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Sample records for andes region

  1. Illicit crops and armed conflict as constraints on biodiversity conservation in the Andes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldså, Jon; Alvarez, María D; Lazcano, Juan Mario; León, Blanca

    2005-05-01

    Coca, once grown for local consumption in the Andes, is now produced for external markets, often in areas with armed conflict. Internationally financed eradication campaigns force traffickers and growers to constantly relocate, making drug-related activities a principal cause of forest loss. The impact on biodiversity is known only in general terms, and this article presents the first regional analysis to identify areas of special concern, using bird data as proxy. The aim of conserving all species may be significantly constrained in the Santa Marta and Perijá mountains, Darién, some parts of the Central Andes in Colombia, and between the middle Marañón and middle Huallaga valleys in Peru. Solutions to the problem must address the root causes: international drug markets, long-lasting armed conflict, and lack of alternative income for the rural poor.

  2. Biological affinities and regional microevolution among pre-Hispanic communities of Colombia's Northern Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Flórez, C D; Colantonio, S E

    2015-01-01

    Dental non-metric data were used to examine the biological continuity of pre-Hispanic peoples of Colombia's Northern Andes, including highland, lowland and coastal peoples. This report contributes to studies regarding the peopling of South America by establishing a benchmark comparison that includes pre-Hispanic populations of the Northern Andes. The sample consisted of a total of 583 individuals from 56 cemeteries ranging in time from the Early Holocene (10,000 BP) to the Final Late Holocene (500 BP). Permanent dentitions from individuals between 5 and 40 years of age were scored for 87 dental traits based on the ASUDAS. A divergence matrix was programmed using the Smith's Mean Measure of Divergence equation (MMD). Bartlett's adjustment and Ascombe transformation were considered into MMD calculations. Principal Coordenate analysis was applied based on MMD matrix scores. A clear group was found that associated Initial Late Holocene samples with Final Late Holocene samples. Early Holocene samples are very different to that, and Middle Holocene samples show as morphologically intermediate series. A comparison of the frequencies by time and period showed that a limited biological continuity existed. Interbreeding among initial populations of the same regions is expressed in similar frequencies of dental traits within Early Holocene and Middle Holocene samples. Early Holocene samples did not match with Sinodont pattern according to discriminant function analysis. These findings help us to better understand the settlement process of human groups in the Northern Andes and its relationship with migratory movements in South America.

  3. Variation in freshwater fish assemblages along a regional elevation gradient in the northern Andes, Colombia.

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    Carvajal-Quintero, Juan D; Escobar, Federico; Alvarado, Fredy; Villa-Navarro, Francisco A; Jaramillo-Villa, Úrsula; Maldonado-Ocampo, Javier A

    2015-07-01

    Studies on elevation diversity gradients have covered a large number of taxa and regions throughout the world; however, studies of freshwater fish are scarce and restricted to examining their changes along a specific gradient. These studies have reported a monotonic decrease in species richness with increasing elevation, but ignore the high taxonomic differentiation of each headwater assemblage that may generate high β-diversity among them. Here, we analyzed how fish assemblages vary with elevation among regional elevation bands, and how these changes are related to four environmental clines and to changes in the distribution, habitat use, and the morphology of fish species. Using a standardized field sampling technique, we assessed three different diversity and two structural assemblage measures across six regional elevation bands located in the northern Andes (Colombia). Each species was assigned to a functional group based on its body shape, habitat use, morphological, and/or behavioral adaptations. Additionally, at each sampling site, we measured four environmental variables. Our analyses showed: (1) After a monotonic decrease in species richness, we detected an increase in richness in the upper part of the gradient; (2) diversity patterns vary depending on the diversity measure used; (3) diversity patterns can be attributed to changes in species distribution and in the richness and proportions of functional groups along the regional elevation gradient; and (4) diversity patterns and changes in functional groups are highly correlated with variations in environmental variables, which also vary with elevation. These results suggest a novel pattern of variation in species richness with elevation: Species richness increases at the headwaters of the northern Andes owing to the cumulative number of endemic species there. This highlights the need for large-scale studies and has important implications for the aquatic conservation of the region.

  4. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing.

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    Román-Cuesta, R M; Carmona-Moreno, C; Lizcano, G; New, M; Silman, M; Knoke, T; Malhi, Y; Oliveras, I; Asbjornsen, H; Vuille, M

    2014-06-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in mountainous ecosystems, and there is a global evidence of increased fire activity with elevation. Whilst fire research has become popular in the tropical lowlands, much less is known of the tropical high Andean region (>2000 masl, from Colombia to Bolivia). This study examines fire trends in the high Andes for three ecosystems, the Puna, the Paramo and the Yungas, for the period 1982-2006. We pose three questions: (i) is there an increased fire response with elevation? (ii) does the El Niño- Southern Oscillation control fire activity in this region? (iii) are the observed fire trends human driven (e.g., human practices and their effects on fuel build-up) or climate driven? We did not find evidence of increased fire activity with elevation but, instead, a quasicyclic and synchronous fire response in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, suggesting the influence of high-frequency climate forcing on fire responses on a subcontinental scale, in the high Andes. ENSO variability did not show a significant relation to fire activity for these three countries, partly because ENSO variability did not significantly relate to precipitation extremes, although it strongly did to temperature extremes. Whilst ENSO did not individually lead the observed regional fire trends, our results suggest a climate influence on fire activity, mainly through a sawtooth pattern of precipitation (increased rainfall before fire-peak seasons (t-1) followed by drought spells and unusual low temperatures (t0), which is particularly common where fire is carried by low fuel loads (e.g., grasslands and fine fuel). This climatic sawtooth appeared as the main driver of fire trends, above local human influences and fuel build

  5. Drainage - Structure Correlation in tectonically active Regions: Case studies in the Bolivian and Colombian Andes

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    Zeilinger, Gerold; Parra, Mauricio; Kober, Florian

    2017-04-01

    It is widely accepted, that drainage patterns are often controlled by tectonics/climate and geology/rheology. Classical drainage patterns can be found 1) in fault-and-thrust belt, where rives follow the valleys parallel or cut perpendicular to strike trough the ridges, forming a trellis pattern, 2) at dome structures where the drainage form a radial pattern or 3) rectangular patterns in strongly fractured regions. In this study, we focus on fault-and-thrust belts, that undergone different phases of tectonic activity. According to classical models, the deformation is propagating into the foreland, hence being youngest at the frontal part and getting successively older towards the axis of the orogen. Drainage patterns in the more interior parts of the orogenic wedge should be then less influenced by the direction of structures, as landscape evolution is changing to a tectonic passive stage. This relationship might represent the transience and maturity of drainage pattern evolution. Here we study drainage patterns of the Bolivian and the eastern Colombian Andes by comparing the relative orientation of the drainage network with the orogen structural grain. The drainage is extracted from Digital Elevation Models (SRTM 30 m) and indexed by their Strahler Order. Order 1 channels have an upstream area of 1 km2. The direction of all segments is analyzed by linear directional mean function that results in the mean orientation of input channels with approx. 500 m average length. The orientation of structures for different structural domains is calculated using the same function on digitized faults and fold-axis. Rose diagrams show the length-weighted directional distribution of structures, of higher (>= 4) and of lower order (changes in the SA into a distinct N-S trend with a pronounced E-W orientation of lower order fluvial channels. A similar pattern is recognized in the Eastern Andes of Colombia, where the structural trend is NE-SW. The Eastern Cordillera comprise a

  6. Mallas y flujos : acción colectiva, cambio social, quinua y desarrollo regional indígena en los Andes Bolivianos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laguna, P.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies collective action and social change in indigenous rural organisations (IRO) in the Bolivian Andes. I focus on the effects and importance that these organisations have in the historical process of regional development as social spaces that encapsulate different projects of social,

  7. Mallas y flujos : acción colectiva, cambio social, quinua y desarrollo regional indígena en los Andes Bolivianos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laguna, P.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies collective action and social change in indigenous rural organisations (IRO) in the Bolivian Andes. I focus on the effects and importance that these organisations have in the historical process of regional development as social spaces that encapsulate different projects of

  8. Climate change projections for the tropical Andes using a regional climate model: Temperature and precipitation simulations for the end of the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, RocíO.; Vuille, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    High-elevation tropical mountain regions may be more strongly affected by future climate change than their surrounding lowlands. In the tropical Andes a significant increase in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns will likely affect size and distribution of glaciers and wetlands, ecosystem integrity, and water availability for human consumption, irrigation, and power production. However, detailed projections of future climate change in the tropical Andes are not yet available. Here we present first results for the end of the 21st century (2071-2100) using a regional climate model (RCM) based on two different emission scenarios (A2 and B2). The model adequately simulates the spatiotemporal variability of precipitation and temperature but displays a cool and wet bias, in particular along the eastern Andean slope during the wet season, December-February. Projections of changes in the 21st century indicate significant warming in the tropical Andes, which is enhanced at higher elevations and further amplified in the middle and upper troposphere. Temperature changes are spatially similar in both scenarios, but the amplitude is significantly higher in RCM-A2. The RCM-A2 scenario also shows a significant increase in interannual temperature variability, while it remains almost unchanged in RCM-B2 when compared to a 20th century control run. Changes in precipitation are spatially much less coherent, with both regions of increased and decreased precipitation across the Andes. These results provide a first attempt at quantifying future climate change in the tropical Andes and could serve as input for impact models to simulate anticipated changes in Andean glaciation, hydrology, and ecosystem integrity.

  9. Regional Deformation of the Southern Puna Plateau, Central Andes, Recorded by Basin Evolution and Bedrock Exhumation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, R.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Sobel, E. R.; Carrapa, B.; Davis, D. W.; Glodny, J.; Stockli, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The regional deformation history of the southern Puna Plateau remains poorly constrained but is key to understanding the growth and dynamics of the central Andes, an important example of orogeny along a non-collisional plate boundary. Several lines of evidence lead us to propose that the southern Puna Plateau was occupied by an uninterrupted sedimentary basin during the late Eocene to early Oligocene (~38-28 Ma). First, oldest strata in the Antofagasta de la Sierra region (SW Puna) and the Pasto Ventura region (SE Puna) both contain little volcanic material, suggesting they predate the most recent arc activity at ~28 Ma. Second, detrital zircons from the Antofagasta de la Sierra region yield youngest U-Pb ages of ~39 Ma and detrital apatites from the Pasto Ventura region yield youngest fission-track ages of ~38 Ma, giving a maximum depositional age. Third, provenance analysis reveals a single, western source for the Antofagasta de la Sierra region (SW Puna) and dual, eastern and western sources for the Pasto Ventura region (SE Puna), supporting the presence of a regional basin. This regional basin was disrupted and compartmentalized by uplift of ~N-S trending bedrock ranges starting as early as in late Oligocene time. Bedrock samples from the eastern foot of the Sierra de Calalaste (SW Puna) yield an apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He age of 19.9±2.0 Ma, consistent with modeled apatite fission-track data that show onset of exhumation at ~25-20 Ma. Modeling of apatite fission-track and (U-Th-Sm)/He data shows that the Sierra Laguna Blanca (SE Puna) experienced exhumation at ~15-10 Ma, the youngest bedrock exhumation documented in the plateau region, implying that deformation and erosion of basement-bounding structures continued into the middle Miocene. We suggest that the post-late Eocene regional deformation history of the southern Puna Plateau documents an important dynamic shift from flexure-controlled foreland dynamics to flexure-limited broken foreland dynamics during the

  10. Glacier changes and climate trends derived from multiple sources in the data scarce Cordillera Vilcanota region, southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, N.; Huggel, C.; Rohrer, M.; Silverio, W.; Mark, B. G.; Burns, P.; Portocarrero, C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of glaciers as temporal water reservoirs is particularly pronounced in the (outer) tropics because of the very distinct wet/dry seasons. Rapid glacier retreat caused by climatic changes is thus a major concern, and decision makers demand urgently for regional/local glacier evolution trends, ice mass estimates and runoff assessments. However, in remote mountain areas, spatial and temporal data coverage is typically very scarce and this is further complicated by a high spatial and temporal variability in regions with complex topography. Here, we present an approach on how to deal with these constraints. For the Cordillera Vilcanota (southern Peruvian Andes), which is the second largest glacierized cordillera in Peru (after the Cordillera Blanca) and also comprises the Quelccaya Ice Cap, we assimilate a comprehensive multi-decadal collection of available glacier and climate data from multiple sources (satellite images, meteorological station data and climate reanalysis), and analyze them for respective changes in glacier area and volume and related trends in air temperature, precipitation and in a more general manner for specific humidity. While we found only marginal glacier changes between 1962 and 1985, there has been a massive ice loss since 1985 (about 30% of area and about 45% of volume). These high numbers corroborate studies from other glacierized cordilleras in Peru. The climate data show overall a moderate increase in air temperature, mostly weak and not significant trends for precipitation sums and probably cannot in full explain the observed substantial ice loss. Therefore, the likely increase of specific humidity in the upper troposphere, where the glaciers are located, is further discussed and we conclude that it played a major role in the observed massive ice loss of the Cordillera Vilcanota over the past decades.

  11. Glacier changes and climate trends derived from multiple sources in the data scarce Cordillera Vilcanota region, southern Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Salzmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of glaciers as temporal water reservoirs is particularly pronounced in the (outer tropics because of the very distinct wet/dry seasons. Rapid glacier retreat caused by climatic changes is thus a major concern, and decision makers demand urgently for regional/local glacier evolution trends, ice mass estimates and runoff assessments. However, in remote mountain areas, spatial and temporal data coverage is typically very scarce and this is further complicated by a high spatial and temporal variability in regions with complex topography. Here, we present an approach on how to deal with these constraints. For the Cordillera Vilcanota (southern Peruvian Andes, which is the second largest glacierized cordillera in Peru (after the Cordillera Blanca and also comprises the Quelccaya Ice Cap, we assimilate a comprehensive multi-decadal collection of available glacier and climate data from multiple sources (satellite images, meteorological station data and climate reanalysis, and analyze them for respective changes in glacier area and volume and related trends in air temperature, precipitation and in a more general manner for specific humidity. While we found only marginal glacier changes between 1962 and 1985, there has been a massive ice loss since 1985 (about 30% of area and about 45% of volume. These high numbers corroborate studies from other glacierized cordilleras in Peru. The climate data show overall a moderate increase in air temperature, mostly weak and not significant trends for precipitation sums and probably cannot in full explain the observed substantial ice loss. Therefore, the likely increase of specific humidity in the upper troposphere, where the glaciers are located, is further discussed and we conclude that it played a major role in the observed massive ice loss of the Cordillera Vilcanota over the past decades.

  12. Characterizing Magmatic Sources in the Central Andes Volcanic Zone with a Regional InSAR Time Series Survey

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    Henderson, S. T.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Central Andes Volcanic Zone (CVZ) contains many intriguing areas of ongoing crustal deformation detectable with InSAR. Foremost among these are the 1-2cm/yr radar line-of-sight (LOS) inflations near Uturuncu Volcano in Bolivia and the Lazufre volcanic area spanning the border of Chile and Argentina (Pritchard and Simons 2002). These two deformation sources are intriguing in that they are long-lived (>10yrs), have large diameters (>50km), and have modeled sources at mid-crustal depths (10-20km). For Uturuncu, the best-fitting source depths coincide with the seismically imaged Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (eg. Chimielowsi et al. 1999, Zandt et al. 2003). Regional InSAR time series analysis enables the spatial and temporal comparison of the Uturuncu and Lazufre signals with other deformations in a sub-region of the CVZ from 1992 to the present. Our study focuses on volcanic deformation, but we also resolve non-magmatic deformation signals including landslides and salars. The study region benefits from a large InSAR dataset of 631 ERS and ENVISAT interferograms, distributed between two descending tracks and two ascending tracks, covering up to 870 kilometers along the volcanic arc. We employ an inversion method based on the SBAS algorithm (Berardino 2002), but modified to avoid interpolation across dates with incoherent values. This modification effectively deals with the heterogeneous spatial extents and data gaps present in individual interferograms for long tracks. With our time series results we investigate the timing of possible magma migrations and we explore the parameters of forward models that match observations. Results indicate continuing monotonic inflation styles at Uturuncu and Lazufre with maximum LOS uplift at 1.0cm/yr and 2.5cm/yr respectively (Pritchard and Simons 2004, Froger et al. 2007, Ruch et al. 2009). We discuss evidence for 2mm/yr broad LOS deflation collocated with the Uturuncu inflation signal and comment on possible models for its origin

  13. Pedological and mineralogical investigations on a soil-paleosoil sequence within Andosols in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes (region Laramate, 14.5S)

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    Leceta Gobitz, Fernando; Mächtle, Bertil; Schukraft, Gerd; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Eitel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    An integrated research project of environmental sciences focuses on a group of four Andosol profiles in Western flank of the Peruvian southern Andes. Aim of this study is to contribute to the reconstruction of the paleo environmental conditions in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes. Standard pedological and sedimentological analysis has been conducted in order to identify morphological and geochemical features generated by climatic variations during the middle and late Holocene. Though a provenance analysis of sediments, all potential lithological sources around the town of Laramate are being examined under the scanning electron microscope, in order to find significant mineralogical associations downward the soil-profile. Preliminary results reveal two edaphic cycles within a soil-paleo soil-sequence: a relative poor developed "Ah" topsoil, mostly composed by fine grain sediments, is underlain by a well preserved "2Ah" paleo soil; a "2Bwt" subsoil exhibits signs of alteration and clay translocation; parent material in slight weathered statement at "2C" culminates the sequence. Mineralogical analytical data supports the premise, that materials in the uppermost horizons are relatable to distal geological units of the Western and Eastern Cordillera, therefore also related to other described aeolian archives from the region: "Desert Margin Loess" at the Andean foot-zone and "Mixed Loess" in the Puna grassland. The amphibole varieties Actinolite, Mg-Hornblende and Edenite could be only distinguished within the soil sediments. The fluvial transport to its current position is excluded, insofar mentioned varieties stem from the granodiorites of Coastal Batholite (downstream the study area), and the vulcanites of the Anta und Andahuaylas Formation (eastward the continental divide). References: Eitel, B., et al. (2005). "Geoarchaeological evidence from desert loess in the Nazca-Palpa region, southern Peru : Palaeoenvironmental changes and their impact on Pre

  14. Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador (South America)

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    Mayorga Torres, Tannia

    2014-05-01

    Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador (South America) 1. INTRODUCTION Monitoring landslides is a mandatory task in charge on the National Institute of Geological Research (INIGEMM) in Ecuador. It is a small country, supposedly will be faster doing monitoring, but what about its geographic characteristics? Lamentably, due to human and financial resources is not possible to put monitoring systems in unstable terrain areas. However, getting ALOS data to accessible price and using open source software to produce interferograms, could be a first step to know steep areas covered by vegetation and where mass movements are not visible. Under this statement, this study is part of the final research in a master study developed at CONAE during 2009-2011, with oral defense in August 2013. As a new technique used in Ecuador, the study processed radar data from ERS-1/2 and ALOS sensor PALSAR for getting differential interferograms, using ROI_PAC software. Stacking DInSAR is applied to get an average of displacement that indicates uplift and subsidence in the whole radar scene that covers two provinces in the Andes region. 2. PROBLEM Mass movements are present in the whole territory, independently of their magnitude and dynamic (slow or fast), they are a latent threat in winter season specially. There are registers of monitoring, such as two GPS's campaigns and artisanal extensometers, which are used to contrast with DInSAR results. However, the campaigns are shorter and extensometers are no trust on all. 3. METHODOLOGY Methodology has four phases of development: (1) Pre-processing of RAW data; (2) Processing of RAW data in ROI_PAC; (3) Post-processing for getting interferograms in units of cm per year; (4) Analysis of the results and comparison with ground truth. Sandwell & Price (1998) proposed Stacking technique to increase the fringes and decrease errors due to the atmosphere, to average several interferograms. L band penetrates

  15. The contribution of evapotranspiration to the seasonal and intraseasonal variability of regional moisture transport along the eastern flanks of the Andes

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    Sun, X.; Barros, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of evapotranspiration (ET) to the regional moisture transport along the eastern flanks of the Andes was investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF3.4) model. As the South American Low Level Jet (SALLJ) is a major component of the boundary layer water budget over this region and its moisture primarily originates from the Amazon, the contributions of low-land versus high-land ET were examined separately for characteristic hydrometeorological regimes during the monsoon and dry season. Both real-data cases and idealized simulations were conducted. The wet season real-data case simulations were carried out during the South American Low Level Jet Experiment (SALLJEX), for which a large number of observations (e.g., aircraft, radiosonde, stations based and etc.) are available. To examine the insights learned from the realistic simulations, two types of idealized simulations were implemented: high-resolution quasi-2D simulations with topography matching the NE-SW cross section going through Cusco, Peru to examine the contributions of ET from highland forest, and 3D idealized simulations at relatively coarser resolution, with topography representing the shape and geometry of the Andes, to examine the influence of Amazon ET on moisture fluxes.

  16. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. M. Scheel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, for instance, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio.

    The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance.

    In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed.

    Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor

  17. Regional climate of the Subtropical Central Andes using high-resolution CMIP5 models. Part II: future projections for the twenty-first century

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    Zazulie, Natalia; Rusticucci, Matilde; Raga, Graciela B.

    2017-12-01

    In Part I of our study (Zazulie et al. Clim Dyn, 2017, hereafter Z17) we analyzed the ability of a subset of fifteen high-resolution global climate models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 to reproduce the past climate of the Subtropical Central Andes (SCA) of Argentina and Chile. A subset of only five GCMs was shown to reproduce well the past climate (1980-2005), for austral summer and winter. In this study we analyze future climate projections for the twenty-first century over this complex orography region using those five GCMs. We evaluate the projections under two of the representative concentration pathways considered as future scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Future projections indicate warming during the twenty-first century over the SCA region, especially pronounced over the mountains. Projections of warming at high elevations in the SCA depend on altitude, and are larger than the projected global mean warming. This phenomenon is expected to strengthen by the end of the century under the high-emission scenario. Increases in winter temperatures of up to 2.5 °C, relative to 1980-2005, are projected by 2040-2065, while a 5 °C warming is expected at the highest elevations by 2075-2100. Such a large monthly-mean warming during winter would most likely result in snowpack melting by late winter-early spring, with serious implication for water availability during summer, when precipitation is a minimum over the mountains. We also explore changes in the albedo, as a contributing factor affecting the net flux of energy at the surface and found a reduction in albedo of 20-60% at high elevations, related to the elevation dependent warming. Furthermore, a decrease in winter precipitation is projected in central Chile by the end of the century, independent of the scenario considered.

  18. Andes: An intelligent homework helper

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    van de Sande, Brett; Vanlehn, Kurt; Treacy, Don; Shelby, Bob; Wintersgill, Mary

    2007-03-01

    Andes (www.andes.pitt.edu) is an intelligent tutor homework system designed for use as the homework portion of an introductory physics course. It encourages students to use good problem solving techniques and provides immediate feedback on each step of a problem solution along with hints on request. I will discuss how Andes works, from a student perspective, and present research demonstrating its effectiveness as a pedagogical tool. Then, I will discuss using Andes as a tool for conducting education research, briefly reviewing several studies conducted using Andes. Finally, I will show how logs of student solutions to Andes problems can be used to develop cognitive models of student learning.

  19. ANDES: An Underground Laboratory in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Claudio O.

    ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) is an underground laboratory, proposed to be built inside the Agua Negra road tunnel that will connect Chile (IV Region) with Argentina (San Juan Province) under the Andes Mountains. The Laboratory will be 1750 meters under the rock, becoming the 3rd deepest underground laboratory of this kind in the world, and the first in the Southern Hemisphere. ANDES will be an international Laboratory, managed by a Latin American consortium. The laboratory will host experiments in Particle and Astroparticle Physics, such as Neutrino and Dark Matter searches, Seismology, Geology, Geophysics and Biology. It will also be used for the development of low background instrumentation and related services. Here we present the general features of the proposed laboratory, the current status of the proposal and some of its opportunities for science.

  20. Glacier changes and climate trends derived from multiple sources in the data scarce Cordillera Vilcanota region, Southern Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    N. Salzmann; C. Huggel; M. Rohrer; W. Silverio; B. G. Mark; P. Burns; C. Portocarrero

    2012-01-01

    The role of glaciers as temporal water reservoirs is particularly pronounced in the (outer) tropics because of the very distinct wet/dry seasons. Rapid glacier retreat caused by climatic changes is thus a major concern, and decision makers demand urgently for regional/local glacier evolution trends, ice mass estimates and runoff assessments. However, in remote mountain areas, spatial and temporal data coverage is typically very scarce and this is further complicated by a high spatial and temp...

  1. The effect of pre-Hispanic agriculture practices on soils in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes (region Laramate, 14.5°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leceta, Fernando; Mächtle, Bertil; Schukraft, Gerd; Eitel, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    ) could be also attested in the Laramate area. Retention of eroded loessic material transported against the terrace walls could be associated to periods of increased geomorphodynamics founded in the surroundings by 600 AD (Forbriger & Schittek 2011, unpublished raw data). References Branch, N., Kemp, R., Silva, B., Meddens F., Williams, A., Kendall, A., Vivanco Pomacanchari, C. (2007): Testing the sustainability and sensitivity to climatic change of terrace agricultural systems in the Peruvian Andes: a pilot study. Journal of Archaeological Science 34 (2007) 1-9. Eitel, B., Hecht, S., Mächtle, B., Schukraft, G., Kadereit, A., Wagner, G. A., Kromer, B., Unkel, I., Reindel, M. (2005): Geoarchaeological evidence from desert loess in the Nasca-Palpa region, southern Peru: Palaeoenvironmental changes and their impact on Pre-Columbian cultures. Archaeometry 47, 137-185. Mächtle, B. (2007): Geomorphologisch-bodenkundliche Untersuchungen zur Rekonstruktion der holozänen Umweltgeschichte in der nördlichen Atacama im Raum Palpa/Südperu. Dissertation, Heidelberger Geographische Arbeiten 123.- 227 S.

  2. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Andes. These studies documented a range of impacts on vegetation, birds and mammals; including changes in plant species richness, composition and vegetation cover and the tolerance of wildlife of visitor use. There was little research on the impacts of visitors on soils and aquatic systems and for some ecoregions in the Andes. We identify research priorities across the region that will enhance management strategies to minimise visitor impacts in Andean ecosystems.

  3. Convective initiation in the vicinity of the subtropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Houze, R.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme convection tends to form in the vicinity of mountain ranges, and the Andes in subtropical South America help spawn some of the most intense convection in the world. An investigation of the most intense storms for 11 years of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data shows a tendency for squall lines to initiate and develop in this region with the canonical leading convective line/trailing stratiform structure. The synoptic environment and structures of the extreme convection and MCSs in subtropical South America are similar to those found in other regions of the world, especially the United States. In subtropical South America, however, the topographical influence on the convective initiation and maintenance of the MCSs is unique. A capping inversion in the lee of the Andes is important in preventing premature triggering. The Andes and other mountainous terrain of Argentina focus deep convective initiation in a narrow region. Subsequent to initiation, the convection often evolves into propagating mesoscale convective systems similar to those seen over the Great Plains of the U. S. and produces damaging tornadoes, hail, and floods across a wide agricultural region. Numerical simulations conducted with the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model extend the observational analysis and provide an objective evaluation of storm initiation, terrain effects, and development mechanisms. The simulated mesoscale systems closely resemble the storm structures seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar as well as the overall shape and character of the storms shown in GOES satellite data. A sensitivity experiment with different configurations of topography, including both decreasing and increasing the height of the Andes Mountains, provides insight into the significant influence of orography in focusing convective initiation in this region. Lee cyclogenesis and a strong low-level jet are modulated by the height of the Andes Mountains and directly affect the character

  4. Rock Glacier Response to Climate Change in the Argentinian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, J.; Korup, O.; Moreiras, S.

    2017-12-01

    Rock glaciers are bodies of frozen debris and ice that move under the influence of gravity in permafrost areas. Rock glaciers may store a large amount of sediments and play an important role as prime movers of debris in the Andean sediment cascade. However, little is known about how much sediment and water rock glaciers may store at the mountain-belt scale, and the few existing estimates vary considerably. We address this question for the Argentinian Andes, for which a new glacial inventory containing more than 6500 rock glaciers gives us the opportunity to analyse their relevance within the sediment cascade. We examine the inventory for catchments in five sub-regions, i.e. the Desert Andes (22°-31°S); the Central Andes (31°-36°S); the Northern Andes of Patagonia (36°-45°S); the Southern Andes of Patagonia (45°-52°S); and Tierra del Fuego (52°-55°S), together with climate variables of the WorldClim datasets, and digital topographic data, to estimate how rock-glacier extents may change under different past and future climate scenarios. We observe for the northern Desert Andes that rock glacier toes are at 4000 to 5000 m a.s.l. and a mean annual temperature range of 3° and 8°C, though most rock glaciers are in areas with mean annual temperatures between -5 and 5°C, marking a distinct thermal niche. Rock glaciers are traditionally viewed as diagnostic of sporadic alpine permafrost and their toes are often near the annual mean 0°C isotherm. However, we find that only rock glaciers in the southern Desert Andes and Central Andes are located where annual mean temperature is -2°C. Future scenarios project an increase of > four degrees in these areas, which may further degrade ground ice and potentially change the rates at which rock glaciers advance. Where active rock glaciers become inactive their coarse material, which was formerly bound by ice, may be released into the sediment cascade, whereas accelerating or rapidly downwasting rock glaciers may either

  5. Charles Darwin in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; Bizzo, Luis Eduardo Maestrelli

    2006-01-01

    Considering geological time as an important epistemological obstacle to the construction of ideas on biological evolution, a study was carried out on the so-called "Darwin Papers". The conclusion was that Charles Darwin's excursion in the Andes during March-April 1835 was a crucial step in this regard. An expedition was carried out in…

  6. Climate variability of the tropical Andes since the late Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bräuning

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Available proxy records witnessing palaeoclimate of the tropical Andes are comparably scarce. Major implications of palaeoclimate development in the humid and arid parts of the Andes are briefly summarized. The long-term behaviour of ENSO has general significance for the climatic history of the Andes due to its impact on regional circulation patterns and precipitation regimes, therefore ENSO history derived from non-Andean palaeo-records is highlighted. Methodological constraints of the chronological precision and the palaeoclimatic interpretation of records derived from different natural archives, such as glacier sediments and ice cores, lake sediments and palaeo-wetlands, pollen profiles and tree rings are addressed and complementary results concerning former climatic conditions are discussed in terms of possible implications of former atmospheric circulation patterns and main climatic forcing factors. During the last years, increasing tree-ring information is getting available from the tropical Andes, providing high-resolution climate-sensitive records covering the past centuries for the study of climate variability.

  7. Climate variability of the tropical Andes since the late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuning, A.

    2009-10-01

    Available proxy records witnessing palaeoclimate of the tropical Andes are comparably scarce. Major implications of palaeoclimate development in the humid and arid parts of the Andes are briefly summarized. The long-term behaviour of ENSO has general significance for the climatic history of the Andes due to its impact on regional circulation patterns and precipitation regimes, therefore ENSO history derived from non-Andean palaeo-records is highlighted. Methodological constraints of the chronological precision and the palaeoclimatic interpretation of records derived from different natural archives, such as glacier sediments and ice cores, lake sediments and palaeo-wetlands, pollen profiles and tree rings are addressed and complementary results concerning former climatic conditions are discussed in terms of possible implications of former atmospheric circulation patterns and main climatic forcing factors. During the last years, increasing tree-ring information is getting available from the tropical Andes, providing high-resolution climate-sensitive records covering the past centuries for the study of climate variability.

  8. Synchronous interhemispheric Holocene climate trends in the tropical Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, Pratigya J; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Vuille, Mathias; Bezada, Maximiliano

    2013-09-03

    Holocene variations of tropical moisture balance have been ascribed to orbitally forced changes in solar insolation. If this model is correct, millennial-scale climate evolution should be antiphased between the northern and southern hemispheres, producing humid intervals in one hemisphere matched to aridity in the other. Here we show that Holocene climate trends were largely synchronous and in the same direction in the northern and southern hemisphere outer-tropical Andes, providing little support for the dominant role of insolation forcing in these regions. Today, sea-surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean modulate rainfall variability in the outer tropical Andes of both hemispheres, and we suggest that this mechanism was pervasive throughout the Holocene. Our findings imply that oceanic forcing plays a larger role in regional South American climate than previously suspected, and that Pacific sea-surface temperatures have the capacity to induce abrupt and sustained shifts in Andean climate.

