Valdivieso, Francisca; Mertz, Gregory; Ferrés, Marcela

    2014-10-01

    Andes hantavirus (ANDV) causes hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in Chile and is the only hantavirus for which person-to-person transmission has been proven. We describe an outbreak of 5 human cases of ANDV infection in which symptoms developed in 2 household contacts and 2 health care workers after exposure to the index case-patient. Results of an epidemiologic investigation and sequence analysis of the virus isolates support person-to-person transmission of ANDV for the 4 secondary case-patients, including nosocomial transmission for the 2 health care workers. Health care personnel who have direct contact with ANDV case-patients or their body fluids should take precautions to prevent transmission of the virus. In addition, because the incubation period of ANDV after environmental exposure is longer than that for person-to-person exposure, all persons exposed to a confirmed ANDV case-patient or with possible environmental exposure to the virus should be monitored for 42 days for clinical symptoms.

  6. Out of the Andes: patterns of diversification in clearwing butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, M; Joron, M; Willmott, K; Silva-Brandão, K L; Kaiser, V; Arias, C F; Gomez Piñerez, L M; Uribe, S; Brower, A V Z; Freitas, A V L; Jiggins, C D

    2009-04-01

    Global biodiversity peaks in the tropical forests of the Andes, a striking geological feature that has likely been instrumental in generating biodiversity by providing opportunities for both vicariant and ecological speciation. However, the role of these mountains in the diversification of insects, which dominate biodiversity, has been poorly explored using phylogenetic methods. Here we study the role of the Andes in the evolution of a diverse Neotropical insect group, the clearwing butterflies. We used dated species-level phylogenies to investigate the time course of speciation and to infer ancestral elevation ranges for two diverse genera. We show that both genera likely originated at middle elevations in the Andes in the Middle Miocene, contrasting with most published results in vertebrates that point to a lowland origin. Although we detected a signature of vicariance caused by the uplift of the Andes at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, most sister species were parapatric without any obvious vicariant barrier. Combined with an overall decelerating speciation rate, these results suggest an important role for ecological speciation and adaptive radiation, rather than simple vicariance.

  7. Lithospheric scale model of Merida Andes, Venezuela (GIAME Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, M.; Orihuela, N. D.; Klarica, S.; Gil, E.; Levander, A.; Audemard, F. A.; Mazuera, F.; Avila, J.

    2013-05-01

    Merida Andes (MA) is one of the most important orogenic belt in Venezuela and represents the northern culmination of South America Andes. During the last 60 years, several models have been proposed to explain the shallow and deep structure, using different geological, geophysical, seismological, geochemical and petrologic concepts; nevertheless, most of them have applied local observation windows, and do not represent the major structure of MA. Therefore, a multidisciplinary research group, coordinated by FUNVISIS, in close cooperation with UCV, ULA and PDVSA, is proposed in order to get the outlined goals in the project entitled GIAME ("Geociencia Integral de los Andes de MErida") was established, which aims to generate a lithospheric scale model and the development of a temporal dynamic model for the MA. As a base for lithospheric investigations of the Merida Andes, we are proposing three wide angle seismic profiles across the orogen on three representative sites, in order to determine the inner structure and its relation with the orogen's gravimetric root. To the date, there are no seismic studies at lithospheric scale which cross MA. The wide angle seismic will be complemented with the re-processing and re-interpretation of existing reflection seismic data, which will allow to establish a relationship between MA and its associated flexural basins (Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins). Depending on the results of the VENCORP Project (VENezuelan COntinental Reflection Profiling), which might show some reliable results about crustal features and Moho reflectors along three long seismic profiles at Caribbean Moutain system, a reflection seismic profile across the central portion of MA is proposed. Additional tasks, consisting in MA quaternary deformation studies, using research methods like neotectonics and paleoseismology, georadar, numerical modeling, cinematic GPS, SAR interferometry, thermocronology, detailed studies on regional geology, flexural modeling

  8. Molecular and biological characterization of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV, Pomovirus) isolates from potato-growing regions in Colombia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, José; Adams, Ian; Boonham, Neil

    2016-01-01

    samples were taken from the main potato-producing regions in Colombia and virus was recovered by planting Nicotiana benthamiana as bait plants. The complete genomes of five isolates were sequenced and three of the isolates were inoculated to four different indicator plants. Based on sequence comparisons......Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) causes necrotic flecks inside and on tubers in temperate countries. In South America, these symptoms have not been observed, although the presence of the virus has been confirmed in the Andes and in Central America. To characterize PMTV isolates from the Andes, soil...

  9. Glacier shrinkage and water resources in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Bernard; Coudrain, Anne

    For more than a century glaciers around the world have been melting as air temperatures rise due to a combination of natural processes and human activity. The disappearance of these glaciers can have wide-ranging effects, such as the creation of new natural hazards or changes in stream flow that could threaten water suppliesSome of the most dramatic melting has occurred in the Andes mountain range in South America. To highlight the climatic and glacial change in the Andes and to encourage the scientific community to strengthen the glacier observation network that stretches from Colombia to the Patagonian ice fields, the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Naturales (INRENA), Perú, and the Institute of Research and Development (IRD), France, recently organized the second Symposium on Mass Balance of Andean Glaciers in Huaráz,Perú.

  10. Zeolitización de rocas andesíticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plana, F.

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of some andesites from King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Anctartica has pointed out the existence of a hydrothermal alteration process going rise to a zeolitic secondary minerals of low-temperature assemblages. Two paragenesis have been identified (Smectite-Bytownite-Mordenite, Smectite-Albite-Laumontite which reflecting different conditions durign the hydrothermal alteration of these andesitic rocksEl estudio de rocas andesíticas de la Isla King George (Archipiélago de las Shetland del Sur, Antártida pone de manifiesto la existencia de procesos de alteración hidrotermal con la formación de minerales zeolíticos secundarios pertenecientes a asociaciones de baja temperatura. Se han identificado dos paragénesis (Esmectitas-Bytownita-Mordenita, Esmectitas-AlbitaLaumontita que reflejan distintas condiciones durante la alteración hidrotermal de dichas rocas andesíticas.

  11. Migrating deformation in the Central Andes from enhanced orographic rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Kevin; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2011-12-01

    Active shortening in the Central Andes shifted from the western to the eastern margin between 10-7Ma. Here we propose that this shift was primarily controlled by changes in erosion patterns. The uplift of the Andes blocked easterly winds, resulting in enhanced orographic rainfall on the eastern margin and reduced rainfall on the western margin. Lower erosion rates, associated with the arid conditions, caused the western margin to steepen inhibiting internal deformation and the migration of deformation to the eastern margin where it is active today. River channel profiles on the western margin are indicative of long-term transience from an older tectonic event whereas those on the eastern margin reflect ongoing coupled climatic-tectonic feedback. Both critical wedge theory and local-scale fault friction calculations support this interpretation. This work emphasizes the role that orographic rainfall and erosion can have on the orogen-scale development of mountain belts.

  12. Paleoatimetry of southern Tibet and the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, J.; Dettinger, M. P.; DeCelles, P. G.; Leary, R.; Kapp, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Here we explore a variety of isotopic systems to reconstruct paleoatitude in southern Tibet and the central Andes. A multi-system approach is essential since the necessary mineral archives are not always available, and because diagenetic resetting of some systems clearly occurs. In the central Andes at ~24°S, carbonate is rare due to hyperaridity, and where present, evaporation in soils and lakes completely alters the primary meteoric signal. Waters of hydration of volcanic glass are a much more promising target in this region given the prevalence of volcanic tuffs. We have analyzed the δD value of a suite of modern and ancient glasses back to 34 Ma that show little change in elevation in the western Cordillera of the Andes. By contrast, the eastern Cordillera of the Andes rose in the last 15 Ma. This pattern is consistent with gradual eastward propagation of the whole orogen at this latitude, including the trench, forearc, magmatic arc, and foreland. The paleoaltimetry of Tibet poses quite different challenges to those in South America. Volcanic glass archives are so far unavailable, whereas carbonate archives are common but in some cases diagenetically reset. We have focused on records of conventional δ18O values and clumped isotope thermometry. One must treat both archives with great caution due to resetting, especially clumped isotopes. Available evidence suggests that southern Tibet has been near current elevations since the early Miocene. For the pre- Miocene we present new isotopic/paleosol records found along the suture zone of India and Asia that we believe partly chronicle the rise of the suture zone from near sea-level to >4000 m today.

  13. Diversification of clearwing butterflies with the rise of the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    De‐Silva, Donna Lisa; Elias, Marianne; Willmott, Keith; Mallet, James; Day, Julia J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim Despite the greatest butterfly diversity on Earth occurring in the Neotropical Andes and Amazonia, there is still keen debate about the origins of this exceptional biota. A densely sampled calibrated phylogeny for a widespread butterfly subtribe, Oleriina (Nymphalidae: Ithomiini) was used to estimate the origin, colonization history and diversification of this species‐rich group. Location Neotropics. Methods Ancestral elevation and biogeographical ranges were reconstructed using ...

  14. Diversification of clearwing butterflies with the rise of the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    De‐Silva, Donna Lisa; Elias, Marianne; Willmott, Keith; Mallet, James; Day, Julia J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim Despite the greatest butterfly diversity on Earth occurring in the Neotropical Andes and Amazonia, there is still keen debate about the origins of this exceptional biota. A densely sampled calibrated phylogeny for a widespread butterfly subtribe, Oleriina (Nymphalidae: Ithomiini) was used to estimate the origin, colonization history and diversification of this species‐rich group. Location Neotropics. Methods: Ancestral elevation and biogeographical ranges were reconstructed using...

  15. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Myers, Stephen C.; Wallace, Terry C.; Silver, Paul G.; Drake, Lawrence

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20°S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). Waveforms of deep regional events in the downgoing Nazca slab and teleseismic earthquakes were processed to isolate the P-to-S converted phases from the Moho in order to compute the crustal thickness. We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70 74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32 38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20°S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16°S, 55 60 km) to south (20°S, 70 74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton.

  16. Permafrost Distribution Modeling in the Semi-Arid Chilean Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Azócar, Guillermo F.; Brenning, Alexander; Bodin, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Mountain permafrost and rock glaciers in the dry Andes are of growing interest due to the increase in human activities in this remote area. Empirical models of mountain permafrost distribution based on the spatial analysis of intact and relict rock glaciers and mean annual air temperature (MAAT) have been established as a tool for regional-scale assessments of permafrost favorability across entire mountain ranges; however, this kind of model approach has never been applied for a large portion...

  17. A review of the geology of the Argentinian Fuegian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Eduardo B.; Martinioni, Daniel R.

    2001-06-01

    Seven stratigraphic units reflect the tectonic evolution of the Argentinian Fuegian Andes: Basement (Paleozoic-Jurassic); Lemaire Formation (Upper Jurassic); Yahgan-Beauvoir formations (Lower Cretaceous); Cerro Matrero Formation (Upper Cretaceous); Rı´o Claro Formation (Paleocene); La Despedida Group (Eocene); and Cabo Peña Formation (uppermost Eocene-Lower Oligocene). Basement rocks (garnet, quartz-sericite, and chlorite schists; and amphibolites) are unconformably covered by the Lemaire Formation (rhyolites; basalts; slates; and acidic volcaniclastic breccias, tuffs, conglomerates, and turbidites), formed during extensional tectonism. The post-rift Yahgan Formation (deep-marine black mudstones, andesitic volcaniclastic turbidites and tuffs) interfingers northward with the Beauvoir Formation (slope and platform black mudstones), and covers the Lemaire Formation unconformably. The Yahgan Formation represents an andesitic, volcaniclastic apron, coeval with a Pacific volcanic-arc, filling a marginal basin floored with oceanic crust. The Late Cretaceous compressional orogeny resulted in tectonic inversion, closure of the marginal basin, peak metamorphism and folding, and initial uplifting of the Fuegian Andes. By the latest Cretaceous-earliest Paleogene, the Andes were exposed to subaerial erosion, and the lowest Danian Rı´o Claro Formation bears clear evidence of an Andean clastic provenance. The Rı´o Claro Formation represents the first molasse deposits of the foreland stage of evolution of the Fuegian Andes. Earliest Paleogene north-verging thrust propagation deformed the Rı´o Claro Formation and older units, producing northward depocenter migration. La Despedida Group rests unconformably on the Rı´o Claro Formation and is involved in the thrust and fold belt. Important Eocene compression resulted in thrusting of central Andean basement schists and the Lemaire Formation over Lower Cretaceous and continental Paleogene rocks, respectively. In the

  18. Geochemical composition of river loads in the Tropical Andes: first insights from the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio Poma, Gustavo; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Bouillon, Steven; Álvarez, Lenín; Zhiminaicela, Santiago

    2015-04-01

    Processes governing the transport of total suspended material (TSM), total dissolved solids (TDS) and particulate organic carbon (POC) are currently not well known for Tropical Andean river systems. We analyzed the geochemical behavior and the budgets of the particulate and dissolved loads for several sub-catchments in the Paute River basin in the southern Ecuadorian Andes, and examined how anthropogenic activities influenced the dynamics of riverine suspended and dissolved loads. We gathered a large dataset by regularly sampling 8 rivers for their TSM, POC, and TDS. Furthermore, we determined the major elements in the dissolved load and stable isotope composition (δ13C) of both the POC, and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The rivers that were sampled flow through a wide range of land uses including: 3 nature conservation areas (100 - 300 Km²), an intensive grassland and arable zone (142 Km²); downstream of two cities (1611 and 443 Km²), and 2 degraded basins (286 and 2492 Km²). We described the geochemical characteristics of the river loads both qualitatively and quantitatively. Important differences in TSM, POC and TDS yields were found between rivers: the concentration of these loads increases according with human activities within the basins. For all rivers, TSM, TDS and POC concentrations were dependent on discharge. Overall, a clear relation between TSM and POC (r²=0.62) was observed in all tributaries. The C:N ratios and δ13CPOC suggest that the POC in most rivers is mainly derived from soil organic matter eroded from soils dominated by C3 vegetation (δ13CPOC < -22‰). Low Ca:Si ratios (<1)and high δ13CDIC (-9 to -4) in the Yanuncay, Tomebamba1 and Machángara, rivers suggest that weathering of silica rocks is dominant in these catchments, and that the DIC is mainly derived from the soil or atmospheric CO2. In contrast, the Ca:Si ratio was high for the Burgay and Jadán rivers (1-13), and the low δ13CDIC values (-9 to -15) suggest that

  19. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Andes. These studies documented a range of impacts on vegetation, birds and mammals; including changes in plant species richness, composition and vegetation cover and the tolerance of wildlife of visitor use. There was little research on the impacts of visitors on soils and aquatic systems and for some ecoregions in the Andes. We identify research priorities across the region that will enhance management strategies to minimise visitor impacts in Andean ecosystems.

  20. Protoplanetary Disk Structure With Grain Evolution: the ANDES Model

    CERN Document Server

    Akimkin, V; Wiebe, D; Semenov, D; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya; Vasyunin, A; Birnstiel, T; Henning, Th

    2013-01-01

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes 1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, 2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes surface reactions, 3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and 4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains to the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partl...

  1. Infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by ANDES Hantavirus enhances pro-inflammatory state, the secretion of active MMP-9 and indirectly enhances endothelial permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Lastra Marcelo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Andes virus (ANDV, a rodent-borne Hantavirus, is the major etiological agent of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in South America, which is mainly characterized by a vascular leakage with high rate of fatal outcomes for infected patients. Currently, neither specific therapy nor vaccines are available against this pathogen. ANDV infects both dendritic and epithelial cells, but in despite that the severity of the disease directly correlates with the viral RNA load, considerable evidence suggests that immune mechanisms rather than direct viral cytopathology are responsible for plasma leakage in HCPS. Here, we assessed the possible effect of soluble factors, induced in viral-activated DCs, on endothelial permeability. Activated immune cells, including DC, secrete gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteases (gMMP-2 and -9 that modulate the vascular permeability for their trafficking. Methods A clinical ANDES isolate was used to infect DC derived from primary PBMC. Maturation and pro-inflammatory phenotypes of ANDES-infected DC were assessed by studying the expression of receptors, cytokines and active gMMP-9, as well as some of their functional status. The ANDES-infected DC supernatants were assessed for their capacity to enhance a monolayer endothelial permeability using primary human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC. Results Here, we show that in vitro primary DCs infected by a clinical isolate of ANDV shed virus RNA and proteins, suggesting a competent viral replication in these cells. Moreover, this infection induces an enhanced expression of soluble pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α and the active gMMP-9, as well as a decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These viral activated cells are less sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, supernatants from ANDV-infected DCs were able to indirectly enhance the permeability of a monolayer of primary HUVEC. Conclusions Primary human DCs

  2. Did growth of high Andes slow down Nazca plate subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence velocity rate of the Nazca and South-American plate and its variations during the last 100 My are quite well-known from the global plate reconstructions. The key observation is that the rate of Nazca plate subduction has decreased by about 2 times during last 20 Myr and particularly since 10 Ma. During the same time the Central Andes have grown to its present 3-4 km height. Based on the thin-shell model, coupled with mantle convection, it was suggested that slowing down of Nazca plate resulted from the additional load exerted by the Andes. However, the thin-shell model, that integrates stresses and velocities vertically and therefore has no vertical resolution, is not an optimal tool to model a subduction zone. More appropriate would be modeling it with full thermomechanical formulation and self-consistent subduction. We performed a set of experiments to estimate the influence that an orogen like the Andes could have on an ongoing subduction. We used an enhanced 2D version of the SLIM-3D code suitable to simulate the evolution of a subducting slab in a self-consistent manner (gravity driven) at vertical crossections through upper mantle, transition zone and shallower lower mantle. The model utilizes non-linear temperature- and stress-dependant visco-elasto-plastic rheology and phase transitions at 410 and 660 km depth. We started from a reference case with a similar configuration as both Nazca and South-America plates. After some Mys of slow kinematicaly imposed subduction, to develop a coherent thermo-mechanical state, subduction was totally dynamic. On the other cases, the crust was slowly thickened artificially during 10 My to generate the Andean topography. Although our first results show no substantial changes on the velocity pattern of the subduction, we, however, consider this result as preliminary. At the meeting we plan to report completed and verified modeling results and discuss other possible cases of the late Cenozoic slowing down of

  3. Oroclinal Bending and Mountain Uplift in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpodozis, C.; Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.

    2007-05-01

    The large paleomagnetic database now available for the Central Andes permits a good understanding of the overall spatial and temporal variations of rotations. Mesozoic to Early Paleogene rocks along the forearc of northern Chile (23°-28°S) record significant clockwise rotations (>25°) [Arriagada et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001923]. Along the forearc of southern Peru, counterclockwise rotations recorded within flat lying red-beds (Moquegua Formation) increase from about -30° at 17.5°S to - 45° at15.5°S and decrease through time from the late Eocene to the late Oligocene-early Miocene [Roperch et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001882]. Recently published thermo-chronological studies show evidence for strong exhumation within Bolivian Eastern Cordillera and the Puna plateau starting in the Eocene while structural studies indicate that the majority of crustal shortening in the Eastern Cordillera occurred during the Eocene-Oligocene, although the final stages of deformation may have continued through the Early Miocene. Rotations in the Peruvian and north Chilean forearc thus occurred at the same time than deformation and exhumation/uplift within the Eastern Cordillera. In contrast Neogene forearc rocks in southern Peru and northern Chile do not show evidences of rotation but low magnitude (10°) counterclockwise rotations are usually found in mid to late Miocene rocks from the northern Altiplano. These Neogene rotations are concomitant with shortening in the Sub-Andean zone and sinistral strike-slip faulting along the eastern edge of the northern Altiplano. We interpret the rotation pattern along the southern Peru and north Chile forearc as a result of strong late Eocene- late Oligocene oroclinal bending of the Central Andes associated with shortening gradients along the Eastern Cordillera associated both with the Abancay deflection and the Arica bend. The amount and spatial distribution of pre-Neogene shortening needed to account for

  4. Gastrointestinal parasites of Lamas in the Bolivian Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Anne Malene; Nees, Ellinor Spörndly; Monrad, Jesper

    A cross sectional study was conducted to determine prevalences and intensities of gastrointestinal (GIT) parasites in lamas in the Bolivian Andes. A quantitative and qualitative necro-copro-parasitlogical study was performed on 33 lamas between October and December 2007. At the time of necropsy the......  lamas were aged 1½  to >4 years. They originated from 14 different farms in the most lama dense areas of Bolivia: Oruro, Potosi, La Paz and the highlands above Cochabamba. In total 16 different species of nematodes, one cestode species, one trematode species, and one coccidian genus were detected...... %); in the liver: Fasciola hepatica (12 %); in faeces Eimeria spp. (82 %). Pathological changes in the liver were ascribed to be most probably caused by L. chavezi larva migration. The latter species, considered to be the very most pathogenic of all lama GIT nematode species, was also the species detected...

  5. Record Solar UV Irradiance in the Tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie A. Cabrol

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High elevation, thin ozone layer, and clear sky produce intense ultraviolet (UV radiation in the tropical Andes. Recent models suggest that tropical stratospheric ozone will slightly decrease in the coming decades, potentially resulting in more UV anomalies. Data collected between 4,300-5,916 m above sea level (asl in Bolivia show how this trend could dramatically impact surface solar irradiance. During 61 days, two Eldonet dosimeters recorded extreme UV-B irradiance equivalent to a UV index (UVI of 43.3, which is the highest ground value ever reported. If they become more common, events of this magnitude may have societal and ecological implications, which make understanding the process leading to their generation critical. Our data show that this event and other major UV spikes were consistent with rising UV-B/UV-A ratios in the days to hours preceding the spikes, trajectories of negative ozone anomalies (NOAs, and radiative transfer modeling.

  6. Agricultura y ganaderia en Taya, pueblo de los Andes Peruanos

    OpenAIRE

    Pouget, Cécile

    1988-01-01

    Mémoire de fin d'études présentant les activités agricoles des paysans de Taya, village des Andes péruviennes situé sur des pentes très fortes entre 3000 et 3500 mètres d'altitude. Les paysans y cultivent le maïs et les pommes de terre pour leur propre consommation, mais aussi la luzerne destinée aux vaches laitières. Avec le lait, ils font des fromages qu'ils vendent. L'organisation de l'occupation du sol montre que malgré l'érosion, le manque d'eau et d'argent, les paysans continuent ce typ...

  7. A new species of Trechisibus from Peruvian Andes (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Trechinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Delgado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the new species Trechisibus (s. str. delestali sp. n., is described from the southern Peruvian Andes. The morphological differences with the geographically closest species of the subgenus are also presented and discussed.

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR and WPA outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1964: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: January 1 through April 30, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  11. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January to April, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  12. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  13. Narrative report: January, February, March, and April, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  14. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: May 1 through August 31, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  15. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January to April, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  16. Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1978 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  17. Lake Andes Waterfowl Production Area: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR- Waterfowl Production Area outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by...

  18. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Lake Andes [Wetland Management District]: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. [Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Narrative report : July 1, 1975 through December 31, 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1976 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  1. Lake Andes Wetland District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Planning and accomplishment narrative: Lake Andes Wetlands District: July 1, 1972 through June 30, 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District describes Refuge activities during the 1973 fiscal year. Highlights and accomplishments are described.

  4. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1977 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  6. Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  7. Phase 1 Watershed Assessment Final Report: Lake Andes Watershed, Charles Mix County, South Dakota.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was included in the 1998 South Dakota 303(d) list as an impairment-related Total Maximum Daily Load waterbody. In 1922 Congress passed a bill that...

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Lake Andes Wetland Management District : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the Refuge and...

  13. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the Refuge and...

  14. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the Refuge and...

  15. Narrative report: January, February, March, and April, 1963: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  16. Lake Assessment Project Report, Lake Andes: Charles Mix County, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was included in the 1998 South Dakota 303(d) list as an impairment-related Total Maximum Daily Load waterbody. In 1922 Congress passed a bill that...

  17. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September to December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Annual narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge and Management District: Calendar year 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR during the 1974 calendar year. Monthly activities reports are provided. Resource management- including...

  19. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  20. Complex brittle deformation pattern along the Southern Patagonian Andes (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberón, Vanesa; Sue, Christian; Ronda, Gonzalo; Ghiglione, Matías

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes is located in the southern extreme of the Pacific subduction zone, where the Antartic oceanic plate sinks underneath South America. The history of the area begins with compression during Paleozoic, Jurassic extension associated to the rift and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, then a sag stage in the Lower Cretaceous followed by a foreland phase as a result of plate tectonics (Ghiglione et al., 2016). The kinematic study is concentrated in the Argentinean foothills, between 46°40' and 48° SL. We measured around 800 fault planes and their striaes with the sense of movement in order to characterize the stress field. The software used to make the stress inversion were Tensor (Delvaux, 2011) and Multiple Inverse Method MIM (Yamaji et al., 2011). The stress field map was built with the results of the MIM. We present new data from 48 sites located in the northern sector of the Southern Patagonian Andes. The measurements were made in several rocks from Paleozoic to Lower Cretaceous, even though most were taken in pyroclastic jurassic rocks from El Quemado Complex. Paleostress tensors obtained are mostly strike-slip, although a 25% is normal and there are a few compresional. The pattern of faults found is complex. In some sites the tensor can be locally linked to satellite images and observations from the field or be related to a major thrust front. There is no clear correlation between the age and/or lithology with the tensor since the youngest rocks measured are Lower Cretaceous. Probably there are several generations of family faults connected to different and recent tectonic phases then the paleostress tensors might correspond to the latest tectonic events.

  1. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Vasyunin, A. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States); Birnstiel, T., E-mail: akimkin@inasan.ru, E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru, E-mail: pavyar@inasan.ru, E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de, E-mail: semenov@mpia.de, E-mail: henning@mpia.de, E-mail: anton.vasyunin@gmail.com, E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  2. An elusive new species of Marsupial Frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca from the Andes of northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of marsupial frog, genus Gastrotheca, is described from high-elevation grasslands in the Andes in Región Amazonas in northernPeru, where even calling males are well hidden in deep moss. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by its unique color pattern that includes a narrow, blackbordered, yellow middorsal stripe. The species apparently belongs to the Gastrotheca plumbea Group, which ranges in the Andes from northern Colombia to northern Peru.

  3. Glaciation and topographic evolution of the Central Patagonian Andes since 6 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeleit, E. C.; Laemel, R.; De Wolf, W. E.; Shuster, D. L.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    New and existing thermochronological data are used to model glacial erosion and topographic evolution of the central Patagonian Andes (~47S) over the last 6 Ma. The modern Andes are cut by large valleys and fjords with local valley relief of at least 2.5 km. It is currently thought that a formerly uniformly high Andes was 'buzzed' down to the elevation of the equilibrium line altitude, presumably in the last 2 Ma concurrent with late Cenozoic global cooling. However, studies of glacial debris show that glaciers were present in Patagonia as early as 6 Ma. The extent of these early glaciations is unclear, but recent work suggests that glacial valleys in the central Patagonian Andes were carved at a steady rate beginning at 6 Ma, implying that valley incision may be an important process in the topographic evolution of glaciated mountain ranges, rather than cirque retreat. To understand how valley relief has formed in the Andes, we dated 30 samples from Steffen Fjord in Chile using apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology. We use this new data and existing thermochronological data in the region to estimate the topographic form of the central Andes at 6 Ma and model how the valley relief has evolved since the initiation of glaciation using Pecube.

  4. Into the Andes: multiple independent colonizations drive montane diversity in the Neotropical clearwing butterflies Godyridina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazot, Nicolas; Willmott, Keith R; Condamine, Fabien L; De-Silva, Donna Lisa; Freitas, André V L; Lamas, Gerardo; Morlon, Hélène; Giraldo, Carlos E; Jiggins, Chris D; Joron, Mathieu; Mallet, James; Uribe, Sandra; Elias, Marianne

    2016-11-01

    Understanding why species richness peaks along the Andes is a fundamental question in the study of Neotropical biodiversity. Several biogeographic and diversification scenarios have been proposed in the literature, but there is confusion about the processes underlying each scenario, and assessing their relative contribution is not straightforward. Here, we propose to refine these scenarios into a framework which evaluates four evolutionary mechanisms: higher speciation rate in the Andes, lower extinction rates in the Andes, older colonization times and higher colonization rates of the Andes from adjacent areas. We apply this framework to a species-rich subtribe of Neotropical butterflies whose diversity peaks in the Andes, the Godyridina (Nymphalidae: Ithomiini). We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny of the Godyridina and fitted time-dependent diversification models. Using trait-dependent diversification models and ancestral state reconstruction methods we then compared different biogeographic scenarios. We found strong evidence that the rates of colonization into the Andes were higher than the other way round. Those colonizations and the subsequent local diversification at equal rates in the Andes and in non-Andean regions mechanically increased the species richness of Andean regions compared to that of non-Andean regions ('species-attractor' hypothesis). We also found support for increasing speciation rates associated with Andean lineages. Our work highlights the importance of the Andean slopes in repeatedly attracting non-Andean lineages, most likely as a result of the diversity of habitats and/or host plants. Applying this analytical framework to other clades will bring important insights into the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the most species-rich biodiversity hotspot on the planet.

  5. Large slope failures in the La Paz basin, Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N. J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Rabus, B.; Guzmán, M. A.; Minaya, E.; Clague, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The La Paz basin in the eastern Bolivian Andes has been a hotspot for large-scale, deep-seated gravitational slope deformation during the Holocene. In less than 2 Ma, a network of steep-sided valleys up to 800 m deep formed in sediments of the Altiplano Plateau and underlying basement rocks. We characterize the distribution, extent, mechanisms, and modern activity of large-scale failures within this landscape using optical image interpretation, existing geologic maps, synthetic RADAR interferometry (InSAR), and field investigation. Deposits of nearly 20 landslides larger than 100 Mm3 occur within the basin. Most failures have occurred in weakly lithified Late Miocene to Pliocene sedimentary rocks and include earth flows, translational and rotational landslides, and plug flows. Failures in underlying tectonized Paleozoic sedimentary rocks include bedding-parallel rockslides. The largest failure is the 3 km3 Achcocalla earth flow (ca. 11 ka BP), which ran out ~20 km. Other dated events span the period from the early Holocene to nearly the Colonial historic period. InSAR results show that many large slope failures, including the Achocalla earth flow, are currently moving at rates of a few centimeters to a few decimeters per year. Rapid deposition, shallow burial, and rapid incision of the basin fills produced steep slopes in weak geologic materials that, coupled with groundwater discharge from the valley walls, are the primary controls on instability. In contrast, the Altiplano surface has changed little in 2 Ma and the adjacent slopes of the Cordilleran Real, although steep, are relatively stable. Of the over 100 landslides that have occurred in the city of La Paz since the early twentieth century, most are at the margins of large, deep-seated prehistoric failures, and two of the most damaging historic landslides (Hanko-Hanko, 1582; Pampahasi, 2011) were large-scale reactivations of previously failed slopes. Improved understanding of large, deep-seated landslides in

  6. Gravity modelling of the Ramadas Caldera (Argentinean Puna, central Andes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casas, A. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Facultad de Geologia; Hernandez, E.; Marti, J. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. de Ciencias de la Terra Jaume Almera; Petrinovic, I. [Universidad Nacional de Salta (Argentina)

    1995-12-31

    In order to identify and characterize the event area of abundant Upper Miocene proximal rhyolitic pyroclastic deposits and extrusive domes which concentrate in the Ramadas area, near Sant`Antonio de los Cobres (Salta) at the Puna Altiplano (Central Andes), a detailed gravity survey has been carried out. Regional Bouguer gravity data were augmented with new 173 gravity observations measured sufficiently close-spaced to resolve the short wavelength produced by the structure of interest. Besides, the geophysical survey was done in conjunction with geologic and geochemical studies which were critically important to our interpretation. After the separation of the regional trend, the residual anomaly map displays a circular gravity low reaching-80 m Gal centered over scarce outcrops of rhyolitic and pyroclastic. This gravity low is interpreted as produced by block subsidence along ring fractures during eruption and/or deflation of the chamber. As the accumulation of thick, low density rock types in the zone of collapse is responsible of the prominent negative gravity anomalies, them has been used to estimated the thickness of caldera infill. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  7. The Grenville-age basement of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the basement of the Andes shows the strong Grenville affinities of most of the inliers exposed in the different terranes from Colombia to Patagonia. The terranes have different histories, but most of them participated in the Rodinia supercontinent amalgamation during the Mesoproterozoic between 1200 and 1000 Ma. After Rodinia break-up some terranes were left in the Laurentian side such as Cuyania and Chilenia, while others stayed in the Gondwanan side. Some of the terranes once collided with the Amazon craton remained attached, experiencing diverse rifting episodes all along the Phanerozoic, as the Arequipa and Pampia terranes. Some other basement inliers were detached in the Neoproterozoic and amalgamated again to Gondwana in the Early Cambrian, Middle Ordovician or Permian times. A few basement inliers with Permian metamorphic ages were transferred to Gondwana after Pangea break-up from the Laurentian side. Some of them were part of the present Middle America terrane. An exceptional case is the Oaxaquia terrane that was detached from the Gondwana margin after the Early Ordovician and is now one of the main Mexican terranes that collided with Laurentia. These displacements, detachments, and amalgamations indicate a complex terrane transfer between Laurentia and Gondwana during Paleozoic times, following plate reorganizations and changes in the absolute motion of Gondwana.

  8. [Medical education at Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego Vicuña, F

    1997-07-01

    Universidad de los Andes School of Medicine started in 1991 with a new medical curriculum aimed at providing a medical education for its students, that is, it attempts to give, together with technical proficiency in medical matters, formation of character and a strong ethical attitude. The curriculum lasts for seven years: five of basic, pre-clinical and clinical theoretical and practical courses, followed by two years of internships in Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Pediatrics, plus a four month period of an elective internship. The courses have an integrated design, in which each matter is presented from multiple perspectives, e.g. in Internal Medicine together with the clinical aspects of disease, the pathophysiology and the pharmacology of the drugs used are presented. Also the Pathology of each disease is given in coordination in the Pathology course. General educational matters such as Anthropology, Psychology, Origin of Living Beings, Theology and Medical Ethics are interspersed in the curriculum. An important feature is the personal counselling system, in which each student may choose an academic counsellor and discuss with him (her) the subjects of his choosing. Clinical practice is given in a system that includes five hospitals and five private clinics that range from general medical practice to Psychiatry or Ophthalmology.

  9. Meteorological Conditions of Floods In The Chilean Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, J.

    Catastrophic floods occurred on mountains River during 2000 and 2001. The meteo- rological conditions of flood during the last five years have analyzed. For example, the flood of June 29 of 2000 occurred after one of extremely wettest June of the last 40 years were snowfall was 991cm in the Aconcagua Valley. Infrequently storms activ- ity generated a huge snowfall and rainfall over the Andes mountains on June of 2000 (1525mm in El Maule Valley) and the end of the unusually period, the flood was trig- gered by rising temperatures on the mountains and heavy rain (199mm in 24 hours) fall over the fresh snow on the morning of June 29 and floods wave developed and moved down along of the all river located on Central part of Chile, the foods peak was 2970.5m3/s on the El Maule basin in the morning of June 29. The regional meteoro- logical models with the hydrological forecasting was used for alert of the floods.

  10. Paleomagnetism of Permian and Triassic rock, central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Randall D.; Kent, Dennis V.; Mpodozis, Constantino; Davidson, John

    The first paleomagnetic data from Permian and Triassic formations west of the Andean divide are presented. Four formations of Permian or Triassic age in the central Chilean Andes have been investigated: two are located in the coastal ranges, and two are in the main cordillera. Of the formations in the main cordillera (Pastos Blancos and Matahuaico formations), only the Pastos Blancos Formation has yielded characteristic directions. While a fold test is absent, magnetizations are most likely secondary and yield pre-tilt corrected concordant inclinations, but yield declinations discordant 30° clockwise in comparison to the South American apparent polar wander path. Both formations from the coastal ranges (Cifuncho and Pichidangui formations) yielded stable directions. Postfolding magnetizations in the Cifuncho Formation also show declinations discordant 30° clockwise and concordant inclinations. The Pichidangui Formation has two stable components: one of postfolding age is concordant to apparent polar wander path data, and one of probable prefolding (Late Triassic) age is concordant in declination, but discordant in inclination. Further work is needed to better define the prefolding magnetizations in the Pichidangui Formation, but at present these preliminary results are the first paleomagnetic signs of displaced terranes along the Pacific margin of Chile. If correct, the results suggest that the Pichidangui Formation was some 15° of latitude farther south during the Late Triassic and had likely moved northward to its present latitudinal position with respect to cratonic South America by Middle to Late Jurassic.

  11. Quaternary Glaciations in the Rio Mendoza Valley, Argentine Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espizua, Lydia E.

    1993-09-01

    In the Rio Mendoza valley, five Pleistocene drifts and one Holocene drift are distinguished by multiple relative-age criteria, including surface-rock weathering, development of rock varnish, moraine morphology, soil-profile development, and stratigraphic relationships. Several absolute ages suggest a preliminary chronology. During the oldest (Uspallata) glaciation, a system of valley glaciers flowed 110 km from the Andean drainage divide and 80 km from Cerro Aconcagua to terminate at 1850 m. Drift of this ice advance is older than a widespread tephra dated by fission-track at 360,000 ± 36,000 yr. During the Punta de Vacas advance, ice terminated at 2350 m, while during the subsequent Penitentes advance, the glacier system ended at 2500 m. A travertine layer overlying Penitentes Drift has U-series age of 24,200 ± 2000 yr B.P. The distribution of Horcones Drift, which is inferred to represent the last glacial maximum, delimits an independent ice stream that flowed 22 km down Horcones valley to 2750 m. A later readvance (Almacenes) reached 3250 m. Confluencia Drift is considered to be Neoglacial in age and extends downvalley to 3300 m. The moraine sequence is compared with those studied by Caviedes (1972) along Rio Aconcagua on the Chilean flank of the Andes.

  12. Bofedales: high altitude peatlands of the central Andes Bofedales: turberas de alta montaña de los Andes centrales

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    FRANCISCO A SQUEO

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an exceptional group of alpine peatlands in the world situated in the arid grasslands of the central Andes. The peatlands in northern Chile occur in the most arid part of their range. Members of the Juncaceae are the primary peat-forming plant species. Fresh and mildly saline groundwaters originate from glaciers, snowmelt and rain are the water sources for the northern Chile peatlands. Paleoecological investigations suggest that some peatlands are recent features of the landscape having developed within the last three thousand years or less. These peatlands are unique, extremely fragile water features sensitive to climate changes and human disturbances such as regional mining activity. Much more work is required to develop scientifically based sound management and conservation programs for the rare plants and animals that live in them and to ensure the future livelihoods of the indigenous peoples who depend on themExiste un grupo excepcional de turberas (bofedales de alta montaña en el mundo situados en la estepa árida de los Andes centrales. Los bofedales en el norte de Chile están presentes en la parte más árida de su rango. Las principales especies de plantas responsables de la formación de turba corresponden a miembros de Juncaceae. El agua fresca y medianamente salina de los bofedales proviene de agua subterránea asociada a riachuelos proveniente de glaciares, derretimiento de nieve y lluvia. Investigaciones paleoecológicas sugieren que algunos bofedales son integrantes recientes del paisaje, habiéndose desarrollado durante los últimos tres mil años o menos. Estos bofedales son entidades únicas, extremadamente frágiles por su dependencia del agua, sensibles a los cambios climáticos y vulnerables a la alteración humana tal como la actividad minera en la región. Se requiere mucho más trabajo para desarrollar programas de manejo y conservación, con sólidas bases científicas, de las plantas y animales que viven en

  13. Linchamientos y conflicto político en Los Andes Lynchings and Political conflict in The Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Vilas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En 2004, los alcaldes de dos municipalidades de la región aimara de los Andes fueron linchados en la aparente culminación de agudos conflictos políticos internos y entre las respectivas comunidades y el Estado central. En este artículo se discuten ambos casos con el fin de ilustrar las transformaciones experimentadas en años recientes en la organización y la dinámica interna de las comunidades andinas, y de la articulación conflictiva de la política local en los procesos e instituciones de más amplio alcance. Precariedad social e incapacidad o renuencia del Estado para responder con eficacia a demandas básicas de determinados grupos de población configuran enmarcamientos socioeconómicos e institucionales de los linchamientos. En contraste con enfoques que enfatizan en factores culturales tradicionales o en un supuesto nacionalismo indígena, en el artículo se destaca la gravitación de fenómenos y procesos político- institucionales recientes en la transformación cultural y política de las comunidades, en el modo en que éstas procesan sus conflictos internos y con el Estado central.In 2004, two municipalitys mayors form the aimara Andes of Peru and Bolivia were subjected to mass lynchings as a result of the apparent culmination of violent political confrontations. This paper deals with these events as dramatic illustrations of the transformations the Andean communities experienced during recent decades in their internal dynamics, as well as in the articulation of local politics to processes and institutions beyond the communal limits. Structural precariousness combined with the state's inability or reluctance to come to terms with social or political demands from relevant segments of the people in the communities set the socioeconomic and institutional stage for lynchings. In contrast with approaches relating these events to an alleged indigenous cultural identity, the analysis points to the impact of the communities' political

  14. Structure and tectonic evolution of the Fuegian Andes (southernmost South America) in the framework of the Scotia Arc development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Dimieri, Luis V.; Olivero, Eduardo B.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    The major structural and tectonic features of the Fuegian Andes provide an outstanding onshore geological framework that aids in the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Scotia Arc, mainly known from offshore studies. The orogenic history of the Fuegian Andes (Late Cretaceous-Miocene) is thus compared and integrated with the tectonic history of the Scotia Sea. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene structures in the Fuegian Andes suggest a N-directed contraction consistent with an oroclinal bending of the southernmost South America-Antarctic Peninsula continental bridge. This N-directed contraction in the Fuegian Andes continued during the spreading of the West Scotia Ridge, between 40-50 and 10 Ma ago. The onset of major strike-slip faulting in Tierra del Fuego is considered here to be not older than the late Miocene, consistent with the recent history of the North Scotia Ridge; thus forming part of a tectonic regime superposed to the prior contraction in the Fuegian Andes.

  15. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  16. Possible future lakes in the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonia, Daniel; Haeberli, Wilfried; Torres, Judith; Giraldez, Claudia; Schauwecker, Simone; Santiago, Alexzander; Cochachin, Alejo; Huggel, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Climate change has caused large losses of glacier mass in the Andes of Peru. Also, given the projected changes in climate, based on different IPCC scenarios for 2050 and 2080, simulations with a tropical glacier-climate model indicate that glaciers will continue to retreat. According to the national Peruvian glacier inventories 43% of glacier area has disappeared between 1970 and 2003-2010 in the 19 snowy mountain ranges and a total of 8 355 new lakes have formed in deglaciating terrain. With glacier retreat new lakes form in parts of the glacier tongue where there is an overdeepening, and these lakes can be a source of natural hazards to downstrean populations. Therefore, the identification of possible future lakes is important to plan for preventive measures concerning possible lake outbursts as well as to understand changes in freshwater storage in the corresponding source areas. Modeling of glacier-bed overdeepenings and possible future lakes forming in such topographic depressions when becoming ice-free was done using the SRTM DEM from the year 2000 with a 90 m resolution and the 2003-2010 glacier outlines from the recently published national glacier inventory of Perú. The GIS-based analysis followed three main steps: (1) identification of flat glacier areas with less than 10° surface slope as a first-order spatial approximation to possible occurrences of glacier-bed overdeepenings; (2) application, using Google Earth, of three morphological indications of glacier-bed overdeepenings following Frey et al. (2010): steepening surface slope, onset of crevasse formation, lateral flow-narrowing; and (3) verification of the results from steps (1) and (2) by comparison with GlabTop modeling of bed topographies following Linsbauer et al. (2012) using the SRTM DEM, contour lines and constructed branch lines for all glaciers. A pilot study has already been carried out for the Cordillera Blanca. The results show that 31 major new lakes may form in the future. The total

  17. High resolution precipitation climatology for the Andes of South Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachte, Katja; Bendix, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The climate of Ecuador is strongly dominated by the complex structure of the Andes Mountains. Due to their heights and north-south orientation they act like a barrier, which cause delineation between the western and eastern flanks, as well as the inner-Andean areas. Commonly the Ecuadorian climate is classified in three zones, Costa, Interandina and Oriente. Existing precipitation products such as the GPCC or TRMM data are enabled to represent these climate zones, but because of their spatial resolution, they pass to capture the different regimes within a zone. Especially the inner-Andean region (Interandina) with its characteristic complex terrain shows spatially high climate variability. Local circulation systems, e.g. mountain-valley breezes as well as effects of windward and lee-side, drive the climate conditions allowing for the differentiation of air temperature and rainfall distribution on relative small scales. These highly variable patterns are also reflected by the diversity of ecosystems, e.g. rainforest, dry forest and Paramo, in a relative small area. In order to represent the local systems a dynamical downscaling approach for the Ecuadorian region is applied. In doing so the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used. A suitable model setup was evaluated within a sensitivity study, where various parametrization schemes were tested. The most suitable physics combination was used for a 30 year hint cast simulation. The poster presents first results of the high resolution climate simulations. On the basis of the spatial distribution of rainfall patterns distinct precipitation regimes within the Interandina will be shown. The aim is to highlight and discuss the importance of the adequately representation of the terrain in mountainous regions like the Andean Mountains.

  18. Evolution of Irruputuncu volcano, Central Andes, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, I.; Roche, O.; Moune, S.; Aguilera, F.; Campos, E.; Pizarro, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Irruputuncu is an active volcano located in northern Chile within the Central Andean Volcanic Zone (CAVZ) and that has produced andesitic to trachy-andesitic magmas over the last ˜258 ± 49 ka. We report petrographical and geochemical data, new geochronological ages and for the first time a detailed geological map representing the eruptive products generated by the Irruputuncu volcano. The detailed study on the volcanic products allows us to establish a temporal evolution of the edifice. We propose that the Irruputuncu volcanic history can be divided in two stages, both dominated by effusive activity: Irruputuncu I and II. The oldest identified products that mark the beginning of Irruputuncu I are small-volume pyroclastic flow deposits generated during an explosive phase that may have been triggered by magma injection as suggested by mingling features in the clasts. This event was followed by generation of large lava flows and the edifice grew until destabilization of its SW flank through the generation of a debris avalanche, which ended Irruputuncu I. New effusive activity generated lavas flows to the NW at the beginning of Irruputuncu II. In the meantime, lava domes that grew in the summit were destabilized, as shown by two well-preserved block-and-ash flow deposits. The first phase of dome collapse, in particular, generated highly mobile pyroclastic flows that propagated up to ˜8 km from their source on gentle slopes as low as 11° in distal areas. The actual activity is characterized by deposition of sulfur and permanent gas emissions, producing a gas plume that reaches 200 m above the crater. The maximum volume of this volcanic system is of ˜4 km3, being one of the smallest active volcano of Central Andes.

  19. The Little Ice Age in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomelli, V.; Cooley, D.; Naveau, P.; Rabatel, A.

    2003-12-01

    The period known as the Little Ice Age, from the 17th to the 19th century, brought a cooling of around 0.5 degrees Celsius as well as varyingly humid episodes Eurasia and North America. Because of a lack of long paleoclimatic time series in the tropical Andes, it is still unclear if similar cooling occurred over these tropical and Southern Hemisphere regions. Furthermore, if changes did take place, it is currently not well established if they were temporally synchronous or shifted with respect of the variations in the Northern Hemisphere or the globe. To look into this important climatic question and for advancing our understanding of the past climate links between the tropics and higher latitudes, 25 glaciers located in Bolivia and in Peru were carefully selected. Glacial activity and environmental changes were analyzed using lichenometry. Largest lichen diameters were measured in the different glacial basins. To better analyze these maximum diameters and to more appropriately represent uncertainty and the character of this collected data, age estimates of the different moraine systems were derived using extreme value theory rather than the traditional averaging. The results reveal two particular phases of glacier growth, 1550-1600 and 1800-1850. These two phases have also been identified in other proxy records, such as ice-cores and documentary data (particularly from church chronicles). In order to understand the climatic changes that could have contributed to the glacial variations, a simple model based on both precipitations and temperatures is applied to estimate mass balance questions in the basins. A cooling of the order of 0.5 C seems to be the most consistent with the data. Finally, these findings are compared with the better-known histories of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude glaciers.

  20. The nature of orogenic crust in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    2002-10-01

    The central Andes (16°-22°S) are part of an active continental margin mountain belt and the result of shortening of the weak western edge of South America between the strong lithospheres of the subducting Nazca plate and the underthrusting Brazilian shield. We have combined receiver function and surface wave dispersion results from the BANJO-SEDA project with other geophysical studies to characterize the nature of the continental crust and mantle lithospheric structure. The major results are as follows: (1) The crust supporting the high elevations is thick and has a felsic to intermediate bulk composition. (2) The relatively strong Brazilian lithosphere is underthrusting as far west (65.5°W) as the high elevations of the western part of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) but does not underthrust the entire Altiplano. (3) The subcrustal lithosphere is delaminating piecemeal under the Altiplano-EC boundary but is not completely removed beneath the central Altiplano. The Altiplano crust is characterized by a brittle upper crust decoupled from a very weak lower crust that is dominated by ductile deformation, leading to lower crustal flow and flat topography. In contrast, in the high-relief, inland-sloping regions of the EC and sub-Andean zone, the upper crust is still strongly coupled across the basal thrust of the fold-thrust belt to the underthrusting Brazilian Shield lithosphere. Subcrustal shortening between the Altiplano and Brazilian lithosphere appears to be accommodated by delamination near the Altiplano-EC boundary. Our study suggests that orogenic reworking may be an important part of the "felsification" of continental crust.

  1. Glacier loss and emerging hydrologic vulnerabilities in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, B. G.; McKenzie, J. M.; Baraer, M.; Lagos, P.; Lautz, L.; Carey, M.; Bury, J.; Crumley, R.; Wigmore, O.; Somers, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating glacier recession in the tropical Andes is transforming downstream hydrology, while increasing demands for water by end-users (even beyond the watershed limits) is complicating the assessment of vulnerability. Future scenarios of hydro-climatic vulnerability require a better understanding of coupled hydrologic and human systems, involving both multiscale process studies and more robust models of glacier-climate interactions. We synthesize research in two proglacial valleys of glacierized mountain ranges in different regions of Peru that are both in proximity to growing water usage from urban sectors, agriculture, hydroelectric generation, and mining. In both the Santa River watershed draining the Cordillera Blanca and the Shullcas River watershed below Hyuatapallana Mountain in Junin, glaciers have receded over 25% since the 1980s. Historical runoff and glacier data, combined with glacier-climate modeling, show a long-term decrease in discharge resulting from a net loss of stored water. We find evidence that this altered hydrology is transforming proglacial wetland ecology and water quality, even while water resource use has intensified. Beyond glaciers, our results show that over 60% of the dry season base flow in each watershed is groundwater sourced from heterogeneous aquifers. Municipal water supply in Huancayo already relies on 18 groundwater wells. Perceptions of water availability and actual water use practices remain relatively divorced from the actual water resources provided from each mountain range. Critical changes in glacier volume and water supply are not perceived or acknowledged consistently amongst different water users, nor reflected in water management decisions. In order to identify, understand, model, and adapt to climate-glacier-water changes, it is vital to integrate the analysis of water availability and groundwater processes (the domain of hydrologists) with that of water use (the focus for social scientists). Attention must be

  2. Bayesian spatiotemporal interpolation of rainfall in the Central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa-Moreno, Juan; Keir, Greg; McIntyre, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in the populous and economically significant Central Chilean region is governed by complex interactions between precipitation, temperature, snow and glacier melt, and streamflow. Streamflow prediction at daily time scales depends strongly on accurate estimations of precipitation in this predominantly dry region, particularly during the winter period. This can be difficult as gauged rainfall records are scarce, especially in the higher elevation regions of the Chilean Andes, and topographic influences on rainfall are not well understood. Remotely sensed precipitation and topographic products can be used to construct spatiotemporal multivariate regression models to estimate rainfall at ungauged locations. However, classical estimation methods such as kriging cannot easily accommodate the complicated statistical features of the data, including many 'no rainfall' observations, as well as non-normality, non-stationarity, and temporal autocorrelation. We use a separable space-time model to predict rainfall using the R-INLA package for computationally efficient Bayesian inference, using the gridded CHIRPS satellite-based rainfall dataset and digital elevation models as covariates. We jointly model both the probability of rainfall occurrence on a given day (using a binomial likelihood) as well as amount (using a gamma likelihood or similar). Correlation in space and time is modelled using a Gaussian Markov Random Field (GMRF) with a Matérn spatial covariance function which can evolve over time according to an autoregressive model if desired. It is possible to evaluate the GMRF at relatively coarse temporal resolution to speed up computations, but still produce daily rainfall predictions. We describe the process of model selection and inference using an information criterion approach, which we use to objectively select from competing models with various combinations of temporal smoothing, likelihoods, and autoregressive model orders.

  3. Two New Species of Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) from the High Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan S; Moncada, Ligia I; Matta, Nubia E; Adler, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    The females, males, pupae, and larvae of two new species of Simulium are described and illustrated from a small stream 3950 m above sea level in the Lake Otún area of the Colombian Andes Mountains. Simulium (Pternaspatha) quimbayium n. sp. represents a 630-km northeastern extension of the distributional range of previously known members of the subgenus Pternaspatha, and Simulium (Psilopelmia) machetorum n. sp. represents the highest altitude recorded for a species of the subgenus Psilopelmia. These species illustrate the unique simuliid biodiversity in the páramo ecosystem of the high northern Andes.

  4. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Mérida Andes and the Santander Massif, NW South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard; Mora, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    New apatite U-Pb and multiphase 40Ar/39Ar data constrain the high to medium temperature (~ 500 °C-~ 300 °C) thermal histories of igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Mérida Andes of Venezuela, and new apatite and zircon fission track data constrain the ~ 500 °C-~ 60 °C thermal histories of pre-Jurassic igneous and metamorphic rocks of the adjacent Santander Massif of Colombia. Computed thermal history envelopes using apatite U-Pb dates and grain size information from an Early Palaeozoic granodiorite in the Mérida Andes suggest that it cooled from > 500 °C to histories. The generally accepted timing of amalgamation of Pangaea along the Ouachita-Marathon suture pre-dates Late Permian to Triassic cooling recorded in basement rocks of the Mérida Andes by > 30 Ma, and its effect on rocks preserved in north-western South America is unknown. We interpret late Permian to Triassic cooling in the Mérida Andes to be driven by exhumation. Previous studies have suggested that a short phase of shortening and anatexis is recorded at ~ 253 Ma in the Maya Block, which may have been adjacent to the basement rocks of the Mérida Andes in the Late Permian. The coeval onset of exhumation in the Mérida Andes may be a result of increased coupling in the magmatic arc, which was located along the western margin of Pangaea. Triassic extension is documented in the Central Cordillera of Colombia and Ecuador between ~ 240 Ma and ~ 215 Ma, although extension at this time has not been clearly identified in the Mérida Andes or the Santander Massif. Permian to Triassic cooling is not recorded in the structurally isolated Caparo Block in the southern Mérida Andes, suggesting that it may have constituted a distinct fault block in the Triassic. New fission track data from the Santander Massif suggest that it started exhuming at ~ 40 Ma during a period of accelerated convergence between the Nazca/Farallòn Plate and the western margin of South America. Exhumation in the Santander

  5. A fusion-inhibiting peptide against Rift Valley fever virus inhibits multiple, diverse viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus, Class II (Andes virus, or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors.