  9. Vegetation and environmental dynamics in the Páramo of Jimbura region in the southeastern Ecuadorian Andes during the late Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Andrea; León-Yánez, Susana; Behling, Hermann

    2012-12-01

    The last 15,000 years of vegetation, fire and climate history were reconstructed from the Laguna Natosa Peat bog core (3600 m elevation) in the Páramo of Jimbura region in the Cordillera Real, close to the Peruvian border of southern Ecuador in the southernmost part of the Andean depression. The pollen record, dated by 5 radiocarbon dates, indicates that during the late Glacial (ca. 15,000-12,000 cal yr BP) a gradual expansion of mountain forest, restricting the páramo vegetation to small patches, and a shift of the forest line to higher elevation took place; reflecting an increase in temperature. However, a clear signal of the warmer Bølling/Allerød interstadial and the cooler Younger Dryas period, are not reflected in the record. During the transition from the late Glacial to the early/mid-Holocene (ca. 12,000-4800 cal yr BP), tree taxa such as Hedyosmum and Podocarpaceae are well represented, suggesting that the upper forest line, especially in the mid-Holocene, reached slightly higher elevations than at present. Hence, páramo vegetation was limited, indicating warmer climatic conditions for the early to mid-Holocene period than today. The late Holocene from 4800 cal yr BP until the present is characterized by higher occurrences of páramo taxa. During this period, the upper forest line shifted downwards giving room to the expansion of the páramo vegetation to its current size. Fire was rare during the late Glacial period but became more frequent after about 8000 cal yr BP, probably due to the dry event during the mid-Holocene and increased human activity.

  10. Climatic risk for potato late blight in the Andes region of Venezuela Risco climático para a ocorrência de requeima da batata na região andina da Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Ibet Lozada Garcia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Potato is an important crop for Venezuelan agriculture. However, its production is highly affected by late blight (Phytophtora infestans, since weather is commonly favorable for this disease. The aim of this study was to determine the sowing dates of low climatic risk for potato late blight in the Andes region of Venezuela, with an agrometeorological disease model and geographical information system (GIS tools. The disease model used in this study was developed by Hyre (1954 which requires daily rainfall and temperature data which were obtained from 106 weather stations, located at the States of Mérida, Táchira, and Trujillo, for a period of 31 years. Hyre's model was applied for all stations obtainig the following variables: number of disease favorable days (DFD; number of periods with ten consecutive favorable days, named disease occurrence (O; and number of sprays required for disease control (S. These variables were used to calculate the Maximum Risk Index (MRI and the Probable Risk Index (PRI. The interpolation of these indexes was used to generate maps of climatic risk for each sowing date. MRI and PRI maps showed that the highest climatic risk for potato late blight occurrence was during the rainy season, from May to July, decreasing during dry and mid seasons. However, high disease risk variability was observed for all seasons. The maps generated by coupling an agrometeorological disease model and GIS also show that in great part of potato areas of Andes region the number of sprays could be reduced, but more investigations about that must be carried out.A batata é uma importante cultura para a agricultura venezuelana. Entretanto, sua produção é altamente afetada pela ocorrência da requeima (Phytophtora infestans, já que as condições climáticas são normalmente favoráveis para essa doença. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar as datas de semeadura com os menores riscos climáticos para a ocorrência da requeima na regi

  11. Tectonics of the northern Venezuelan Andes from satellite images analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, D.; Backé, G.; Hervouët, Y.

    2003-04-01

    The northern part of the Venezuelan (or Merida) Andes is a complex area comprising a Cretaceous to Quaternary sedimentary sequence that recorded two main stages of deformation: (1) the uplifting of the Carribean belt in the Cretaceous-Eocene (Carribean stage), which is superimposed by (2) the building of the Venezuelan Andes since the Miocene (Andean stage). The study area is located at the junction between the Merida Andes and the Caribbean belt, and constitutes a key zone to understand the transition between these two orogens. Our aim is to implement the structural mapping in order to propose a new model of deformation at regional scale. The methodology is based on analysis of Landsat TM, SPOT, radarsat and DEM images, and is complemented by geological studies in the field. Integration of this complementary data set into a GIS enables a new understanding of the tectonics of the northern Venezuelan Andes during the Neogene-Quaternary. We focused on three main areas where the structures are clearly exposed. In the Mene Grande area, our structural analysis allows to precise the geometry and timing of deformations. The Cerro la Galera anticline is a fault bend fold propagating to the SW that developped along the Burro Negro fault during the Eocene-Oligocene and then eroded. The Cerro La Luna (or Cerro Misoa) is a pop-up structure that developped later during the Andean stage. In the Jirajara area, we have evidenced a releasing-bend basin at left-stepping offset of the Valera fault. To the east, this basin is surrounded by the relief of the Serrania de Jirajara which gravitationally collapses towards the lowland of the basin. In the Sierra de Barragua area, we mapped the left-lateral strike-slip Rio Diquiva fault 25 km east of the Valera fault. This fault is a major structure bounding two distincts areas of sedimentation during the Eocene. The synthesis of these observations shows that the northern Venezuelan Andes consist in a mosaic of independent crustal blocks

  12. Aves de la ladera oriental de los Andes Orientales, alto río Cusiana, Boyacá, Colombia Aves de la ladera oriental de los Andes Orientales, alto río Cusiana, Boyacá, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares Antonio

    1971-09-01

    Full Text Available The bird collection (52 species and subspecies treated in this paper was collected in the upper Cusiana River, eastern slope of the Eastern Andes, Departamento de Boyacá, Colombia. In the introduction are given geographical details of the proper area where the material was secured.  This study is very important because of the little knowledge on the ornisof the Eastern Andes in Boyacá. Some light is thrown on the similarities and discrepancies between the avifaunas of Boyacá and Cundinamarca (Eastern Andes and also on the relations with the adjacent regions of Venezuela.  The intergradation of Atlapetes semirufus zimmeri with A. s. semirufus is discussed and the subspecies Hemispingus frontalis flavidorsalis isadded to the colombian avifauna. Previous local avifaunas of the Andes in Boyacá are: Borrero and Olivares (1955 and Olivares (1963.The bird collection (52 species and subspecies treated in this paper was collected in the upper Cusiana River, eastern slope of the Eastern Andes, Departamento de Boyacá, Colombia. In the introduction are given geographical details of the proper area where the material was secured.  This study is very important because of the little knowledge on the ornisof the Eastern Andes in Boyacá. Some light is thrown on the similarities and discrepancies between the avifaunas of Boyacá and Cundinamarca (Eastern Andes and also on the relations with the adjacent regions of Venezuela.  The intergradation of Atlapetes semirufus zimmeri with A. s. semirufus is discussed and the subspecies Hemispingus frontalis flavidorsalis isadded to the colombian avifauna. Previous local avifaunas of the Andes in Boyacá are: Borrero and Olivares (1955 and Olivares (1963.

  13. Micro X-ray Fluorescence Study of Late Pre-Hispanic Ceramics from the Western Slopes of the South Central Andes Region in the Arica y Parinacota Region, Chile: A New Methodological Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flewett, S.; Saintenoy, T.; Sepulveda, M.; Mosso, E. F.; Robles, C.; Vega, K.; Gutierrez, S.; Romero, A.; Finney, L.; Maxey, E.; Vogt, S.

    2016-08-16

    Archeological ceramic paste material typically consists of a mix of a clay matrix and various millimeter and sub-millimeter sized mineral inclusions. Micro X-ray Fluorescence (μXRF) is a standard compositional classification tool, and in this work we propose and demonstrate an improved fluorescence map processing protocol where the mineral inclusions are automatically separated from the clay matrix to allow independent statistical analysis of the two parts. Application of this protocol allowed us to improve enhance the differentiation discrimination between different ceramic shards compared with the standard procedure of comparing working with only the spatially averaged elemental concentrations. Using the new protocol, we performed an initial compositional classification of a set of 83 ceramic shards from the western slopes of the south central Andean region in the Arica y Parinacota region of present-day far northern Chile. Comparing the classifications obtained using the new versus the old (average concentrations only) protocols, we found that some samples were erroneously classified with the old protocol. From an archaeological perspective, a very broad and heterogeneous sample set was used in this study due to the fact that this was the first such study to be performed on ceramics from this region. This allowed a general overview to be obtained, however further work on more specific sample sets will be necessary to extract concrete archaeological conclusions.

  14. Andes Mountain Snow Distribution, Properties, and Trend: 1979-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Liston, Glen E.; Hiemstra, Christopher A.

    2015-04-01

    Andes snow presence, absence, properties, and water amount are key components of Earth's changing climate system that incur far-reaching physical ramifications. Modeling developments permit relatively high-resolution (4-km horizontal grid; 3-h time step) Andes snow estimates for 1979-2014. SnowModel, in conjunction with land cover, topography, and 35-years of NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric reanalysis data, was used to create a spatially distributed, time-evolving, snow-related dataset that included air temperature, snow precipitation, snow-season timing and length, maximum snow water equivalent depth, and average snow density. Regional variability is a dominant feature of the modeled snow-property trends from an area northeast of Quito (latitude: 2.65°S to 0.23°N) to Patagonia (latitude: 52.15°S to 46.44°S). For example, the Quito area annual snow cover area changed -45%, -43% around Cusco (latitude: 14.75°S to 12.52°S), -5% east of Santiago (including the Olivares Basin), and 25% in Patagonia. The annual snow covered area for the entire Andes decreased 13%, mainly in the elevation band between 4,000-5,000 m a.s.l. In spite of strong regional variability, the data clearly show a general positive trend in mean annual air temperature and precipitation, and a decreasing trend in snow precipitation, snow precipitation days, and snow density. Also, the snow-cover onset is later and the snow-cover duration - the number of snow cover days - decreased.

  15. Transboundary protected area proposals along the Southern Andes of Chile and Argentina: Status of current efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Keller

    2007-01-01

    An evolving network of protected areas along the southern Andes of Chile and Argentina-the heart of Patagonia-are in various stages of evaluation and potential Transboundary Protected Area designations. This paper examines three such efforts. The first proposal is the North Andean-Patagonia Regional Eco-Corridor, which was the subject of a recent bilateral meeting...

  16. Vulnerability to climate change and community based adaptation in the Peruvian Andes, a stepwise approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasage, R.; Muis, S.; Sardella, C.S.E.; van Drunen, M.A.; Verburg, P.H.; Aerts, J.C.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    The livelihoods of people in the Andes are expected to be affected by climate change due to their dependence on glacier water. The observed decrease in glacier volume over the last few decades is likely to accelerate during the current century, which will affect water availability in the region.

  17. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Glacier surface mass balance and freshwater runoff modeling for the entire Andes Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Liston, Glen E.; Yde, Jacob C.

    2017-04-01

    Glacier surface mass balance (SMB) observations for the Andes Cordillera are limited and, therefore, estimates of the SMB contribution from South America to sea-level rise are highly uncertain. Here, we simulate meteorological, snow, glacier surface, and hydrological runoff conditions and trends for the Andes Cordillera (1979/80-2013/14), covering the tropical latitudes in the north down to the sub-polar latitudes in the far south, including the Northern Patagonia Ice Field (NPI) and Southern Patagonia Ice Field (SPI). SnowModel - a fully integrated energy balance, blowing-snow distribution, multi-layer snowpack, and runoff routing model - was used to simulate glacier SMBs for the Andes Cordillera. The Randolph Glacier Inventory and NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications products, downscaled in SnowModel, allowed us to conduct relatively high-resolution simulations. The simulated glacier SMBs were verified against independent directly-observed and satellite gravimetry and altimetry-derived SMB, indicating a good statistical agreement. For glaciers in the Andes Cordillera, the 35-year mean annual SMB was found to be -1.13 m water equivalent. For both NPI and SPI, the mean SMB was positive (where calving is the likely reason for explaining why geodetic estimates are negative). Further, the spatio-temporal freshwater river runoff patterns from individual basins, including their runoff magnitude and change, were simulated. For the Andes Cordillera rivers draining to the Pacific Ocean, 86% of the simulated runoff originated from rain, 12% from snowmelt, and 2% from ice melt, whereas, for example, for Chile, the water-source distribution was 69, 24, and 7%, respectively. Along the Andes Cordillera, the 35-year mean basin outlet-specific runoff (L s-1 km-2) showed a characteristic regional hourglass shape pattern with highest runoff in both Colombia and Ecuador and in Patagonia, and lowest runoff in the Atacama Desert area.

  19. Glacial lakes of the Central and Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan; Glasser, Neil F.; Reynolds, John M.; Harrison, Stephan; Anacona, Pablo Iribarren; Schaefer, Marius; Shannon, Sarah

    2018-03-01

    The prevalence and increased frequency of high-magnitude Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs) in the Chilean and Argentinean Andes suggests this region will be prone to similar events in the future as glaciers continue to retreat and thin under a warming climate. Despite this situation, monitoring of glacial lake development in this region has been limited, with past investigations only covering relatively small regions of Patagonia. This study presents new glacial lake inventories for 1986, 2000 and 2016, covering the Central Andes, Northern Patagonia and Southern Patagonia. Our aim was to characterise the physical attributes, spatial distribution and temporal development of glacial lakes in these three sub-regions using Landsat satellite imagery and image datasets available in Google Earth and Bing Maps. Glacial lake water volume was also estimated using an empirical area-volume scaling approach. Results reveal that glacial lakes across the study area have increased in number (43%) and areal extent (7%) between 1986 and 2016. Such changes equate to a glacial lake water volume increase of 65 km3 during the 30-year observation period. However, glacial lake growth and emergence was shown to vary sub-regionally according to localised topography, meteorology, climate change, rate of glacier change and the availability of low gradient ice areas. These and other factors are likely to influence the occurrence of GLOFs in the future. This analysis represents the first large-scale census of glacial lakes in Chile and Argentina and will allow for a better understanding of lake development in this region, as well as, providing a basis for future GLOF risk assessments.

  20. Rapid Diversification and Time Explain Amphibian Richness at Different Scales in the Tropical Andes, Earth's Most Biodiverse Hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carl R; Lambert, Shea M; Wiens, John J

    2017-12-01

    The Tropical Andes make up Earth's most species-rich biodiversity hotspot for both animals and plants. Nevertheless, the ecological and evolutionary processes underlying this extraordinary richness remain uncertain. Here, we examine the processes that generate high richness in the Tropical Andes relative to other regions in South America and across different elevations within the Andes, using frogs as a model system. We combine distributional data, a newly generated time-calibrated phylogeny for 2,318 frog species, and phylogenetic comparative methods to test the relative importance of diversification rates and colonization times for explaining Andean diversity at different scales. At larger scales (among regions and families), we find that faster diversification rates in Andean clades most likely explain high Andean richness. In contrast, at smaller temporal and spatial scales (within family-level clades within the Andes), diversification rates rarely explain richness patterns. Instead, we show that colonization times are important for shaping elevational richness patterns within the Andes, with more species found in habitats colonized earlier. We suggest that these scale-dependent patterns might apply to many other richness gradients. Recognition of this scale dependence may help to reconcile conflicting results among studies of richness patterns across habitats, regions, and organisms.

  1. A millennium of metallurgy recorded by lake sediments from Morococha, Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Kittleson, John L

    2007-05-15

    To date, information concerning pre-Colonial metallurgy in South America has largely been limited to the archaeological record of artifacts. Here, we reconstruct a millennium of smelting activity in the Peruvian Andes using the lake-sediment stratigraphy of atmospherically derived metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Bi, and Ti) and lead isotopic ratios (206Pb/ 207Pb) associated with smelting from the Morococha mining region in the central Peruvian Andes. The earliest evidence for metallurgy occurs ca. 1000 A.D., coinciding with the fall of the Wari Empire and decentralization of local populations. Smelting during this interval appears to have been aimed at copper and copper alloys, because of large increases in Zn and Cu relative to Pb. A subsequent switch to silver metallurgy under Inca control (ca. 1450 to conquest, 1533 A.D.) is indicated by increases in Pb, Sb, and Bi, a conclusion supported by further increases of these metals during Colonial mining, which targeted silver extraction. Rapid development of the central Andes during the 20th century raised metal burdens by an order of magnitude above previous levels. Our results represent the first evidence for pre-Colonial smelting in the central Peruvian Andes, and corroborate the sensitivity of lake sediments to pre-Colonial metallurgical activity suggested by earlier findings from Bolivia.

  2. Andes: An Intelligent Homework System for Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Brett; VanLehn, K.; Hausmann, R.; Treacy, D.; Shelby, R.

    2006-12-01

    We know that students benefit from solving homework problems under the guidance of an expert (human) tutor. The Andes system (http://www.andes.pitt.edu) is designed for students to solve homework problems under the guidance of an expert computer tutor. Andes encourages students to use sound problem solving techniques and provides immediate right/wrong feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes also provides hints based on previous student actions. I will discuss how Andes works, from a student's perspective, and summarize research that demonstrates its effectiveness as a pedagogical tool. I will also discuss how Andes can function as a tool for conducting educational research, presenting an investigation of students' hint usage as an example.

  3. Late Pleistocene glacial fluctuations in Cordillera Oriental, subtropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Mateo A.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Strelin, Jorge A.; Astini, Ricardo A.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Caffee, Marc W.; Schwartz, Roseanne

    2017-09-01

    The behavior of subtropical glaciers during Middle to Late Pleistocene global glacial maxima and abrupt climate change events, specifically in Earth's most arid low-latitude regions, remains an outstanding problem in paleoclimatology. The present-day climate of Cordillera Oriental, in arid northwestern Argentina, is influenced by shifts in subtropical climate systems, including the South American Summer Monsoon. To understand better past glacier-subtropical climates during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 26.5-19 ka) and other time periods, we combined geomorphic features with forty-two precise 10Be ages on moraine boulders and reconstructed paleo-equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) at Nevado de Chañi (24°S) in the arid subtropical Andes. We found a major glacial expansion at ∼23 ± 1.6 ka, that is, during the global LGM. Additional glacial expansions are observed before the global LGM (at ∼52-39 ka), and after, at 15 ± 0.5 and 12 ± 0.6 ka. The ∼15 ka glacial event was found on both sides of Chañi and the ∼12 ka event is only recorded on the east side. Reconstructed ELAs of the former glaciers exhibit a rise from east to west that resembles the present subtropical climate trajectory from the Atlantic side of the continent; hence, we infer that this climate pattern must have been present in the past. Based on comparison with other low-latitude paleoclimate records, such as those from lakes and caves, we infer that both temperature and precipitation influenced past glacial occurrence in this sector of the arid Andes. Our findings also imply that abrupt deglacial climate events associated with the North Atlantic, specifically curtailed meridional overturning circulation and regional cooling, may have had attendant impacts on low subtropical Southern Hemisphere latitudes, including the climate systems that affect glacial activity around Nevado de Chañi.

  4. Non-pollen palynomorphs from surface sediments along an altitudinal transect of the Venezuelan Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya, E.; Rull, V.; van Geel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Palynological studies including records of non-pollen palynomorphs (NPP) are uncommon in the Neotropics, in spite of their demonstrated usefulness in other regions. Modern analog studies to improve palaeoecological interpretations of NPP are even more scarce. Here, we report the NPP assemblages recorded in modern surface samples from an altitudinal transect of the Venezuelan Andes, ranging from about 2300 and 4600 m. We compared the assemblages with the results of previous pollen analyses of ...

  5. Caravan-submm, A Fisrt Black Hole Imager at Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, M.; Kasuga, T.; Ishitsuka Iba, J. K.; Oka, T.; Sekido, M.; Takefuji, K.; Takahashi, M.; Saida, H.; Takahashi, R.

    2017-07-01

    We introduce our Peruvian-Japanese black hole imaging project, Caravan-submm at Andes. By constructing a sub-millimeter wavelength (submm) VLBI network at Andes we aim to get images of black hole horizon and the surroundings of Sgr A*. The array contains at least two fixed VLBI stations and one mobile VLBI station.

  6. Human impacts on headwater fluvial systems in the northern and central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Carol P.

    2006-09-01

    South America delivers more freshwater runoff to the ocean per km 2 land area than any other continent, and much of that water enters the fluvial system from headwaters in the Andes Mountains. This paper reviews ways in which human occupation of high mountain landscapes in the Andes have affected the delivery of water and sediment to headwater river channels at local to regional scales for millennia, and provides special focus on the vulnerability of páramo soils to human impact. People have intentionally altered the fluvial system by damming rivers at a few strategic locations, and more widely by withdrawing surface water, primarily for irrigation. Unintended changes brought about by human activities are even more widespread and include forest clearance, agriculture, grazing, road construction, and urbanization, which increase rates of rainfall runoff and accelerate processes of water erosion. Some excavations deliver more sediment to river channels by destabilizing slopes and triggering processes of mass-movement. The northern and central Andes are more affected by human activity than most high mountain regions. The wetter northern Andes are also unusual for the very high water retention characteristics of páramo (high elevation grass and shrub) soils, which cover most of the land above 3000 m. Páramo soils are important regulators of headwater hydrology, but human activities that promote vegetation loss and drying cause them to lose water storage capacity. New data from a case study in southern Ecuador show very low bulk densities (median 0.26 g cm - 3 ), high organic matter contents (median 43%), and high water-holding capacities (12% to 86% volumetrically). These data document wetter soils under grass than under tree cover. Effects of human activity on the fluvial system are evident at local scales, but difficult to discern at broader scales in the regional context of geomorphic adjustment to tectonic and volcanic processes.

  7. Changing Student Attitudes using Andes, An Intelligent Homework System

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Brett; Vanlehn, Kurt; Treacy, Don; Shelby, Bob; Wintersgill, Mary

    2007-03-01

    The size of introductory physics lectures often inhibits personal homework assistance and timely corrective feedback. Andes, an intelligent homework help system designed for two semesters of introductory physics, can fill this need by encouraging students to use sound problem solving techniques and providing immediate feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes provides principles-based hints based on previous student actions. A multi-year study at the U.S. Naval Academy demonstrates that students using Andes perform better than students working the same problems as graded pencil and paper homeworks. In addition, student attitude surveys show that Andes is preferred over other homework systems. These findings have implications for student attitudes toward, and mastery of, physics. See http://www.andes.pitt.edu for more information.

  8. Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum seroprevalences in domestic South American camelids of the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Velásquez, Amanda; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Ortega-Mora, Luis M; Casas-Astos, Eva; Serrano-Martínez, Enrique; Casas-Velásquez, Gina; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, Jose A; Alvarez-García, Gema

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of Toxoplasma gondii- and Neospora caninum-specific antibodies in domestic South American camelids (SAC) (llamas and alpacas) from the Peruvian Andes through a cross-sectional study. A wide panel of serum samples collected from 1,845 llamas and 2,874 alpacas from the two main SAC production areas of Peru was selected. Immunofluorescence antibody technique was employed to detect and titrate specific anti-T. gondii and anti-N. caninum immunoglobulins G in serum samples. The association between T. gondii and N. caninum seroprevalence and the geographical origin (Central and South Peruvian Andes) was evaluated. Anti-T. gondii antibodies were found in 460 (24.9 %) llamas and 706 (24.6 %) alpacas, whereas anti-N. caninum antibodies were detected in 153 (8.3 %) llamas and 425 (14.8 %) alpacas. Toxoplasma gondii infection was strongly associated with the South Peruvian Andes where moderate climate conditions, larger human population, compared to the Central region, and the presence of wildlife definitive hosts could favor horizontal transmission to SAC. In contrast, N. caninum infection was not associated with the geographical region. These results indicate that T. gondii and N. caninum infections are highly and moderately widespread, respectively, in both species of domestic SAC studied in the sampled areas and appropriate control measures should be undertaken to reduce the prevalence of both parasitic infections.

  9. Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy of Forest Canopy Chemistry in the Andes-Amazon Corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R.; Anderson, C.; Knapp, D. E.; Asner, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Andes-Amazon corridor is one of the most biologically diverse regions on Earth. Elevation gradients provide opportunities to explore the underlying sources and environmental controls on functional diversity of the forest canopy, however plot-based studies have proven highly variable. We used airborne imaging spectroscopy from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System (AToMS) to quantify changes canopy functional traits in a series of eleven 25-ha landscapes distributed along a 3300 m elevation gradient from lowland Amazonia to treeline in the Peruvian Andes. Each landscape encompassed a 1 ha field plot in which all trees reaching the canopy were climbed and leaves were sampled for 20 chemical traits. We used partial least squares regression to relate plot-level chemical values with airborne spectroscopy from the 1 ha area. Sixteen chemical traits produced predictable relationships with the spectra and were used to generate maps of the 25 ha landscape. Ten chemical traits were significantly related to elevation at the 25 ha scale. These ten traits displayed 35% greater accuracy (R2) and precision (rmse) when evaluated at the 25 ha scale compared to values derived from tree climbing alone. The results indicate that high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy can be used as surrogate for laborious tree climbing and chemical assays to understand chemical diversity in Amazonian forests. Understanding how these chemicals vary among forest communities throughout the Andes-Amazon corridor will facilitate mapping of functional diversity and the response of canopies to climate change.

  10. Glacier loss and hydro-social risks in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Bryan G.; French, Adam; Baraer, Michel; Carey, Mark; Bury, Jeffrey; Young, Kenneth R.; Polk, Molly H.; Wigmore, Oliver; Lagos, Pablo; Crumley, Ryan; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Lautz, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Accelerating glacier recession in tropical highlands and in the Peruvian Andes specifically is a manifestation of global climate change that is influencing the hydrologic cycle and impacting water resources across a range of socio-environmental systems. Despite predictions regarding the negative effects of long-term glacier decline on water availability, many uncertainties remain regarding the timing and variability of hydrologic changes and their impacts. To improve context-specific understandings of the effects of climate change and glacial melt on water resources in the tropical Andes, this article synthesizes results from long-term transdisciplinary research with new findings from two glacierized Peruvian watersheds to develop and apply a multi-level conceptual framework focused on the coupled biophysical and social determinants of water access and hydro-social risks in these settings. The framework identifies several interacting variables-hydrologic transformation, land cover change, perceptions of water availability, water use and infrastructure in local and regional economies, and water rights and governance-to broadly assess how glacier change is embedded with social risks and vulnerability across diverse water uses and sectors. The primary focus is on the Santa River watershed draining the Cordillera Blanca to the Pacific. Additional analysis of hydrologic change and water access in the geographically distinct Shullcas River watershed draining the Huaytapallana massif towards the city of Huancayo further illuminates the heterogeneous character of hydrologic risk and vulnerability in the Andes.

  11. Facing unprecedented drying of the Central Andes? Precipitation variability over the period AD 1000–2100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neukom, Raphael; Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Rohrer, Mario; Calanca, Pierluigi; Acuña, Delia; Christie, Duncan A; Morales, Mariano S

    2015-01-01

    Projected future trends in water availability are associated with large uncertainties in many regions of the globe. In mountain areas with complex topography, climate models have often limited capabilities to adequately simulate the precipitation variability on small spatial scales. Also, their validation is hampered by typically very low station density. In the Central Andes of South America, a semi-arid high-mountain region with strong seasonality, zonal wind in the upper troposphere is a good proxy for interannual precipitation variability. Here, we combine instrumental measurements, reanalysis and paleoclimate data, and a 57-member ensemble of CMIP5 model simulations to assess changes in Central Andes precipitation over the period AD 1000–2100. This new database allows us to put future projections of precipitation into a previously missing multi-centennial and pre-industrial context. Our results confirm the relationship between regional summer precipitation and 200 hPa zonal wind in the Central Andes, with stronger Westerly winds leading to decreased precipitation. The period of instrumental coverage (1965–2010) is slightly dryer compared to pre-industrial times as represented by control simulations, simulations from the past Millennium, ice core data from Quelccaya ice cap and a tree-ring based precipitation reconstruction. The model ensemble identifies a clear reduction in precipitation already in the early 21st century: the 10 year running mean model uncertainty range (ensemble 16–84% spread) is continuously above the pre-industrial mean after AD 2023 (AD 2028) until the end of the 21st century in the RCP2.6 (RCP8.5) emission scenario. Average precipitation over AD 2071–2100 is outside the range of natural pre-industrial variability in 47 of the 57 model simulations for both emission scenarios. The ensemble median fraction of dry years (defined by the 5th percentile in pre-industrial conditions) is projected to increase by a factor of 4 until 2071

  12. Climate Change Projections for the Tropical Andes Using Multiple Emission Scenarios: Implications for Future Glaciation and Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille, M.; Urrutia, R.

    2008-12-01

    Observations on glacier extent in the tropical Andes give a detailed and unequivocal account of rapid shrinkage of tropical Andean glaciers since the Little Ice Age. Future climate change will likely continue to affect high-elevation tropical mountain regions more strongly than their surrounding lowlands. Increasing temperature and changes in precipitation patterns will affect the size and distribution of glaciers and wetlands, ecosystem integrity, and water availability for human consumption, irrigation, mining and power production. With this looming threat for future water supplies in the tropical Andes, discussions about adequate adaptation and mitigation strategies abound. Yet detailed projections of future climate change in the tropical Andes, which should form the basis for any such measure, are not yet available. Here we will present first results for the end of the 21st century (2071- 2100) using a regional climate model based on two different emission scenarios (A2 and B2). Our results indicate significant warming in the tropical Andes, ranging from 2° C to 7° C, depending on location and scenario considered. The warming is enhanced at higher elevations and further amplified in the mid-and upper troposphere. Temperature changes are spatially similar in both scenarios, but the amplitude is significantly higher (up to 3° C) in A2. The A2 scenario also shows a significant increase in interannual temperature variability, while it remains almost unchanged in B2 when compared to a 20th century control run. Inspection of the annual mean temperature probability density function for both slopes of the Andes further reveals that there is no overlap between mean annual temperature of either of the two future scenarios with a control run. In both cases the coldest temperatures projected for the years 2071-2100 are much higher than the warmest years in the modern control run (1961-90). Changes in precipitation are spatially much less coherent, with both regions of

  13. Over three millennia of mercury pollution in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A.; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Biester, Harald; Wolfe, Alexander P.

    2009-01-01

    We present unambiguous records of preindustrial atmospheric mercury (Hg) pollution, derived from lake-sediment cores collected near Huancavelica, Peru, the largest Hg deposit in the New World. Intensive Hg mining first began ca. 1400 BC, predating the emergence of complex Andean societies, and signifying that the region served as a locus for early Hg extraction. The earliest mining targeted cinnabar (HgS) for the production of vermillion. Pre-Colonial Hg burdens peak ca. 500 BC and ca. 1450 AD, corresponding to the heights of the Chavín and Inca states, respectively. During the Inca, Colonial, and industrial intervals, Hg pollution became regional, as evidenced by a third lake record ≈225 km distant from Huancavelica. Measurements of sediment-Hg speciation reveal that cinnabar dust was initially the dominant Hg species deposited, and significant increases in deposition were limited to the local environment. After conquest by the Inca (ca. 1450 AD), smelting was adopted at the mine and Hg pollution became more widely circulated, with the deposition of matrix-bound phases of Hg predominating over cinnabar dust. Our results demonstrate the existence of a major Hg mining industry at Huancavelica spanning the past 3,500 years, and place recent Hg enrichment in the Andes in a broader historical context. PMID:19451629

  14. Arguedasmachine: Modernity and Affect in the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Beasley-Murray

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peruvian writer José María Arguedas’s final book, an unfinished and posthumously published novel entitled El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo, is set in the coastal boomtown of Chimbote during the late 1960s. Rapid industrialization has led to the town being dominated by fish-processing factories belching out smoke, and surrounded by slums in which thousands of recent immigrants from the Andes eke out a living at the margins of this intense capitalist exploitation. The novel’s main concern is with these margins, with the slums or barriadas in which all of Peru’s cultures and languages are thrown together in chaos and misery, if also in vital intercommunication and restless striving. But at the center of the novel is a strange scene of epiphany that takes place at the heart of the industrial enterprise.

  15. Sr and Nd isotopic and trace element compositions of Quaternary volcanic centers of the Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futa, K.; Stern, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of samples from six Quaternary volcanoes located in the northern and southern extremities of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ, 33-46??S) of the Andes and from four centers in the Austral Volcanic Zone (AVZ, 49-54??S) range for 87Sr 86Sr from 0.70280 to 0.70591 and for 143Nd 144Nd from 0.51314 to 0.51255. The ranges are significantly greater than previously reported from the southern Andes but are different from the isotopic compositions of volcanoes in the central and northern Andes. Basalts and basaltic andesites from three centers just north of the Chile Rise-Trench triple junction have 87Sr 86Sr, 143Nd 144Nd, La Yb, Ba La, and Hf Lu that lie within the relatively restricted ranges of the basic magmas erupted from the volcanic centers as far north as 35??S in the SVZ of the Andes. The trace element and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of these magmas may be explained by source region contamination of subarc asthenosphere, with contaminants derived from subducted pelagic sediments and seawater-altered basalts by dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. In the northern extremity of the SVZ between 33?? and 34??S, basaltic andesites and andesites have higher 87Sr 86Sr, Rb Cs, and Hf Lu, and lower 143Nd 144Nd than basalts and basaltic andesites erupted farther south in the SVZ, which suggests involvement of components derived from the continental crust. In the AVZ, the most primitive sample, high-Mg andesite from the southernmost volcanic center in the Andes (54??S) has Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and K Rb and Ba La similar to MORB. The high La Yb of this sample suggests formation by small degrees of partial melting of subducted MORB with garnet as a residue. Samples from centers farther north in the AVZ show a regionally regular northward increase in SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, Ba La, and 87Sr 86Sr and decrease in MgO, Sr, K Rb, Rb Cs, and 143Nd 144Nd, suggesting increasingly greater degrees of fractional crystallization and associated intra

  16. The Glaciation of the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Carlos

    This pleasing book fills the gap in the knowledge about Pleistocene and recent glaciation between Colombia and Peru. A significant amount of data exists already for Colombia and Venezuela and for Peru, Bolivia, and, particularly, Chile. Hastenrath has now given us a description of glaciers and glaciation underneath the equator in the Andes.The book begins with brief summaries of the physiography and the atmospheric circulation, which give the general setting of Ecuador. Then follow detailed descriptions of the glaciers and glacial morphology of all the important mountains of the Western and Eastern Cordilleras. These are well illustrated, and a particularly useful feature is the comparison of old photographs and paintings of glaciers with modern photographs, many taken by the author. All illustrate the spectacular retreat of the glaciers in the Ecuadorian Andes during the last century and correlate quite well with observations elsewhere. This retreat is snown quantitatively in Table 4, in terms of decrease in glacier-covered area since the glacial advance of moraine stage III. The area of present-day glaciers is about 10% of the area during that stage (compared with about 1.5% in the Sierra Nevada de Mérida, Venezuela). A series of maps show the glacial morphology of the mountains (unfortunately, some of the maps have been included within the binding, thus losing some information; they could have been reduced somewhat to fit a single page or, if too large, could have been included in the pocket, together with the map of Chimborazo-Carihuairazo).

  17. Meteorological Conditions of Floods In The Chilean Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, J.

    Catastrophic floods occurred on mountains River during 2000 and 2001. The meteo- rological conditions of flood during the last five years have analyzed. For example, the flood of June 29 of 2000 occurred after one of extremely wettest June of the last 40 years were snowfall was 991cm in the Aconcagua Valley. Infrequently storms activ- ity generated a huge snowfall and rainfall over the Andes mountains on June of 2000 (1525mm in El Maule Valley) and the end of the unusually period, the flood was trig- gered by rising temperatures on the mountains and heavy rain (199mm in 24 hours) fall over the fresh snow on the morning of June 29 and floods wave developed and moved down along of the all river located on Central part of Chile, the foods peak was 2970.5m3/s on the El Maule basin in the morning of June 29. The regional meteoro- logical models with the hydrological forecasting was used for alert of the floods.

  18. Land Use Change and Hydrologic Processes in High-Elevation Tropical Watersheds of the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, W. A.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Covino, T. P.; Peña, C.

    2013-12-01

    The humid tropics cover one-fifth of the Earth's land surface and generate the greatest amount of runoff of any biome globally, but remain poorly understood and understudied. Humid tropical regions of the northern and central Andes have experienced greater anthropogenic land-use/land-cover (LULC) change than nearly any other high mountain system in the world. Vast expanses of this region are currently undergoing rapid transformation to farmland for production of potatoes and pasture for cattle grazing. Although the humid tropics have some of the highest runoff ratios, precipitation, and largest river flows in the world, there is a lack of scientific literature that addresses hydrologic processes in these regions and very few field observations are available to inform management strategies to ensure the sustainability of water resources of present and future generations. We seek to improve understanding of hydrologic processes and feedbacks in the humid tropics using existing and new information from two high-elevation watersheds that span a LULC gradient in the Andes Mountains of Colombia. One site is located in the preserved Chingaza Natural National Park in Central Colombia (undisturbed). The second site is located ~60 km to the northwest and has experienced considerable LULC change over the last 40 years. Combined, these watersheds deliver over 80% of the water resources to Bogotá and neighboring communities. These watersheds have similar climatological characteristics (including annual precipitation), but have strong differences in LULC which result in substantial differences in hydrologic response and streamflow dynamics. We present an overview of many of the pressing issues and effects that land degradation and climate change are posing to the long-term sustainability of water resources in the northern Andes. Our overarching goal is to provide process-based knowledge that will be useful to prevent, mitigate, or respond to future water crises along the Andean

  19. Bayesian spatiotemporal interpolation of rainfall in the Central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa-Moreno, Juan; Keir, Greg; McIntyre, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in the populous and economically significant Central Chilean region is governed by complex interactions between precipitation, temperature, snow and glacier melt, and streamflow. Streamflow prediction at daily time scales depends strongly on accurate estimations of precipitation in this predominantly dry region, particularly during the winter period. This can be difficult as gauged rainfall records are scarce, especially in the higher elevation regions of the Chilean Andes, and topographic influences on rainfall are not well understood. Remotely sensed precipitation and topographic products can be used to construct spatiotemporal multivariate regression models to estimate rainfall at ungauged locations. However, classical estimation methods such as kriging cannot easily accommodate the complicated statistical features of the data, including many 'no rainfall' observations, as well as non-normality, non-stationarity, and temporal autocorrelation. We use a separable space-time model to predict rainfall using the R-INLA package for computationally efficient Bayesian inference, using the gridded CHIRPS satellite-based rainfall dataset and digital elevation models as covariates. We jointly model both the probability of rainfall occurrence on a given day (using a binomial likelihood) as well as amount (using a gamma likelihood or similar). Correlation in space and time is modelled using a Gaussian Markov Random Field (GMRF) with a Matérn spatial covariance function which can evolve over time according to an autoregressive model if desired. It is possible to evaluate the GMRF at relatively coarse temporal resolution to speed up computations, but still produce daily rainfall predictions. We describe the process of model selection and inference using an information criterion approach, which we use to objectively select from competing models with various combinations of temporal smoothing, likelihoods, and autoregressive model orders.

  20. Finanzas de la Universidad de Los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Aura Casal de Altuve

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo primario de este artículo es el de fungir de base comparativa para otros estudios de países latinoamericanos que podrían estar considerando síntomas similares en el área de la investigación contable. El punto de partida lo representa un estudio de caso de los profesores del Departamento de Contabilidad y Finanzas de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales de la Universidad de los Andes. El artículo analiza la relación entre investigación y enseñanza y si el departamento está o no cumpliendo con sus objetivos. Un objetivo secundario consiste en la determinación de los posibles factores que han tenido una influencia significativa en el desempeño de la investigación y de la enseñanza por parte de los investigadores. Basándose en entrevistas y recolección directa de datos, se consideran las estrategias institucionales para fijar los objetivos de las actividades de investigación

  1. Oscillations and trends of river discharge in the southern Central Andes and linkages with climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, Fabiana; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2017-12-01

    This study analyzes the discharge variability of small to medium drainage basins (102-104 km2) in the southern Central Andes of NW Argentina. The Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) was applied to evaluate non-stationary oscillatory modes of variability and trends, based on four time series of monthly-normalized discharge anomaly between 1940 and 2015. Statistically significant trends reveal increasing discharge during the past decades and document an intensification of the hydrological cycle during this period. An Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) analysis revealed that discharge variability in this region can be best described by five quasi-periodic statistically significant oscillatory modes, with mean periods varying from 1 to ∼20 y. Moreover, we show that discharge variability is most likely linked to the phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) at multi-decadal timescales (∼20 y) and, to a lesser degree, to the Tropical South Atlantic SST anomaly (TSA) variability at shorter timescales (∼2-5 y). Previous studies highlighted a rapid increase in discharge in the southern Central Andes during the 1970s, inferred to have been associated with the global 1976-77 climate shift. Our results suggest that the rapid discharge increase in the NW Argentine Andes coincides with the periodic enhancement of discharge, which is mainly linked to a negative to positive transition of the PDO phase and TSA variability associated with a long-term increasing trend. We therefore suggest that variations in discharge in this region are largely driven by both natural variability and the effects of global climate change. We furthermore posit that the links between atmospheric and hydrologic processes result from a combination of forcings that operate on different spatiotemporal scales.

  2. Prediction of extreme floods in the Central Andes by means of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Barbosa, Henrique; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Based on a non-linear synchronisation measure and complex network theory, we present a novel framework for the prediction of extreme events of spatially embedded, interrelated time series. This method is general in the sense that it can be applied to any type of spatially sampled time series with significant interrelations, ranging from climate observables to biological or stock market data. In this presentation, we apply our method to extreme rainfall in South America and show how this leads to the prediction of more than 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of Bolivia and northern Argentina, with only 1% false alarms. From paleoclimatic to decadal time scales, the Central Andes continue to be subject to pronounced changes in climatic conditions. In particular, our and past work shows that frequency as well as magnitudes of extreme rainfall events have increased significantly during past decades, calling for a better understanding of the involved climatic mechanisms. Due to their large spatial extend and occurrence at high elevations, these extreme events often lead to severe floods and landslides with disastrous socioeconomic impacts. They regularly affect tens of thousands of people and produce estimated costs of the order of several hundred million USD. Alongside with the societal value of predicting natural hazards, our study provides insights into the responsible climatic features and suggests interactions between Rossby waves in polar regions and large scale (sub-)tropical moisture transport as a driver of subseasonal variability of the South American monsoon system. Predictable extreme events result from the propagation of extreme rainfall from the region of Buenos Aires towards the Central Andes given characteristic atmospheric conditions. Our results indicate that the role of frontal systems originating from Rossby waves in polar latitudes is much more dominant for controlling extreme rainfall in

  3. Regionalisation of Hydrological Indices to Assess Land-Use Change Impacts in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, W.; Ochoa Tocachi, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    Andean ecosystems are major water sources for cities and communities located in the Tropical Andes; however, there is a considerable lack of knowledge about their hydrology. Two problems are especially important: (i) the lack of monitoring to assess the impacts of historical land-use and cover change and degradation (LUCCD) at catchment scale, and (ii) the high variability in climatic and hydrological conditions that complicate the evaluation of land management practices. This study analyses how a reliable LUCCD impacts assessment can be performed in an environment of high variability combined with data-scarcity and low-quality records. We use data from participatory hydrological monitoring activities in 20 catchments distributed along the tropical Andes. A set of 46 hydrological indices is calculated and regionalized by relating them to 42 physical catchment properties. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is performed to maximise available data while minimising redundancy in the sets of variables. Hydrological model parameters are constrained by estimated indices, and different behavioural predictions are assembled to provide a generalised response on which we assess LUCCD impacts. Results from this methodology show that the attributed effects of LUCCD in pair-wise catchment comparisons may be overstated or hidden by different sources of uncertainty, including measurement inaccuracies and model structural errors. We propose extrapolation and evaluation in ungauged catchments as a way to regionalize LUCCD predictions and to provide statistically significant conclusions in the Andean region. These estimations may deliver reliable knowledge to evaluate the hydrological impact of different watershed management practices.

  4. Mammalian carnivore occupancy is inversely related to presence of domestic dogs in the high Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Although the Andes have long been occupied by people, habitat loss, fragmentation through deforestation, and other human activities such as introduction of invasive species have increased drastically during the past century. The Ecuadorian Andes are considered a biodiversity hotspot. However, the fauna and threats to the region are poorly studied, and understanding of factors that shape the distribution of species in habitats disturbed by human activities is needed to identify and mitigate region-wide threats to wildlife. We evaluated factors associated with patterns of occurrence of Andean carnivores in landscapes of the northern Ecuadorian Andes, particularly habitat loss, fragmentation, and occupancy of domestic dogs, and determined whether thresholds occurred for these factors beyond which carnivore occurrence declined markedly. Five study areas (each 20 x 20 km) were surveyed with a total effort of 2,800 camera trap nights. Occupancies of four of the eight carnivores known from the region were best predicted by occupancy of domestic dogs rather than measures of habitat loss and fragmentation [Andean fox (Pseudalopex culpaeus), puma (Puma concolor), striped hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus semistriatus), and Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus)]. The two largest carnivores, puma and Andean bear, demonstrated significant threshold responses to the presence of domestic dogs at two sites. Four smaller carnivores were recorded too infrequently to model occupancy, and at least two of these species appear to be in decline. The magnitude of domestic dog impacts on native species in tropical areas like the Ecuadorian Andes currently are not recognized. Results of our study indicate that small and large carnivores are in urgent need of conservation and clearly point to dogs as a significant threat to a broad range of native species. PMID:29489855

  5. Mammalian carnivore occupancy is inversely related to presence of domestic dogs in the high Andes of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Ríos, Galo; Branch, Lyn C

    2018-01-01

    Although the Andes have long been occupied by people, habitat loss, fragmentation through deforestation, and other human activities such as introduction of invasive species have increased drastically during the past century. The Ecuadorian Andes are considered a biodiversity hotspot. However, the fauna and threats to the region are poorly studied, and understanding of factors that shape the distribution of species in habitats disturbed by human activities is needed to identify and mitigate region-wide threats to wildlife. We evaluated factors associated with patterns of occurrence of Andean carnivores in landscapes of the northern Ecuadorian Andes, particularly habitat loss, fragmentation, and occupancy of domestic dogs, and determined whether thresholds occurred for these factors beyond which carnivore occurrence declined markedly. Five study areas (each 20 x 20 km) were surveyed with a total effort of 2,800 camera trap nights. Occupancies of four of the eight carnivores known from the region were best predicted by occupancy of domestic dogs rather than measures of habitat loss and fragmentation [Andean fox (Pseudalopex culpaeus), puma (Puma concolor), striped hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus semistriatus), and Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus)]. The two largest carnivores, puma and Andean bear, demonstrated significant threshold responses to the presence of domestic dogs at two sites. Four smaller carnivores were recorded too infrequently to model occupancy, and at least two of these species appear to be in decline. The magnitude of domestic dog impacts on native species in tropical areas like the Ecuadorian Andes currently are not recognized. Results of our study indicate that small and large carnivores are in urgent need of conservation and clearly point to dogs as a significant threat to a broad range of native species.

  6. Mammalian carnivore occupancy is inversely related to presence of domestic dogs in the high Andes of Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galo Zapata-Ríos

    Full Text Available Although the Andes have long been occupied by people, habitat loss, fragmentation through deforestation, and other human activities such as introduction of invasive species have increased drastically during the past century. The Ecuadorian Andes are considered a biodiversity hotspot. However, the fauna and threats to the region are poorly studied, and understanding of factors that shape the distribution of species in habitats disturbed by human activities is needed to identify and mitigate region-wide threats to wildlife. We evaluated factors associated with patterns of occurrence of Andean carnivores in landscapes of the northern Ecuadorian Andes, particularly habitat loss, fragmentation, and occupancy of domestic dogs, and determined whether thresholds occurred for these factors beyond which carnivore occurrence declined markedly. Five study areas (each 20 x 20 km were surveyed with a total effort of 2,800 camera trap nights. Occupancies of four of the eight carnivores known from the region were best predicted by occupancy of domestic dogs rather than measures of habitat loss and fragmentation [Andean fox (Pseudalopex culpaeus, puma (Puma concolor, striped hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus semistriatus, and Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus]. The two largest carnivores, puma and Andean bear, demonstrated significant threshold responses to the presence of domestic dogs at two sites. Four smaller carnivores were recorded too infrequently to model occupancy, and at least two of these species appear to be in decline. The magnitude of domestic dog impacts on native species in tropical areas like the Ecuadorian Andes currently are not recognized. Results of our study indicate that small and large carnivores are in urgent need of conservation and clearly point to dogs as a significant threat to a broad range of native species.

  7. Exhumation of the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes (5-12°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, M.; Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Hourigan, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The topography of mountain belts is the first-order morphological expression of the dynamical forces that drive plate tectonics. Despite recent advances in techniques that quantify tectonic and geomorphologic processes, characterizing the near and far-field forces that form mountainous topography at a continental scale remains challenging. The South American Andes are an example of a long-lived orogen that is morphologically and tectonically segmented. For example, the Northern Peruvian Andes are a region characterized by flat-slab subduction, no active volcanism and a relatively narrow section of high topography, in contrast to the central Andes, which contain the broad Altiplano-Puna plateau, active volcanism and normal-angle subduction. Current models of Andean orogenesis based on paleoelevation estimates, thermochronology data, and structural analysis suggest that most of the high topography evolved sometime in the last 20Ma, possibly characterized by a period of punctuated uplift from 10-6Ma. However, as many of these data are from the central Andes, they may not be directly applicable to the entire Andean chain. Therefore, it is critical to investigate areas outside of the central Andean region using similar techniques to test the applicability of these models elsewhere in the Andes. For this study, we use (U-Th)/He low-temperature thermochronology to characterize the shallow crustal cooling history from three sites in the Western Cordillera of the Peruvian Andes, across seven degrees of latitude (5°S to 12°S). Near-vertical sample transects were taken in three river valleys that expose the Jurassic through Eocene granitoids of the 1,600km long Coastal Batholith of Peru. By using both apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometers we are able to quantify crustal exhumation rates as well as detect temporal and spatial accelerations and decelerations of exhumation. This new dataset, combined with existing crystallization ages of the plutonic sequence of the

  8. Analysis of La Dehesa paleo-landslide. Central Pre-Andes of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia Baldis, Carla; Rothis, Luis Martín; Perucca, Laura; Esper Angillieri, María; Vargas, Horacio; Ponce, David; Allis, Carlos

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to consider the influence of Quaternary faults as likely triggering factor for rockslides occurrence in the Central Pre-Andes, a region with intense shallow seismic activity. A rockslide deposit was selected as study case, placed in the western flank of La Dehesa and Talacasto (DT) range (31°3‧37″ S and 68°46‧ 8″ W). Applied methodology includes the characterization of main discontinuities, reconstruction of the topography using a high-resolution digital elevation model, safety factor calculation along the sliding surface and, Newmark displacements estimation for three different hypothetical seismic scenarios, recreated from existing neotectonic local information. Equilibrium-limit method's results confirm that study case, La Dehesa rockslide (LDR), had a stable and safe slope's configuration under static conditions. However, a seismic horizontal coefficient between 0.2 and 0.3 decreases safety factor below the safety threshold. Newmark's displacements for different seismic reconstructed scenarios varies between 4.1 and 15.9 cm, values that agreed with a coherent failure process, likely triggered by Pleistocene to Holocene seismogenic sources in Central Pre-Andes. LDR trigger could be assigned mainly to an earthquake related to La Dehesa Quaternary fault (LDF) activity; however, similar movements produced by neighboring faults should not be discarded. LDR triggering related to climatic conditions is despised. Finally, the methodology presented in this work is easy to reproduce and may be applied to other rockslides located in the mountainous areas of the Central Pre-Andes of Argentina.

  9. Geografía, café y prosperidad en los andes occidentales de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Barón

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Compuesta por los departamentos de Antioquia, Caldas, Quindío, Risaralda y Valle del Cauca, los Andes Occidentales ha sido por mucho años una de las regiones más prósperas de Colombia. Esta prosperidad se ha traducido en condiciones de vida e infraestructura superiores a las del resto del país. El éxito y bienestar que presentan hoy en día los Andes Occidentales están estrechamente ligados a la concentración de la producción de café, que se dio allí durante gran parte del siglo XX. El arraigo del café en la región no sólo se dio debido a que la geografía ofrecía las condiciones ideales para el cultivo, sino también a las instituciones cafeteras creadas para organizar la industria del café. A pesar de esta prosperidad, el constante descenso del precio internacional del café después del rompimiento del pacto de cuotas de producción en 1989, sumado al estancamiento de la industria manufacturera en algunos departamentos de la región, han afectado las economías departamentales menos diversificadas. Es así como la región de los Andes Occidentales Colombianos presenta las tasas de desempleo más altas del país, tasas que se han visto afectadas aún más con la crisis financiera internacional a través del menor flujo de remesas que los trabajadores oriundos de la región, y residentes en el exterior envían a sus familias.

  10. Mio-Pliocene aridity in the south-central Andes associated with Southern Hemisphere cold periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, William H; Fisher, G Burch; Burbank, Douglas W; Ciccioli, Patricia L; Alonso, Ricardo N; Gorin, Andrew L; Silverhart, Perri H; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R C; Christoffersen, Michael S

    2017-06-20

    Although Earth's climate history is best known through marine records, the corresponding continental climatic conditions drive the evolution of terrestrial life. Continental conditions during the latest Miocene are of particular interest because global faunal turnover is roughly synchronous with a period of global glaciation from ∼6.2-5.5 Ma and with the Messinian Salinity Crisis from ∼6.0-5.3 Ma. Despite the climatic and ecological significance of this period, the continental climatic conditions associated with it remain unclear. We address this question using erosion rates of ancient watersheds to constrain Mio-Pliocene climatic conditions in the south-central Andes near 30° S. Our results show two slowdowns in erosion rate, one from ∼6.1-5.2 Ma and another from 3.6 to 3.3 Ma, which we attribute to periods of continental aridity. This view is supported by synchrony with other regional proxies for aridity and with the timing of glacial ‟cold" periods as recorded by marine proxies, such as the M2 isotope excursion. We thus conclude that aridity in the south-central Andes is associated with cold periods at high southern latitudes, perhaps due to a northward migration of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies, which disrupted the South American Low Level Jet that delivers moisture to southeastern South America. Colder glacial periods, and possibly associated reductions in atmospheric CO 2 , thus seem to be an important driver of Mio-Pliocene ecological transitions in the central Andes. Finally, this study demonstrates that paleo-erosion rates can be a powerful proxy for ancient continental climates that lie beyond the reach of most lacustrine and glacial archives.

  11. Glacier change and glacial lake outburst flood risk in the Bolivian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Cook

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers of the Bolivian Andes represent an important water resource for Andean cities and mountain communities, yet relatively little work has assessed changes in their extent over recent decades. In many mountain regions, glacier recession has been accompanied by the development of proglacial lakes, which can pose a glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF hazard. However, no studies have assessed the development of such lakes in Bolivia despite recent GLOF incidents here. Our mapping from satellite imagery reveals an overall areal shrinkage of 228.1 ± 22.8 km2 (43.1 % across the Bolivian Cordillera Oriental between 1986 and 2014. Shrinkage was greatest in the Tres Cruces region (47.3 %, followed by the Cordillera Apolobamba (43.1 % and Cordillera Real (41.9 %. A growing number of proglacial lakes have developed as glaciers have receded, in accordance with trends in most other deglaciating mountain ranges, although the number of ice-contact lakes has decreased. The reasons for this are unclear, but the pattern of lake change has varied significantly throughout the study period, suggesting that monitoring of future lake development is required as ice continues to recede. Ultimately, we use our 2014 database of proglacial lakes to assess GLOF risk across the Bolivian Andes. We identify 25 lakes that pose a potential GLOF threat to downstream communities and infrastructure. We suggest that further studies of potential GLOF impacts are urgently required.

  12. Exploring climate changes in mountainous ecosystems in the Andes of South Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachte, Katja; Rollenbeck, Rütger; Campozano, Lenin; Celleri, Rollando; Bendix, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The Andes Mountains of Ecuador are one of the most biologically diverse regions of the world with high ecosystem diversity. Particularly the complex structure of the terrain causes a variety of ecosystems across small scales that are strongly related to zonal and altitudinal gradients in climate parameters. At the eastern slopes mountain rain forest dominate because extensive rain amounts occur due to impinging easterlies. They advance warm-moist air from the Amazon basin to the Andes and subsequently lead to an orographic enhancement of cloud and precipitation. In contrast, the western slopes are under the influence of a strong seasonality driven by the South American monsoon system leading to distinct rainy and dry periods which is reflected in the deciduous forest / dry forest. Additionally, as a result of the altitudinal gradient paramo ecosystem occurs above the timberline. In the light of recent and future climate changes as an indicator for loss of biodiversity these ecosystems are strongly endangered. Therefore the high resolution climate indicator system (hrCIS) for South Ecuador is developed to derive climate change indicators relevant for ecosystem research. The hrCIS is generated applying the regional climate model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) in a dynamical downscaling approach. It covers a time period 1995 to 2015 with a spatial and temporal resolution of 4 km and 1 hour, respectively, on the inner domain. On the basis of important climate change indicators, e.g. precipitation and temperature, their recent developments associated with the respective ecosystem are presented and discussed.

  13. Permafrost distribution map of San Juan Dry Andes (Argentina) based on rock glacier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper Angillieri, María Yanina

    2017-01-01

    Rock glaciers are frozen water reservoirs in mountainous areas. Water resources are important for the local populations and economies. The presence of rock glaciers is commonly used as a direct indicator of mountain permafrost conditions. Over 500 active rock glaciers have been identified, showing that elevations between 3500 and 4500 m asl., a south-facing or east-facing aspect, areas with relatively low solar radiation and low mean annual air temperature (-4 to 0 °C) favour the existence of rock glaciers in this region. The permafrost probability model, for Dry Andes of San Juan Province between latitudes 28º30‧S and 32°30‧S, have been analyzed by logistic regression models based on the active rock glaciers occurrence in relation to some topoclimatic variables such as altitude, aspect, mean annual temperature, mean annual precipitation and solar radiation, using optical remote sensing techniques in a GIS environment. The predictive performances of the model have been estimated by known rock glaciers locations and by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). This regional permafrost map can be applied by the Argentinean Government for their recent initiatives which include creating inventories, monitoring and studying ice masses along the Argentinean Andes. Further, this generated map provides valuable input data for permafrost scenarios and contributes to a better understanding of our geosystem.

  14. East of the Andes: The genetic profile of the Peruvian Amazon populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Corcia, T; Sanchez Mellado, C; Davila Francia, T J; Ferri, G; Sarno, S; Luiselli, D; Rickards, O

    2017-06-01

    Assuming that the differences between the Andes and the Amazon rainforest at environmental and historical levels have influenced the distribution patterns of genes, languages, and cultures, the maternal and paternal genetic reconstruction of the Peruvian Amazon populations was used to test the relationships within and between these two extreme environments. We analyzed four Peruvian Amazon communities (Ashaninka, Huambisa, Cashibo, and Shipibo) for both Y chromosome (17 STRs and 8 SNPs) and mtDNA data (control region sequences, two diagnostic sites of the coding region, and one INDEL), and we studied their variability against the rest of South America. We detected a high degree of genetic diversity in the Peruvian Amazon people, both for mtDNA than for Y chromosome, excepting for Cashibo people, who seem to have had no exchanges with their neighbors, in contrast with the others communities. The genetic structure follows the divide between the Andes and the Amazon, but we found a certain degree of gene flow between these two environments, as particularly emerged with the Y chromosome descent cluster's (DCs) analysis. The Peruvian Amazon is home to an array of populations with differential rates of genetic exchanges with their neighbors and with the Andean people, depending on their peculiar demographic histories. We highlighted some successful Y chromosome lineages expansions originated in Peru during the pre-Columbian history which involved both Andeans and Amazon Arawak people, showing that at least a part of the Amazon rainforest did not remain isolated from those exchanges. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Desarrollo de metgis, un sistema combinado de información geográfica, meteorológica y de cobertura de nieve de alta resolución, para la región andina Development of metgis, a combined high-resolution system of geographic, meteorological and snow cover information for the andes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Spreitzhofer

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En el marco de un proyecto de investigación interdisciplinario e internacional con participación de institutos de investigación de montaña y universidades de Estados Unidos, Austria, Suiza y Japón se construye MetGIS (Meteorological and Geographic Information System, un sistema Java de información geográfica y meteorológica para Sudamérica, focalizado en la región andina de Argentina, Chile y Perú. La sección geográfica incluye una topografía basada en datos SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topographic Missión e información sobre las carreteras, las vías férreas, los ríos, las fronteras y las ciudades. Las gráficas de la topografía del terreno (la altitud, la pendiente y la orientación del mismo sirven como fondo para la información meteorológica y nivológica. Con éste sistema será posible visualizar en forma combinada las observaciones de varias redes, los resultados de los pronósticos numéricos de modelos como el MM5 y los errores de dichos modelos. Los campos analizados y pronosticados pueden ser transformados a escalas de mayor resolución, usando métodos apropiados tales como el de "downscaling" (VERA = Viena Enhanced Resolution Analysis. Respecto a los rasgos del sistema, relacionados específicamente con áreas de montaña, los datos SRTM combinados con VERA permiten dar una buena estimación de las áreas con temperaturas bajo cero y acumulación de nieve. Se planea integrar en el futuro el modelo suizo SNOWPACK que realiza simulaciones de la cubierta de nieve.Within the framework of an interdisciplinary international research project with contributions from mountain research institutes and universities of the USA, Austria, Switzerland and Japan, a Java-based combined meteorological and geographic information system (named MetGIS for South America is under development, with a special focus on the Andes region of Argentina, Chile and Peru. The geographic part of the system includes a topography based on data of the

  16. Cloud climatology at the Andes/Amazon Transition in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halladay, K.; New, M. G.; Malhi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The climate of tropical montane regions is complex but may be sensitive to global change. We examine the local and regional cloud climatology of a region of the tropical Andes in Peru using corrected ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) DX cloud product (1983-2008), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) MOD35 visible cloud flags (2000-2008) and ground-based cloud observations. The results were compared for three zones: highlands (grassland), eastern slope (the montane forest) and lowlands (tropical forest). We found that in the dry season (JJA) the study area is part of a localised region of increased cloud frequency relative to the highlands, lowlands and other parts the eastern slope, which is likely to result from the mean low-level wind trajectory and diurnal upslope flow. The highlands exhibited the greatest amplitude mean annual cycle of cloud frequency, with a minimum in June for all times of day. This was linked to the effect of the annual cycle of upper level zonal winds, with persistent westerlies in the austral winter suppressing cloud formation at higher elevations. Higher lowland cloud frequencies than those on the eastern slope in the morning in May and June suggest the persistence of nighttime downslope flows and low-level convergence at lower altitudes. We also examined trends and variability in cloud cover for the three zones, and their relationship to sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Lowland cloud frequencies were significantly correlated with tropical North Atlantic (TNA) SSTs in February, March, August and September, but this was reduced after detrending, whereas the eastern slope and the highlands were not significantly correlated with tropical North Atlantic SSTs. Pacific SST correlations were highest for the eastern slope and highlands from February to April. Indian Ocean SST anomalies were significantly correlated with dry season cloud frequency for the lowlands and

  17. Aridity changes in the temperate-Mediterranean transition of the Andes since ad 1346 reconstructed from tree-rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, Duncan A.; Quesne, Carlos le [Universidad Austral de Chile, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); Boninsegna, Jose A.; Morales, Mariano S.; Villalba, Ricardo [Instituto Argentino de Nivologia, Glaciologia y Ciencias Ambientales, IANIGLA, Departamento de Dendrocronologia e Historia Ambiental, Mendoza (Argentina); Cleaveland, Malcolm K.; Stahle, David W. [University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Tree-Ring Laboratory, Department of Geosciences, Fayetteville, AR (United States); Lara, Antonio [Universidad Austral de Chile, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Austral de Chile, Forest Ecosystem Services under Climatic Fluctuations (Forecos), Valdivia (Chile); Mudelsee, Manfred [Climate Risk Analysis, Hanover (Germany); Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The Andes Cordillera acts as regional ''Water Towers'' for several countries and encompasses a wide range of ecosystems and climates. Several hydroclimatic changes have been described for portions of the Andes during recent years, including glacier retreat, negative precipitation trends, an elevation rise in the 0 isotherm, and changes in regional streamflow regimes. The Temperate-Mediterranean transition (TMT) zone of the Andes (35.5 -39.5 S) is particularly at risk to climate change because it is a biodiversity hotspot with heavy human population pressure on water resources. In this paper we utilize a new tree-ring network of Austrocedrus chilensis to reconstruct past variations in regional moisture in the TMT of the Andes by means of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). The reconstruction covers the past 657 years and captures interannual to decadal scales of variability in late spring-early summer PDSI. These changes are related to the north-south oscillations in moisture conditions between the Mediterranean and Temperate climates of the Andes as a consequence of the latitudinal position of the storm tracks forced by large-scale circulation modes. Kernel estimation of occurrence rates reveals an unprecedented increment of severe and extreme drought events during the last century in the context of the previous six centuries. Moisture conditions in our study region are linked to tropical and high-latitude ocean-atmospheric forcing, with PDSI positively related to Nino-3.4 SST during spring and strongly negatively correlated with the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) during summer. Geopotential anomaly maps at 500-hPa show that extreme dry years are tightly associated with negative height anomalies in the Ross-Amundsen Seas, in concordance with the strong negative relationship between PDSI and AAO. The twentieth century increase in extreme drought events in the TMT may not be related to ENSO but to the positive AAO trend during late-spring and

  18. SRTM Perspective of Colored Height and Shaded Relief Laguna Mellquina, Andes Mountains, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This depiction of an area south of San Martin de Los Andes, Argentina, is the first Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)view of the Andes Mountains, the tallest mountain chain in the western hemisphere. This particular site does not include the higher Andes peaks, but it does include steep-sided valleys and other distinctive landforms carved by Pleistocene glaciers. Elevations here range from about 700 to 2,440 meters (2,300 to 8,000 feet). This region is very active tectonically and volcanically, and the landforms provide a record of the changes that have occurred over many thousands of years. Large lakes fill the broad mountain valleys, and the spectacular scenery here makes this area a popular resort destination for Argentinians.Three visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading, color coding of topographic height and a perspective view. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark, as would be the case at noon at this latitude in the southern hemisphere. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to white at the highest elevations. The perspective is toward the west, 20 degrees off horizontal with 2X vertical exaggeration. The back (west) edge of the data set forms a false skyline within the Andes Range.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved

  19. Healthy and Sustainable Horticulture Production in the Central Andes

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Healthy and Sustainable Horticulture Production in the Central Andes. Horticultural production in mid-altitude Andean valleys uses substantial amounts of highly hazardous and mutagenic pesticides. But, it is a growing source of income for farm families and fresh vegetables for metropolitan markets. Preliminary research ...