  6. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy Orogenia activa de los Andes centro-australes estudiada mediante geodesia de GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.Se presentan mediciones GPS del campo de velocidad en los Andes centro-australes entre el extremo norte de Santa Cruz y la faja plegada de Malargüe. Se modela el campo de velocidad intersísmico como la combinación de una señal elástico/efímera asociada con el anclaje del límite principal de placas, y una componente constante, no reversible de desplazamiento asociada con una convergencia localizada en el retroarco y crecimiento del

  7. Evolución tectonomagmática de los Andes bolivianos Tectonomagmaticevolution of the Bolivian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Jiménez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes bolivianos ocuparonuna posición de retroarco durante gran parte del Fanerozoico. En su evoluciónse reconoce una primera etapa, restringida al Paleozoico inferior, en la quehubo una gran transferencia de material sedimentario en la corteza superior, yuna segunda en la que predominó el reciclaje de la masa cortical. A lo largodel Paleozoico inferior, una cuenca marina epicratónica se formó entre elcratón de Amazonia, el macizo Arequipa-Antofalla, y el macizo Pampeanofuncionando inicialmente como cuenca de retroarco y luego como cuenca deantepaís hasta colmatarse en el Paleozoico superior. En este lapso ocurrierontres etapas de deformación: La fase oclóyica (límite Ordovícico-Silúrico decarácter restringido, la fase eohercínica (límite Devónico-Carbonífero, y lafase hercínica (Carbonífero Superior también de influencia areal restringida.En el Mesozoico, se registraron aún breves incursiones marinas antes que en elEoceno comience a edificarse una protocordillera. El solevantamiento general detoda la región centroandina, se inició en el Oligoceno Superior afectando alAltiplano y la Cordillera Oriental actuales. Este solevantamiento ocurrió entres etapas limitadas por la formación de superficies de erosión datadas en 18y 10 Ma. La ladera oeste de la Cordillera Oriental, denominada faja de Huarina,tuvo un rol muy importante en la evolución de la región centroandina. Además decobijar a gran parte del magmatismo de retroarco, en esta faja ocurrió la mayorsubsidencia de la cuenca paleozoica. En esta faja ocurrieron preferentementedurante el Mesozoico, procesos de rifting y de adelgazamiento litosférico. Enel Paleógeno, la faja de Huarinas fue la primera en ser solevantada aislando lacuenca altiplánica del interior del continente, y durante el OligocenoSuperior, se constituyó en el cinturón retrocabalgante del orógeno. Ladeformación en el Altiplano y la Cordillera Oriental concluyó hace 10 Ma cuandose form

  8. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  9. A millennium of metallurgy recorded by lake sediments from Morococha, Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Kittleson, John L

    2007-05-15

    To date, information concerning pre-Colonial metallurgy in South America has largely been limited to the archaeological record of artifacts. Here, we reconstruct a millennium of smelting activity in the Peruvian Andes using the lake-sediment stratigraphy of atmospherically derived metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Bi, and Ti) and lead isotopic ratios (206Pb/ 207Pb) associated with smelting from the Morococha mining region in the central Peruvian Andes. The earliest evidence for metallurgy occurs ca. 1000 A.D., coinciding with the fall of the Wari Empire and decentralization of local populations. Smelting during this interval appears to have been aimed at copper and copper alloys, because of large increases in Zn and Cu relative to Pb. A subsequent switch to silver metallurgy under Inca control (ca. 1450 to conquest, 1533 A.D.) is indicated by increases in Pb, Sb, and Bi, a conclusion supported by further increases of these metals during Colonial mining, which targeted silver extraction. Rapid development of the central Andes during the 20th century raised metal burdens by an order of magnitude above previous levels. Our results represent the first evidence for pre-Colonial smelting in the central Peruvian Andes, and corroborate the sensitivity of lake sediments to pre-Colonial metallurgical activity suggested by earlier findings from Bolivia.

  10. Cloud forest restoration for erosion control in a Kichwa community of the Ecuadorian central Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, L.; Giordanengo, J.; Sacatoro, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Denver Professional Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) has begun conducting erosion control projects in the Kichwa communities of Malingua Pamba in the Andes Mountains south of Quito, Ecuador. In many high elevation areas in this region, erosion of volcanic soils on steep hillsides (i.e., teach these skills to adjacent villages.

  11. High altitude C4 grasslands in the northern Andes: relicts from glacial conditions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, A.; Mora, G.; Cleef, A.M.; Hooghiemstra, H.

    2001-01-01

    The altitudinal vegetation distribution in the northern Andes during glacial time differed from the present-day conditions as a result of temperature and precipitation change. New evidence indicate that as a response to a reduced atmospheric partial CO2 pressure (pCO2), the competitive balance betwe

  12. Deformation, deposition, and surface uplift in the hinterland of the Central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leier, A.; McQuarrie, N.; Garzione, C. N.; Eiler, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Paleoelevation histories from mountain belts like the Central Andes of Bolivia provide important constraints on the timing and geodynamic mechanisms associated with surface uplift. New stable isotope data from paleosol carbonate nodules in the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera of the Central Andes of Bolivia indicate a previously undocumented episode of surface uplift occurred in the region between ca. 24 and 17 Ma. Oxygen isotope and clumped-isotope thermometry values from paleosol carbonate in strata >24 Ma suggest paleoelevations as low as sea-level. Paleosol carbonate in strata ca. 17 Ma have oxygen isotope and clumped-isotope thermometry values, which using modern lapse rates, indicate an increase in elevation of approximately 3 km. Relatively undeformed Oligocene and Miocene strata overlap faulted Paleozoic rocks of the Bolivian Eastern Cordillera, indicating deposition and surface uplift post-dated and was decoupled from upper crustal deformation. Together, geological data from the area record an initial period of deformation and exhumation, a subsequent period of sediment deposition and overlap, and then an episode of surface uplift that was not accompanied by upper crustal deformation. We propose accommodation for the Oligocene-Miocene strata was associated with mantle and lowermost crustal processes, and the subsequent increase in surface elevation was an isostatic response to removal of dense material through delamination or drip. Combined with existing data sets in the Central Andes, these new data suggest multiple, regionally-variable, and diachronous periods of surface uplift occurred within the Central Andes during the Cenozoic Era.

  13. Hydrological cycles and trends in the NW Argentine Andes since 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, Fabiana; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variability characterizes the hydrometeorological pattern in the NW Argentine Andes, draining parts of the most populated and economically important areas of South America. During the summer monsoon season (DJF), the eastern flanks of the central Andes are characterized by deep convection, exposing them to extreme hydrometeorological events. These often result in floods and landslides with disastrous effects on the local populations. Here, we analyze river discharge to explore long-term hydrological variability in NW Argentine Andes and the linked climate controlling processes. We rely on 13 daily river discharge time series relevant to drainage basins spanning several size orders (102-104 km2) starting in 1914 and define different hydro-climate indices both for the mean and the extreme hydrological events. We apply quantile regression to investigate long-term trends and spectral analysis associated with cross-correlation with SST-based climate indices to identify links to large-scale climate variability modes. River discharge presents a pronounced and coherent variability signal in South America, particularly for wide drainage basins, such as the Amazon and Paraná/La Plata rivers, strongly associated to Pacific and Atlantic Oceans Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies (i.e. ENSO, PDO, AMO). Our analysis evidences that in the NW Argentine Andes, mean discharge values are characterized by statistically significant, mostly positive, long-term trends since 1940, whereas the extreme events present a more non-unidirectional trend pattern. Also, coherent multi-annual to multi-decadal cycles characterizing the discharge pattern have been identified, suggesting that processes linked to SST anomaly-modes strongly control the hydrometeorology variability in the NW Argentina Andes.

  14. Episodic subgreenschist facies metamorphism in the Andes of Chile - is it a valid model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, R. E.; Robinson, D.; Aguirre, L.; Vergara, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Central Andes of Chile are characterized by subgreenschist facies burial metamorphism that is reported as having developed in up to seven episodic cycles of some 40Myr duration. The main evidence in support of the model is reported as mineralogical breaks at major stratigraphic boundaries that are interpreted as documenting sharp breaks in metamorphic grade. Here we test this model by examination of the progressive secondary mineral development, reaction progress in mafic phyllosilicates, and topological variations of the low-grade assemblages in metabasites for Jurassic to Miocene sequences east of Santiago. The mafic phyllosilicates (smectite - mixed-layer chlorite/smectite - chlorite) show increasing reaction progress with stratigraphic age and there is a continuum across the main stratigraphic boundaries, such there is no offset or gap in the reaction progress at these boundaries. There are some differences in mineral assemblages between the various stratigraphic units, such as between prehnite+pumpellyite+/-laumonite or amphibole-bearing and non amphibole bearing rocks, from which contrasting subgreenschist facies can be recognised. However, consideration of the controls on mineral parageneses at subgreenschist facies conditions demonstrates that these different facies cannot be used solely as evidence of sharp breaks in metamorphic grade at unconformities, as has been reported in many previous publications for the Andes. The presently accepted model for the Central Andes, involving repeated cycles of episodic metamorphism developing in extensional basins, is, therefore, partly unfounded. Consideration of the overall tectonic evolution of this part of the Andes concurs that the burial metamorphism developed in extensional settings, but in only two events, namely in mid-late Cretaceous and Late Miocene times respectively. The results from this work suggest that the record of sharp metamorphic breaks and the episodic model of metamorphism reported for many

  15. Hantavirus Gn and Gc glycoproteins self-assemble into virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Márquez, Chantal L; Bulling, Manuela; Klingström, Jonas; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2014-02-01

    How hantaviruses assemble and exit infected cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of Andes (ANDV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantavirus Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins lead to their self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) which were released to cell supernatants. The viral nucleoprotein was not required for particle formation. Further, a Gc endodomain deletion mutant did not abrogate VLP formation. The VLPs were pleomorphic, exposed protrusions and reacted with patient sera.

  16. Screening for new accumulator plants in Andes Range mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2016-04-01

    accumulated considerable concentrations of Cu and Zn. The species from the genus Bidens (Asteraceae) were able not only to accumulate high shoot As concentrations (> 1000 μg g-1 in B. cynapiifolia from Peru) but also considerable amounts of Pb (B. humilis from Chile). The highest Cu shoot concentrations were found in Mullinum spinosum (870 μg g-1) and in B. cynapiifolia (620 μg g-1). The shoot accumulation of Zn was highest in Baccharis amdatensis (>1900 μg g-1) and in Rumex crispus (1300 μg g-1) from the Ag mine in Ecuador (Bech et al., 2002). In the Peruvian Andes, B. triplinervia can be considered interesting for phytostabilization, due to its capacity to restrict the accumulation of elevated amounts of Pb and Zn in the shoots.

  17. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  18. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Waterfowl Production Area District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR- Waterfowl Production Area District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins...

  19. Fort Niobrara Easement Refuges: Lake Andes, Lake Arconge, Carr, Eagle Creek: May 1, 1942 to August 31, 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR between May and August of 1942. Lake Arconge Refuge, Carr Refuge, and Eagle Creek Refuge are also...

  20. Fort Niobrara Easement Refuges: Lake Andes, Lake Arconge, Carr, Eagle Creek: Narrative report: Sept. to Dec. 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes, Lake Arconge, Carr, and Eagle Creek Refuges between September and December of 1943. Weather conditions,...

  1. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades.

  2. Co-Infection by Chytrid Fungus and Ranaviruses in Wild and Harvested Frogs in the Tropical Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin W Warne

    Full Text Available While global amphibian declines are associated with the spread of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, undetected concurrent co-infection by other pathogens may be little recognized threats to amphibians. Emerging viruses in the genus Ranavirus (Rv also cause die-offs of amphibians and other ectotherms, but the extent of their distribution globally, or how co-infections with Bd impact amphibians are poorly understood. We provide the first report of Bd and Rv co-infection in South America, and the first report of Rv infections in the amphibian biodiversity hotspot of the Peruvian Andes, where Bd is associated with extinctions. Using these data, we tested the hypothesis that Bd or Rv parasites facilitate co-infection, as assessed by parasite abundance or infection intensity within individual adult frogs. Co-infection occurred in 30% of stream-dwelling frogs; 65% were infected by Bd and 40% by Rv. Among terrestrial, direct-developing Pristimantis frogs 40% were infected by Bd, 35% by Rv, and 20% co-infected. In Telmatobius frogs harvested for the live-trade 49% were co-infected, 92% were infected by Bd, and 53% by Rv. Median Bd and Rv loads were similar in both wild (Bd = 101.2 Ze, Rv = 102.3 viral copies and harvested frogs (Bd = 103.1 Ze, Rv = 102.7 viral copies. While neither parasite abundance nor infection intensity were associated with co-infection patterns in adults, these data did not include the most susceptible larval and metamorphic life stages. These findings suggest Rv distribution is global and that co-infection among these parasites may be common. These results raise conservation concerns, but greater testing is necessary to determine if parasite interactions increase amphibian vulnerability to secondary infections across differing life stages, and constitute a previously undetected threat to declining populations. Greater surveillance of parasite interactions may increase our capacity to contain and mitigate the impacts of these and

  3. Co-Infection by Chytrid Fungus and Ranaviruses in Wild and Harvested Frogs in the Tropical Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Robin W; LaBumbard, Brandon; LaGrange, Seth; Vredenburg, Vance T; Catenazzi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    While global amphibian declines are associated with the spread of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), undetected concurrent co-infection by other pathogens may be little recognized threats to amphibians. Emerging viruses in the genus Ranavirus (Rv) also cause die-offs of amphibians and other ectotherms, but the extent of their distribution globally, or how co-infections with Bd impact amphibians are poorly understood. We provide the first report of Bd and Rv co-infection in South America, and the first report of Rv infections in the amphibian biodiversity hotspot of the Peruvian Andes, where Bd is associated with extinctions. Using these data, we tested the hypothesis that Bd or Rv parasites facilitate co-infection, as assessed by parasite abundance or infection intensity within individual adult frogs. Co-infection occurred in 30% of stream-dwelling frogs; 65% were infected by Bd and 40% by Rv. Among terrestrial, direct-developing Pristimantis frogs 40% were infected by Bd, 35% by Rv, and 20% co-infected. In Telmatobius frogs harvested for the live-trade 49% were co-infected, 92% were infected by Bd, and 53% by Rv. Median Bd and Rv loads were similar in both wild (Bd = 101.2 Ze, Rv = 102.3 viral copies) and harvested frogs (Bd = 103.1 Ze, Rv = 102.7 viral copies). While neither parasite abundance nor infection intensity were associated with co-infection patterns in adults, these data did not include the most susceptible larval and metamorphic life stages. These findings suggest Rv distribution is global and that co-infection among these parasites may be common. These results raise conservation concerns, but greater testing is necessary to determine if parasite interactions increase amphibian vulnerability to secondary infections across differing life stages, and constitute a previously undetected threat to declining populations. Greater surveillance of parasite interactions may increase our capacity to contain and mitigate the impacts of these and other wildlife

  4. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that lead to ...

  5. A survey of North American migratory waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christopher J.; Docherty, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of migratory waterfowl for duck plague (DP) virus was conducted in the Mississippi and Central flyways during 1982 and in the Atlantic and Pacific flyways during 1983. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 3,169 migratory waterfowl in these four flyways, principally mallards (Anas platyrhynchos L.), black ducks (Anas rubripes Brewster), and pintails (Anas acuta L). In addition 1,033 birds were sampled from areas of recurrent DP outbreaks among nonmigratory and captive waterfowl, and 590 from Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, the site of the only known major DP outbreak in migratory waterfowl. Duck plague virus was not found in any of the samples. Results support the hypothesis that DP is not established in North American migratory waterfowl as an enzootic disease.

  6. Interseismic Rates From the CTO cGPS Andes and Nepal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J.; Chowdhury, F.; Avouac, J.; Simons, M.; Barrientos, S. E.; Comte, D.; Norabuena, E. O.; Sapkota, S. N.

    2009-12-01

    To study crustal deformation at converging plate margins the Caltech Tectonics Observatory (CTO), together with partner institutions in the host countries, operates continuously observing GPS stations in the central Andes (northern Chile and southern Peru) and in Nepal. The currently 20-site Andes network was established in 2005 with 7 stations. Efforts are underway to provide data streaming links at near real time for the majority of sites. The Nepal network started with 10 sites in 2004 and has been expanded to 23 sites in the last couple of years. Dual frequency code and phase data from all sites are processed with the GAMIT/GLOBK processing package. Reliable interseismic velocities are now available for the majority of sites. Network metadata, rinex data files, processed time series and velocity estimates can be found online thru links at the CTO website: tectonics.caltech.edu.

  7. Illicit crops and armed conflict as constraints on biodiversity conservation in the Andes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldså, Jon; Alvarez, María D; Lazcano, Juan Mario; León, Blanca

    2005-05-01

    Coca, once grown for local consumption in the Andes, is now produced for external markets, often in areas with armed conflict. Internationally financed eradication campaigns force traffickers and growers to constantly relocate, making drug-related activities a principal cause of forest loss. The impact on biodiversity is known only in general terms, and this article presents the first regional analysis to identify areas of special concern, using bird data as proxy. The aim of conserving all species may be significantly constrained in the Santa Marta and Perijá mountains, Darién, some parts of the Central Andes in Colombia, and between the middle Marañón and middle Huallaga valleys in Peru. Solutions to the problem must address the root causes: international drug markets, long-lasting armed conflict, and lack of alternative income for the rural poor.

  8. Surface uplift in the Central Andes driven by growth of the Altiplano Puna Magma Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jonathan P.; Ward, Kevin M.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.; Finnegan, Noah J.

    2016-10-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (APMB) in the Central Andes is the largest imaged magma reservoir on Earth, and is located within the second highest orogenic plateau on Earth, the Altiplano-Puna. Although the APMB is a first-order geologic feature similar to the Sierra Nevada batholith, its role in the surface uplift history of the Central Andes remains uncertain. Here we show that a long-wavelength topographic dome overlies the seismically measured extent of the APMB, and gravity data suggest that the uplift is isostatically compensated. Isostatic modelling of the magmatic contribution to dome growth yields melt volumes comparable to those estimated from tomography, and suggests that the APMB growth rate exceeds the peak Cretaceous magmatic flare-up in the Sierran batholith. Our analysis reveals that magmatic addition may provide a contribution to surface uplift on par with lithospheric removal, and illustrates that surface topography may help constrain the magnitude of pluton-scale melt production.

  9. Climate change and water resources in arid mountains: an example from the Bolivian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangecroft, Sally; Harrison, Stephan; Anderson, Karen; Magrath, John; Castel, Ana Paola; Pacheco, Paula

    2013-11-01

    Climate change is projected to have a strongly negative effect on water supplies in the arid mountains of South America, significantly impacting millions of people. As one of the poorest countries in the region, Bolivia is particularly vulnerable to such changes due to its limited capacity to adapt. Water security is threatened further by glacial recession with Bolivian glaciers losing nearly half their ice mass over the past 50 years raising serious water management concerns. This review examines current trends in water availability and glacier melt in the Bolivian Andes, assesses the driving factors of reduced water availability and identifies key gaps in our knowledge of the Andean cryosphere. The lack of research regarding permafrost water sources in the Bolivian Andes is addressed, with focus on the potential contribution to mountain water supplies provided by rock glaciers.

  10. Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Christopher James; Maldonado Goyzueta, Carla Brenda; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg;

    2016-01-01

    Bolivia is one of the most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Between the Andes and the Amazon drainage basin spans the Yungas, a vast forested region shown to be extremely species rich in macro-organisms. However, it remains unclear whether this high diversity is also reflected in mic...... root-associated fungal diversity in subtropical regions. This study sheds further light on the diversity and distribution of the world's "hidden biodiversity"....

  11. Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis in an HIV-negative patient from the Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, Ericson L.; Valqui,Willi; Vilchez,Luis; Evangelista,Lourdes; Crispin,Sarita; Tello,Mercedes; Ñavincopa,Marcos; Béjar,Vilma; Gonzáles,José; Alex G. Ortega-Loayza

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent Peruvian patient from the Andes with a one-month history of meningoencephalitis. Cryptococcus gattii was identified from a cerebrospinal fluid culture through assimilation of D-proline and D-tryptophan as the single nitrogen source. Initially, the patient received intravenous antifungal therapy with amphotericin B. The patient was discharged 29 days after hospitalization and continued with oral fluconazole treatment for ten weeks. During this period, the...

  12. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.

  13. La implantación de la viruela en los Andes, la historia de un holocausto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel García Cáceres

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La historia de las epidemias de viruela en los Andes tiene el carácter tétrico del relato de un holocausto. Esta presentación está destinada a resaltar las etapas más importantes del proceso de la implantación de la viruela en las poblaciones andinas en general y, en particular, en el Perú, desde principio del siglo XVI hasta nuestros días.

  14. Foreland shortening and crustal balancing in the Andes at 30°S latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, R. W.; Figueroa, D.; Synder, D.; Beer, J.; Mpodozis, C.; Isaacks, B. L.

    1990-08-01

    Excellent surface exposures, known Benioff zone geometry, a dynamic morphology, and the availability of industry seismic reflection data all make the Andes at 30°S an excellent transect for investigating crustal-scale balanced sections. 150-170 km of horizontal shortening has occurred in three major belts located between the trench and the foreland. The thin-skinned, east-verging Precordillera of western Argentina accounts for 60-75% of the total shortening and formed mostly since major volcanism ceased at ˜10 Ma. Industry seismic reflection data show that the décollement of the Precordillera belt is located anomalously deep at ˜15 km. The belt is dominated by fault propagation folds and contains several prominent out-of-sequence thrust faults. Seismic stratigraphie analysis shows that Miocene strata in the Iglesia Valley, located between the Precordillera and the crest of the Andes, accumulated in a piggy-back basin. Onlap relations on the western side indicate that the High Cordillera was uplifted as a major fault bend fold over a buried ramp. Thrusting in the two western belts, both in the High Cordillera of Chile, formed during the waning stages of arc volcanism, 11-16 Ma. and account for 25-40% of the shortening. The observed shortening is probably greater than can be accounted for with reasonable crustal thicknesses, indicating the possibility of continental truncation or erosion along the plate margin or an anomalously thick root held down by the nearly flat subducted Nazca Plate. Our preferred crustal geometry puts the ramp between upper and lower crustal deformation west of the high topography, requiring crustal scale tectonic wedging to thicken the crust beneath the crest of the Andes. This non-unique model provides a simple explanation of the first order morphology of the Andes at this latitude.

  15. Late Quaternary deglacial history of the Mérida Andes, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, Nathan D.; Abbott, Mark B.; Polissar, Pratigya J.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Bezada, Maximiliano; Rull, Valentí

    2005-10-01

    Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from seven lakes and two bogs spanning the Cordillera de Mérida in the Venezuelan Andes were used to identify and date the regional history of late Pleistocene and Holocene glacial activity. Coring sites were selected at different elevations across a pronounced rain shadow from southeast (wet) to northwest (dry). Sediment lithostratigraphy and magnetic susceptibility, in conjunction with AMS radiocarbon dates on macrofossils and charcoal, were used to constrain deglaciation. The local expression of the Last Glacial Maximum occurred between 22 750 and 19 960 cal. yr BP. On the wetter southeastern side of the Cordillera de Mérida, glaciers had significantly retreated by 15 700 cal. yr BP, followed by several minor glacial advances and retreats between 14 850 and 13 830 cal. yr BP. At least one major glacial readvance occurred between 13 830 and 10 000 cal. yrBP in the wetter southeastern sector of the region. The drier northwest side of the Cordillera de Mérida records initial glacial retreat by 14240cal.yrBP. Multiple sites on both sides of the Mérida Andes record a further phase of extensive deglaciation approximately 10000cal.yrBP. However, the north-northwest facing Mucubají catchment remained partially glaciated until ca. 6000cal.yrBP. Deglacial ages from the Venezuelan Andes are consistently younger than those reported from the Southern Hemisphere Andes, suggesting an inter-hemispheric deglacial lag in the northern tropics of the order of two thousand years.

  16. Desarrollo del programa de Doctorado en Ingeniería en la Universidad de los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available La Memoria, que la Revista de Ingeniería presenta en este número, recuenta el proceso de constitución del programa de doctorado en la Facultad de Ingeniería de la Universidad de los Andes, el cual cumple en 2009 una década de formación de profesionales a nivel doctoral.

  17. A plastic rheology phenomenological 201 . model that explains the Andes evolution in northern Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Introcaso, Antonio; Giménez, Mario; Martínez, María Patricia; Ruiz, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    A plastic rheology, partially phenomenological model is presented to explain the isostatically compensated Andean relief formation. This model considers a combination of lithospheric heating with long period relaxation and successive crustal shortenings on a north section of Argentina located at 24°S latitude. The present size of the Andean root –related to the Andes construction– was obtained by inverting regionalized Bouguer anomalies, also consistent with geoi...

  18. Climate Change and Glacial Lake Outburst Floods in the Bolivian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Joensen, Maria Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is causing many tropical glaciers to retreat, creating dangerous glacier lakes with risks of outbursts. Although it is a growing hazard in many countries, glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) have not been studied much in the Bolivian Andes. Through this literature review, the risks of GLOFs has been researched by looking into temperature, precipitation and glacier retreat trends in the Altiplano, Cordillera Real and Cordillera Apolobamba, as well as the vulnerability of mounta...

  19. Ethnic voting in the Andes: how ethnicity and ethnic attitudes shape presidential vote choice

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, S. G. W.

    2016-01-01

    The rise of ethnic politics has been a prominent feature of Latin America’s recent history, particularly in the Andes where much of the population claim some indigenous descent. Prominent politicians use ethnicity to frame important aspects of their political projects and identities, survey data show an emerging ethnic voting gap in several countries, and political protests, debates, and media coverage periodically expose strong ethnic undercurrents. Yet existing scholarship has not examined ...

  20. The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Erica M; Tabima, Javier F; Cooke, David E L; Restrepo, Silvia; Fry, William E; Forbes, Gregory A; Fieland, Valerie J; Cardenas, Martha; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2014-06-17

    Phytophthora infestans is a destructive plant pathogen best known for causing the disease that triggered the Irish potato famine and remains the most costly potato pathogen to manage worldwide. Identification of P. infestan's elusive center of origin is critical to understanding the mechanisms of repeated global emergence of this pathogen. There are two competing theories, placing the origin in either South America or in central Mexico, both of which are centers of diversity of Solanum host plants. To test these competing hypotheses, we conducted detailed phylogeographic and approximate Bayesian computation analyses, which are suitable approaches to unraveling complex demographic histories. Our analyses used microsatellite markers and sequences of four nuclear genes sampled from populations in the Andes, Mexico, and elsewhere. To infer the ancestral state, we included the closest known relatives Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora mirabilis, and Phytophthora ipomoeae, as well as the interspecific hybrid Phytophthora andina. We did not find support for an Andean origin of P. infestans; rather, the sequence data suggest a Mexican origin. Our findings support the hypothesis that populations found in the Andes are descendants of the Mexican populations and reconcile previous findings of ancestral variation in the Andes. Although centers of origin are well documented as centers of evolution and diversity for numerous crop plants, the number of plant pathogens with a known geographic origin are limited. This work has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of hosts and pathogens, as well as the harnessing of plant disease resistance to manage late blight.

  1. Potential of a Neutrino Detector in the ANDES Underground Laboratory for Geophysics and Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, P A N; Nunokawa, H; Funchal, R Zukanovich

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Agua Negra tunnels that will link Argentina and Chile under the Andes, the world longest mountain range, opens the possibility to build the first deep underground labo- ratory in the Southern Hemisphere. This laboratory has the acronym ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) and its overburden could be as large as \\sim 1.7 km of rock, or 4500 mwe, providing an excellent low background environment to study physics of rare events like the ones induced by neutrinos and/or dark matter. In this paper we investigate the physics potential of a few kiloton size liquid scintillator detector, which could be constructed in the ANDES laboratory as one of its possible scientific programs. In particular, we evaluate the impact of such a detector for the studies of geoneutrinos and galactic supernova neutrinos assuming a fiducial volume of 3 kilotons as a reference size. We emphasize the complementary roles of such a detector to the ones in the Northern Hemisphere neutrino facilities through some adv...

  2. Miocene orographic uplift forces rapid hydrological change in the southern central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Sachse, Dirk; Mulch, Andreas; Pingel, Heiko; Tofelde, Stefanie; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-10-01

    Rainfall in the central Andes associated with the South American Monsoon and the South American Low-Level Jet results from orographic effects on atmospheric circulation exerted by the Andean Plateau and the Eastern Cordillera. However, despite its importance for South American climate, no reliable records exist that allow decoding the evolution of thresholds and interactions between Andean topography and atmospheric circulation, especially regarding the onset of humid conditions in the inherently dry southern central Andes. Here, we employ multi-proxy isotope data of lipid biomarkers, pedogenic carbonates and volcanic glass from the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina and present the first long-term evapotranspiration record. We find that regional eco-hydrology and vegetation changes are associated with initiation of moisture transport via the South American Low-Level Jet at 7.6 Ma, and subsequent lateral growth of the orogen at 6.5 Ma. Our results highlight that topographically induced changes in atmospheric circulation patterns, not global climate change, were responsible for late Miocene environmental change in this part of the southern hemisphere. This suggests that mountain building over time fundamentally controlled habitat evolution along the central Andes.

  3. Grenvillian remnants in the Northern Andes: Rodinian and Phanerozoic paleogeographic perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Chew, D.; Valencia, V. A.; Bayona, G.; Mišković, A.; Ibañez-Mejía, M.

    2010-01-01

    Grenvillian crust is encountered in several basement inliers in the northern Andes of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and is also represented as a major detrital or inherited component within Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic sedimentary and magmatic rocks. This review of the tectonic and geochronological record of the Grenvillian belt in the northern Andes suggests that these crustal segments probably formed on an active continental margin in which associated arc and back-arc magmatism evolved from ca. 1.25 to 1.16 Ga, possibly extending to as young as 1.08 Ga. The lithostratigraphic and tectonic history of the Grenvillian belt in the northern Andes differs from that of the Sunsas belt on the southwest Amazonian Craton and from the Grenvillian belt of Eastern Laurentia. It is considered that this belt, along with similar terranes of Grenvillian age in Middle America and Mexico define a separate composite orogen which formed on the northwestern margin of the Amazonian Craton. Microcontinent accretion and interaction with the Sveconorwegian province on Baltica is a feasible tectonic scenario, in line with recent paleogeographic reconstructions of the Rodinian supercontinent. Although Phanerozoic tectonics may have redistributed some of these terranes, they are still viewed as para-autocthonous domains that remained in proximity to the margin of Amazonia. Paleogeographic data derived from Phanerozoic rocks suggest that some of the Colombian Grenvillian fragments were connected to northernmost Peru and Ecuador until the Mesozoic, whereas the Mexican terranes where attached to the Colombian margin until Pangea fragmentation in Late Triassic times.

  4. Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis in an HIV-negative patient from the Peruvian Andes Meningoencefalite causada por Cryptococcus gattii em um paciente HIV-negativo procedente dos Andes Peruanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson L. Gutierrez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an immunocompetent Peruvian patient from the Andes with a one-month history of meningoencephalitis. Cryptococcus gattii was identified from a cerebrospinal fluid culture through assimilation of D-proline and D-tryptophan as the single nitrogen source. Initially, the patient received intravenous antifungal therapy with amphotericin B. The patient was discharged 29 days after hospitalization and continued with oral fluconazole treatment for ten weeks. During this period, the patient showed clinical improvement with slight right-side residual weakness. Through this case report, we confirm the existence of this microorganism as an infectious agent in Peru.Nós reportamos o caso de um paciente peruano immunocompetente proveniente dos Andes com história de um mês com meningoencefalite. Foi identificado o Cryptococcus gattii na cultura de liquido cerebrospinal através da assimilação de D-prolina e D-tryptofano como fonte única de nitrogênio. Inicialmente, o paciente recebeu tratamento antifúngico intravenoso com amfotericina B. O paciente foi liberado 29 dias depois da hospitalização, seguindo tratamento oral durante 10 semanas com fluconazol. Durante este período, o paciente apresentou melhoria clinica e uma leve fraqueza residual direita. Com o reporte do caso, nós confirmamos a existência desse microorganismo como agente infeccioso em nosso país.

  5. Facing unprecedented drying of the Central Andes? Precipitation variability over the period AD 1000-2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukom, Raphael; Rohrer, Mario; Calanca, Pierluigi; Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Acuña, Delia; Christie, Duncan A.; Morales, Mariano S.

    2015-08-01

    Projected future trends in water availability are associated with large uncertainties in many regions of the globe. In mountain areas with complex topography, climate models have often limited capabilities to adequately simulate the precipitation variability on small spatial scales. Also, their validation is hampered by typically very low station density. In the Central Andes of South America, a semi-arid high-mountain region with strong seasonality, zonal wind in the upper troposphere is a good proxy for interannual precipitation variability. Here, we combine instrumental measurements, reanalysis and paleoclimate data, and a 57-member ensemble of CMIP5 model simulations to assess changes in Central Andes precipitation over the period AD 1000-2100. This new database allows us to put future projections of precipitation into a previously missing multi-centennial and pre-industrial context. Our results confirm the relationship between regional summer precipitation and 200 hPa zonal wind in the Central Andes, with stronger Westerly winds leading to decreased precipitation. The period of instrumental coverage (1965-2010) is slightly dryer compared to pre-industrial times as represented by control simulations, simulations from the past Millennium, ice core data from Quelccaya ice cap and a tree-ring based precipitation reconstruction. The model ensemble identifies a clear reduction in precipitation already in the early 21st century: the 10 year running mean model uncertainty range (ensemble 16-84% spread) is continuously above the pre-industrial mean after AD 2023 (AD 2028) until the end of the 21st century in the RCP2.6 (RCP8.5) emission scenario. Average precipitation over AD 2071-2100 is outside the range of natural pre-industrial variability in 47 of the 57 model simulations for both emission scenarios. The ensemble median fraction of dry years (defined by the 5th percentile in pre-industrial conditions) is projected to increase by a factor of 4 until 2071-2100 in

  6. Sr and Nd isotopic and trace element compositions of Quaternary volcanic centers of the Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futa, K.; Stern, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of samples from six Quaternary volcanoes located in the northern and southern extremities of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ, 33-46??S) of the Andes and from four centers in the Austral Volcanic Zone (AVZ, 49-54??S) range for 87Sr 86Sr from 0.70280 to 0.70591 and for 143Nd 144Nd from 0.51314 to 0.51255. The ranges are significantly greater than previously reported from the southern Andes but are different from the isotopic compositions of volcanoes in the central and northern Andes. Basalts and basaltic andesites from three centers just north of the Chile Rise-Trench triple junction have 87Sr 86Sr, 143Nd 144Nd, La Yb, Ba La, and Hf Lu that lie within the relatively restricted ranges of the basic magmas erupted from the volcanic centers as far north as 35??S in the SVZ of the Andes. The trace element and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of these magmas may be explained by source region contamination of subarc asthenosphere, with contaminants derived from subducted pelagic sediments and seawater-altered basalts by dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. In the northern extremity of the SVZ between 33?? and 34??S, basaltic andesites and andesites have higher 87Sr 86Sr, Rb Cs, and Hf Lu, and lower 143Nd 144Nd than basalts and basaltic andesites erupted farther south in the SVZ, which suggests involvement of components derived from the continental crust. In the AVZ, the most primitive sample, high-Mg andesite from the southernmost volcanic center in the Andes (54??S) has Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and K Rb and Ba La similar to MORB. The high La Yb of this sample suggests formation by small degrees of partial melting of subducted MORB with garnet as a residue. Samples from centers farther north in the AVZ show a regionally regular northward increase in SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, Ba La, and 87Sr 86Sr and decrease in MgO, Sr, K Rb, Rb Cs, and 143Nd 144Nd, suggesting increasingly greater degrees of fractional crystallization and associated intra

  7. Developing services for climate impact and adaptation baseline information and methodologies for the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, C.

    2012-04-01

    Impacts of climate change are observed and projected across a range of ecosystems and economic sectors, and mountain regions thereby rank among the hotspots of climate change. The Andes are considered particularly vulnerable to climate change, not only due to fragile ecosystems but also due to the high vulnerability of the population. Natural resources such as water systems play a critical role and are observed and projected to be seriously affected. Adaptation to climate change impacts is therefore crucial to contain the negative effects on the population. Adaptation projects require information on the climate and affected socio-environmental systems. There is, however, generally a lack of methodological guidelines how to generate the necessary scientific information and how to communicate to implementing governmental and non-governmental institutions. This is particularly important in view of the international funds for adaptation such as the Green Climate Fund established and set into process at the UNFCCC Conferences of the Parties in Cancun 2010 and Durban 2011. To facilitate this process international and regional organizations (World Bank and Andean Community) and a consortium of research institutions have joined forces to develop and define comprehensive methodologies for baseline and climate change impact assessments for the Andes, with an application potential to other mountain regions (AndesPlus project). Considered are the climatological baseline of a region, and the assessment of trends based on ground meteorological stations, reanalysis data, and satellite information. A challenge is the scarcity of climate information in the Andes, and the complex climatology of the mountain terrain. A climate data platform has been developed for the southern Peruvian Andes and is a key element for climate data service and exchange. Water resources are among the key livelihood components for the Andean population, and local and national economy, in particular for

  8. Control tectónico de la red de drenaje de los Andes del norte argentino Tectonic control of the drainage in the Andes of northern Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mon

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Los ríos transversales que drenan la vertiente oriental de los Andes del norte argentino muestran bruscos desvíos hacia cursos longitudinales, inmediatamente al oeste de la traza de grandes cabalgamientos o de los bordes de láminas levantadas por fallas ubicadas en el lado opuesto de ellos. Los ríos desviados colectan otros ríos transversales antes de emerger en la dirección opuesta y de atravesar el frente montañoso. El desvío de los ríos se interpreta como la respuesta al levantamiento progresivo y al crecimiento lateral de cinturones fallados o de anticlinales propagados a lo largo de fallas ciegas. La mayor parte de los ríos de la región fueron desviados, pocos de ellos mantuvieron sus cursos a través de las estructuras en desarrollo. La reorganización del drenaje por el desarrollo de una topografía controlada estructuralmente influyó en la ubicación y en la concentración de los desagües de los ríos en el frente montañoso. Este segmento de los Andes, que se extiende a lo largo de más de 600 km, tiene sólo tres desagües representados por los ríos troncales Bermejo, Juramento y Salí-Dulce. El drenaje evolucionó desde el levantamiento de la Puna (12- 15 Ma, después de la regresión marina final. El desvío de los ríos puede haber empezado después del levantamiento de la Cordillera Oriental (10 Ma y prosiguió con el levantamiento de nuevas montañas hacia el este. El levantamiento de las cadenas montañosas avanzó de oeste a este. Los cinturones más orientales del Sistema Subandino y de las Sierras Pampeanas septentrionales se levantaron después de los 3 Ma. El levantamiento rápido de los obstáculos tectónicos puede explicar la tendencia al desvío de los ríos de esta región.Transverse rivers draining the eastern flank of the Andes of north Argentina show abrupt diversions to axial courses immediately west of the trace of big thrusts, or the borders of plates uplifted by faults located along the opposite

  9. Fore-arc structure, plate coupling and isostasy in the Central Andes: Insight from gravity data modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sophia; Mahatsente, Rezene

    2017-02-01

    The central segment of the Peru-Chile subduction zone has not seen a major earthquake of similar scale to the megathrust Iquique event in 1877 (Magnitude ∼8.8). The plate interface between the subducting and overriding plates in the central segment of the subduction zone is highly coupled and is accumulating elastic energy. Here, we assessed the locking mechanism and isostatic state of the Central Andes based on gravity models of the crust and upper mantle structure. The density models are based on satellite gravity data and are constrained by velocity models and earthquake hypocenters. The gravity models indicate a high density batholithic structure in the fore-arc, overlying the subducting Nazca plate. This high density crustal structure is pressing downward into the slab and locking the plate interface. Thus, plate coupling in the Central Andes may result from pressure exerted by high density fore-arc structures and buoyancy force on the subducting Nazca plate. The increased compressive stress closer to the trench, due to the increased contact between the subducting and overriding plates, may increase the intraplate coupling in the Central Andes. To assess the isostatic state of the Central Andes, we determined the residual topography of the region (difference between observed and isostatic topography). There is a residual topography of ∼800 m in the western part of the Central Andes that cannot be explained by the observed crustal thicknesses. The residual topography may be attributed to mantle wedge flow and subduction of the Nazca plate. Thus, part of the observed topography in the western part of the Central Andes may be dynamically supported by mantle wedge flow below the overriding plate.

  10. Setting practical conservation priorities for birds in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Pimm, Stuart L

    2014-10-01

    We aspired to set conservation priorities in ways that lead to direct conservation actions. Very large-scale strategic mapping leads to familiar conservation priorities exemplified by biodiversity hotspots. In contrast, tactical conservation actions unfold on much smaller geographical extents and they need to reflect the habitat loss and fragmentation that have sharply restricted where species now live. Our aspirations for direct, practical actions were demanding. First, we identified the global, strategic conservation priorities and then downscaled to practical local actions within the selected priorities. In doing this, we recognized the limitations of incomplete information. We started such a process in Colombia and used the results presented here to implement reforestation of degraded land to prevent the isolation of a large area of cloud forest. We used existing range maps of 171 bird species to identify priority conservation areas that would conserve the greatest number of species at risk in Colombia. By at risk species, we mean those that are endemic and have small ranges. The Western Andes had the highest concentrations of such species-100 in total-but the lowest densities of national parks. We then adjusted the priorities for this region by refining these species ranges by selecting only areas of suitable elevation and remaining habitat. The estimated ranges of these species shrank by 18-100% after accounting for habitat and suitable elevation. Setting conservation priorities on the basis of currently available range maps excluded priority areas in the Western Andes and, by extension, likely elsewhere and for other taxa. By incorporating detailed maps of remaining natural habitats, we made practical recommendations for conservation actions. One recommendation was to restore forest connections to a patch of cloud forest about to become isolated from the main Andes.

  11. Geografía, café y prosperidad en los andes occidentales de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Barón

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Compuesta por los departamentos de Antioquia, Caldas, Quindío, Risaralda y Valle del Cauca, los Andes Occidentales ha sido por mucho años una de las regiones más prósperas de Colombia. Esta prosperidad se ha traducido en condiciones de vida e infraestructura superiores a las del resto del país. El éxito y bienestar que presentan hoy en día los Andes Occidentales están estrechamente ligados a la concentración de la producción de café, que se dio allí durante gran parte del siglo XX. El arraigo del café en la región no sólo se dio debido a que la geografía ofrecía las condiciones ideales para el cultivo, sino también a las instituciones cafeteras creadas para organizar la industria del café. A pesar de esta prosperidad, el constante descenso del precio internacional del café después del rompimiento del pacto de cuotas de producción en 1989, sumado al estancamiento de la industria manufacturera en algunos departamentos de la región, han afectado las economías departamentales menos diversificadas. Es así como la región de los Andes Occidentales Colombianos presenta las tasas de desempleo más altas del país, tasas que se han visto afectadas aún más con la crisis financiera internacional a través del menor flujo de remesas que los trabajadores oriundos de la región, y residentes en el exterior envían a sus familias.

  12. On Restoring Sedimentary Basins for Post-Depositional Deformation - Paleozoic Basins of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlburg, H.

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction and interpretation of sedimentary basins incorporated into folded and thrusted mountain belts is strongly limited by the style and intensity of shortening. This problem is exacerbated if deformation is polyphasic as is the case for the Paleozoic basins in the central Andes. Some of these have been deformed by folding and thrusting during at least 3 events in the Late Ordovician, the Late Paleozoic and Cenozoic. A realistic reconstruction of the original basin dimensions and geometries from outcrops and maps appears to be almost impossible. We present results of a stepwise reconstruction of the Paleozoic basins of the central Andes by restoring basin areas and fills accounting for crustal shortening. The structurally most prominent feature of the central Andes is the Bolivian Orocline which accomodated shortening in the last 45 Ma on the order of between 300 and 500 km. In a first step basins were restored by accounting for Cenozoic rotation and shortening by deconvolving the basins using an enhanced version of the oroclinal bending model of Ariagada et al. (2008). Results were then restored stepwise for older deformation. Constraints on these subsequent steps are significantly poorer as values of shortening can be derived only from folds and thusts apparent in outcrops. The amount of shortening accomodated on unexposed and therefore unknown thrusts can not be quantified and is a significant source of error very likely leading to an underestimation of the amount of shortening. Accepting these limitations, basin restoration results in an increase in basin area by ≥100%. The volumes of stratigraphically controlled basin fills can now be redistributed over the wider, restored area, translating into smaller rates of accumulation and hence required subsidence. The restored rates conform to those of equivalent modern basin settings and permit a more realistic and actualistic analysis of subsidence drivers and the respective tectonic framework.

  13. Constraints on deformation of the Southern Andes since the Cretaceous from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Hernandez-Moreno, Catalina; Ghiglione, Matias C.; Speranza, Fabio; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-12-01

    The southernmost segment of the Andean Cordillera underwent a complex deformation history characterized by alternation of contractional, extensional, and strike-slip tectonics. Key elements of southern Andean deformation that remain poorly constrained, include the origin of the orogenic bend known as the Patagonian Orocline (here renamed as Patagonian Arc), and the exhumation mechanism of an upper amphibolite facies metamorphic complex currently exposed in Cordillera Darwin. Here, we present results of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) from 22 sites in Upper Cretaceous to upper Eocene sedimentary rocks within the internal structural domain of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). AMS parameters from most sites reveal a weak tectonic overprint of the original magnetic fabric, which was likely acquired upon layer-parallel shortening soon after sedimentation. Magnetic lineation from 17 sites is interpreted to have formed during compressive tectonic phases associated to a continuous N-S contraction. Our data, combined with the existing AMS database from adjacent areas, show that the Early Cretaceous-late Oligocene tectonic phases in the Southern Andes yielded continuous contraction, variable from E-W in the Patagonian Andes to N-S in the Fuegian Andes, which defined a radial strain field. A direct implication is that the exhumation of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex occurred under compressive, rather than extensional or strike-slip tectonics, as alternatively proposed. If we agree with recent works considering the curved Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt as a primary arc (i.e., no relative vertical-axis rotation of the limbs occurs during its formation), then other mechanisms different from oroclinal bending should be invoked to explain the documented radial strain field. We tentatively propose a kinematic model in which reactivation of variably oriented Jurassic faults at the South American continental margin controlled

  14. The Glacier Inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina (31°-35°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri Hidalgo, L.; Zalazar, L.; Castro, M.; Pitte, P.; Masiokas, M. H.; Ruiz, L.; Villalba, R.; Delgado, S.; Gimenez, M.; Gargantini, H.

    2015-12-01

    The National Law for protection of glaciers in Argentina envisages the development of a National Inventory of Glaciers. All glaciers and periglacial landforms which are important as strategic water resource must be properly identified and mapped. Here we present a detailed and complete glacier and rock glacier inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina between 31° and 35°S. This semi-arid region contains some of the highest mountains of South America and concentrates the second most glacierized area in Argentina after the Patagonian Andes. To develop the inventory, we used remotely sensed data and related techniques complemented with field surveys. Clean ice and perennial snowfields were identified applying an automatic extraction method on medium spatial-resolution images. Debris-covered and rock glaciers were manually digitized on higher spatial-resolution images. With minor modifications, the present digital inventory is consistent with GLIMS standards. For each glacier, we derived 38 database fields, adding five specific attributes for rock glaciers, which are not included in the original GLIMS database. In total we identified 8069 glaciers covering an area of 1768 km2. Debris-covered ice and rock glaciers represent 57% of the total inventoried area. In this region, rock glaciers are a common feature in the arid landscape and constitute an important water reserve at regional scale. Many glaciers were characterized by gradual transition from debris-covered glaciers, in the upper part, to rock glaciers, in the lower sector. The remaining 43% includes clean ice glaciers and permanent snowfields. These are mostly mountain and valley-type glaciers with medium-to-small sizes. This detailed inventory constitutes a valuable contribution to the ongoing global efforts (e.g. WGI, RGI and GLIMS) to map the world's glaciers. It is also the base for ongoing glaciological, climatological and hydrological studies in this portion of southern Andes.

  15. Cyanogenic polimorphysm in brackens, Pteridium arachnoideum and P. caudatum, from the northern Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto de J. Oliveros-Bastidas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanogenesis in Pteridium caudatum and P. arachnoideum has been examined. Samples of the Andes of South America furnished from 0 to 4.63 mg of prunasin g-1 of frond dry weight (dw in P. caudatum and from 0 to 103 mg of g-1 dw in P. arachnoideum. In both fern species the continuous distribution of prunasin suggested cyanogenic polymorphism. The frequency of cyanogenic morphs was 84.7% for P. caudatum and 98.6% for P. arachnoideum. Cyanogenic activity was highest in the young crozier and waned rapidly with frond growth. The crozier head was found to yield HCN much more than the stipe.

  16. Detection of 18.6 year nodal induced drought in the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Robert G.

    1983-11-01

    Analysis of tree-ring chronologies from the Patagonian Andes yields evidence for the 18.6 yr lunar nodal term in drought/flood. The mean discrepancy between epochs of drought/flood and the nodal tide since AD 1600 is 0.7 ± 2.2 yr, but the polarity of the signal is apparently bimodal. From nodal epoch 1750.0 through 1898.9 drought and tide were in phase, whereas prior to 1750.0 and subsequent to 1898.9 drought and tide were out of phase. There is evidence also for the solar cycle drought signal in the data.

  17. Spatial distribution of rock glaciers in the semi-arid Andes of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöthe, Jan Henrik; Halla, Christian; Schrott, Lothar; Götz, Joachim; Trombotto, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Active rock glaciers are indicators for permafrost in periglacial environments of high mountain areas. Within the permafrost body and the seasonally frozen active layer, these rock glaciers potentially store large amounts of water. Especially in semiarid mountain belts, such as the central Andes of Argentina, rock glaciers attain several kilometres in length, covering surface areas of >106 m2. Here, rock glaciers even outrange ice glaciers in cumulative area and absolute number, indicating they might constitute a large water reservoir in this semiarid part of the Andes. Despite their potential hydrological importance, our knowledge about the rock glaciers' spatial distribution, subsurface composition and absolute ice content is still very limited. Our study addresses this shortcoming and aims at assessing the hydrological significance of rock glacier permafrost in the semi-arid Andes of Argentina by combining local geophysical investigations with regional remote sensing analysis. Our research focuses on the central Andes between 30°S and 33°S, where we have compiled an inventory that comprises more than 1200 rock glaciers, as well as 154 clear-ice and debris-covered glaciers. Two field sites that bracket this regional study area towards their northern and southern edge have been selected for local geophysical investigations. At these locations, earlier studies detected the presence of rock glacier permafrost by thermal monitoring and geophysical prospection. Preliminary results of the regional spatial distribution indicate that the spatial density of rock glaciers increases towards the south, concomitant with a twofold increase in mean annual precipitation. Rock glacier density peaks in the area of the Aconcagua massif, while precipitation is further increasing towards the south. Simultaneously, the lower altitudinal limit of intact rock glaciers slightly decreases, with the lowest rock glacier toe positions in the northern study area located at ~3800 m a. s. l

  18. Subduction Zone Science - Examples of Seismic Images of the Central Andes and Subducting Nazca Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Portner, D. E.; Bishop, B.; Ryan, J. C.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction has shaped large regions of the Earth and constitute over 55,000 km of convergent plate margin today. The subducting slabs descend from the surface into the lower mantle and impacts earthquake occurrence, surface uplift, arc volcanism and mantle convection as well as many other processes. The subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South America plate is one example and constitutes the largest present day ocean-continent convergent margin system and has built the Andes, one of the largest actively growing mountain ranges on Earth. This active margin is characterized by along-strike variations in arc magmatism, upper crustal shortening, crustal thickness, and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the mantle wedge, and the overriding plate. After 20 years of portable seismic deployments in the Central Andes seismologists have combined data sets and used multiple techniques to generate seismic images spanning ~3000 km of the South American subduction zone to ~800 km depth with unprecedented resolution. For example, using teleseismic P- waves we have imaged the Nazca slab penetrating through the mantle transition zone (MTZ) and into the uppermost lower mantle. Our tomographic images show that there is significant along-strike variation in the morphology of the Nazca slab in the upper mantle, MTZ, and the lower mantle, including possible tears, folding, and internal deformation. Receiver function studies and surface wave tomography have revealed major changes in lithospheric properties in the Andes. Improved seismic images allow us to more completely evaluate tectonic processes in the formation and uplift of the Andes including: (1) overthickened continental crust driven by crustal shortening, (2) changes in slab dip and coupling with the overlying plate (3) localized lithospheric foundering, and (4) large-scale mantle and crustal melting leading to magmatic addition and/or crustal flow. Although

  19. Space geodetic observations of nazca-south america convergence across the central andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norabuena; Leffler-Griffin; Mao; Dixon; Stein; Sacks; Ocola; Ellis

    1998-01-16

    Space geodetic data recorded rates and directions of motion across the convergent boundary zone between the oceanic Nazca and continental South American plates in Peru and Bolivia. Roughly half of the overall convergence, about 30 to 40 millimeters per year, accumulated on the locked plate interface and can be released in future earthquakes. About 10 to 15 millimeters per year of crustal shortening occurred inland at the sub-Andean foreland fold and thrust belt, indicating that the Andes are continuing to build. Little (5 to 10 millimeters per year) along-trench motion of coastal forearc slivers was observed, despite the oblique convergence.

  20. Essential Oil Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Hyptis colombiana from the Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Mayalin; Rojas, Luis; Aparicio, Rosa; Lucena, María Eugenia; Usubillaga, Alfredo

    2015-10-01

    Hyptis colombiana is an aromatic shrub native to the Colombian and Venezuelan Andes. Aerial parts were collected in Mérida State at about 3100 m above sea level in February 2005, and May and October 2006. The essential oil was found to contain germacrene D and β-caryophyllene as main constituents (about 50%). The February 2005 and October 2006 oils were found to have antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, but not the May 2006 oil, probably due to the lack of some minor constituent.