  20. Reflections on Andes' Goal-Free User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although the Andes project produced many results over its 18 years of activity, this commentary focuses on its contributions to understanding how a goal-free user interface impacts the overall design and performance of a step-based tutoring system. Whereas a goal-aligned user interface displays relevant goals as blank boxes or empty locations that…

  1. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  2. ISOSTATICALLY DISTURBED TERRAIN OF NORTHWESTERN ANDES MOUNTAINS FROM SPECTRALLY CORRELATED FREE-AIR AND GRAVITY TERRAIN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández P Orlando

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently revised models on global tectonics describe the convergence of the North Andes, Nazca, Caribbean and South American Plates and their seismicity, volcanism, active faulting and extreme
    topography. The current plate boundaries of the area are mainly interpreted from volcanic and seismic datasets with variable confidence levels. New insights on the isostatic state and plate boundaries of
    the northwestern Andes Mountains can be obtained from the spectral analysis of recently available gravity and topography data.
    Isostatically disturbed terrain produces free-air anomalies that are highly correlated with the gravity effects of the terrain. The terrain gravity effects (TGE and free air gravity anomalies (FAGA of the
    Andes mountains spectral correlation data confirms that these mountains are isostatically disturbed. Strong negative terrain-correlated FAGA along western South America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles are consistent with anomalously deepened mantle displaced by subducting oceanic plates.

    Inversion of the compensated terrain gravity effects (CTGE reveals plate subduction systems with alternating shallower and steeper subduction angles. The gravity modeling highlights crustal
    deformation from plate collision and subduction and other constraints on the tectonism of the plate boundary zones for the region.

  3. Crustal balance and crustal flux from shortening estimates in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, David; Kley, Jonas; Oncken, Onno; Sobolev, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The Central Andes of South America form the second largest high elevation plateau on earth. Extreme elevations have formed on a noncollisional margin with abundant associated arc magmatism. It has long been thought that the crustal thickness necessary to support Andean topography was not accounted for by known crustal shortening alone. We show that this may in part be due to a two-dimensional treatment of the problem. A three-dimensional analysis of crustal shortening and crustal thickness shows that displacement of material towards the axis of the bend in the Central Andes has added a significant volume of crust not accounted for in previous comparisons. We find that present-day crustal thickness between 12°S and 25°S is accounted for (∼-10% to ∼+3%)with the same shortening estimates, and the same assumed initial crustal thickness as had previously led to the conclusion of a ∼25-35% deficit in shortening relative to volume of crustal material. We suggest that the present-day measured crustal thickness distribution may not match that predicted due to shortening, and substantial redistribution of crust may have occurred by both erosion and deposition at the surface and lower crustal flow in regions of the thermally weakened middle and lower crust.

  4. Elevational Shifts in the Topographic Position of Polylepis Forest Stands in the Andes of Southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M. Toivonen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The patchy distribution of high-Andean treeline forests has provoked discussion about the relative importance of anthropogenic and climatic causes of this pattern, both of which vary with topography. We aimed to understand the topographic controls on the distribution of Polylepis subsericans treeline forests in the Andes of southern Peru, and the changes in these controls along an elevational gradient. We mapped Polylepis forests in the Cordillera Urubamba, Cusco, using high-resolution aerial images and related forest cover to topographic variables extracted from a digital terrain model (30-m resolution. The variables were selected based on their expected biological relevance for tree growth at high elevations. We constructed logistic regression models of forest cover, separately for each of five 100-m elevational belts. To deal with spatial autocorrelation, models were based on randomized 10% subsampling of the data with 1000 repetitions. The results suggest a consistent shift in topographic preference with elevation, with forests at lower elevations showing a preference for topographically protected sites near rivers and forests at higher elevations being increasingly restricted to north-facing and well-drained sites. Our study offers the first indication of the ability of Andean treeline forests to benefit from the topographic heterogeneity of the high-Andes. Providing that dispersal and establishment are possible, local relocation between microsites could help these forests to persist regionally in spite of changing climatic conditions.

  5. Fault-controlled development of shallow hydrothermal systems: Structural and mineralogical insights from the Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, T.; Arancibia, G.; Rowland, J. V.; Iturrieta, P. C.; Morata, D.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Paleofluid-transporting systems can be recognized as meshes of fracture-filled veins in eroded zones of extinct hydrothermal systems. Here we conducted meso-microstructural analysis and mechanical modeling from two exhumed exposures of the faults governing regional tectonics of the Southern Andes: the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Andean Transverse Faults (ATF). A total of 107 fractures in both exposures were analyzed. The ATF specific segment shows two tectonic solutions that can be modeled as Andersonian and non-Andersonian tectonic regimes: (1) shear (mode II/III) failure occurs at differential stresses > 28 MPa and fluid pressures 85-98% lithostatic in the non-Andersonian regime. Additionally, the LOFS exposure cyclically fails in extension (mode I) or extension + shear (modes I + II/III) in the Andersonian regime, at differential stresses 40-80% lithostatic. In areas of spatial interaction between ATF and LOFS, these conditions might favor: (1) the storage of overpressured fluids in hydrothermal systems associated with the ATF faults, and (2) continuous fluid flow through vertical conduits in the LOFS faults. These observations suggest that such intersections are highly probable locations for concentrated hydrothermal activity, which must be taken into consideration for further geothermal exploration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. PhD CONICYT grants, Centro de Excelencia en Geotermia de los Andes (CEGA-FONDAP/CONICYT Project #15090013), FONDECYT Project #1130030 and Project CONICYT REDES #140036.

  6. High-resolution paleoclimate records of Holocene hydroclimatic variability in the Eastern Colombian Andes from Lago de Tota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. N.; Bird, B. W.; Escobar, J.; Polissar, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Northern Hemisphere (NH) South American Monsoon (SAM) is a significant source of precipitation for the North Andes (north of 0˚) and has major control over regional hydroclimate variability. Holocene-length histories of NH SAM variability are few compared to the Southern Hemisphere (SH), limiting understanding of how these systems are connected on orbital and shorter timescales. Here, we present multi-proxy lake-sediment-based paleoclimate and paleohydrologic reconstructions from Lago de Tota, Colombia, using sedimentological, geochemical and leaf-wax hydrogen isotopic indicators from radiometically dated cores. The results indicate periods of wet and dry climate phases during the past 9000 BP with an average Holocene sedimentation rate 33cm/kyr. An increase in total organic matter (TOM) content and finer grain-size distributions was observed from 8000 to 3200 BP, suggesting a period of high lake level. This was followed by lower TOM and coarser grain sizes, suggesting lower lake levels from 3200 BP to the present. Although Tota's lake level pattern is antiphased with other lake level reconstructions from the NH and SH Andes, it is consistent with hypothesized changes in atmospheric convection over the Andes during the Holocene and the way in which they would be modified by the so-called dry island effect in the Colombian Andes. This suggests that a common forcing mechanism can be invoked to explain differing millennial-scale Andean hydroclimate changes, namely atmospheric convection. Orbital and Pacific atmosphere-forcing are therefore likely to have played a significant role in driving pan-Andean hydroclimate variability based on their inter-hemispheric influence on Andean convection.

  7. New species of the endemic Neotropical caddisfly genus Contulma from the Andes of Ecuador (Trichoptera: Anomalopsychidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph W. Holzenthal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus Contulma Flint (Trichoptera: Anomalopsychidae is composed mostly of regionally endemic species occurring above 2,000 m, with a few more widespread species and some that are found at lower elevations. Adults of three new species of Contulma are described and illustrated from the Andes of Ecuador, Contulma lina, new species, Contulma quito, new species, and Contulma sangay, new species. These species are similar to previously described species from the region, including C. paluguillensis, C. nevada, and C. lancelolata. New provincial records are provided for C. bacula, C. cataracta, and C. echinata. Contulma duffi Oláh, 2016 is considered a junior, subjective synonym of C. penai, Holzenthal & Flint, 1995. Also, we provide an identification key to males of the 30 Contulma species now known.

  8. Multiethnicity, pluralism, and migration in the south central Andes: An alternate path to state expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Paul S

    2015-07-28

    The south central Andes is known as a region of enduring multiethnic diversity, yet it is also the cradle of one the South America's first successful expansive-state societies. Social structures that encouraged the maintenance of separate identities among coexistent ethnic groups may explain this apparent contradiction. Although the early expansion of the Tiwanaku state (A.D. 600-1000) is often interpreted according to a centralized model derived from Old World precedents, recent archaeological research suggests a reappraisal of the socio-political organization of Tiwanaku civilization, both for the diversity of social entities within its core region and for the multiple agencies behind its wider program of agropastoral colonization. Tiwanaku's sociopolitical pluralism in both its homeland and colonies tempers some of archaeology's global assumptions about the predominant role of centralized institutions in archaic states.

  9. The role of biomass in a pilot town of Venezuelan Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, A.; Sanchez, R.; Briceno, L.; Urbina, E. [Universidad de los Andes, Lab. de Bioenergia, Merida (Venezuela)

    1999-01-01

    This work analyses some factors of the energy crisis in a town of Venezuelan Andes (Llano del Hato, 3500 m.a.s.l.). The socioeconomics and climatic conditions in this region make the use of firewood as fuel mandatory. There are extensive desertified areas due to the extraction of plant species for firewood. It has been determined that there are diverse species in the area whose energy potential is superior to that reported in the literature, however, they are incorrectly used and are in danger of extinction. The absence of firewood drives peasants to use manure as a source of fuel. Parallel to the laboratory testing of different raw materials, a program of environmental education and optimisation of biomass to obtain energy is under way. It is hoped that pilot plans like this will expand to all of the Andean region. (Author)

  10. Diversity of the genus Polylepis (Rosaceae, Sanguisorbeae in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Mendoza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study provides information on the diversity of Peruvian species of Polylepis. Nineteen (19 species are reported here (more than 70% of the 27 species registered for the whole Andean region. As a result, Peru could be considered as the country with the largest diversity of Polylepis species, in comparison with Bolivia (13, Ecuador (7, Argentina (4, Colombia (3, Chile (2, and Venezuela (1. The species occur in 19 departments of Peru, with the majority of them in Cusco (10 and Ayacucho (8. Species diversity is mostly concentrated in the Peruvian southern Andes (15 species, with the region becoming the potential center of diversification of the genus Polylepis. Regarding their altitudinal distribution, the greatest diversity (18 is found between 3000 and 4000 m.

  11. Geographic independence of HTLV-I and HTLV-II foci in the Andes highland, the Atlantic coast, and the Orinoco of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninovic, V; Sanzon, F; Lopez, F; Velandia, G; Blank, A; Blank, M; Fujiyama, C; Yashiki, S; Matsumoto, D; Katahira, Y

    1994-01-01

    To clarify the ethnic specificity of human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) and type II (HTLV-II) carriers among Colombian native Indians, we investigated the geographic distribution of HTLV-I and HTLV-II seroprevalence among the isolated ethnic groups of Mongoloid origin in the Andes highlands and the Atlantic coast of Colombia. HTLV-I carriers were found in 1.6% (1/62 samples) of Inga, 8.5% (5/59) of Kamsa, and 0% (0/55) of Cumbal Indians who live in the Andes highlands at 3000 m above sea level. On the other hand, HTLV-II carriers were found in 4.1% (5/123) of Wayuu Indians, who live in the Guajira region of the Atlantic coast of Colombia at a distance of 1000 km from the Andes highlands. This ethnic specificity of HTLV-II was similarly observed among Guahibo Indians in the Orinoco. The seroprevalence of HTLV-I and HTLV-II was mutually exclusive among Inga, Kamsa, and Wayuu Indians. These results suggest that HTLV-I and HTLV-II may have evolved among Mongoloid populations and been independently transmitted among two different lineages of Colombian native Indians, Andes highlanders and Atlantic coast lowlanders.

  12. Sensitivity of glaciation in the arid subtropical Andes to changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, L. J.; Galewsky, J.; Rupper, S.; Ward, D. J.

    2018-04-01

    The subtropical Andes (18.5-27 °S) have been glaciated in the past, but are presently glacier-free. We use idealized model experiments to quantify glacier sensitivity to changes in climate in order to investigate the climatic drivers of past glaciations. We quantify the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) sensitivity (the change in ELA per change in climate) to temperature, precipitation, and shortwave radiation for three distinct climatic regions in the subtropical Andes. We find that in the western cordillera, where conditions are hyper-arid with the highest solar radiation on Earth, ELA sensitivity is as high as 34 m per % increase in precipitation, and 70 m per % decrease in shortwave radiation. This is compared with the eastern cordillera, where precipitation is the highest of the three regions, and ELA sensitivity is only 10 m per % increase in precipitation, and 25 m per % decrease in shortwave radiation. The high ELA sensitivity to shortwave radiation highlights the influence of radiation on mass balance of high elevation and low-latitude glaciers. We also consider these quantified ELA sensitivities in context of previously dated glacial deposits from the regions. Our results suggest that glaciation of the humid eastern cordillera was driven primarily by lower temperatures, while glaciations of the arid Altiplano and western cordillera were also influenced by increases in precipitation and decreases in shortwave radiation. Using paleoclimate records from the timing of glaciation, we find that glaciation of the hyper-arid western cordillera can be explained by precipitation increases of 90-160% (1.9-2.6× higher than modern), in conjunction with associated decreases in shortwave radiation of 7-12% and in temperature of 3.5 °C.

  13. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  14. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon Variation Along Climatic and Topographic Trajectories in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, C.; Grunwald, S.; Quiroz, R.; Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Andes represent the largest and highest mountain range in the tropics. Geological and climatic differentiation favored landscape and soil diversity, resulting in ecosystems adapted to very different climatic patterns. Although several studies support the fact that the Andes are a vast sink of soil organic carbon (SOC) only few have quantified this variable in situ. Estimating the spatial distribution of SOC stocks in data-poor and/or poorly accessible areas, like the Andean region, is challenging due to the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution and the wide range of coexistent ecosystems. Thus, the sampling strategy is vital in order to ensure the whole range of environmental covariates (EC) controlling SOC dynamics is represented. This approach allows grasping the variability of the area, which leads to more efficient statistical estimates and improves the modeling process. The objectives of this study were to i) characterize and model the spatial distribution of SOC stocks in the Central Andean region using soil-landscape modeling techniques, and to ii) validate and evaluate the model for predicting SOC content in the area. For that purpose, three representative study areas were identified and a suite of variables including elevation, mean annual temperature, annual precipitation and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), among others, was selected as EC. A stratified random sampling (namely conditioned Latin Hypercube) was implemented and a total of 400 sampling locations were identified. At all sites, four composite topsoil samples (0-30 cm) were collected within a 2 m radius. SOC content was measured using dry combustion and SOC stocks were estimated using bulk density measurements. Regression Kriging was used to map the spatial variation of SOC stocks. The accuracy, fit and bias of SOC models was assessed using a rigorous validation assessment. This study produced the first comprehensive, geospatial SOC stock assessment in this

  15. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1 There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2 There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3 Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  16. A crustal model for the Venezuelan Andes using converted phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morandi, Maria T; Madrid, Juan

    1998-01-01

    The seismological network of the Venezuelan Andes consist of 10 permanent stations covering approximately 300 Km 2 along the Bocono fault. The Bocono fault is a section of the Bocono Moron El Pilar fault system in northern Venezuela, which is the main tectonic feature on the boundary of the Caribbean and the South American plates. In this work, are analyzed some of the earthquakes from the Bucaramanga Nest (in the northeastern part of Colombia) to obtain the thickness of the crust under the stations of the Venezuelan Andes seismological network. The identification of these and other phases consist of analyzing the total energy of the seismic signal (the energigrams) and the seismograms together. The results show a maximum crustal thickness of 62 km under the highest station (4.100 m) and a minimum thickness of 43 Km below one of the station nearest to the city of Merida

  17. Glacier shrinkage and water resources in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Bernard; Coudrain, Anne

    For more than a century glaciers around the world have been melting as air temperatures rise due to a combination of natural processes and human activity. The disappearance of these glaciers can have wide-ranging effects, such as the creation of new natural hazards or changes in stream flow that could threaten water suppliesSome of the most dramatic melting has occurred in the Andes mountain range in South America. To highlight the climatic and glacial change in the Andes and to encourage the scientific community to strengthen the glacier observation network that stretches from Colombia to the Patagonian ice fields, the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Naturales (INRENA), Perú, and the Institute of Research and Development (IRD), France, recently organized the second Symposium on Mass Balance of Andean Glaciers in Huaráz,Perú.

  18. Zeolitización de rocas andesíticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plana, F.

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of some andesites from King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Anctartica has pointed out the existence of a hydrothermal alteration process going rise to a zeolitic secondary minerals of low-temperature assemblages. Two paragenesis have been identified (Smectite-Bytownite-Mordenite, Smectite-Albite-Laumontite which reflecting different conditions durign the hydrothermal alteration of these andesitic rocksEl estudio de rocas andesíticas de la Isla King George (Archipiélago de las Shetland del Sur, Antártida pone de manifiesto la existencia de procesos de alteración hidrotermal con la formación de minerales zeolíticos secundarios pertenecientes a asociaciones de baja temperatura. Se han identificado dos paragénesis (Esmectitas-Bytownita-Mordenita, Esmectitas-AlbitaLaumontita que reflejan distintas condiciones durante la alteración hidrotermal de dichas rocas andesíticas.

  19. What controls millennial-scale denudation rates across the Central Andes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kober, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable planning of erosion control measures in the Central Andes requires robust knowledge about natural denudation rates. We explore a large dataset combining new and published 10Be (and 26Al) catchment-wide denudation rates from a swath at 17 to 19° S spanning the Western Cordillera that rises from sea level to 5500 m elevation; the Altiplano at ~4000 m; the Eastern Cordillera with elevations up to 6500 m; the Interandean Zone; the Subandean Zone; and the Chaco Plain at 300 m. The selected catchments span a large spread regarding morphometric and climate properties where mean slope angles range from 1 to 31°, and mean precipitation from 100 to 3900 mm/a. The denudation rates (0.0036 to 1.93 mm/a) are averaged over millennia, and reveal two to three magnitudes difference across the Central Andes. The regional distribution of denudation rates clearly demonstrates a more complex interaction of geomorphological, geological and meteorological parameters with the dominant geomorphological processes. In order to elucidate the key controls on denudation, we use multivariate statistics such as principal component analysis in order to remove potentially redundant predictors of denudation in the studied catchments. These predictors include catchment elevation, topographic relief, hillslope inclination, mean precipitation, tree cover, specific stream power, channel steepness indices, sinuosity, drainage density and hypsometric index that we derived from the SRTM 90 m Digital Elevation Database, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and the Terra MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields dataset. Additionally, the rock strength index (PLI) was estimated based on geological units. Preliminary results allow distinguishing five different longitudinal domains of denudation on the basis of climatic regime, hillslope steepness, and the degree of accumulated crustal deformation. We find that the pattern of 10Be catchment-wide denudation rates in the Central Andes

  20. Rain-fed agriculture thrived despite climate degradation in the pre-Hispanic arid Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Pablo; Winkel, Thierry; Ledru, Marie-Pierre; Bernard, Cyril; Egan, Nancy; Swingedouw, Didier; Joffre, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Archaeological research suggests significant human occupation in the arid Andean highlands during the 13th to 15th centuries, whereas paleoclimatic studies reveal prolonged drier and colder conditions during that period. Which subsistence strategy supported local societies in this harsh environment? Our field and aerial surveys of archaeological dwelling sites, granaries, and croplands provide the first evidence of extended pre-Hispanic agriculture supporting dense human populations in the arid Andes of Bolivia. This unique agricultural system associated with quinoa cultivation was unirrigated, consisting of simple yet extensive landscape modifications. It relied on highly specific environmental knowledge and a set of water-saving practices, including microterracing and biennial fallowing. This intense agricultural activity developed during a period of unfavorable climatic change on a regional and global scale, illustrative of efficient adaptive strategies to cope with this climatic change.

  1. Characteristic of Dystrustepts in the Venezuelan Andes Características dos Dystrustepts nos Andes Venezuelanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Ochoa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority (60 % of the soils in the Venezuelan Andes are Inceptisols, a large percentage of which are classified as Dystrustepts by the US Soil Taxonomy, Second Edition of 1999. Some of these soils were classified as Humitropepts (high organic - C-OC-soils and Dystropepts by the Soil Taxonomy prior to 1999, but no equivalent large group was created for high-OC soils in the new Ustepts suborder. Dystrusepts developed on different materials, relief and vegetation. Their properties are closely related with the parent material. Soils developed on transported deposits or sediments have darker and thicker A horizons, a slightly acid reaction, greater CEC and OC contents than upland slope soils. Based on the previous classification into large groups (Humitropepts and Dystropepts we found that: Humitropepts have a slightly less acid and higher values of CEC than Dystropepts. These properties or characteristics seem to be related to the fact that Humitropepts have a higher clay and OC content than the Dystropepts. Canonical discrimination analysis showed that the variables that discriminate the two great soil groups from each other are OC and silt. Data for Humitropepts are grouped around the OC vector (defining axis 3, principal component analysis, while Dystropepts are associated with the clay and sand vectors, with significant correlation. Given the importance of OC for soil properties, we propose the creation of a new large group named Humustepts for the order Inceptisol, suborder Ustepts.Boa parte dos solos dos Andes Venezuelanos (60 % é classificada como "Inceptisol", e uma grande percentagem deles é Dystrustepts nas versões do Soil Taxonomy. Outros foram classificados como Humitropepts - solos com altos teores de C de compostos orgânicos (CO. Os Dystrustepts desenvolvem-se sobre diferentes materiais, relevo e vegetação. Suas características têm estreita relação com o tipo de material de origem. Os Dystrustepts desenvolvidos sobre

  2. Ancient DNA reveals temporal population structure within the South-Central Andes area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, M Gabriela; Mendisco, Fanny; Avena, Sergio A; Crespo, Cristian M; Arencibia, Valeria; Dejean, Cristina B; Seldes, Verónica

    2018-04-01

    The main aim of this work was to contribute to the knowledge of pre-Hispanic genetic variation and population structure among the South-central Andes Area by studying individuals from Quebrada de Humahuaca, North-western (NW) Argentina. We analyzed 15 autosomal STRs in 19 individuals from several archaeological sites in Quebrada de Humahuaca, belonging to the Regional Developments Period (900-1430 AD). Compiling autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosome data, we evaluated population structure and differentiation among eight South-central Andean groups from the current territories of NW Argentina and Peru. Autosomal data revealed a structuring of the analyzed populations into two clusters which seemed to represent different temporalities in the Andean pre-Hispanic history: pre-Inca and Inca. All pre-Inca samples fell into the same cluster despite being from the two different territories of NW Argentina and Peru. Also, they were systematically differentiated from the Peruvian Inca group. These results were mostly confirmed by mitochondrial and Y-chromosome analyses. We mainly found a clearly different haplotype composition between clusters. Population structure in South America has been mostly studied on current native groups, mainly showing a west-to-east differentiation between the Andean and lowland regions. Here we demonstrated that genetic population differentiation preceded the European contact and might have been more complex than thought, being found within the South-central Andes Area. Moreover, divergence among temporally different populations might be reflecting socio-political changes occurred in the evermore complex pre-Hispanic Andean societies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. SRTM Colored Height and Shaded Relief: Laguna Mellquina, Andes Mountains, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This depiction of an area south of San Martin de Los Andes, Argentina, is the first Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) view of the Andes Mountains, the tallest mountain chain in the western hemisphere. This particular site does not include the higher Andes peaks, but it does include steep-sided valleys and other distinctive landforms carved by Pleistocene glaciers. Elevations here range from about 700 to 2,440 meters(2,300 to 8,000 feet). This region is very active tectonically and volcanically, and the landforms provide a record of the changes that have occurred over many thousands of years. Large lakes fill the broad mountain valleys, and the spectacular scenery here makes this area a popular resort destination for Argentinians.Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark, as would be the case at noon at this latitude in the southern hemisphere. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to white at the highest elevations.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U

  4. Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, Alexander; Muenchow, Jannes

    2016-04-01

    Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador A. Brenning (1), J. Muenchow (1) (1) Department of Geography, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany Mountain roads are affected by and also affect themselves landslide suceptibility. Especially in developing countries, inadequate drainage systems and mechanical destabilization of hillslopes by undercutting and overloading are known processes through which road construction and maintenance can enhance landslide activity within the immediate surroundings of road infrastructure. In the Andes of southern Ecuador, strong precipitation gradients as well as lithological differences provide an excellent study site in which the relationship between highways and landslide susceptibility and its regional differentiation can be studied. This study uses Generalized Additive Models (GAM) to investigate patterns of landslide susceptibility along two paved interurban highways in the tropical Andes of southern Ecuador. The relationship of landslides to distance from road is modeled while accounting for topographic, climatic and lithological predictors as possible confounders and modifiers, focusing on the odds ratio of landslide occurrence at 25 m versus 200 m distance from the highway. Spatial attention is given to uncertainties in estimated odds ratios of landslide occurrence using spatial block bootstrap techniques. The GAM is able to represent nonlinear additive terms as well as bivariate smooth interaction terms, providing a good tradeoff between model complexity and interpretability. The estimated odds of landslide occurrence were 18-21 times higher near the highway than at 200 m distance, based on different analyses, with lower 95% confidence limits always >13. (Semi-) parametric estimates confirmed this general range of values but suggests slightly higher odds ratios (95% confidence interval: 15.5-25.3). Highway-related effects were observed to

  5. Steady-state exhumation pattern in the central Andes SE Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz, G.M.H.; Carlotto, V.; van Heiningen, P.S.; Andriessen, P.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Western Cordillera of SE Peru is part of the Central Andes and is situated to the west of the Eastern Andes from which it is separated by the northern termination of the Altiplano - the Inter-Andean Valley. It is a volcanic-volcano-detrital chain that developed in the Palaeogene, and is

  6. Calcite Twin Analysis in the Central Andes of Northern Argentina and Southern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, E.; Hindle, D.

    2005-12-01

    The use of calcite twinning to infer compression directions and strain axes patterns has been applied widely in both fold and thrust belts, and continental interiors. Calcite twinning is noted to be one of the most precise methods for determining the internal strain of deformed rocks. Until now, such data from the deformed plate boundary of the Central Andes were lacking. This study has examined twinning orientations along the deformed Andean foreland (southern Bolivia and northern Argentina) from -25 to -20 latitude. In the Central Andes, we find an abundance of calcite twins in intervals of the Cretaceous age Yacorite limestone. Twin samples were collected, measured for orientation and type (I and II can be best used for strain analysis), and processed using the Groshong method, to give resultant strain tensors. The orientations of the twin short axes trend mostly NE-SW, which is close to the plate convergence direction. However, in a limited number of samples from the north, adjacent to the southern culmination of the active Subandean fold thrust belt, they trend NW-SE. This difference may be related to the more active, or more recent, shortening of the southern portion of the Eastern Cordillera, south of the culmination of the Subandean belt. This implies that twin short axes vary consistently with respect to geographic location and local tectonic regime. NW-SE trends in the northern region match well with fault kinematic studies in rocks pre-dating the San Juan del Oro unconformity (9-10 Ma). NE-SW trends in the south could correspond to much younger (~1-3 Ma) fault kinematic trends. In the Eastern Cordillera, where there is present day tectonic activity, the plunges of the twin short axes are found to be almost horizontal. This suggests that the twins were formed after folding occurred.

  7. Reasons for an outstanding plant diversity in the tropical Andes of Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term field studies in the scope of a multidisciplinary project in southern Ecuador revealed extraordinary high species numbers of many organismic groups. This article discusses reasons for the outstanding vascular plant diversity using a hierarchical scale-oriented top-down approach (Grüninger 2005, from the global scale to the local microscale. The global scale explains general (paleo- ecological factors valid for most parts of the humid tropics, addressing various hypotheses and theories, such as the “greater effective evolutionary time”, constant input of “accidentals”, the “seasonal variability hypothesis”, the “intermediate disturbance hypothesis”, and the impact of soil fertility. The macroscale focuses on the Andes in northwestern South America. The tropical Andes are characterised by many taxa of restricted range which is particularly true for the Amotape-Huancabamba region, i.e. the so called Andean Depression, which is effective as discrete phytogeographic transition as well as barrier zone. Interdigitation of northern and southern flora elements, habitat fragmentation, geological and landscape history, and a high speciation rate due to rapid genetic radiation of some taxa contribute to a high degree of diversification. The mesoscale deals with the special environmental features of the eastern mountain range, the Cordillera Real and surrounding areas in southern Ecuador. Various climatic characteristics, the orographic heterogeneity, the geologic and edaphic conditions as well as human impact are the most prominent factors augmenting plant species diversity. On microscale, prevailing regimes of disturbance and environmental stresses, the orographic basement, as well as the general role on the various mountain chains are considered. Here, micro-habitats e.g. niches for epiphytes, effects of micro-relief patterns, and successions after small-sized disturbance events are screened. Direct effects of human impact are

  8. Eccentricity-driven fluvial fill terrace formation in the southern-central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofelde, Stefanie; Savi, Sara; Wickert, Andrew D.; Wittmann, Hella; Alonso, Ricardo; Strecker, Manfred R.; Schildgen, Taylor F.

    2016-04-01

    Across the world, fill-terrace formation in glaciated catchments has been linked to variable sediment production and river discharge over glacial-interglacial cycles. Little is known, however, how variability in global climate may have affected rainfall patterns and associated surface-processes on multi-millennial timescales in regions far from major glaciers and ice sheets, and how those changes might be reflected in the landscape. Here, we investigate the timing of fluvial fill terrace planation and abandonment in the Quebrada del Toro, an intermontane basin located in the Eastern Cordillera of the southern-central Andes of NW Argentina. Fluvial fills in the valley reach more than 150 m above the current river level. Sculpted into the fills, we observe at least 5 terrace levels with pronounced differences in their extent and preservation. We sampled four TCN (in situ 10Be) depth profiles to date the abandonment of the most extensive terrace surfaces in locations, where subsequent overprint by erosion and deposition was not pronounced. We interpret unexpectedly low 10Be concentrations at shallow depths and surface samples to be related to aeolian input, causing surface inflation. Correcting the depth profiles for inflation results in a reduction of the terrace surface ages by up to 70 ka. The inflation-corrected ages fall within the late Pleistocene (~140 - 370 ka) and suggest a potential link to orbital eccentricity (~100 ka) cycles. The studied fills in the Toro Basin document successive episodes of incision, punctuated by periods of lateral planation and possible partial re-filling. We propose climate cycles as a potentially-dominant factor in forming these terraces. To our knowledge, none of the previously studied fluvial terraces in the Andes date back more than 2 glacial cycles, thus making the Quebrada del Toro an important archive of paleoenvironmental conditions over longer timescales.

  9. Estimation de l'aléa sismique dans les Andes nord équatoriennes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1996-01-01

    ón sismotectónica potencial entre las fallas activas y los eventos sísmicos históricos e instrumentales. Además, para cada fuente sismogenética, se proporcionan sus parámetros geométricos y dinámicos. Los dos sistemas constituyendo la amenaza sísmica mayor son la zona de subducción superficial para la costa y el sistema mayor transpresivo dextral para la cordillera (fallas dextrales del Río Chingual-La Sofia y de Pallatanga. El estudio de los mecanismos focales superficiales de esta región nos permitió calcular una velocidad de acortamiento cortical de 4.6 mm/a según un rumbo N92°E y apreciar tiempos de recurrencia y frequencias de retorno. Un evento de Mw = 5 pudiera producirse cada 0.5 año, de Mw = 6 cada 4.5 años, de Mw = 7 cada 45.4 años o 66, 7.3 y 0.73 eventos de magnitud superior o igual a 5, 6 y 7, por un período de tiempo de 33 años. Por fin, para cada fuente sismogénica, hemos calculado su magnitud máxima probable y el tiempo de recurrencia asociado. La falla transcurrente dextrale del Río Chingual-La Sofia en el norte de la cordillera oriental puede producir un sismo máximo probable de magnitud 7 a 7.5 con un retorno de 400±440 años y la falla dextrale de Pallatanga en el Sur de la cordillera occidental, un sismo máximo probable de 6.7 a 7.2 con un retorno de 380±320 años. En el callejón interandino la falla de Quito puede producir un sismo máximo probable de magnitud 6.6 a 7.6 con un retorno de 930±300 años. SEISMIC HAZARD IN THE ECUADORIAN ANDES. Nothern Ecuadorian Andes are an important seismogenic zone with several destructive events. In order to address the seismic hazard in the Ecuadorian Andes, we have performed a critical reappraisal of both the historical seismicity and active faults of Ecuador. This study shows that the two most important hazard sources are the shallow subduction zone and the major transpressive Ecuadorian fault system, for the coastal lowlands and the Andean region respectively. A study of shallow focal

  10. The Loma Seca tuff and the Calabozos caldera: a major ash-flow and caldera complex in the southern Andes of central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, W.; Grunder, A.L.; Drake, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    A composite ring-structure caldera of Late Pleistocene age, 26 X 14km in size, has been discovered and mapped near the Andean crest in central Chile (35o 30'S). Rhyolitic to dacitic zoned ashflow sheets, each representing 150-300 km3 of magma, were erupted 0.8, 0.3 and 0.15 m.y. ago; the youngest of the associated collapses was closely followed by resurgent doming of the caldera floor and the development of a longitudinal graben. Post-caldera eruption of dacite and andesite have persisted into Holocene time and active hot springs are abundant along caldera-marginal and resurgent fault systems, suggesting a significant geothermal energy resource. The ash-flow magmatism has been no less important in this segment of the glaciated S Andes than in the arid central Andes and may well be accounted for by the existence of thicker crust in both regions.- L.H.

  11. On the Nature of Severe Orographic Thunderstorms near the Andes in Subtropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kristen Lani Emi

    Identifying common features and differences between the mechanisms producing extreme convection near major mountain ranges of the world is an essential step toward a general understanding of orographic precipitation on a global scale. The overarching objective of this dissertation is to understand and examine orographic convective processes in general, while specifically focusing on systems in the lee of the Andes Mountains. Diagnosing the key ingredients necessary for generating high impact weather near extreme topography is crucial to our understanding of orographic precipitating systems. An investigation of the most intense storms in 11 years of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data has shown a tendency for squall lines to initiate and develop east of the Andes with a mesoscale organization similar to storms in the U.S. Great Plains (Rasmussen and Houze 2011). In subtropical South America, however, the topographical influence on the convective initiation and maintenance of the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) is unique. The Andes and other mountainous terrain of Argentina focus deep convective initiation in the foothills of western Argentina (Romatschke and Houze 2010; Rasmussen and Houze 2011). Subsequent to initiation, the convection often evolves into propagating MCSs similar to those seen over the U.S. Great Plains sometimes producing damaging tornadoes, hail and floods across a wide agricultural region (Rasmussen and Houze 2011; Rasmussen et al. 2014b). The TRMM satellite was designed to determine the spatial and temporal variation of tropical and subtropical rainfall amounts and storm structures around the globe with the goal of understanding the factors controlling the precipitation. However, the TRMM PR algorithm significantly underestimates surface rainfall in deep convection over land (Nesbitt et al. 2004; Iguchi et al. 2009; Kozu et al. 2009). When the algorithm rates are compared to a range of conventional Z-R relations, the rain bias tends to be

  12. Linchamientos y conflicto político en Los Andes Lynchings and Political conflict in The Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos M. Vilas

    2007-01-01

    En 2004, los alcaldes de dos municipalidades de la región aimara de los Andes fueron linchados en la aparente culminación de agudos conflictos políticos internos y entre las respectivas comunidades y el Estado central. En este artículo se discuten ambos casos con el fin de ilustrar las transformaciones experimentadas en años recientes en la organización y la dinámica interna de las comunidades andinas, y de la articulación conflictiva de la política local en los procesos e instituciones de má...

  13. Tectonic control of erosion in the southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val, Pedro; Venerdini, Agostina L.; Ouimet, William; Alvarado, Patricia; Hoke, Gregory D.

    2018-01-01

    Landscape evolution modeling and global compilations of exhumation data indicate that a wetter climate, mainly through orographic rainfall, can govern the spatial distribution of erosion rates and crustal strain across an orogenic wedge. However, detecting this link is not straightforward since these relationships can be modulated by tectonic forcing and/or obscured by heavy-tailed frequencies of catchment discharge. This study combines new and published along-strike average rates of catchment erosion constrained by 10Be and river-gauge data in the Central Andes between 28°S and 36°S. These data reveal a nearly identical latitudinal pattern in erosion rates on both sides of the range, reaching a maximum of 0.27 mm/a near 34°S. Collectively, data on topographic and fluvial relief, variability of rainfall and discharge, and crustal seismicity suggest that the along-strike pattern of erosion rates in the southern Central Andes is largely independent of climate, but closely relates to the N-S distribution of shallow crustal seismicity and diachronous surface uplift. The consistently high erosion rates on either side of the orogen near 34°S imply that climate plays a secondary role in the mass flux through an orogenic wedge where the perturbation to base level is similar on both sides.

  14. The Influence of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (mjo) on Extreme Rainfall Over the Central and Southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidinger, H.; Jones, C.; Carvalho, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme rainfall is important for the Andean region because of the large contribution of these events to the seasonal totals and consequent impacts on water resources for agriculture, water consumption, industry and hydropower generation, as well as the occurrence of floods and landslides. Over Central and Southern Peruvian Andes (CSPA), rainfall exceeding the 90th percentile contributed between 44 to 100% to the total Nov-Mar 1979-2010 rainfall. Additionally, precipitation from a large majority of stations in the CSPA exhibits statistically significant spectral peaks on intraseasonal time-scales (20 to 70 days). The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the most important intraseasonal mode of atmospheric circulation and moist convection in the tropics and the occurrence of extreme weather events worldwide. Mechanisms explaining the relationships between the MJO and precipitation in the Peruvian Andes have not been properly described yet. The present study examines the relationships between the activity and phases of the MJO and the occurrence of extreme rainfall over the CSPA. We found that the frequency of extreme rainfall events increase in the CSPA when the MJO is active. MJO phases 5, 6 and 7 contribute to the overall occurrence of extreme rainfall events over the CSPA. However, how the MJO phases modulate extreme rainfall depends on the location of the stations. For instance, extreme precipitation (above the 90th percentile) in stations in the Amazon basin are slightly more sensitive to phases 2, 3 and 4; the frequency of extremes in stations in the Pacific basin increases in phases 5, 6 and 7 whereas phase 2, 3 and 7 modulates extreme precipitation in stations in the Titicaca basin. Greater variability among stations is observed when using the 95th and 99th percentiles to identify extremes. Among the main mechanisms that explain the increase in extreme rainfall events in the Peruvian Andes is the intensification of the easterly moisture flux anomalies, which

  15. Potato-associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senés-Guerrero, Carolina; Torres-Cortés, Gloria; Pfeiffer, Stefan; Rojas, Mercy; Schüßler, Arthur

    2014-08-01

    The world's fourth largest food crop, potato, originates in the Andes. Here, the community composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with potato in Andean ecosystems is described for the first time. AMF were studied in potato roots and rhizosphere soil at four different altitudes from 2,658 to 4,075 m above mean sea level (mamsl) and in three plant growth stages (emergence, flowering, and senescence). AMF species were distinguished by sequencing an approx. 1,500 bp nuclear rDNA region. Twenty species of AMF were identified, of which 12 came from potato roots and 15 from rhizosphere soil. Seven species were found in both roots and soil. Interestingly, altitude affected species composition with the highest altitude exhibiting the greatest species diversity. The three most common colonizers of potato roots detected were Funneliformis mosseae, an unknown Claroideoglomus sp., and Rhizophagus irregularis. Notably, the potato-associated AMF diversity observed in this Andean region is much higher than that reported for potato in other ecosystems. Potato plants were colonized by diverse species from 8 of the 11 Glomeromycota families. Identification of the AMF species is important for their potential use in sustainable management practices to improve potato production in the Andean region.

  16. Methane fluxes from a wet puna ecosystem in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Diem, Torsten; Priscila Huaraca Quispe, Lidia; Quispe Ccahuana, Adan Julian; Meir, Patrick; Arn Teh, Yit

    2014-05-01

    Discrepancies exist between top-down and bottom-up estimates of the tropical South American atmospheric methane budget. This suggests that current source-sink inventories fail to adequately characterise the landscapes of the region. This may be particularly true of Andean environments where very few field observations have been made. The high tropical Andes, between tree and permanent snow-lines, is home to diverse grass, shrub and giant rosette dominated ecosystems known variously from Venezuela to northern Chile and Argentina as paramo, jalca and puna. In humid regions these are characterised by wet, organic-rich mineral soils, peat-forming wetlands and shallow lakes. Such conditions are likely to promote methane production and potentially represent a regionally significant source to the atmosphere that should be considered. We report on methane fluxes from a bunch-grass dominated puna habitat at 3500 m above sea level in south-eastern Peru. Mean annual temperature and precipitation are 11 °C and 2500 mm, respectively. Temperature is aseasonal but experiences considerable diurnal variations with overnight frosting common-place. In contrast, rainfall is intensely episodic and has a pronounced wet season between September and March. Sampling encompassed a range of topographic features, such as grassland on freely draining, gently inclined or steep slopes and depressions containing bogs, over a 3 ha ridge to basin transition. Monthly sampling was carried out between January 2011 and June 2013 to investigate seasonal variability in methane fluxes. Intensive sampling campaigns were conducted to investigate spatial and short-term variations on a daily basis in two nine-day campaigns during wet and dry season. The site was a net source of methane to the atmosphere during the period of study. Methane fluxes were dominated by emissions from bogs, whereas, freely draining grassland exhibited weak source or marginal sink activity. Temporal variations were most notable at

  17. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Region (Region) in South Dakota, which is an ecological treasure of biological importance for wildlife... 1974 to protect an area hugging the eastern bank of the Missouri River in Gregory County, South Dakota... anchor riverine banks in attempts to safeguard important bald eagle roosting sites. The draft Plan and...

  18. Les effets de l’émigration paysanne dans les Andes équatoriennes : une lecture photographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Rebaï

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dans les Andes équatoriennes, les effets de l’émigration paysanne sont partout visibles. Si dans la province de l’Azuay, on assiste à la diminution des superficies cultivées et à la réorganisation des tâches agricoles, on observe par ailleurs l’émergence d’une agriculture commerciale orientée vers le marché urbain régional. En procédant à la description de photographies prises à la campagne comme à la ville, nous chercherons à expliquer l’ensemble de ces mutations, avant de nous interroger plus largement sur l’avenir des exploitations familiales dans cette région.En los Andes ecuatorianos, los efectos de la migración campesina son visibles por todas partes. Si en la provincia del Azuay, se asiste a la disminución de las superficies cultivadas y a la reorganización de las tareas agrícolas, observamos por otro lado la emergencia de una agricultura comercial orientada hacia el mercado urbano regional. Procediendo a la descripción de fotografías tomadas en la campo como en la ciudad, procuraremos explicar el conjunto de estas mutaciones, antes de preguntarnos más ampliamente sobre el futuro de las explotaciones familiares en esta región.

  19. Monogenetic Arc Volcanism in the Central Andes: The "Hidden" Mafic Component in the Land of Andesite and Ignimbrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Alderwerelt, B. M.; Ukstins Peate, I.; Ramos, F. C.

    2016-12-01

    Faulting in the upper crust of the Central Andes has provided passage for small volumes of mafic magma to reach the surface, providing a window into petrogenetic processes in the region's deep crust and upper mantle. Mafic lavas are rare in the Central Andean region dominated by intermediate-composition arc volcanism and massive sheets of silicic ignimbrite, and provide key data on magmatic origin, evolution, and transport. This work characterizes fault-controlled, within-arc monogenetic eruptive centers representative of the most mafic volcanism in the Altiplano-Puna region of the Andes since (at least) the Mesozoic. Olivine-phyric basaltic andesite (54 wt% SiO2, 7.3 wt% MgO) at Cerro Overo maar and associated dome, La Albóndiga Grande, and an olivine-clinopyroxene flow (53 wt% SiO2, 6.7 wt% MgO) from Cordón de Puntas Negras have been erupted at the intersection of regional structural features and the modern volcanic arc. Bulk magma chemistry, radiogenic isotopes, and microanalyses of mineral and melt inclusion composition provide insight on the composition(s) of mafic magmas being delivered to the lowermost crust and the deep crustal processes which shape central Andean magma. Bulk major and trace elements follow regional arc differentiation trends and are clearly modified by crustal magmatic processes. In contrast, microanalyses reveal a much richer history with olivine-hosted melt inclusions recording multiple distinct magmas, including potential primary melts. Single crystal olivine 87Sr/86Sr from Cerro Overo (0.7041-0.7071) define a broader range than whole rock (0.7062-0.7065), indicating preservation of juvenile melt in olivine-hosted inclusions lost at the whole rock scale. Mineral chemistry (via EMPA) P-T calculations define a petrogenetic history for these endmember lavas. Field mapping, bulk chemistry, and microanalyses outline the generation, storage, transportation, and eventual eruption of the "hidden" mafic component of the Andean arc.

  20. New highland distribution records of multiple Anopheles species in the Ecuadorian Andes

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    Hunter Fiona F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent climate change reviews have stressed the possibility of some malaria vectors occupying regions of higher altitudes than previously recorded. Indeed, highland malaria has been observed in several African nations, possibly attributable to changes in land use, vector control and local climate. This study attempts to expand the current knowledge of the distribution of common Anopheles species in Ecuador, with particular attention to highland regions (> 500 m of the Andes. Methods Extensive field collections of larvae were undertaken in 2008, 2009 and 2010 throughout all regions of Ecuador (except the lower-altitude Amazonian plain and compared to historical distribution maps reproduced from the 1940s. Larvae were identified using both a morphological key and sequencing of the 800 bp region of the CO1 mitochondrial gene. In addition, spatial statistics (Getis-Ord Hotspot Analysis: Gi* were used to determine high and low-density clusters of each species in Ecuador. Results Distributions have been updated for five species of Anopheles in Ecuador: Anopheles albimanus, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, Anopheles punctimacula, Anopheles eiseni and Anopheles oswaldoi s.l.. Historical maps indicate that An. pseudopunctipennis used to be widespread in highland Andean valleys, while other species were completely restricted to lowland areas. By comparison, updated maps for the other four collected species show higher maximum elevations and/or more widespread distributions in highland regions than previously recorded. Gi* analysis determined some highland hot spots for An. albimanus, but only cold spots for all other species. Conclusions This study documents the establishment of multiple anopheline species in high altitude regions of Ecuador, often in areas where malaria eradication programs are not focused.

  1. Population genetic structure of traditional populations in the Peruvian Central Andes and implications for South American population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Graciela S; Lewis, Cecil M; Tito, Raúl Y; Covey, R Alan; Cáceres, Angela M; Cruz, Augusto F De La; Durand, Diana; Housman, Genevieve; Hulsey, Brannon I; Iannacone, Gian Carlo; López, Paul W; Martínez, Rolando; Medina, Ángel; Dávila, Olimpio Ortega; Pinto, Karla Paloma Osorio; Santillán, Susan I Polo; Domínguez, Percy Rojas; Rubel, Meagan; Smith, Heather F; Smith, Silvia E; Massa, Verónica Rubín de Celis; Lizárraga, Beatriz; Stone, Anne C

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-based characterizations of Andean peoples are traditionally conducted in the service of elucidating continent-level evolutionary processes in South America. Consequently, genetic variation among "western" Andean populations is often represented in relation to variation among "eastern" Amazon and Orinoco River Basin populations. This west-east contrast in patterns of population genetic variation is typically attributed to large-scale phenomena, such as dual founder colonization events or differing long-term microevolutionary histories. However, alternative explanations that consider the nature and causes of population genetic diversity within the Andean region remain underexplored. Here we examine population genetic diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes using data from the mtDNA first hypervariable region and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats among 17 newly sampled populations and 15 published samples. Using this geographically comprehensive data set, we first reassessed the currently accepted pattern of western versus eastern population genetic structure, which our results ultimately reject: mtDNA population diversities were lower, rather than higher, within Andean versus eastern populations, and only highland Y-chromosomes exhibited significantly higher within-population diversities compared with eastern groups. Multiple populations, including several highland samples, exhibited low genetic diversities for both genetic systems. Second, we explored whether the implementation of Inca state and Spanish colonial policies starting at about ad 1400 could have substantially restructured population genetic variation and consequently constitute a primary explanation for the extant pattern of population diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes. Our results suggest that Peruvian Central Andean population structure cannot be parsimoniously explained as the sole outcome of combined Inca and Spanish policies on the region's population demography: highland populations

  2. Millennial-scale climate variability during the Last Glacial period in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, S. C.; Baker, P. A.; Ekdahl, E.; Seltzer, G. O.; Stevens, L. R.

    2010-04-01

    Millennial-scale climate variation during the Last Glacial period is evident in many locations worldwide, but it is unclear if such variation occurred in the interior of tropical South America, and, if so, how the low-latitude variation was related to its high-latitude counterpart. A high-resolution record, derived from the deep drilling of sediments on the floor of Lake Titicaca in the southern tropical Andes, is presented that shows clear evidence of millennial-scale climate variation between ˜60 and 20 ka BP. This variation is manifested by alternations of two interbedded sedimentary units. The two units have distinctive sedimentary, geochemical, and paleobiotic properties that are controlled by the relative abundance of terrigenous or nearshore components versus pelagic components. The sediments of more terrigenous or nearshore nature likely were deposited during regionally wetter climates when river transport of water and sediment was higher, whereas the sediments of more pelagic character were deposited during somewhat drier climates regionally. The majority of the wet periods inferred from the Lake Titicaca sediment record are correlated with the cold events in the Greenland ice cores and North Atlantic sediment cores, indicating that increased intensity of the South American summer monsoon was part of near-global scale climate excursions.

  3. A satellite geodetic survey of large-scale deformation of volcanic centres in the central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Matthew E; Simons, Mark

    2002-07-11

    Surface deformation in volcanic areas usually indicates movement of magma or hydrothermal fluids at depth. Stratovolcanoes tend to exhibit a complex relationship between deformation and eruptive behaviour. The characteristically long time spans between such eruptions requires a long time series of observations to determine whether deformation without an eruption is common at a given edifice. Such studies, however, are logistically difficult to carry out in most volcanic arcs, as these tend to be remote regions with large numbers of volcanoes (hundreds to even thousands). Here we present a satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey of the remote central Andes volcanic arc, a region formed by subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate beneath continental South America. Spanning the years 1992 to 2000, our survey reveals the background level of activity of about 900 volcanoes, 50 of which have been classified as potentially active. We find four centres of broad (tens of kilometres wide), roughly axisymmetric surface deformation. None of these centres are at volcanoes currently classified as potentially active, although two lie within about 10 km of volcanoes with known activity. Source depths inferred from the patterns of deformation lie between 5 and 17 km. In contrast to the four new sources found, we do not observe any deformation associated with recent eruptions of Lascar, Chile.

  4. River-discharge variability and trends in southeastern Central Andes since 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, Fabiana; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2017-04-01

    The southern Central Andes in NW Argentina comprise small to medium drainage basins (102-104 km2) particularly sensitive to climate variability. In this area and in contrast to larger drainage basins such as the Amazon or La Plata rivers, floodplains or groundwater reservoirs either do not exist or are small. This reduces their dampening effect on discharge variability. Previous studies highlighted a rapid discharge increase up to 40% in seven years in the southern Central Andes during the 1970s, inferred to have been associated with the global 1976-77 climate shift. To better understand the processes that drive variations in river discharge in this region, we analyze discharge variability on different timescales, relying on four time series of monthly discharge between 1940 and 2015. Since river discharge in this complex mountain environment results in a pronounced non-stationary and non-linear character, we apply the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to evaluate non-stationary oscillatory modes of variability and trends. An Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) analysis revealed that discharge variability in this region can be decomposed in four quasi-periodic, statistically significant oscillatory modes, associated with timescales varying from 1 to ˜20y. In addition, statistically significant long-term trends show increasing discharge during the period between 1940 and 2015, documenting an intensification of the hydrological cycle during this period. Furthermore, time-dependent intrinsic correlation (TDIC) analysis shows that discharge variability is most likely linked to the phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) at multi-decadal timescales (˜20y) and, to a lesser degree, to the Tropical South Atlantic SST anomaly (TSA) variability at shorter timescales (˜2-5y). Finally, our results suggest that the rapid discharge increased occurred during the 1970s coincides with the periodic enhancement of discharge mainly linked to the rise of the PDO

  5. Carbon accumulation in high-altitude peatlands of the Central Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanos, Romina; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Huaman, Yizet; Espinoza, Raul; Apaestegui, James; Turcq, Bruno; Willems, Bram

    2017-04-01

    Despite covering only 6 - 8% of the world's land surface, peatlands contain around one third of the global organic soil carbon (C) and are an important component of the global C cycle. Most studies of peatland C dynamics have been carried out on boreal and subarctic peatlands, but less is known about peatlands at lower latitudes, yet there are significant peatland C stocks in these regions that may be more vulnerable to future climate change because they are closer to the climatic limit of peatland distribution. In South America, peatlands in high altitudes called "bofedales" represent one of the most important water resources and also provide key environmental services that support both Andean mountain biodiversity and the wellbeing of human populations. Nowdays, the need for conservation and wise use of these ecosystems is increasingly being recognized. So, a useable assessment of peatlands in the global C cycle requires accurate estimates of carbon pools and fluxes. In order to understand the impact of different altitudes on the growth, production and carbon accumulation, several short (about 30 cm) peatlands cores were collected in the headwater of the Cachi river basin, in the Central Andes of Peru. Two Distichia muscoides cushion plant-dominated "bofedales" which elevations exceed 4000 m were studied. The sedimentation rates, based on radiocarbon dating of peat samples from the two sites studied, were very variable. Cores from the bofedal located at 4200 m present an age of approximately 55 years, while the site at the highest altitude site has an age of approximately about 450 years. Our results point out very different rates of sedimentation in the two peatlands that may be related to the climatic changes observed during the recent past, with a direct consequence on the carbon accumulation rates. In the determination of the annual growth, we observed that this one presented smaller values in the first centimeters of the peatland with lower elevation, while

  6. Classification of debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Jason R.; Bellisario, Antonio C.; Ferrando, Francisco A.

    2015-07-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from true glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. Internal ice is preserved by an insulating cover of thick debris, which acts as a storage reservoir to release water during the summer and early fall. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the central Andes; however, the existing legislation only recognizes uncovered or semicovered glaciers as a water resource. Glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being altered or removed by mining operations to extract valuable minerals from the mountains. In addition, agricultural expansion and population growth in this region have placed additional demands on water resources. In a warmer climate, as glaciers recede and seasonal water availability becomes condensed over the course of a snowmelt season, rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers contribute a larger component of base flow to rivers and streams. As a result, identifying and locating these features to implement sustainable regional planning for water resources is important. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on the interpretation of satellite imagery and aerial photographs. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris-covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (class 1) and fully covered (class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. Based on field observations, the amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced

  7. Adaptive institutions? Peasant institutions and natural models facing climatic and economic changes in the Colombian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feola, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    In the Colombian Andes, peasants have co-evolved with their environment for centuries, but it is uncertain whether traditional informal institutions and natural models are adapting to current and possibly unprecedented economic and climatic disturbances. This study investigated institutional

  8. A new species of Trechisibus from Peruvian Andes (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Trechinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Delgado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the new species Trechisibus (s. str. delestali sp. n., is described from the southern Peruvian Andes. The morphological differences with the geographically closest species of the subgenus are also presented and discussed.

  9. Scale of human mobility in the southern Andes (Argentina and Chile): A new framework based on strontium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberena, Ramiro; Durán, Víctor A; Novellino, Paula; Winocur, Diego; Benítez, Anahí; Tessone, Augusto; Quiroga, María N; Marsh, Erik J; Gasco, Alejandra; Cortegoso, Valeria; Lucero, Gustavo; Llano, Carina; Knudson, Kelly J

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this article is to assess the scale of human paleomobility and ecological complementarity between the lowlands and highlands in the southern Andes during the last 2,300 years. By providing isotope results for human bone and teeth samples, we assess a hypothesis of "high residential mobility" suggested on the basis of oxygen isotopes from human remains. We develop an isotopic assessment of human mobility in a mountain landscape combining strontium and oxygen isotopes. We analyze bone and teeth samples as an approach to life-history changes in spatial residence. Human samples from the main geological units and periods within the last two millennia are selected. We present a framework for the analysis of bioavailable strontium based on the combination of the geological data with isotope results for rodent samples. The 87 Sr/ 86 Sr values from human samples indicate residential stability within geological regions along life history. When comparing strontium and oxygen values for the same human samples, we record a divergent pattern: while δ 18 O values for samples from distant regions overlap widely, there are important differences in 87 Sr/ 86 Sr values. Despite the large socio-economic changes recorded, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr values indicate a persisting scenario of low systematic mobility between the different geological regions. Our results suggest that strontium isotope values provide the most germane means to track patterns of human occupation of distinct regions in complex geological landscapes, offering a much higher spatial resolution than oxygen isotopes in the southern Andes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. ANDES: Statistical tools for the ANalyses of DEep Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denison Mark R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advancements in DNA sequencing technologies have allowed researchers to progress from the analyses of a single organism towards the deep sequencing of a sample of organisms. With sufficient sequencing depth, it is now possible to detect subtle variations between members of the same species, or between mixed species with shared biomarkers, such as the 16S rRNA gene. However, traditional sequencing analyses of samples from largely homogeneous populations are often still based on multiple sequence alignments (MSA, where each sequence is placed along a separate row and similarities between aligned bases can be followed down each column. While this visual format is intuitive for a small set of aligned sequences, the representation quickly becomes cumbersome as sequencing depths cover loci hundreds or thousands of reads deep. Findings We have developed ANDES, a software library and a suite of applications, written in Perl and R, for the statistical ANalyses of DEep Sequencing. The fundamental data structure underlying ANDES is the position profile, which contains the nucleotide distributions for each genomic position resultant from a multiple sequence alignment (MSA. Tools include the root mean square deviation (RMSD plot, which allows for the visual comparison of multiple samples on a position-by-position basis, and the computation of base conversion frequencies (transition/transversion rates, variation (Shannon entropy, inter-sample clustering and visualization (dendrogram and multidimensional scaling (MDS plot, threshold-driven consensus sequence generation and polymorphism detection, and the estimation of empirically determined sequencing quality values. Conclusions As new sequencing technologies evolve, deep sequencing will become increasingly cost-efficient and the inter and intra-sample comparisons of largely homogeneous sequences will become more common. We have provided a software package and demonstrated its

  11. Complex brittle deformation pattern along the Southern Patagonian Andes (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberón, Vanesa; Sue, Christian; Ronda, Gonzalo; Ghiglione, Matías

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes is located in the southern extreme of the Pacific subduction zone, where the Antartic oceanic plate sinks underneath South America. The history of the area begins with compression during Paleozoic, Jurassic extension associated to the rift and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, then a sag stage in the Lower Cretaceous followed by a foreland phase as a result of plate tectonics (Ghiglione et al., 2016). The kinematic study is concentrated in the Argentinean foothills, between 46°40' and 48° SL. We measured around 800 fault planes and their striaes with the sense of movement in order to characterize the stress field. The software used to make the stress inversion were Tensor (Delvaux, 2011) and Multiple Inverse Method MIM (Yamaji et al., 2011). The stress field map was built with the results of the MIM. We present new data from 48 sites located in the northern sector of the Southern Patagonian Andes. The measurements were made in several rocks from Paleozoic to Lower Cretaceous, even though most were taken in pyroclastic jurassic rocks from El Quemado Complex. Paleostress tensors obtained are mostly strike-slip, although a 25% is normal and there are a few compresional. The pattern of faults found is complex. In some sites the tensor can be locally linked to satellite images and observations from the field or be related to a major thrust front. There is no clear correlation between the age and/or lithology with the tensor since the youngest rocks measured are Lower Cretaceous. Probably there are several generations of family faults connected to different and recent tectonic phases then the paleostress tensors might correspond to the latest tectonic events.

  12. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R ∼ 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO 2 , NH 2 CN, HNO, H 2 O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  13. An elusive new species of Marsupial Frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca from the Andes of northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of marsupial frog, genus Gastrotheca, is described from high-elevation grasslands in the Andes in Región Amazonas in northernPeru, where even calling males are well hidden in deep moss. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by its unique color pattern that includes a narrow, blackbordered, yellow middorsal stripe. The species apparently belongs to the Gastrotheca plumbea Group, which ranges in the Andes from northern Colombia to northern Peru.

  14. New ICT in the Peruvian Andes: Theoretical Foundation and Bibliographical Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Sánchez-Dávila

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On the one hand, this paper explains the theoretical foundations on which this proposal for digital anthropology in the Peruvian Andes is based (on the origins of digital anthropology, discussions on oral and written technology, and theories of digital technology as social practice. And, on the other hand, this paper presents a bibliographical balance of the studies on the new ICT in the Peruvian Andes (on identity expression, productive development and formal education in the Andean world.