  1. Wind effects on snow cover in Pascua-Lama, Dry Andes of Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Gascoin, Simon; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Kinnard, Christophe; Borstel, Kirsten; Glen E. Liston

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We present the first application of a distributed snow model (SnowModel) in the instrumented site of Pascua-Lama in the Dry Andes (2600-5630 m above sea level, 29°S). A model experiment was performed to assess the effect of wind on the snow cover patterns. A particular objective was to evaluate the role of blowing snow on the glacier formation. The model was run using the data from 11 weather stations over a complete snow season. First, a cross-validation of the meteor...

  2. Tectonic imprint in magnetic fabrics in sediments from the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Chauvin, A.; Carlotto, V.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic fabrics recorded by continental sediments from the Central Andes were systematically measured for about 200 sites also studied for tectonic rotation. Most sediments of Cenozoic age are fine-grained red beds with a significant content of magnetite of volcanoclastic origine. 80 sites were collected in the Puna and Argentinan Andes, 40 sites in the Bolivian Altiplano, 63 sites in the Abancay- Cusco region of Southern Peru and 27 sites in the Moquegua basin in the forearc of southern Peru. In the Moquegua basin where the sedimentary beds are nearly horizontal, samples from the Eocene - Oligocene Moquegua formation have an oblate magnetic fabrics parallel to bedding and scaterred lineations. In contast, to the east within the Altiplano and Puna Plateaus, a triaxial ellipsoid with a well-defined magnetic lineation is usually recorded. At most localities, the orientation of the magnetic lineation correlates with the orientation of fold axes. Along the Central Andes from north to south, the orientation of magnetic lineations rotates from NW-SE to NE-SW. Compaction and tectonic strain appear to be the two main factors controlling AMS in these continental red beds. The information related to the hydrodynamic conditions acting when the sediments were deposited appears to be fully overprinted. Incipient tectonic strain is recorded during the early stages of deformation. When the sediments are not strongly deformed, the magnetic lineation behaves apparently like a passive marker recording tectonic rotations about vertical and horizontal axes. In most paleomagnetic studies applied to tectonics, tilted sedimentary beds are assumed to have been rotated around an horizontal axis. Without a detailed local structural study, the classic tilt correction leads to an apparent rotation when a possible plunge of the fold axis is not detected (MacDonald, 1980). Non-horizontal magnetic lineation suggests either non-cylindrical folding and/or interference of two phases of compressive

  3. Investigations on vertical crustal movements in the Venezuelan Andes by gravimetric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, H.

    1978-01-01

    A precise gravimetric network has been installed in the Venezuelan Andes to study eventual gravity changes due to vertical tectonic movements. The design and the measurements of the network are described and the accuracy is estimated. In the center of the region a local gravity network has been reobserved three times. The detected variations are discussed. In order to obtain a genuine statement as far as possible about the significance of observed gravity changes, requirements for the procedure of monitoring precise gravity networks are pointed out.

  4. Prediction of extreme floods in the Central Andes by means of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Barbosa, Henrique; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Based on a non-linear synchronisation measure and complex network theory, we present a novel framework for the prediction of extreme events of spatially embedded, interrelated time series. This method is general in the sense that it can be applied to any type of spatially sampled time series with significant interrelations, ranging from climate observables to biological or stock market data. In this presentation, we apply our method to extreme rainfall in South America and show how this leads to the prediction of more than 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of Bolivia and northern Argentina, with only 1% false alarms. From paleoclimatic to decadal time scales, the Central Andes continue to be subject to pronounced changes in climatic conditions. In particular, our and past work shows that frequency as well as magnitudes of extreme rainfall events have increased significantly during past decades, calling for a better understanding of the involved climatic mechanisms. Due to their large spatial extend and occurrence at high elevations, these extreme events often lead to severe floods and landslides with disastrous socioeconomic impacts. They regularly affect tens of thousands of people and produce estimated costs of the order of several hundred million USD. Alongside with the societal value of predicting natural hazards, our study provides insights into the responsible climatic features and suggests interactions between Rossby waves in polar regions and large scale (sub-)tropical moisture transport as a driver of subseasonal variability of the South American monsoon system. Predictable extreme events result from the propagation of extreme rainfall from the region of Buenos Aires towards the Central Andes given characteristic atmospheric conditions. Our results indicate that the role of frontal systems originating from Rossby waves in polar latitudes is much more dominant for controlling extreme rainfall in

  5. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    OpenAIRE

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, Frédérique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 M(w) = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 M(w) = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 M(w) = 8.0 Pisco and the M(w) = 7....

  6. Challenges to managing ecosystems sustainably for poverty alleviation: Securing well-being in the Andes/Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    ESPA-AA (Ecosystem Services and Poverty Alleviation Program)

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on the Amazon basin and the eastern Andean slopes (herein referred to as the Andes/Amazon ecosystem or region). The Amazon is the largest fresh water system and tropical forest in the world. Large portions of the region are still covered by relatively intact primary forests that provide substantial locally and globally valuable ecosystem services (ES). Rural population densities in the region are among the lowest in the world. As such, the Andes/Amazon is a contrast to oth...

  7. Distribución del género gallinago brisson 1760 (aves: scolopacidae) en los andes orientales de colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Arango, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    El género Gallinago Brisson 1760 se compone de 6 especies y 9 subespecies en el Neotrópico; de ellas cinco especies y cuatro subespecies están presentes en los Andes Orientales de Colombia y áreas adyacentes (BLAKE 1977), La especie ausente corresponde a Gallinago andina Tackzonowski 1875, especie típica del altiplano de los Andes Centrales. El génera comprende las aves con mayor especialización del pico para la captura de anélidos y otros invertebrados cavadores del suelo. Ocupa todos los pi...

  8. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika is a virus that is spread mostly by mosquitoes. A pregnant mother can pass it to ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, ...

  9. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in ...

  10. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  11. Permafrost distribution map of San Juan Dry Andes (Argentina) based on rock glacier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper Angillieri, María Yanina

    2017-01-01

    Rock glaciers are frozen water reservoirs in mountainous areas. Water resources are important for the local populations and economies. The presence of rock glaciers is commonly used as a direct indicator of mountain permafrost conditions. Over 500 active rock glaciers have been identified, showing that elevations between 3500 and 4500 m asl., a south-facing or east-facing aspect, areas with relatively low solar radiation and low mean annual air temperature (-4 to 0 °C) favour the existence of rock glaciers in this region. The permafrost probability model, for Dry Andes of San Juan Province between latitudes 28º30‧S and 32°30‧S, have been analyzed by logistic regression models based on the active rock glaciers occurrence in relation to some topoclimatic variables such as altitude, aspect, mean annual temperature, mean annual precipitation and solar radiation, using optical remote sensing techniques in a GIS environment. The predictive performances of the model have been estimated by known rock glaciers locations and by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). This regional permafrost map can be applied by the Argentinean Government for their recent initiatives which include creating inventories, monitoring and studying ice masses along the Argentinean Andes. Further, this generated map provides valuable input data for permafrost scenarios and contributes to a better understanding of our geosystem.

  12. Glacier change and glacial lake outburst flood risk in the Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Simon J.; Kougkoulos, Ioannis; Edwards, Laura A.; Dortch, Jason; Hoffmann, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Glaciers of the Bolivian Andes represent an important water resource for Andean cities and mountain communities, yet relatively little work has assessed changes in their extent over recent decades. In many mountain regions, glacier recession has been accompanied by the development of proglacial lakes, which can pose a glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) hazard. However, no studies have assessed the development of such lakes in Bolivia despite recent GLOF incidents here. Our mapping from satellite imagery reveals an overall areal shrinkage of 228.1 ± 22.8 km2 (43.1 %) across the Bolivian Cordillera Oriental between 1986 and 2014. Shrinkage was greatest in the Tres Cruces region (47.3 %), followed by the Cordillera Apolobamba (43.1 %) and Cordillera Real (41.9 %). A growing number of proglacial lakes have developed as glaciers have receded, in accordance with trends in most other deglaciating mountain ranges, although the number of ice-contact lakes has decreased. The reasons for this are unclear, but the pattern of lake change has varied significantly throughout the study period, suggesting that monitoring of future lake development is required as ice continues to recede. Ultimately, we use our 2014 database of proglacial lakes to assess GLOF risk across the Bolivian Andes. We identify 25 lakes that pose a potential GLOF threat to downstream communities and infrastructure. We suggest that further studies of potential GLOF impacts are urgently required.

  13. Orographic precipitation gradient over the west slope of the Andes at 30 degrees south

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaff, M. L.; Rutllant, J. A.; Rondanelli, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    The Elqui valley around 30°S in Chile is located within a semi-arid region in which the mean annual precipitation (80-180 mm) accumulates in austral winter in connection with mid-latitude weather disturbances: fronts and cut-off lows. Given the steep topography of the Andes in this region (0 - 5000 m in ~ 200 km) the flow and precipitation are strongly influenced by the Andes. Typically, the precipitation increases with elevation due to the forced ascent over the topography in a well-mixed atmosphere. However, it has been observed that some particular storms produce an inverse orographic precipitation gradient (OPG). An eventual increase in the frequency of this type of storms would lead to decreased water availability during the warm, rainless season and consequently to the damming capacity of the watershed. Therefore, clarifying the mechanism that produce either positive or negative OPGs within individual storms may shed light on the issue of expected climate variability. In this work we characterize OPGs according to the Froude number and associated intensity and location of the barrier jet when orographic blocking occurs. The flow blocking and stability parameters will be estimated using CFSR Reanalysis winds and temperatures along the slope from surface weather stations. These results are contrasted with studies over the Sierra Nevada that show a negative correlation between the height of the barrier jet and OPGs, and also a positive correlation between Froude number and a OPG.

  14. Thermal physiology, disease, and amphibian declines on the eastern slopes of the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catenazzi, Alessandro; Lehr, Edgar; Vredenburg, Vance T

    2014-04-01

    Rising temperatures, a widespread consequence of climate change, have been implicated in enigmatic amphibian declines from habitats with little apparent human impact. The pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), now widespread in Neotropical mountains, may act in synergy with climate change causing collapse in thermally stressed hosts. We measured the thermal tolerance of frogs along a wide elevational gradient in the Tropical Andes, where frog populations have collapsed. We used the difference between critical thermal maximum and the temperature a frog experiences in nature as a measure of tolerance to high temperatures. Temperature tolerance increased as elevation increased, suggesting that frogs at higher elevations may be less sensitive to rising temperatures. We tested the alternative pathogen optimal growth hypothesis that prevalence of the pathogen should decrease as temperatures fall outside the optimal range of pathogen growth. Our infection-prevalence data supported the pathogen optimal growth hypothesis because we found that prevalence of Bd increased when host temperatures matched its optimal growth range. These findings suggest that rising temperatures may not be the driver of amphibian declines in the eastern slopes of the Andes. Zoonotic outbreaks of Bd are the most parsimonious hypothesis to explain the collapse of montane amphibian faunas; but our results also reveal that lowland tropical amphibians, despite being shielded from Bd by higher temperatures, are vulnerable to climate-warming stress.

  15. Un nuevo Eleutherodactylus (Anura, Leptodactylidae de la Cordillera de Mérida, Andes de Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacón-Ortiz, A.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A new frog of the genus Eleutherodactylus is described from the Cordillera de Mérida, Venezuelan Andes. The species is distinguished from others by its moderate size, first finger equal or shorter than second, basal webbing on toes, and dominant colour immaculate brown or with a few spots. The species is compared with the groups unistrigatus and conspicillatus, but not assigned to either of them. A distribution map and a sonogram (of the song are presented. Comments about current knowledge of frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus in Venezuela are provided.Se describe una nueva rana del género Eleutherodactylus de la Cordillera de Mérida, Andes de Venezuela. La especie se distingue del resto de congéneres por su tamaño moderado, primer dedo de la mano igual o más corto que el segundo, palmeadura pedal basal, y color dominante marrón uniforme o con pocas manchas. Se compara la especie con los grupos unistrigatus y conspicillatus, pero no se asigna a ninguno de ellos. Se presenta un mapa de distribución y un sonograma del canto. Se comenta brevemente sobre el conocimiento actual de las ranas del género Eleutherodactylus en Venezuela.

  16. A new species of Andean poison frog, Andinobates (Anura: Dendrobatidae), from the northwestern Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amézquita, Adolfo; Márquez, Roberto; Medina, Ricardo; Mejía-Vargas, Daniel; Kahn, Ted R; Suárez, Gustavo; Mazariegos, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The poison frogs of the Colombian Andes, Pacific lowlands and Panama have been recently recognized as a new, monophyletic and well-supported genus: Andinobates. The species richness and distribution within Andinobates remain poorly understood due to the paucity of geographic, genetic and phenotypic data. Here we use a combination of molecular, bioacoustic and morphometric evidence to describe a new species of Andean poison frog: Andinobates cassidyhornae sp. nov. from the high elevation cloud forests of the Colombian Cordillera Occidental, in the northwestern Andes. The new species is associated to the bombetes group and characterized by a unique combination of ventral and dorsal color patterns. Data on 1119 bp from two mitochondrial markers allowed us to reject the null hypotheses that A. cassidyhornae sp. nov. is part of the phenotypically similar and geographically less distant species: A. opisthomelas, A. virolinensis or A. bombetes. The best available phylogenetic trees and the genetic distance to other Andinobates species further support this decision. Altogether, the advertisement call parameters unambiguously separated A. cassidyhornae sp. nov. calls from the calls of the three closest species. The new species adds to a poorly known and highly endangered genus of poison frogs that requires further studies and urgent conservation measures.

  17. Bird conservation would complement landslide prevention in the Central Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Pimm, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Conservation and restoration priorities often focus on separate ecosystem problems. Inspired by the November 11th (2011) landslide event near Manizales, and the current poor results of Colombia's Article 111 of Law 99 of 1993 as a conservation measure in this country, we set out to prioritize conservation and restoration areas where landslide prevention would complement bird conservation in the Central Andes. This area is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, but also one of the most threatened. Using the case of the Rio Blanco Reserve, near Manizales, we identified areas for conservation where endemic and small-range bird diversity was high, and where landslide risk was also high. We further prioritized restoration areas by overlapping these conservation priorities with a forest cover map. Restoring forests in bare areas of high landslide risk and important bird diversity yields benefits for both biodiversity and people. We developed a simple landslide susceptibility model using slope, forest cover, aspect, and stream proximity. Using publicly available bird range maps, refined by elevation, we mapped concentrations of endemic and small-range bird species. We identified 1.54 km(2) of potential restoration areas in the Rio Blanco Reserve, and 886 km(2) in the Central Andes region. By prioritizing these areas, we facilitate the application of Article 111 which requires local and regional governments to invest in land purchases for the conservation of watersheds.

  18. Two new species of Leptanilloides Mann, 1823 (Formicidae: Dorylinae from the Andes of southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut Delsinne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Leptanilloides are described: L. copalinga Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., and L. prometea Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., based on workers collected in the leaf litter and soil of the Andes of southern Ecuador. Both species belong to the L. biconstricta species-group (formally diagnosed here. The metatibial gland, considered a synapomorphy for Dorylinae, is observed in L. prometea sp. nov. but seems absent in L. copalinga sp. nov. We provide a COI DNA barcode for both species and a revised key for the worker caste of all known species in the genus. We also describe a single male identified as a potential new Leptanilloides species on the basis of morphology. Furthermore, its mitochondrial COI gene sequence does not match any previously barcoded species. However, we refrain from giving it a specific name because of our lack of knowledge about the worker caste. So far, half of the 14 Leptanilloides species have been discovered above 1500 m in the mountain forests or páramos of the Ecuadorian Andes, confirming, if needed, the biological significance of these threatened habitats.

  19. Temperature and Rainfall Variability in the Northern Andes Over the Past Two Millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, T. M.; Bixler, C. W.; Mora, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies of tropical glaciers have shown that most are retreating rapidly, with some of the most dramatic changes occurring since the mid-1970s, most likely as a result of increasing global temperatures. However, a longer-term perspective is needed to place these changes in the context of natural climate variability. To better understand the climatological factors driving long-term variations in the mass balance of tropical glaciers, we reconstructed changes in precipitation and temperature in the northern tropical Andes using variations in the hydrogen isotope composition of sedimentary leaf waxes and branched GDGT distributions in a high-resolution varved sediment record from Lago Chingaza, Colombia. Br-GDGT derived temperatures are significantly correlated with instrumental temperature data and indicate that recent warming in the northern tropical Andes is unprecedented over the past two millennia. Furthermore, the magnitude of warming since the Little Ice Age is substantially larger than suggested by high latitude temperature reconstructions. Hydrogen isotope data indicated that colder conditions during the Little Ice Age were accompanied by a decrease in rainfall, likely associated with a southward shift in the position of the ITCZ. Over the past few centuries, warmer temperatures were accompanied by an increase in rainfall and a northward expansion of the tropical rainbelt. Together, these data suggest that the dominant control on the retreat of Andean glaciers has been the unprecedented rate and magnitude of recent warming.

  20. Remote Sensing of Snow as a Tool to Forecast Water Shortage in the Argentinian Dry Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbart, Nicolas; Dunesme, Samuel; Lavie, Emilie; Madelin, Malika

    2016-08-01

    In the Argentinian Dry Andes the annual snow melt is the main source of superficial water and aquifer recharge, essential for the population of the oases. Interannual variability in the snow cover in the Andes mountains causes variability in the water volumes available. In this study we analyze the errors of a water discharge forecast method based on the MODIS MOD10A2 snow cover product, with regards to the mass anomalies estimated by GRACE satellite at the scale of four watersheds.Because the high-water period (September-April) discharge is directly related to the snow extent at the beginning of the snowmelt period, i.e. in September and October, we use MOD10A2 images to forecast the average high water season discharge. Despite an average uncertainty of 15%, uncertainty peaks to about 50% in several years. Comparison with mass anomalies retrieved GRACE satellite data suggests that overestimation of our forecast method comes from snowbed thickness interannual variations.

  1. Hydrological Modeling of Highly Glacierized Basins (Andes, Alps, and Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Omani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT was used to simulate five glacierized river basins that are global in coverage and vary in climate. The river basins included the Narayani (Nepal, Vakhsh (Central Asia, Rhone (Switzerland, Mendoza (Central Andes, Argentina, and Central Dry Andes (Chile, with a total area of 85,000 km2. A modified SWAT snow algorithm was applied in order to consider spatial variation of associated snowmelt/accumulation by elevation band across each subbasin. In previous studies, melt rates varied as a function of elevation because of an air temperature gradient while the snow parameters were constant throughout the entire basin. A major improvement of the new snow algorithm is the separation of the glaciers from seasonal snow based on their characteristics. Two SWAT snow algorithms were evaluated in simulation of monthly runoff from the glaciered watersheds: (1 the snow parameters are lumped (constant throughout the entire basin and (2 the snow parameters are spatially variable based on elevation bands of a subbasin (modified snow algorithm. Applying the distributed SWAT snow algorithm improved the model performance in simulation of monthly runoff with snow-glacial regime, so that mean RSR decreased to 0.49 from 0.55 and NSE increased to 0.75 from 0.69. Improvement of model performance was negligible in simulations of monthly runoff from the basins with a monsoon runoff regime.

  2. Albedo changes, Milankovitch forcing, and late quaternary climate changes in the central Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kull, C.; Grosjean, M. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography

    1998-11-01

    Late quaternary humidity changes resulted in substantial modifications of the land surface characteristics in the Altiplano of the Atacama desert, central Andes. Reconstructions of surface albedo, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo, and shortwave net radiation in the Andes of northern Chile for 20,14,10,7 and 0 ka suggest that surface and TOA albedo increased substantially during periods of relatively humid environmental conditions (i.e., with large palaeolakes, glaciers and dense vegetation). The decrease of summer shortwave net radiation and seasonality during the late-glacial/early Holocene humid phase (14 to 10 ka) due to Earth`s surface and atmospheric characteristics added to the effect of orbitally driven negative deviations of southern Hemisphere austral summer insolation and minimum seasonality at 20 S. Therefore, in situ radiative forcing is, in contrast to the Northern Hemisphere tropics, not a suitable explanation for enhanced convective precipitation and, ultimately, humid climatic conditions. Our results suggest that late Quaternary humidity changes on the Altiplano reflect a collective response to (1) environmental changes in the source area of the moisture (e.g., reexpansion of the rain forest and increased release of latent heat over Amazonia and the Chaco, warm sea surface temperatures in the E Pacific) and, (2) large-scale circulation patterns and wave structures in the upper troposphere (strength and position of the Bolivian high, divergent flow stimulating convection over the Altiplano), or that they even reflect a response to (3) interhemispherical teleconnections. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 45 refs.

  3. Bird conservation would complement landslide prevention in the Central Andes of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Conservation and restoration priorities often focus on separate ecosystem problems. Inspired by the November 11th (2011 landslide event near Manizales, and the current poor results of Colombia’s Article 111 of Law 99 of 1993 as a conservation measure in this country, we set out to prioritize conservation and restoration areas where landslide prevention would complement bird conservation in the Central Andes. This area is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, but also one of the most threatened. Using the case of the Rio Blanco Reserve, near Manizales, we identified areas for conservation where endemic and small-range bird diversity was high, and where landslide risk was also high. We further prioritized restoration areas by overlapping these conservation priorities with a forest cover map. Restoring forests in bare areas of high landslide risk and important bird diversity yields benefits for both biodiversity and people. We developed a simple landslide susceptibility model using slope, forest cover, aspect, and stream proximity. Using publicly available bird range maps, refined by elevation, we mapped concentrations of endemic and small-range bird species. We identified 1.54 km2 of potential restoration areas in the Rio Blanco Reserve, and 886 km2 in the Central Andes region. By prioritizing these areas, we facilitate the application of Article 111 which requires local and regional governments to invest in land purchases for the conservation of watersheds.

  4. A new species of Eretris Thieme (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) from the Elbow of the Andes region in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrcz, Tomasz W; Gareca, Yuvinka

    2009-01-01

    A new species of cloud forest butterfly, Eretris julieta n. sp. is described from a region of south-central Bolivia known as the Elbow of the Andes. It is the southernmost known representative of the genus, hitherto known only from a restricted area of interandean valleys in the department of Santa Cruz. Its affinities with other congeners are evaluated.

  5. Late Pleistocene glaciations of the arid subtropical Andes and new results from the Chajnantor Plateau, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dylan J.; Cesta, Jason M.; Galewsky, Joseph; Sagredo, Esteban

    2015-11-01

    The spatiotemporal pattern of glaciation along the Andes Mountains is an important proxy record reflecting the varying influence of global and regional circulation features on South American climate. However, the timing and extent of glaciation in key parts of the orogen, particularly the deglaciated arid Andes, are poorly constrained. We present new cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl exposure ages for glacial features on and near the Chajnantor Plateau (23 °S). The new dates, although scattered due to cosmogenic inheritance, imply that the most recent extensive glacial occupation ended before or during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We discuss this new record in the context of published glacial chronologies from glacial features in Peru, Bolivia, and northern Chile rescaled using the latest cosmogenic 10Be production rate calibration for the tropical Andes. The results imply regionally synchronous moraine stabilization ca. 25-40 ka, 15-17 ka, and 12-14 ka, with the youngest of these moraines absent in records south of ˜20 °S, including in our new Chajnantor area chronology. This spatial pattern implicates easterly moisture in generating sufficient snowfall to glaciate the driest parts of the Andes, while allowing a role for westerly moisture, possibly modulated by the migration of the Southern Westerly Wind belt, in the regions near and south of the Atacama Desert.

  6. Kas Arnold Rüütel valetas süümevannet andes? / Anneli Ammas, Garel Püüa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ammas, Anneli, 1962-

    2006-01-01

    Autorite hinnangul tekib 31. augustil Eesti Ekspressis ilmunud artikli põhjal, milles käsitleti Johannes Hindi represseerimist, küsimus, kas Arnold Rüütel on valetanud Eesti Vabariigile korduvalt süümevannet andes. TÜ professori Kalle Meruski seisukoht. Lisa: Rüütel käskis kontrolli tugevdada

  7. Uplift and volcanism of the SE Colombian Andes in relation to Neogene sedimentation in the Upper Magdalena Valley.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van der A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study deals with the relation between Neogene uplift and volcanism of the SE Colombian Andes and sedimentation processes in the Upper Magdalena Valley. The southernmost part of the Upper Magdalena Valley, the S. Neiva Basin, is located between latitudes 2°08'-2°31 N and longitudes 75°22'

  8. Ensayos metodologicos para la investigacion de reservorios de Leishmania spp en los Andes venezolanos Methodological assay for research of reservoirs of Leishmania spp. in the Venezuelan Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lugo Yarbuh

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen dos técnicas, presuntiva y confirmativa, para la investigación de mamíferos que pudieran ser reservorios de Leishmania que parasitan al hombre. Se investigan los cambios en los títulos de inmovilización y aglutinación de promastigotos de cultivo por los sueros de animales normales y expuestos una o varias veces a la inoculación intradérmica de pequeñas dosis de promastigotos vivos. Se registra una caída de los títulos de aglutinación en los sueros de hamsteres, de Holochilus venezuelae y de Didelphis marsupialis después de la inoculación con L. mexicana mexicana de Panamá y de L. gamhami de la región de los Andes venezolanos. Se discute la natureza de estos fenómenos. Se han hecho xenodiagnósticos con Lutzomyia townsendi en Holochilus venezuelae y Sigmodon hispidus infectados experimentalmente com L. mexicana mexicana, L. mexicana amazonensis, L. braziliensis y L. garnhami. Las pruebas fueron leidas mediante el examen microscópico de las gotitas de heces excretadas entre las 108 y 132 horas después de la ingesta infectante, tras colorearlas con Giemsa. Se obtuvieron resultados positivos en 23% de los experimentos usando mamíferos con lesiones localizadas, dejando a los flebótomos ingurgitarse libremente sobre animales anestesiados que poseian una hasta varias lesiones localizadas.Presumptive and confirmative techniques for searching mammals which could be reservoirs for Leishmania parasites from man are described. The changes of immobilising and agglutinating titers for promastigotes from culture by sera from normal and exposed mammals after single or repeated intradermal inoculation of promastigotes are described. A fall in titers of agglunation is observed in sera from hamsters, Holochilus venezuelae and Didelphis marsupialis after inoculation with L. mexicana mexicana from Panama and L. garnhami from the Venezuelan Andes region. The nature of this phenomenon is discussed. Xenodiagnoses were made with

  9. Crustal Thickness in Northern Andes Using pP and sS Precursors at Teleseismic Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda Camacho, N. M.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Andean belt is a result of the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continental plate. It has an extension of 8000 km from Venezuela to Tierra del Fuego. While the crustal-thickness is a well-known property in Southern and Central Andes, it is still poorly known in the Northern Andes (between 10°N and 4° S). The crustal thickness is a very important property to understand the crustal evolution such as in geodynamic models and in modeling wave-propagation in global and regional seismic studies. Due to the high seismic activity at intermediate depths in the Northern Andes, it is possible to use the teleseismic P-wave and S-wave trains to find the crustal-thickness. In this study, we analyze the reflections from the underside of the Moho for intermediate and deep earthquakes in the northern Andes recorded at teleseismic distances (between 40°- 85°), and estimate the crustal-thickness at the bounce points of the pP and sS wave by converting the delay time between the phases pP and pmP and also between sS and smS into crustal thickness. This method can be applied in zones with earthquakes having magnitude larger than 6 for that reason the Northern Andes is a favorable area to develop it. We analyzed five events from the Northern Andes with magnitude larger than 6 and deeper than 100 km. The crustal thickness was calculated using the P wave with the vertical component and the S wave using both transverse SH and radial SV components. We find that the crustal-thickness in this area varied from 27.9 × 2.4 km at (76.48 W, 4.82 N) to 55.7 × 5.2 km at (77.92 W, 2 S). Our results show a crustal-thickness consistent with a compilation made for a larger region that includes our research area, showing residuals between -4 km and 4 km in most of the bounce points . We are getting results in areas that have not been studied previously so it will help to increase the database of crustal-thicknesses for the Northern Andes.

  10. Sr and Nd isotopic and trace element compositions of Quaternary volcanic centers of the southern Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futa, Kiyoto; Stern, C.R.

    1988-05-01

    Isotopic compositions of samples from six Quaternary volcanoes located in the northern and southern extremities of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ, 33-46/sup 0/S) of the Andes and from four centers in the Austral Volcanic Zone (AVZ, 49-54/sup 0/S) range for /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr from 0.70280 to 0.70591 and for /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd from 0.51314 to 0.51255. Basalts and basaltic andesites from three centers just north of the Chile Rise-Trench triple junction have /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr, /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd, La/Yb, Ba/La and Hf/Lu that lie within the relatively restricted ranges of the basic magmas erupted from the volcanic centers as far north as 35/sup 0/S in the SVZ of the Andes. The trace element and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of these magmas may be explained by source region contamination of subarc asthenosphere, with contaminants derived from subducted pelagic sediments and seawater-altered basalts by dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. In the northern extremity of the SVZ between 33/sup 0/ and 34/sup 0/S, basaltic andesites and andesites have higher /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr, Rb/Cs, and Hf/Lu, and lower /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd than basalts and basaltic andesites erupted farther south in the SVZ, which suggests involvement of components derived from the continental crust. In the AVZ, the most primitive sample, high-Mg andesite from the southernmost volcanic center in the Andes (54/sup 0/S) has Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and K/Rb and Ba/La similar to MORB. The high La/Yb of this sample suggests formation by small degrees of partial melting of subducted MORB with garnet as a residue. Samples from centers farther north in the AVZ show a regionally regular northward increase in SiO/sub 2/, K/sub 2/O, Rb, Ba, Ba/La, and /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr and decrease in MgO, Sr, K/Rb, Rb/Cs, and /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd, suggesting increasingly greater degrees of fractional crystallization and associated intra-crustal contamination. (orig./SHOE).

  11. The Bolivian Orocline and its implications for the origin of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Central Andes includes a complex combination of thrusting, wrenching and block rotation leading progressively to the curvature of the orogenic system of the South American continental margin at 18ºS (Bolivian Orocline). Tectonic deformation in the Bolivian Orocline cannot be realistically restored using information from balanced cross sections alone, as the deformation includes an important component of block rotation, associated to counterclockwise block rotation in southern Peru and clockwise rotation in northern Chile. Recent work shows that block rotations in the forearc are essentially pre-early Miocene, predating the onset of Neogene shortening in the Sub Andean zone. Most rotations in the forearc of northern Chile where acquired through a single tectonic event during the Paleogene-early Miocene which probably coincides with the Eocene orogen-wide Incaic event which affected large regions of the central Andes between ca. 50 and 40 Ma. Results from 2D restoration experiments support the hypothesis of the Paleogene formation of the Bolivian Orocline, as a consequence of differential shortening, concentrated in the Eastern Cordillera of Bolivia, southern Peru and northwestern Argentina. Within the southern central Andes four additional curvatures including striking changes in the pattern of rotations have been discovered. From north to south these are the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament, Vallenar, Maipo and Arauco oroclines. However, an important part of rotation needs to be balanced, in the forearc region, by two major conjugate oblique shear zones (Abancay Deflection and Antofagasta-Calama Lineament). These structural features are probably related to inherited lithospheric discontinuities associated with the accretion of basement terranes which could be responsible for producing and delimitating significant and abrupt changes in the magnitude of the Central Andean Rotation Pattern along the margin. While shortening and crustal

  12. Classification of debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Jason R.; Bellisario, Antonio C.; Ferrando, Francisco A.

    2015-07-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from true glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. Internal ice is preserved by an insulating cover of thick debris, which acts as a storage reservoir to release water during the summer and early fall. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the central Andes; however, the existing legislation only recognizes uncovered or semicovered glaciers as a water resource. Glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being altered or removed by mining operations to extract valuable minerals from the mountains. In addition, agricultural expansion and population growth in this region have placed additional demands on water resources. In a warmer climate, as glaciers recede and seasonal water availability becomes condensed over the course of a snowmelt season, rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers contribute a larger component of base flow to rivers and streams. As a result, identifying and locating these features to implement sustainable regional planning for water resources is important. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on the interpretation of satellite imagery and aerial photographs. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris-covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (class 1) and fully covered (class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. Based on field observations, the amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced

  13. Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, Alexander; Muenchow, Jannes

    2016-04-01

    Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador A. Brenning (1), J. Muenchow (1) (1) Department of Geography, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany Mountain roads are affected by and also affect themselves landslide suceptibility. Especially in developing countries, inadequate drainage systems and mechanical destabilization of hillslopes by undercutting and overloading are known processes through which road construction and maintenance can enhance landslide activity within the immediate surroundings of road infrastructure. In the Andes of southern Ecuador, strong precipitation gradients as well as lithological differences provide an excellent study site in which the relationship between highways and landslide susceptibility and its regional differentiation can be studied. This study uses Generalized Additive Models (GAM) to investigate patterns of landslide susceptibility along two paved interurban highways in the tropical Andes of southern Ecuador. The relationship of landslides to distance from road is modeled while accounting for topographic, climatic and lithological predictors as possible confounders and modifiers, focusing on the odds ratio of landslide occurrence at 25 m versus 200 m distance from the highway. Spatial attention is given to uncertainties in estimated odds ratios of landslide occurrence using spatial block bootstrap techniques. The GAM is able to represent nonlinear additive terms as well as bivariate smooth interaction terms, providing a good tradeoff between model complexity and interpretability. The estimated odds of landslide occurrence were 18-21 times higher near the highway than at 200 m distance, based on different analyses, with lower 95% confidence limits always >13. (Semi-) parametric estimates confirmed this general range of values but suggests slightly higher odds ratios (95% confidence interval: 15.5-25.3). Highway-related effects were observed to

  14. Computer Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Computer viruses are small software programs that are designed to spread from one computerto another and to interfere with computer operation.A virus might delete data on your computer,use your e-mail program to spread itself to othercomputers,or even erase everything on your hard disk.Viruses are most easily spread by attach-ments in e-mail messages or instant messaging messages.That is why it is essential that you never

  15. Geologic evolution of the Cordillera Darwin orogenic core complex, Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. P.

    1981-08-01

    Located in the east-west trending Andes of Tierra del Fuego is a structural culmination exposing deeper crustal levels than in surrounding areas, termed an orogenic core complex because of the localization there of relatively high-grade metamorphism, intense polyphase deformation, and differential uplift. Strongly deformed and regionally metamorphosed pre-Late Jurassic basement rocks mainly of sedimentary origin are unconformably overlain by a cover sequence of Upper Jurassic silicic-intermediate volcanic rocks (Tobifera Formation) and Lower Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks (Yahgan Formation). The D1 and D2 phases produced major and minor fold structures, extension and intersection lineations, and axial planar and transposition foliations in complex patterns similar to those in other collision-type orogens. The Darwin and Beagle suites show affinities with S- and I-type granitic suites respectively.

  16. Molecular method for the detection of Andes hantavirus infection: validation for clinical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Cecilia; Martinez-Valdebenito, Constanza; Rios, Susana; Martinez, Jessica; Vial, Pablo; Ferres, Marcela; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Perez, Ruth; Valdivieso, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome is a severe disease caused by exposure to New World hantaviruses. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of specific initial symptoms. Anti-hantavirus antibodies are usually negative until late in the febrile prodrome or the beginning of cardiopulmonary phase while Andes hantavirus (ANDV) RNA genome can be detected before symptoms onset. We analyzed the effectiveness of RTqPCR as a diagnostic tool detecting ANDV-Sout genome in peripheral blood cells from 78 confirmed hantavirus patients and 166 negative controls. Our results indicate that RTqPCR had a low detection limit (~10 copies), with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 94.9%. This suggests the potential for establishing RT-qPCR as the assay of choice for early diagnosis, promoting early effective care of patients and improve other important aspects of ANDV infection management, such as compliance of biosafety recommendations for health personnel in order to avoid nosocomial transmission. PMID:26508102

  17. Pablo Palacio: Corporal Violence on Impossible Identities in the Zone of the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falconí Travez, Diego Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Palacio was an Ecuadorian writer who, in the 1920’s, built within his narrative a catalog of rare bodies with ambiguous and disturbing sexualities, characterizations that are quite different from ones portrayed in the Andean tradition to which Palacio belongs. Nonetheless one of the most issues striking facts of these characters is that their bodies are disciplined by certain discourses of power in a violent way. This paper explores trough literary theory such abuse and violence on women and homosexual identities in two of his stories. The aim of the paper is to investigate issues such as violence, economy of representation, its relationship with the literary text and vulnerability, as a sine qua non norm of abuse, in certain bodies in the area of the Andes.

  18. Landsat Thematic Mapper observations of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P. W.; Wells, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing with the Landsat Thematic Mapper of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes between 18 and 27 deg S revealed, for the first time, the presence of 28 breached volcanic cones and 11 major volcanic debris avalanche deposits, several of which cover areas in excess of 100 sq km. It is concluded that such avalanche deposits are normal products of the evolution of large composite volcanoes, comparable with lava and pyroclastic flow deposits. A statistical survey of 578 composite volcanoes in the same area indicated that a majority of cones which achieve edifice heights between 2000 and 3000 m may undergo sector collapse. The paper describes morphological criteria for identifying breached composite cones and volcanic debris avalanches using orbital images.

  19. Les tertres artificiels du piémont amazonien des Andes, Équateur1

    OpenAIRE

    Rostain, Stéphen

    2013-01-01

    Sur le piémont oriental des Andes équatoriennes, la vallée de l’Upano court du nord au sud entre deux cordillères. Des dizaines de sites à tertres artificiels de terre sont disposés sur les terrasses bordant la rivière. Plusieurs de ces monticules ont été fouillés par décapage en aire durant deux projets archéologiques, entre 1995 et 2005. Une longue séquence culturelle a ainsi pu être définie entre au moins 500 av. J.-C. et 1200 apr. J.-C. Les tertres furent construits par des communautés de...

  20. The Flying Telescope: How to Reach Remote Areas in the Colombian Andes for Astronomy Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, M. K.; Buelhoff, K.

    2016-12-01

    The project Cielo y Tierra, Spanish for Sky and Earth, was undertaken in order to bring astronomy and ecology to remote villages throughout Colombia using sustainable transport. This transport included three horses and two paragliders. The innovative approach of the expedition helped to keep an extremely low budget whilst making it possible to cross the Colombian Andes from northeast to southwest. This article will show how projects like these can succeed, the need for this kind of project, and the possible impact, with this project reaching more than 1500 people. We hope to encourage others not to be afraid of going into countries like Colombia on a low-budget educational expedition. The success of this project shows that outreach and education projects are possible in these remote areas where little or no governmental or other support reaches.

  1. Demonstration of two pulses of Paleogene deformation in the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D.C.; Sebrier, M.; Megard, F.; McKee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    New radiometric ages of about 25 m.y. on volcanic materials in a marine intercalation within clastic continental strata of the Upper Moquegua Formation near Caraveli, southern Peru, together with an age of 25.3 ?? 0.4 m.y obtained by Tosdal et al. from a locality about 300 km to the ESE, show that the formation contains strata of late Oligocene as well as Miocene age, and demonstrate that the coastal region was at a low elevation during latest Oligocene time. Because the unconformities between the Upper Moquegua Formation and the underlying Lower Moquegua Formation, and between the Lower Moquegua Formation and underlying Paleocene rocks cannot both represent the same tectonic event, two discrete Paleogene events must be present in the Andes of Peru. Although the exact timing of these events is uncertain, the unconformities are likely to be of Paleocene and middle Eocene age or possibly of middle Eocene and Oligocene age. ?? 1985.

  2. Privatizing Water in the Chilean Andes: The Case of Las Vegas de Chiu-Chiu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Prieto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean water model has been described as a textbook example of a free-market water system. This article contributes to the critiques of this model by showing the effect of its implementation in the Atacameño community of Chiu-Chiu, located in the Atacama Desert in the south-central Andes. In this community, the privatization of water rights ignored local water management practices that had produced a high-altitude wetland (known as a vega. This led to the inhabitants’ dispossession of crucial water rights and to wetland degradation. This process belies statements that the Chilean model relies on an unregulated market and instead highlights the state’s role in marginalizing local irrigation practices by reducing the water consumption of the indigenous population while keeping the copper mining industry (the main source of Chilean income and related growing urban populations supplied with water.

  3. Demonstration of two pulses of Paleogene deformation in the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Donald C.; Sébrier, Michel; Megard, François; McKee, Edwin H.

    1985-05-01

    New radiometric ages of about 25 m.y. on volcanic materials in a marine intercalation within clastic continental strata of the Upper Moquegua Formation near Caraveli, southern Peru, together with an age of 25.3 ± 0.4 m.y obtained by Tosdal et al. from a locality about 300 km to the ESE, show that the formation contains strata of late Oligocene as well as Miocene age, and demonstrate that the coastal region was at a low elevation during latest Oligocene time. Because the unconformities between the Upper Moquegua Formation and the underlying Lower Moquegua Formation, and between the Lower Moquegua Formation and underlying Paleocene rocks cannot both represent the same tectonic event, two discrete Paleogene events must be present in the Andes of Peru. Although the exact timing of these events is uncertain, the unconformities are likely to be of Paleocene and middle Eocene age or possibly of middle Eocene and Oligocene age.

  4. Mapping advanced argillic alteration zones with ASTER and Hyperion data in the Andes Mountains of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Yuddy; Goïta, Kalifa; Péloquin, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Hyperion hyperspectral sensor datasets to detect advanced argillic minerals. The spectral signatures of some alteration clay minerals, such as dickite and alunite, have similar absorption features; thus separating them using multispectral satellite images is a complex challenge. However, Hyperion with its fine spectral bands has potential for good separability of features. The Spectral Angle Mapper algorithm was used in this study to map three advanced argillic alteration minerals (alunite, kaolinite, and dickite) in a known alteration zone in the Peruvian Andes. The results from ASTER and Hyperion were analyzed, compared, and validated using a Portable Infrared Mineral Analyzer field spectrometer. The alterations corresponding to kaolinite and alunite were detected with both ASTER and Hyperion (80% to 84% accuracy). However, the dickite mineral was identified only with Hyperion (82% accuracy).

  5. Two new species of Salamanders, Genus Bolitoglossa (Amphibia: Plethodontidae), from the Eastern Colombian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Aldemar A; Wake, David B; Márquez, Roberto; Silva, Karen; Franco, Rosmery; Amézquita, Adolfo

    2013-01-25

    The salamander fauna of Colombia is very poorly known, probably because most research efforts have been devoted to anurans during the last two decades. Here, we describe two new species of the genus Bolitoglossa (Eladinea) from the eastern flank of the Eastern Colombian Andes (Cordillera Oriental), near the border with Venezuela. Bolitoglossa tamaense sp. nov. is distributed between 2000 to 2700 m.a.s.l. and Bolitoglossa leandrae sp. nov. is distributed in the low-lands at about 600 m. The new species are diagnosed by a combination of molecular (16S rRNA sequences), coloration, body size, and morphometric (number of maxillary and vomerine teeth and differences in foot webbing) characters. Both species face threats such as chytridiomycosis infections and habitat fragmentation that have already affected other sala-manders in the country. Thus, intensive field and museum work is needed to better document and perhaps protect the local salamander diversity.

  6. Horizontal subduction zones, convergence velocity and the building of the Andes

    CERN Document Server

    Martinod, Joseph; Roperch, Pierrick; Guillaume, Benjamin; Espurt, Nicolas; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.09.010

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the relationships between Andean shortening, plate velocities at the trench, and slab geometry beneath South America. Although some correlation exists between the convergence velocity and the westward motion of South America on the one hand, and the shortening of the continental plate on the other hand, plate kinematics neither gives a satisfactory explanation to the Andean segmentation in general, nor explains the development of the Bolivian orocline in Paleogene times. We discuss the Cenozoic history of horizontal slab segments below South America, arguing that they result from the subduction of oceanic plateaus whose effect is to switch the buoyancy of the young subducting plate to positive. We argue that the existence of horizontal slab segments, below the Central Andes during Eocene-Oligocene times, and below Peru and North-Central Chile since Pliocene, resulted (1) in the shortening of the continental plate interiors at a large distance from the trench, (2) in stronger interplate coupling and...

  7. Turismo residencial y crisis de la agricultura campesina. Los casos de Vilcabamba y Cotacachi (Andes ecuatorianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Gascón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El turismo residencial genera cambios rápidos en la estructura social y económica local. En zonas rurales, muchas veces estos cambios suelen pasar por la marginación de las actividades económicas primarias tradicionales como la agricultura campesina. A través del estudio del desarrollo del turismo resi- dencial internacional en dos localidades rurales de los Andes ecuatorianos, Vilcabamba (provincia de Loja y Cotacachi (provincia de Imbabura, el presente artículo analiza los mecanismos que explican este proceso. Concretamente, el texto muestra como el turismo residencial pone en riesgo los mecanismos de reproducción campesina y favorece la descampesinización del territorio.

  8. Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Christopher James; Maldonado Goyzueta, Carla Brenda; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg;

    2016-01-01

    variation respectively. Surprisingly, altitude does not influence community formation, and there is limited evidence that climate (precipitation and temperature) play a role. Our results suggest that sampling should be performed over a wide geographical and environmental range in order to capture the full......Bolivia is one of the most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Between the Andes and the Amazon drainage basin spans the Yungas, a vast forested region shown to be extremely species rich in macro-organisms. However, it remains unclear whether this high diversity is also reflected...... in microbial diversity. Here we assess the genetic, taxonomic and functional diversity of root-associated fungi surrounding Cinchona calisaya calisaya trees, a typical element of the intermediate altitudes of the Bolivian Yungas. We determine the relative effects of edaphic properties, climate, and geography...

  9. Diversity of the genus Polylepis (Rosaceae, Sanguisorbeae in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Mendoza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study provides information on the diversity of Peruvian species of Polylepis. Nineteen (19 species are reported here (more than 70% of the 27 species registered for the whole Andean region. As a result, Peru could be considered as the country with the largest diversity of Polylepis species, in comparison with Bolivia (13, Ecuador (7, Argentina (4, Colombia (3, Chile (2, and Venezuela (1. The species occur in 19 departments of Peru, with the majority of them in Cusco (10 and Ayacucho (8. Species diversity is mostly concentrated in the Peruvian southern Andes (15 species, with the region becoming the potential center of diversification of the genus Polylepis. Regarding their altitudinal distribution, the greatest diversity (18 is found between 3000 and 4000 m.

  10. Tecnología apropiada: Sus inicios en la Universidad de los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista de Ingeniería

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available El origen de la tecnología apropiada en la Universidad de los Andes debe entenderse no sólo a partir de las inquietudes de algunos profesores de la Facultad de Ingeniería, sino que debe leerse en sintonía con una serie de eventos de índole nacional e internacional que permitieron su desarrollo. En los años 70, Estados Unidos sufrió una crisis energética, ante la cual se debió buscar alternativas que pudieran suplir la necesidad de energía y la dificultad de remplazar el petróleo. Se generó, entonces, un movimiento cuyo objetivo era desarrollar energías renovables basadas en recursos naturales.

  11. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Strain partitioning is a common process at obliquely convergent plate margins dividing oblique convergence into margin-normal slip on the plate-bounding fault and horizontal shearing on a strike-slip system parallel to the subduction margin. In subduction zones, strain partitioning in the upper continental plate is mainly controlled by the shear forces acting on the plate interface and the strength of the continental crust. The plate interface forces are influenced by the subducting plate dip angle and the obliquity angle between the normal to the plate margin and the convergence velocity vector, and the crustal strength of the continent is strongly affected by the presence or absence of a volcanic arc, with the presence of the volcanic arcs being common at steep subduction zones. Along the ˜7000 km western margin of South America the convergence obliquity, subduction dip angles and presence of a volcanic arc all vary, but strain partitioning is only observed along parts of it. This raises the questions, to what extent do subduction zone characteristics control strain partitioning in the overriding continental plate, and which factors have the largest influence? We address these questions using lithospheric-scale 3D numerical geodynamic experiments to investigate the influence of subduction dip angle, convergence obliquity, and weaknesses in the crust owing to the volcanic arc on strain partitioning behavior. We base the model design on the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (5° N - 2° S), characterized by steep subduction (˜ 35°), a convergence obliquity between 31° -45° and extensive arc volcanism, and where strain partitioning is observed. The numerical modelling software (DOUAR) solves the Stokes flow and heat transfer equations for a viscous-plastic creeping flow to calculate velocity fields, thermal evolution, rock uplift and strain rates in a 1600 km x 1600 km box with depth 160 km. Subduction geometry and material properties are based on a

  12. Contenidos de uranio de lavas recientes en el sector sur de los Andes centrales

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    Guerra, N.

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the distribution of U in modern lava -flows of the southern part from the Central Andes (16°-28° S. For a given SiO2, content of the rocks, U abundance increases from west to east in a transects to the Andean Belt, while the depth of the subduction zone increases and the thickness of the continental curst decreases. Besides, U content tends to inerease steadly with the latitude, while the thick of the continental crust and the depth of the seismic zone decreases southward. Thus, on the basis of the available data, we are in a position to suggest that the U behavior in the studied lavas depends on the alkalanity and magmatic history of each volcanic center.

    Se presenta un estudio de distribución de U en lavas modernas del sector sur de los Andes centrales (16°-28° S. Para rocas de contenidos similares en SiO2 la abundancia de U crece de oeste a este en un perfil transversal al cordón andino, mientras que aumenta la profundidad de subducción, y disminuye la potencia de la corteza continental. Además, mientras la potencia de la corteza continental y la profundidad de la zona sísmica de Benioff disminuyen hacia el sur, U tiende a aumentar con la latitud. Así, y basado en los datos disponibles, estamos en posición de sugerir que el comportamiento de U en las rocas estudiadas, depende de la alcalinidad y de la historia magmática de cada centro volcánico.

  13. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Cuesta, R M; Carmona-Moreno, C; Lizcano, G; New, M; Silman, M; Knoke, T; Malhi, Y; Oliveras, I; Asbjornsen, H; Vuille, M

    2014-06-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in mountainous ecosystems, and there is a global evidence of increased fire activity with elevation. Whilst fire research has become popular in the tropical lowlands, much less is known of the tropical high Andean region (>2000 masl, from Colombia to Bolivia). This study examines fire trends in the high Andes for three ecosystems, the Puna, the Paramo and the Yungas, for the period 1982-2006. We pose three questions: (i) is there an increased fire response with elevation? (ii) does the El Niño- Southern Oscillation control fire activity in this region? (iii) are the observed fire trends human driven (e.g., human practices and their effects on fuel build-up) or climate driven? We did not find evidence of increased fire activity with elevation but, instead, a quasicyclic and synchronous fire response in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, suggesting the influence of high-frequency climate forcing on fire responses on a subcontinental scale, in the high Andes. ENSO variability did not show a significant relation to fire activity for these three countries, partly because ENSO variability did not significantly relate to precipitation extremes, although it strongly did to temperature extremes. Whilst ENSO did not individually lead the observed regional fire trends, our results suggest a climate influence on fire activity, mainly through a sawtooth pattern of precipitation (increased rainfall before fire-peak seasons (t-1) followed by drought spells and unusual low temperatures (t0), which is particularly common where fire is carried by low fuel loads (e.g., grasslands and fine fuel). This climatic sawtooth appeared as the main driver of fire trends, above local human influences and fuel build

  14. Reasons for an outstanding plant diversity in the tropical Andes of Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term field studies in the scope of a multidisciplinary project in southern Ecuador revealed extraordinary high species numbers of many organismic groups. This article discusses reasons for the outstanding vascular plant diversity using a hierarchical scale-oriented top-down approach (Grüninger 2005, from the global scale to the local microscale. The global scale explains general (paleo- ecological factors valid for most parts of the humid tropics, addressing various hypotheses and theories, such as the “greater effective evolutionary time”, constant input of “accidentals”, the “seasonal variability hypothesis”, the “intermediate disturbance hypothesis”, and the impact of soil fertility. The macroscale focuses on the Andes in northwestern South America. The tropical Andes are characterised by many taxa of restricted range which is particularly true for the Amotape-Huancabamba region, i.e. the so called Andean Depression, which is effective as discrete phytogeographic transition as well as barrier zone. Interdigitation of northern and southern flora elements, habitat fragmentation, geological and landscape history, and a high speciation rate due to rapid genetic radiation of some taxa contribute to a high degree of diversification. The mesoscale deals with the special environmental features of the eastern mountain range, the Cordillera Real and surrounding areas in southern Ecuador. Various climatic characteristics, the orographic heterogeneity, the geologic and edaphic conditions as well as human impact are the most prominent factors augmenting plant species diversity. On microscale, prevailing regimes of disturbance and environmental stresses, the orographic basement, as well as the general role on the various mountain chains are considered. Here, micro-habitats e.g. niches for epiphytes, effects of micro-relief patterns, and successions after small-sized disturbance events are screened. Direct effects of human impact are

  15. Exploring pain in the Andes--learning from the Quichua (Inca) people experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incayawar, Mario; Saucier, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    There is a mounting recognition that culture profoundly shapes human pain experience. The 28 million indigenous people of the Andes in South America, mainly the Quichua (Inca) people, share a distinctive culture. However, little is known about their pain experience and suffering. The aim of the present study was to explore how Quichua adults perceive, describe, and cope with the pain. An exploratory qualitative/descriptive study was conducted with a convenience sample of 40 Quichua adults, including 15 women and 25 men, in the Northern Highlands of Ecuador. Data were collected through structured interviews of approximately 3 h, using a Quichua questionnaire called "The Nature of Pain" [Nanay Jahua Tapuicuna]. The interviews covered the notions of causation of pain, vulnerability to pain, responses to pain, aggravating factors, frequent locations of pain, types of pain, duration, characteristics of pain, control of pain, pathways to care, and preventive measures of pain. Basic descriptive analyses were performed. The Quichuas' pain experience is complex and their strategies to cope with it are sophisticated. According to the Quichuas, emotions, life events, co-morbid conditions, and spirits, among others factors play an important role in the origin, diagnosis, and treatment of pain. They strongly embrace biomedicine and physicians as well as Quichua traditional medicine and traditional healers. Family members and neighbors are also valuable sources of health care and pain control. The pathway to pain care that the Quichua people prefer is inclusive and pluralistic. The knowledge of the Quichua ethnographic "emic" details of their belief system and coping strategies to control pain are clinically useful not only for the health professional working in the Andes, some Quichua cultural characteristics related to pain could be useful to the culturally competent health practitioner who is making efforts to provide high-quality medical care in rural and multicultural

  16. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1 There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2 There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3 Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  17. Gene expression in the Andes; relevance to neurology at sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenzeller, Otto; Minko, Tamara; Pozharov, Vitaly; Bonfichi, Maurizio; Malcovati, Luca; Gamboa, Jorge; Bernardi, Luciano

    2003-03-15

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a maladaptation syndrome to chronic hypoxia, occurs in the Andes. Gene expression differences in Andeans could explain adaptation and maladaptation to hypoxia, both of which are relevant to neurology at sea level. Expression of genes responsive to cellular oxygen concentration, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), three splicing variants of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 12 Cerro de Pasco (CP) (altitude 4338 m) natives and 15 CMS patients in CP. Thirteen high altitude natives living in Lima and five Lima natives were sea level controls. A CMS score (CMS-sc) was assigned clinically. Expression was related to the clinical assessment. High expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF-121 was found in CMS (P<0.001). Samples from CP had higher expression than those from Lima (P<0.001). Expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF-121 was related to age (P<0.001); adjusting for age did not abolish the group effect. Higher CMS-sc was related to expression independent of age (P<0.001). VEGF-165 and -189 were expressed only in CMS. Birth altitude had no effect on gene expression. pVHL was not quantifiable.HIF-1alpha and VEGF-121 participate in adaptation to hypoxia. The high levels may explain blood vessel proliferation in Andeans and hold lessons for patients at sea level. VEGF-165 expression suggests that it contributes to preservation of neuronal function in human chronic hypoxia. VHL mutations may mark those destined to develop neural crest tumors which are common in the Andes.