  15. Floristic relationships among vegetation types of new zealand and the southern andes: similarities and biogeographic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Cecilia; Baccalá, Nora; Wardle, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Similarities between the floras of geographically comparable regions of New Zealand (NZ) and the southern Andes (SA) have interested biologists for over 150 years. The present work selects vegetation types that are physiognomically similar between the two regions, compares their floristic composition, assesses the environmental factors that characterize these matching vegetation types, and determines whether phylogenetic groups of ancestral versus modern origin are represented in different proportions in their floras, in the context of their biogeographic history. Floristic relationships based on 369 genera of ten vegetation types present in both regions were investigated with correspondence analysis (CA) and ascending hierarchical clustering (AHC). The resulting ordination and classification were related to the environmental characteristics of the different vegetation types. The proportions of different phylogenetic groups between the regions (NZ, SA) were also compared, and between forest and non-forest communities. Floristic similarities between NZ and SA tend to increase from forest to non-forest vegetation, and are highest in coastal vegetation and bog. The floras of NZ and SA also differ in their phylogenetic origin, NZ being characterized by an 'excess' of genera of basal origin, especially in forests. The relatively low similarities between forests of SA and NZ are related to the former being largely of in situ South American and Gondwanan origin, whereas the latter have been mostly reconstituted though transoceanic dispersal of propagules since the Oligocene. The greater similarities among non-forest plant communities of the two regions result from varied dispersal routes, including relatively recent transoceanic dispersal for coastal vegetation, possible dispersal via a still-vegetated Antarctica especially for bog plants, and independent immigration from Northern Hemisphere sources for many genera of alpine vegetation and grassland.

  16. The role of climate in the accumulation of lithium-rich brine in the Central Andes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, L.V.; Chan, L.-H.; Alonso, R.N.; Lowenstein, T.K.; McDonough, W.F.; Houston, J.; Li, J.; Bobst, A.; Jordan, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • δ 7 Li of waters and rocks in the Central Andes were measured. • Halite/brine partition coefficients of lithium and δ 7 Li of halite were determined. • Li-rich brines have a high component of fluids of geothermal origin. • Removal of lithium by clays is minor relative to other regions of the world. • The weathering flux of lithium and sodium decouple according to climate state. - Abstract: Lithium-rich brine within the sub-surface of the Salar del Hombre Muerto (SHM) salt pan in the Andes of northwestern Argentina has a chemical and isotopic composition which is consistent with Li derived from several sources: the modern halite saturated lagoon, Li-rich salts and brines formed recently, and dissolution of halite which precipitated from ancient saline lakes. SHM lies in the closed basin that includes part of the massive Cerro Galán caldera which is drained by the Río los Patos, which is responsible for 90% of surface runoff into the salar. The low Li isotope composition, +3.4‰, of this river is consistent with significant contributions of geothermal spring water. As water drains through the volcaniclastic deposits which cover a large proportion of the basin, Li removal, as indicated by decreasing Li/Na, occurs but without significant isotope fractionation. This indicates a mechanism of surface sorption onto smectite or ferrihydrite rather than Li incorporation into octahedral structural sites of clays. These observations suggest that conditions in this high altitude desert have limited the dilution of hydrothermal spring water as well as the formation of clay minerals, which jointly have allowed the Li resource to accumulate rapidly. Changes in climate on a multi-millennial time scale, specifically in the hydrologic budget, have resulted in solute accumulation rates that have been variable through time, and decoupled Li and Na fluxes. Inflow to the salar under modern conditions has high Li/Na (7.9 × 10 −3 by wt) with δ 7 Li

  17. Las ignimbritas del complejo volcánico Coranzuli (Puna Argentina-Andes Centrales

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    Martí, J.

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The Coranzulí is a large Upper Miocene volcanic complex located on a NE-SW and NW-SE regional faults intersection, at 66º 15' W 23º S, in the Northwest of Argentina in Jujuy province. It corresponds to one of four large volcanic complexes which represent the end of Transversal Volcanic Chaines in La Puna Argentina in the Central Andes. The volcanic activity was characterized by at least four separate ignimbrite eruptions which produced four different ignimbrite sheets. These are well welded, very crystal-rich, lithie poor ignimbrites and have a moderate to high pumice content. The total volume of the Coranzuli ignimbrites exeededs 650 Km3. Preliminary data indicate that the eruption oeeurred from a homogeneous magmatic chamber without zoning. The emplacement characteristics of the ignimbrites and the lack of basal or interbedded plinian fall deposits suggest that the eruptions developed quickly to massive proportions.El Coranzuli es uno de los grandes complejos volcánicos que representan el remate final de las Cadenas Volcánicas Transversales de la Puna Argentina, en los Andes Centrales. Se trata de un complejo volcánico del Mioceno superior situado a los 66º 15' W 23º S en el NW de Argentina en la provincia de Jujuy, en la intersección entre dos fallas regionales de dirección NE-SW y NW-SE, respectivamente. La actividad eruptiva se caracterizó por la existencia de, al menos, cuatro erupciones ignimbríticas que produjeron cuatro diferentes mantos ignimbríticos. Se trata de ignimbritas bien soldadas, muy ricas en cristales, pobre en fragmentos líticos y que presentan un contenido en fragmentos pumíticos de moderado a alto. El volumen total que representan estas ignimbritas supera los 650 km3. Los datos preliminares indican que el magma juvenil deriva de una cámara magmática homogénea no zonada. Las características de emplazamiento de estas ignimbritas, así como la falta de depósitos plinianos de caída en la base o

  18. The Tropical Andes without Snow and Ice - Impacts, Uncertainties and Challenges Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change has lead to significant glacier retreat in the tropical Andes over the past several decades. Despite the apparent hiatus in warming along the Pacific coast, temperature continues to rise at higher elevations, putting smaller glaciers in lower lying mountain ranges on the verge of complete disappearance. As a result water availability and water quality in glacier-fed river systems will be reduced during the dry season. The lack of a seasonal snow cover in the tropics, which provides for an additional hydrologic buffer in mid-latitude mountain ranges, further exacerbates the situation. Altered precipitation regimes, including changes in total precipitation amount, changes in the rain/snow ratio, or changes in the wet season length will also affect water availability, but projections of these changes are currently fraught with uncertainty. The importance of glacier-fed water supply varies between regions and depends on the presence of other water regulators (reservoirs, wetlands), the length of the dry season and the trajectory of water demand (population growth, expanding economic activities). Here we will review downscaled CMIP5 model results for some of these mountain ranges and discuss the consequences of future warming and projected precipitation changes for the Andean cryosphere, while considering uncertainties associated with downscaling methodology, model dependency and choice of emission scenario. Adaptation strategies will be evaluated in the light of these results, discussing the need to pursue no-regret strategies, when implementing water conservation measures. Lessons learned from past adaptation and capacity building activities in the region will be discussed, emphasizing a) the need to strengthen the institutional standing of authorities involved in glacier research, b) alignment of capacity building and international cooperation with the national and regional needs and c) improvements to long-term climate and glacier monitoring programs

  19. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, Colin A.; Abbott, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from 210 Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ∼ 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our 14 C and 210 Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ∼ 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ∼ 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 μg g -1 . The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution

  20. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Colin A. [Department of Geology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada)], E-mail: cacooke@ualberta.ca; Abbott, Mark B. [Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada); Section of Anthropology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from {sup 210}Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning {approx} 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our {sup 14}C and {sup 210}Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins {approx} 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after {approx} 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude

  1. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from (210)Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ~1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our (14)C and (210)Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ~1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ~1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 microg g(-1). The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution.

  2. Resilience and adaptations of rural communities and agricultural land use in the tropical Andes: Coping with environmental and socio-economic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadel, Ch.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a long settlement history of the tropical Andes, rural farming communities have always been exposed to conditions of ecological and economic vulnerability, risks, and even disasters. This has resulted, at certain times and in some regions, to a destabilization of livelihoods and to a manifestation of various forms of marginalization, to poverty or outmigration. However, Andean communities , over a long time, have given admirable testimonies of resilience and adaptations in the face of adverse conditions or new challenges. This paper examines the potentials and different facets of resilience and adaptation strategies of the rural campesinado in the tropical Andes. It emphasizes the proven traditional concepts of verticality, complementarity, reciprocity, and mutual community support, which to date support the feasibility and sustainability of Andean farming and community survival. In spite of this recognition, it is argued that Andean rural livelihoods always had to adapt to new developments, to threats and challenges, as well as to opportunities and alternative potentials. In the face of an almost ubiquitous penetration of modernization, new technologies, and economic and cultural globalization, the fundamental question arises, whether this can be considered as a path to progress and development, or as a threat to the survival of small-scale farming and rural community living. The paper concludes by formulating, albeit in a tentative form, some general suggestions for ‘development’ approaches and for research priorities in the rural Andes.

    A pesar de una tradición muy extensa del asentamiento humano en los Andes tropicales, las comunidades campesinas siempre enfrentaron condiciones de vulnerabilidad ecológica y económica, con varios riesgos, y aun desastres. Eso ha resultado, en diversos tiempos y en algunas regiones, en una estabilización de la superviviencia humana y en varias manifestaciones de marginalización, de

  3. Correlation of Early Tertiary Terrestrial Deposits of the Amaga Basin, Cauca Depression, Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, G. M.; Sierra, G. M.; MacDonald, W. D.

    2001-05-01

    The Amaga Formation of the Amaga Basin preserves early Tertiary terrestrial deposits of many facies: channel, crevasse splay, paludal, flood plain, point bar, etc. These deposits lie between two major strike-slip fault zones, the Cauca and the Romeral in the Cauca Valley of the northern Andes of Colombia. Coal deposits characterize the lower part of the stratigraphic section; fine to medium clastic sediments otherwise dominate the sections. Within the basin, correlation between sections is difficult because various discontinuities interrupt the continuity of the strata. These include Tertiary intrusives, folding and faulting. Rapid lateral facies changes further complicate the correlations. Detailed studies on five stratigraphic sections are underway. Multiple methods of correlating sections are being used, including fluvial sequence stratigraphy in outcrops, architectural facies analysis, heavy mineral separates, grain-size and grain-ratio variations, paleocurrent directions, and magnetic property variations. Distinctive regional variations in magnetic anisotropic susceptibility indicate areas in which tectonic effects overprint sedimentary fabrics. The presence of secondary hematite and siderite is related to that overprinting. A major compositional break (identified by grain-ratio variations) has been found in the middle of the section. The integrated correlation results are summarized.

  4. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  5. Neotropical Andes hot springs harbor diverse and distinct planktonic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Serrano, Luisa; López, Gina; Bohorquez, Laura C; Bustos, José R; Rubiano, Carolina; Osorio-Forero, César; Junca, Howard; Baena, Sandra; Zambrano, María M

    2014-07-01

    Microbial explorations of hot springs have led to remarkable discoveries and improved our understanding of life under extreme conditions. The Andean Mountains harbor diverse habitats, including an extensive chain of geothermal heated water sources. In this study, we describe and compare the planktonic microbial communities present in five high-mountain hot springs with distinct geochemical characteristics, at varying altitudes and geographical locations in the Colombian Andes. The diversity and structure of the microbial communities were assessed by pyrosequencing the V5 - V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The planktonic communities varied in terms of diversity indexes and were dominated by the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria, Aquificae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, and Thermotogae, with site-specific bacterial taxa also observed in some cases. Statistical analyses showed that these microbial communities were distinct from one another and that they clustered in a manner consistent with physicochemical parameters of the environment sampled. Multivariate analysis suggested that pH and sulfate were among the main variables influencing population structure and diversity. The results show that despite their geographical proximity and some shared geochemical characteristics, there were few shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and that community structure was influenced mainly by environmental factors that have resulted in different microbial populations. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 3-D modeling of magnetotelluric data in the Paniri-Toconce volcanic chain, Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, R.; Brasse, H.; Diaz, D.

    2017-12-01

    The research is located in the San Pedro-Toconce volcanic chain in the central volcanic zone of the Andes, North Chile. This area is interesting because of its proximity to several active volcanic centers, the geysers field of El Tatio and the recently opened geothermal plant Cerro Pabellon. Thermobarometry studies made in the area point to magma accumulated at 8 km below Lavas de Chao, and depths greater than 24 km below Toconce and Cerro de Leon. Regional geophysical studies show a distribution of conductive bodies around the complex, but the resolution of these studies at shallow depths are not conclusive. Data from wells show the possible presence of a large geothermal system in the southwest part of the complex, with depths of 2 km. Twenty broadband magnetotelluric (MT) stations were measured in the vicinity of the complex and combined with 15 long period MT stations measured in the 1990s, aiming at characterizing the deep conductive structures previously observed in the area, with magmatic bodies associated with the adjacent volcanic system. The results of a 3-D inversion show several conductive anomalies around the complex. Analyses of conductivity together with the 3-D models obtained indicate the presence of a geothermal system to the southwest of the complex with maximum depths of about 5 km, and two possible magmatic chambers below Paniri volcano and between Paniri and San Pedro volcanoes. In addition, the presence of a highly conductive structure to the east is obtained, associated with the Altiplano-Puna magma body (APMB).

  7. The high Andes, gene flow and a stable hybrid zone shape the genetic structure of a wide-ranging South American parrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer H Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the gene flow in some organisms is strongly affected by physical barriers and geographical distance, other highly mobile species are able to overcome such constraints. In southern South America, the Andes (here up to 6,900 m may constitute a formidable barrier to dispersal. In addition, this region was affected by cycles of intercalating arid/moist periods during the Upper/Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These factors may have been crucial in driving the phylogeographic structure of the vertebrate fauna of the region. Here we test these hypotheses in the burrowing parrot Cyanoliseus patagonus (Aves, Psittaciformes across its wide distributional range in Chile and Argentina. Results Our data show a Chilean origin for this species, with a single migration event across the Andes during the Upper/Late Pleistocene, which gave rise to all extant Argentinean mitochondrial lineages. Analyses suggest a complex population structure for burrowing parrots in Argentina, which includes a hybrid zone that has remained stable for several thousand years. Within this zone, introgression by expanding haplotypes has resulted in the evolution of an intermediate phenotype. Multivariate regressions show that present day climatic variables have a strong influence on the distribution of genetic heterogeneity, accounting for almost half of the variation in the data. Conclusions Here we show how huge barriers like the Andes and the regional environmental conditions imposed constraints on the ability of a parrot species to colonise new habitats, affecting the way in which populations diverged and thus, genetic structure. When contact between divergent populations was re-established, a stable hybrid zone was formed, functioning as a channel for genetic exchange between populations.

  8. Tectonic control on denudation rates in the central Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Kober, Florian; Hippe, Kristina; Lendzioch, Theodora; Grischott, Reto; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro; Christl, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Effects of a positive feedback loop between erosion and tectonics have been shown by analogue and numerical models and have been inferred from field observations at the scale of mountain ranges. We present new data from the Bolivian Andes supporting these observations, although common geomorphic parameters do not indicate a simple correlation. The upper Rio Grande segment, located between Cochabamba, Santa Cruz and Sucre, drains a major catchment in the central Bolivian Cordillera, from the Eastern Cordillera (EC) in the W, through the Interandean Zone (IAZ) and the Subandes (SA) in the E. The catchment covers an area of 58939 km² with an altitude range from 400 to 5150 m above sea level. Geologically, the Bolivian Andes comprise (from W to E) the Altiplano, the EC, the IAZ and the SA fold and thrust belts. The Altiplano represents an almost perfectly closed basin with distinct barriers defined by the Western Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera. The Rio Grande does not reach the Altiplano (unlike Rio La Paz and Rio Consata) but has its western drainage divide along the high peaks of the EC that experienced a period of intense shortening between Late Oligocene and Miocene. Near Cochabamba, the EC comprises metasedimentary siliciclastic rocks of Ordovician age. These rocks are overlain by Cretaceous to Paleocene and / or Neogene sediments with an angular unconformity. The IAZ and SA form an east-vergent fold and thrust belt and comprise Paleozoic and Mesozoic units. Farther east, the structures of the SA progressively include Neogene foreland strata of the Chaco foreland basin. The Chaco basin rests on the Brazilian shield east of the Subandean Belt and forms the modern foreland basin, where the lower Rio Grande catchment is sited. We obtained 58 cosmogenic 10Be catchment wide denudation rates for the Rio Grande catchments upstream of Abapó. They range from 7 mm/kyr to 1550 mm/kyr thus integrating at maximum over the last 10.000 years, with a mean of 262 mm/kyr. In

  9. The Distribution of Colias in the Equatorial Andes The Distribution of Colias in the Equatorial Andes

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    Hovanitz William

    1945-04-01

    Full Text Available The Genus Colias of primarily yellow and orange Pierid butterflies, is largerly northern in distribution. Representatives are found from Europe across the great Eurasiatic land mass to Siberia and northern Japan from where they span the narrow water barrier separating America and occur throughout North America. In the Mediterranean region, representatives are found on both the European and the African shores of the sea and also are found south around the Sahara desert through the highlands of Ethiopia and the Sudan into the southern parts of that continent, being absent in the hotter and more humid places. The Genus Colias of primarily yellow and orange Pierid butterflies, is largerly northern in distribution. Representatives are found from Europe across the great Eurasiatic land mass to Siberia and northern Japan from where they span the narrow water barrier separating America and occur throughout North America. In the Mediterranean region, representatives are found on both the European and the African shores of the sea and also are found south around the Sahara desert through the highlands of Ethiopia and the Sudan into the southern parts of that continent, being absent in the hotter and more humid places.

  10. Spatial and temporal characterization of progressive deformation during orogenic growth: Example from the Fuegian Andes, southern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Cao, Sebastián J.; Dimieri, Luis V.

    2017-06-01

    Superposed structural fabrics in the easternmost Fuegian Andes reveal two distinct, non-coaxial deformation phases across the transition from the orogenic core to the thrust-fold belt. Each phase is characterized by different metamorphic conditions and consistently different orientations, which allow the structural correlation between the orogenic core and the internal thrust-fold belt. The first deformation phase was coeval with regional metamorphism reaching upper greenschist facies, and featured simple shear deformation of the basement (Paleozoic and Jurassic) and cover (Cretaceous) in the top of the underthrusting South American plate. The second phase developed during collision of the orogenic wedge with the Río Chico Arch, a promontory in the underthrusting plate; this phase was characterized by thrust sheet emplacement and formation of a crustal duplex, with rock uplift and consequent low to very-low grade metamorphism. Buttressing against the Río Chico Arch is responsible for the change in shortening orientation that distinguishes both phases.

  11. Ethnographic model of acoustic use of space in the southern Andes for an archaeo-musicological investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez de Arce, Jose

    2002-11-01

    Studies of ritual celebrations in central Chile conducted in the past 15 years show that the spatial component of sound is a crucial component of the whole. The sonic compositions of these rituals generate complex musical structures that the author has termed ''multi-orchestral polyphonies.'' Their origins have been documented from archaeological remains in a vast region of southern Andes (southern Peru, Bolivia, northern Argentina, north-central Chile). It consists of a combination of dance, space walk-through, spatial extension, multiple movements between listener and orchestra, and multiple relations between ritual and ambient sounds. The characteristics of these observables reveal a complex schematic relation between space and sound. This schema can be used as a valid hypothesis for the study of pre-Hispanic uses of acoustic ritual space. The acoustic features observed in this study are common in Andean ritual and, to some extent are seen in Mesoamerica as well.

  12. Recursos hídricos en los Andes: Lago Titicaca

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    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available RESSOURCES EN EAUX DANS LES ANDES : LAC TITICACA. Une analyse par régression a été menée entre les variations de niveau du Lac Titicaca et les entrées du système (apports des affluents et précipitations. Les coefficients de corrélation, quoique relativement faibles, montrent aux abords du lac un effet de persistance qui diminue lorsque les stations sont éloignées du plan d’eau. L’inertie du lac se manifeste l’année suivante pour les affluents du lac et évidemment pour le lac lui-même. Ces résultats confirment la présence d’un mécanisme de rétro alimentation (effet boomerang. Cela montre que le système du Lac Titicaca est fragile, face à une utilisation excessive de ses eaux. Las regresiones estudiadas de cambios de nivel en el lago Titicaca contra precipitaciones y aportes en su cuenca, aunque relativamente bajas, muestran un efecto de persistencia en las proximidades del lago que decrece conforme las estaciones se alejan de éste. Lo que evidencia que la inercia del lago se manifiesta en el período siguiente (lag uno en los afluentes del lago y obviamente en el propio lago, fenómeno que parece confirmar la presencia de un mecanismo de retroalimentación (efecto boomerang. Este comportamiento muestra la fragilidad del lago frente a un aprovechamiento consuntivo excesivo. WATER RESOURCES IN THE ANDES: LAKE TITICACA. The studied regressions of the level changes in the Lake Titicaca versus the rainfall and the runoff in the basin, even being relatively low, show an effect of persistence in the proximity of the lake which decreases as we go away from it. This makes evident that the lake inertia manifests itself the following period (lag one in the lake tributaries and obviously in the lake itself, phenomenon which seems to confirm the presence of a feedback mechanism (boomerang effect. This behaviour shows the fragility of the lake against the excessive consumptive uses of the waters in its basin.

  13. Large slope failures in the La Paz basin, Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N. J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Rabus, B.; Guzmán, M. A.; Minaya, E.; Clague, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The La Paz basin in the eastern Bolivian Andes has been a hotspot for large-scale, deep-seated gravitational slope deformation during the Holocene. In less than 2 Ma, a network of steep-sided valleys up to 800 m deep formed in sediments of the Altiplano Plateau and underlying basement rocks. We characterize the distribution, extent, mechanisms, and modern activity of large-scale failures within this landscape using optical image interpretation, existing geologic maps, synthetic RADAR interferometry (InSAR), and field investigation. Deposits of nearly 20 landslides larger than 100 Mm3 occur within the basin. Most failures have occurred in weakly lithified Late Miocene to Pliocene sedimentary rocks and include earth flows, translational and rotational landslides, and plug flows. Failures in underlying tectonized Paleozoic sedimentary rocks include bedding-parallel rockslides. The largest failure is the 3 km3 Achcocalla earth flow (ca. 11 ka BP), which ran out ~20 km. Other dated events span the period from the early Holocene to nearly the Colonial historic period. InSAR results show that many large slope failures, including the Achocalla earth flow, are currently moving at rates of a few centimeters to a few decimeters per year. Rapid deposition, shallow burial, and rapid incision of the basin fills produced steep slopes in weak geologic materials that, coupled with groundwater discharge from the valley walls, are the primary controls on instability. In contrast, the Altiplano surface has changed little in 2 Ma and the adjacent slopes of the Cordilleran Real, although steep, are relatively stable. Of the over 100 landslides that have occurred in the city of La Paz since the early twentieth century, most are at the margins of large, deep-seated prehistoric failures, and two of the most damaging historic landslides (Hanko-Hanko, 1582; Pampahasi, 2011) were large-scale reactivations of previously failed slopes. Improved understanding of large, deep-seated landslides in

  14. An analysis of surface air temperature trends and variability along the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquist, Eric S.

    Climate change is difficult to study in mountainous regions such as the Andes since steep changes in elevation cannot always be resolved by climate models. However, it is important to examine temperature trends in this region as rises in surface air temperature are leading to the melting of tropical glaciers. Local communities rely on the glacier-fed streamflow to get their water for drinking, irrigation, and livestock. Moreover, communities also rely on the tourism of hikers who come to the region to view the glaciers. As the temperatures increase, these glaciers are no longer in equilibrium with their current climate and are receding rapidly and decreasing the streamflow. This thesis examines surface air temperature from 858 weather stations across Ecuador, Peru, and Chile in order to analyze changes in trends and variability. Three time periods were studied: 1961--1990, 1971--2000, and 1981--2010. The greatest warming occurred during the period of 1971--2000 with 92% of the stations experiencing positive trends with a mean of 0.24°C/decade. There was a clear shift toward cooler temperatures at all latitudes and below elevations of 500 m during the most recent time period studied (1981--2010). Station temperatures were more strongly correlated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), than the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). A principal component analysis confirmed ENSO as the main contributor of variability with the most influence in the lower latitudes. There were clear multidecadal changes in correlation strength for the PDO. The PDO contributed the most to the increases in station temperature trends during the 1961--1990 period, consistent with the PDO shift to the positive phase in the middle of this period. There were many strong positive trends at individual stations during the 1971--2000 period; however, these trends could not fully be attributed to ENSO, PDO, or SAM, indicating anthropogenic effects of

  15. Salud intercultural: el ciclo vital en los andes

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    Luis Alberto Santa María

    Full Text Available Se presenta las teorías e ideas más relevantes sobre el ciclo vital en los Andes, y su relación con el desarrollo humano y la salud. El ciclo vital no es un fenómeno inmutable, el número de etapas y su significado está pautado histórica y culturalmente. Se realiza un análisis comparativo con la teoría de Freud y Erikson. Se concluye que el aporte de la cultura andina se centra en: 1 Cada etapa del desarrollo humano está asociada a procesos productivos y reproductivos de la vida en relación, así como a un adecuado equilibrio entre derechos y deberes en la vida en sociedad; 2 La pareja es la unidad social básica, y no el individuo. Es un aporte para el diseño de intervenciones sanitarias con enfoque intercultural.

  16. Use and legacy of mercury in the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Hintelmann, Holger; Ague, Jay J; Burger, Richard; Biester, Harald; Sachs, Julian P; Engstrom, Daniel R

    2013-05-07

    Both cinnabar (HgS) and metallic mercury (Hg(0)) were important resources throughout Andean prehistory. Cinnabar was used for millennia to make vermillion, a red pigment that was highly valued in pre-Hispanic Peru; metallic Hg(0) has been used since the mid-16th century to conduct mercury amalgamation, an efficient process of extracting precious metals from ores. However, little is known about which cinnabar deposits were exploited by pre-Hispanic cultures, and the environmental consequences of Hg mining and amalgamation remain enigmatic. Here we use Hg isotopes to source archeological cinnabar and to fingerprint Hg pollution preserved in lake sediment cores from Peru and the Galápagos Islands. Both pre-Inca (pre-1400 AD) and Colonial (1532-1821 AD) archeological artifacts contain cinnabar that matches isotopically with cinnabar ores from Huancavelica, Peru, the largest cinnabar-bearing district in Central and South America. In contrast, the Inca (1400-1532 AD) artifacts sampled are characterized by a unique Hg isotopic composition. In addition, preindustrial (i.e., pre-1900 AD) Hg pollution preserved in lake sediments matches closely the isotopic composition of cinnabar from the Peruvian Andes. Industrial-era Hg pollution, in contrast, is distinct isotopically from preindustrial emissions, suggesting that pre- and postindustrial Hg emissions may be distinguished isotopically in lake sediment cores.

  17. Fragmentation of Andes-to-Amazon connectivity by hydropower dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth P; Jenkins, Clinton N; Heilpern, Sebastian; Maldonado-Ocampo, Javier A; Carvajal-Vallejos, Fernando M; Encalada, Andrea C; Rivadeneira, Juan Francisco; Hidalgo, Max; Cañas, Carlos M; Ortega, Hernan; Salcedo, Norma; Maldonado, Mabel; Tedesco, Pablo A

    2018-01-01

    Andes-to-Amazon river connectivity controls numerous natural and human systems in the greater Amazon. However, it is being rapidly altered by a wave of new hydropower development, the impacts of which have been previously underestimated. We document 142 dams existing or under construction and 160 proposed dams for rivers draining the Andean headwaters of the Amazon. Existing dams have fragmented the tributary networks of six of eight major Andean Amazon river basins. Proposed dams could result in significant losses in river connectivity in river mainstems of five of eight major systems-the Napo, Marañón, Ucayali, Beni, and Mamoré. With a newly reported 671 freshwater fish species inhabiting the Andean headwaters of the Amazon (>500 m), dams threaten previously unrecognized biodiversity, particularly among endemic and migratory species. Because Andean rivers contribute most of the sediment in the mainstem Amazon, losses in river connectivity translate to drastic alteration of river channel and floodplain geomorphology and associated ecosystem services.

  18. Linchamientos y conflicto político en Los Andes Lynchings and Political conflict in The Andes

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    Carlos M. Vilas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En 2004, los alcaldes de dos municipalidades de la región aimara de los Andes fueron linchados en la aparente culminación de agudos conflictos políticos internos y entre las respectivas comunidades y el Estado central. En este artículo se discuten ambos casos con el fin de ilustrar las transformaciones experimentadas en años recientes en la organización y la dinámica interna de las comunidades andinas, y de la articulación conflictiva de la política local en los procesos e instituciones de más amplio alcance. Precariedad social e incapacidad o renuencia del Estado para responder con eficacia a demandas básicas de determinados grupos de población configuran enmarcamientos socioeconómicos e institucionales de los linchamientos. En contraste con enfoques que enfatizan en factores culturales tradicionales o en un supuesto nacionalismo indígena, en el artículo se destaca la gravitación de fenómenos y procesos político- institucionales recientes en la transformación cultural y política de las comunidades, en el modo en que éstas procesan sus conflictos internos y con el Estado central.In 2004, two municipalitys mayors form the aimara Andes of Peru and Bolivia were subjected to mass lynchings as a result of the apparent culmination of violent political confrontations. This paper deals with these events as dramatic illustrations of the transformations the Andean communities experienced during recent decades in their internal dynamics, as well as in the articulation of local politics to processes and institutions beyond the communal limits. Structural precariousness combined with the state's inability or reluctance to come to terms with social or political demands from relevant segments of the people in the communities set the socioeconomic and institutional stage for lynchings. In contrast with approaches relating these events to an alleged indigenous cultural identity, the analysis points to the impact of the communities' political

  19. Observations of the Breakdown of Mountain Waves Over the Andes Lidar Observatory at Cerro Pachon on 8/9 July 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, J. H.; Fritts, D. C.; Wang, L.; Gelinas, L. J.; Rudy, R. J.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Taylor, M. J.; Pautet, P. D.; Smith, S.; Franke, S. J.

    2018-01-01

    Although mountain waves (MWs) are thought to be a ubiquitous feature of the wintertime southern Andes stratosphere, it was not known whether these waves propagated up to the mesopause region until Smith et al. (2009) confirmed their presence via airglow observations. The new Andes Lidar Observatory at Cerro Pachon in Chile provided the opportunity for a further study of these waves. Since MWs have near-zero phase speed, and zero wind lines often occur in the winter upper mesosphere (80 to 100 km altitude) region due to the reversal of the zonal mean and tidal wind, MW breakdown may routinely occur at these altitudes. Here we report on very high spatial/temporal resolution observations of the initiation of MW breakdown in the mesopause region. Because the waves are nearly stationary, the breakdown process was observed over several hours; a much longer interval than has previously been observed for any gravity wave breakdown. During the breakdown process observations were made of initial horseshoe-shaped vortices, leading to successive vortex rings, as is also commonly seen in Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of idealized and multiscale gravity wave breaking. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) structures were also observed to form. Comparing the structure of observed KHI with the results of existing DNS allowed an estimate of the turbulent kinematic viscosity. This viscosity was found to be around 25 m2/s, a value larger than the nominal viscosity that is used in models.

  20. Peltephilidae and Mesotheriidae (Mammalia) from late Miocene strata of Northern Chilean Andes, Caragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Sanhueza, Germán; Moreno, Karen; Bobe, René; Carrano, Matthew T.; García, Marcelo; Corgne, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Until now, only one Cenozoic fossil mammal from the Chilean Precordillera (Arica and Parinacota Region) has been reported, Caraguatypotherium munozi (Mesotheriidae: Notoungulata). In this study, we describe a fourth specimen of C. munozi and a new armadillo species, Epipeltephilus caraguensis (Peltephilidae: Cingulata), both collected from a new site closer to the fossiliferous outcrops of the Caragua area (Serravallian - Tortonian). E. caraguensis differs from other members of the family in having: two sulci in the articular surface of the mobile osteoderm; having a tubular, rough and raised anterior edge; a conspicuous transverse depression; and four widely spaced foramina. This taxon represents the youngest known peltephilid from intermediate latitudes and indicates a wide geographic distribution (Patagonia to Central Andes) of the family just prior to its extinction. The new mesothere specimen is 19% larger than previous records. The revision of the dental features of C. munozi allowed the identification of an ambiguous trait in its original diagnosis, i.e. an enamel fracture was misinterpreted with the presence of a posterior sulcus on the talonid of the m3, suggesting that further taxonomic and systematic revision for the Caragua mesothere is necessary. Although the fossil record from the Caragua area is still scarce, mesotheriines seem to be abundant at this latitude, just as has been observed at several early to late Miocene sites such as Chucal (Chile), Cerdas and Nazareno (Bolivia), as well as in southern regions such as Arroyo Chasicó and Mendoza (Argentina). The presence of a new peltephilid species in Caragua sustains the hypothesis of provincialism during the Miocene in intermediate latitudes. Our findings also provide further support for probable faunal movements between intermediate and higher latitudes rather than to lower ones.

  1. Altitudinal and seasonal variations of persistent organic pollutants in the Bolivian Andes Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estellano, Victor H; Pozo, Karla; Harner, Tom; Franken, Margot; Zaballa, Mauricio

    2008-04-01

    Polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers were deployed over four periods of approximately 3 months along an altitudinal gradient (1820, 2600, 4650, and 5200 masl) on the east side of the Andean mountain range in Bolivia. The purpose of the study was to assess the gas-phase concentration and the altitudinal and seasonal trends of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Target compounds that were regularly detected included alpha- and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), endosulfans, and select PCB congeners. Endosulfans and HCH concentrations increased with altitude. Enrichment factors (concentration at the highest altitude divided by concentration at the lowest altitude) ranged from 10 to 20 for HCHs and 3 to 10 for endosulfans. Air parcel back trajectory analysis indicated that, in general, the high-altitude sites were exposed to a larger airshed and hence susceptible to long-range atmospheric transport from more distant regions. Seasonal differences were also observed with SigmaHCH concentrations peaking during periods 2 and 3 (March-September 2005). Airsheds (derived from the analysis of back trajectories) for periods 2 and 3 were less oriented along the Andes range (mountain air) with greater input from coastal regions. Endosulfans peaked during periods 1 and 2 (February-June 2005) and also exhibited the highest air concentrations of the target compounds, reaching approximately 1500 pg/m3 at the two highest elevation sites. PCB air concentrations at all sites were generally typical of global background values (measure air concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Bolivia and one of only a few studies to investigate altitudinal gradients of POPs.

  2. An Albian Cenomanian unconformity in the northern Andes: Evidence and tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes, Elsa; de Freitas, Mario

    2006-09-01

    The Villeta Group of Colombia and equivalent stratigraphic units of Venezuela and Ecuador comprise marine sequences ranging from Albian to Santonian in age. Deposition of the Villeta Group was presumed to take place entirely in quiet tectonic conditions in a passive margin setting that occupied NW South America. From a large database of 2D/3D seismic, well, surface geology, and biostratigraphic data, we present evidence for intra-Villeta (mostly late Albian-Cenomanian) deformation in parts of the Upper Magdalena Valley and Eastern Cordillera of Colombia, controlled by transpressional fault reactivation, produced by transpressional fault reactivation and thrusting that resulted in an angular unconformity. This event has been largely unnoticed in the literature, but previously scattered evidence supports our observations, suggesting regionally extensive tectonism. Published fission-track age determinations and other geologic evidence from Colombia and Venezuela suggest significant uplifts around 80-100 m.y., which may reflect changes in the subduction regime, with compressional deformation in certain regions and extensional deformation in others. A late Albian onset of compressional deformation along the Colombian and Peruvian segments of the Andes may be related to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean at equatorial latitudes. Identification of tectonic activity with development of an unconformity in intra-Villeta times provides new insights into understanding the evolution of the Upper Magdalena Valley and adjacent areas of Colombia and western Venezuela and creates new possibilities for hydrocarbon exploration, with additional trapping phases, better reservoir preservation by early migration and secondary porosity, and ultimately facies changes with stratigraphic potential.

  3. Comparative phylogeography of co-distributed Phrygilus species (Aves, Thraupidae) from the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Varas, R; González-Acuña, D; Vianna, J A

    2015-09-01

    The Neotropical ecoregion has been an important place of avian diversification where dispersal and allopatric events coupled with periods of active orogeny and climate change (Late Pliocene-Pleistocene) have shaped the biogeography of the region. In the Neotropics, avian population structure has been sculpted not only by geographical barriers, but also by non-allopatric factors such as natural selection and local adaptation. We analyzed the genetic variation of six co-distributed Phrygilus species from the Central Andes, based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers in conjunction with morphological differentiation. We examined if Phrygilus species share patterns of population structure and historical demography, and reviewed the intraspecific taxonomy in part of their geographic range. Our results showed different phylogeographic patterns between species, even among those belonging to the same phylogenetic clade. P. alaudinus, P. atriceps, and P. unicolor showed genetic differentiation mediated by allopatric mechanisms in response to specific geographic barriers; P. gayi showed sympatric lineages in northern Chile, while P. plebejus and P. fruticeti showed a single genetic group. We found no relationship between geographic range size and genetic structure. Additionally, a signature of expansion was found in three species related to the expansion of paleolakes in the Altiplano region and the drying phase of the Atacama Desert. Morphological analysis showed congruence with molecular data and intraspecific taxonomy in most species. While we detected genetic and phenotypic patterns that could be related to natural selection and local adaptation, our results indicate that allopatric events acted as a major factor in the population differentiation of Phrygilus species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes

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    Christopher James Barnes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bolivia is one of the most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Between the Andes and the Amazon drainage basin spans the Yungas, a vast forested region shown to be extremely species rich in macro-organisms. However, it remains unclear whether this high diversity is also reflected in microbial diversity. Here we assess the genetic, taxonomic and functional diversity of root-associated fungi surrounding Cinchona calisaya calisaya trees, a typical element of the intermediate altitudes of the Bolivian Yungas. We determine the relative effects of edaphic properties, climate, and geography in regulating fungal community assembly. We show that α-diversity for these fungal communities was similar to temperate and arid ecosystems, averaging 90.1 operational taxonomic units (OTUs per sample, with reads predominantly assigned to the Ascomycota phylum and with a saprotrophic lifestyle. ß-diversity was calculated as the distance-decay rate, and in contrast to α-diversity, was exceptionally high with a rate of -0.407. Soil properties (pH and P principally regulated fungal community assembly in an analogous manner to temperate environments, with pH and phosphorus explaining 7.8 % and 7.2 % of community variation respectively. Surprisingly, altitude does not influence community formation, and there is limited evidence that climate (precipitation and temperature play a role. Our results suggest that sampling should be performed over a wide geographical and environmental range in order to capture the full root-associated fungal diversity in subtropical regions. This study sheds further light on the diversity and distribution of the world's hidden biodiversity.

  5. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  6. Hydrological differentiation and spatial distribution of high altitude wetlands in a semi-arid Andean region derived from satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    M. Otto; D. Scherer; J. Richters

    2011-01-01

    High Altitude Wetlands of the Andes (HAWA) belong to a unique type of wetland within the semi-arid high Andean region. Knowledge about HAWA has been derived mainly from studies at single sites within different parts of the Andes at only small time scales. On the one hand, HAWA depend on water provided by glacier streams, snow melt or precipitation. On the other hand, they are suspected to influence hydrology through water retention and veg...

  7. Hydrological differentiation and spatial distribution of high altitude wetlands in a semi-arid Andean region derived from satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    M. Otto; D. Scherer; J. Richters

    2011-01-01

    High Altitude Wetlands of the Andes (HAWA) are unique types of wetlands within the semi-arid high Andean region. Knowledge about HAWA has been derived mainly from studies at single sites within different parts of the Andes at only small time scales. On the one hand HAWA depend on water provided by glacier streams, snow melt or precipitation. On the other hand, they are suspected to influence hydrology through water retention and vegetation growth altering stream flow velocity. We derive...

  8. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. M. Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Niño (EN and La Niña (LN events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ. For the austral summer period of 1977–2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency. During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ around 30° S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years.

  9. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, G.A.M.; Ambrizzi, T. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Marengo, J.A. [National Inst. for Space Studies, Cachoeira Paulista, SP (Brazil). Center for Weather Forecasts and Climate Studies

    2009-07-01

    The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Nino (EN) and La Nina (LN) events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ). For the austral summer period of 1977-2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency. During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ) around 30 S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP) anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years. (orig.)

  10. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. M. Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Niño (EN and La Niña (LN events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ. For the austral summer period of 1977–2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency.

    During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ around 30° S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years.

  11. Primer registro del frutero pechinegro Pipreola lubomirskii (Aves, Cotingidae en la vertiente occidental de los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letty Salinas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El frutero pechinegro, Pipreola lubomirskii, es un cotíngido registrado como raro y de distribución local en los Andes del Norte. Antes del presente registro sólo había sido reportado para la vertiente oriental del Perú y Ecuador, así como los Andes del sur de Colombia. El presente registro amplia su distribución a los bosques montañosos de la vertiente occidental de los Andes peruanos, habiéndose encontrado en los bosques nublados del valle del río Zaña, en el departamento de Cajamarca (6º50’-6º52’ latitud S, 79º10’-79º07’ longitud O.

  12. Traditional use of the Andean flicker (Colaptes rupicola as a galactagogue in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froemming Steve

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper explores the use of the dried meat and feathers of the Andean Flicker (Colaptes rupicola to increase the milk supply of nursing women and domestic animals in the Andes. The treatment is of preColumbian origin, but continues to be used in some areas, including the village in the southern Peruvian highlands where I do ethnographic research. I explore the factors giving rise to and sustaining the practice, relate it to other galactagogues used in the Andes and to the use of birds in ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary treatments in general, and situate it within the general tendency in the Andes and elsewhere to replicate human relations in the treatment of valuable livestock. The bird's use as a galactagogue appears to be motivated by both metaphorical associations and its perceived efficacy, and conceptually blends human and animal healthcare domains.

  13. Lithospheric Structure and Isostasy of Central Andes: Implication for plate Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatsente, R.; Rutledge, S.

    2017-12-01

    A significant section of the Peru-Chile convergent zone is building up stresses. The interseismic coupling in northern and southern Peru is significantly high indicating, elastic energy accumulation since the 1746 and 1868 earthquakes of magnitude 8.6 and 8.8 , respectively. Similar seismic patterns have also been observed in Central Chile. The plate interface beneath Central Chile is highly coupled, and the narrow zones of low coupling separate seismic gaps. The reasons for the seismic gaps and plate coupling are yet unknown, but the configuration of the slab is thought to be the main factor. Here, we assessed the locking mechanism and isostatic state of the Central Andes based on gravity models of the crust and upper mantle structure. The density models are based on satellite gravity data and are constrained by velocity models and earthquake hypocenters. The gravity models indicate a high-density batholithic structure in the fore-arc, overlying the subducting Nazca plate. This high-density body pushes downward on the slab, causing the slab to lock with the overlying continental plate. The increased compressive stress closer to the trench, due to the increased contact area between the subducting and overriding plates, may have increased the plate coupling in the Central Andes. Thus, trench parallel crustal thickness and density variations along the Central Andes and buoyancy force on the subducting Nazca plate may control plate coupling and asperity generation. The western part of the Central Andes may be undercompensated. There is a residual topography of 800 m in the western part of the Central Andes that cannot be explained by the observed crustal thicknesses. Thus, part of the observed topography in the western part of the Central Andes may be dynamically supported by mantle wedge flow below the overriding plate.

  14. Recent temperature trends in the South Central Andes reconstructed from sedimentary chrysophyte stomatocysts in Laguna Escondida (1742 m a.s.l., 38°28 S, Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, R.; Schneider, T.; Hernández-Almeida, I.; Grosjean, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study we present a quantitative, high resolution reconstruction of past austral winter length in the Chilean Andes at 38°S from AD 1920 to 2009. For Laguna Escondida, a nearly pristine lake situated on the flanks of the Andes at 1740 m above sea level, past variability in the duration of the winter season (Days T4 °C) was reconstructed. Because high elevation meteorological stations are absent in this region, the reconstruction provides novel insights into recent temperature trends in the central-southern Andes. As a cold-season temperature proxy, we used chrysophyte stomatocysts. This novel proxy for cold season temperature was so far applied successfully in the European Alps and Pyrenees but has not yet been tested in the Southern Hemisphere. The reconstruction in this study was based on a newly developed Transfer Function to estimate Days T4 °C (number of consecutive days with surface water temperatures at or below 4 °C) from sedimentary stomatocyst assemblages (R2boot = 0.8, RMSEPboot = 28.7 days (= half the standard deviation)). To develop a high quality TF model, sediment traps and thermistors were placed in thirty remote lakes along an altitude gradient (420-2040 m a.s.l.). Complete materials and data were collected in 24 lakes after one year. Detailed statistical analyses indicate that modern stomatocysts primarily respond to the length of the cold season. The TF model was then applied to the sedimentary stomatocysts from a 210Pb-dated short core of L. Escondida. Comparison to independent reanalysis data showed that reconstructed changes in Days T4°C provides detailed information on winter-spring temperature variability since AD 1920. The reconstruction shows that recent warming (onset in AD 1980) in the southern Chilean Andes was not exceptional in the context of the past century. This is in strong contrast to studies from the Northern Hemisphere. The finding is also in contrast to the cooling temperature trends which were detected using

  15. Long-term carbon accumulation in Andes peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Yizet; Moreira-turq, Patricia; Willems, Bram; Espinoza, Raul; Turq, Bruno; Apaéstegui, James; Llanos, Romina

    2017-04-01

    High-altitude peatlands of the Andes still remain relatively unexplored since most of the studies on carbon capture in tropical soils have focused on peatlands in low altitude areas, leaving aside the importance of the study of high mountain wetlands, currently called "bofedales" located between 3000 and 5000 masl, covering most of the Andes mountains in South America. These peatlands in turn may also represent important paleoclimatic records. In this study, we investigated three peatland cores (APA-01, APA2-01, and APA2-02) at different altitudes (4210 m, 4420 m and 4432 m, respectively) in high Andean Peatlands of southern Peru. The peatland studied is located at the headwater basin Cachi River, in the town of Ayacucho, Peru. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role played by past climatic changes on the peatlands carbon accumulation. Each core was sectioned centimeter by centimeter and sub samples (n = 31) were collected for radiocarbon dating by AMS (acceleration mass spectrometer) and were used to create a sedimentological model based on the program Clam2.2R. The concentrations of carbon and nitrogen were determined from a C / H / N elemental analyzer and the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) were also analyzed. The bulk density was determined based on the volume occupied by the sediment (g /cm3). Finally, the carbon accumulation rate (gC m-2año-1) was determined. The three cores were characterized by two sedimentary units, the results present in the first sedimentary unit of APA01 an average long-term carbon accumulation rate of 59 gC m-2año-1, APA2-01 with 32 gC m-2año-1 and finally APA2-02 with 24 gC m-2año-1; for the second sedimentary unit we have: APA01 on average 17 gC m-2año-1, APA2-01 with 33 gC m-2año-1 and finally APA2-02 with 49 gC m-2año-1. In conclusion, we can say that the carbon accumulation rate for the first sedimentary unit of the three cores decreases as the altitude increases; on the other hand, we have the

  16. Structure and Evolution of the Central Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L.; Pfiffner, O. A.

    2009-04-01

    Three major units make up the Andes in Peru: (1) The Western Cordillera consists of the Cretaceous Coastal Batholith intruding Jurassic to Cretaceous volcaniclastics (Casma group) in the west, and a fold-and-thrust belt of Mesozoic sediments in the east. Eocene and Miocene volcanics (Calipuy group and equivalents) overly all of these rock types. (2) The Central Highland contains a folded Paleozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary sequence overlain by thick Quaternary deposits. A major fault puts Neoproterozoic basement rocks of the Eastern Cordillera next to these units. (3) In the Eastern Cordillera, Late Paleozoic clastic successions unconformably overly folded Early Paleozoic sediments and a Neoproterozoic basement in the east. Permian (locally Triassic) granitoids intruded these units and were affected by folding and thrusting. In the core of the Eastern Cordillera, Early Cretaceous overly Early or Late Paleozoic strata. To the west, a thrust belt of Paleozoic to Cenozoic strata forms the transition to the foreland of the Brasilian shield. The most external part of this thrust belt involves Pliocene sediments and is referred to as Subandine zone. The Coastal Batholith is internally undeformed. The adjacent fold-and-thrust belt to the east is characterized by tight, nearly isoclinal upright folds with amplitudes of up to 1000 m. At the surface only Cretaceous rocks are observed. Using balancing techniques, a detachment horizon at the base of the Lowermost Cretaceous (Goyallarisquizga group - Oyon Formation) can be proposed. Further east, folds are more open, asymmetric and east verging, Jurassic sediments appear in the cores of the anticlines. The abrupt change in style from upright tight folding in the west to more open folding in the east is explained by a primary difference in the depositional sequence, most probably associated with synsedimentary faulting. The overlying volcanics of the Calipuy group and equivalents are, in turn, only slightly folded. In the Northern

  17. Morphologic evolution of the Central Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Pfiffner, O. Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the morphology of the Andes of Peru and its evolution based on the geometry of river channels, their bedrock profiles, stream gradient indices and the relation between thrust faults and morphology. The rivers of the Pacific Basin incised Mesozoic sediments of the Marañon thrust belt, Cenozoic volcanics and the granitic rocks of the Coastal Batholith. They are mainly bedrock channels with convex upward shapes and show signs of active ongoing incision. The changes in lithology do not correlate with breaks in slope of the channels (or knick points) such that the high gradient indices (K) with values between 2,000-3,000 and higher than 3,000 suggest that incision is controlled by tectonic activity. Our analysis reveals that many of the ranges of the Western Cordillera were uplifted to the actual elevations where peaks reach to 6,000 m above sea level by thrusting along steeply dipping faults. We correlate this uplift with the Quechua Phase of Neogene age documented for the Subandean thrust belt. The rivers of the Amazonas Basin have steep slopes and high gradient indices of 2,000-3,000 and locally more than 3,000 in those segments where the rivers flow over the crystalline basement of the Eastern Cordillera affected by vertical faulting. Gradient indices decrease to 1,000-2,000 within the east-vergent thrust belt of the Subandean Zone. Here a correlation between breaks in river channel slopes and location of thrust faults can be established, suggesting that the young, Quechua Phase thrust faults of the Subandean thrust belt, which involve Neogene sediments, influenced the channel geometry. In the eastern lowlands, these rivers become meandering and flow parallel to anticlines that formed in the hanging wall of Quechua Phase thrust faults, suggesting that the river courses were actively displaced outward into the foreland.

  18. Erosion by Ice and Water in the Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This scene on the remote, rugged Argentine/Chilean border in the far southern Andes Mountains offers numerous, dramatic examples of both erosional processes and features of ice and water. The sharp, glaciated crest of the Cerro San Lorenzo (center) exceeds 12,000 feet and casts a long shadow southeastward. Glaciers on its western flank flow into the valley. This Electronic Still Camera photo was taken from the International Space Station, in December 2000 (late spring) when most of the previous winter's snow had melted below an altitude of 6,000 feet. Lago Pueyrredon, and the other lakes visible here, have been excavated by geologically recent episodes of glacier erosion, when glaciers extended all the way onto the lowland plains (top right). Since the last melting of the glaciers (15,000 years ago) three distinct fan deltas (semicircular features, marked with arrows) have formed where rivers flow into the lake. Counterclockwise currents in the lake-driven by strong winds from the west-have generated thin sand spits from each fan-delta. The largest spit (attached to the largest fan-delta, see right arrow) has isolated an approximately 10-kilometer long segment of the south end of the lake. The river that constructed the largest fan presently discharges turbid water to this isolated basin, giving it a lighter color than the rest of the lake. Glacial data collected over the past 50 years indicate that small ice bodies are disappearing at accelerated rates. (EOS, vol 81, no. 24, June 13, 2000) Predictions are that large fluctuations in land ice, with significant implications to society, are possible in the coming decades and centuries due to natural and anthropogenic climate change. Before glacial data can be used to address critical problems pertaining to the world's economic and environmental health, more detailed information about such glaciers is needed. Image ISS001-ESC-5113 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  19. Morphological analysis of Cerro Bravo Volcano, Central Andes of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Palacio, E.; Murcia, H. F.; Robayo, C.; Chica, P.; Piedrahita, D. A.; Aguilar-Casallas, C.

    2017-12-01

    Keywords: Cerro Bravo Volcano, Volcanic landforms, Craters. Cerro Bravo Volcano (CBV) belongs to the San Diego-Cerro Machín Volcano - Tectonic Province in the Central Andes of Colombia. CVB is located 150 km NW from Bogotá, the capital of Colombia, and 25 km E from Manizales city ( 350,00 inhabitants). The volcanic activity of CBV began at 50,000 years ago and has been characterized by produce effusive and explosive (subplinian to plinian) eruptions with dacitic and andesitic in composition products. The effusive activity is evidenced by lava flows and lava domes, while the explosive activity is evidenced by pyroclastic density current deposits and pyroclastic fall deposits; some secondary deposits such as debris avalanches and lahares has been also recognised. Currently, the CBV is considered as a hazard for the Manizales city. In order to characterise the volcanic edifice, a morphological analysis was carried out and a map was created from a digital elevations model (DEM) with 12.5 m resolution as well as aerial photographs. Thus, it was possible to associate the landforms with the evolution of the volcano. Based on this analysis, it was possible to identify the base and top of the CBV edifice as 2400 and 4020 m.a.s.l., respectively, with a diameter in its major axis of 5.8 km. The volcanic edifice has four main craters opening to the north. The craters are apart from each other by heights and distances between 120 m.a.s.l. and 1 km, respectively; this geomorphology is an evidence of different eruptive stages of the volcano construction. Morphological analysis has shown that some craters were created from explosive eruptions, however the different heights between each crater suggest the creation of lava domes and their collapse as a response of the final effusive activity.

  20. Weathering and transport of sediments in the Bolivian Andes : time constraints from uranium-series isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Dosseto, A.; Bourdon, B.; Gaillardet, J.; Maurice Bourgoin, Laurence; Allegre, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    Rivers from the upper Rio Madeira basin (Bolivia) have been studied with uranium-series isotopes in order to constrain the timescales of weathering and sediment transfer from the Andes through the Amazon tropical plain. Uranium (U), thorium, (Th) and radium (Ra) isotopes (U-238-U-234-Th-230-Ra-226 and Th-232) have been analyzed in the suspended load (> 0.2 mu m) of rivers. Increasing Th-230 excesses relative to U-238 in suspended particles from the Andes to the tropical plain is interpreted a...

  1. Multi year aerosol characterization in the tropical Andes and in adjacent Amazonia using AERONET measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Daniel; Andrade-Flores, Marcos; Eck, Thomas F.; Stein, Ariel F.; O'Neill, Norman T.; Lyamani, Hassan; Gassó, Santiago; Whiteman, David N.; Veselovskii, Igor; Velarde, Fernando; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2017-10-01

    This work focuses on the analysis of columnar aerosol properties in the complex geophysical tropical region of South America within 10-20° South and 50-70° West. The region is quite varied and encompasses a significant part of Amazonia (lowlands) as well as high mountains in the Andes (highlands,∼4000 m a.s.l.). Several AERONET stations were included to study the aerosol optical characteristics of the lowlands (Rio Branco, Ji Parana and Cuiaba in Brazil and Santa Cruz in Bolivia) and the highlands (La Paz, Bolivia) during the 2000-2014 period. Biomass-burning is by far the most important source of aerosol in the lowlands, particularly during the dry season (August-October). Multi-annual variability was investigated and showed very strong burning activity in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. This resulted in smoke characterized by correspondingly strong, above-average AODs (aerosol optical depths) and homogeneous single scattering albedo (SSA) across all the stations (∼0.93). For other years, however, SSA differences arise between the northern stations (Rio Branco and Ji Parana) with SSAs of ∼0.95 and the southern stations (Cuiaba and Santa Cruz) with lower SSAs of ∼0.85. Such differences are explained by the different types of vegetation burned in the two different regions. In the highlands, however, the transport of biomass burning smoke is found to be sporadic in nature. This sporadicity results in highly variable indicators of aerosol load and type (Angstrom exponent and fine mode fraction) with moderately significant increases in both. Regional dust and local pollution are the background aerosol in this highland region, whose elevation places it close to the free troposphere. Transported smoke particles were generally found to be more optical absorbing than in the lowlands: the hypothesis to explain this is the significantly higher amount of water vapor in Amazonia relative to the high mountain areas. The air-mass transport to La Paz was investigated using

  2. Adapting to Uncertain Futures: Glacier Recession and Livelihood Vulnerability in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, J.

    2008-12-01

    With a large portion of the world's population dependent on hydrologic resources linked to tropical glaciers, the decline of these natural "water towers" has important repercussions for the social and ecological systems that depend on these vital reservoirs of freshwater. In Peru's Cordillera Blanca (the highest and most extensively glaciated range in the tropics) glacial melt water makes up a critical percentage of the discharge of a wide array of water courses, ranging from first-order, highland streams to the Rio Santa, one of the largest and most economically important rivers on Peru's Pacific slope. Climate change-induced warming is occurring rapidly in this region and glaciers have lost a significant percentage of their mass in the past 50 years. While there have been indications that significant and temporary increases in glacial meltwater discharge flows will take place, predictions for the coming decades suggest that these flows will decrease and be more variable across seasons in even the most glaciated catchments of the range. Current population levels and patterns of water use in the Central Andes suggest that many human communities are highly vulnerable to decreasing or variable quantities of water and other changes associated with climate change. Here will be presented the first results from two years of field work assessing human vulnerability to increasing hydrological variability due to glacier-recession and evaluating how changing access to water resources is contributing to livelihood adaptation and potential conflicts over resources in the Cordillera Blanca region of Peru. The findings are drawn from stratified case-study research in two communities and are comprised of an extensive set of key interviews with national, regional and local key informants and semi-structured household surveys that were sampled utilizing stratified systematic unaligned techniques. The results provide insights into key elements of household vulnerability, how

  3. Influences of the ENSO, oscillation Madden-Julian, waves of the east, hurricanes and moon phases on the diurnal cycle of precipitation at the tropical Andes of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poveda, German; Mesa, Oscar; Agudelo, Paula; Alvarez, Juan; Arias, Paola; Moreno, Hernan; Salazar, Luis; Toro, Vladimir; Vieira, Sara

    2002-01-01

    We study the effects of large-scale ocean-atmospheric, astronomic phenomena on the diurnal cycle of precipitation at the tropical Andes of Colombia. Such phenomena include both phases of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), namely El Nino and La Nina, the intra seasonal Madden-Julian oscillation, tropical easterly waves (4-8 days), moon phases and hurricanes over the Atlantic and eastern pacific oceans. We found a clear-cut effect of both ENSO phases: El Nino is associated with a diminished rainfall diurnal cycle, and La Nina intensifies it. Thus, ENSO modulates precipitation in Colombia at timescales ranging from hours to decades. We identified a close association with different phases of the Madden-Julian oscillation, as the diurnal cycle is intensified (larger amplitude) during its westerly phase, but it gets decreased during its easterly phase. For both ENSO and the Madden-Julian oscillation we identified a clear-cut influence on the amplitude of the diurnal cycle, yet the phase is conserved for the most part. Tropical easterly waves appear to affect the diurnal cycle, but no clear overall signal is pervasive throughout the region. We al so found a significant statistical association with hurricanes occurring over the northeastern pacific ocean with the diurnal cycle of precipitation at rain gages located over the eastern slope of the eastern range of the Colombian Andes. Rainfall at all the remaining slopes of the Andes is statistically associated with hurricanes occurring at the tropical north Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea. Moon phases are not statistically associated with the diurnal cycle and daily total rainfall

  4. Unraveling the diversification history of grasshoppers belonging to the “Trimerotropis pallidipennis” (Oedipodinae: Acrididae species group: a hotspot of biodiversity in the Central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Verónica Guzmán

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Andean Mountain range has been recognized as one of the biodiversity hotspots of the world. The proposed mechanisms for such species diversification, among others, are due to the elevation processes occurring during the Miocene and the intensive glacial action during the Pleistocene. In this study we investigated the diversification history of the grasshopper Trimerotropis pallidipennis species complex which shows a particularly wide latitudinal and altitudinal distribution range across the northern, central and southern Andes in South America. Many genetic lineages of this complex have been so far discovered, making it an excellent model to investigate the role of the central Andes Mountains together with climatic fluctuations as drivers of speciation. Phylogenetics, biogeographic and molecular clock analyses using a multi-locus dataset revealed that in Peru there are at least two, and possibly four genetic lineages. Two different stocks originated from a common ancestor from North/Central America—would have dispersed toward southern latitudes favored by the closure of the Panama Isthmus giving rise to two lineages, the coastal and mountain lineages, which still coexist in Peru (i.e., T. pallidipennis and T. andeana. Subsequent vicariant and dispersal events continued the differentiation process, giving rise to three to six genetic lineages (i.e., clades detected in this study, which were geographically restricted to locations dispersed over the central Andes Mountains in South America. Our results provide another interesting example of “island diversification” motored by the topography plus unstable climatic conditions during the Pleistocene, pointing out the presence of a hotspot of diversification in the Andean region of Peru.

  5. The effect of offset on fracture permeability of rocks from the Southern Andes Volcanic Zone, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flores, P.; Wang, G.; Mitchell, T. M.; Meredith, P. G.; Nara, Y.; Sarkar, V.; Cembrano, J.

    2017-11-01

    The Southern Andes Volcanic Zone (SVZ) represents one of the largest undeveloped geothermal provinces in the world. Development of the geothermal potential requires a detailed understanding of fluid transport properties of its main lithologies. The permeability of SVZ rocks is altered by the presence of fracture damage zones produced by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Andean Transverse Faults (ATF). We have therefore measured the permeability of four representative lithologies from the volcanic basement in this area: crystalline tuff, andesitic dike, altered andesite and granodiorite. For comparative purposes, we have also measured the permeability of samples of Seljadalur basalt, an Icelandic rock with widely studied and reported hydraulic properties. Specifically, we present the results of a systematic study of the effect of fractures and fracture offsets on permeability as a function of increasing effective pressure. Baseline measurements on intact samples of SVZ rocks show that the granodiorite has a permeability (10-18 m2), two orders of magnitude higher than that of the volcanic rocks (10-20 m2). The presence of throughgoing mated macro-fractures increases permeability by between four and six orders of magnitude, with the highest permeability recorded for the crystalline tuff. Increasing fracture offset to produce unmated fractures results in large increases in permeability up to some characteristic value of offset, beyond which permeability changes only marginally. The increase in permeability with offset appears to depend on fracture roughness and aperture, and these are different for each lithology. Overall, fractured SVZ rocks with finite offsets record permeability values consistent with those commonly found in geothermal reservoirs (>10-16 m2), which potentially allow convective/advective flow to develop. Hence, our results demonstrate that the fracture damage zones developed within the SVZ produce permeable regions, especially within the

  6. Assessing glacier melt contribution to streamflow at Universidad Glacier, central Andes of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bravo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Glacier melt is an important source of water for high Andean rivers in central Chile, especially in dry years, when it can be an important contributor to flows during late summer and autumn. However, few studies have quantified glacier melt contribution to streamflow in this region. To address this shortcoming, we present an analysis of meteorological conditions and ablation for Universidad Glacier, one of the largest valley glaciers in the central Andes of Chile at the head of the Tinguiririca River, for the 2009–2010 ablation season. We used meteorological measurements from two automatic weather stations installed on the glacier to drive a distributed temperature-index and runoff routing model. The temperature-index model was calibrated at the lower weather station site and showed good agreement with melt estimates from an ablation stake and sonic ranger, and with a physically based energy balance model. Total modelled glacier melt is compared with river flow measurements at three sites located between 0.5 and 50 km downstream. Universidad Glacier shows extremely high melt rates over the ablation season which may exceed 10 m water equivalent in the lower ablation area, representing between 10 and 13 % of the mean monthly streamflow at the outlet of the Tinguiririca River Basin between December 2009 and March 2010. This contribution rises to a monthly maximum of almost 20 % in March 2010, demonstrating the importance of glacier runoff to streamflow, particularly in dry years such as 2009–2010. The temperature-index approach benefits from the availability of on-glacier meteorological data, enabling the calculation of the local hourly variable lapse rate, and is suited to high melt regimes, but would not be easily applicable to glaciers further north in Chile where sublimation is more significant.