  18. Drivers of atmospheric methane uptake by montane forest soils in the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam P.; Diem, Torsten; Huaraca Quispe, Lidia P.; Cahuana, Adan J.; Reay, Dave S.; Meir, Patrick; Arn Teh, Yit

    2016-07-01

    The soils of tropical montane forests can act as sources or sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4). Understanding this activity is important in regional atmospheric CH4 budgets given that these ecosystems account for substantial portions of the landscape in mountainous areas like the Andes. We investigated the drivers of net CH4 fluxes from premontane, lower and upper montane forests, experiencing a seasonal climate, in south-eastern Peru. Between February 2011 and June 2013, these soils all functioned as net sinks for atmospheric CH4. Mean (standard error) net CH4 fluxes for the dry and wet season were -1.6 (0.1) and -1.1 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the upper montane forest, -1.1 (0.1) and -1.0 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the lower montane forest, and -0.2 (0.1) and -0.1 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the premontane forest. Seasonality in CH4 exchange varied among forest types with increased dry season CH4 uptake only apparent in the upper montane forest. Variation across these forests was best explained by available nitrate and water-filled pore space indicating that nitrate inhibition of oxidation or diffusional constraints imposed by changes in water-filled pore space on methanotrophic communities may represent important controls on soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange. Net CH4 flux was inversely related to elevation; a pattern that differs to that observed in Ecuador, the only other extant study site of soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange in the tropical Andes. This may result from differences in rainfall patterns between the regions, suggesting that attention should be paid to the role of rainfall and soil moisture dynamics in modulating CH4 uptake by the organic-rich soils typical of high-elevation tropical forests.

  19. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  20. High-resolution satellite-gauge merged precipitation climatologies of the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Bastian; Buytaert, Wouter; Zulkafli, Zed; Lavado, Waldo; Willems, Bram; Robles, Luis Alberto; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Juan-Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Satellite precipitation products are becoming increasingly useful to complement rain gauge networks in regions where these are too sparse to capture spatial precipitation patterns, such as in the Tropical Andes. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (TPR) was active for 17 years (1998-2014) and has generated one of the longest single-sensor, high-resolution, and high-accuracy rainfall records. In this study, high-resolution (5 km) gridded mean monthly climatological precipitation is derived from the raw orbital TPR data (TRMM 2A25) and merged with 723 rain gauges using multiple satellite-gauge (S-G) merging approaches. The resulting precipitation products are evaluated by cross validation and catchment water balances (runoff ratios) for 50 catchments across the Tropical Andes. Results show that the TPR captures major synoptic and seasonal precipitation patterns and also accurately defines orographic gradients but underestimates absolute monthly rainfall rates. The S-G merged products presented in this study constitute an improved source of climatological rainfall data, outperforming the gridded TPR product as well as a rain gauge-only product based on ordinary Kriging. Among the S-G merging methods, performance of inverse distance interpolation of satellite-gauge residuals was similar to that of geostatistical methods, which were more sensitive to gauge network density. High uncertainty and low performance of the merged precipitation products predominantly affected regions with low and intermittent precipitation regimes (e.g., Peruvian Pacific coast) and is likely linked to the low TPR sampling frequency. All S-G merged products presented in this study are available in the public domain.

  1. Subduction and collision processes in the Central Andes constrained by converted seismic phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X; Sobolev, S V; Kind, R; Oncken, O; Bock, G; Asch, G; Schurr, B; Graeber, F; Rudloff, A; Hanka, W; Wylegalla, K; Tibi, R; Haberland, C; Rietbrock, A; Giese, P; Wigger, P; Röwer, P; Zandt, G; Beck, S; Wallace, T; Pardo, M; Comte, D

    The Central Andes are the Earth's highest mountain belt formed by ocean-continent collision. Most of this uplift is thought to have occurred in the past 20 Myr, owing mainly to thickening of the continental crust, dominated by tectonic shortening. Here we use P-to-S (compressional-to-shear) converted teleseismic waves observed on several temporary networks in the Central Andes to image the deep structure associated with these tectonic processes. We find that the Moho (the Mohorovicić discontinuity--generally thought to separate crust from mantle) ranges from a depth of 75 km under the Altiplano plateau to 50 km beneath the 4-km-high Puna plateau. This relatively thin crust below such a high-elevation region indicates that thinning of the lithospheric mantle may have contributed to the uplift of the Puna plateau. We have also imaged the subducted crust of the Nazca oceanic plate down to 120 km depth, where it becomes invisible to converted teleseismic waves, probably owing to completion of the gabbro-eclogite transformation; this is direct evidence for the presence of kinetically delayed metamorphic reactions in subducting plates. Most of the intermediate-depth seismicity in the subducting plate stops at 120 km depth as well, suggesting a relation with this transformation. We see an intracrustal low-velocity zone, 10-20 km thick, below the entire Altiplano and Puna plateaux, which we interpret as a zone of continuing metamorphism and partial melting that decouples upper-crustal imbrication from lower-crustal thickening.

  2. Disappearance of the glacier on Mama Cotacachi: ethnoecological research and climate change in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhoades, R.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A first documented case study of a disappearing glacier in the snow capped volcano Cotacahi in Ecuador is presented with the studies belonging to the social sciences in relation to climate change and its impact on the population of the Equatorial Andes. With the use of multiple source methodology, including ethnographic analyzes, visual representations, repetitive photography, critical mapping by the local communities, longitudinal surveys, even archival research, as well as interviews to social actors and utilization of spatial data in a geographical information system (GIS. It is concluded that the documented disappearance of the glacier on the Cotacahi serves as an urgent call for action to the important dearth of social research related to global change from the ethnoecological perspective, with a cultural, local approach.

    Se presenta el primer estudio documentado de la desaparición del glaciar del nevado Cotacachi en el Ecuador, con los estudios que corresponden a las ciencias sociales en relación con el cambio climático y su impacto en la población de los Andes ecuatoriales. Mediante el uso de una metodología que incluye análisis etnográficos, representaciones visuales, fotografía repetitiva, mapeo crítico por parte de las comunidades locales, encuestas longitudinales e incluso investigación de archivos, así como también entrevistas a actores sociales, y utilización de los datos espaciales en un sistema de información geográfica (SIG. Se concluye que la desaparición documentada del glaciar del Cotacachi sirve como una llamada de atención urgente a la importante falta de investigaciones sociales relacionadas con el cambio global desde el punto de vista etnoecológico, con un enfoque cultural local.

  3. Ethnoecology of the tropical Andes avian indicators of landscape change in highland Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmiento, F. O.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Four Andean birds offer clues to rethink the ethnoecology of neotropical cloud forests, challenging the notion of conservation based only in water resources and biodiversity. Using both archaeological and actuoecological evidence, the role of humans in shaping high Andean landscapes' location and maintenance is argued as an important factor for conservation priorities of tropical montane cloud forests, particularly in the equatorial mountains. Avian examples demonstrate intricate linkages of culture and nature in the tropical Andes. Traditional knowledge associated to ornithological clues, helps understanding the dynamics of cultural landscapes, with birds as proxy of synergisms affecting the complexities of both, nature and culture. A paradox of conservation is highlighted with avian indicators. The four selected species were cases where landscape change and biodiversity help in determining ethnoecological insights. Unlike the preservation of absolute nature reserves, landscape stewardship, conservation easements and cultural la^tdscapes are listed as options for inclusion in the repertoire of conservation scenarios for cloud forests survival, which includes sacred places and spiritual domains as intangibles worth protecting in the Tropical Andes.

    [fr] Quatre oiseaux andins nous donnent des raisons pour repenser Vethnoécologie des forêts néotropicales humides, ce qui met en question l'idée de la conservation basée sur les ressources d'eau et la biodiversité seules. En se servant des évidences archéologiques et écologiques actuelles, on soutient que les êtres humains ont un rôle dans la formation des hauts paysages andins. On soutient aussi que l'entretien est un facteur important dans la conservation des forêts tropicales humides en montagne, surtout dans les montagnes équatoriales. Les exemples aviaires démontrent les liens compliqués entre la culture et la nature dans les Andes tropicales. Les connaissances

  4. Computer Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高振桥

    2002-01-01

    If you work with a computer,it is certain that you can not avoid dealing, with at least one computer virus.But how much do you know about it? Well,actually,a computer virus is not a biological' one as causes illnesses to people.It is a kind of computer program

  5. Phytophthora viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohong; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora sp. is a genus in the oomycetes, which are similar to filamentous fungi in morphology and habitat, but phylogenetically more closely related to brown algae and diatoms and fall in the kingdom Stramenopila. In the past few years, several viruses have been characterized in Phytophthora species, including four viruses from Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen, and an endornavirus from an unnamed Phytophthora species from Douglas fir. Studies on Phytophthora viruses have revealed several interesting systems. Phytophthora infestans RNA virus 1 (PiRV-1) and PiRV-2 are likely the first members of two new virus families; studies on PiRV-3 support the establishment of a new virus genus that is not affiliated with established virus families; PiRV-4 is a member of Narnaviridae, most likely in the genus Narnavirus; and Phytophthora endornavirus 1 (PEV1) was the first nonplant endornavirus at the time of reporting. Viral capsids have not been found in any of the above-mentioned viruses. PiRV-1 demonstrated a unique genome organization that requires further examination, and PiRV-2 may have played a role in late blight resurgence in 1980s-1990s.

  6. Evapofacieshalítica en el Salar del Rincón, departamento Los Andes, Salta Halitefacies in the salar del Rincon, Andes Department, Salta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ovejero Toledo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El salar delRincón se encuentra ubicado en el departamento Los Andes, provincia de Salta enel extremo noroeste de la Puna Austral, a una altura media de 3.660 m s.n.m. Eneste trabajo se dan a conocer los resultados de la correlación de sondeos, quepermitieron determinar facies de halita, texturas, estructuras, materialesclásticos intersticiales, mineralogía, composición química de la salmuera y losparámetros hidráulicos del acuífero, determinados a lo largo de una transectaeste-oeste que cubre aproximadamente 30 km². La fase cristalina estácompuesta mayoritariamente de halita, con yeso, mirabilita, thenardita,glauberita, hidroglauberita, eugsterita, calcita y ulexita solo en el sectoroeste de la transecta. Se identificaron las siguientes evapofacies halítica:costra salina, geodas y halita bandeada. Las texturas observadas incluyen:cristales hoppers, pirámides chevron, halita intersticial muddyhalite y halita cloudy. La composición de la salmuera es denaturaleza clorurada sódica con variaciones en profundidad de sulfato y borato.Los cationes son Ca, Mg, Li y K, la relación K/Li es de 20/1. El cálculo dereserva a nivel de recurso mineral, en sectores con distinta porosidad eficaz,dio para Li+ 208,2 kt y para K+ 4231,9 kt (> 30 %; yLi+ 14,9 kt y K+ 302, 9 kt (Salar del Rincón is located at 3,660 m.a.s.l. in the Andes district, Salta province, andnortheast of the Southern Puna. This paper shows the results of theborehole correlation that helped determine the halite facies, textures,structures, interstitial clastic material, mineralogy, chemical composition ofthe brine and the aquifer hydraulic parameters determineted in an E-W transectthat covers approximately 30 km². The crystalline phase is mainlymade up of halite with gypsum, mirabilite, thenardite, glauberite,hydroglauberite, eugsterite, calcite, and ulexite only in the western area oftransect. The following halite evapofacies were identified: saline crust,geodes and banded

  7. Nuclear Data for Safe Operation and Waste Transmutation: ANDES (Accurate Nuclear Data for nuclear Energy Sustainability); Datos nucleares para la operacion segura y la transmutacion de residuos: Andes (Datos Nucleares Precisos para la Sostenibilidad de la Energia Nuclear)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear research within the 7th Framework Program (FP7 and FP7+2) of EURATOM has devoted a significant fraction of its efforts to the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles and reactor concepts, mainly fast reactors, aiming to improve the long term sustainability by reduction of the final wastes, optimal use of natural resources and improvement of safety in the present and future nuclear installations. The new design need more accurate basic nuclear data for isotopes, like minor actinides, potentially playing an important role in the operation, fuel concept, safety or final wastes of those reactors and fuel cycles. Four projects, ANDES, ERINDA, EUFRAT and CHANDA, supported by EURATOM within the FP7 and FP7+2, have put together most of the European Nuclear Data community to respond efficiently and in a coordinated way to those needs. This paper summarizes the objectives, and main achievements of ANDES, the project responsible for most of the measurements and technical achievements that was coordinated by CIEMAT. Indeed, CIEMAT has coordinated the nuclear data R and D projects within EURATOM during the last 7 years (NUDATRA domain of EUROTRANS, and ANDES) and will continue this coordination in the CHANDA project till 2017. (Author)

  8. Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes. The shrub Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae is reported for the first time as a host plant for three Neotropical Polyommatini (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Polyommatinae: Hemiargus ramon (Dognin, 1887, Leptotes trigemmatus (Butler, 1881 and Nabokovia faga (Dognin, 1895, based on two collections performed in the western slopes of the northern Chilean Andes in two consecutive summers. The relative abundance was always above 90% for N. faga while it was always less than 5% for H. ramon and L. trigemmatus. Furthermore, N. faga was not found on inflorescences of other native Fabaceae examined in the study site. This pattern suggests a close relationship between N. faga and D. pennellii var. chilensis, at least at a local scale.

  9. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  10. Distribution of the Neotropical Otter Lontra longicaudis in the Venezuelan Andes: Habitat and Status of its Population

    OpenAIRE

    González I.; Utrera A.

    2001-01-01

    The current distribution and status of Lontra longicaudis annectens on the Southern slope of the Venezuelan Andes was established by carrying out interviews with local people. Following this, 25 rivers were surveyed for direct evidence of the presence of this species. The species was recorded on 23 of these rivers, and a clear decreasing trend in the species' population was detected. Based on these results, the main threats for the species appear to be reduction of their natural habitat and ...

  11. Salar de Atacama basin: A record of compressional tectonics in the central Andes since the mid-Cretaceous

    OpenAIRE

    ARRIAGADA, César; Cobbold, Peter,; Roperch, Pierrick

    2006-01-01

    19 p.; International audience; The Salar de Atacama basin lies in the inner fore arc of northern Chile. Topographically and structurally, it is a first-order feature of the central Andes. The sedimentary fill of the basin constrains the timing and extent of crustal deformation since the mid-Cretaceous. We have studied good exposures along the western edge of the basin and have correlated them with seismic reflection sections and data from an exploration well. Throughout most of its history, t...

  12. Identificación, caracterización y dinámica de las geoformas glaciales y periglaciales en la Cordillera de los Andes a través de sensores remotos

    OpenAIRE

    Falaschi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    El presente trabajo de Tesis Doctoral tuvo el objetivo de estudiar los glaciares y glaciares de escombros en tres regiones montañosas a lo largo de la Cordillera de los Andes Argentina: Monte San Lorenzo (Provincia de Santa Cruz), Volcán Domuyo (Provincia de Neuquén), y Nevados de Cachi (Provincia de Salta). Cada uno de estos sitios presenta características climáticas propias, representativas de tres porciones particulares de los Andes: Andes Patagónicos Meridionales, Andes Centrales Meridion...

  13. Phylogeography in the northern Andes: complex history and cryptic diversity in a cloud forest frog, Pristimantis w-nigrum (Craugastoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieswetter, Charles M; Schneider, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the pattern of genetic and morphological variation and the timing of diversification in a Neotropical direct developing frog, Pristimantis w-nigrum (Craugastoridae) to gain insight into the historical biogeography of the northern Andes. Phylogenetic inference and analyses of genetic differentiation at mitochondrial and nuclear markers reveal eight mitochondrial clades that display concordant and highly structured nuclear genetic variation along both eastern and western slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. These eight phylogroups are deeply divergent and show little evidence of change in effective size over substantial periods of time. Consistent with other phylogenetic studies of vertebrates in the Andes, the timing of genetic divergence among lineages coincides with sequential bouts of Andean orogenesis during the late Miocene and early Pliocene. Morphometric analyses recover little morphological variation among populations in spite of considerable genetic divergence. The deep genetic differentiation among populations of P. w-nigrum suggests that this species harbors unrecognized diversity and may represent a complex of cryptic species. These results illuminate the evolutionary processes that generate diversity in tropical montane biomes and underscore the fact that cryptic diversity may be an important component of Neotropical montane biodiversity.

  14. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y; Venegas, Pablo J; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000-1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543-1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122-1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported.

  15. Air temperature change in the northern and southern tropical Andes linked to North-Atlantic stadials and Greenland interstadials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Dunia H.; Hooghiemstra, Henry

    2016-04-01

    We use eight pollen records reflecting climatic and environmental change from northern and southern sites in the tropical Andes. Our analysis focuses on the signature of millennial-scale climate variability during the last 30,000 years, in particular the Younger Dryas (YD), Heinrich stadials (HS) and Greenland interstadials (GI). We identify rapid responses of the vegetation to millennial-scale climate variability in the tropical Andes. The signature of HS and the YD are generally recorded as downslope migrations of the upper forest line (UFL), and are likely linked to air temperature cooling. The GI1 signal is overall comparable between northern and southern records and indicates upslope UFL migrations and warming in the tropical Andes. Our marker for lake level changes indicates a north to south difference that could be related to moisture availability. The direction of air temperature change recorded by the Andean vegetation is consistent with millennial-scale cryosphere and sea surface temperature records from the American tropics, but suggests a potential difference between the magnitude of temperature change in the ocean and the atmosphere.

  16. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... partners in government, academia, and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries to better understand Zika virus, the disease ... Associated Co-Infections Allergy, Immunology, Transplantation Research Resources Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Resources Preclinical and Clinical Services ...

  17. TRMM- and GPM-based precipitation analysis and modelling in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Bastian; Buytaert, Wouter; Zulkafli, Zed; Onof, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Despite wide-spread applications of satellite-based precipitation products (SPPs) throughout the TRMM-era, the scarcity of ground-based in-situ data (high density gauge networks, rainfall radar) in many hydro-meteorologically important regions, such as tropical mountain environments, has limited our ability to evaluate both SPPs and individual satellite-based sensors as well as accurately model or merge rainfall at high spatial resolutions, particularly with respect to extremes. This has restricted both the understanding of sensor behaviour and performance controls in such regions as well as the accuracy of precipitation estimates and respective hydrological applications ranging from water resources management to early warning systems. Here we report on our recent research into precipitation analysis and modelling using various TRMM and GPM products (2A25, 3B42 and IMERG) in the tropical Andes. In an initial study, 78 high-frequency (10-min) recording gauges in Colombia and Ecuador are used to generate a ground-based validation dataset for evaluation of instantaneous TRMM Precipitation Radar (TPR) overpasses from the 2A25 product. Detection ability, precipitation time-series, empirical distributions and statistical moments are evaluated with respect to regional climatological differences, seasonal behaviour, rainfall types and detection thresholds. Results confirmed previous findings from extra-tropical regions of over-estimation of low rainfall intensities and under-estimation of the highest 10% of rainfall intensities by the TPR. However, in spite of evident regionalised performance differences as a function of local climatological regimes, the TPR provides an accurate estimate of climatological annual and seasonal rainfall means. On this basis, high-resolution (5 km) climatological maps are derived for the entire tropical Andes. The second objective of this work is to improve the local precipitation estimation accuracy and representation of spatial patterns of

  18. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, FréDéRique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-12-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 Mw = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 Mw = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 Mw = 8.0 Pisco and the Mw = 7.7 Tocopilla earthquakes. We find that the data require a highly heterogeneous ISC pattern and that, overall, areas with large seismic slip coincide with areas which remain locked in the interseismic period (with high ISC). Offshore Lima where the ISC is high, a Mw˜8.6-8.8 earthquake occurred in 1746. This area ruptured again in a sequence of four Mw˜8.0 earthquakes in 1940, 1966, 1974 and 2007 but these events released only a small fraction of the elastic strain which has built up since 1746 so that enough elastic strain might be available there to generate a Mw > 8.5 earthquake. The region where the Nazca ridge subducts appears to be mostly creeping aseismically in the interseismic period (low ISC) and seems to act as a permanent barrier as no large earthquake ruptured through it in the last 500 years. In southern Peru, ISC is relatively high and the deficit of moment accumulated since the Mw˜8.8 earthquake of 1868 is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.4 earthquake. Two asperities separated by a subtle aseismic creeping patch are revealed there. This aseismic patch may arrest some rupture as happened during the 2001 Arequipa earthquake, but the larger earthquakes of 1604 and 1868 were able to rupture through it. In northern Chile, ISC is very high and the rupture of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake has released only 4% of the elastic strain that has accumulated since 1877. The deficit of moment which has accumulated there is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.7 earthquake. This study thus

  19. The Basement of the Andes: the Gondwana-Laurentia Connections Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, V. A.

    2009-05-01

    The research performed in the last decade in the basement of the Andes have shown that the Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks have recorded a series of igneous and metamorphic events through time. These episodes can be grouped in discrete orogenic events, which have different paleogeographic distribution and intensity. The first and most important orogenic event is widely distributed along the margin and correspond to the Sunsas-Grenville orogen. Evidence of metamorphism and associated magmatic rocks are found from Colombia to the southernmost Patagonia. This episode produced the amalgamation of Amazonia, Pampia and Patagonia, among other cratonic blocks, to form Rodinia. The Rodinia break-up leaved several cratonic blocks accreted in the Gondwana side, such as Marañón, Arequipa, and Antofalla, although the generalized extension of this period produced crustal attenuation, rifted basins, and limited oceanic realms during late Proterozoic times. The Brasiliano-Pampean orogeny reamalgamated these blocks against the Gondwana margin. A new episode of break-up produced the dispersal of several Gondwanian blocks, separation along some previous sutures, crustal attenuation and magmatism in Late Cambrian times, until the new amalgamation occurred in Middle Late Ordovician times. These processes led to the Famatinian orogeny when metamorphism and arc magmatism was widely spread along the continental margin, as seen in Chibcha, Marañón, Arequipa and Sierras Pampeanas. Besides the re-accretion of some parautochthonous terranes, new exotic blocks were derived from Laurentia, such as the Cuyania terrane, which finally collided against the Andean proto-margin at ~ 460 Ma to form the Argentine Precordillera and surrounding regions. Late accretion in Early to Middle Devonian times of Chilenia and related terranes formed most of the basement of Central Andes. Final collision between Laurentia and Gondwana in the Late Carboniferous - Early Permian times to form the Alleghanides

  20. Control tectónico de la red de drenaje de los Andes del norte argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mon

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Los ríos transversales que drenan la vertiente oriental de los Andes del norte argentino muestran bruscos desvíos hacia cursos longitudinales, inmediatamente al oeste de la traza de grandes cabalgamientos o de los bordes de láminas levantadas por fallas ubicadas en el lado opuesto de ellos. Los ríos desviados colectan otros ríos transversales antes de emerger en la dirección opuesta y de atravesar el frente montañoso. El desvío de los ríos se interpreta como la respuesta al levantamiento progresivo y al crecimiento lateral de cinturones fallados o de anticlinales propagados a lo largo de fallas ciegas. La mayor parte de los ríos de la región fueron desviados, pocos de ellos mantuvieron sus cursos a través de las estructuras en desarrollo. La reorganización del drenaje por el desarrollo de una topografía controlada estructuralmente influyó en la ubicación y en la concentración de los desagües de los ríos en el frente montañoso. Este segmento de los Andes, que se extiende a lo largo de más de 600 km, tiene sólo tres desagües representados por los ríos troncales Bermejo, Juramento y Salí-Dulce. El drenaje evolucionó desde el levantamiento de la Puna (12- 15 Ma, después de la regresión marina final. El desvío de los ríos puede haber empezado después del levantamiento de la Cordillera Oriental (10 Ma y prosiguió con el levantamiento de nuevas montañas hacia el este. El levantamiento de las cadenas montañosas avanzó de oeste a este. Los cinturones más orientales del Sistema Subandino y de las Sierras Pampeanas septentrionales se levantaron después de los 3 Ma. El levantamiento rápido de los obstáculos tectónicos puede explicar la tendencia al desvío de los ríos de esta región.

  1. Future runoff from glacierized catchments in the Central Andes could substantially decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Marlene; Schauwecker, Simone; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Drenkhan, Fabian; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Kaser, Georg; Suarez, Wilson; García Hernández, Javier; Fluixá-Sanmartín, Javier; Ayros, Edwin; Rohrer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    In Peru, about 50% of the energy is produced from hydropower plants. An important amount of this energy is produced with water from glaciated catchments. In these catchments river streamflow is furthermore needed for other socio-economic activities such as agriculture. However, the amount and seasonality of water from glacial melt is expected to undergo strong changes. As glaciers are projected to further decline with continued warming, runoff will become more and more sensitive to possible changes in precipitation patterns. Moreover, as stated by a recent study (Neukom et al., 2015), wet season precipitation sums in the Central Andes could decrease up to 19-33 % by the end of the 21st century compared to present-day conditions. Here, we investigate future runoff availability for selected glacierized catchments in the Peruvian Andes. In a first step, we apply a simplified energy balance and runoff model (ITGG-2.0-R) for current conditions. Thereafter, we model future runoff for different climate scenarios, including the possibility of strongly reduced precipitation. Preliminary findings indicate (i) changes in the seasonal distribution of runoff and (ii) significant reductions of the annual runoff in future for the mentioned scenario with significant precipitation decreases. During early phases of glacier recession, melt leads to increased runoff - respectively compensates for the precipitation reduction in the corresponding scenario - depending on the fraction of catchment glaciation. Glaciers are acting as natural water reservoirs and may buffer the decreasing precipitation in glacierized catchments for a limited period. However, strongly reduced precipitation will have noticeable consequences on runoff, particularly when glacier melt contribution gets smaller and finally is completely missing. This will have consequences on the water availability for hydropower production, agriculture, mining and other water uses. Critical conditions may emerge in particular

  2. Shortening in the Central Andes at the transition to flat slab subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safipour, R.; DeCelles, P. G.; Carrapa, B.; Kapp, P. A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Reiners, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    Shortening in the Central Andes is considered to decrease north and south of the apex of the Bolivian orocline, mainly owing to differences in the pre-existing stratigraphic architecture of the continental margin. Estimates of shortening in the central Andes of northern Argentina remain poorly documented, but are required for assessment of the regional kinematic history of the orogenic system. The problem is acute at the north to south transition from the high elevation Puna plateau to the lower elevation region of the Sierras Pampeanas intra-foreland block uplifts, which corresponds with a transition to a flat segment of the subducting Nazca plate. Although deformation in the Eastern Cordillera appears to have propagated forelandward from west to east, the trend in the Sierras Pampeanas is not clear from existing data. We mapped the structures along a roughly E-W transect at latitude 28°S in the Sierra de Las Planchadas of the northern Sierras Pampeanas to measure finite strain and kinematic indicators, and to develop a regional restorable cross section for measuring total shortening. We also sampled for low-T thermochronology in order to determine the timing of exhumation and inferred thrust propagation. A minimum of 40 km of shortening in the Sierra de Las Planchadas is estimated from our restored cross section. When added to the 20 km shortening documented in ranges to the east by previous studies, this brings the total minimum estimated shortening at this latitude to ~60 km. Apatite fission track ages from the hanging walls of thrusts are ~20 Ma, and apatite helium ages range from 10 Ma west of the range to 2.3 Ma in the Fiambalá basin which borders the range to the east. Cretaceous and Paleogene cooling ages are observed in ranges to the east of the Sierra de Las Planchadas, so the young cooling ages found in this study suggest that exhumation was complex and possibly diachronous at this latitude. To the extent that exhumation occurs simultaneously with

  3. Cosmogenic Dating of Moraines of the Local Last Glacial Maximum in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Seltzer, G. O.; Rodbell, D. T.; Finkel, R. C.; Farber, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    We have used cosmogenic dating (10Be) to identify moraines of the local last glacial maximum along two east-west transects in the tropical Andes: the Junin region of central Peru ( ˜11° S 76° W) and the Cordillera Real of western Bolivia ( ˜16.3° S 68.2° W). The 10Be ages from boulders on moraines in our study areas suggest that the local last glacial maximum occurred ca. 30,000 10Be yr BP (before the inferred peak of Northern Hemisphere glaciation at ca. 21,000 calendar yr BP) and that deglaciation was well underway by 20,000 10Be yr BP. Recessional moraines were deposited between about 20,000 and 15,000 10Be yr BP. Published 14C dates from the Cordillera Real indicate that glaciers were within their present limits by about 11,000 calendar yr BP. Asymmetry in the east-west glacial extent and amount of snowline depression was relatively minor in the Junin region, but was more pronounced in the Cordillera Real. In the Junin region, terminal moraines of the local last glacial maximum lie at ˜4150-4200 m on the east side of the cordillera and at ˜4250-4400 m on the west side. In the Cordillera Real, lateral moraines of the local last glacial maximum lie at ˜4600 m on the southwest side of the cordillera (Milluni Valley), while a late-glacial (ca. 12,000 10Be yr BP) terminal moraine lies at ˜3800 m on the northeast side of the cordillera (Zongo Valley). Snowline depression during the local last glacial maximum in the Andes was ˜200-600 m on both sides of the eastern cordillera in the Junin region and on the southwest (Altiplano) side of the Cordillera Real, but closer to ˜900-1000 m on the northeast side of the Cordillera Real. The asymmetry likely arose from differences in precipitation (which comes mainly from the east) and from variations in shading, amount of supraglacial material, and topography between the deeply incised eastern valleys and the relatively broad, shallow valleys descending to high-altitude plateau surfaces on the west sides.

  4. Lateglacial temperature reconstruction in the Eastern Tropical Andes (Bolivia) inferred from paleoglaciers and paleolakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L.; Blard, P. H.; Lave, J.; Prémaillon, M.; Jomelli, V.; Brunstein, D.; Lupker, M.; Charreau, J.; Mariotti, V.; Condom, T.; Bourles, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent insights shed light on the global mechanisms involved in the abrupt oscillations of the Earth climate for the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) to Holocene period (Zhang et al., 2014; Banderas et al., 2015). Yet the concomitant patterns of regional climate reorganization on continental areas are for now poorly documented. Particularly, few attempts have been made to propose temporal reconstructions of the regional climate variables in the High Tropical Andes, a region under the direct influence of the upper part of the troposphere. We present new glacial chronologies from the Zongo (16.3°S - 68.1°W, Bolivia) and Wara-Wara (17.3°S - 66.1°W, Bolivia) valleys based on Cosmic Ray Exposure dating (CRE) from an exceptional suite of recessive moraines. These new data permitted to refine existing chronologies (Smith et al., 2005 ; Zech et al., 2010): the Zongo valley is characterized by an older local last glacial maximum than the Wara Wara valley. Both sites however exhibit similar glacier behaviours, with a progressive regression between 18 ka and the Holocene. In both sites, glaciers recorded stillstand episodes synchronous with the cold events of the Norther Hemisphere (Henrich 1 event, Younger Dryas). Since the nearby Altiplano basin registered lake level variations over the same period, we were able to apply a joint modelling of glaciers Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) and lake budget. This permits to derive a temporal evolution of temperature and precipitation for both sites. These new reconstructions show for both sites that glaciers of the Eastern Tropical Andes were both influenced by the major climatic events of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. However, precipitation variability is more influenced by the Northern Atlantic events. This observation is in good agreement with the theories suggesting that North Hemisphere cold events are coeval with an important southward deflexion of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) due to the inter

  5. Las ignimbritas del complejo volcánico Coranzuli (Puna Argentina-Andes Centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí, J.

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The Coranzulí is a large Upper Miocene volcanic complex located on a NE-SW and NW-SE regional faults intersection, at 66º 15' W 23º S, in the Northwest of Argentina in Jujuy province. It corresponds to one of four large volcanic complexes which represent the end of Transversal Volcanic Chaines in La Puna Argentina in the Central Andes. The volcanic activity was characterized by at least four separate ignimbrite eruptions which produced four different ignimbrite sheets. These are well welded, very crystal-rich, lithie poor ignimbrites and have a moderate to high pumice content. The total volume of the Coranzuli ignimbrites exeededs 650 Km3. Preliminary data indicate that the eruption oeeurred from a homogeneous magmatic chamber without zoning. The emplacement characteristics of the ignimbrites and the lack of basal or interbedded plinian fall deposits suggest that the eruptions developed quickly to massive proportions.El Coranzuli es uno de los grandes complejos volcánicos que representan el remate final de las Cadenas Volcánicas Transversales de la Puna Argentina, en los Andes Centrales. Se trata de un complejo volcánico del Mioceno superior situado a los 66º 15' W 23º S en el NW de Argentina en la provincia de Jujuy, en la intersección entre dos fallas regionales de dirección NE-SW y NW-SE, respectivamente. La actividad eruptiva se caracterizó por la existencia de, al menos, cuatro erupciones ignimbríticas que produjeron cuatro diferentes mantos ignimbríticos. Se trata de ignimbritas bien soldadas, muy ricas en cristales, pobre en fragmentos líticos y que presentan un contenido en fragmentos pumíticos de moderado a alto. El volumen total que representan estas ignimbritas supera los 650 km3. Los datos preliminares indican que el magma juvenil deriva de una cámara magmática homogénea no zonada. Las características de emplazamiento de estas ignimbritas, así como la falta de depósitos plinianos de caída en la base o

  6. Surface exposure dating of moraines and alluvial fans in the Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; García Morabito, Ezequiel; Haghipour, Negar; Christl, Marcus; Likermann, Jeremías; Tobal, Jonathan; Yamin, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    The role of tectonics versus climate in controlling the evolution of alluvial fans in discussed controversially. The southern Central Andes and their forelands provide a perfect setting to study climate versus tectonic control of alluvial fans. On the one hand, the region is tectonically active and alluvial fan surfaces are offset by faults. The higher summits, on the other hand, are glaciated today, and glacial deposits document past periods of lower temperatures and increased precipitation. We applied 10Be surface exposure dating on 5 fan terraces 4 moraines of the Ansilta range (31.6°S - 69.8°W) using boulders and amalgamated pebbles to explore their chronological relationship. From youngest to oldest, the alluvial fan terraces yield minimum ages of 15 ± 1 ka (T1), 97 ± 9 ka (T2), 141 ± 9 ka (T3), 286 ± 14 ka (T4) and 570 ± 57 ka (T5). Minimum ages derived from moraines are 14 ± 1 ka (M1), 22 ± 2 ka (M2), 157 ± 14 ka (M3) and 351 ± 33 ka (M4), all calculations assuming no erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. The moraines document glacial advances during cold periods at the marine isotope stages (MIS) 2, 6 and 10. The terraces T1, T3 seem to be geomorphologic counterparts during MIS 2 and 6. We suggest that T2, T4 and T5 document aggradation during the cold periods MIS 5d, 8 and 14 in response to glacial advances, although the respective moraines are not preserved. Our results highlight: i) the arid climate in the Southern Central Andes favors the preservation of glacial and alluvial deposits allowing landscape and climate reconstructions back to ~570 ka), ii) alluvial deposits correlate with moraines or fall into cold glacial times, so that climate, and in particular the existence of glaciers, seems to be the main forcing of alluvial fan formation at our study site. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary

  7. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  8. Aridity changes in the temperate-Mediterranean transition of the Andes since ad 1346 reconstructed from tree-rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, Duncan A.; Quesne, Carlos le [Universidad Austral de Chile, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); Boninsegna, Jose A.; Morales, Mariano S.; Villalba, Ricardo [Instituto Argentino de Nivologia, Glaciologia y Ciencias Ambientales, IANIGLA, Departamento de Dendrocronologia e Historia Ambiental, Mendoza (Argentina); Cleaveland, Malcolm K.; Stahle, David W. [University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Tree-Ring Laboratory, Department of Geosciences, Fayetteville, AR (United States); Lara, Antonio [Universidad Austral de Chile, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Austral de Chile, Forest Ecosystem Services under Climatic Fluctuations (Forecos), Valdivia (Chile); Mudelsee, Manfred [Climate Risk Analysis, Hanover (Germany); Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The Andes Cordillera acts as regional ''Water Towers'' for several countries and encompasses a wide range of ecosystems and climates. Several hydroclimatic changes have been described for portions of the Andes during recent years, including glacier retreat, negative precipitation trends, an elevation rise in the 0 isotherm, and changes in regional streamflow regimes. The Temperate-Mediterranean transition (TMT) zone of the Andes (35.5 -39.5 S) is particularly at risk to climate change because it is a biodiversity hotspot with heavy human population pressure on water resources. In this paper we utilize a new tree-ring network of Austrocedrus chilensis to reconstruct past variations in regional moisture in the TMT of the Andes by means of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). The reconstruction covers the past 657 years and captures interannual to decadal scales of variability in late spring-early summer PDSI. These changes are related to the north-south oscillations in moisture conditions between the Mediterranean and Temperate climates of the Andes as a consequence of the latitudinal position of the storm tracks forced by large-scale circulation modes. Kernel estimation of occurrence rates reveals an unprecedented increment of severe and extreme drought events during the last century in the context of the previous six centuries. Moisture conditions in our study region are linked to tropical and high-latitude ocean-atmospheric forcing, with PDSI positively related to Nino-3.4 SST during spring and strongly negatively correlated with the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) during summer. Geopotential anomaly maps at 500-hPa show that extreme dry years are tightly associated with negative height anomalies in the Ross-Amundsen Seas, in concordance with the strong negative relationship between PDSI and AAO. The twentieth century increase in extreme drought events in the TMT may not be related to ENSO but to the positive AAO trend during late-spring and

  9. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  10. New isotopic ages and the timing of orogenic events in the Cordillera Darwin, southernmost Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, F.; Nelson, E.; Kawashita, K.; Suárez, M.

    1981-10-01

    The Cordillera Darwin, a structural culmination in the Andes of Tierra del Fuego, exposes an orogenic core zone that has undergone polyphase deformation and metamorphism. Some of the classic problems of orogenic zones have remained unanswered in the Cordillera Darwin: the age of deformed plutonic rocks, the distinction of structurally reactivated basement and metamorphosed cover rocks, and the timing of orogenic events. This study addresses and partially answers these questions. A well-constrained Rb-Sr isochron age of157±8m.y. and an initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.7087 obtained from a pre-tectonic granitic suite suggest a genetic relation between this suite and Upper Jurassic silicic volcanic rocks in the cover sequence (Tobifera Formation), and also suggest involvement of continental crust in formation of these magmas. A poorly constrained Rb-Sr isochron age of240±40m.y. obtained from supposed basement schists is consistent with field relations in the area which suggest a late Paleozoic/early Mesozoic metamorphism for these pre-Late Jurassic rocks. However, because of scatter in the data and the uncertainties involved in dating metasedimentary rocks, the significance of the isotopic age is dubious. Compilation of previously published ages in the area [9] with new mineral ages reported here indicate that "early Andean" orogenic events occurred between 100 and 84 m.y. ago, and that subduction-related magmatism has contributed, probably discontinuously, to the crustal evolution of the region throughout the Mesozoic.

  11. The Basement of the Central Andes: The Arequipa and Related Terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Victor A.

    2008-05-01

    The basement of the Central Andes provides insights for the dispersal of Rodinia, the reconstruction of Gondwana, and the dynamics of terrane accretion along the Pacific. The Paleoproterozoic Arequipa terrane was trapped during collision between Laurentia and Amazonia in the Mesoproterozoic. Ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism correlates with the collapse of the Sunsás-Grenville orogen after 1000 Ma and is related to slab break-off and dispersal of Rodinia. The Antofalla terrane separated in the Neoproterozoic, forming the Puncoviscana basin. Its closure was coeval with the collision of the eastern Sierras Pampeanas. The rift-drift transitions of the early Paleozoic clastic platform showed a gradual younging to the north, in agreement with counterclockwise rotation based on paleomagnetic data of Antofalla. North of Arequipa arc magmatism and high-grade metamorphism are linked to collision of the Paracas terrane in the Ordovician, during the Famatinian orogeny in the Sierras Pampeanas. The early Paleozoic history of the Arequipa massif is explained by a backarc, which further south changed to open oceanic conditions and subsequent collision. The Antofalla terrane reaccreted to the continental margin by the late Ordovician. These accretions and subsequent separations during the Mesoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic early Cambrian, and late Cambrian middle Ordovician are explained by changes in absolute motion of the Gondwana supercontinent during plate global reorganization.

  12. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200–800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700–50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures. PMID:28139760

  13. Caracterización de semillas de lupino (Lupinus mutabilis sembrado en los Andes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduar Ortega-David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se identificaron las propiedades físicas, composicionales y fisicoquímicas de la semilla de Lupino (Lupinus mutabilis cultivado en Nariño (Andes de Colombia. Su composición se determinó realizando análisis proximales de semilla completa, tegumento y cotiledones. Además se determinó el contenido de minerales y su composición elemental. Se estableció cuantitativamente el contenido de alcaloides presentes y su perfil composicional. Se determinaron propiedades físicas como la forma y el tamaño de la semilla. Se determinaron las propiedades fisicoquímicas como la capacidad de retención de agua y el pH. Las cantidades de nutrientes de la semilla son menores que los valores reportados en la literatura. Se presenta una variación en cuanto al perfil de alcaloides, siendo la esparteína la segunda sustancia de mayor presencia. La hidratación de la semilla conduce a un incremento de 1.72 veces su tamaño original. Se puede sugerir que la proteína posee afinidad hidrofílica evidenciada por la elevada capacidad de retención de agua de la semilla. La identificación de estas propiedades permite reconocer el potencial de la semilla para su futuro aprovechamiento.

  14. Caracterización de semillas de lupino (Lupinus mutabilis sembrado en los Andes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega-David Eduar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se identificaron las propiedades físicas, composicionales y fisicoquímicas de la semilla de Lupino (Lupinus mutabilis cultivado en Nariño (Andes de Colombia. Su composición se determinó realizando análisis proximales de semilla completa, tegumento y cotiledones. Además se determinó el contenido de minerales y su composición elemental. Se estableció cuantitativamente el contenido de alcaloides presentes y su perfil composicional. Se determinaron propiedades físicas como la forma y el tamaño de la semilla. Se determinaron las propiedades fisicoquímicas como la capacidad de retención de agua y el pH. Las cantidades de nutrientes de la semilla son menores que los valores reportados en la literatura. Se presenta una variación en cuanto al perfil de alcaloides, siendo la esparteína la segunda sustancia de mayor presencia. La hidratación de la semilla conduce a un incremento de 1.72 veces su tamaño original. Se puede sugerir que la proteína posee afinidad hidrofílica evidenciada por la elevada capacidad de retención de agua de la semilla. La identificación de estas propiedades permite reconocer el potencial de la semilla para su futuro aprovechamiento.

  15. Gravity Wave and Turbulence Transport of Heat and Na in the Mesopause Region over the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yafang; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    The vertical heat and Na fluxes induced by gravity waves and turbulence are derived based on over 600 hours of observations from the Na wind/temperature lidar located at Andes lidar Observatory (ALO), Cerro Pachón, Chile. In the 85-100 km region, the annual mean vertical fluxes by gravity waves show downward heat transport with a maximum of 0.78K m/s at 90 km, and downward Na transport with a maximum of 210 m/s/cm3 at 94km. The maximum cooing rate reaches -24 K/d at 94km. The vertical fluxes have strong seasonal variations, with large differences in magnitudes and altitudes of maximum fluxes between winter and summer. The vertical fluxes due to turbulence eddies are also derived with a novel method that relates turbulence fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind with photon count fluctuations at very high resolution (25 m, 6 s). The results show that the vertical transports are comparable to those by gravity waves and they both play significant roles in the atmospheric thermal structure and constituent distribution. This direct measure of turbulence transport also enables estimate of the eddy diffusivity for heat and constituent in the mesopause region.

  16. Neotropical Andes hot springs harbor diverse and distinct planktonic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Serrano, Luisa; López, Gina; Bohorquez, Laura C; Bustos, José R; Rubiano, Carolina; Osorio-Forero, César; Junca, Howard; Baena, Sandra; Zambrano, María M

    2014-07-01

    Microbial explorations of hot springs have led to remarkable discoveries and improved our understanding of life under extreme conditions. The Andean Mountains harbor diverse habitats, including an extensive chain of geothermal heated water sources. In this study, we describe and compare the planktonic microbial communities present in five high-mountain hot springs with distinct geochemical characteristics, at varying altitudes and geographical locations in the Colombian Andes. The diversity and structure of the microbial communities were assessed by pyrosequencing the V5 - V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The planktonic communities varied in terms of diversity indexes and were dominated by the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria, Aquificae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, and Thermotogae, with site-specific bacterial taxa also observed in some cases. Statistical analyses showed that these microbial communities were distinct from one another and that they clustered in a manner consistent with physicochemical parameters of the environment sampled. Multivariate analysis suggested that pH and sulfate were among the main variables influencing population structure and diversity. The results show that despite their geographical proximity and some shared geochemical characteristics, there were few shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and that community structure was influenced mainly by environmental factors that have resulted in different microbial populations.

  17. Methodology for Evaluating the Quality of Ecosystem Maps: A Case Study in the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolors Armenteras

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty in thematic maps has been tested mainly in maps with discrete or fuzzy classifications based on spectral data. However, many ecosystem maps in tropical countries consist of discrete polygons containing information on various ecosystem properties such as vegetation cover, soil, climate, geomorphology and biodiversity. The combination of these properties into one class leads to error. We propose a probability-based sampling design with two domains, multiple stages, and stratification with selection of primary sampling units (PSUs proportional to the richness of strata present. Validation is undertaken through field visits and fine resolution remote sensing data. A pilot site in the center of the Colombian Andes was chosen to validate a government official ecosystem map. Twenty primary sampling units (PSUs of 10 × 15 km were selected, and the final numbers of final sampling units (FSUs were 76 for the terrestrial domain and 46 for the aquatic domain. Our results showed a confidence level of 95%, with the accuracy in the terrestrial domain varying between 51.8% and 64.3% and in the aquatic domain varying between 75% and 92%. Governments need to account for uncertainty since they rely on the quality of these maps to make decisions and guide policies.

  18. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200–800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700–50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures.

  19. Les variations glaciaires dans les Andes de Mendoza (Argentine entre 1975 et 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Cossart

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Le suivi des glaciers constitue un enjeu essentiel pour l’organisation des sociétés et le fonctionnement des milieux montagnards. Dans la mesure où les glaciers influencent fortement le régime des cours d’eau, et donc les stratégies d’irrigation, leur disparition peut remettre en cause de nombreux usages liés à l’eau. Or, si nombre de glaciers sont étudiés individuellement, des méthodes permettant d’effectuer des suivis de l’englacement à l’échelle régionale manquent. Nous proposons donc ici une méthode, fondée sur la reconstitution de champs d’altitudes de la Ligne d’Équilibre Glaciaire, aboutissant à la réalisation de cartes diachroniques régionales. Nous synthétisons ainsi les variations glaciaires depuis 30 ans sur l’ensemble d’un secteur de plusieurs milliers de kilomètres carr��s : les Andes de Mendoza (Argentine.

  20. Warm Storms Associated with Avalanches Hazard and Floods in the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, J.

    2003-04-01

    Rain-on-snow events produce avalanches of different magnitude depending on the snowpack properties, air temperatures and rain intensities. Winter storms in this mountain range typically have rain/snow levels between 1000 and 2200 m. above sea level, but warm storms with higher rain/snow of to 3000 m. above sea level. occur in extreme winters and have the potential to generate rain on snow floods and wet-snow avalanches. For example, the flood of June 29 of 2000 occurred after one of extremely wet June of the last 40 years were snowfall was 991cm in the Aconcagua Valley. Infrequently storms activity generated a huge snowfall and rainfall over the Andes mountains on June of 2000 (1525mm in El Maule Valley) and the end of the unusually period, the flood was triggered by rising temperatures on the mountains and heavy rain (199mm in 24 hours) fall over the fresh snow on the morning of June 29 and floods wave developed and moved down along of the all river located on Central part of Chile, the foods peak was 2970.5m3/s on the El Maule basin in the morning of June 29. This paper studies the characteristics of warm storms the had the potential to generate wet-snow avalanches and floods.

  1. Molecular method for the detection of Andes hantavirus infection: validation for clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Cecilia; Martinez-Valdebenito, Constanza; Rios, Susana; Martinez, Jessica; Vial, Pablo A; Ferres, Marcela; Rivera, Juan C; Perez, Ruth; Valdivieso, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome is a severe disease caused by exposure to New World hantaviruses. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of specific initial symptoms. Antihantavirus antibodies are usually negative until late in the febrile prodrome or the beginning of cardiopulmonary phase, while Andes hantavirus (ANDV) RNA genome can be detected before symptoms onset. We analyzed the effectiveness of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as a diagnostic tool detecting ANDV-Sout genome in peripheral blood cells from 78 confirmed hantavirus patients and 166 negative controls. Our results indicate that RT-qPCR had a low detection limit (~10 copies), with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 94.9%. This suggests the potential for establishing RT-qPCR as the assay of choice for early diagnosis, promoting early effective care of patients, and improving other important aspects of ANDV infection management, such as compliance of biosafety recommendations for health personnel in order to avoid nosocomial transmission.

  2. Agriculture at the Edge: Landscape Variability of Soil C Stocks and Fluxes in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Peña, C.

    2015-12-01

    Paramos, or tropical alpine grasslands occurring right above the forest tree-line (2,800 - 4,700 m), are among the most transformed landscapes in the humid tropics. In the Tropical Andes, Paramos form an archipelago-like pattern from Northern Colombia to Central Peru that effectively captures atmospheric moisture originated in the Amazon-Orinoco basins, while marking the highest altitude capable of sustaining vegetation growth (i.e., 'the edge'). This study investigates the role of land management on mediating soil carbon stocks and fluxes in Paramo ecosystems of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. Observations were collected at a Paramo site strongly modified by land use change, including active potato plantations, pasture, tillage, and land abandonment. Results show that undisturbed Paramos soils have high total organic carbon (TOC), high soil water content (SWC), and low soil CO2 efflux (RS) rates. However, Paramo soils that experience human intervention show lower TOC, higher and more variable RS rates, and lower SWC. This study demonstrates that changes in land use in Paramos affect differentially the accumulation and exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere and offers implications for management and protection strategies of what has been deemed the fastest evolving biodiversity ecosystem in the world.

  3. Identidades ambiguas. Movilidad social y conflictos en los Andes, siglo XVII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorandi, Ana María

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo aborda el proceso de complicación de la estructura de la población global en los Andes durante el siglo XVII, provocada por la movilidad social y aumento de la cantidad de niveles jerárquicos en cada uno de los sectores. Se analiza de qué manera importantes segmentos de población buscan crear sus propios espacios dentro de la estructura global y las disputas entre los miembros, las alianzas sectoriales y/o coyunturales provocan distintos tipos de conflictos en un siglo que hasta ahora ha sido considerado como el siglo donde tuvo un relativo éxito el llamado “pacto colonial”. Se señala la existencia de conflictos a causa de la explotación colonial del indígena, pero también aquellos que se suscitan entre agentes del sector español que buscan alianzas muy diversas y que son emergentes de la gran movilidad social.

  4. Calculated WIMP signals at the ANDES laboratory: comparison with northern and southern located dark matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Civitarese, O; Mosquera, M E

    2016-01-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) are possible components of the Universe's Dark Matter. The detection of WIMP is signalled by the recoil of the atomic nuclei which form a detector. CoGeNT at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (SUL) and DAMA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) have reported data on annual modulation of signals attributed to WIMP. Both experiments are located in laboratories of the northern hemisphere. Dark matter detectors are planned to operate (or already operate) in laboratories of the southern hemisphere, like SABRE at Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory (SUPL) in Australia, and DM-ICE in the South Pole. In this work we have analysed the dependence of diurnal and annual modulation of signals, pertaining to the detection of WIMP, on the coordinates of the laboratory, for experiments which may be performed in the planned new underground facility ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experimental Site), to be built in San Juan, Argentina. We made predictions for NaI and Ge-type de...

  5. Nazca - South America Convergence and Motion of the North Andes Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Mora-paez, H.; Mothes, P. A.; Ruiz, G.

    2012-12-01

    The North Andes block (NAB) is a hypothesized tectonic block that moves (escapes) north-northeast relative to a stable South American reference frame. The motion of this block is thought to be derived by the collision of the Carnegie Ridge in southern Ecuador and/or by oblique convergence and high degrees of interplate coupling north of the ridge (i.e., strain partitioning). We investigate the kinematics of NAB motion utilizing a velocity field based on new continuous GPS networks and existing episodic GPS data in Ecuador and Colombia. The new velocity field and published earthquake slip vectors are inverted to solve for the Euler vector of the NAB and interseismic elastic strain accumulation on block-bounding faults using a block modeling approach. At the latitude of Ecuador, the NAB is rigid with transpressional deformation accommodating northeastward motion along its boundary with South America. In central to northern Colombia, the NAB is dissected by several prominent shear zones. We test a suite of block models to investigate the tectonic nature of the NAB and the style of faulting in the upper plate accommodating block motion. Through the estimation of elastic strain accumulation on all block-bounding faults, we improve the understanding of interseismic coupling along a convergent margin capable of producing M>8 earthquakes and upper plate faults capable of generating M>6 earthquakes.

  6. Does external funding help adaptation? Evidence from community-based water management in the Colombian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtinho, Felipe; Eakin, Hallie; López-Carr, David; Hayes, Tanya M

    2013-11-01

    Despite debate regarding whether, and in what form, communities need external support for adaptation to environmental change, few studies have examined how external funding impacts adaptation decisions in rural resource-dependent communities. In this article, we use quantitative and qualitative methods to assess how different funding sources influence the initiative to adapt to water scarcity in the Colombian Andes. We compare efforts to adapt to water scarcity in 111 rural Andean communities with varied dependence on external funding for water management activities. Findings suggest that despite efforts to use their own internal resources, communities often need external support to finance adaptation strategies. However, not all external financial support positively impacts a community's abilities to adapt. Results show the importance of community-driven requests for external support. In cases where external support was unsolicited, the results show a decline, or "crowding-out," in community efforts to adapt. In contrast, in cases where communities initiated the request for external support to fund their own projects, findings show that external intervention is more likely to enhance or "crowds-in" community-driven adaptation.

  7. [Breastfeeding, complimentary feeding practices and childhood malnutrition in the Bolivian Andes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Agudo, Yesmina; Jones, Andrew D; Berti, Peter R; Larrea Macías, Sergio

    2010-03-01

    Northern Potosi is one of the poorest parts of Bolivia with the highest indicators of rural poverty, malnutrition and food insecurity in the Bolivian Andes. The objective of this research was to characterize the levels of malnutrition and describe infant feeding practices in Potosi, Bolivia and use this information to develop an effective, gender sensitive and culturally relevant intervention encouraging good infant feeding practices. Standard methods were used to collect anthropometric data. Weight and height data were collected for 400 children under five years of age from 30 communities. In six of these communities, interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 33 mothers and other families in addition to household observational data that were collected to describe infant feeding practices. Nearly 20% of children were underweight; stunting was widespread as well. 38% of mothers initiated breastfeeding 12 hours or more after birth. 39% of mothers initiated complementary feeding in the first three months following birth. The type of complementary food given to children was usually inadequate. With this research we could see that nutritional deficiencies often begin when the mother starts breastfeeding and when first introduced complementary feeding. Interventions aimed at improving maternal and child nutrition will require changes in parents' behavior, greater recognition and community support of the importance of child feeding, and the inclusion of strategies to reach young people, involve men, and make high quality nutrition promotion more widely available in the communities.

  8. Effects of loadingeunloading and wettingedrying cycles on geomechanical behaviors of mudrocks in the Colombian Andes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Camilo Torres-Suarez; Adolfo Alarcon-Guzman; Rafael Berdugo-De Moya

    2014-01-01

    The mudrocks in the Colombian Andes, particularly those exhibiting low cementation (bonding), are susceptible to degradation when the environmental conditions change, which are challenging issues for engineering works. In this paper, the changes in physico-mechanical properties of mudrocks were moni-tored in laboratory, and some influential factors on the mechanical competence of geomaterials were studied. The geotechnical characteristics and experimental designs were developed from physical, chem-ical, mechanical and compositional points of view. In the tests, the techniques such as vapor equilibrium technique (VET) were employed to apply wettingedrying cycles and to control relative humidity (suction-controlled) and loadingeunloading cycles through ultrasonic wave velocities technique. The results show that the main failure mechanisms for the laminated mudrocks start on the microscopic scale by fissures coalescence, exhibiting physico-chemical degradation as well;the global geomechanical behavior presents a state between a ductile, like rock, and a fragile, like soil. The obtained results can provide engineering values according to monitoring laboratory set, when compared with in situ conditions.

  9. The powers of water-user associations: on multiplicity, fluidity, and durability in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Verzijl

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use insights from institutional bricolage and actor network theory to make sense of an Andean water user association (WUA and its bricoleurs in the Region of Ayacucho, Peru. Rather than being designed and clearly defined, we see natural resource institutions as continuously performed and patched together, through heterogeneous elements and practices, by those that live, experience and enact these institutions every day and by those who make sense of them. We present three cases, three supra-community efforts to secure water livelihoods, in which the Ayacucho water user association is enacted differently. Similar actors and practices like, water law, local customs, water bodies, and ecological services are performed in alternate ways for diverse purposes. It is this range of co-existing performances or enactments and the fluidity of actors and bricoleurs which enables an institution to adapt and adjust. We hold that an Andean WUA can be a bureaucratic imposition, but in many ways the WUA is something else too: a strategic ally; a prerequisite for subsidy consideration, a marketplace for exchanging goods and services and more. In the setting of the contemporary Peruvian Andes, the durability of natural resource institutions can be understood through the fluidity and multiplicity of performances and purposes. This has normative and political implications for researchers and policymakers as to what enactment they consider and target.

  10. Leaf Litterfall and Decomposition of Polylepis reticulata in the Treeline of the Ecuadorian Andes

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    Juan Pinos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaf litterfall contributes significantly to carbon fluxes in forests. A crucial open question for the sustainability of mountain forests is how climate change will affect this and other carbon fluxes (eg photosynthesis and respiration. Leaf litterfall and decomposition of Polylepis reticulata, an endemic species of the Andes, were analyzed during a period of 1 year at 6 experimental plots located in the Andean páramo between 3700 and 3900 m above sea level in Cajas National Park, Ecuador. Litterfall was collected in each plot using 5 randomly distributed traps. Every trap had a 40-cm diameter (0.125 m2 and was suspended 0.8 to 1.0 m above the ground. The decomposition rate of the leaf litter was analyzed using litter bags. Eighteen bags with approximately 20 g of dry litter were placed in the litter layer in each experimental plot and collected 30, 60, 90, 150, 210, 300, and 365 days after they were installed. The mean annual litterfall recorded was 3.77 Mg ha−1, representing 51% of the leaf biomass present in the canopy, so the leaf life span of P. reticulata in Cajas National Park is 1.98 years. Litterfall occurred all year, with no significant seasonal pattern. The mean decomposition rate (k obtained for this study period was 0.38 year−1. This study contributes to the information gap on litterfall and decomposition in natural forests located at the highest elevations in the world.

  11. Glacier area changes in the Rio Olivares catchment, Central Andes 1955-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmros, Jeppe.; Wilson, Ryan; Mernild, Sebastian; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2014-05-01

    Here, we present a new glacier inventory for the Rio Olivares catchment (531 km2), Central Chilean Andes (33°14`44 S, 70°07`26 V). Area changes for 145 glaciers were analyzed for the period 1955 through 2013 based on terrestrial photogrammetry, aerial photography, and satellite imagery. The results show that glacier area not including rock glaciers reduced by ~18 % - from 93.8 (1955) to 75.9 km2 (2013), equivalent to an estimated volume loss of 40 % (2.9 km3) based on volume-area scaling functions. Rock glacier area increased from 10.4 (1955) to 10.7 km2 (2013). Additionally, a detailed area, hypsometry, and elevation time series analysis for the five largest glaciers in the catchment was conducted, showing that terminus positions ascended by an average of 351 ± 8 meters and slope increased 0.7° on average. A comparison between changes in glacier area and variations in the El Niño Southern Oscillation index indicates a significant climatic link.

  12. Thermal remote sensing of ice-debris landforms using ASTER: an example from the Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, A.; Peña, M. A.; Long, S.; Soliman, A.

    2012-03-01

    Remote sensors face challenges in characterizing mountain permafrost and ground thermal conditions or mapping rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers. We explore the potential of thermal imaging and in particular thermal inertia mapping in mountain cryospheric research, focusing on the relationships between ground surface temperatures and the presence of ice-debris landforms on one side and land surface temperature (LST) and apparent thermal inertia (ATI) on the other. In our case study we utilize ASTER daytime and nighttime imagery and in-situ measurements of near-surface ground temperature (NSGT) in the Mediterranean Andes during a snow-free and dry observation period in late summer. Spatial patterns of LST and NSGT were mostly consistent with each other both at daytime and at nighttime. Daytime LST over ice-debris landforms was decreased and ATI consequently increased compared to other debris surfaces under otherwise equal conditions, but NSGT showed contradictory results, which underlines the complexity and possible scale dependence of ATI in heterogeneous substrates with the presence of a thermal mismatch and a heat sink at depth. While our results demonstrate the utility of thermal imaging and ATI mapping in a mountain cryospheric context, further research is needed for a better interpretation of ATI patterns in complex thermophysical conditions.

  13. Reconsidering the glacier to rock glacier transformation problem: New insights from the central Andes of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Sébastien; Kinnard, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    The glacier to rock glacier transformation problem is revisited from a previously unseen angle. A striking case in the Juncal Massif (located in the upper Aconcagua Valley, Chilean central Andes) is documented. There, the Presenteseracae debris-covered glacier has advanced several tens of metres and has developed a rock glacier morphology in its lower part over the last 60 years. The conditions for a theoretically valid glacier to rock glacier transformation are discussed and tested. Permafrost probability in the area of the studied feature is highlighted by regional-scale spatial modelling together with on-site shallow ground temperature records. Two different methods are used to estimate the mean surface temperature during the summer of 2014, and the sub-debris ice ablation rates are calculated as ranging between 0.05 and 0.19 cm d- 1, i.e., 0.04 and 0.17 m over the summer. These low ablation rates are consistent with the development of a coherent surface morphology over the last 60 years. Furthermore, the rates of rock wall retreat required for covering the former glacier at Presenteseracae lie within the common 0.1-2 mm y- 1 range, assuming an average debris thickness and a range of debris-covering time intervals. The integration of the geomorphological observations with the numerical results confirms that the studied debris-covered glacier is evolving into a rock glacier.

  14. De Los ríos profundos a Lituma en los andes: La respuesta de Mario Vargas Llosa a José María Arguedas

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    Marie-Madeleine Gladieu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available La novela de Mario Vargas Llosa Lituma en los Andes1 poco tiene que ver, aparentemente, con el mundo narrativo de José María Arguedas: las nuevas aventuras de un personaje ficticio bien conocido de los lectores, presente en varias obras anteriores de aquel autor, en nada se asemejan a las del niño Ernesto ni a las de otro protagonista arguediano. Los Andes sirven de decorado para los dos relatos, pero entre la naturaleza y los pueblos que se suceden en Los ríos profundos2en toda su diversidad, y los paisajes hoscos y siempre peligrosos por los que cruza Lituma, apenas reconoce el lector aquella parte del sur peruano. Algunos detalles, sin embargo, al examinar bien el texto y el contexto de Lituma en los Andes, llaman la atención.

  15. Reconstruction of cryospheric changes in the Maipo and Juncal river basins, central Andes of Chile: an integrative geomorphological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; García, Juan L.; Gómez, Gabriel; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Salzmann, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Water in the central Andes (32-38° S), a semi-arid mountainous area with elevations over 6000 m asl., is of great importance and a critical resource especially in the dry summer months. Ice bodies, such as glaciers and rock glaciers (permafrost) in the high mountains, provide a substantial part of the fresh-water resources but also for intensive economical use for the lowlands including Santiago metropolitan region, Chile. However the evolution of these ice bodies since the last deglaciation (i.e., Holocene, last ˜12,000 years), and in particular during historical times, and their feedback with climate is fairly unknown. In view of projected climate change, this is striking because it is also unknown whether these natural resources could be used as sustainable fresh-water source in the future. Within the presented project, we develop and apply an integrative geomorphologic approach to study glaciers and their long-term evolution in the central Andes of Chile. Apart from glaciers (with variable debris-coverage), rock glaciers have evolved over time as striking geomorphological landforms in this area. We combine geomorphologic mapping using remote-sensing and in-situ data with an innovative surface exposure dating technique to determine the ages of distinct moraine ridges at three study sites in watersheds of the Santiago region: Juncal Norte, Loma Larga and Nieves Negras glaciers. First results of the project are presented, including a detailed geomorphological mapping and first analysis of the landform dynamics. At all three sites, we distinguished at least three moraine systems of a Holocene putative age. These prominent moraine belts show that glaciers were at least 5 km longer than at present. Deglaciation from these ice marginal positions was gradual and complex in response to the detrital cover on the glaciers. Differences in ice thickness of the main glaciers in the respective valleys amount to about 100 m. Due to the partial, extensive debris coverage, the

  16. Reconstructing glacier mass balances in the Central Andes of Chile and Argentina using local and regional hydro-climatic data

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    M. H. Masiokas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great number and variety of glaciers in southern South America, in situ glacier mass balance records are extremely scarce and glacier–climate relationships are still poorly understood in this region. Here we use the longest (> 35 years and most complete in situ mass balance record, available for glaciar Echaurren Norte in the Andes at ~34° S, to develop a minimal glacier surface mass balance model that relies on nearby monthly precipitation and air temperature data as forcing. This basic model is able to explain 78 % of the variance in the annual glacier mass balance record over the 1978–2013 calibration period. An attribution assessment indicates that precipitation variability constitutes the most important forcing modulating annual glacier mass balances at this site. A regionally-averaged series of mean annual streamflow records from both sides of the Andes is then used to estimate, through simple linear regression, this glacier's annual mass balance variations since 1909. The reconstruction model captures 68 % of the observed glacier mass balance variability and shows three periods of sustained positive mass balances embedded in an overall negative trend totaling almost −42 m w.eq. over the past 105 years. The three periods of sustained positive mass balances (centered in the 1920s–1930s, in the 1980s and in the first decade of the 21st century coincide with several documented glacier advances in this region. Similar trends observed in other shorter glacier mass balance series suggest the glaciar Echaurren Norte reconstruction is representative of larger-scale conditions and could be useful for more detailed glaciological, hydrological and climatological assessments in this portion of the Andes.

  17. Holocene changes in monsoon precipitation in the Andes of NE Peru based on δ18O speleothem records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M. G.; Cruz, F. W.; Vuille, M.; Apaéstegui, J.; Strikis, N.; Panizo, G.; Novello, F. V.; Deininger, M.; Sifeddine, A.; Cheng, H.; Moquet, J. S.; Guyot, J. L.; Santos, R. V.; Segura, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    Two well-dated δ18O-speleothem records from Shatuca cave, situated on the northeastern flank of the Peruvian Andes (1960 m asl) were used to reconstruct high-resolution changes in precipitation during the Holocene in the South American Summer Monsoon region (SASM). The records show that precipitation increased gradually throughout the Holocene in parallel with the austral summer insolation trend modulated by the precession cycle. Additionally the Shatuca speleothem record shows several hydroclimatic changes on both longer- and shorter-term time scales, some of which have not been described in previous paleoclimatic reconstructions from the Andean region. Such climate episodes, marked by negative excursions in the Shatuca δ18O record were logged at 9.7-9.5, 9.2, 8.4, 8.1, 5.0, 4.1, 3.5, 3.0, 2.5, 2.1 and 1.5 ka b2k, and related to abrupt multi-decadal events in the SASM. Some of these events were likely associated with changes in sea surface temperatures (SST) during Bond events in the North Atlantic region. On longer time scales, the low δ18O values reported between 5.1-5.0, 3.5-3.0 and 1.5 ka b2k were contemporaneous with periods of increased sediment influx at Lake Pallcacocha in the Andes of Ecuador, suggesting that the late Holocene intensification of the monsoon recorded at Shatuca site may also have affected high altitudes of the equatorial Andes further north. Numerous episodes of low SASM intensity (dry events) were recorded by the Shatuca record during the Holocene, in particular at 10.2, 9.8, 9.3, 6.5, 5.1, 4.9, 2.5 and 2.3 ka b2k, some of them were synchronous with dry periods in previous Andean records.

  18. High-Resolution ∂18O record of middle-late Holocene hydrologic variability from the central Peruvian Andes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbell, D. T.; Abbott, M.; Bird, B. W.; Stansell, N.

    2009-12-01

    Laguna Yuraicocha in the western cordillera of the central Peruvian Andes (12.53°S; 75.50°W; 4460 masl) is dammed by late glacial moraines and is underlain and surrounded by Jurassic and Cretaceous limestone interbedded with siliciclastic rocks. A 6.9 meter-long sediment core from the distal end of the lake is dominated by authigenic calcite (marl) with a mean concentration of 82 weight percent that has accumulated at a rate of ~ 1 mm yr-1 for the past 6200 years. The age model for the core is based on a combination of 210Pb and AMS 14C ages from charcoal; modern lake water is ~1‰ evaporatively enriched from mean regional precipitation. Marl samples were taken with an average sampling interval of 8 years; samples were treated to remove organic matter, sieved to concentrate the Andes. Subcentennial variance in 18O with an ~2‰ amplitude is persistent throughout the record. Time series analysis reveals strength in the 5-12 year window, which may record the influence of ENSO on the hydrologic balance of the region through its effect on the strength of the South American summer monsoon. Spectral strength is also present in the 40-200 year periodicity and this spectral component appears to weaken in the last millennium. The progressive increase in hydrologic balance during the middle-late Holocene is consistent with glacial geologic evidence for the onset of neoglaciation in the Peruvian Andes, including the dramatic reformation of the Quelccaya Ice Cap ~5100 years ago. This appears to confirm the notion that Andean glaciers, especially those in the southern and western cordillera of Peru and Bolivia, are especially sensitive to changes in regional moisture balance.

  19. Da Amazônia ao Pacífico cruzando os Andes

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    Enrique Amayo Zevallos

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available A Área Amazônica (AA é compartilhada por oito países sul-americanos independentes. Desde os tempos coloniais sentiu-se a necessidade da construção de uma via de união da AA com o Oceano Pacífico. Mas os Andes, em termos técnicos e econômicos, foram barreira insuperável até as últimas décadas do século XIX. Nos últimos anos, para o Brasil - país que tem perto de 60% da AA -, esta via vem se tornando cada vez mais importante em termos de exportação, especialmente para o mercado japonês, de grãos, madeira, polpa de madeira etc., ao mesmo tempo em que o Japão também deseja acesso direto à AA. Brasil e Peru, segundo país da AA, com a maior e mais ocidental costa no Pacífico, têm desenvolvido projetos para a construção de uma estrada, contando para isso com apoio financeiro oferecido pelo Japão em diversas oportunidades. Tais projetos tentam conciliar não apenas os interesses de Brasil e Peru, mas também os da Bolívia, país mediterrâneo que poderia finalmente ter acesso livre à costa do Pacífico. Os Estados Unidos, porém, opõem-se a construção da mencionada via e, o projeto está a espera de que o financiamento anteriormente aventado permita sua concretização. Parece que, na construção da projetada estrada, interesses estratégicos das grandes potências mundiais estão envolvidos.The Amazon Area (AA is shared by 8 independent south american countries. Since colonial times it was felt the need of a road linking the AA to the Pacific Ocean. Up to the last decades of the 19th Century the Andes were, in technical and economical terms, almost an insuperable challenge. In the last years for Brazil, the country that has about 60% of the AA, that road has become almost a need for exporting grains, timber, woodpulp etc. (mainly to Japan. And Japan also wants an acess to that area. So, Brasil, together with Peru - the second, after Brazil, AA country that has the largest and westernmost coast in the Pacific - have

  20. DIET OF DIRECT-DEVELOPING FROGS (ANURA: CRAUGASTORIDAE: Pristimantis FROM THE ANDES OF WESTERN COLOMBIA

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    Juan Carlos GARCIA-R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the diet of 15 montane frog species of the genus Pristimantis (Craugastoridae from the Andes of Western Colombia to determine the diet range, breadth of niche and overlap among species.  We identified 499 prey items from stomach and intestinal contents of 154 specimens. Prey items were included in 74 different categories. The most common 15 prey categories accounted for 65 % of all frogs’ diet. The invertebrate families Isotomidae, Chironomidae, Formicidae, and Tipulidae were the most abundant categories and accounted for 32 % of the frogs’ diet. Ten of the 15 frog species were found with at least one item of Araneae. Coleoptera and Tipulidae were found in nine frog species, and Acari and Carabidae in eight frog species. In general, beetles were found in gastrointestinal tracts of all species examined, except for P. quantus, but interpretation needs caution because only one individual of this species was caught. Pristimantis hectus showed a specialized diet, consuming mainly dipterans of the family Chironomidae, while the remaining species showed a generalist diet. Pristimantis palmeri showed niche overlap with P. erythropleura (Фjk = 0.69, P. myops (Фjk = 0.64, and P. orpacobates (Фjk = 0.64. Our results suggest that most of the frogs species studied are generalist, foraging opportunistically on dipterans, arachnids, collembolans, coleopterans, and hymenopterans. Here, we report the diet of montane Pristimantis species and discuss the results in comparison with data on related species in montane and lowland regionsDieta de ranas de desarrollo directo (Anura: Craugastoridae: Pristimantis de los Andes occidentales de ColombiaEstudiamos la dieta de 15 especies de ranas montanas del género Pristimantis (Craugastoridae en la Cordillera Occidental de Colombia para determinar su variación, amplitud y traslape de nicho. En los contenidos estomacales e intestinales de 154 especímenes se identificaron 499 presas que fueron

  1. Multi-sensor geophysical constraints on crustal melt in the central Andes: the PLUTONS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Comeau, M. J.; West, M. E.; Christensen, D. H.; Mcfarlin, H. L.; Farrell, A. K.; Del Potro, R.; Gottsmann, J.; McNutt, S. R.; Michelfelder, G.; Diez, M.; Elliott, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Keyson, L.; Delgado, F.; Unsworth, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Andes is a key global location to quantify storage, transport, and volumes of magma in the Earth's crust as it is home to the world's largest zone of partial melt (the Altiplano-Puna Magma or Mush Body, APMB) as well as the more recently documented Southern Puna Magma Body (SPMB). We describe results from the recently completed international PLUTONS project that focused inter-disciplinary study on two sites of large-scale surface uplift that presumably represent ongoing magmatic intrusions in the mid to upper crust - Uturuncu, Bolivia (in the center of the APMB) and Lazufre on the Chile-Argentina border (on the edge of the SPMB). In particular, a suite of geophysical techniques (seismology, gravity, surface deformation, and electro-magnetic methods) have been used to infer the current subsurface distribution and quantity of partial melts in combination with geochemical and lab studies on samples from the area. Both Uturuncu and Lazufre show separate geophysical anomalies in the upper and mid/lower crust (e.g., low seismic velocity, low resistivity, etc.) indicating multiple distinct reservoirs of magma and/or hydrothermal fluids with different properties. The characteristics of the geophysical anomalies differ somewhat depending on the technique used - reflecting the different sensitivity of each method to subsurface melt of different compositions, connectivity, and volatile content. For example, the depth to the top of the APMB is shallower in a joint ambient noise tomography and receiver function analysis compared to a 3D magnetotelluric inversion. One possibility is that the seismic methods are detecting brines above the APMB that do not have a large electromagnetic signature. Comparison of the geophysical measurements with laboratory experiments at the APMB indicate a minimum of 4-25% melt averaged over the region is needed -- higher melt volumes are permitted by the gravity and MT data and may exist in small regions. However, bulk melt values above

  2. Moderate, strong and strongest earthquake-prone areas in the Caucasus, California and the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzeboev, Boris; Gvishiani, Alexei

    2016-04-01

    We present this study on recognition of areas of possible occurrence of strong earthquakes. The study deals with the earthquake-prone areas in three regions with different geological and tectonic structures located in different parts of the world. The authors created a new method (FCAZ - Fuzzy Clustering and Zoning) for recognition of highly seismic areas, where epicenters of earthquakes with magnitude M≥M0 can occur. The magnitude threshold M0 depends on the seismic activity of the region. The objects of clustering are earthquake epicenters. The new method allows us to implement uniformly necessary clustering of the recognition objects respectively for moderate, strong and strongest events. Suggested approach consists of two steps: clustering of known earthquake epicenters by the original DPS (Discrete Perfect Sets) algorithm and delineating highly seismic zones around the recognized clusters by another original E2XT algorithm. By means of this method we detected the areas of possible occurrence of the epicenters of strong earthquakes in the Caucasus (M≥5), in California (M≥6.5) and in the mountain belt of the Andes (M≥7.75). The latter case relates to the possible areas of natural disaster occurence. Reliability of the results is confirmed by numerous control experiments, including individual and complete seismic history. Two strongest recent Chilean earthquakes occurred in 2014 and 2015 after the moment the results were published. Their epicenters belong to the zone recognized as high seismically hazardous. It is a strong independent argument which confirms the reliability of the results. The presented results integrate most recent outcomes of more than 40 years of research in pattern recognition and systems analysis for seismic zoning implemented in Russian Academy of Science. This research is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-30020).

  3. Recent geodetic mass balance of Monte Tronador glaciers, northern Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lucas; Berthier, Etienne; Viale, Maximiliano; Pitte, Pierre; Masiokas, Mariano H.

    2017-02-01

    Glaciers in the northern Patagonian Andes (35-46° S) have shown a dramatic decline in area in the last decades. However, little is known about glacier mass balance changes in this region. This study presents a geodetic mass balance estimate of Monte Tronador (41.15° S; 71.88° W) glaciers by comparing a Pléiades digital elevation model (DEM) acquired in 2012 with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) X-band DEM acquired in 2000. We find a slightly negative Monte-Tronador-wide mass budget of -0.17 m w.e. a-1 (ranging from -0.54 to 0.14 m w.e. a-1 for individual glaciers) and a slightly negative trend in glacier extent (-0.16 % a-1) over the 2000-2012 period. With a few exceptions, debris-covered valley glaciers that descend below a bedrock cliff are losing mass at higher rates, while mountain glaciers with termini located above this cliff are closer to mass equilibrium. Climate variations over the last decades show a notable increase in warm season temperatures in the late 1970s but limited warming afterwards. These warmer conditions combined with an overall drying trend may explain the moderate ice mass loss observed at Monte Tronador. The almost balanced mass budget of mountain glaciers suggests that they are probably approaching a dynamic equilibrium with current (post-1977) climate, whereas the valley glaciers tongues will continue to retreat. The slightly negative overall mass budget of Monte Tronador glaciers contrasts with the highly negative mass balance estimates observed in the Patagonian ice fields further south.

  4. Hydrogen Isotope Biogeochemistry of Plant Biomarkers in Tropical Trees from the Andes to Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feakins, S. J.; Ponton, C.; West, A. J.; Malhi, Y.; Goldsmith, G.; Salinas, N.; Bentley, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Plant leaf waxes are well known biomarkers for terrestrial vegetation. Generally, their hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H) records the isotopic composition of precipitation, modulated by leaf water processes and a large biosynthetic fractionation. In addition, the D/H of methoxyl groups on tree wood lignin is an emerging technique thought to record the D/H of source waters, without leaf water complications. Using each of these biomarkers as proxies requires understanding D/H fractionations in plant systems, but few studies have directly studied hydrogen isotope biogeochemistry in tropical plants. An approach that has proven helpful is the paired analysis of plant waters and plant biomarkers: in order that fractionations can be directly computed rather than assumed. This presents logistical challenges in remote tropical forest environments. We report on a unique dataset collected by tree-climbers from 6 well-studied vegetation plots across a 4km elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes and Amazonia. We have measured the D/H of stem water and leaf water, and we compare these to precipitation isotopes and stream waters. The goal of the plant water studies is to understand plant water uptake and stem-leaf water isotopic offsets which can vary due to both transpiration and foliar uptake of water in tropical montane forests. We are in the process of measuring the D/H of plant biomarkers (n-alkanoic acids, n-alkanes and lignin methoxyl) in order to assess how these water isotopic signals are encoded in plant biomarkers. We compare the species-specific modern plant insights to the plant leaf wax n-alkanoic acid D/H that we have recently reported from soils and river sediments from the same region, in order to understand how signals of plant biogeochemistry are integrated into geological sedimentary archives. Progress and open questions in tropical isotope biogeochemistry will be discussed at the meeting.

  5. Sustainable livelihood development in the Andes: local institutions and regional resource use in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, A

    1993-03-01

    Poverty alleviation has not been achieved through rural development efforts in the Andean region of South America. The social and environmental crisis can be addressed by engaging the rural poor with their considerable skills in resource management in the development effort. Efforts need to be coordinated both within and outside the immediate peasant situation. For example, the origins of the biased spatial organization of resource use, (the best lands are dominated by large farmers and more fragile lands are in the hands of small farmers) need to be addressed in any viable strategy of sustainable development. Obstacles need to be overcome at the field, farm, community, region, and national level in technological, institutional, political, and economic ways. This article focuses on the regional and institutional level and technology as instrumental to change at the local level. The structure of the discussion centered on the main ideas of "sustainable thinking," the application of this thinking within a case study in Chimborazo conducted from 1988 to the present in the Ecuadoran Andes, and a description of how resource use has changed over time within the context of regional economic, social, and demographic change. There is an analysis of how peasants have struggled to sustain their social systems through changes in resource and labor use systems. Future efforts might be better coordinated based on the unsuccessful experiences exposed in the case study. The article further develops the ideas proposed by Gow on sustainable use of the land and the need for political commitment, institutional strengthening, improved local organization, environmental education, and economic development. Peasants constructed their own ideas about desirable livelihoods. This thinking led to the attacks on the hacienda as a way of coping with integration into the national economy. The peasant federations were not changing the basic structures underlying this incorporation. The local

  6. Wide-Angle Seismic Experiment Across the Oeste Fault Zone, Central Andes, Northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Yáñez, G. A.; Vera, E. E.; Sepúlveda, J.

    2008-12-01

    From December 6-21, 2007, we conducted a 3-component, radio-telemetric, seismic survey along a ~ 15-km wide E-W transect in the Central Andes, at a latitude of ~ 22.41° S, centered north of the city of Calama (68.9° W), Chile. The study area is sandwiched between the Central Depression in the west and the Andean Western Cordillera of Chile. Recording stations, nominally spaced at intervals of either 125 or 250 m collected up to 3.5 s of refracted seismic arrivals at maximum source-receiver offsets exceeding 15 km. Ten shothole sources, spaced 2-6 km apart focused energy on the shallow (0-3 km), crustal, Paleogene-age structures. Preliminary, tomographic inversions of refracted first arrivals show the top of a shallow ( 600 km), strike-slip fault zone known as the Oeste fault. Turning ray densities suggest the base of the overlying velocity gradient unit (VP, 2-4 km/s) dips inwardly from both east and west directions toward the Oeste fault to depths of almost 1 km. Plate reorganization commencing at least by the latter half of the Oligocene led from oblique to more orthogonal convergence between the South American and the Nazca (Farallon) Plates. We interpret previously mapped, older, minor faults as being generated within the right-lateral, orogen-parallel, Oeste strike-slip fault zone, and postdated by Neogene, N-S striking thrust faults. In this context we also interpret that the spatial distribution of velocity units requires an period of extensional activity that may (1) postdate the transpressional strike slip fault activity of the Neogene, (2) be related to a later releasing bend through the translation and interaction of rigid blocks hidden at depth or even (3) be the consequence of inelastic failure from the result of flexural loading.

  7. Between hearth and labor market: the recruitment of peasant women in the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, S A

    1990-01-01

    To cover subsistence requirements, peasant women from the Peruvian Andes increasingly are being forced to engage in income-generating activities, including domestic service, marketing, manufacturing, and herding. In many cases, recruitment into waged labor involves migration from rural communities. Case studies of the placement of peasant women in external labor markets illustrate the complex micro- and macro-level factors that determine the mix of productive and reproductive labor. The sexual division of labor in the domestic economy and community is the critical in regulating the length of absence of peasant women from the home, the types of jobs taken, and the migratory destination. In 1 such case study, 56 women from the village of Kallarayan (all of whom had migrated at some point) were interviewed during 13 months of fieldwork in 1984-85. There is no paid employment in Kallarayan, so 14% of the village's population is involved in migration to urban areas or commercial agricultural areas in jungle valleys at any point. Male migration is high in the 11-40-year age group, but becomes seasonal once men marry. Female migrants tend to remain away from the village for longer periods, but are almost exclusively single. Recruitment of peasant women into paid labor is achieved by 5 types of agents: family, godparents and friends, authority figures, recruiting agents, and employers. Peasant girls under 15 years of age tend to be allocated to external labor markets (largely domestic services) by parents and godparents; after 15 years, however, when children are considered to reach adulthood, there is a shift toward self-motivated migration or recruitment by employers and agents. The eldest daughter typically enters migration at age 14 years and sacrifices her education, while younger siblings remain in the home longer. In all but the poorest families, female migration for waged labor ends with marriage.

  8. Plant leaf wax biomarkers capture gradients in hydrogen isotopes of precipitation from the Andes and Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Salinas, Norma; Shenkin, Alexander; Blonder, Benjamin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Ponton, Camilo; Arvin, Lindsay J.; Wu, Mong Sin; Peters, Tom; West, A. Joshua; Martin, Roberta E.; Enquist, Brian J.; Asner, Gregory P.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2016-06-01

    Plant leaf waxes have been found to record the hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation and are thus used to reconstruct past climate. To assess how faithfully they record hydrological signals, we characterize leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions in forest canopy trees across a highly biodiverse, 3 km elevation range on the eastern flank of the Andes. We sampled the dominant tree species and assessed their relative abundance in the tree community. For each tree we collected xylem and leaf samples for analysis of plant water and plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions. In total, 176 individuals were sampled across 32 species and 5 forest plots that span the gradient. We find both xylem water and leaf wax δD values of individuals correlate (R2 = 0.8 and R2 = 0.3 respectively) with the isotopic composition of precipitation (with an elevation gradient of -21‰ km-1). Minimal leaf water enrichment means that leaf waxes are straightforward recorders of the isotopic composition of precipitation in wet climates. For these tropical forests we find the average fractionation between source water and leaf wax for C29n-alkanes, -129 ± 2‰ (s.e.m., n = 136), to be indistinguishable from that of temperate moist forests. For C28n-alkanoic acids the average fractionation is -121 ± 3‰ (s.e.m., n = 102). Sampling guided by community assembly within forest plots shows that integrated plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions faithfully record the gradient of isotopes in precipitation with elevation (R2 = 0.97 for n-alkanes and 0.60 for n-alkanoic acids). This calibration study supports the use of leaf waxes as recorders of the isotopic composition of precipitation in lowland tropical rainforest, tropical montane cloud forests and their sedimentary archives.

  9. Elevational Ranges of Montane Birds and Deforestation in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Pimm, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Deforestation causes habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, and can ultimately cause extinction of the remnant species. Tropical montane birds face these threats with the added natural vulnerability of narrower elevational ranges and higher specialization than lowland species. Recent studies assess the impact of present and future global climate change on species' ranges, but only a few of these evaluate the potentially confounding effect of lowland deforestation on species elevational distributions. In the Western Andes of Colombia, an important biodiversity hotspot, we evaluated the effects of deforestation on the elevational ranges of montane birds along altitudinal transects. Using point counts and mist-nets, we surveyed six altitudinal transects spanning 2200 to 2800 m. Three transects were forested from 2200 to 2800 m, and three were partially deforested with forest cover only above 2400 m. We compared abundance-weighted mean elevation, minimum elevation, and elevational range width. In addition to analysing the effect of deforestation on 134 species, we tested its impact within trophic guilds and habitat preference groups. Abundance-weighted mean and minimum elevations were not significantly different between forested and partially deforested transects. Range width was marginally different: as expected, ranges were larger in forested transects. Species in different trophic guilds and habitat preference categories showed different trends. These results suggest that deforestation may affect species' elevational ranges, even within the forest that remains. Climate change will likely exacerbate harmful impacts of deforestation on species' elevational distributions. Future conservation strategies need to account for this by protecting connected forest tracts across a wide range of elevations.

  10. Miocene fossil hydrothermal system associated with a volcanic complex in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Francisco; Aguirre, Luis; Vergara, Mario; Valdebenito, Leticia; Fonseca, Eugenia

    2004-11-01

    Cenozoic deposits in the Andes of central Chile have been affected by very low-grade burial metamorphism. At about 33°S in the Cuesta de Chacabuco area, approximately 53 km north of Santiago, two Oligocene and Miocene volcanic units form a ca. 1300-m-thick rock pile. The Miocene unit corresponds to a volcanic complex composed of two eroded stratovolcanoes. Secondary mineral assemblages in both units were studied petrographically and using X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses. Most of the igneous minerals are wholly or partially preserved, and the ubiquitous secondary minerals are zeolites and mafic phyllosilicates. The alteration pattern observed is characterized by a lateral zonation in secondary mineralogy related to a lateral increase in temperature but not to stratigraphic depth. The following three zones were established, mainly based on the distribution of zeolites: zone I comprises heulandite, thomsonite, mesolite, stilbite and tri-smectite; zone II contains laumontite, yugawaralite, prehnite, epidote and chlorite; and zone III comprises wairakite, epidote, chlorite, diopside, biotite and titanite. For each zone, the following temperature ranges were estimated: zone I, 100-180 °C; zone II, 180-270 °C; and zone III, 245-310 °C. The alteration episode was characterized by a high Pfluid/ Ptotal ratio (ca. 1.0), although slightly variable, a high geothermal gradient of ca. 160 °C km -1 and fluid pressures below 500 bars. Although temperature was the main control on the mineral zonation, several interrelated parameters, mainly fluid composition, porosity and permeability, were also important. Hot, near neutral to slightly alkaline pH, alkali chloride hydrothermal fluids with very low dissolved CO 2 contents deposited the secondary minerals. The alteration pattern is the result of depositing fluids in outflow regions from a hydrothermal system developed inside a volcanic complex during the Miocene. The hydrothermal system has been eroded to a

  11. Elevational Ranges of Montane Birds and Deforestation in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela

    Full Text Available Deforestation causes habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, and can ultimately cause extinction of the remnant species. Tropical montane birds face these threats with the added natural vulnerability of narrower elevational ranges and higher specialization than lowland species. Recent studies assess the impact of present and future global climate change on species' ranges, but only a few of these evaluate the potentially confounding effect of lowland deforestation on species elevational distributions. In the Western Andes of Colombia, an important biodiversity hotspot, we evaluated the effects of deforestation on the elevational ranges of montane birds along altitudinal transects. Using point counts and mist-nets, we surveyed six altitudinal transects spanning 2200 to 2800 m. Three transects were forested from 2200 to 2800 m, and three were partially deforested with forest cover only above 2400 m. We compared abundance-weighted mean elevation, minimum elevation, and elevational range width. In addition to analysing the effect of deforestation on 134 species, we tested its impact within trophic guilds and habitat preference groups. Abundance-weighted mean and minimum elevations were not significantly different between forested and partially deforested transects. Range width was marginally different: as expected, ranges were larger in forested transects. Species in different trophic guilds and habitat preference categories showed different trends. These results suggest that deforestation may affect species' elevational ranges, even within the forest that remains. Climate change will likely exacerbate harmful impacts of deforestation on species' elevational distributions. Future conservation strategies need to account for this by protecting connected forest tracts across a wide range of elevations.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability in denudation across the Bolivian Andes from multiple geochronometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Nadja; Ehlers, Todd A.; Schaller, Mirjam; Barnes, Jason B.; Tawackoli, Sohrab; Poulsen, Christopher J.

    2010-10-01

    We quantify spatial and temporal variations in denudation rates across the central Andean fold-thrust belt in Bolivia with particular focus on the Holocene. Measured and predicted 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentrations in river sediments are used to (1) calculate catchment-averaged denudation rates from 17 basins across two transects at different latitudes, and (2) evaluate the sensitivity of Holocene climate change on the denudation history recorded by the CRN data. Estimated denudation rates vary by two orders of magnitude from 0.04 to 1.93 mm yr - 1 with mean values of 0.40 ± 0.29 mm yr - 1 in northern Bolivia and 0.51 ± 0.50 mm yr - 1 in the south. Results demonstrate no statistically significant correlation between denudation rates and morphological parameters such as relief, slope or drainage basin size. In addition, the CRN-derived denudation rates do not reflect present-day latitudinal variations in precipitation. Comparison to ˜ 130 previously published denudation rates calculated over long (thermochronology-derived; > 10 6 yrs), medium (CRN-derived; 10 2-10 4 yrs), and short timescales (sediment flux-derived; 10 1 yrs) indicate temporal variations in denudation rates that increase between 0 and 200% over the last ˜ 5 ka. CRN modeling results suggest that the CRN-derived denudation rates may not be fully adjusted to wetter climate conditions recorded in the central Andes since the mid-Holocene. We conclude that large spatial variability in CRN denudation may be due to local variations in tectonics (e.g. faulting), while large temporal variability in denudation may be due to temporal variations in climate.

  13. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Colin A. [Department of Geology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada)], E-mail: cacooke@ualberta.ca; Abbott, Mark B. [Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada); Section of Anthropology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from {sup 210}Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning {approx} 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our {sup 14}C and {sup 210}Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins {approx} 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after {approx} 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude

  14. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from (210)Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ~1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our (14)C and (210)Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ~1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ~1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 microg g(-1). The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution.

  15. Land Cover Change in the Andes of Southern Ecuador—Patterns and Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia F. Curatola Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the megadiverse tropical mountain forest in the Andes of southern Ecuador, a global biodiversity hotspot, the use of fire to clear land for cattle ranching is leading to the invasion of an aggressive weed, the bracken fern, which is threatening diversity and the provisioning of ecosystem services. To find sustainable land use options adapted to the local situation, a profound knowledge of the long-term spatiotemporal patterns of land cover change and its drivers is necessary, but hitherto lacking. The complex topography and the high cloud frequency make the use of remote sensing in this area a challenge. To deal with these conditions, we pursued specific pre-processing steps before classifying five Landsat scenes from 1975 to 2001. Then, we quantified land cover changes and habitat fragmentation, and we investigated landscape changes in relation to key spatial elements (altitude, slope, and distance from roads. Good classification results were obtained with overall accuracies ranging from 94.5% to 98.5% and Kappa statistics between 0.75 and 0.98. Forest was strongly fragmented due to the rapid expansion of the arable frontier and the even more rapid invasion by bracken. Unexpectedly, more bracken-infested areas were converted to pastures than vice versa, a practice that could alleviate pressure on forests if promoted. Road proximity was the most important spatial element determining forest loss, while for bracken the altitudinal range conditioned the degree of invasion in deforested areas. The annual deforestation rate changed notably between periods: ~1.5% from 1975 to 1987, ~0.8% from 1987 to 2000, and finally a very high rate of ~7.5% between 2000 and 2001. We explained these inconstant rates through some specific interrelated local and national political and socioeconomic drivers, namely land use policies, credit and tenure incentives, demography, and in particular, a severe national economic and bank crisis.

  16. Unexpectedly High Beta-Diversity of Root-Associated Fungal Communities in the Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher J.; Maldonado, Carla; Frøslev, Tobias G.; Antonelli, Alexandre; Rønsted, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Bolivia is one of the most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Between the Andes and the Amazon drainage basin spans the Yungas, a vast forested region shown to be extremely species rich in macro-organisms. However, it remains unclear whether this high diversity is also reflected in microbial diversity. Here we assess the genetic, taxonomic and functional diversity of root-associated fungi surrounding Cinchona calisaya trees, a typical element of the intermediate altitudes of the Bolivian Yungas. We determine the relative effects of edaphic properties, climate, and geography in regulating fungal community assembly. We show that α-diversity for these fungal communities was similar to temperate and arid ecosystems, averaging 90.1 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per sample, with reads predominantly assigned to the Ascomycota phylum and with a saprotrophic lifestyle. ß-diversity was calculated as the distance-decay rate, and in contrast to α-diversity, was exceptionally high with a rate of −0.407. Soil properties (pH and P) principally regulated fungal community assembly in an analogous manner to temperate environments, with pH and phosphorus explaining 7.8 and 7.2% of community variation respectively. Surprisingly, altitude does not influence community formation, and there is limited evidence that climate (precipitation and temperature) play a role. Our results suggest that sampling should be performed over a wide geographical and environmental range in order to capture the full root-associated fungal diversity in subtropical regions. This study sheds further light on the diversity and distribution of the world's “hidden biodiversity.” PMID:27630629

  17. Evapofacieshalítica en el Salar del Rincón, departamento Los Andes, Salta

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    Alberto Ovejero Toledo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El salar delRincón se encuentra ubicado en el departamento Los Andes, provincia de Salta enel extremo noroeste de la Puna Austral, a una altura media de 3.660 m s.n.m. Eneste trabajo se dan a conocer los resultados de la correlación de sondeos, quepermitieron determinar facies de halita, texturas, estructuras, materialesclásticos intersticiales, mineralogía, composición química de la salmuera y losparámetros hidráulicos del acuífero, determinados a lo largo de una transectaeste-oeste que cubre aproximadamente 30 km². La fase cristalina estácompuesta mayoritariamente de halita, con yeso, mirabilita, thenardita,glauberita, hidroglauberita, eugsterita, calcita y ulexita solo en el sectoroeste de la transecta. Se identificaron las siguientes evapofacies halítica:costra salina, geodas y halita bandeada. Las texturas observadas incluyen:cristales hoppers, pirámides chevron, halita intersticial muddyhalite y halita cloudy. La composición de la salmuera es denaturaleza clorurada sódica con variaciones en profundidad de sulfato y borato.Los cationes son Ca, Mg, Li y K, la relación K/Li es de 20/1. El cálculo dereserva a nivel de recurso mineral, en sectores con distinta porosidad eficaz,dio para Li+ 208,2 kt y para K+ 4231,9 kt (> 30 %; yLi+ 14,9 kt y K+ 302, 9 kt (< 10 %. Los contenidos deLi+ y K+ en toda la transecta son 223,1 kt y 4534,8 ktrespectivamente. El estudio permitió determinar una concentración promedio de0,4 g/l de litio y 8 g/l de potasio.

  18. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  19. The Tropical Andes without Snow and Ice - Impacts, Uncertainties and Challenges Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change has lead to significant glacier retreat in the tropical Andes over the past several decades. Despite the apparent hiatus in warming along the Pacific coast, temperature continues to rise at higher elevations, putting smaller glaciers in lower lying mountain ranges on the verge of complete disappearance. As a result water availability and water quality in glacier-fed river systems will be reduced during the dry season. The lack of a seasonal snow cover in the tropics, which provides for an additional hydrologic buffer in mid-latitude mountain ranges, further exacerbates the situation. Altered precipitation regimes, including changes in total precipitation amount, changes in the rain/snow ratio, or changes in the wet season length will also affect water availability, but projections of these changes are currently fraught with uncertainty. The importance of glacier-fed water supply varies between regions and depends on the presence of other water regulators (reservoirs, wetlands), the length of the dry season and the trajectory of water demand (population growth, expanding economic activities). Here we will review downscaled CMIP5 model results for some of these mountain ranges and discuss the consequences of future warming and projected precipitation changes for the Andean cryosphere, while considering uncertainties associated with downscaling methodology, model dependency and choice of emission scenario. Adaptation strategies will be evaluated in the light of these results, discussing the need to pursue no-regret strategies, when implementing water conservation measures. Lessons learned from past adaptation and capacity building activities in the region will be discussed, emphasizing a) the need to strengthen the institutional standing of authorities involved in glacier research, b) alignment of capacity building and international cooperation with the national and regional needs and c) improvements to long-term climate and glacier monitoring programs

  20. Giant magmatic water reservoir beneath Uturuncu volcano and Altiplano-Puna region (Central Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonier, Mickael; Gaillard, Fabrice; Muir, Duncan; Blundy, Jon; Unsworth, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism at continental arcs is the surface manifestation of long-lived crustal magmatic processes whereby mantle-derived hydrous basalt magma differentiates to more silica-rich magmas by a combination of crystallization and crustal melting. What erupts is just a fraction of the total volume of magma produced by these processes; the unerupted, plutonic residues solidify and are inaccessible to direct study until millions of years of uplift and erosion bring them to the surface. In contrast, geophysical surveys, using electromagnetic and seismic waves, can provide real-time images of subduction zone magmatic systems. Several such studies have revealed that arc volcanoes are underlain by large partially molten regions at depths of >10 km, the largest known example being the Altiplano-Puna magma body (APMB) in central Andes. Interpreting such geophysical images in terms of amount, composition and distribution of partial melts is limited by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of silicate melts at elevated pressures and temperatures. Here we present high-pressure, in situ experimental data showing that the electrical conductivity of andesitic melts is primarily controlled by their dissolved water contents. Linking our new measurements to petrological constraints from andesites erupted on the Altiplano, we show that the APMB is composed of 10-20% of an andesitic melt containing 8-10 wt% dissolved water. This implies that the APMB is a giant water anomaly in the global subduction system, with a total mass of dissolved magmatic water about half of the water contained within the Adriatic Sea. In addition to the controls on the physical properties of the melts, the abundance of dissolved water governs the structural levels of magma ponding, equivalent to the depth of water saturation, where degassing and crystallisation promote partial melting and weakening of the upper crust. Unexpectedly, very high concentrations of water in andesite magmas shall impede their

  1. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes from male native miners working in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio R. Santa Maria

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes from underground miners from the Casapalca (n = 8, mean age = 45 y, range = 36 y to 55 y and Bellavista (n = 8, mean age = 28 y, range 23 y to 34 y high-altitude mining camps in the Peruvian Andes. This population was occupationally exposed to heavy metals such as lead and zinc as well as diesel emission particles, organic solvents and mine dust. The control groups consisted of individuals from a high altitude farming community in the Peruvian village of Tinco (n = 8, mean age = 37 y, range = 25 y to 52 y and the sea level city of Lima (n = 14, mean age = 26 y, range = 20 y to 35 y. All individuals were male native Peruvians. A significantly higher incidence (1.88%, p < 0.05 of chromosomal aberrations (chromatid deletions and breaks, chromosome breaks and acentric fragments were detected in lymphocytes from miners at the Casapalca camp as compared to miners from the Bellavista camp (0.5%, chromatid deletions and acentric fragments only and the Lima sea level (0.07%, chromatid deletions only and Tinco high altitude (no aberrations controls. These results suggest that male native Peruvians occupationally exposed to underground mining activity have an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations, which could be related to both age and exposure time. The increased chromosomal damage observed in the mining populations studied may be attributable to the complex mixture of genotoxic agents to which the miners may have been exposed.

  2. Description and molecular diagnosis of a new species of Brunfelsia (Solanaceae) from the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipowicz, Natalia; Nee, Michael H; Renner, Susanne S

    2012-01-01

    Brunfelsia plowmaniana N.Filipowicz & M.Nee sp. nov., a species from humid and cloud forests of the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes, is described and provided with a molecular diagnosis, using provisions available in the recently approved International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants. Specimens belonging to the new species were previously placed in the polymorphic Brunfelsia uniflora (Pohl) D.Don, which a molecular phylogeny revealed as polyphyletic. Revision of numerous collections revealed clear morphological differences between the new species and Brunfelsia uniflora, the type locality of which is in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

  3. Description and molecular diagnosis of a new species of Brunfelsia (Solanaceae from the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Filipowicz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Brunfelsia plowmaniana N.Filipowicz & M.Nee sp. nov., a species from humid and cloud forests of the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes, is described and provided with a molecular diagnosis, using provisions available in the recently approved International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants. Specimens belonging to the new species were previously placed in the polymorphic B. uniflora (Pohl D.Don, which a molecular phylogeny revealed as polyphyletic. Revision of numerous collections revealed clear morphological differences between the new species and B. uniflora, the type locality of which is in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

  4. Meteorological control of air pollution in a complex topography, high-altitude valley in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Pizarro, R.; Arango, C. D.; Peña, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    About two-thirds of the Latin-American population lives on the Andes. In Colombia, 70% of the population lives at altitudes over 1 km above the sea level (ASL) on a complex topography 3 Andean mountain-chain system. Understanding and properly modeling air pollution in the Tropical Andes is thus a challenging task not just because of the complexity of horizontal and vertical transport in the Intertropical Convergence Zone but because of the strong influence of regional- and local-scale circulation phenomena. The Sogamoso Valley (5 degrees 43' N, 72 degrees 55' W, 2570 m ASL), located on the Colombian Andes Eastern Mountain Chain, is one of the most industrialized regions of Colombia. Air quality in this region is affected by a heterogeneous group of emission sources, which include truck traffic, heavy industry (including steelworks and cement), medium- and small-scale industry, and around 600 low-technology, highly polluting brick and quicklime production furnaces. 24-h average PM10 concentrations frequently double the Colombian standard (150 μg/m3). Measurements and analysis conducted in 2002 found that relatively rapid changes in the regional atmospheric circulation patterns strongly influence the Sogamoso Valley air quality, including drastic PM10 concentration variations observed during periods of fairly steady emissions. The strong linear dependence of the daily temperature variation amplitude and the maximum wind speed on the daily accumulated solar radiation suggests that air quality is ultimately determined by the synoptic activation of local and mesoscale circulation patterns and meteorological conditions, including mountain and valley winds, strong anabatic and katabatic winds from the lowlands (at both sides of the Colombian Andes Eastern Mountain Chain), channeling, and radiative cooling temperature inversion. During clear sky periods, katabatic advection of pollution from furnaces on the foothills resulted in recurrent nocturnal pollution episodes with

  5. New and Evolving Seismic Images of the Central Andes and Subducting Nazca Slab: 20 Years of Portable Seismology Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Beno Gutenberg first identified a seismic low velocity zone in the upper mantle that we now refer to as the asthenosphere that is still the focus of many studies in active tectonic regions. The upper-most mantle is very heterogeneous and occupies the depth range where much of the tectonic action occurs especially in subduction zones and convergent margins. The central South American convergent margin is the result of the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American Plate and includes the Andes, one of the largest actively growing mountain ranges on Earth. The South American subduction zone has two regions of "flat" subduction in Peru and central Chile and Argentina separated by a segment of "normal" subduction and an active magmatic arc. The central Andean plateau has an average elevation of 3-4 km and some of the thickest crust on Earth with deformation reaching ~800 km inland. This active margin is characterized by along-strike variations in magmatism, upper crustal shortening, crustal thickness, and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the mantle wedge, and the overriding plate. After 20 years of portable seismic deployments in the Central Andes seismologists have generated unprecedented seismic images spanning ~3000 km of the Andean lithosphere, the subducting Nazca slab, and the surrounding mantle. Seismic travel-time, ambient noise and earthquake surface-wave tomography, receiver function imaging, and joint receiver function - surface wave dispersion inversions have produced along strike images of the Central Andes from the surface to a depth of ~700 km. These new images were made possible by PI-driven portable broadband seismic deployments and data sharing by many international groups. I will highlight images of along-strike variations in crustal properties and thickness, mantle lithospheric structure, and slab geometry. These seismic images allow us to more completely evaluate the role

  6. Isolation and molecular identification of Leishmania ( Viannia peruviana from naturally infected Lutzomyia peruensis (Diptera: Psychodidae in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Enrique Perez

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Viannia peruviana was isolated from 1/75 Lutzomyia peruensis captured during May 2006 in an endemic cutaneous leishmaniasis region of the Peruvian Andes (Chaute, Huarochiri, Lima, Peru. Sand fly gut with promastigotes was inoculated into a hamster and the remaining body was fixed in ethanol. L. (Viannia sp. was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and Leishmania species through molecular genotyping by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses targeting the genes cpb and hsp70, resulting L. (V. peruviana. The infected sand fly appeared 15 days after the rains finished, time expected and useful real time data for interventions when transmission is occurring.

  7. Some additional observations for understanding the glacial history and neotectonics of the Venezuelan Andes and Bocono fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesnousky, S. G.; Arenguren, R.; Rengifo, M.; Owen, L. A.; Caffee, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    To quantify the glacial history and neotectonics of the Venezuelan Andes we report 23 cosmogenic surface exposure ages from moraines of the Sierra Nevada de Merida, 6 ages from an offset fan along the flanks of the Andes, and several OSL ages of glacial outwash deposits. Rocks from the La Victoria and Los Zerpas moraines yield ages of 16.5±1.6 ka and 16.9±1.3 ka, respectively. About 25 km to the west in the drainage basin of the Rio Mucujun, rocks on the crest of the La Culata moraine show ages of 15.2 ± 0.9 kyr and 15.1 ± 1.1 kyr, respectively. A large La Culata inset moraine, situated upstream from the terminus of moraine deposits gives an age of 14.2 ± 1.0 kyr. Previously documented offsets of the La Victoria and Los Zerpas moraines by a strand of the Bocono fault are ~100m, suggesting a latest Pleistocene slip rate of about ~6 mm/yr, less than the total right-lateral slip across the Bocono fault of 12±2 mm/yr interpreted by others from geodesy. Surface exposure ages for boulders from a fan that is truncated, abandoned, and uplifted ~120 m above stream grade by a southeast dipping thrust fault along the northwestern flank of the Andes at Tucanizon show large scatter and range to about 110 kyr. The observations place an initial upper limit of about 1 mm/yr on the late Pleistocene uplift of the Andes. The outwash of the glaciers that produced the moraines of La Culata was transported down the Rio Mucujun to its confluence with the Rio Chama where it produced valley fill deposits with a surface at 100 m heights and greater above the Rio Chama. The largest and highest remnant of this surface is that upon which the major city of Merida is located. Initial dating of sediments within the fill deposits with optical stimulated luminescence suggests that the final aggradation of valley fill deposits on which the Meseta is formed occurred quite rapidly over a period of about 5 to 6 kyr and that the surface was initially incised and abandoned 30 ky ago, some 15 kyr

  8. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  9. The potential of stalagmites from the Patagonian Andes as sub-annually-resolved paleoclimate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Rolf; Schimpf, Daniel; Mangini, Augusto; Kronz, Andreas; Wörner, Gerhard; Simon, Klaus; Spötl, Christoph; Arz, Helge

    2010-05-01

    Stalagmites of the superhumid southern Andes are occasionally formed in small non-carst caves in a metamorphic and/or granitoid basement. They originate from coastal erosion in fracture zones during periods of higher sea levels. These small and relatively open caves are equilibrated with outside temperatures. Their drip rates reflect regional precipitation related to westerly wind intensities. To evaluate the reproducibility of proxies of different stalagmites we have investigated three U/Th-dated stalagmites (each one with 14-16 ages) from a single cave which grew simultaneously during the last 5 Ka. The host rocks provide a large variety of fine-grained siliciclastic minerals which are deposited on the stalagmite. Thin sections, scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, and cave monitoring show that up to 3 wt% of siliciclastic minerals was accumulated successively on top of the stalagmites, depending on the individual drip rates above a certain threshold level. The amount of detritus was determined by the contents of detrital elements like Y and HREE, which were measured by ICP-MS (LAM-ICP-MS) from drill-holes (1-1.5 mm diameter) and laser ablation (5-10 μm steps). The LAM-ICP-MS pattern of e.g. Y and Al show a monthly resolution with clear seasonal cycles for the last 5 Kyrs. The presumable annual cycles match well into the time span in-between single Th/U ages. The seasonality results from two times higher drip rates in southern hemisphere summer (stronger westerlies) compared to winter. The time series show annual as well as typical sun-spot-related cyclicities (~11, 90, 210 years). Since these proxies are only sensitive to precipitation (and westerly changes) we suggest that the westerly intensities are controlled indirectly by changes in the sun's activity. Typically acid soil water with pH values of 3-5 leach several elements (U, Sr, Fe, Mg etc.) from the surrounding rocks, leading to high Mg/Ca ratios in the stalagmite during less humid periods

  10. Plant Virus Metagenomics: Advances in Virus Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roossinck, Marilyn J; Martin, Darren P; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    In recent years plant viruses have been detected from many environments, including domestic and wild plants and interfaces between these systems-aquatic sources, feces of various animals, and insects. A variety of methods have been employed to study plant virus biodiversity, including enrichment for virus-like particles or virus-specific RNA or DNA, or the extraction of total nucleic acids, followed by next-generation deep sequencing and bioinformatic analyses. All of the methods have some shortcomings, but taken together these studies reveal our surprising lack of knowledge about plant viruses and point to the need for more comprehensive studies. In addition, many new viruses have been discovered, with most virus infections in wild plants appearing asymptomatic, suggesting that virus disease may be a byproduct of domestication. For plant pathologists these studies are providing useful tools to detect viruses, and perhaps to predict future problems that could threaten cultivated plants.

  11. Unexpected climatological behavior of MLT gravity wave momentum flux in the lee of the Southern Andes hot spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, R. J.; Janches, D.; Fritts, D. C.; Stockwell, R. G.; Coy, L.

    2017-01-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER), located at Tierra del Fuego (53.7°S, 67.7°W), has been providing near-continuous high-resolution measurements of winds and high-frequency gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes of the mesopause region since May 2008. As SAAMER is located in the lee of the largest seasonal GW hot spot on Earth, this is a key location to study GWs and their interaction with large-scale motions. GW momentum flux climatologies are shown for the first time for this location and discussed in light of these unique dynamics. Particularly, the large eastward GW momentum fluxes during local winter are surprising, as these observations cannot be explained by the direct upward propagation of expected large-amplitude mountain waves (MWs) through the eastward stratospheric jet. Instead, these results are interpreted as secondary GWs propagating away from stratospheric sources over the Andes accompanying MW breaking over the Southern Andes.

  12. Effect of Moxidectin Treatment at Peripartum on Gastrointestinal Parasite Infections in Ewes Raised under Tropical Andes High Altitude Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Duarte, J. J.; Lozano-Márquez, H.; Grajales-Lombana, H. A.; Manrique-Perdomo, C.; Martínez-Bello, D. A.; Saegerman, C.; Raes, M.; Kirschvink, N.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the impact of moxidectin at peripartum on nematode fecal egg count (FEC) and clinical parameters on ewes in the high altitude tropical Andes of Colombia. FEC and clinical evaluations were performed on 9 occasions in 43 naturally infected ewes before and during gestation and after lambing. Moxidectin (Mox, 200 µg kg−1) was applied at late pregnancy (T1, n = 15) or 48 hours after parturition (T2, n = 14). 14 untreated ewes served as controls (C). Suckling lambs (n = 58) remained untreated and underwent four clinical and parasitological evaluations until 8 weeks after birth. Mox efficacy equaled 99.3% (T1) and 96.9% (T2). Highest mean FEC value reflecting periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) was recorded in C ewes at 4–6 weeks after lambing. Significant FEC reductions were found in T1 (94.8%) and T2 (96.7%) ewes (p < 0.05). All lambs showed a significant and ewes-group independent increase in FEC before weaning (p < 0.05). Clinical parameters (anemia and diarrhea) showed time- and treatment-related differences (p < 0.05). Monitoring of FEC and clinical parameters linked to gastrointestinal parasite infections allowed demonstrating that postpartum or preweaning are two critical periods to nematode infection for sheep raised under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Use of Mox as anthelmintic treatment prevented PPER. PMID:26078913

  13. Crustal structure of the high Andes in the North Pampean flat slab segment from magnetic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Marcos A.; Winocur, Diego; Álvarez, Orlando; Folguera, Andrés; Martinez, Myriam P.

    2017-01-01

    The Main Andes at the northern Chilean-Pampean flat slab segment were formed by the inversion of late Oligocene to early Miocene extensional depocenters in Neogene times. Their structure, size and depth are loosely constrained by field data since these sequences have amalgamated forming an almost continuous blanket with scarce basement outcrops. Satellite and aerial gravity and magnetic data are used in this work to define a 3D model that shows the basement structure at depth and adjust 2D structural sections previously based on field data. The results indicate complex basin geometry with depocenters of variable size and depth buried beneath Mesozoic (?)-Paleogene and Neogene sections. Additionally, previously proposed crustal heterogeneities across this orogenic segment are geophysically constrained with a new crustal heterogeneity identified on the basis of a modeled 2D crustal section. We propose hypothetically, that this crustal discontinuity could have played a role in controlling Paleogene extension at the hanging wall of an asymmetric rift basin, explaining the locus and development of the Doña Ana Basin. Finally, this work provides new information about Cenozoic structure and Paleozoic basement architecture, presumably derived from amalgamation history of one of the highest and more inaccessible regions of the Andes.

  14. Effect of Moxidectin Treatment at Peripartum on Gastrointestinal Parasite Infections in Ewes Raised under Tropical Andes High Altitude Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Vargas-Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the impact of moxidectin at peripartum on nematode fecal egg count (FEC and clinical parameters on ewes in the high altitude tropical Andes of Colombia. FEC and clinical evaluations were performed on 9 occasions in 43 naturally infected ewes before and during gestation and after lambing. Moxidectin (Mox, 200 µg kg−1 was applied at late pregnancy (T1, n=15 or 48 hours after parturition (T2, n=14. 14 untreated ewes served as controls (C. Suckling lambs (n=58 remained untreated and underwent four clinical and parasitological evaluations until 8 weeks after birth. Mox efficacy equaled 99.3% (T1 and 96.9% (T2. Highest mean FEC value reflecting periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER was recorded in C ewes at 4–6 weeks after lambing. Significant FEC reductions were found in T1 (94.8% and T2 (96.7% ewes (p<0.05. All lambs showed a significant and ewes-group independent increase in FEC before weaning (p<0.05. Clinical parameters (anemia and diarrhea showed time- and treatment-related differences (p<0.05. Monitoring of FEC and clinical parameters linked to gastrointestinal parasite infections allowed demonstrating that postpartum or preweaning are two critical periods to nematode infection for sheep raised under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Use of Mox as anthelmintic treatment prevented PPER.

  15. Landscape-scale changes in forest structure and functional traits along an Andes-to-Amazon elevation gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, G. P.; Anderson, C. B.; Martin, R. E.; Knapp, D. E.; Tupayachi, R.; Sinca, F.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Elevation gradients provide opportunities to explore environmental controls on forest structure and functioning. We used airborne imaging spectroscopy and lidar (light detection and ranging) to quantify changes in three-dimensional forest structure and canopy functional traits in twenty 25 ha landscapes distributed along a 3300 m elevation gradient from lowland Amazonia to treeline in the Peruvian Andes. Elevation was positively correlated with lidar-estimated canopy gap density and understory vegetation cover, and negatively related to canopy height and the vertical partitioning of vegetation in canopies. Increases in canopy gap density were tightly linked to increases in understory plant cover, and larger gaps (20-200 m2) produced 25-30 times the response in understory cover than did smaller gaps (soil increased, with elevation. Scaling of gap size to gap frequency (λ) was, however, nearly constant along the elevation gradient. When combined with other canopy structural and functional trait information, this suggests near-constant canopy turnover rates from the lowlands to treeline, which occurs independent of decreasing biomass or productivity with increasing elevation. Our results provide the first landscape-scale quantification of forest structure and canopy functional traits with changing elevation, thereby improving our understanding of disturbance, demography and ecosystem processes in the Andes-to-Amazon corridor.

  16. River-discharge dynamics in the Southern Central Andes and the 1976-77 global climate shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, F.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that the 1976-77 global climate shift strongly affected the South American climate. In our study, we observed a link between this climate shift and river-discharge variability in the subtropical Southern Central Andes. We analyzed the daily river-discharge time series between 1940 and 1999 from small to medium mountain drainage basins (102-104 km2) across a steep climatic and topographic gradient. We document that the discharge frequency distribution changed significantly, with higher percentiles exhibiting more pronounced trends. A change point between 1971 and 1977 marked an intensification of the hydrological cycle, which resulted in increased river discharge. In the upper Rio Bermejo basin of the northernmost Argentine Andes, the mean annual discharge increased by 40% over 7 years. Our findings are important for flood risk management in areas impacted by the 1976-77 climate shift; discharge frequency distribution analysis provides important insights into the variability of the hydrological cycle in the Andean realm.

  17. Stratigraphic and Petrological Constraints of Cretaceous Subduction Initiation and Arc-Continent Collision in the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, S.; Cardona, A.; Mejia, D.; Parra, M.

    2014-12-01

    Middle to Late-Cretaceous orogenic events in the northern Andes have been commonly reconstructed from the analysis of inland basins or the integration of regional scale thermochronological, geochronological and geochemical datasets from the accreted blocks. In contrast, limited studies have been developed on the stratigraphic and deformational record of magmatic and sedimentary sequences exposed near the suture zones. New field and petrologic data are used to characterize an ophiolite type sequence that outcrops in the western flank from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera of Colombia. Stratigraphic analysis indicate the existence of Albian-Aptian deep marine pelitic sequence interbedded with minor chert and thin quartz sandstone beds that apparently change to a volcanic dominate stratigraphy. Deformed ophiolite-like mafic and ultramafic plutonic rocks and isolated pillow lavas are also exposed to the east in fault contact with the pelitic sequence. The pelitic and interlayered volcanic rocks represent the growth of an extensional Early-Cretaceous basin that followed a Late-Jurassic magmatic quiescence in the Northern Andes. The volcano-sedimentary record is probably related to the growth of a fore-arc basin in a new subduction zone that extends until the Late Cretaceous. The deformation and obduction of the ophiolitic association and the fore-arc basin were probably triggered by the Late Cretaceous collision with an allocthonous plateau-arc associated to the migration of the Caribbean plate.

  18. Tectonomagmatic characteristics of the back-arc portion of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault Zone, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, V.; Gioncada, A.; Omarini, R.; Riller, U.; Mazzuoli, R.; Vezzoli, L.

    2011-06-01

    Post-20 Ma magmatism in the Central Andes is either localized in the magmatic arc or distributed east of it, on the Altiplano-Puna Plateau. Here there is a distinct concentration of magmatic centers on NW-SE trending lineaments, such as the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT), that extends into the Eastern Cordillera to the east of the Puna. Understanding the possible genetic relationship between prominent structures and magmatic centers on these lineaments is important to elucidate the tectonomagmatic evolution of the Central Andes. We investigated the back-arc area of the COT using remote sensing, geological, structural, and petrochemical data. Our study demonstrates that this portion of the COT consists of NW-SE striking faults, formed under overall left-lateral transtension that decreases in activity toward the COT termini. Deformation on the COT occurred during and after activity of prominent N-S striking transpressive fault systems and is coeval with magmatism, which is focused on the central COT. The most evolved magmatic rocks, with an upper crustal imprint, are exposed on the central COT, whereas more primitive, mantle-derived mafic to moderately evolved magmatic rocks, are found toward the COT termini. This points to a genetic relationship between upper crustal deformation and magmatic activity that led to enhanced magma storage in the central COT. COT magmas may result either from slab steepening or episodic delamination of the asthenospheric mantle.

  19. Status and evolution of the cryosphere in the Andes of Santiago (Chile, 33.5°S.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, X.; Rojas, F.; Brenning, A.

    2010-06-01

    In the context of a general retreat of glaciers in the dry Andes, this study focuses on the state and recent evolution of debris-covered glaciers and permafrost-related landforms, especially rock glaciers, in the semiarid to semihumid Laguna Negra catchment, a part of the Andes of central Chile at 33.5°S, that is a key contributor of drinking water for the city of Santiago. We conducted catchment-scale geomorphological mapping, diachronic analysis of 1955 and 1996 orthophotographs and digital elevation models (DEMs), and the analysis of ground temperatures and their sensitivity to climate variation. Rock glaciers dominate spatially and in terms of water storage over glaciers (area ratio: 1.7:1; ratio of water equivalents: 1.5:1). An intense downwasting has affected both debris-covered and exposed glacier components in the Punta Negra subcatchment, a process that is associated with the growth of numerous thermokarst depressions. The altitudinal transect of ground temperature suggest that permafrost is widespread above ˜ 4000 m asl, although it can also occur at lower elevations on sheltered footslopes and within rock glaciers. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the near-surface ground thermal regime at high altitudes is strongly influenced by the snow cover disappearance date, which may therefore constitute an important control on the effect of climatic warming.

  20. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  1. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  2. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  3. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  4. Virus Ebola Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharyono Wuryadi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Virus Marburg dan Ebola diklasifikasikan sebagai virus yang sangat menular dan dimasukkan dalam klasifikasi sebagai virus/pathogen dengan derajat biosafety 4, sehingga untuk menanganinya diperlukan laboratorium khusus tingkat 4.

  5. CENOZOIC EXHUMATION OF THE ANTIOQUEÑO PLATEAU, NORTHERN ANDES, COLOMBIA, FROM APATITE LOW-TEMPERATURE THERMOCHRONOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Moreno, S. A.; Foster, D. A.; O'Sullivan, P. B.; Donelick, R.; Stockli, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Antioqueño plateau (AP), in the northernmost Cordillera Central, Colombia, is the most extensive and best preserved relict surface in the Northern Andes. Apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and fission track (AFT) results from twenty two samples, collected from paleocrustal depths along two vertical profiles in canyons dissecting the AP, constrain Cenozoic erosional exhumation of this segment of the Andean range. The two profiles exhibit excellent reproducibility of AHe and AFT data. Helium ages increase with elevation from ~22-49 Ma. A marked inflection point in the AHe age-elevation plots at 25 Ma defines the bottom of the post-Oligocene He partial retention zone (PRZ). Virtually invariant ages at ~25 Ma record onset of rapid exhumation in the AP. A more subtle slope change in the PRZ at ~43 Ma is interpreted as a minor exhumation pulse. AFT better defines timing and intensity of Eocene exhumation. AFT ages for both profiles vary from ~30-49 Ma and are consistently older than AHe ages. AFT data display invariant ages (±2σ) between 1500-2400 m elevations while confined track length data exhibit uni-modal distributions with a mean track length of ~14.2 μm. Both facts indicate rapid cooling. This is further supported by virtually concordant AFT and AHe ages for both profiles between 1500 to 2200 m implying that rocks were exhumed from temperatures >120°C to below AHe closure temperature 60°C. Assuming a geothermal gradient of ~25°C/km this corresponds to exhumation rates in the order of 0.5 mm/y, comparable in intensity to the Miocene pulse defined by AHe. Integrated thermal modeling show an episode of rapid cooling at ~43-49 Ma. AFT profiles show an apparent inflection point at ~1400 m, which defines the upper boundary of an apatite partial annealing zone (PAZ) exhumed during the 43-49 Ma cooling event. The position of the PAZ and PRZ relative to the present erosional surface point to average erosion rates of ~0.03 mm/yr, which constitute very low denudation rates

  6. Oncogenic viruses and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxiang; George; Luo; Jing-hsiung; James; Ou

    2015-01-01

    <正>This special issue of the journal is dedicated to the important topic of oncogenic viruses and cancer.It contains seven review articles covering all known oncogenic viruses except for human T-lymphotropic virus type1(HTLV-1).These review articles are contributed by experts on specific viruses and their associated human cancers.Viruses account for about 20%of total human cancer cases.Although many viruses can cause various tumors in animals,only seven of them

  7. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  8. Poder y sociedad en los Andes: Manuel Isidoro Belzu, un caudillo popular. Bolivia, 1848-1855

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Javier Ortíz Mesa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} En este ensayo quiero referirme a un gobernante boliviano, Manuel Isidoro Belzu, presidente entre los años de 1848 y 1855. Con una larga carrera militar de casi 25 años, en un ambiente de permanente inestabilidad política y con una fascinante estrategia, Belzu ha sido percibido por algunos historiadores y literatos como un «Caudillo del Pueblo», otros lo calificaron como un demagogo y algunos más como el presidente para la Bolivia de entonces. Manuel Isidoro Belzu nació al tiempo que se vislumbraba la Bolivia Republicana en 1808. Fue un hombre pobre como muchos de sus conciudadanos, predominantemente indígenas. No obstante, Belzu fue un mestizo, expresión de los cambios raciales que desde la Colonia se produjeron en la población de la Audiencia de Charcas cuya sede y capital fue Chuquisaca o Sucre, donde tuvo asiento el emporio minero más importante y productivo de los Andes, el Cerro Rico de Potosí.

  9. A glaciological baseline for the upper Olivares basin, Chilean Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriaux, T.; Bown, F.; Burger, F.; Cisternas, S.; Gacitúa, G.; Hernández, J.; Malmros, J.; Muñoz, C.; Oberreuter, J.; Rivera, A.; Silva, R.

    2013-12-01

    Santiago de Chile, with near 6.7 million of inhabitants, is located at the foot of the Andes, in the Maipo river basin, where there are approximately 424 km2 of ice, being the biggest glaciers, those located at the upper Olivares basin. Very little has been researched in recent years about the ongoing changes taking place in the area or about the glacier meltwater contribution or about the human impact on the glaciers. In order to tackle this deficiency, we began a research program in 2012, aiming to complete a glaciological baseline for this area, including glacier mass, energy and hydrological studies. For this purpose, we have established a detailed monitoring program on two glaciers where we installed 3 automatic weather stations, two arrays of stakes for mass balance studies, two automatic photographic cameras for monitoring albedo changes and two runoff stations, among several other instruments. Also, we have surveyed 5 glaciers with our airborne radar and lidar systems, allowing mapping their surface topographies at different seasons and the bedrocks underneath the ice. Analysis of satellite images shows generalized glacier area shrinkage, with a mean area lost of 25.5% since 1967 (total of 68.6 km2 in 1967 among 6 studied glaciers). The collected radar ice thickness data (maximum ice thickness of 223 m), allowed calculating a total volume of water equivalent of 3 km3 storage in 5 main glaciers of the basin. The GPS surveys of several stakes resulted in surface ice velocities between 1 and 5 m/yr. The mass balance studies showed high summer ablation rates, with an important role of sublimation, expressed as penitentes with heights of up to 1.5 m. Runoff contributed by Olivares Alfa glacier averaged 461 l/s between January and April 2013 with peaks of up to 2000 l/s, confirming the importance of glacier meltwater for the basin during summer months (January-March). The above numbers are some of the results obtained in the area, illustrating the importance of

  10. Leaf Wax δ13C Varies with Elevation in the Peruvian Andes and Western Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. S.; Feakins, S. J.; Ponton, C.; Peters, T.; West, A. J.; Galy, V.; Bentley, L. P.; Salinas, N.; Shenkin, A.; Martin, R.; Asner, G. P.; Malhi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Plant leaf wax carbon isotopic composition (δ13Cwax) reflects the net isotopic effects associated with diffusion into the leaf, fixation of carbon by Rubisco and biosynthesis of individual leaf wax biochemicals. As declining pCO2 with elevation affects the first two fractionations, we expect to find an isotopic gradient in δ13Cwax, if the fractionation of leaf wax biosynthesis is constant. To test this, we report δ13Cwax values from 500 samples of leaves collected by tree-climbers from the upper canopy from 9 forest-inventory plots spanning a 3.5km elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes and western Amazonia during the CHAMBASA field campaign. These samples provide a unique opportunity to study the relationship between δ13Cwax and pCO2 in diverse species across this remote tropical montane forest and lowland rainforest. The very wet climate throughout (2-5 m rainfall per year) minimizes fractionation effects due to stomatal restrictions (i.e. water use efficiency) that may be an important factor elsewhere. Preliminary results show δ13Cwax values on average increase with elevation by ~1.5‰/km, a trend consistent with bulk plant δ13C in previous studies. The mean epsilon between bulk and C29 n-alkane is -7.3±2.2‰. Inter-sample differences are large on the order of 10‰. Shaded leaves and understory leaves are found to be depleted relative to sunlit leaves, presumably due to a lower photosynthetic rate and use of respired CO2 in the understory. C29 n-alkanes are on average ~2.5‰ more depleted than C30 n-alkanoic acids, indicating fractionation during selective decarboxylation. We further compare results from plants with soil and river sediments to provide insights into how leaf wax signals are archived in soils and exported from the landscape. We find a ~1.4‰/km gradient in forest soils similar to plants. We observe a ~2‰ offset between C29 n-alkane in plant leaves and in soils across the elevation profile, which is likely a signal of degradation

  11. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the Eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-P. Ledru

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analysed the pollen content of a 1100-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the Eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the andean forest to the bog (T and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P, was defined to distinguish the atmospheric moisture from the soil moisture content of the páramo. Results showed that between 900 AD and 1230 AD, the Medieval Climate Anomaly interval was warm and moist with high T/P index linked to a high ENSO variability and a weak South American Summer Monsoon (SASM activity. Between 1230 and 1650 AD, a dry climate prevailed characterized by an abrupt decrease in the T/P index related to lower ENSO variability with significant impact on the floristic composition of the páramo. During the Little Ice Age, two phases were observed, first a wet phase between 1650 and 1750 AD linked to low ENSO variability in the Pacific and warm south equatorial Atlantic SSTs favored the return of a wet páramo, and a cold and dry phase between 1750 and 1810 AD associated with low ENSO variability and weak SASM activity resulting in drying of the páramo. The Current Warm Period marks the beginning of a climate characterized by high convective activity, the highest in the last millennium, and weaker SASM activity modifying the water stock of the páramo. Our results show that the páramo is progressively loosing its capacity for water storage and that the variability of both tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTs matters for Andean climate patterns although many teleconnection mechanisms are still poorly understood.

  12. Along-Strike Variations in Crustal Seismicity in the Central Andes and Geodynamic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, K.; Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; McGroder, M.; Kendall, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    For the central Andes, we compiled relocated crustal earthquakes (magnitude ≥ 4.5) from the EHB Bulletin and Nipress et al. [2007] and focal mechanisms from the Global CMT catalog and published literature [Alvarado et al., 2005]. These data were plotted in map, cross section, and 3D views in the context of local tomography [Koulakov et al., 2006] and lithospheric boundaries [Tassara et al., in prep]. The results imply major along-strike variations in the mechanisms of crustal deformation. At the latitude of the Altiplano, there is scarce forearc seismicity. The thin-skinned Bolivian retroarc thrust belt shows no seismic events (magnitude ≥ 4.5), suggesting that it is deforming aseismically or locked. In contrast, at the latitude of the Puna to the south (20-25°S), crustal seismicity is more prevalent in both the forearc and retroarc. Within this region, active deformation in the Coastal Cordillera near Antofagasta is occurring along steeply east-dipping normal faults at 15-41 km depth; this is the only part of the central Andean forearc that displays prominent extension. Outboard of this, thrust events at ~15 km depth in the forearc wedge display gently dipping nodal planes, and may be signatures of underplating crust that was tectonically eroded at the trench. Underplating is a likely process by which this region of the forearc has undergone ~1 km of surface uplift during the Neogene. Seismicity with thrust or reverse and oblique focal mechanisms in the retroarc wedge is localized beneath the frontal part of the thick-skinned Eastern Cordilleran thrust belt and the Santa Barbara ranges. Seismicity along discrete, east- and west-dipping planes occurs to near Moho depths (~50 km). While retroarc crustal seismicity continues to the south toward the Juan Fernandez flat slab, there is a concentration of seismic events in the retroarc at the latitude (22-23°S) where there is prominent normal faulting in the forearc. We interpret the compiled data to suggest that

  13. Modelling distributed ablation on Juncal Norte Glacier, dry Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, Marco; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Helbing, Jakob; Dadic, Ruzica; Burlando, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    In the Aconcagua River Basin, in the dry Andes of central Chile, water resources in summer originate mostly from snow and ice glacier melt. Summer seasons are dry and stable, with precipitation close to zero, low relative humidity and very intense solar radiation. The region's economic activities are dependent on these water resources, but their assessment is still incomplete and an effort is needed to evaluate present and future changes in water from glacier and seasonal snow covers in this area. The main aim of this paper is to simulate glacier melt and runoff from Juncal Norte Glacier, in the upper Aconcagua Basin, using models of various complexity and data requirement. We simulate distributed glacier ablation for two seasons using an energy-balance model (EB) and an enhanced temperature-index model (ETI). Meteorological variables measured at Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) located on and off-glacier are extrapolated from point observations to the glacier-wide scale. Shortwave radiation is modelled with a parametric model taking into account shading, reflection from slopes and atmospheric transmittance. In the energy-balance model, the longwave radiation flux is computed from Stefan-Boltzmann relationships and turbulent fluxes are calculated using the bulk aerodynamic method. The EB model includes subsurface heat conduction and gravitational redistribution of snow. Glacier runoff is modelled using a linear reservoir approach accounting for the temporal evolution of the system. Hourly simulations of glacier melt are validated against ablation observations (ultrasonic depth gauge and ablation stakes) and runoff measured at the glacier snout is compared to a runoff record obtained from a combination of radar water level measurements and tracer experiments. Results show that extrapolation of meteorological input data, and of temperature in particular, is the largest source of model uncertainty, together with snow water equivalent initial conditions. We explore

  14. Asynchronous Glacial Chronologies in the Central Andes (15-40°S) and Paleoclimatic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, R.; Kull, C.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2006-12-01

    We have established glacial chronologies along a N-S transect over the Central Andes using 10Be surface exposure dating. Our results show that maximum glacial advances occurred asynchronously and reflect the varying influence and shifts of the major atmospheric circulation systems during the Late Quaternary: the tropical circulation in the north and the westerlies in the south. In Bolivia (three research areas in the Cordillera Real and the Cordillera Cochabamba, ~15°S) glacial advances could be dated to ~20 and 12 ka BP. This is in good agreement with published exposure age data from moraines in Bolivia and Peru (provided that all ages are calculated following the same scaling system). Accordingly, the maximum glaciation there probably occurred roughly synchronous to the temperature minimum of the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the lateglacial cold reversals. Strict correlation with neither the Younger Dryas in the northern hemisphere, nor the Antarctic Cold Reversal is possible due to the current systematic exposure age uncertainties (~10%). Glacier-Climate-Modelling corroborates the sensitivity of the reconstructed glaciers to temperature changes, rather than precipitation. On the contrary, there is good evidence for the dominant role of precipitation changes on the glacial chronologies in the lee of the Cordillera Occidental, i.e. on the Altiplano and further south. The pronounced lateglacial wet phase, which is well documented in lake transgression phases as far south as 28°S (-> tropical moisture source), seems to have caused glacial advances even at ~30°S. In two research areas in Chile at that latitude, we were able to date several lateglacial moraines. Besides, the maximum datable glaciation there occurred at ~30 ka BP. That is significantly earlier than the LGM (sensu strictu) and points to favourable climate conditions for glaciation at that time (particularly increased precipitation). We conclude that the westerlies were more intensive or

  15. Eocene extensional exhumation of basement and arc rocks along southwesternmost Peru, Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noury, Mélanie; Bernet, Matthias; Sempéré, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The overthickened crust of the current Central Andes is commonly viewed as the result of tectonic shortening. However, in the present-day terrestrial forearc and arc of southwesternmost Peru, crustal thickness increases from 30 km along the coastline to >60 km below the active arc, whereas the upper crust exhibits little to no evidence of crustal shortening and, in constrast, many extensional features. How (and when) crustal overthickness was acquired in this region is thus little understood. Because crustal overthickening often results in extensional collapse and/or significant erosion, here we address this issue through a regional-scale study of exhumation using fission-track thermochronology. The limited fission-track data previously available in the area suggested that exhumation began during the Mesozoic. In this study, we present new apatite and zircon fission-track data obtained along the current terrestrial forearc of southwesternmost Peru. This relatively restricted area presents the interest of providing extensive outcrops of Precambrian to Ordovician basement and Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous arc plutons. In order to compare the chronology of exhumation of these units, we performed extensive sampling for fission-track dating, as well as structural mapping. Our results indicate that the basement rocks and Jurassic plutons that crop out in the Arequipa region, where the crust is now >50 km-thick, experienced a rapid cooling through the 240-110°C temperature range between ~65 and ~35 Ma. This period of rapid exhumation coincided in time with the accumulation of terrestrial forearc deposits (the Lower Moquegua Group), that exhibit many syn-sedimentary extensional features and are bounded by conspicuous normal faults, specifically along the region where intense activity of the main arc between ~90 and ~60 Ma had led to voluminous magma emplacement. This close succession of (1) intense magmatic activity and (2) regional-scale exhumation associated with

  16. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  17. Regional distance shear-coupled PL propagation within the northern Altiplano, central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer L.; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    1999-12-01

    Properties of the shear-coupled P wavetrain (SPL) from regional earthquakes provide important information about the structure of the crust and upper mantle. We investigate broad-band seismic data from intermediate-depth earthquakes and develop a grid search technique using synthetic seismograms to study the sensitivity of SPL and to model the crustal structure of the northern Altiplano, central Andes. Waveforms from an earthquake that occurred on 1994 December 12 within the Nazca slab beneath the Altiplano display a clear SPL wavetrain at the temporary stations deployed during the BANJO and SEDA experiments. We relocate this event and determine the moment tensor by inverting the complete long-period waveforms. With these source parameters fixed, we perform sensitivity analyses using a reflectivity technique to compute synthetic seismograms at a distance of 313 km (BANJO station 2, SALI). We find that, at this distance, the long-period SPL wavetrain is sensitive to the following model parameters, in order of decreasing sensitivity: crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness, focal depth, distance (location), crustal Qα and Qβ, and mantle velocity. We develop a grid search method to investigate the four parameters of the crust/upper mantle model to which the synthetic seismograms are most sensitive at SALI (crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness). Trade-offs exist among all four of the model parameters, resulting in a range of acceptable crustal models that provide excellent fits between the data and synthetic seismograms in the passband of 15-100 s at a single station. However, by using data at a range of distances (150-450 km) we find that the model that provides the best overall fit between the data and synthetic seismograms, and thus best approximates the average characteristics of the crust and upper mantle structure of the northern Altiplano, is characterized by an average crustal velocity of 6

  18. Variation of the upper mantle velocity structure along the central-south Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaofeng; Sandvol, Eric; Shen, Yang; Gao, Haiying

    2014-05-01

    Variations in the subduction angle of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate has lead to different modes of deformation and volcanism along the Andean active margin. The volcanic gap between the central and southern Andean volcanic zones is correlated with the Pampean flat-slab subduction zone, where the subducting Nazca slab changes from a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the Puna plateau to a horizontal slab beneath the Sierras Pampeanas, and then to a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the south Andes from north to south. The Pampean flat-slab subduction correlates spatially with the track of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, and is associated with the inboard migration of crustal deformation. A major Pliocene delamination event beneath the southern Puna plateau has previously been inferred from geochemical and geological and preliminary geophysical data. The mechanisms for the transition between dipping- and flat-subduction slab and the mountain building process of the central Andean plateau are key issues to understanding the Andean-type orogenic process. We use a new frequency-time normalization approach with non-linear stacking to extract very-broadband (up to 300 second) empirical Green's functions (EGFs) from continuous seismic records. The long-period EGFs provide the deeper depth-sensitivity needed to constrain the mantle structure. The broadband waveform data are from 393 portable stations of four temporary networks: PUNA, SIEMBRA, CHARGE, RAMP, East Sierras Pampeanas, BANJO/SEDA, REFUCA, ANCORP, and 31 permanent stations accessed from both the IRIS DMC and GFZ GEOFON DMC. A finite difference waveform propagation method is used to generate synthetic seismograms from 3-D velocity model. We use 3-D traveltime sensitivity kernels, and traveltime residuals measurement by waveform cross-correlation to directly invert the upper mantle shear-wave velocity structure. The preliminary model shows strong along-strike velocity variations within in the mantle wedge and

  19. Broadband regional waveform modeling to investigate crustal structure and tectonics of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer Lyn

    We use broadband regional waveform modeling of earthquakes in the central Andes to determine seismic properties of the Altiplano crust. Properties of the shear-coupled P-wavetrain (SPL ) from intermediate-depth events provide particularly important information about the structure of the crust. We utilize broadband seismic data recorded at the BANJO and SEDA stations, and synthetic seismograms computed with a reflectivity technique to study the sensitivity of SPL to crustal and upper mantle parameters at regional distances. We find that the long-period SPL-wavetrain is most sensitive to crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios, average crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. A comprehensive grid search method developed to investigate these four parameters suggests that although trade-offs exist between model parameters, models of the Altiplano which provide the best fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by low Poisson's ratios, low average crustal velocity and thick crust. We apply our grid search technique and sensitivity analysis results to model the full waveforms from 6 intermediate-depth and 2 shallow-focus earthquakes recorded at regional distances by BANJO and SEDA stations. Results suggest that the Altiplano crust is much thicker (55--65 km) and slower (5.75--6.25 km/s) than global average values. Low crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios together with the lack of evidence for a high-velocity lower crust suggests a bulk felsic crustal composition, resulting in an overall weak crust. Our results favor a model of crustal thickening involving large-scale tectonic shortening of a predominantly felsic crust. To better understand the mechanics of earthquake rupture along the South American subduction zone, we have analyzed broadband teleseismic P-waves and utilize single- and multi-station inversion techniques to constrain source characteristics for the 12 November 1996 Peru subduction zone earthquake. Aftershock locations, intensity reports

  20. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-P. Ledru

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analyzed the pollen content of a 1150-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the Andean forest to the bog (T and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P, was defined. This index was used to distinguish changes in the atmospheric moisture from the soil moisture content of the páramo and their associated patterns of interdecadal El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO variability and South American summer monsoon (SASM activity. Results show that between 850 and 1250 AD, the Medieval Climate Anomaly interval was warm and moist with a high transported pollen/Poaceae pollen (T/P index linked to high ENSO variability and weak SASM activity. Between 1250 and 1550 AD, a dry climate prevailed, characterized by an abrupt decrease in the T/P index and therefore no upslope cloud convection, related to lower ENSO variability and with significant impact on the floristic composition of the páramo. During the Little Ice Age, two phases were observed: first, a wet phase between 1550 and 1750 AD linked to low ENSO variability in the Pacific and warm south equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs favored the return of a wet páramo, and then a cold and dry phase between 1750 and 1800 AD associated with low ENSO variability and weak SASM activity resulted in drying of the páramo. The current warm period marks the beginning of a climate characterized by high convective activity – the highest in the last millennium – and weaker SASM activity modifying the water storage of the páramo. Our results show that the páramo is progressively losing its capacity for water storage and that the interdecadal variability of both tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTs matter for

  1. Drivers of methane uptake by montane forest soils in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Diem, Torsten; Huaraca Quispe, Lidia; Cahuana, Adan; Meir, Patrick; Teh, Yit

    2016-04-01

    The exchange of methane between the soils of humid tropical forests and the atmosphere is relatively poorly documented. This is particularly true of montane settings where variations between uptake and emission of atmospheric methane have been observed. Whilst most of these ecosystems appear to function as net sinks for atmospheric methane, some act as considerable sources. In regions like the Andes, humid montane forests are extensive and a better understanding of the magnitude and controls on soil-atmosphere methane exchange is required. We report methane fluxes from upper montane cloud forest (2811 - 2962 m asl), lower montane cloud forest (1532 - 1786 m asl), and premontane forest (1070 - 1088 m asl) soils in south-eastern Peru. Between 1000 and 3000 m asl, mean annual air temperature and total annual precipitation decrease from 24 ° C and 5000 mm to 12 ° C and 1700 mm. The study region experiences a pronounced wet season between October and April. Monthly measurements of soil-atmosphere gas exchange, soil moisture, soil temperature, soil oxygen concentration, available ammonium and available nitrate were made from February 2011 in the upper and lower montane cloud forests and July 2011 in the premontane forest to June 2013. These soils acted as sinks for atmospheric methane with mean net fluxes for wet and dry season, respectively, of -2.1 (0.2) and -1.5 (0.1) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in the upper montane forest; -1.5 (0.2) and -1.4 (0.1) mg CH4 m-2 d-1in the lower montane forest; and -0.3 (0.2) and -0.2 (0.2) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in the premontane forest. Spatial variations among forest types were related to available nitrate and water-filled pore space suggesting that nitrate inhibition of oxidation or constraints on the diffusional supply of methane to methanotrophic communities may be important controls on methane cycling in these soils. Seasonality in methane exchange, with weaker uptake related to increased water-filled pore space and soil temperature during the wet

  2. Monitoring rock glacier dynamics and ground temperatures in the semiarid Andes (Chile, 30°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, Alexander; Azócar, Guillermo F.; Bodin, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Rock glaciers and mountain permafrost are widespread in the high semiarid Andes of Chile, where they concentrate greater amounts of ice than glaciers. Rock glaciers are of particular interest because in some cases the permafrost they contain might be in a degrading in response to climatic warming. This could result in increased dynamics and even to destabilization, which has been observed on some rock glaciers in the studied area. Displacement rates and active-layer temperatures of two rock glaciers as well as ground surface temperatures of the periglacial environment in the upper Elqui valley have been monitored since summer 2009/10 with funding from the Chilean Dirección General de Aguas. Differential GPS measurements of 115 points on the surface of two rock glaciers since April 2010 showed horizontal displacements of up to 1.3 m/a on the Llano de las Liebres rock glacier and up to 1.2 m/a on the Tapado rock glacier. General velocity patterns are consistent with the morphological evidence of activity (e.g., front slopes, looseness of debris) and for the Tapado complex, a clearly distinct activity from the debris-covered glacier was observed. Temperature measurements in four boreholes indicate active-layer depths of about 2.5 m at the highest locations on the Tapado rock glacier (~4400 m a.s.l.) and about 8 m near the front of the Llano rock glacier (3786 m a.s.l.). Spatial patterns of mean ground surface temperature (MGST) were analyzed with regards to influences of elevation, potential incoming solar radiation, location on ice-debris landforms (rock and debris-covered glaciers), and snow cover duration using linear mixed-effects models. While accounting for the other variables, sites with long-lasting snow patches had ~0.4°C lower MGST, and ice-debris landforms had ~0.4-0.6°C lower MGST than general debris surfaces, highlighting important local modifications to the general topographic variation of ground thermal conditions.

  3. Killing the snake of poverty : local perceptions of poverty and well-being and people’s capabilities to improve their lives in the Southern Andes of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miyashita, A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the generalised image of comuneros of the Southern Andes of Peru as living in poverty, a closer examination of the daily lives of the campesinos provides a more dynamic perspective. Some households claim that their lives are improving, others that their lives are the same, while many report

  4. A preliminary checklist of polypores of Peru, with notes on distribution in the Andes-Amazon region and new records for the country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janovec JP

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of 33 polypore species (Hymenochaetales and Polyporales from the Camanti-Marcapata Biological Corridor (CMBC of Cusco, Peru, is provided with data about distribution in the Andes-Amazon region. More than 90% of polypore species reported herein are new records to the country.

  5. U/Pb ages on detrital zircons in the southern central Andes Neogene foreland (36°-37°S): Constraints on Andean exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, Lucía; Bottesi, Germán; Naipauer, Maximiliano; Folguera, Andrés; Ramos, Victor A.

    2011-12-01

    U/Pb dating on detrital zircons was performed in the Pampa de Carrizalito depocenter of the Late Miocene foreland basin associated with the Southern Central Andes orogenic front. This reveals Andean and pre-Andean components in magmatic derived zircons inhomogeneously distributed through the sequence. Andean, Grenville, Pampean, Famatinian and Gondwanic components reveal a complex source distribution from either the Main Andes, Coastal Cordillera and basement foreland areas. These are discussed showing different patterns in the context of the Andean orogenic cycle. Cretaceous and Jurassic components that are partly related to Mesozoic batholiths, developed at the western slope of the Andes at these latitudes, have a very contrasting behavior through the sequence: While Jurassic grains are represented from base to top, Cretaceous ones dilute upwardly. This is explained through the progressive uplift of the Southern Central Andes that could have created a barrier to Cretaceous and Jurassic detritus, while the older ones could have had either an alternative source area represented by the inverted rift system of the Huincul Ridge in the foreland area and the Cordillera del Viento in the hinterland area or the reworking of Jurassic sedimentary sequences of the Neuquén basin. Finally, a progressive enrichment in pre-Andean components to the top of the sequence is interpreted as related to the development of a broken foreland and the consequent rapid expansion of the orogenic front at the time of development of a slab shallowing setting in the region as shown by previous works.

  6. The Real of Community, the Desire for Development and the Performance of Egalitarianism in the Peruvian Andes: A Materialist–Utopian Account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a materialist–utopian perspective for explaining the persistence of community in the Andes by drawing upon Lacanian theory and the thought of the Peruvian Marxist José Carlos Mariátegui. What characterizes the Andean comunidad are not notions of belonging and identity, but the exi

  7. Mallas y flujos : acción colectiva, cambio social, quinua y desarrollo regional indígena en los Andes Bolivianos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laguna, P.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies collective action and social change in indigenous rural organisations (IRO) in the Bolivian Andes. I focus on the effects and importance that these organisations have in the historical process of regional development as social spaces that encapsulate different projects of social,

  8. The ethno-politics of water security: contestations of ethnicity and gender in strategies to control water in the Andes of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera-Delgado, J.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is the result of a multidisciplinary research which tries to explain water injustices and the threats to water rights access and control experienced by indigenous peasants of the Peruvian Andes. It attempts to contribute to the analysis of the interactions between ethnicity and gender, a

  9. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in aerosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes

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    E. González-Toril

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Four different communities and one culture of pigmented microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation in mineral medium of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia, from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed the identification of sequences belonging to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified and the maritime Antarctic soil the poorest (only one. Snow samples from Col du midi (Alps and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones. These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clone. The only microorganism identified in the maritime Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp. was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. The two snow samples from the Alps only shared one common microorganism. Most of the identified microorganisms have been detected previously in cold environments (Dietzia kujamenisi, Pseudonocardia Antarctica, Hydrogenophaga palleronii and Brebundimonas sp., marine sediments (Aquiflexus balticus, Pseudomonas pseudoalkaligenes, Pseudomonas sp. and one uncultured Alphaproteobacteria, and soils and rocks (Pseudonocardia sp.,

  10. VIOLENCIA POLÍTICA, ASISTENCIA MILITAR DE ESTADOS UNIDOS Y PRODUCCIÓN DE COCA EN LOS ANDES CENTRALES

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    Moisés Arce

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ¿Tiene la violencia política un impacto significativo sobre la producción de drogas en los Andes Centrales? ¿Disminuye la ayuda militar estadounidense la oferta de drogas ilícitas que se origina en los Andes Centrales? ¿Qué otros factores ayudan a explicar dicha producción? ¿Tiene la lucha estadounidense contra el narcotráfico las mismas consecuencias en cada país? Este trabajo evalúa de manera empírica los efectos de la violencia política y la ayuda exterior de Estados Unidos (EE.UU. en los tres países productores de droga más prolíficos de América Latina: Colombia, Bolivia y Perú. Los resultados guardan relación directa con la literatura existente que recalca los obstáculos que los gobiernos enfrentan cuando pretenden regular los mercados de bienes de contrabando. Un análisis comparativo de la política antidrogas de EE.UU. aclara los éxitos y las limitaciones de la estrategia que actualmente se lleva a cabo, particularmente en Colombia, donde la violencia política ha facilitado el fortalecimiento del narcotráfico a nivel internacionalWhat is the effect of political violence on the production of coca in the Central Andes? Does U.S. military aid reduce the amount of drugs that originate from this region? What other factors help explain the production of coca? Are the effects of U.S. military aid the same across the Andean nations? This paper tests the effects of political violence and U.S. military aid in the drug producing nations of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru. Our results are consistent with existing literature that emphasizes the obstacles that governments face as they attempt to suppress markets for prohibited goods. Our comparative analysis sheds new light on the limitations of the current U.S. policy, particularly in Colombia, where political violence has strengthened the global drug trade

  11. Dynamics and Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Northwestern Andes: Subduction Segments, Moho Depth, and Possible Relationships to Mantle Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Becker, T. W.; Porritt, R. W.; Cardona, A.; Poveda, E.; Posada, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northwestern South American plate shows a complex tectonic setting whose causes and relationship to mantle structure are still debated. We combine different techniques to elucidate some of the links between slabs and surface deformation in Colombia. Crustal structure beneath the Northern Andes was inferred from receiver functions where we find thicknesses of nearly 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera and underneath the southern volcanic area of the Central Cordillera. We infer that such crustal thickening resulted from shortening, magmatic addition, and accretion-subduction. Analyses of relative teleseismic travel time delays and estimates of residual surface topography based on our new crustal model suggest that there are at least two subduction segments underneath the area. The Caribbean slab lies at a low angle beneath northernmost Colombia and steepens beneath the Eastern Cordillera. Such steepening is indicated by negative travel time relative residuals in the area of the Bucaramanga Nest, implying a cold anomaly in the upper mantle, and by positive residual topography just off the east of this area, perhaps generated by slab-associated return flow. Results for the western Andes and the Pacific coastal plains are consistent with "normal" subduction of the Nazca plate: travel time relative residuals there are predominantly positive, and the residual topography shows an W-E gradient, going from positive at the Pacific coastline to negative at the Magdalena Valley, which separates the eastern cordillera from the rest of the Colombian Andean system. Azimuthal analysis of relative travel time residuals further suggests the presence of seismically slow materials beneath the central part of the Eastern Cordillera. Azimuthal anisotropy from SKS splitting in that region indicates that seismically fast orientations do not follow plate convergence, different from what we find for the western Colombian Andes and the Caribbean and Pacific coastal plains

  12. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Damien; Sempere, Thierry; Plantard, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes, biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida, a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures and thus thrives above 2.0-2.5 km in these tropical highlands. The Peruvian populations of this species exhibit a clear evolutionary pattern with deeper, more ancient lineages occurring in Andean southern Peru and shallower, younger lineages occurring progressively northwards. Genetically diverging G. pallida populations thus progressively colonized highland areas as these were expanding northwards, demonstrating that altitude in the Peruvian Andes was acquired longitudinally from south to north, i.e. in the direction of decreasing orogenic volume. This phylogeographic structure is recognized in other, independent highland biotaxa, and point to the Central Andean Orocline (CAO) as the region where high altitudes first emerged. Moreover, molecular clocks relative to Andean taxa, including the potato-tomato group, consistently estimate that altitudes high enough to induce biotic radiation were first acquired in the Early Miocene. After calibration by geological and biological tie-points and intervals, the phylogeny of G. pallida is used as a molecular clock, which estimates that the 2.0-2.5 km threshold elevation range was reached in the Early Miocene in southernmost Peru, in the Middle and Late Miocene in the Abancay segment (NW southern Peru), and from the latest Miocene in central and northern Peru. Although uncertainties attached to phylochronologic ages are significantly larger than those derived from geochronological methods, these results are fairly consistent with coeval

  13. Large scale features associated with strong frontogenesis in equivalent potential temperature in the South American subtropics east of the Andes

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    J. M. Arraut

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available South American subtropics east of the Andes exhibit a region of intense climatological frontogenesis in equivalent potential temperature (EPT in the December to March season, mostly produced by deformation of the wind field. The goal of this paper is to investigate the large scale features associated with intense and weak frontogenesis by deformation (FGD in EPT in the region where it attains its climatological maximum. This can be approximately delimited by 32–42° S and 66–69° W, which is small enough as to contain only one synoptic perturbation at a time. The spatial average of the positive values of frontogenesis at 850 hPa over the whole region (DFG+ is used to represent the strength of the perturbation. ECMWF ERA-40 reanalysis data set is used to calculate DFG+ at six hour intervals for 21 seasons (1981–2002. Compositing analysis is carried out for strong (above the 0.75 quantile and weak (below the 0.25 quantile events. For strong events the geopotential field at 850 hPa exhibits the North Argentinean Low (NAL, a transient trough and the Low Pressure Tongue East of the Andes (LPT. Upon comparison with the composite field of FGD it can be observed that FGD exhibits a strong maximum over the Argentinean Col (AC which separates the NAL and the trough. These features are absent in the weak frontogenesis composite, which exhibits a stronger South Pacific Subtropical High close to the continent. At 250 hPa the strong FGD composite exhibits a trough over the Andes with a wind speed maximum to its east. Both of these features are associated with the deepening of the NAL in the literature. These are not present in the weak FGD composites. Strong events show an intense quasi meridional corridor of water vapor transport from the Amazon to the subtropics that encounters westerly flow in the neighborhood of the AC. This is absent in weak events. A preliminary analysis of precipitation is carried out using the GPCP daily data set. An intense

  14. Estructura litosférica de los Andes centrales a partirde un modelo gravimétrico 3D

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    Claudia B. Prezzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A través del modelado directode la anomalía de Bouguer se desarrolló un modelo de densidades en 3D de lacorteza continental, la placa subducida y el manto superior, para los AndesCentrales entre los 20-29°S y los 74-61°O. El objetivo de este trabajo escontribuir a un mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica, integrando lainformación disponible (geofísica, geológica, petrológica y geoquímica en unúnico modelo. La geometría del modelo está definida y limitada por la ubicaciónde hipocentros, líneas sísmicas de reflexión y refracción, tomografías deatenuación y de tiempos de arribo, estudios magnetotelúricos, modelos térmicosy secciones estructurales balanceadas. Las densidades asignadas a losdiferentes cuerpos fueron calculadas a partir de datos petrológicos ygeoquímicos, estimando las condiciones de presión y temperatura. El modeloconsiste de 31 planos verticales E-O paralelos, donde la corteza continentalestá compuesta por distintos cuerpos que representan a las diferentes unidadesmorfotectónicas de los Andes Centrales. Se generaron mapas isocóricos del techode la placa subducida, del Moho continental y del techo de la astenósferadebajo de Sudamérica. Se calculó la anomalía residual mediante la sustracciónde los efectos gravimétricos de la placa subducida modelada y del Moho modeladode la anomalía de Bouguer. Este estudio demuestra como el modelado gravimétrico3D, integrando información geofísica, geológica y petrológica, puede contribuiral mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica de los Andes Centrales.

  15. Tomographic imaging of the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle in the mantle transition zone beneath the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, A. C.; Biryol, C. B.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    The central Andes in South America is an ideal location to investigate the interaction between a subducting slab and the surrounding mantle to the base of the mantle transition zone (MTZ). We used finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography to image velocity anomalies in the mantle from 100 - 700 km between 10° and 28°S in the central Andes by combining data from twelve separate networks deployed in the region between 1994 and 2013. P- and PKIKP- (diffracted PKP) arrivals were picked in multiple frequency bands for earthquakes at distances between 30° and 90° and between 155° to 180° from the array, respectively. The tomographic algorithm used calculates approximate finite frequency kernels for each ray, providing additional sampling for each model layer to potentially increase the resolution of our images. The trench-parallel, fast anomaly which appears to correspond with the subducting Nazca slab is the most prominent anomaly in our tomograms. Variations in the width of the slab anomaly in the deeper parts of the model show evidence for deformation of the slab between 300 and 660 km. Our results show localized thickening of the Nazca slab in the MTZ north of 14°S, between 16° and 18°S, and south of 25°S, in agreement with the idea that the Nazca slab stagnates at least temporarily in the transition zone before resuming subduction into the lower mantle. Our images of the deeply subducted Nazca slab also show evidence of varying degrees of thinning in the mantle transition zone, particularly at 20° and 24°S, possibly indicating that the stress state changes along strike as the slab deforms in the MTZ before resuming subduction into the lower mantle. We also image along-strike variations in the sub-slab mantle in the MTZ including a strong low velocity anomaly between 22° and 28°S which is similar to those seen in other subduction zones, and is interpreted as either a local thermal anomaly or a region of hydrated material in the MTZ. A similar

  16. Cooling and Exhumation of the Coastal Batholith in the Peruvian Andes (5-12°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, M.; Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Hourigan, J. K.; Audin, L.

    2014-12-01

    The South American Andes exhibit strong morphological differences along strike, shaped by a combination of tectonic forces and surface processes. In the central Peruvian Andes (~12°S) a major morphological transition occurs; to the north, the spines of the Western and Eastern Cordilleras come together into a relatively narrow configuration of high topography. In Southern Peru, the region of high topography widens, where the Western and Eastern Cordilleras flank the broad, Altiplano plateau. Despite this morphological change, the Mesozoic-early Cenozoic Coastal Batholith outcrops continuously from 0°-18°S along the western margin of the Peruvian Andes, emplaced along a trench-parallel marginal basin in the Mesozoic. The Coastal Batholith is an ideal geologic setting to investigate potential differences in rock exhumation and cooling histories along the western margin of Peru. While the cooling history of the southern Coastal Batholith has been previously used to estimate timing and magnitude of rock exhumation in Southern Peru, north of 12°S it is poorly constrained. We present 16 zircon and 7 apatite (U-Th)/He mean-ages from three sites, across seven degrees of latitude (5°S to 12°S). In general, ZHe and AHe ages capture two stages of cooling, Oligocene-to-mid-Miocene and mid-to-late Miocene, respectively. We model time-temperature histories of samples with paired AHe and ZHe ages using a Monte-Carlo inversion of HeFTy® (Ketcham, 2005); best fit time-temperature pathways show cooling rates ranging from ~2-24°C/my, where fastest cooling rates are generally observed in the mid-Miocene. To estimate exhumation rates, we apply a simple thermal model to account for nonuniform geothermal gradients expected in a trench-arc setting. Exhumation rates range from ~0.2mm/yr in the north, to 0.4-0.7mm/yr in the south, and rates increase orogenward, where mean elevation is highest. These results, particularly the predominance of Miocene ZHe and AHe data, and the younging

  17. Population genetic structure of traditional populations in the Peruvian Central Andes and implications for South American population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Graciela S; Lewis, Cecil M; Tito, Raúl Y; Covey, R Alan; Cáceres, Angela M; Cruz, Augusto F De La; Durand, Diana; Housman, Genevieve; Hulsey, Brannon I; Iannacone, Gian Carlo; López, Paul W; Martínez, Rolando; Medina, Ángel; Dávila, Olimpio Ortega; Pinto, Karla Paloma Osorio; Santillán, Susan I Polo; Domínguez, Percy Rojas; Rubel, Meagan; Smith, Heather F; Smith, Silvia E; Massa, Verónica Rubín de Celis; Lizárraga, Beatriz; Stone, Anne C

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-based characterizations of Andean peoples are traditionally conducted in the service of elucidating continent-level evolutionary processes in South America. Consequently, genetic variation among "western" Andean populations is often represented in relation to variation among "eastern" Amazon and Orinoco River Basin populations. This west-east contrast in patterns of population genetic variation is typically attributed to large-scale phenomena, such as dual founder colonization events or differing long-term microevolutionary histories. However, alternative explanations that consider the nature and causes of population genetic diversity within the Andean region remain underexplored. Here we examine population genetic diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes using data from the mtDNA first hypervariable region and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats among 17 newly sampled populations and 15 published samples. Using this geographically comprehensive data set, we first reassessed the currently accepted pattern of western versus eastern population genetic structure, which our results ultimately reject: mtDNA population diversities were lower, rather than higher, within Andean versus eastern populations, and only highland Y-chromosomes exhibited significantly higher within-population diversities compared with eastern groups. Multiple populations, including several highland samples, exhibited low genetic diversities for both genetic systems. Second, we explored whether the implementation of Inca state and Spanish colonial policies starting at about ad 1400 could have substantially restructured population genetic variation and consequently constitute a primary explanation for the extant pattern of population diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes. Our results suggest that Peruvian Central Andean population structure cannot be parsimoniously explained as the sole outcome of combined Inca and Spanish policies on the region's population demography: highland populations

  18. Altitudinal vegetation belts in the high-Andes of central Chile (33°S Pisos altitudinales de vegetación en los Andes de Chile central (33°S

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    Lohengrin A. Cavieres

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The limits of alpine vegetation belts have been established mainly based on physiognomic criteria. However, a more objective approach for fixing limits of vegetation belts are methods based on species composition and relative abundance of each species. While these methods are more time consuming, they are more detailed and permit the detection of physical factors affecting the limits of vegetation belts. In this paper we: 1 describe the altitudinal changes of vegetation above timberline, 2 compare vegetation belts defined with physiognomy and two floristic methods (a qualitative one based on altitudinal changes in species composition, and a quantitative one based on changes in dominant species; and 3 detect some environmental factors responsible for the altitudinal distribution of alpine vegetation between 2100 and 3700 masl in the Andes of Santiago, central Chile (33°S. There was a complete agreement between the different methods in delimiting the subalpine belt. However, in the lower alpine belt (the cushion's belt floristic methods subdivided it in 2-3 sub-belts. In the floristic methods, elevations 3500-3700 that formed the higher alpine belt segregated in separate ways because they have no species in common. Physiognomic descriptions lose relevant information about species distribution, especially at higher elevations. Mean annual temperature and nitrogen content of soil are the main environmental factors affecting the altitudinal limits of vegetation belts in the central Chilean AndesLa delimitación de los pisos altitudinales de vegetación andina se ha basado principalmente en criterios fisionómicos. Sin embargo, un criterio más objetivo para la delimitación es usar métodos basados en la composición y abundancia relativa de las especies presentes. Mientras estos métodos requieren de un mayor esfuerzo de muestreo, son más detallados y permiten detectar factores físicos involucrados en la delimitación altitudinal de la vegetaci

  19. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  20. Declining Lake Habitats in the Andes: Implications for Early Mars, Life, and Exploration (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, N. A.; Grin, E. A.; High Lakes Project Team

    2010-12-01

    The environment of the Andes presents analogies with Mars when the planet was transitioning from a wetter to a drier, colder climate: thin atmosphere, high solar irradiance, depleted ozone, high temperature fluctuations with low averages, ice, low precipitation and RH, and volcanic activity. This region is also among three areas of the world most impacted by climate change, which results in enhanced evaporation and high negative water balance that modifies lake habitat rapidly. Data shows strong interannual fluctuations in precipitation, water balance, major ion concentration, and pH are well marked. Microorganisms dwelling near the surface are exposed to a UV flux 170% that of sea level, and exceptionally high UVB levels. The thin cold atmosphere generates sudden and significant inverse relationship between UV and temperatures. In this cold, unstable environment lake habitats host abundant life. In addition to adaptation strategies, the timing of key cycles appears to be a critical factor in life’ survival. Environmental analogy with early Mars is multifold. Aridification has resulted in an evaporative environment. Latitude and altitude generate a UV-flux double that of present-day Mars at the equator and UVB only half that of the red planet, low average total ozone, and a low atmospheric pressure. Yearly temperature extremes range from -40C to +9C. Lakes are ice-covered starting austral fall, reaching maximum thickness by mid-winter. Thawing occurs in spring, but negative night temperatures result in the formation of a thin film of ice that thaws by mid-morning in spring and summer. Because of their geophysical environment, rapid climate change, isolation, and mostly uncharted ecosystems, these lakes are representative of an end-member class of terrestrial lakes and are meaningful analogs to early martian lakes. With differences inherent to the study of terrestrial analogs, the overall environmental similarity of Andean lakes with Mars at the Noachian

  1. Recent trends in human migrations: the case of the Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, M M; Torrealba, R

    1982-01-01

    studies identified that use demographic, economic, or phychosocial approaches have provided partial explanations of the current status of Andean migrations. The explanations they offer, by not transcending the current reality of the migrants, overlook the historical traits of internal migration. Migratory flows do not spring up suddenly. They result from specific socio-political circumstances which, when closely linked to demographic evidence, serve as a basis for understanding the process. Review of studies on internal migration in the Northern Andes, as presented here, reveals a series of distinguishing characteristics: there are 5 migratory patterns--rural to rural, rural to urban, urban to urban, seasonal worker migration, and return migration, and the predominant pattern has been rural to urban; the demographic data show the importance of rural migrants to urban growth in the region and a complementary loss of population in the rural areas; depopulation of the countryside has been selective; and there is a marked disparity in employment remuneration between rural and urban areas.

  2. Modelling and monitoring vegetation and evapotranspiration on an anthropogenic grassland succession in the Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Andes of southern Ecuador the infestation of pasture (mostly C4-grass Setaria sphacelata) by the aggressive bracken fern (Pteridium sp.) still is an unsolved problem. Environmental and exogenous factors and direct plant competition have been hypothesized to drive bracken occurrence. Special attention is given to pasture burning, which stimulates bracken growth, and is common in the relative dry season (Oct-Dec). However, no knowledge is available for a quantitative hypothesis investigation on bracken occurrence under current and future local climate. In this work a modeling approach is presented, in which initial investigations support the application of a two-big-leaf model, and parameterization and model forcing are made with extensive data on physiological traits and on the physical environment. Our main aims here are (i) to show field investigations on a plant scale, which are the basis for a proper model parameterization; and (ii) to provide initialization data, which is based on estimation of green leaf area index from very-high and high resolution optical remote sensing (air-photos and Quickbird images); (iii) to simulate vegetation succession after burn on an experimental site, using in situ climate data and future climate-change scenarios. The modeling approach is based in the main on the vegetation dynamic model called Southern Bracken Competition Model (SoBraCoMo), which has been coupled to a hydrological model written on the catchment model framework (CMF), to simulate soil-vegetation dynamics. Main initialization variables are biochemical parameters (quantum and carboxylation efficiency) and the green leaf area index (green-LAI). Forcing data include soil, leaf and air temperature, soil and air humidity and radiation. The model has been developed and tested on the experimental site (2100 m asl) in the Rio San Francisco Valley, Ecuador. Simulation results on the burn experiment of 2009 showed that stimulation by fire could not boost fern

  3. Evolución tectonomagmática de los Andes bolivianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Jiménez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes bolivianos ocuparonuna posición de retroarco durante gran parte del Fanerozoico. En su evoluciónse reconoce una primera etapa, restringida al Paleozoico inferior, en la quehubo una gran transferencia de material sedimentario en la corteza superior, yuna segunda en la que predominó el reciclaje de la masa cortical. A lo largodel Paleozoico inferior, una cuenca marina epicratónica se formó entre elcratón de Amazonia, el macizo Arequipa-Antofalla, y el macizo Pampeanofuncionando inicialmente como cuenca de retroarco y luego como cuenca deantepaís hasta colmatarse en el Paleozoico superior. En este lapso ocurrierontres etapas de deformación: La fase oclóyica (límite Ordovícico-Silúrico decarácter restringido, la fase eohercínica (límite Devónico-Carbonífero, y lafase hercínica (Carbonífero Superior también de influencia areal restringida.En el Mesozoico, se registraron aún breves incursiones marinas antes que en elEoceno comience a edificarse una protocordillera. El solevantamiento general detoda la región centroandina, se inició en el Oligoceno Superior afectando alAltiplano y la Cordillera Oriental actuales. Este solevantamiento ocurrió entres etapas limitadas por la formación de superficies de erosión datadas en 18y 10 Ma. La ladera oeste de la Cordillera Oriental, denominada faja de Huarina,tuvo un rol muy importante en la evolución de la región centroandina. Además decobijar a gran parte del magmatismo de retroarco, en esta faja ocurrió la mayorsubsidencia de la cuenca paleozoica. En esta faja ocurrieron preferentementedurante el Mesozoico, procesos de rifting y de adelgazamiento litosférico. Enel Paleógeno, la faja de Huarinas fue la primera en ser solevantada aislando lacuenca altiplánica del interior del continente, y durante el OligocenoSuperior, se constituyó en el cinturón retrocabalgante del orógeno. Ladeformación en el Altiplano y la Cordillera Oriental concluyó hace 10 Ma cuandose form

  4. Amazon River dissolved load: temporal dynamics and annual budget from the Andes to the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Crave, Alain; Viers, Jérôme; Filizola, Naziano; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina; Sánchez, Liz Stefanny Hidalgo; Lagane, Christelle; Casimiro, Waldo Sven Lavado; Noriega, Luis; Pombosa, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to estimate the export fluxes of major dissolved species at the scale of the Amazon basin, to identify the main parameters controlling their spatial distribution and to identify the role of discharge variability in the variability of the total dissolved solid (TDS) flux through the hydrological cycle. Data are compiled from the monthly hydrochemistry and daily discharge database of the "Programa Climatologico y Hidrologico de la Cuenca Amazonica de Bolivia" (PHICAB) and the HYBAM observatories from 34 stations distributed over the Amazon basin (for the 1983-1992 and 2000-2012 periods, respectively). This paper consists of a first global observation of the fluxes and temporal dynamics of each geomorphological domain of the Amazon basin. Based on mean interannual monthly flux calculations, we estimated that the Amazon basin delivered approximately 272 × 10(6) t year(-1) (263-278) of TDS during the 2003-2012 period, which represents approximately 7 % of the continental inputs to the oceans. This flux is mainly made up by HCO3, Ca and SiO2, reflecting the preferential contributions of carbonate and silicate chemical weathering to the Amazon River Basin. The main tributaries contributing to the TDS flux are the Marañon and Ucayali Rivers (approximately 50 % of the TDS production over 14 % of the Amazon basin area) due to the weathering of carbonates and evaporites drained by their Andean tributaries. An Andes-sedimentary area-shield TDS flux (and specific flux) gradient is observed throughout the basin and is first explained by the TDS concentration contrast between these domains, rather than variability in runoff. This observation highlights that, under tropical context, the weathering flux repartition is primarily controlled by the geomorphological/geological setting and confirms that sedimentary areas are currently active in terms of the production of dissolved load. The log relationships of concentration vs discharge have

  5. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    The geodynamic evolution of the Paleozoic continental margin of Gondwana in the region of the southern Central Andes is characterized by the westward progression of orogenic basin formation through time. The Ordovician basin in the northwest Argentinian Cordillera Oriental and Puna originated as an Early Ordovician back-arc basin. The contemporaneous magmatic arc of an east-dipping subduction zone was presumably located in northern Chile. In the back-arc basin, a ca. 3500 meter, fining-up volcaniclastic apron connected to the arc formed during the Arenigian. Increased subsidence in the late Arenigian allowed for the accomodation of large volumes of volcaniclastic turbidites during the Middle Ordovician. Subsidence and sedimentation were caused by the onset of collision between the para-autochthonous Arequipa Massif Terrane (AMT) and the South American margin at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. This led to eastward thrusting of the arc complex over its back-arc basin and, consequently, to its transformation into a marine foreland basin. As a result of thrusting in the west, a flexural bulge formed in the east, leading to uplift and emergence of the Cordillera Oriental shelf during the Guandacol Event at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. The basin fill was folded during the terminal collision of the AMT during the Oclóyic Orogeny (Ashgillian). The folded strata were intruded post-tectonically by the presumably Silurian granitoids of the "Faja Eruptiva de la Puna Oriental." The orogeny led to the formation of the positive area of the Arco Puneño. West of the Arco Puneño, a further marine basin developed during the Early Devonian, the eastern shelf of which occupied the area of the Cordillera Occidental, Depresión Preandina, and Precordillera. The corresponding deep marine turbidite basin was located in the region of the Cordillera de la Costa. Deposition continued until the basin fill was folded in the early Late Carboniferous Toco Orogeny. The basin

  6. Una nueva especie de Pristimantis (Anura: Craugastoridae del corredor ecológico Llangantes-Sangay, Andes de Ecuador

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    Juan Pablo Reyes-Puig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Describimos una nueva especie de Pristimantis conocida del bosque nublado de las estribaciones orientales de los Andes centrales de Ecuador. La nueva especie se caracteriza por tener un distintivo patrón de manchas irregulares blancas sobre el vientre negro, dorso verde, tubérculos cónicos en el párpado, tubérculo interorbital, e hilera de tubérculos ulnares y tarsales. Esfuerzos por conservar esta especie se han cristalizado en dos áreas protegidas dentro del corredor Llanganates Sangay, un punto caliente de diversidad que resguarda poblaciones de ranas endémicas y todavía desconocidas.

  7. Brachistosternus ninapo una nueva especie (Scorpiones:Bothriuridae de los Andes occidentales en el sur del Perú

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    José Antonio Ochoa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describe Brachistosternus ninapo, nueva especie de Bothriuridae de los Andes occidentales del sur del Perú (2900 a 4050 m. Esta especie pertenece al subgénero Brachistosternus (Leptosternus Maury. Está relacionada con la especie boliviana Brachistosternus galianoae Ojanguren Affilastro y se diferencia de ella, por la morfología del hemiespermatóforo (forma de la lámina y algunos detalles de la región de lóbulos, el número de setas dorsales laterales del segmento caudal V, la proporción largo/ancho de la pinza del pedipalpo y en el patrón de pigmentación de los tergitos.

  8. Procesos de isomorfismo en la Facultad de Administración de la Universidad de los Andes.

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    Alexánder Guzmán Vásquez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo partimos de los siguientes interrogantes: ¿Ha cambiado la relación entre las facultades de Administración en Colombia y sus profesores en los últimos 15 años? Y si efectivamente ha cambiado ¿por qué se han presentado estos cambios? Buscando respuestas revisamos literatura en teoría organizacional y observamos la experiencia de la Facultad de Administración de la Universidad de los Andes. Gracias a lo anterior planteamos la coexistencia de procesos de isomorfi smo en las organizaciones, la presencia de mecanismos que facilitan el desarrollo de estos procesos y resaltamos la importancia del aprendizaje organizacional para el éxito de los mismos.

  9. InSAR Observations Of Crustal Deformation Mechanics In The Interior Of The Puna Plateau Of The Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelmann, Felix; Motagh, Mahdi; Bokhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2013-12-01

    Crustal deformation evidences in the orogenic interior of the Southern Central Andes at different time scales are observed by applying ENVISAT InSAR time series from 2005 - 2009 and differential GPS data taken in the study area of the palaeo-lake Salar de Pocitos (24.5°S, 67°W, 3650 m asl). Ongoing shortening in the region from the Tertiary to the present-day is indicated by an uplift of Quaternary palaeo-lake terraces of about 4 to 5m within the last 44ka as well as by the growth of an anticline in Tertiary sediments and the reactivation of the reverse-fault bounded Sierra de Macón, both with uplift rates of 2 - 5mm/a. In summary, this study emphasizes the diachronous and spatially disparate character of the tectonic regime at the Puna Plateau.

  10. A new species of the Pristimantis orestes group (Amphibia: Strabomantidae) from the high Andes of Ecuador, Reserva Mazar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guayasamin, Juan M; Arteaga, Alejandro F

    2013-02-21

    We describe a new Pristimantis from La Libertad and Rumiloma, Reserva Mazar, Andes of Southeastern Ecuador, at elevations between 2895-3415 m. This species is assigned to the P. orestes group, from whose members it differs by its small body size (adult males ≤ 18.1 mm; adult females ≤ 23.7 mm), usually reticulated ventral pattern, and visible tympanum. The vocalization of the new species consists of a series of calls; each call is composed by a pulsed, non-modulated note in frequency, and with a dominant frequency of 3122-3171 Hz. A molecular phylogeny based on a fragment of the mitochondrial gene 12S shows that the new species is sister to Pristimantis simonbolivari.

  11. Understanding ebola virus transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Seth; Prescott, Joseph; Munster, Vincent

    2015-02-03

    An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  12. Late Cretaceous-early Eocene counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes and evolution of the Patagonia-Antarctic Peninsula system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, F.; Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Ruffet, G.; Ramírez de Arellano, C.; Hervé, F.; Poujol, M.

    2016-02-01

    The southernmost Andes of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego present a prominent arc-shaped structure: the Patagonian Bend. Whether the bending is a primary curvature or an orocline is still matter of controversy. New paleomagnetic data have been obtained south of the Beagle Channel in 39 out of 61 sites. They have been drilled in Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sediments and interbedded volcanics and in mid-Cretaceous to Eocene intrusives of the Fuegian Batholith. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured at each site and the influence of magnetic fabric on the characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) in plutonic rocks was corrected using inverse tensors of anisotropy of remanent magnetizations. Normal polarity secondary magnetizations with west-directed declination were obtained in the sediments and they did not pass the fold test. These characteristic directions are similar to those recorded by mid Cretaceous intrusives suggesting a remagnetization event during the normal Cretaceous superchron and describe a large (> 90°) counterclockwise rotation. Late Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the Fueguian Batholith, record decreasing counterclockwise rotations of 45° to 30°. These paleomagnetic results are interpreted as evidence of a large counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes related to the closure of the Rocas Verdes Basin and the formation of the Darwin Cordillera during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Bend can thus be described as the formation of a progressive arc from an oroclinal stage during the closure of the Rocas Verdes basin to a mainly primary arc during the final stages of deformation of the Magallanes fold and thrust belt. Plate reconstructions show that the Antarctic Peninsula would have formed a continuous margin with Patagonia between the Early Cretaceous and the Eocene, and acted as a non-rotational rigid block facilitating the development of the Patagonian Bend.

  13. The Relative Impact of Climate Change on the Extinction Risk of Tree Species in the Montane Tropical Andes.

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    Natalia Tejedor Garavito

    Full Text Available There are widespread concerns that anthropogenic climate change will become a major cause of global biodiversity loss. However, the potential impact of climate change on the extinction risk of species remains poorly understood, particularly in comparison to other current threats. The objective of this research was to examine the relative impact of climate change on extinction risk of upper montane tree species in the tropical Andes, an area of high biodiversity value that is particularly vulnerable to climate change impacts. The extinction risk of 129 tree species endemic to the region was evaluated according to the IUCN Red List criteria, both with and without the potential impacts of climate change. Evaluations were supported by development of species distribution models, using three methods (generalized additive models, recursive partitioning, and support vector machines, all of which produced similarly high AUC values when averaged across all species evaluated (0.82, 0.86, and 0.88, respectively. Inclusion of climate change increased the risk of extinction of 18-20% of the tree species evaluated, depending on the climate scenario. The relative impact of climate change was further illustrated by calculating the Red List Index, an indicator that shows changes in the overall extinction risk of sets of species over time. A 15% decline in the Red List Index was obtained when climate change was included in this evaluation. While these results suggest that climate change represents a significant threat to tree species in the tropical Andes, they contradict previous suggestions that climate change will become the most important cause of biodiversity loss in coming decades. Conservation strategies should therefore focus on addressing the multiple threatening processes currently affecting biodiversity, rather than focusing primarily on potential climate change impacts.

  14. Fluctuations of Glaciar Esperanza Norte in the North Patagonian Andes of Argentina during the past 400 yr

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    L. Ruiz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of studies of Little Ice Age (LIA glacier fluctuations in Southern South America has increased in recent years but is largely biased towards sites in the South Patagonian Andes. In this paper we present a detailed record of length and areal fluctuations of Glaciar Esperanza Norte (GEN, in the North Patagonian Andes of Argentina, during the past four centuries. The GEN record was reconstructed through the dendro-geomorphological dating of moraines and the analysis of satellite imagery, aerial photographs and documentary material complemented with extensive field surveys. The maximum LIA extent at GEN was associated with an outer moraine dated to the mid 17th century. At least 19 subsequent readvances or standstills evidenced by morainic ridges were identified inside the most extensive LIA moraine. The dating and spacing of these moraines and the additional information available indicate that the ice front retreated much more rapidly during the 20th century than during earlier centuries. Comparison with the record of LIA fluctuations of Glaciar Frías, an ice mass of similar characteristics located 110 km to the north of GEN, shows a similar pattern of recession over the past 400 yr. Both glacier records have the peak LIA event occurring roughly during the same interval and show a minor readvance during the 1970s, but there are still a few discrepancies in the dating of some inner moraines. These differences may be due to local, specific factors or associated with the inherent uncertainties in the dating of the moraines. The chronologies of GEN and Frías are among the most detailed currently available in Patagonia, but a larger number of study sites is needed to develop robust, regionally representative glacier chronologies. Detailed glaciological, geomorphological and meteorological data are also needed to understand the glacier-climate relationships in this region and develop reliable paleoclimatic reconstructions.

  15. The stratigraphy of cretaceous mudstones in the eastern Fuegian Andes: new data from body and trace fossils

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    Eduardo B. Olivero

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The stratigraphy of Cretaceous marine mudstones in the Fuegian Andes, roughly equivalent to Charles Darwin's clay-slate formation, remains a still unsolved problem. Previous records of Albian, Turonian-Coniacian, and Santonian-Campanian bivalves are combined with new findings of the Late Albian inoceramid Inoceramus anglicus Woods, and the Maastrichtian ammonites Diplomoceras sp., Anagaudryceras sp., Maorites densicostatus (Kilian and Reboul, Maorites sp., and Pachydiscus (Neodesmoceras sp. to further constrain the Cretaceous stratigraphy of the eastern Fuegian Andes. In addition, new records of distinctive trace fossils and ichnofabric are meaningful for stratigraphic division and delineation of paleoenvironmental settings in these Cretaceous mudstones. The Lower Cretaceous ichnoassemblage of Chondrites targioni (Brongniart and Zoophycos isp. is consistent with the inferred slope-volcaniclastic apron settings of the Yahgan Formation; Nereites missouriensis (Weller reflects distal basin plain depositional settings for the Beauvoir Formation. In the Upper Cretaceous, the "Estratos de Buen Suceso" record the earliest extensively bioturbated horizons, reflecting prolonged well-oxygenated bottom conditions. In the Bahía Thetis Formation, organic-rich, channel margin or distal basin slaty mudstones record the last occurrence of inoceramid bivalves in the Austral Basin; the generalized absence of trace fossils is consistent with dysoxic bottom conditions. The thoroughly bioturbated Policarpo Formation, records a marked change in paleoceanographic conditions. The strong contrast in the intensity of bioturbation between the Upper Campanian-Maastrichtian Bahía Thetis Formation, almost devoid of trace fossils, and the highly bioturbated Maastrichtian-Danian Policarpo Formation reflects a change from dysoxic-anoxic to well ventilated conditions, probably associated with a cooling trend of bottom waters in the austral deep oceans.

  16. The Mass Elevation Effect of the Central Andes and Its Implications for the Southern Hemisphere's Highest Treeline

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    Wenhui He

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the highest treelines in the world is at 4810 m above sea level on the Sajama Volcano in the central Andes. The climatological cause of that exceptionally high treeline position is still unclear. Although it has been suggested that the mass elevation effect (MEE explains the upward shift of treelines in the Altiplano region, the magnitude of MEE has not yet been quantified for that region. This paper defines MEE as the air temperature difference in summer at the same elevation between the inner mountains/plateaus (Altiplano and the free atmosphere above the adjacent lowlands of the Andean Cordillera. The Altiplano air temperature was obtained from the Global Historical Climatology Network-Monthly temperature database, and the air temperature above the adjacent lowlands was interpolated based on the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis 1 data set. We analyzed the mean air temperature differences for January, July, and the warm months from October to April. The air temperature was mostly higher on the Altiplano than over the neighboring lowlands at the same altitude. The air temperature difference increased from the outer Andean east-facing slope to the interior of the Altiplano in summer, and it increased from high latitudes to low latitudes in winter. The mean air temperature in the Altiplano in summer is approximately 5 K higher than it is above the adjacent lowlands at the same mean elevation, averaging about 3700 m above sea level. This upward shift of isotherms in the inner part of the Cordillera enables the treeline to climb to 4810 m, with shrub-size trees reaching even higher. Therefore, the MEE explains the occurrence of one of the world’s highest treelines in the central Andes.

  17. Cenozoic uplift of the Central Andes in northern Chile and Bolivia - reconciling paleoaltimetry with the geological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Cenozoic geological evolution of the Central Andes, along two transects between ~17.5°S and 21°S, is compared with paleo-topography, determined from published paleo-altimetry studies. Surface and rock uplift are quantified using simple 2-D models of crustal shortening and thickening, together with estimates of sedimentation, erosion and magmatic addition. Prior to ~25 Ma, during a phase of amagmatic flat-slab subduction, thick skinned crustal shortening and thickening was focused in the Eastern and Western Cordilleras, separated by a broad basin up to 300 km wide and close to sea level, which today comprises the high Altiplano. Surface topography in the Eastern Cordillera appears to be ~1 km lower than anticipated from crustal thickening, which may be due to the pull-down effect of the subducted slab, coupled to the overlying lithosphere by a cold mantle wedge. Oligocene steepening of the subducted slab is indicated by the initiation of the volcanic arc at ~27 - 25 Ma, and widespread mafic volcanism in the Altiplano between 25 and 20 Ma. This may have resulted in detachment of mantle lithosphere and possibly dense lower crust, triggering 1 - 1.5 km of rapid uplift (over << 5 Myrs) of the Altiplano and western margin of the Eastern Cordillera and establishing the present day lithospheric structure beneath the high Andes. Since ~25 Ma, surface uplift has been the direct result of crustal shortening and thickening, locally modified by the effects of erosion, sedimentation and magmatic addition from the mantle. The rate of crustal shortening and thickening varies with location and time, with two episodes of rapid shortening in the Altiplano, lasting < 5 Myrs, that are superimposed on a long term history of ductile shortening in the lower crust, driven by underthrusting of the Brazilian Shield on the eastern margin.

  18. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

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    G. A. M. Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Niño (EN and La Niña (LN events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ. For the austral summer period of 1977–2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency.

    During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ around 30° S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years.

  19. Evaluación del estado de conservación de los bosques montanos en los Andes tropicales

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    N. Tejedor Garavito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes tropicales constituyen una región única con una alta diversidad de hábitats, producto de complejos gradientes espaciales y ambientales. Los bosques montanos de esta región son considerados como una prioridad global de conservación, debido principalmente a su elevada riqueza biológica y de endemismos. Sin embargo su biodiversidad es de las menos conocidas de toda la región tropical, aunque se reconoce la amplia gama de servicios ambientales que prestan, incluyendo la regulación del clima regional y la captura y almacenamiento de carbono. Este artículo ofrece una perspectiva general del estado de conservación de los bosques montanos tropicales andinos y de los retos que esta implica. Asimismo, proporciona información sobre sus amenazas, identificando aquéllas que con mayor probabilidad sean responsables de aumentar el riesgo de extinción de especies. Se resalta la necesidad de disponer de más información sobre el estado de conservación de las especies para identificar las futuras prioridades de conservación en la región. La reciente iniciativa de la "Lista Roja y planeación para la conservación de especies de árboles montanos de los Andes Tropicales", formada por delegados de varios países de la región, constituirá una sólida base para el desarrollo y enfoque de políticas y respuestas de manejo dirigidas a la reducción de la deforestación y pérdida de especies en estos bosques, incluyendo acciones para promover la creación de áreas protegidas, restauración forestal y manejo forestal sostenible.

  20. Spatiotemporal characteristics and synchronization of extreme rainfall in South America with focus on the Andes Mountain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The South American Andes are frequently exposed to intense rainfall events with varying moisture sources and precipitation-forming processes. In this study, we assess the spatiotemporal characteristics and geographical origins of rainfall over the South American continent. Using high-spatiotemporal resolution satellite data (TRMM 3B42 V7), we define four different types of rainfall events based on their (1) high magnitude, (2) long temporal extent, (3) large spatial extent, and (4) high magnitude, long temporal and large spatial extent combined. In a first step, we analyze the spatiotemporal characteristics of these events over the entire South American continent and integrate their impact for the main Andean hydrologic catchments. Our results indicate that events of type 1 make the overall highest contributions to total seasonal rainfall (up to 50 %). However, each consecutive episode of the infrequent events of type 4 still accounts for up to 20 % of total seasonal rainfall in the subtropical Argentinean plains. In a second step, we employ complex network theory to unravel possibly non-linear and long-ranged climatic linkages for these four event types on the high-elevation Altiplano-Puna Plateau as well as in the main river catchments along the foothills of the Andes. Our results suggest that one to two particularly large squall lines per season, originating from northern Brazil, indirectly trigger large, long-lasting thunderstorms on the Altiplano Plateau. In general, we observe that extreme rainfall in the catchments north of approximately 20°S typically originates from the Amazon Basin, while extreme rainfall at the eastern Andean foothills south of 20°S and the Puna Plateau originates from southeastern South America.

  1. Spatiotemporal variability of modern precipitation δ18O in the central Andes and implications for paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Barnes, Jason B.; Tabor, Clay R.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the patterns of rainfall isotopic composition in the central Andes is hindered by sparse observations. Despite limited observational data, stable isotope tracers have been commonly used to constrain modern-to-ancient Andean atmospheric processes, as well as to reconstruct paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry histories. Here, we present isotopic compositions of precipitation (δ18Op and δDp) from 11 micrometeorological stations located throughout the Bolivian Altiplano and along its eastern flank at ~21.5°S. We collected and isotopically analyzed 293 monthly bulk precipitation samples (August 2008 to April 2013). δ18Op values ranged from -28.0‰ to 9.6‰, with prominent seasonal cycles expressed at all stations. We observed a strong relationship between the δ18Op and elevation, though it varies widely in time and space. Constraints on air sourcing estimated from atmospheric back trajectory calculations indicate that continental-scale climate dynamics control the interannual variability in δ18Op, with upwind precipitation anomalies having the largest effect. The impact of precipitation anomalies in distant air source regions to the central Andes is in turn modulated by the Bolivian High. The importance of the Bolivian High is most clearly observed on the southern Bolivian Altiplano. However, monthly variability among Altiplano stations can exceed 10‰ in δ18Op on the plateau and cannot be explained by elevation or source variability, indicating a nontrivial role for local scale effects on short timescales. The strong influence of atmospheric circulation on central Andean δ18Op requires that paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry studies consider the role of South American atmospheric paleocirculation in their interpretation of stable isotopic values as proxies.

  2. Spatial modeling of permafrost distribution using rock glacier inventories, topographic attributes and temperature data in the semiarid Andes, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar Sandoval, G.; Brenning, A.; Bodin, X.

    2012-12-01

    Statistical-empirical models have been widely used to estimate the spatial distribution of permafrost in the European Alps and North America using topographic, climatic data and geomorphic indicators of permafrost (i.e. rock glaciers). At present, little knowledge about mountain permafrost distribution is available for the Andes. As a first approximation of permafrost distribution, a logistic regression model was fitted to predict rock glacier activity status. The model is based on explanatory variables elevation and potential incoming solar radiation (PISR) derived from an ASTER G-DEM v. 2 digital elevations model and air temperature data in the Chilean Andes between 29 and 34°S. Rock glacier activity status (intact versus fossil) was obtained from several recent rock glacier inventories and is based on the interpretation of aerial photographs or satellite imagery with a resolution higher than 5 m. Constant lapse rates of temperature are obtained for several weather stations in the study region. These are used to estimate the change in temperature with elevation based on the digital elevation model. The model's predictive performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve. As a preliminary result using a probability threshold of 0.5, mountain permafrost may be present in up to 21% (1510 km2) of the Huasco watershed (29°S) located in the northern part of the study area. Considering a threshold > 0.75, about 12% (709 km2) of this watershed may be underlain by mountain permafrost. As next steps toward a permafrost distribution model, sources of bias related to the thermal offset and displacement of rock glaciers will be eliminated, and downscaling as well as spatial interpolation approaches will be evaluated in order to replace elevation as a proxy variable with estimates of mean annual air temperature.

  3. Holocene denudation rates from the superhumid southernmost Chilean Patagonian Andes (53°S) deduced from lake sediment budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Sonja; Kilian, Rolf; Baeza, Oscar; Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge

    2013-04-01

    Holocene denudation rates and their regional variations in the superhumid and temperate climate of the southernmost Patagonian Andes are poorly surveyed. Therefore we have investigated denudation in five small lake catchments (0.11-1.62 km2) across a precipitation gradient from 600 to > 9000 mm yr- 1 in southernmost Chile at 53°S. Variations in denudation rates can be defined most precisely by using small catchments and short time spans (Holocene) thus can be related to variable bedrock types, vegetation cover, elevation, and climate. Minimum physical denudation rates were determined from sediment budgets based on sediment echosounder data and physical properties of sediment cores. The Holocene denudation rates vary from 0.08 mm kyr- 1 in the highly elevated, bare granitic rock catchments to 9.01 mm kyr- 1 in the low and vegetated catchments with a basement of sedimentary rocks. These values are comparable with those from similar areas in Norway, Sweden, and NW Iceland. The high annual precipitation in the study area has only a minor effect on denudation. Enhanced geomorphic activity during paraglacial conditions caused a faster denudation after the glacier retreat until either the clastic, glacial detritus was removed or the catchment was covered with vegetation. Chemical comparisons between basement rocks and lake sediments indicate a pronounced chemical denudation in catchments with peaty soils and low soil water pH values of 3 to 5. The Holocene surface lowering rates are on average 200 fold lower than Cenozoic surface lowering rates calculated from fission-track data for the southern Andes. This discrepancy can be explained by significantly higher erosion rates during glacial periods.

  4. El alto de Copahue - Pino Hachado y la fosa de Loncopué: un comportamiento tectónico episódico, Andes neuquinos (37º - 39ºS The Copahue-Pino Hachado high and the Loncopuè trough: An episodic tectonic behaviour, Neuquén Andes (37º- 39ºS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. García Morabito

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes de la parte central de Neuquén (38º-39ºS, enmarcados en los Andes Centrales Australes (35º-39ºS, han poseído una cronología de levantamiento similar al resto de los Andes Patagónicos Septentrionales (39º-46ºS construyéndose a través de sucesivas fases de alzamiento en el Cretácico medio, Eoceno medio y Mioceno superior. Sin embargo, se han diferenciado con respecto al resto de los Andes Patagónicos, ubicados hacia el sur, en lo relativo a las distintas fases de relajamiento extensional que han sufrido, tanto en el Oligoceno superior como en el Plio-Cuaternario. Existen evidencias que sugieren un comportamiento episódico de la faja plegada y corrida neuquina dado por regímenes tectónicos compresivos seguidos por estadios de extensión generalizados al menos desde el Cretácico medio. El estudio de dos unidades morfoestructurales desarrolladas entre los 37º y los 39ºS ejemplifican este comportamiento peculiar, el alto de Copahue - Pino Hachado ubicado en la zona limítrofe argentino-chilena y su extensión hacia el norte en territorio chileno, en la laguna de la Laja, y la fosa de Loncopué en el retroarco. El estudio de la estructura miocena a cuaternaria y la descripción detallada de la estratigráfía de este sector cordillerano han aportado un nuevo cuadro de evolución para este sector de los Andes.The Andes located in the central Neuquén (38º-39ºS, which belong to the southern Central Andes (35º-39ºS, have recorded a similar chronology of uplift than the neighbor northern Patagonian Andes (39º-46ºS. Both areas have been formed trough successive phases of contraction in the Late Cretaceous, Middle Eocene and Late Miocene respectively. However, the Neuquén Andes have experienced two discrete phases of orogenic relaxation, during the Late Oligocene and Pliocene-Quaternary, which make then distinctive respect to the area located to the south. Field studies have shown new evidences of an episodic behavior of

  5. Determinación de procesos y áreas de riesgos en los Andes centrales de Chile mediterráneo: Casos de estudio

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    Quintanilla, Víctor

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available ln the course of the Mountain Hazards Mapping Project in the Central Andes from Chile (Project FONDECYT Nº 482-91 natural hazards were assessed and mapped in the Aconcagua Bassin Test area of the high Andes (2.500 to 4.000 m.. Various geomorphic hazard processes (avalanches, rockfalls, landslide hazards, water activity were mapped on the scale 1:50.000 with a simplified legend. The mountainous area seems to be relatively stable and the rock substratum (mainly granitic is resistant to weathering. The greatest hazards are avalanches and landslides, which have a long recurrence interval and are difficult to predict, although their source areas can be identified.

    [es] Durante la realización del proyecto de Cartografía de Riesgos de Montaña en los Andes Centrales de Chile (Proyecto FONDECYT nº 482- 91 se cartografiaron los riesgos naturales en la cuenca del Aconcagua, altos Andes (2.500 a 4.000 m. Varios riesgos geomorfológicos (avalanchas, caídas de piedras, erosión hídrica fueron cartografiados a escala 1:50.000 con una leyenda simplificada. Las áreas de montaña parecen relativamente estables y el sustrato rocoso (principalmente granítico es resistente a la meteorización.
    Los mayores riesgos son las avalanchas y los deslizamientos, que tienen un largo periodo de recurrencia y son difíciles de predecir, aunque sus áreas fuente pueden ser fácilmente identificadas.
    [fr] Durant la réalisation du projet de cartographie des risques de montagne dans les Andes Centrales du Chili (Projet FONDECYT nº 482-91 on a réalisé des cartographies des risques naturels dans le bassin de Aconcagua, Hautes Andes (2500 à 4000 m. Des risques géomorphologiques variés (avalanches, chutes de pierres, érosion hydrique ont été représentés au 1:50.000ième avec une légende simplifiée. Les zones de montagne paraissent relativement stables et la roche mère (principalement granitique est résistante à la d

  6. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  7. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  8. Analysis of Virus Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kalyani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Security of wired and wireless networks is the most challengeable in today's computer world. The aim of this study was to give brief introduction about viruses and worms, their creators and characteristics of algorithms used by viruses. Here wired and wireless network viruses are elaborated. Also viruses are compared with human immune system. On the basis of this comparison four guidelines are given to detect viruses so that more secure systems are made. While concluding this study it is found that the security is most challengeable, thus it is required to make more secure models which automatically detect viruses and prevent the system from its affect.

  9. Hepatitis Delta Virus: A Peculiar Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Alves; Cristina Branco; Celso Cunha

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is distributed worldwide and related to the most severe form of viral hepatitis. HDV is a satellite RNA virus dependent on hepatitis B surface antigens to assemble its envelope and thus form new virions and propagate infection. HDV has a small 1.7 Kb genome making it the smallest known human virus. This deceivingly simple virus has unique biological features and many aspects of its life cycle remain elusive. The present review endeavors to gather the available ...

  10. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  11. Distribución y conservación de especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y Andes tropicales Distribution and conservation of endangered species in Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Londoño-Murcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se modeló el nicho ecológico proyectado como distribución potencial de 313 especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y los Andes tropicales, según las listas de la UICN. De estas especies, 285 fueron plantas y 28 fueron vertebrados terrestres. La superposición de las distribuciones de las especies amenazadas cubrió prácticamente toda la región. Ecuador mostró cerca del 30% de su área con 50 especies. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panamá mostraron > 50, aunque en 50% de su área. El Salvador y Honduras, de 11 a 20 en > 50% de su área y México de 1 a 5 especies en > 50% de su área. La distribución de estas especies en áreas transformadas (agricultura y áreas urbanas varió del 11al 30%; El Salvador, Panamá y Guatemala mostraron > 50% de la distribución; Colombia, Honduras y México This study modeled ecological niches projected as potential distributions for 313 endangered species listed in the IUCN for Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes, of which 285 were plants, and 28 terrestrial vertebrates. Overlapping of endangered species distributions covered most of the region. Ecuador showed close to 30% of its area with 50 endangered species. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panama showed more than 50 endangered species in 50% of its area with endangered species (21 to 50 species were Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Panama. El Salvador and Honduras showed > 50% of its area with 11 to 20 endangered species; Mexico showed 50% of endangered species in transformed areas; Colombia, Honduras and Mexico showed < 40%, and Belize and Ecuador showed < 25% of endangered species in transformed areas, respectively. El Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Nicaragua and Mexico showed a high proportion of endangered species in transformed areas for the Classes Amphibia, Liliopsida, Polipodiopsida, and the Orders Asterales, Fabales, Laurales, Myrtales, Scrophulariales and Rubiales. Less than 35% of endangered

  12. Clave de géneros de larvas de Trichoptera (Insecta de la Vertiente Occidental de los Andes, Lima, Perú

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    Ana A. Huamantinco

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una clave para identificación de larvas de Trichoptera en el último estadio de desarrollo. El material biológico fue colectado en quebradas situadas en la cuenca media y alta de ríos del departamento de Lima, Vertiente Occidental de los Andes. Se presenta una sinopsis de los géneros y especies para el Perú de las familias encontradas en este estudio.

  13. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, Silvina; Petrinovic, Ivan [CONICET -IBIGEO. Museo de Cs. Naturales, Universidad de Salta, Mendoza 2 (4400), Salta (Argentina)], E-mail: guzmansilvina@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  14. A multi-institutional and interdisciplinary approach to the assessment of vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Peruvian Central Andes: problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Martínez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A local integrated assessment of the vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Mantaro River Basin, located in Peruvian Central Andes, was developed between years 2003 to 2005. In this paper we present some lessons learned during the development of this study, emphasizing the multi-institutional and interdisciplinary efforts, briefly showing the methodological aspects, and pointing out the main problems found.

  15. Pluri-decadal (1955–2014) evolution of glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile (30–33° S)

    OpenAIRE

    S. Monnier; Kinnard, C.

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with relationships between debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the central Andes of Chile. Three glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms are investigated over the last decades in order to highlight and question the significance of their landscape evolution and dynamics. We use series of historical air photos and Geoeye satellite images together with common remote sensing operations including imagery orthorectification, digital elevation model generation, an...

  16. Religión, género y construcción de una sexualidad en los Andes (Siglos XVI y XVII. Una acercamiento provisional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armas Asin, Fernando

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This study emphasizes the conceptual changes in regard to sex, sexuality and general genre relations in the Andes, in the 16th and 17th centuries, in the context of the establishment of the colonial society. It is analyzed the way in which a new discourse on the body was developed as a consequence of the deeply represive baroque culture. This culture recreated religious values which controlled every aspect of the daily life. It also enforced a rigid legislation which ruled through society as a whole.

    El estudio busca enfatizar los cambios conceptuales que se produjeron en torno al sexo, la sexualidad, y, en términos generales, en las relaciones de género en los Andes en los siglos XVI y XVII, en un contexto de establecimiento de la sociedad colonial. Se analiza cómo se construyó un nuevo discurso sobre el cuerpo en los Andes como consecuencia de la cultura barroca, profundamente represiva. Dicha cultura recreó valores religiosos que controlaban todos los aspectos de la vida diaria, además de poner en marcha una legislación muy rígida que reguló toda la sociedad.

  17. Quantifying the change in equilibrium-line altitude during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Subtropical Andes using a mass-balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, L.; Galewsky, J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying changes in equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) can be used to better understand past regional climates. We use a glacial mass-balance model in conjunction with global climate model (GCM) output data to calculate the change in ELA between modern and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 ka) climates in the presently hyper-arid subtropical Andes. The region is currently unglaciated, despite cold enough temperatures, as there is too little moisture to sustain glaciers. Previous studies suggest this area was glaciated during the LGM, however, little is known about the extent of the glaciation or the climate required to sustain it. The mass-balance model used in this study calculates the change in ELA using the positive degree-day (PDD) sum, the sum of daily mean air temperatures that are above zero. The PDD sum is used to calculate ablation, which is then assumed to be proportional to temperature, in order to calculate the change in ELA. Using output from several GCM simulations, we compare the change in ELA between LGM and modern climates across the different models for the subtropical Andes. These simulations suggest that the changes in climate resulted in a lowering of ELAs to the extent that parts of the subtropical Andes were glaciated during the LGM.

  18. Breeding system of Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae in two populations on different slopes of the Andes Sistema reproductivo de Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae en dos poblaciones ubicadas en diferentes laderas de los Andes

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    ADRIANA E ROVERE

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant breeding systems are considered to reflect species' life history characteristics, selection due to biotic or abiotic factors, pollination conditions, or a combination of these. Reproductive systems may vary over ecological gradients. The breeding system of the ornithophilous Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae from temperate South America was studied by pollination treatments: manual self-pollination, manual cross-pollination, automatic self-pollination, and natural pollination. These treatments were conducted in a coastal western and an Andean eastern population. Embothrium coccineum was found to be self-incompatible and highly dependent on the pollinating agent at both sites. However, pollen limitations were greater in the coastal population, as breeding efficiency was lower. Populations have different floral visitors whose identity differentially affects reproductive efficiency and pollen flow in E. coccineumLos sistemas de compatibilidad reproductiva en las plantas son considerados una manifestación de la historia de vida, de la selección ante factores abióticos ó bióticos, de las condiciones de polinización o una de combinación de esos factores. El sistema reproductivo de una especie puede variar a lo largo de un gradiente ecológico-ambiental. El sistema reproductivo de Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae, un árbol ornitófilo endémico de los bosques templados de sur de Sudamérica, fue estudiado mediante experimentos de polinización: autopolinización manual, polinización manual cruzada, autopolinización automática y polinización natural en flores descubiertas. Este trabajo se realizó en una población costera al oeste de la cordillera de los Andes y una población andina ubicada al este de la cordillera de los Andes. En ambas poblaciones se encontró que E. coccineum es autoimcompatible y altamente dependiente de los agentes polinizadores en ambos sitios. Sin embargo, la limitación por polen fue mayor en la poblaci

  19. Structure andevolution of the austral basin fold-thrust belt, Southern Patagonian Andes Estructura y evolución de la faja plegada y corrida dela cuenca Austral, Andes Patagónicos Australes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías C. Ghiglione

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuseson the evolution of the Southern Patagonian Andes fold-thrust belt and theadjacent non-deformed foreland of the Austral basin between 49°45' and52°00'SL. This sector involves mainly Late Cretaceous sequences of the firstregressive cycle (Lago Viedma Cycle of the Austral basin foreland stage, andCampanian to Paleogene sequences associated with tectonic uplift of its westernboundary. From a stratigraphic-sedimentary point of view, a first-orderincrease in the fillthickness and depth to the basement exists from north tosouth including the presence of deeper depositional environments in the samedirection. Furthermore, there are strong along-strike variations in width andlateral position of the structural domains following the same trend. Based uponprevious interpretations, is concluded that the distribution of extensionaldepocenters from the early extensional phase of the basin controlled theseimportant sedimentary and structural N-S contrasts. Furthermore, in ourpresented model, East-west oriented transition zones are interpreted asaccommodation zones separating synrift sub-basins.Este estudio se concentra en la evolución de la fajaplegada y corrida de los Andes Patagónicos Australes y del antepaís adyacenteno deformado de la cuenca Austral entre los 49°45' y 52°00'SL. Este sectorinvolucra principalmente secuencias cretácicas superiores del primer cicloregresivo (Ciclo Lago Viedma de la etapa de antepaís de la cuenca Austral, ysecuencias campanianas a paleógenas asociadas con el levantamiento tectónico desu límite occidental. Desde el punto de vista estratigráfico sedimentario,existe un incremento de primer orden de norte a sur en el espesor del relleno yla profundidad del basamento incluyendo la presencia de ambientesdeposicionales más profundos en la misma dirección. Se han detectado fuertes variacionesa lo largo del rumbo en el ancho y la posición lateral de los dominiosestructurales en la misma direcci

  20. Aplicación de tres índices bióticos en el río San Juan, Andes, Colombia (Application of three biotic indexes in the river San Juan, Andes, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mailedt Paola Murillo Torrentes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Durante los meses de febrero, mayo, agosto y octubre del año 2014, se evaluó la calidad del agua del río San Juan. Para tal fin se establecieron seis puntos de muestreo donde se recolectaron muestras de agua y macroinvertebrados acuáticos para los análisis fisicoquímicos e hidrobiológicos. Se aplicaron y modificaron los índices bióticos EPT (efemerópteros, plecópteros, tricópteros, BMWP/Col (Biological Monitoring Working Party y ASPT (Average Score per Taxon basados en las comunidades de macroinvertebrados acuáticos capturados. Los resultados de las variables fisicoquímicas y los índices bióticos indican que las estaciones E1 y E2 son las que presentan menor grado de contaminación, en las demás estaciones disminuye considerablemente la calidad del agua debido a las actividades económicas desarrolladas en el sector y a su cercanías con el casco urbano del municipio de Andes. De los tres índices analizados, el ASPT modificado y adaptado al río San Juan es el que mejor se relaciona con las condiciones ambientales del río en tanto las características de los macroinvertebrados acuáticos recolectados y analizados en el trayecto objeto de estudio. (Abstract. During the months of February, May, August and October 2014, the water quality of the San Juan River was assessed. To this aim, six sampling points were established, where water samples and macroinvertebrates for physical-chemical and hydrobiological analysis were collected. Three biotic indexes were applied and one modified: EPT (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera, BMWP / Col (Biological Monitoring Working Party and ASPT (Average Score per Taxon based on the captured communities of aquatic macroinvertebrates. The results of the physical-chemical variables and biotic indixes indicate that E1 and E2 stations are those with lower degree of contamination, other stations considerably decreased water quality due to economic activities around, and the short distance with the

  1. Parasite loads and altitudinal distribution of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes Cargas parasitarias y distribución de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN H. CAROTHERS

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the distributions of ten species of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes to the distributions of four types of parasites: malaria-causing Plasmodium, gut nematodes, ticks, and mites. We wanted to see if parasite numbers might be a factor in determining distributional limits of the lizards. We found that there was no evidence of malarial infestation of the lizards, that ticks were almost absent, that more often than not mite numbers decreased at the distributional limits of the lizards, and that gut nematodes confined to the herbivorous lizards in our sample may well be beneficial rather than detrimental. Rather than parasitism, other biotic interactions (e.g., predation or competition are more likely candidates as factors influencing lizard elevational distributions, as are abiotic characteristics such as microhabitat availabilities and thermal factorsEste estudio compara las distribuciones de diez especies de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central, con las distribuciones de cuatro tipos de parásitos: Plasmodium causantes de malaria, nemátodos intestinales, garrapatas y ácaros. Quisimos verificar si los números de parásitos pudieran ser un factor determinante de los límites de distribución de las lagartijas. Encontramos que no había evidencia de infestación por malaria en las lagartijas; que las garrapatas estaban casi ausentes; que los números de ácaros más a menudo decrecían que aumentaban en los límites distribucionales de las lagartijas; y que los nemátodos intestinales confinados a las lagartijas herbívoras en nuestra muestra bien podían ser beneficiosos antes que dañinos. Más bien que parasitismo, otras interacciones bióticas (e.g., depredación o competencia son candidatos más probables como factores que influyen las distribuciones altitudinales de las lagartijas, además de características abióticas tales como la disponibilidad de microhábitats y los factores térmicos

  2. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  3. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of ...

  4. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  5. Acute bee paralysis virus [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Acute bee paralysis virus [gbvrl]: 14 CDS's (15780 codons) fields: [triplet] [frequ...osomal protein / MAP kinase List of codon usage for each CDS (format) Homepage Acute bee paralysis virus ...

  6. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to ...

  7. Quasispecies of dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosu, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic viruses have RNA genomes that cause acute and chronic infections. These viruses replicate with high mutation rates and exhibit significant genetic diversity, so-called viral quasispecies. Viral quasispecies play an important role in chronic infectious diseases, but little is known about their involvement in acute infectious diseases such as dengue virus (DENV) infection. DENV, the most important human arbovirus, is a causative agent of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Accumulating observations suggest that DENV exists as an extremely diverse virus population, but its biological significance is unclear. In other virus diseases, quasispecies affect the therapeutic strategies using drugs and vaccines. Here, I describe the quasispecies of DENV and discuss the possible role of quasispecies in the pathogenesis of and therapeutic strategy against DENV infection in comparison with other viruses such as Hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and poliovirus.

  8. Ebola Virus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marburg virus outbreaks: Ebola and Marburg virus disease epidemics: preparedness, alert, control, and evaluation When an outbreak ... Offices WHO African Region WHO Region of the Americas WHO South-East Asia Region WHO European Region ...

  9. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  10. The ash deposits of the 4200 BP Cerro Blanco eruption: the largest Holocene eruption of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, Jose-Luis; Saavedra, Julio; Perez-Torrado, Francisco-Jose; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Lobo, Agustin; Rejas, Marta; Gallardo, Juan-Fernando; Osterrieth, Margarita; Carrizo, Julieta; Esteban, Graciela; Martinez, Luis-Dante; Gil, Raul-Andres; Ratto, Norma; Baez, Walter

    2015-04-01

    We present new data about a major eruption -spreading approx. 110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in the Central Andes of NW Argentina (Southern Puna, 26°45' S, 67°45' W). This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. Discrimination and correlation of pyroclastic deposits of this eruption of Cerro Blanco was conducted comparing samples of proximal (domes, pyroclastic flow and fall deposits) with distal ash fall deposits (up to 400 km from de vent). They have been characterized using optical and electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, particle-size distribution by laser diffraction and electron microprobe and HR-ICP-MS with laser ablation for major and trace element composition of glass, feldspars and biotite. New and published 14C ages were calibrated using Bayesian statistics. An one-at-a-time inversion method was used to reconstruct the eruption conditions using the Tephra2 code (Bonadonna et al. 2010, https://vhub.org/resources/tephra2). This method allowed setting the main features of the eruption that explains the field observations in terms of thickness and grain size distributions of the ash fall deposit. The main arguments that justify the correlation are four: 1) Compositional coincidence for glass, feldspars, and biotite in proximal and distal materials; 2) Stratigraphic and geomorphological relationships, including structure and thickness variation of the distal deposits; 3) Geochronological consistency, matching proximal and distal ages; and 4) Geographical distribution of correlated outcrops in relation to the eruption centre at the coordinates of Cerro Blanco. With a magnitude of 7.0 and a volcanic explosivity index or VEI 7, this eruption of ~4200 BP at Cerro Blanco is the largest in the last five millennia known in the Central

  11. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  12. Virus diseases of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stanley W.

    1954-01-01

    Viruses are probably the cause of a wide spectrum of fish diseases. Although relatively few virus diseases of fish are known today, some of the diseases of unknown etiology, as well as some diseases presently accepted as due to bacteria, protozoa, fungi or nutritional deficiencies, possibly will be recognized eventually as virus diseases.

  13. Computer Virus Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  14. Avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) severely impact poultry egg production. Decreased egg yield and hatchability, as well as misshapen eggs, are often observed during infection with AIV and NDV, even with low-virulence strains or in vaccinated flocks. Data suggest that in...

  15. Compositional variations of ignimbrite magmas in the Central Andes over the past 26 Ma - A multivariate statistical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmeier, M.; Wörner, G.

    2016-10-01

    Multivariate statistical and geospatial analyses based on a compilation of 890 geochemical and 1200 geochronological data for 194 mapped ignimbrites from the Central Andes document the compositional and temporal patterns of large-volume ignimbrites (so-called "ignimbrite flare-ups") during Neogene times. Rapid advances in computational science during the past decade led to a growing pool of algorithms for multivariate statistics for large datasets with many predictor variables. This study applies cluster analysis (CA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on log-ratio transformed data with the aim of (1) testing a tool for ignimbrite correlation and (2) distinguishing compositional groups that reflect different processes and sources of ignimbrite magmatism during the geodynamic evolution of the Central Andes. CA on major and trace elements allows grouping of ignimbrites according to their geochemical characteristics into rhyolitic and dacitic "end-members" and to differentiate characteristic trace element signatures with respect to Eu anomaly, depletions in middle and heavy rare earth elements (REE) and variable enrichments in light REE. To highlight these distinct compositional signatures, we applied LDA to selected ignimbrites for which comprehensive datasets were available. In comparison to traditional geochemical parameters we found that the advantage of multivariate statistics is their capability of dealing with large datasets and many variables (elements) and to take advantage of this n-dimensional space to detect subtle compositional differences contained in the data. The most important predictors for discriminating ignimbrites are La, Yb, Eu, Al2O3, K2O, P2O5, MgO, FeOt, and TiO2. However, other REE such as Gd, Pr, Tm, Sm, Dy and Er also contribute to the discrimination functions. Significant compositional differences were found between (1) the older (> 13 Ma) large-volume plateau-forming ignimbrites in northernmost Chile and southern Peru and (2) the

  16. Thicknesses and volumes of glaciers in the Andes of Peru estimated with satellite data and digital terrain information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Judith; Colonia, Daniel; Haeberli, Wilfried; Giráldez, Claudia; Frey, Holger; Huggel, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The glaciers in the tropical Andes of Peru have been melting at an unprecedented rate in recent years and generally after the Little Ice Age, a cold period that lasted from the 16th to the 19th century. Knowledge of glacier thicknesses and volumes is necessary for evaluating possible future scenarios of glacier shrinkage and of water supply to the Andean populations under conditions of continued warming. Calculation of glacier volumes for 19 mountain ranges in Perú has been based on two ice- thickness modeling methods including an area-related approach with different parameterizations and a slope-dependent approach. Both methods allow for rapid treatment of regional data obtained from satellite imagery and a Digital Elevation Model, integrated into a Geographic Information System. In addition, glacier outlines were obtained from the glacier inventory compiled by the Unit of Glaciology and Water Resources (UGRH) - National Water Authority (ANA) that used satellite imagery (ASTER, SPOT and LISS III from 2003 to 2010) and topographic information acquired from the cartography of the National Geographical Institute (IGN). The volume-area scaling approach resulted in glacier volume of 35.00 km3 and a total volume of 34.39 km3 resulted from the slope-dependent thickness with a thickness approximately 30 m. Estimated results also show a loss of the total ice surface ~42% and glacier volume loss about ~38% in both methods based on the first Glacier Inventory of Peru (from aerial photographs 1962 -1970) performed by HIDRANDINA SA. The results also indicate that volume estimations are subject to large uncertainties. Field measurements of glacier thickness are scarce and locally restricted due to rugged topography, high altitude and heavy crevassing of glaciers. Possibilities of calibrating and validating the applied model approaches are therefore limited. New possibilities nevertheless come into play with slope-dependent approaches, which lead beyond area-related average

  17. Miocene development of alpine glacial relief in the Patagonian Andes, as revealed by low-temperature thermochronometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeleit, Elizabeth C.; Brandon, Mark T.; Shuster, David L.

    2017-02-01

    Apatite thermochronometry and synthetic maps of ages and rates for thermochronometric data are used to estimate the timing of incision of valley relief in the Andes. Central Patagonia offers a unique location to study the feedbacks between long-term climate, topography, and erosion due to the high relief and well-resolved mid-latitude glacial history. New apatite (U-Th)/He ages from two vertical transects and two 4He/3He release spectra in the fjord network around 47°S reveal fast cooling (15-30 °C/Ma) from ∼10 to 5 Ma. Samples currently at the surface cooled below ∼35 °C by ∼5 Ma, indicating slow cooling and little erosion in those regions since 5 Ma. We show that these very low-temperature thermochronometric data are useful indicators of changes in topography, and insensitive to deep thermal processes, such as migration of the Chile triple junction. Map-based predictions of the thermochronometric signatures of disparate topographic scenarios show the distribution of sample data necessary to resolve the timing of relief change. Comparisons to predicted cooling ages and rates indicate that our new apatite He data are most consistent with a pulse of early glacial incision, with much of the observed valley relief in Patagonia carved between 10 and 5 Ma. Early onset of glaciation in Patagonia is supported by glacial till with bracketing ages of 7.4 and 5 Ma. We therefore conclude that the observed thermochronometric signal of fast cooling from 10 to 5 Ma is likely due to an increase in valley relief coinciding with these early glaciations in the Andes. In other glaciated areas at lower latitudes, studies have found a dramatic increase in valley relief at ∼1 Ma. This timing has generated the idea that incision of glacial valleys may be related to the mid-Pleistocene transition, when the global glacial cycle changed from 40 to 100 ka periods. Our results from a higher latitude indicate an alternative, that glacial valleys incised rapidly after the onset of

  18. Holocene compression in the Acequión valley (Andes Precordillera, San Juan province, Argentina): Geomorphic, tectonic, and paleoseismic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard, M.; Franck, A.; Perucca, L.; Laura, P.; Pantano, Ana; Avila, Carlos R.; Onorato, M. Romina; Vargas, Horacio N.; Alvarado, Patricia; Viete, Hewart

    2016-04-01

    The Matagusanos-Maradona-Acequión Valley sits within the Andes Precordillera fold-thrust belt of western Argentina. It is an elongated topographic depression bounded by the roughly N-S trending Precordillera Central and Oriental in the San Juan Province. Moreover, it is not a piggy-back basin as we could have expected between two ranges belonging to a fold-thrust belt, but a very active tectonic corridor coinciding with a thick-skinned triangular zone, squeezed between two different tectonic domains. The two domains converge, where the Precordillera Oriental has been incorporated to the Sierras Pampeanas province, becoming the western leading edge of the west-verging broken foreland Sierras Pampeanas domain. This latter province has been in turn incorporated into the active deformation framework of the Andes back-arc at these latitudes as a result of enhanced coupling between the converging plates due to the subduction of the Juan Fernández ridge that flattens the Nazca slab under the South American continent. This study focuses on the neotectonics of the southern tip of this N-S elongated depression, known as Acequión (from the homonym river that crosses the area), between the Del Agua and Los Pozos rivers. This depression dies out against the transversely oriented Precordillera Sur, which exhibits a similar tectonic style as Precordillera Occidental and Central (east-verging fold-thrust belt). This contribution brings supporting evidence of the ongoing deformation during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene of the triangular zone bounded between the two leading and converging edges of Precordillera Central and Oriental thrust fronts, recorded in a multi-episodic lake sequence of the Acequión and Nikes rivers. The herein gathered evidence comprise Late Pleistocene-Holocene landforms of active thrusting, fault kinematics (micro-tectonic) data and outcrop-scale (meso-tectonic) faulting and folding of recent lake and alluvial sequences. In addition, seismically

  19. Tertiary tectonics of the Patagonian Andes retro-arc area between 38°15' and 40°S latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Ezequiel García; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2011-03-01

    The structure and tectonics of the retro-arc area of the Andes between 38°30' and 40°S remains poorly understood because of the scarcity of previous structural studies. This paper analyzes the styles, distribution and timing of the deformation in the eastern flank of the Andes between these latitudes, with focus in the Tertiary tectonics of the area. This Andean section can be divided into an internal and an external domain based on its distinctive structural evolution. The boundary between them coincides with the Bio Bio and Aluminé valleys, which separate sectors of the fold-and-thrust belt with opposite vergence and different structural styles. Structures developed in the external domain during the Andean cycle are associated with a west-verging fold-and-thrust belt which was controlled geometrically by pre-existing normal faults of the Mesozoic rift phase. We also differentiate three segments along the external domain of the inner retro-arc zone at these latitudes. Each segment is associated with a Tertiary depocenter related to the western border of a structural high (Copahue-Pino Hachado Block and Cordilleras de Catan Lil and Chachil) which constitutes an outstanding feature within the study area. The recognition and interpretation of the main structures and the spatial and temporal distribution of the Tertiary sequences allowed us to establish a tectonic model in which the uplift of this NNW-trending block during upper Miocene times, originated a series of intermontane depocenters well represented between 38 and 40°S. As a result of that, syntectonic and synorogenic deposits accumulated in a compressive regime. These depocenters can be integrated in a narrow deposition zone associated with the western slope of the Copahue-Pino Hachado Block and its southward prolongation in the Cordillera de Catan Lil and Cordillera del Chachil. On the basis of tectonostratigraphic controls we define the last Andean contractional phase of the inner retro-arc area at

  20. Bimodal volcanism in a tectonic transfer zone: Evidence for tectonically controlled magmatism in the southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinovic, I. A.; Riller, U.; Brod, J. A.; Alvarado, G.; Arnosio, M.

    2006-04-01

    This field-based and analytical laboratory study focuses on the genetic relationship between bimodal volcanic centres and fault types of an important tectonic transfer zone in the southern Central Andes, the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) volcanic belt. More specifically, tectono-magmatic relationships are examined for the 0.55 Ma Tocomar, the 0.78 Ma San Jerónimo and the 0.45 Ma Negro de Chorrillos volcanic centres in the Tocomar area (66°30 W-24°15 S). Structures of the COT volcanic belt, notably NW-SE striking strike-slip faults and NE-SW trending normal faults, accommodated differential shortening between major N-S striking thrust faults on the Puna Plateau. We present evidence that bimodal volcanism was contemporaneous with activity of these fault types in the COT volcanic belt, whereby eruption and composition of the volcanic rocks in the Tocomar and San Jerónimo-Negro de Chorrillos areas appear to have been controlled by the kinematics of individual faults. More specifically, rhyolitic centres such as the Tocomar are associated with normal faults, whereas shoshonitic-andesitic monogenetic volcanoes, e.g., the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos centres, formed at strike-slip dominated faults. Thus, the eruption of higher viscous rhyolite magmas appears to have been facilitated in tectonic settings characterized by horizontal dilation whereas ascent and effusive volcanic activity of less viscous and hot basaltic andesites to shoshonites were controlled by subvertical strike-slip faults. While the Tocomar rhyolites are interpreted to be derived from an anatectic crustal source, geochemical characteristics of the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos shoshonitic andesites are in agreement with a deeper source. This suggests that the composition of erupted volcanic rocks as well as their spatial distribution in the Tocomar area is controlled by the activity of specific fault types. Such volcano-tectonic relationships are also evident from older

  1. The taxonomy of viruses should include viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisher, Charles H

    2016-05-01

    Having lost sight of its goal, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses has redoubled its efforts. That goal is to arrive at a consensus regarding virus classification, i.e., proper placement of viruses in a hierarchical taxonomic scheme; not an easy task given the wide variety of recognized viruses. Rather than suggesting a continuation of the bureaucratic machinations of the past, this opinion piece is a call for insertion of common sense in sorting out the avalanche of information already, and soon-to-be, accrued data. In this way information about viruses ideally would be taxonomically correct as well as useful to working virologists and journal editors, rather than being lost, minimized, or ignored.

  2. Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Barbarán

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From an historic and demographic perspective, as well as the use of natural resources, we analyzed the relationship between human migrations and the economic activities of Los Andes Department, West of the Salta Province, in NW Argentina. Using the residual method, we calculated migratory balances between Argentinean population censuses carried out in 1947,1960, 1970, 1980 and 2001. The migratory balances were negative for all the periods studied. When the train started to run through Ramal C-14, the workers who built it have to find jobs somewhere else. At the same time, the railway made easier for the natives, to find better economicopportunities out of the Puna. The close of mine La Casualidad by the end of the 70’s, the low creation of jobs by the remaining mining operations, focused in to hire qualified technicians no available in Los Andes and the privatization of the railway in early 90’s, were important factors of emigration. Despite of cattle rising as the main economic activity in rural areas, it is practiced without any technology of management. The overgrazing caused for that reason, has reduced almost to the half the quantity of sheep by inhabitant between 1947 and 2001. That is why the local people have to press more on the wildlife, trading illegally with vicuña (Vicugna vicugna fiber. Despite of a touristic development plan, a law promoting sheep rising and a census of vicuña population carried out by the provincial government, these recent actions should be part of a development project of regional scale, oriented to the sustainable use of the natural resources of Los Andes Department. That project would create jobs and discourage emigration.Desde una perspectiva histórica, demográfica y del uso de los recursos naturales, analizamos la relación existente entre las migraciones humanas y las actividades económicas en el departamento Los Andes, ubicado al W de la provincia de Salta, en el Noroeste Argentino. Usando el m

  3. Genotipificación del virus de la hepatitis B de pacientes de áreas endémicas del Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisely Hijar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available En el mundo existen más de 350 millones de portadores crónicos con hepatitis viral B, en el Perú la prevalencia de este virus es variada. Existen áreas hiperendémicas en la región Amazónica y en algunos valles de la vertiente oriental de los Andes tales como Abancay y Ayacucho. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar preliminarmente los genotipos del virus de la hepatitis B (HBV presentes en muestras serológicas de Ancash, Ayacucho, Lima, Loreto y Ucayali. El análisis de la secuencia de ADN parcial de la región S del genoma viral del HBV fue realizado a partir de doce sueros con antígeno e (HBeAg positivos. El resultado de este análisis indica la presencia del genotipo F (subtipo adw4 en todas las muestras analizadas.

  4. Resilience and adaptations of rural communities and agricultural land use in the tropical Andes: Coping with environmental and socio-economic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadel, Ch.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a long settlement history of the tropical Andes, rural farming communities have always been exposed to conditions of ecological and economic vulnerability, risks, and even disasters. This has resulted, at certain times and in some regions, to a destabilization of livelihoods and to a manifestation of various forms of marginalization, to poverty or outmigration. However, Andean communities , over a long time, have given admirable testimonies of resilience and adaptations in the face of adverse conditions or new challenges. This paper examines the potentials and different facets of resilience and adaptation strategies of the rural campesinado in the tropical Andes. It emphasizes the proven traditional concepts of verticality, complementarity, reciprocity, and mutual community support, which to date support the feasibility and sustainability of Andean farming and community survival. In spite of this recognition, it is argued that Andean rural livelihoods always had to adapt to new developments, to threats and challenges, as well as to opportunities and alternative potentials. In the face of an almost ubiquitous penetration of modernization, new technologies, and economic and cultural globalization, the fundamental question arises, whether this can be considered as a path to progress and development, or as a threat to the survival of small-scale farming and rural community living. The paper concludes by formulating, albeit in a tentative form, some general suggestions for ‘development’ approaches and for research priorities in the rural Andes.

    A pesar de una tradición muy extensa del asentamiento humano en los Andes tropicales, las comunidades campesinas siempre enfrentaron condiciones de vulnerabilidad ecológica y económica, con varios riesgos, y aun desastres. Eso ha resultado, en diversos tiempos y en algunas regiones, en una estabilización de la superviviencia humana y en varias manifestaciones de marginalización, de

  5. Viruses of asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoli, Laura; Tiberini, Antonio; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The current knowledge on viruses infecting asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is reviewed. Over half a century, nine virus species belonging to the genera Ilarvirus, Cucumovirus, Nepovirus, Tobamovirus, Potexvirus, and Potyvirus have been found in this crop. The potyvirus Asparagus virus 1 (AV1) and the ilarvirus Asparagus virus 2 (AV2) are widespread and negatively affect the economic life of asparagus crops reducing yield and increasing the susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stress. The main properties and epidemiology of AV1 and AV2 as well as diagnostic techniques for their detection and identification are described. Minor viruses and control are briefly outlined.

  6. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of small enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of 9000-13 000 bases. Most infect mammals and birds. Many flaviviruses are host-specific and pathogenic, such as hepatitis C virus in the genus Hepacivirus. The majority of known members in the genus Flavivirus are arthropod...... borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae....

  7. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Judson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  8. Serodiagnosis for Tumor Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Brian J.; Labo, Nazzarena; Miley, Wendell J.; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The known human tumor viruses include the DNA viruses Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus. RNA tumor viruses include Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 and hepatitis C virus. The serological identification of antigens/antibodies in plasma serum is a rapidly progressing field with utility for both scientists and clinicians. Serology is useful for conducting seroepidemiology studies and to inform on the pathogenesis and host immune response to a particular viral agent. Clinically, serology is useful for diagnosing current or past infection and for aiding in clinical management decisions. Serology is useful for screening blood donations for infectious agents and for monitoring the outcome of vaccination against these viruses. Serodiagnosis of human tumor viruses has improved in recent years with increased specificity and sensitivity of the assays, as well as reductions in cost and the ability to assess multiple antibody/antigens in single assays. Serodiagnosis of tumor viruses plays an important role in our understanding of the prevalence and transmission of these viruses and ultimately in the ability to develop treatments/preventions for these globally important diseases. PMID:25843726

  9. Initial study of arthropods succession and pig carrion decomposition in two freshwater ecosystems in the Colombian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Maria; Wolff, Marta

    2011-10-10

    Entomological succession and trophic roles of arthropods associated with different stages of carcass decomposition were studied to estimate the post-mortem submersion interval in two freshwater ecosystems in the Colombian Andes, at an altitude of 2614 m. Pig carcasses were employed as models placed 68 m apart, one in a stream (lotic) and another in an artificial lake (lentic). Decomposition time to skeletal remains was 74 days in the lake and 80 days in the stream. Six phases of decomposition were established: submerged fresh, early floating, floating decay, bloated deterioration, floating remains and sunken remains. A total of 18,832 organisms associated with the carcasses were collected: 11,487 in the lake (four orders, 19 families and 33 species) and 7345 in the stream (eight orders, 15 families and 25 species). Organisms were classified in the following ecological categories: shredders, collectors, predators, necrophagous, sarcosaprophagous and opportunists. Physical and chemical properties of the habitats, such as water temperature, CO(2) and conductivity, varied according to rainfall. In the lake, shredders (Coleoptera: Tropisternus sp. and Berosus sp.) and collectors (Diptera: Chironomus sp.) were found to be associated with submerged phases. Predators (Odonata) were only present during the first phases. Coleoptera (Dytiscidae) were found during floating decay and bloated deterioration stages. In the stream, shredders (Hyalella sp.) and collectors (Simulium sp.) were found during all stages, whereas the predator Oxelytrum discicolle was found exclusively during the floating stages, during which body temperature increased in a fashion similar to active decay in terrestrial environments.

  10. Comparison of Three Supervised Learning Methods for Digital Soil Mapping: Application to a Complex Terrain in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hitziger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A digital soil mapping approach is applied to a complex, mountainous terrain in the Ecuadorian Andes. Relief features are derived from a digital elevation model and used as predictors for topsoil texture classes sand, silt, and clay. The performance of three statistical learning methods is compared: linear regression, random forest, and stochastic gradient boosting of regression trees. In linear regression, a stepwise backward variable selection procedure is applied and overfitting is controlled by minimizing Mallow’s Cp. For random forest and boosting, the effect of predictor selection and tuning procedures is assessed. 100-fold repetitions of a 5-fold cross-validation of the selected modelling procedures are employed for validation, uncertainty assessment, and method comparison. Absolute assessment of model performance is achieved by comparing the prediction error of the selected method and the mean. Boosting performs best, providing predictions that are reliably better than the mean. The median reduction of the root mean square error is around 5%. Elevation is the most important predictor. All models clearly distinguish ridges and slopes. The predicted texture patterns are interpreted as result of catena sequences (eluviation of fine particles on slope shoulders and landslides (mixing up mineral soil horizons on slopes.

  11. Climate Warming and Soil Carbon in Tropical Forests: Insights from an Elevation Gradient in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Andrew T.; Whitaker, Jeanette; Turner, Benjamin L.; Salinas, Norma; Zimmermann, Michael; Malhi, Yadvinder; Meir, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in tropical forests will influence future climate. Studies of a 3.5-kilometer elevation gradient in the Peruvian Andes, including short-term translocation experiments and the examination of the long-term adaptation of biota to local thermal and edaphic conditions, have revealed several factors that may regulate this sensitivity. Collectively this work suggests that, in the absence of a moisture constraint, the temperature sensitivity of decomposition is regulated by the chemical composition of plant debris (litter) and both the physical and chemical composition of preexisting SOM: higher temperature sensitivities are found in litter or SOM that is more chemically complex and in SOM that is less occluded within aggregates. In addition, the temperature sensitivity of SOM in tropical montane forests may be larger than previously recognized because of the presence of “cold-adapted” and nitrogen-limited microbial decomposers and the possible future alterations in plant and microbial communities associated with warming. Studies along elevation transects, such as those reviewed here, can reveal factors that will regulate the temperature sensitivity of SOM. They can also complement and guide in situ soil-warming experiments, which will be needed to understand how this vulnerability to temperature may be mediated by altered plant productivity under future climatic change. PMID:26955086

  12. Analysis and dynamic modeling of a moraine failure and glacier lake outburst flood at Ventisquero Negro, Patagonian Andes (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worni, Raphael; Stoffel, Markus; Huggel, Christian; Volz, Christian; Casteller, Alejandro; Luckman, Brian

    2012-06-01

    SummaryAlthough moraine dams are inherently prone to failure because of their often weak structure, loose internal composition and lack of an engineered spillway, the understanding of dam breaching processes remains largely incomplete and appropriate modeling approaches are scarce. This paper analyzes a recent glacier lake outburst, caused by the failure of the terminal moraine of Ventisquero Negro (Patagonian Andes, Argentina) in May 2009. The dam breach trigger, breaching and lake emptying processes, plus the dynamics of the outburst flood were reconstructed based on field evidence and the application of a dynamic dam break model. Results indicate that the moraine failure was caused most probably by a rising lake level due to heavy precipitation, resulting in high lake outflow which led to dam erosion and finally to dam failure. The lake volume of ca. 10 × 106 m3 was released in ca. 3 h, producing high-discharge (ca. 4100 m3 s-1) debris flows and hyperconcentrated flows as the escaping water entrained large volumes of clastic material. The methodology presented in this paper provides valuable insights into complex dam breach and GLOF processes, and closes a critical gap in dynamic dam break modeling aimed at providing the lake outburst hydrograph. An accurate determination of outburst hydrographs constitutes one of the most crucial aspects for hazard assessment of unstable lakes and will gain further importance with ongoing glacier retreat and glacier lake formation.

  13. Soluble iron inputs to the Southern Ocean through recent andesitic to rhyolitic volcanic ash eruptions from the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonella, L. E.; Palomeque, M. E.; Croot, P. L.; Stein, A.; Kupczewski, M.; Rosales, A.; Montes, M. L.; Colombo, F.; García, M. G.; Villarosa, G.; Gaiero, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    Patagonia, due to its geographic position and the dominance of westerly winds, is a key area that contributes to the supply of nutrients to the Southern Ocean, both through mineral dust and through the periodic deposits of volcanic ash. Here we evaluate the characteristics of Fe dissolved (into soluble and colloidal species) from volcanic ash for three recent southern Andes volcanic eruptions having contrasting features and chemical compositions. Contact between cloud waters (wet deposition) and end-members of andesitic (Hudson volcano) and rhyolitic (Chaitén volcano) materials was simulated. Results indicate higher Fe release and faster liberation rates in the andesitic material. Fe release during particle-seawater interaction (dry deposition) has higher rates in rhyolitic-type ashes. Rhyolitic ashes under acidic conditions release Fe in higher amounts and at a slower rate, while in those samples containing mostly glass shards, Fe release was lower and faster. The 2011 Puyehue eruption was observed by a dust monitoring station. Puyehue-type eruptions can contribute soluble Fe to the ocean via dry or wet deposition, nearly reaching the limit required for phytoplankton growth. In contrast, the input of Fe after processing by an acidic eruption plume could raise the amount of dissolved Fe in surface ocean waters several times, above the threshold required to initiate phytoplankton blooms. A single eruption like the Puyehue one represents more than half of the yearly Fe flux contributed by dust.

  14. Selection of astrophysical/astronomical/solar sites at the Argentina East Andes range taking into account atmospheric components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, R. D.; García, B.; Micheletti, M. I.; Salum, G.; Freire, M.; Maya, J.; Mancilla, A.; Crinó, E.; Mandat, D.; Pech, M.; Bulik, T.

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we analyze sites in the Argentinian high Andes mountains as possible places for astrophysical/astronomical/solar observatories. They are located at: San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) and El Leoncito/CASLEO region: sites 1 and 2. We consider the following atmospheric components that affect, in different and specific wavelength ranges, the detection of photons of astronomical/astrophysical/solar origin: ozone, microscopic particles, precipitable water and clouds. We also determined the atmospheric radiative transmittance in a day near the summer solstice at noon, in order to confirm the clearness of the sky in the proposed sites at SAC and El Leoncito. Consequently, all the collected and analyzed data in the present work, indicate that the proposed sites are very promising to host astrophysical/astronomical/solar observatories. Some atmospheric components, like aerosols, play a significant role in the attenuation of light (Cherencov and/or fluorescence) detected in cosmic rays (particles or gamma photons) astrophysical observatories, while others, like ozone have to be considered in astronomical/solar light detection.

  15. Genetic Variations in the TP53 Pathway in Native Americans Strongly Suggest Adaptation to the High Altitudes of the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacovas, Vanessa Cristina; Rovaris, Diego Luiz; Peréz, Orlando; de Azevedo, Soledad; Macedo, Gabriel Souza; Sandoval, José Raul; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Villena, Mercedes; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Ramallo, Virginia; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of the five single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes of the TP53 pathway (TP53, rs1042522; MDM2, rs2279744; MDM4, rs1563828; USP7, rs1529916; and LIF, rs929271) were studied in a total of 282 individuals belonging to Quechua, Aymara, Chivay, Cabanaconde, Yanke, Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, Uros, Guarani Ñandeva, and Guarani Kaiowá populations, characterized as Native American or as having a high level (> 90%) of Native American ancestry. In addition, published data pertaining to 100 persons from five other Native American populations (Surui, Karitiana, Maya, Pima, and Piapoco) were analyzed. The populations were classified as living in high altitude (≥ 2,500 m) or in lowlands (< 2,500 m). Our analyses revealed that alleles USP7-G, LIF-T, and MDM2-T showed significant evidence that they were selected for in relation to harsh environmental variables related to high altitudes. Our results show for the first time that alleles of classical TP53 network genes have been evolutionary co-opted for the successful human colonization of the Andes.

  16. Genetic Variations in the TP53 Pathway in Native Americans Strongly Suggest Adaptation to the High Altitudes of the Andes.

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    Vanessa Cristina Jacovas

    Full Text Available The diversity of the five single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes of the TP53 pathway (TP53, rs1042522; MDM2, rs2279744; MDM4, rs1563828; USP7, rs1529916; and LIF, rs929271 were studied in a total of 282 individuals belonging to Quechua, Aymara, Chivay, Cabanaconde, Yanke, Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, Uros, Guarani Ñandeva, and Guarani Kaiowá populations, characterized as Native American or as having a high level (> 90% of Native American ancestry. In addition, published data pertaining to 100 persons from five other Native American populations (Surui, Karitiana, Maya, Pima, and Piapoco were analyzed. The populations were classified as living in high altitude (≥ 2,500 m or in lowlands (< 2,500 m. Our analyses revealed that alleles USP7-G, LIF-T, and MDM2-T showed significant evidence that they were selected for in relation to harsh environmental variables related to high altitudes. Our results show for the first time that alleles of classical TP53 network genes have been evolutionary co-opted for the successful human colonization of the Andes.

  17. Genetic Variations in the TP53 Pathway in Native Americans Strongly Suggest Adaptation to the High Altitudes of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peréz, Orlando; de Azevedo, Soledad; Macedo, Gabriel Souza; Sandoval, José Raul; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Villena, Mercedes; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Ramallo, Virginia; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of the five single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes of the TP53 pathway (TP53, rs1042522; MDM2, rs2279744; MDM4, rs1563828; USP7, rs1529916; and LIF, rs929271) were studied in a total of 282 individuals belonging to Quechua, Aymara, Chivay, Cabanaconde, Yanke, Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, Uros, Guarani Ñandeva, and Guarani Kaiowá populations, characterized as Native American or as having a high level (> 90%) of Native American ancestry. In addition, published data pertaining to 100 persons from five other Native American populations (Surui, Karitiana, Maya, Pima, and Piapoco) were analyzed. The populations were classified as living in high altitude (≥ 2,500 m) or in lowlands (< 2,500 m). Our analyses revealed that alleles USP7-G, LIF-T, and MDM2-T showed significant evidence that they were selected for in relation to harsh environmental variables related to high altitudes. Our results show for the first time that alleles of classical TP53 network genes have been evolutionary co-opted for the successful human colonization of the Andes. PMID:26382048

  18. Reactividad potencial de las rocas andesíticas de Cabo de Gata (SE de España

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    Soriano, J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Andesitic rocks produce an alkali-silica reaction with the components of the interstitial phase of concrete. This reaction can be considered as belonging to the slow-kinetic type, since the incongruent dissolution of the rock-forming minerals leads to the late formation of siliceous calc-alkaline gel. As a conquence, the conventional mortar-bar method does not detect such reaction until 90 days later.

    Las rocas andesíticas producen una reacción álcalis-sílice con los componentes de la fase intersticial del hormigón. Esta reacción puede encuadrarse dentro de las de cinética lenta, ya que la disolución incongruente de los minerales constituyentes de las rocas, da lugar a la formación tardía de geles silicocalco-alcalinos. En consecuencia, la utilización convencional del método de ensayo de barras de mortero no detecta la reacción hasta transcurridos al menos 90 días.

  19. A new species of Cryptotis (Mammalia, Eulipotyphla, Soricidae) from the Sierra de Perijá, Venezuelan-Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga-Carmona, Marcial; Woodman, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The Sierra de Perijá is the northern extension of the Cordillera Oriental of the Andes and includes part of the border between Colombia and Venezuela. The population of small-eared shrews (Mammalia, Eulipotyphla, Soricidae, Cryptotis) inhabiting the Sierra de Perijá previously was known from only a single skull from an individual collected in Colombia in 1989. This specimen had been referred to alternatively as C. thomasi and C. meridensis, but more precise definition of the known Colombian and Venezuelan species of Cryptotis has since excluded the Sierra de Perijá population from any named species. The recent collection of a specimen from the Venezuelan slope of Sierra de Perijá, prompted us to re-evaluate the taxonomic status of this population and determine its relationship with other Andean shrews. Our examination of the available specimens revealed that they possess a unique suite of morphological and morphometrical characters, and we describe the Sierra de Perijá population as a new species in the South American C. thomasi species group. Recognition of this new species adds to our knowledge of this genus in South America and to the biodiversity of the Sierra de Perijá.

  20. Modelling wet snow avalanche runout to assess road safety at a high-altitude mine in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Cesar Vera; Wever, Nander; Bühler, Yves; Stoffel, Lukas; Margreth, Stefan; Bartelt, Perry

    2016-11-01

    Mining activities in cold regions are vulnerable to snow avalanches. Unlike operational facilities, which can be constructed in secure locations outside the reach of avalanches, access roads are often susceptible to being cut, leading to mine closures and significant financial losses. In this paper we discuss the application of avalanche runout modelling to predict the operational risk to mining roads, a long-standing problem for mines in high-altitude, snowy regions. We study the 35 km long road located in the "Cajón del rio Blanco" valley in the central Andes, which is operated by the Codelco Andina copper mine. In winter and early spring, this road is threatened by over 100 avalanche paths. If the release and snow cover conditions can be accurately specified, we find that avalanche dynamics modelling is able to represent runout, and safe traffic zones can be identified. We apply a detailed, physics-based snow cover model to calculate snow temperature, density and moisture content in three-dimensional terrain. This information is used to determine the initial and boundary conditions of the avalanche dynamics model. Of particular importance is the assessment of the current snow conditions along the avalanche tracks, which define the mass and thermal energy entrainment rates and therefore the possibility of avalanche growth and long runout distances.

  1. Zonda downslope winds in the central Andes of South America in a 20-year climate simulation with the Eta model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico, Pablo L.; Chou, Sin Chan; Mourão, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    The Zonda wind is a local version of the alpine foehn in the central Andes Mountains in South America. It blows on the eastern slopes and produces an extremely warm and dry condition in Argentina. In this study, the occurrence of Zonda wind events during a 20-year simulation from the regional Eta model is analyzed and results are compared to previous studies of Zonda wind events based on weather observations. We define a set of parameters to account for the zonal pressure gradient across the mountain, vertical movement, and air humidity typical of Zonda wind events. These parameters are applied to characterize Zonda wind events in model run and to classify them as surface-level or high-level episodes. The resulting annual distribution of Zonda occurrences based on composite analyses shows a preference for winter and spring with rare occurrences during summer. For the surface-level Zonda wind events, the highest frequency occurs during spring. Whereas surface-level Zonda wind episodes more commonly initiate in the afternoon, high-level Zonda wind events show no preference for a given initiation time. Our results are mostly in agreement with previous observational results.

  2. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

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    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  3. Estimating glacier and snowmelt contributions to stream flow in a Central Andes catchment in Chile using natural tracers

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    M. Rodriguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for hydrograph separation in high elevation watersheds, which aims at identifying individual flow sources such as snow- and ice melt, rainfall and soil water. Daily summer and bi-daily spring water samples from the outlet of the Juncal River were analyzed for all major ions as well as stable water isotopes, δ18O and δ2H. Additionally, various water sources such as rain, springs, snow- and glacial melt were sampled throughout the catchment. A principal component analysis (PCA was performed in order to reduce the dimensionality of the problem. Potential sources were identified in a two-component U space that explains 77% of variability. Hydrograph separation (HS was performed through three models: (i Isotopic model, (ii Mixing–PCA model, and (iii Informative–Bayesian model, with very similar results in each case. At the Juncal River outlet, summer flows were composed by at least 50% of water originating in highly glaciarized headwaters in 2011–2012 (a dry period in the Central Andes. Autumn and winter flows were highly influenced by soil water and affect total annual discharge. Before the high flow season, snow melt accounted for approximately 25% of streamflow, However during summer, when streamflow was highest, snowmelt contribution was minimal, while glacier melt and soil water were the most important sources.

  4. Arquitectura precerámica en la cordillera de los Andes, Piruru frene a la diversidad de los datos

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    Elisabeth Bonnier

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Los datos sobre la arquitectura precerámica en la cordilleraandina provienen de cinco sitios: La Galgada, Piruru, Huaricoto, Shillacotoy Kotosh. Contexto arqueológico y rasgos arquitectónicos específicos permitenidentificar la función ceremonial de esta arquitectura. La descripciónde las construcciones religiosas pone en evidencia un conjunto pertinente decaracteres comunes. El espacio ceremonial, construido y sin construir, se articulaalrededor del doble elemento arquitectónico fundamental, el fogón yel piso. Para analizar el piso a dos niveles, dos neologismos, pericausto y epicaustohan sido creados. El análisis arquitectónico muestra que el piso es elespacio sagrado por excelencia. Los fechados 14C de los sitios estudiadosdestacan la larga duración del Precerámico Final con arquitectura. A la luz delos últimos trabajos en Piruru y de los cambios arquitectónicos perceptiblesen este sitio, la hipótesis, formulada a principios de este decenio, sobre ·taexistencia de una tradición religiosa única propia de los Andes Centrales, seestá reconsiderando.

  5. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C; Rincón, Ascanio D; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W M

    2014-10-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U-Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal-vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

  6. A Stepwise, Participatory Approach to Design and Implement Community Based Adaptation to Drought in the Peruvian Andes

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    Ralph Lasage

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The livelihoods of people in the Andes are expected to be affected by climate change due to their dependence on glacier water. The observed decrease in glacier volume over the last few decades is likely to accelerate during the current century, which will affect water availability in the region. This paper presents an approach for participatory development of community-based adaptation measures to cope with the projected impacts of climate change. It combines in an innovative manner participatory design with physical measurements, modeling and a vulnerability analysis. Vulnerability to drought is made operational for households in a catchment of the Ocoña River basin in Peru. On the basis of a household survey (n = 94 we explore how a vulnerability index (risk divided by response efficacy can be used to assess the distribution of vulnerability over households, and how socio-economic factors determine this vulnerability. Water entitlement, area of irrigated land, income and education are all significantly correlated with vulnerability to drought. The research showed that the main source of spring water is local rainwater, and that water use efficiency is low. The selected adaptation measures aimed to increase water availability close to farmland, and increase water use efficiency of farmers and households.

  7. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C.; Rincón, Ascanio D.; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U–Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal–vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic–Jurassic boundary. PMID:26064540

  8. Paleoecological potential of mid-altitude peat deposits in the Tropical Andes: evidence from subfossil wood and palynology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Arango, Catalina; Andres Ayala Usma, David; Boom, Arnoud; Archila, Sonia; Montes, Camilo

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of past climatic and ecological phenomena at mid-altitudes in the tropical Andes is limited by the lack of ancient lakes and other well preserved paleoclimatological archives. During the opening of a main road a decade ago in the Central Cordillera of Colombia, some buried peat deposits became exposed within the Pereira Volcanodetritic Fan (~2000 m.a.s.l), revealing a rich resource of organic remains, including big fragments of subfossil trees and micro and macro plant remains ideal for multiproxy analysis. Radiocarbon dating and palynological analysis suggest that the deposit dates back to the last glacial period. We present the first δ13C results of a subfossil wood sample with visible tree rings, that was identified as a member of the genus Chrysochlamys (Clusiaceae) and that revealed a periodic signal that might be attributed to climatic variability. A clear seasonal pattern arises suggesting a different climatic configuration, most likely related to a broader migrational range of the ITCZ related to higher eccentricity. Pollen analysis reveals the prevalence of montane Andean forests and Paramo elements (today ca. 1200 meters higher) indicating much colder climates than today. These first findings indicate that mid-altitude Andean peats are highly sensitive to climatic variability and provide an excellent opportunity to study ancient environmental phenomena at extremely high resolution.

  9. Effects of loading–unloading and wetting–drying cycles on geomechanical behaviors of mudrocks in the Colombian Andes

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    Mario Camilo Torres-Suarez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The mudrocks in the Colombian Andes, particularly those exhibiting low cementation (bonding, are susceptible to degradation when the environmental conditions change, which are challenging issues for engineering works. In this paper, the changes in physico-mechanical properties of mudrocks were monitored in laboratory, and some influential factors on the mechanical competence of geomaterials were studied. The geotechnical characteristics and experimental designs were developed from physical, chemical, mechanical and compositional points of view. In the tests, the techniques such as vapor equilibrium technique (VET were employed to apply wetting–drying cycles and to control relative humidity (suction-controlled and loading–unloading cycles through ultrasonic wave velocities technique. The results show that the main failure mechanisms for the laminated mudrocks start on the microscopic scale by fissures coalescence, exhibiting physico-chemical degradation as well; the global geomechanical behavior presents a state between a ductile, like rock, and a fragile, like soil. The obtained results can provide engineering values according to monitoring laboratory set, when compared with in situ conditions.

  10. The role of the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament in ore deposit deformation in the Andes of northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Carlos; Ramírez, Luis E.; Townley, Brian; Solari, Marcelo; Guerra, Nelson

    2007-02-01

    During the Late Jurassic-Early Oligocene interval, widespread hydrothermal copper mineralization events occurred in association with the geological evolution of the southern segment of the central Andes, giving rise to four NS-trending metallogenic belts of eastward-decreasing age: Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, Late Paleocene-Early Eocene, and Late Eocene-Early Oligocene. The Antofagasta-Calama Lineament (ACL) consists of an important dextral strike-slip NE-trending fault system. Deformation along the ACL system is evidenced by a right-lateral displacement of the Late Paleocene-Early Eocene metallogenic belts. Furthermore, clockwise rotation of the Early Cretaceous Mantos Blancos copper deposit and the Late Paleocene Lomas Bayas porphyry copper occurred. In the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene metallogenic belt, a sigmoidal deflection and a clockwise rotation is observed in the ACL. The ACL is thought to have controlled the emplacement of Early Oligocene porphyry copper deposits (34-37 Ma; Toki, Genoveva, Quetena, and Opache), whereas it deflected the Late Eocene porphyry copper belt (41-44 Ma; Esperanza, Telégrafo, Centinela, and Polo Sur ore deposits). These observations suggest that right-lateral displacement of the ACL was active during the Early Oligocene. We propose that the described structural features need to be considered in future exploration programs within this extensively gravel-covered region of northern Chile.

  11. Largest explosive eruption in historical times in the Andes at Huaynaputina volcano, a.d. 1600, southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Davila, Jasmine; Eissen, Jean-Philippe

    1999-05-01

    The largest explosive eruption (volcanic explosivity index of 6) in historical times in the Andes took place in a.d. 1600 at Huaynaputina volcano in southern Peru. According to chronicles, the eruption began on February 19 with a Plinian phase and lasted until March 6. Repeated tephra falls, pyroclastic flows, and surges devastated an area 70 × 40 km2 west of the vent and affected all of southern Peru, and earthquakes shook the city of Arequipa 75 km away. Eight deposits, totaling 10.2 13.1 km3 in bulk volume, are attributed to this eruption: (1) a widespread, ˜8.1 km3 pumice-fall deposit; (2) channeled ignimbrites (1.6 2 km3) with (3) ground-surge and ash-cloud-surge deposits; (4) widespread co-ignimbrite ash layers; (5) base-surge deposits; (6) unconfined ash-flow deposits; (7) crystal-rich deposits; and (8) late ash-fall and surge deposits. Disruption of a hydrothermal system and hydromagmatic interactions are thought to have fueled the large-volume explosive eruption. Although the event triggered no caldera collapse, ring fractures that cut the vent area point to the onset of a funnel-type caldera collapse.

  12. Advanced seismic and GPR survey of a rock glacier in the Upper Choapa Valley, semi-arid Andes of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, S.; Bodet, L.; Camerlynck, C. M.; Dhemaied, A.; Galibert, P.; Kinnard, C.; Vitale, Q.; Saéz, R.

    2011-12-01

    In semi-arid to arid contexts, rock glaciers, as other prominent permafrost features, can represent critical permanent resources of solid water. It is thus important to analyze their internal structure and estimate their ice content, especially in mining areas where human activities may have an impact on permafrost features. In the upper Choapa Valley, semi-arid Andes of Chile (31.59°S, 70.50°W), we investigate a small rock glacier located in an open-pit copper mine, using data from two boreholes and advanced geophysical methods. The two boreholes, performed using diamond drill hole technique, reveal relatively low ice content (order of magnitude: 20-25%) in the rock glacier. Seismic and ground-penetrating (GPR) radar surveys were performed on the surface of the rock glacier. P- and S-wave refraction seismics were employed along two profiles. The ground-penetrating radar operation mode was quite new and innovative for a rock glacier site; it consisted, (1) for three-dimensional imaging, of a rectangular grid of 25 evenly (2 m) spaced constant-offset (2 m) profiles, and (2) for velocity analysis, of a 150 m-long profile performed many times in constant-offset mode with offset varying between 0.5 and 16 m. The processing of the acquired data permits to obtain an accurate representation of the internal structure and an estimation of the overall ice content in the rock glacier.

  13. Diagnóstico virológico y molecular de virus transmitidos por roedores. Hantavirus y arenavirus

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    Silvana Levis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Los hantavirus (familia Bunyaviridae y arenavirus (familia Arenaviridae son virus de roedores; cada uno de ellos parece estar estrictamente asociado con una especie de roedor en la que causa una infección persistente y asintomática. En las Américas tienen como reservorios primarios a roedores de la sub-familia Sigmodontinae, y son causantes de síndrome pulmonar por Hantavirus (SPH y fiebres hemorrágicas, respectivamente (1,2. El número de estos virus identificados en los últimos años ha aumentado significativamente; actualmente, el género Hantavirus está compuesto por más de 28 tipos diferentes, mientras que al menos 23 arenavirus conforman el género Arenavirus. Entre los hantavirus asociados con SPH se destacan el virus Sin Nombre en Norteamérica, y los virus Andes, Laguna Negra, Caño Delgadito, Araraquara y Juquitiba, en el cono sur de América, entre otros (2. Los arenavirus asociados a fiebres hemorrágicas reconocidos en Sud América al presente son: Junín (Argentina, Guanarito (Venezuela, Sabiá (Brasil, y Machupo y Chapare (Bolivia (3.

  14. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  15. How do two Lupinus species respond to temperature along an altitudinal gradient in the Venezuelan Andes? ¿Cómo responden dos especies de Lupinus a la temperatura en un gradiente altitudinal en los Andes venezolanos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERMÍN RADA

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature determines plant formations and species distribution along altitudinal gradients. Plants in the tropical high Andes, through different physiological and morphological characteristics, respond to freezing night temperatures and high daytime energy inputs which occur anytime of the year. The main objective of this study was to characterize day and night temperature related responses of two Lupinus species with different altitudinal ranges (L. meridanus, 1,800-3,600 and L. eromonomos, 3,700-4,300 m of altitude. Are there differences in night low temperature resistance mechanisms between the species along the gradient? How do these species respond, in terms of optimum temperature for photosynthesis, to increasing altitude? Lupinus meridanus shows frost avoidance, in contrast to L. eromonomos, which tolerates freezing at higher altitudes. Optimum temperature for photosynthesis decreases along the gradient for both species. Maximum C0(2 assimilation rates were higher in L. meridanus, while L. eromonomos showed decreasing C0(2 assimilation rates at the higher altitude. In most cases, measured daily leaf temperature is always within the 80 % of optimum for photosynthesis. L. meridanus7 upper distribution limit seems to be restricted by cold resistance mechanisms, while L. eromonomos7 to a combination of both cold resistance and to C0(2 assimilation responses at higher altitudes.La temperatura determina las formaciones vegetales y la distribución de especies a lo largo de gradientes altitudinales. Las plantas en los altos Andes tropicales, a través de diferentes características morfológicas y fisiológicas, responden a temperaturas congelantes nocturnas y altas entradas energéticas durante el día en cualquier momento del año. El objetivo principal de este estudio fue caracterizar las respuestas relacionadas con temperaturas diurnas y nocturnas en dos especies de Lupinus con diferente distribución altitudinal (L. meridanus, 1

  16. On Darwin's footsteps across the Andes: Tithonian-Neocomian fossil invertebrates from the Piuquenes pass Tras las huellas de Darwin a través de los Andes: invertebrados fósiles del Tithoniano-Neocomiano del paso de Piuquenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Aguirre-Urreta

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to summarize the modern knowledge of the geology of the Piuquenes Pass, in the Main Andes of Argentina and Chile, and to describe a small fauna of Tithonian-Neocomian invertebrates mostly represented by ammonites. The present knowledge of the region is compared with Darwin's, as expressed in his famous book on the Geology of South America.El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar una breve revisión moderna de la geología del Paso de Piuquenes en los Andes Principales de Chile y Argentina y describir una pequeña fauna de invertebrados del Tithoniano-Neocomiano compuesta principalmente por amonites. Se compara también el conocimiento de esta región con la referida por Darwin en su famoso libro sobre la geología de América del Sur.

  17. Lacustrine sedimentation in an altitude forest site, central Andes, Bolivia. Palaeo-climatic implications; Etude de la sedimentation lacustre d`un site de foret d`altitude des Andes centrales Bolivie. Implications paleoclimatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sifeddine, A.; Bertaux, J. [ORSTOM, 93 - Bondy (France); Mourguiart, Ph. [Bordeaux-1 Univ. URA 197 CNRS, ORSTOM-AIMPACT, 33 (France). Dept. de Geologie et d`Oceanographie; Martin, L. [ORSTOM-AIMPACT, PPPG, IG/UFBA, Salvador (Brazil); Disnar, J.R.; Laggoun-Defarge, F. [Orleans Univ. URA 724-CNRS, 45 (France); Argollo, J. [Universidad Mayor de San Andre, IIG, La Paz (Bolivia)

    1998-12-31

    A sedimentological study of a 755 cm length core sampled in the middle of a marshy depression surrounded by a cloud forest in the central Andes reveals that this site has recorded important environmental variations during the last 50 000 years. For the most part (625 cm) the core is composed of detrital rich sediments deposited during the Upper Pleistocene. The highest amount of detrital influx underlines the Last Glacial Maximum which ranges from ca 29,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. to ca 16,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (ca 18,500 cal yr B.P.), between two relatively humid phases. The sedimentation of the present Interglacial, starting at ca 12,500 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (14,500 cal yr B.P.), is mainly organic, as a consequence of the great development of soils and the forest vegetal cover the catchment area. The maximum extension of this vegetal cover ranging from 12,500 to ca 10,500 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (14,500 and 12,400 cal yr B.P.) is followed from 10,500 to 8,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (12,400 and 8,800 cal yr B.P.) by a drier period is revealed by the occurrence of micro-charcoals in the sediment. Between ca 8,000 and 4,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (8,800 and 4,500 cal yr B.P.), the sharp increase of micro-charcoals content, likely related to palaeo-fires, underlines an intensification of this dry trend. (authors) 30 refs.

  18. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  19. Mechanical properties of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2013-01-01

    Structural biology techniques have greatly contributed to unveil the relationships between structure, properties and functions of viruses. In recent years, classic structural approaches are being complemented by single-molecule techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers to study physical properties and functions of viral particles that are not accessible to classic structural techniques. Among these features are mechanical properties such as stiffness, intrinsic elasticity, tensile strength and material fatigue. The field of virus mechanics is contributing to materials science by investigating some physical parameters of "soft" biological matter and biological nano-objects. Virus mechanics studies are also starting to unveil the biological implications of physical properties of viruses. Growing evidence indicate that viruses are subjected to internal and external forces, and that they may have adapted to withstand and even use those forces. This chapter describes what is known on the mechanical properties of virus particles, their structural determinants, and possible biological implications, of which several examples are provided.

  20. Geochemical and thermochronological signals in Tertiary to Recent sediments from the Western Andes (15-19°S): proxies for sediment provenance and Andean uplift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decou, A.; Mamani, M.; von Eynatten, H.; Wörner, G.

    2009-04-01

    During the Cenozoic the landscape at the western margin of South America changed dramatically due to the tectonic evolution of the Andes (Isacks 1988, J Geophysical Res 93) and significant variations in climate (Gregory-Wodzicki 2000, GSA Bulletin 112). At present day the climate in the western Central Andes (N-Chile, S-Peru) is arid (rainfall average is less than 100-200 mm/y) Climate has changed significantly through time, for example, sediments on the Altiplano and the eastern Central Andes indicate a period of increased precipitation at around 7-8 Ma (Gaupp et al. 1999, PPP 151; Uba et al. 2007, Geology 35). The uplift of the Andes started some 30-25 My ago (Isacks, 1988,). Siliciclastic sedimentation along the western flank of the Central Andes started at 55 Ma and lasted until recent time (Moquegua Group, Roperch et al. 2006, Tectonics 25). This implies that a river system with sediment deposition was already developed before the Andean uplift which occurred during deposition of the Moquegua Group. The Moquegua group is composed of four units: Moquegua A (55-45Ma), Moquegua B (45-30Ma), Moquegua C (30-15?Ma) and Moquegua D (15?-0Ma) (Roperch et al. 2006). The sedimentary basin of Moquegua has a complex internal structure and is composed of different subbasins. We focus in this study respectively, from north to south, on the Cuno Cuno section (cut by the Rio Ocoña), the Majes section (cut by the Rio Majes) and the Moquegua section (cut by the Rio Moquegua). Several facies and compositional changes of Moquegua Group sediments, both along orogenic strike and through time, are already described; however, it lacks a detailed provenance study to constrain the tectonic and climatic controls on sediment generation, dispersal, and accumulation. To do so sandstones from all Moquegua units from the three different sections have been sampled. Because it is crucial to know all the potential source rocks in some detail, the Proterozoic-Paleozoic basement, the Jurassic