  7. Mining and drought in the tropical Andes: a case study of lake Poopó

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogheib, C.

    2017-12-01

    The respective impacts of mining water withdrawals and El Niño-related droughts on water availability in the Altiplano region of the tropical Andes were investigated. The naturally semi-arid to arid climate of the region is highly vulnerable to the effects of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) as well as changes to the Bolivian High upper troposphere circulation. The 2015-2016 El Niño event displayed a maximal Oceanic Niño Index (ONI) of up to 2.2 °C, comparable with the 1998-1999 event, considered as the most severe of the 20th century with a maximal ONI of 2.5 °C. This has severely impacted the Altiplano region. Whereas mining has been found to affect observed water quality in the region, its influence on water availability has not been extensively examined. In light of these observations, the case of Lake Poopó, a water body at the intersection of both these climatic and anthropogenic influences, was further analyzed. The lake was officially declared dry in January 2016 by the Bolivian government. Therefore, a water balance model was implemented for the Lake Titicaca - Río Desaguadero - Lake Poopó - Salar de Coipasa (TDPS) catchment, simulating several possible climatic scenarios. Mines were identified and associated water withdrawals were extrapolated using available processing water consumption data. Long-term climatic trends, as averaged between 1970 and 2010 were used to assess the recovery prospects of the lake. Mining was found to have a very limited impact on water quantity in Lake Poopó, with total mining water withdrawals accounting for 0.2% to 0.4% of the total amount of water flowing into the lake from the Desaguadero River, reduced by only 1%. However, 1998 El Niño-induced drought conditions were found to cause a net yearly reduction in storage of 0.76 m. Under such climatic constraints, it was obtained that 32 months were needed for the lake to dry out from its height of 1.972 m as observed on the 10th of April 2013 and 38 months

  8. Multiproxy Holocene paleoclimate records from the southern Peruvian Andes - what new can we learn from the stable carbon isotope composition of high altitude organic matter deposits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Engel, Zbyněk

    2015-04-01

    Interpretation of the Central Andean paleoclimate over the last millennia still represents a research challenge demanding deeper studies [1,2]. Several high-resolution paleoclimate proxies for the last 10,000 years have been developed for the northern hemisphere. However, similar proxies are very limited for South America, particularly for high altitudes where, for example, tree-ring chronologies are not available and instrumental records are very limited. Consequently, our knowledge of high altitude climate changes in arid regions of the Peruvian Andes mainly relies on ice-core and lake deposit studies. In our study, we used a new alternative proxy for interpretation of palaeoclimate conditions based on a peat core taken from the Carhuasanta Valley at the foot of Nevado Mismi in the southern Peruvian Andes (15° 30'S, 71° 43'W, 4809m a.s.l.). The stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of Distichia peat reflects mainly the relative variation of the mean air temperature during subsequent growing seasons [3], and allows reconstructions of palaeotemperature changes. In contrast, peat organic carbon concentration (C % wt) records mainly wetness in the valley, directly corresponding to the changes in runoff in the upper part of the catchment. The most prominent climate changes recorded in the peat over last 4ka occurred between 3040 and 2750 cal. yrs BP. The initial warming turned to a very rapid cooling to temperatures at least 2° C lower than the mean for the Late Holocene. Initially drier conditions within this event turned to a short wet phase after 2780 cal. yrs BP, when the temperature increased again. This event coincides with significant changes in peat and ice core records in the Central Andes that match the timing of the global climate event around 2.8 cal. ka BP. Climatic conditions in the study area became relatively dry and stable after the event for about 800 years. Highly variable temperatures and humidity prevailed during the last 2000 years, when

  9. Contemporary recent extension and compression in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.

    2018-02-01

    Although extension in the high Andes vs. compression in the lowlands has already been widely discussed in the literature, for the first time we recognized both extensional and contractional structures that developed contemporaneously during late Pliocene-Quaternary times in a wide area of the central Andean chain (about 90,000 km2), where crustal earthquake data are missing. This area comprises north-eastern Chile, south-western Bolivia and north-western Argentina, and extends from the Puna Plateau to the Altiplano-volcanic belt. Late Pliocene-Quaternary folds, with hinge lines trending NNE-SSW to N-S, are mostly located along the westernmost part of the volcanic belt and the eastern part of the Western Cordillera. Locally, there are coeval reverse faults, parallel to the folds, which reach up to the surface; particularly, the Miscanti Ridge, Tolocha Fault and La Casualidad Ridge may be the morphostructural expression of tens-km-long fault-propagation folds, which locally show topographic scarps hundreds of meters high. North and east of the contractional structures, we found evidence of late Pliocene-Quaternary normal faults striking N-S in the southern part of the study area, and NW-SE in the northern part. Well-developed grabens are present in the higher areas of the volcanic belt and in the transition zone with the Puna Plateau. The surface rupture zones of normal fault swarms range 8-24 km in length, with single fault strands up to 18 km long, which are typical of tectonic structures. The distribution in space and time of the studied contractional and extensional structures indicates that they originated in the same time period; we thus address the challenging question regarding the possible origin of the stress sources, by analysing possible causes such as volcanotectonics, high topography, orogeny collapse, and gravitational spreading of the orogen, in relation also with the role played by inherited structures. We finally analyse the relations between the

  10. Macroinvertebrate community response to acid mine drainage in rivers of the High Andes (Bolivia).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damme, P.A. van; Hamel, C.; Ayala, A.; Bervoets, L.

    2008-01-01

    Several High Andes Rivers are characterized by inorganic water pollution known as acid mine drainage (AMD). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between metal concentrations in the sediments and the macroinvertebrate communities in two river basins affected by AMD. In general, the

  11. A Uniform Conductivity Image along the Chilean Margin? Observations from the Central and Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasse, H.; Soyer, W.

    2001-12-01

    Over the last years a reasonably detailed image of electrical conductivity distribution has been achieved in the central Andes at latitudes 20--22oS. These studies have been complemented by recent magnetotelluric investigations in the southern Chilean Andes (39oS). Despite the different subduction settings concerning e.g., age of subducted plate, trench filling and history of volcanic arcs, the inferred conductivity distributions show remarkable similarities. Higher conductivities assumed to be connected with hydration-dehydration processes are only resolved as a 2nd order effect at larger depths above the downgoing slab. On the other hand, large margin-subparallel fault zones presumably originating from oblique subduction are consistently imaged as good conductors in the mid crust, e.g., the Atacama Fault and the West Fissure in the central Andes and the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault in the south. The main differences concerning electrical properties between the two subduction settings include the large conductivity anomaly below the Altiplano high plateau in the central Andes and an anisotropic forearc crust in the south, indicated by ystematic deflection of induction arrows. An explanation of the latter phenomenon may possibly be seen in fossil, Cenozoic or even Pre-Andean structures.

  12. New Osornophryne (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) from the Atlantic Versant of the Andes in Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Two species of the little known genus Osornophryne are described from the Atlantic (Amazonian) versant of the Andes in Ecuador. O. guacamayo spec. nov. occurs at 2100 m, has well developed cranial ridges, rather peculiar feet with toes IV and V of about equal length and much longer than the others.

  13. How well do Important Bird Areas represent species and minimize conservation conflict in the tropical Andes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Dea, Niall; Bastos Araujo, Miguel; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Where high species richness and high human population density coincide, potential exists for conflict between the imperatives of species conservation and human development. We examine the coincidence of at-risk bird species richness and human population in the countries of the tropical Andes. We ...

  14. High altitude C4 grasslands in the northern Andes: relicts from glacial conditions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, A.; Mora, G.; Cleef, A.M.; Hooghiemstra, H.

    2001-01-01

    The altitudinal vegetation distribution in the northern Andes during glacial time differed from the present-day conditions as a result of temperature and precipitation change. New evidence indicate that as a response to a reduced atmospheric partial CO2 pressure (pCO2), the competitive balance

  15. Millennial-scale vegetation changes in the tropical Andes using ecological grouping and ordination methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urrego, D.H.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Rama-Corredor, O.; Martrat, B.; Grimalt, J.O.; Thompson, L.; Bush, M.B.; González-Carranza, Z.; Hanselman, J.; Valencia, B.; Velásquez-Ruiz, C.

    2016-01-01

    We compare eight pollen records reflecting climatic and environmental change from northern and southern sites in the tropical Andes. Our analysis focuses on the last 30 000 years, with particular emphasis on the Pleistocene to Holocene transition. We explore ecological grouping and downcore

  16. Climate Change in the High Andes:implications and adaptation strategies for small-scale farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, C.; Nicklin, C.; Dangles, O.; Vanek, S.; Sherwood, S.G.; Halloy, S.; Garrett, K.A.; Forbes, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Global climate change represents a major threat to sustainable farming in the Andes. Farmers have used local ecological knowledge and intricate production systems to cope, adapt and reorganize to meet climate uncertainty and risk, which have always been a fact of life. Those traditional

  17. Palm harvest impact in the western Amazon, Andes and Pacific lowlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Palms are the most useful group of plants in tropical American forests and in this project we study the effect of extraction and trade of palms on forests in the western Amazon, Andes, and Pacific lowlands. We determine the size of the resource by making palm community studies in the different...

  18. Drunken Speech and the Construction of Meaning: Bilingual Competence in the Southern Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Penelope M.

    1991-01-01

    Examination of the language use of drunken speakers in a bilingual Southern Peruvian Andes community found that drunken speakers were less constrained in their linguistic choices by individual linguistic competence and of differential status between speaker and addressee, and they exploited the ambiguities in implicit social meanings that normally…

  19. Distichia acicularis sp. nov. – a new cushion forming Juncaceae from the high Andes of Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Henrik; Lægaard, Simon

    1986-01-01

    Distichia acicularis is described as a new species of Juncaceae. It occurs in the high Andes of Ecuador between 3200 m and 4200 m above sea level. Its closest relative is D. muscoides Nees & Meyen from which it is distinct through its narrow, linear, mucronate leafblades and its 1–3 mm long auric...

  20. Altitudinal changes in diversity of macroinvertebrates from small streams in the Ecuadorian Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Dean

    2003-01-01

    Altitudinal patterns in diversity of macroinvertebrate families at different spatial scales (stone, stream and altitude) were studied by collecting stone samples from six streams at each of the three altitudes: lowlands (400m), midlands (2000m) and highlands (3800 m), in the equatorial Andes...

  1. Stepwise colonization of the Andes by ruddy ducks and the evolution of novel β-globin variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Fuentes, V; Cortázar-Chinarro, M; Lozano-Jaramillo, M; McCracken, K G

    2013-03-01

    Andean uplift played a key role in Neotropical bird diversification, yet past dispersal and genetic adaptation to high-altitude environments remain little understood. Here we use multilocus population genetics to study population history and historical demographic processes in the ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), a stiff-tailed diving duck comprising three subspecies distributed from Canada to Tierra del Fuego and inhabiting wetlands from sea level to 4500 m in the Andes. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA, four autosomal introns and three haemoglobin genes (α(A), α(D), β(A)) and used isolation-with-migration (IM) models to study gene flow between North America and South America, and between the tropical and southern Andes. Our analyses indicated that ruddy ducks dispersed first from North America to the tropical Andes, then from the tropical Andes to the southern Andes. While no nonsynonymous substitutions were found in either α globin gene, three amino acid substitutions were observed in the β(A) globin. Based on phylogenetic reconstruction and power analysis, the first β(A) substitution, found in all Andean individuals, was acquired when ruddy ducks dispersed from low altitude in North America to high altitude in the tropical Andes, whereas the two additional substitutions occurred more recently, when ruddy ducks dispersed from high altitude in the tropical Andes to low altitude in the southern Andes. This stepwise colonization pattern accompanied by polarized β(A) globin amino acid replacements suggest that ruddy ducks first acclimatized or adapted to the Andean highlands and then again to the lowlands. In addition, ruddy ducks colonized the Andean highlands via a less common route as compared to other waterbird species that colonized the Andes northwards from the southern cone of South America. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Weathering as the limiting factor of denudation in the Western escarpment of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbühl, L. M.; Schlunegger, F.; Kracht, O.; Ramseyer, K.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Aldahan, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2009-04-01

    A crucial issue in process geomorphology is the search for the scale and the extent to which precipitation, and climate in general, influences the nature and the rates of sediment transfer (weathering, erosion, sediment transport and deposition). We present an analysis of the possible interplay between precipitation, weathering and denudation rates for the western Andean slope between the Cordillera and the Pacific coast. It is based on morphometric studies and quantitative 10Be denudation rate estimates of three transverse river systems (Piura at 5°S, Pisco at 13°S, and Lluta at 18°S) draining the Western escarpment of the Peruvian and North Chilean Andes. The systems originate at elevations >3000 m above sea level, cover an area between 3000 and 10'000 km2 and discharge into the Pacific Ocean. The precipitation rate pattern implies a hyperarid climate at the coast, and semi-arid to semi-humid conditions in the Cordillera where the streams rise. There, climatic conditions are generally controlled by the easterlies that deliver moisture from the Atlantic Ocean via the low level Andean jet. The precipitation rate pattern of the Cordillera shows a North-South decreasing trend, from ca. 1000 mm/yr in Northern Peru to 150 mm/yr in Northern Chile. In these higher regions of the drainage basins, hillslopes are convex with nearly constant curvatures and are mantled by a >1 m thick regolith cover. In addition, hillslope erosion is limited to the regolith-bedrock interface. We interpret these geomorphic features to indicate weathering-controlled sediment discharge. In the lower river segments, beyond tectonic knickzones, regular precipitation is almost absent. For the case of the Piura river in Northern Peru, precipitation in this segment occurs in relation to highly episodic El Niño events related to the westerlies. This results in a supply-limited sediment discharge, leading to predominance of channelized processes on the hillslopes, a spare regolith cover and an

  3. Coupled geohazards at Southern Andes (Copahue-Lanín volcanoes): Chile's GEO supersite proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Luis E.; Cordova, Loreto

    2017-04-01

    Southern Andes are a young and active mountain belt where volcanism and tectonic processes (and those related to the hydrometeorological conditions controlled by this geological setting) pose a significant threat to the growing communities nearby. This proposal focus on a ca. 200 km long segment of the Southern Andes where 9 stratovolcanoes and 2 distributed volcanic fields are located, just along a tectonic corridor defined by the northern segment of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Faul System (LOFS), a long-lived active strike-slip fault running for 1200 km. Volcanoes in this area take part of the central province of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (37-41°S), particularly the northermost portion that is limited at the south by an Andean tranverse fault (Lanalhue Fault, which define the Villarrica-Lanin volcanic chain) and run along the horse-tail array of the LOFS to the north. Most of the stravolcanoes are atop of the LOFS main branch with only 3 exceptions (Callaqui, Tolhuaca and Lanín) 15-20 km away, but related to transverse faults. Hazards in the segment derive from the activity of some of the most active volcanoes in South America (e.g., Villarrica, Llaima), others with long-lasting weak activity (e.g., Copahue) or some volcanoes with low frequency but high magnitude eruptions in the geological record. Only since the beggining of the 20th century 80 eruptions have been recorded in this area. In addition, activity of the LOFS has been detected prior to some eruptions and coeval with some others (e.g., Lonquimay 1989). A strong two-way coupling between tectonics and volcanism has been proposed for the segment but only recently detected by geophysical techniques or numerical modelling. Tectonic triggered landslides are frequent in this region together with debris flows at erupting ice-covered volcanoes or stream headed at high altitude basins. The latter scenario seems to be worst at present because of global climate change. Ground-based monitoring networks for both

  4. Studying the Effects of Amazonian Land Cover Change on Glacier Mass Balance in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, B. G.; Fernandez, A.; Gabrielli, P.; Montenegro, A.; Postigo, J.; Hellstrom, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent research has highlighted several ongoing environmental changes occurring across Tropical South America, including Andean glacier retreat, drought, as well as changes in land-use and land-cover. As the regional climate of the area is mostly characterized by land-ocean interactions, the atmospheric convection in the Amazon, and the effect of the Andes on circulation patterns, it follows that changes in one of those regions may affect the other. Most scholars who have studied the causes of tropical glaciers' fluctuations have not analyzed the linkages with changes in the Amazon with the same attention paid to the influence of Pacific sea surface temperature. Here we study the response of glacier surface mass balance in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru (10°S), to a scenario where the Amazonian rainforest is replaced by savannas. We ran climatic simulations at 2-km spatial resolution utilizing the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model considering two scenarios: (a) control (CRTL), with today's rainforest extent; and (b) land cover change (LCC), where all the rainforest was replaced by savanna. WRF output was in turn ingested into a glacier energy and mass balance (GEMB) model that we validate by reconstructing both the accumulated mass balance from available observations, and the altitudinal distribution of mass balance in the region. Seasonal comparison between CRTL and LCC scenarios indicates that forest replacement by savanna results in more positive glacier mass balance. This shift to more positive mass balance contrasts with a (WRF) modeled rise in the elevation of the freezing line (0°C) between 30 to 120 m for the LCC scenario. Our results are surprising because most previous studies have shown that reducing Amazon forest cover diminishes rainfall and increases temperature, suggesting that glaciers should lose mass. We hypothesize and discuss implications of possible land-atmospheric processes that might drive this tropical glacier response to

  5. Palabras y silencios: la retórica del poder en los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available PAROLES ET SILENCES : LA RETHORIQUE DU POUVOIR DANS LES ANDES. La parole condense différents arguments et formes de pouvoir dans les sociétés andines. Le domaine social et le cadre cérémoniel appartiennent à ceux qui articulent bien les mots. La différenciation entre la valeur octroyée à la parole et celle correspondant aux silences implique diverses modalités de prestige de reconnaissance sociale et de pouvoir rituel dans les Andes. Les personnes, les vivants et les savants exercent une maîtrise subtile de la parole face aux étrangers, aux défunts et aux sots, qui demeurent socialement “muets”, silencieux. La palabra condensa diferentes argumentos y formas de poder en las sociedades andinas. El dominio social y el ámbito ceremonial pertenecen a los buenos articuladores de palabras. La diferenciación entre el valor otorgado a la palabra y el que corresponde a los silencios implica diferentes modalidades de prestigio, reconocimiento social y poder ritual en los Andes. Las personas, los vivos y los sabios ejercen un dominio exquisito de la palabra frente a los extraños, los difuntos y los “necios” que permanecen socialmente “mudos”, callados. WORDS AND SILENCES: THE RHETORIC OF POWER IN THE ANDES. Words have different meanings and means to exercise power in Andean societies. Social power and ceremonial environments belong people who are fluent in language. The difference between the value ascribed to the spoken word and that ascribed to silence implies several kinds of prestige, social recognition and ritual power in the Andes. “Ordinary”, alive and wise people exert an exquisite authority with words as compared with strange, dead and “stupid people” who remain socially 'dumb', silent.

  6. Un réseau d'observation des glaciers dans les Andes tropicales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Par leur grande sensibilité au changement climatique, les glaciers tropicaux sont d’excellents indicateurs de l’évolution du climat et, en même temps, des objets hydrologiques susceptibles d’évoluer rapidement dans le futur. On montre que l’actuel recul accéléré des glaciers dans les Andes centrales et les conséquences qu’il peut avoir en matière hydrologique et de risques naturels rendent nécessaire un programme de surveillance de ces glaciers au niveau de toute la chaîne, ce que l’ORSTOM contribue à faire depuis 1991. UNA RED DE OBSERVACIÓN DE LOS GLACIARES EN LOS ANDES TROPICALES. Por su gran sensibilidad al cambio climático, los glaciares tropicales son excelentes indicadores de la evolución del clima, así como objectos hidrológicos susceptibles de una evolución rápida en el futuro. Considerando el actual retroceso acelerado de los glaciares en los Andes centrales y las consecuencias que puede tener a nivel hidrológico así como en el campo de los riesgos naturales, es necesario un programa de monitoreo de los glaciares a nivel de toda la cordillera, que es lo que ORSTOM contribuye a hacer desde 1991. A GLACIER MONITORING NETWORK IN THE TROPICAL ANDES. The high sensibility of Tropical glaciers to climatic forcing make it possible to use them as reliable indicators of climate evolution, as well as hydrological systems which could change rapidly in the future. Considering the present increase in glacier retreat in central Andes and the consequences induced by this evolution on water resources and natural hazards, a monitoring program at a large scale appears to be highly desirable. This has been the objective of ORSTOM since 1991.

  7. The influence of climate change on recent peat accumulation patterns of Distichia muscoides cushion bogs in the high-elevation tropical Andes of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Juan C.; Vitt, Dale H.; Wieder, R. Kelman

    2013-12-01

    Extensive cushions of Distichia muscoides found at high elevations in the Andes form deep deposits of peat and function as peatland. The location of Distichia peatlands at the highest elevations makes them susceptible to the effects of global change including global warming. Accumulation rates of organic matter are the key function of peatland ecosystems and are highly susceptible to changes in climate. This study used 210Pb chronologies to infer the recent dynamics of three Distichia muscoides peatlands located above 4000 m in elevation. Chronological markers from dated volcanic eruptions were correlated to the 210Pb chronologies of Distichia peat and validated the 210Pb chronologies. Changes in 210Pb activity with depth indicated rapid accumulation in recent times. Organic matter had a mean accumulation rate of 1400 g m-2 yr-1 during the past 10 years, with values well above the observed regional accumulation rate of 300-400 g m-2 yr-1. The same pattern was observed in peat accretion rates, with growth rates of 1-2 cm per year during the last 10 years. Cushion plants engineer their own environment, allowing the system to be less susceptible to direct changes in climate. However, the high rates of peat accretion in recent times may be originated from increasing temperatures and excess water from nearby glacier melt. However, glaciers are predicted to disappear during the next 20 years in the northern Andes, reducing water inputs in tropical high-elevation ecosystems.

  8. Water and sediment quality of the Lake Andes and Choteau Creek basins, South Dakota, 1983-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven Kent; Neitzert, Kathleen M.

    2003-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation has proposed construction of the Lake Andes/Wagner Irrigation Demonstration Project to investigate environmental effects of irrigation of glacial till soils substantially derived from marine shales. During 1983-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey collected hydrologic, water-quality, and sediment data in the Lake Andes and Choteau Creek Basins, and on the Missouri River upstream and downstream from Choteau Creek, to provide baseline information in support of the proposed demonstration project. Lake Andes has a drainage area of about 230 mi2 (square miles). Tributaries to Lake Andes are ephemeral. Water-level fluctuations in Lake Andes can be large, and the lake has been completely dry on several occasions. The outlet aqueduct from Lake Andes feeds into Garden Creek, which enters Lake Francis Case just upstream from Fort Randall Dam on the Missouri River. For Lake Andes tributary stations, calcium, magnesium, and sodium are approximately codominant among the cations, and sulfate is the dominant anion. Dissolved-solids concentrations typically range from about 1,000 mg/L (milligrams per liter) to about 1,700 mg/L. Major-ion concentrations for Lake Andes tend to be higher than the tributaries and generally increase downstream in Lake Andes. Proportions of major ions are similar among the different lake units (with the exception of Owens Bay), with calcium, magnesium, and sodium being approximately codominant among cations, and sulfate being the dominant anion. Owens Bay is characterized by a calcium sulfate water type. Dissolved-solids concentrations for Lake Andes typically range from about 1,400 to 2,000 mg/L. Whole-water nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations are similar among the Lake Andes tributaries, with median whole-water nitrogen concentrations ranging from about 1.6 to 2.4 mg/L, and median whole-water phosphorus concentrations ranging from about 0.5 to 0.7 mg/L. Whole-water nitrogen concentrations in Lake Andes are similar among the

  9. Secondary Forest and Shrubland Dynamics in a Highly Transformed Landscape in the Northern Andes of Colombia (1985–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Rubiano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of natural ecosystems in highly transformed landscapes is key to the design of regional development plans that are more sustainable and otherwise enhance conservation initiatives. We analyzed secondary forest and shrubland dynamics over 30 years (1985–2015 in a densely populated area of the Colombian Andes using satellite and biophysical data. We performed a land-cover change analysis, assessed landscape fragmentation, and applied regression models to evaluate the effects of environmental and geographical correlates with the observed forest transitions. Forest cover area increased during the 30 year-span, due mostly to forest regrowth in areas marginal for agriculture, especially during the first half of the study period. However, a high dynamic of both forest regrowth and clearing near urban centers and roads was observed. Soil fertility turned out to be a key correlate of both forest recovery and deforestation. Secondary forests, <30 years old represent the most fragmented component. Our findings reflect the complexity of the processes occurring in highly transformed and densely populated regions. Overall, this study provides elements for a better understanding of the factors driving land cover change near large urban areas, and raises new iideas for further research.

  10. Modelling wet snow avalanche runout to assess road safety at a high-altitude mine in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Cesar Vera; Wever, Nander; Bühler, Yves; Stoffel, Lukas; Margreth, Stefan; Bartelt, Perry

    2016-11-01

    Mining activities in cold regions are vulnerable to snow avalanches. Unlike operational facilities, which can be constructed in secure locations outside the reach of avalanches, access roads are often susceptible to being cut, leading to mine closures and significant financial losses. In this paper we discuss the application of avalanche runout modelling to predict the operational risk to mining roads, a long-standing problem for mines in high-altitude, snowy regions. We study the 35 km long road located in the "Cajón del rio Blanco" valley in the central Andes, which is operated by the Codelco Andina copper mine. In winter and early spring, this road is threatened by over 100 avalanche paths. If the release and snow cover conditions can be accurately specified, we find that avalanche dynamics modelling is able to represent runout, and safe traffic zones can be identified. We apply a detailed, physics-based snow cover model to calculate snow temperature, density and moisture content in three-dimensional terrain. This information is used to determine the initial and boundary conditions of the avalanche dynamics model. Of particular importance is the assessment of the current snow conditions along the avalanche tracks, which define the mass and thermal energy entrainment rates and therefore the possibility of avalanche growth and long runout distances.

  11. Drivers of methane uptake by montane forest soils in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Diem, Torsten; Huaraca Quispe, Lidia; Cahuana, Adan; Meir, Patrick; Teh, Yit

    2016-04-01

    The exchange of methane between the soils of humid tropical forests and the atmosphere is relatively poorly documented. This is particularly true of montane settings where variations between uptake and emission of atmospheric methane have been observed. Whilst most of these ecosystems appear to function as net sinks for atmospheric methane, some act as considerable sources. In regions like the Andes, humid montane forests are extensive and a better understanding of the magnitude and controls on soil-atmosphere methane exchange is required. We report methane fluxes from upper montane cloud forest (2811 - 2962 m asl), lower montane cloud forest (1532 - 1786 m asl), and premontane forest (1070 - 1088 m asl) soils in south-eastern Peru. Between 1000 and 3000 m asl, mean annual air temperature and total annual precipitation decrease from 24 ° C and 5000 mm to 12 ° C and 1700 mm. The study region experiences a pronounced wet season between October and April. Monthly measurements of soil-atmosphere gas exchange, soil moisture, soil temperature, soil oxygen concentration, available ammonium and available nitrate were made from February 2011 in the upper and lower montane cloud forests and July 2011 in the premontane forest to June 2013. These soils acted as sinks for atmospheric methane with mean net fluxes for wet and dry season, respectively, of -2.1 (0.2) and -1.5 (0.1) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in the upper montane forest; -1.5 (0.2) and -1.4 (0.1) mg CH4 m-2 d-1in the lower montane forest; and -0.3 (0.2) and -0.2 (0.2) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in the premontane forest. Spatial variations among forest types were related to available nitrate and water-filled pore space suggesting that nitrate inhibition of oxidation or constraints on the diffusional supply of methane to methanotrophic communities may be important controls on methane cycling in these soils. Seasonality in methane exchange, with weaker uptake related to increased water-filled pore space and soil temperature during the wet

  12. Screening for new accumulator plants in Andes Range mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2016-04-01

    accumulated considerable concentrations of Cu and Zn. The species from the genus Bidens (Asteraceae) were able not only to accumulate high shoot As concentrations (> 1000 μg g-1 in B. cynapiifolia from Peru) but also considerable amounts of Pb (B. humilis from Chile). The highest Cu shoot concentrations were found in Mullinum spinosum (870 μg g-1) and in B. cynapiifolia (620 μg g-1). The shoot accumulation of Zn was highest in Baccharis amdatensis (>1900 μg g-1) and in Rumex crispus (1300 μg g-1) from the Ag mine in Ecuador (Bech et al., 2002). In the Peruvian Andes, B. triplinervia can be considered interesting for phytostabilization, due to its capacity to restrict the accumulation of elevated amounts of Pb and Zn in the shoots.

  13. Elizabeth Monasterios. 2015. La vanguardia plebeya del Titikaka. Gamaliel Churata y otras beligerancias estéticas en los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Mancosu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reseña de Elizabeth Monasterios, La vanguardia plebeya del Titikaka. Gamaliel Churata y otras beligerancias estéticas en los Andes. Lima/La Paz: IFEA/Plural Editores, 2015, pp. 345.

  14. Remote sensing and climate data as a key for understanding fasciolosis transmission in the Andes: review and update of an ongoing interdisciplinary project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Màrius V. Fuentes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica in various South American countries located on the slopes of the Andes has been recognized as an important public health problem. However, the importance of this zoonotic hepatic parasite was neglected until the last decade. Countries such as Peru and Bolivia are considered to be hyperendemic areas for human and animal fasciolosis, and other countries such as Chile, Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela are also affected. At the beginning of the 1990s a multidisciplinary project was launched with the aim to shed light on the problems related to this parasitic disease in the Northern Bolivian Altiplano. A few years later, a geographic information system (GIS was incorporated into this multidisciplinary project analysing the epidemiology of human and animal fasciolosis in this South American Andean region. Various GIS projects were developed in some Andean regions using climatic data, climatic forecast indices and remote sensing data. Step by step, all these GIS projects concerning the forecast of the fasciolosis transmission risk in the Andean mountain range were revised and in some cases updated taking into account new data. The first of these projects was developed on a regional scale for the central Chilean regions and the proposed model was validated on a local scale in the Northern Bolivian Altiplano. This validated mixed model, based on both fasciolosis climatic forecast indices and normalized difference vegetation index values from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite sensor, was extrapolated to other human and/or animal endemic areas of Peru and Ecuador. The resulting fasciolosis risk maps make it possible to show the known human endemic areas of, mainly, the Peruvian Altiplano, Cajamarca and Mantaro Peruvian valleys, and some valleys of the Ecuadorian Cotopaxi province. Nevertheless, more climate and remote sensing data, as well as more accurate epidemiological reports, have to be

  15. The last glacial termination on the eastern flank of the central Patagonian Andes (47 ° S

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    W. I. Henríquez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined in detail the sequence of events during the last glacial termination (T1 in the core sector of the Patagonian Ice Sheet (PIS, the largest ice mass in the Southern Hemisphere outside of Antarctica. Here we report results from Lago Edita (47°8′ S, 72°25′ W, 570 m a.s.l., a small closed-basin lake located in a valley overridden by eastward-flowing Andean glaciers during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. The Lago Edita record shows glaciolacustrine sedimentation until 19 400 yr BP, followed by organic sedimentation in a closed-basin lake and a mosaic of cold-resistant hygrophilous conifers and rainforest trees, along with alpine herbs between 19 400 and 11 000 yr BP. Our data suggest that the PIS retreated at least  ∼  90 km from its LGM limit between  ∼  21 000 and 19 400 yr BP and that scattered, low-density populations of cold-resistant hygrophilous conifers, rainforest trees, high-Andean and steppe herbs thrived east of the Andes during the LGM and T1, implying high precipitation levels and southern westerly wind (SWW influence at 47° S. The conifer Podocarpus nubigena increased between 14 500 and 13 000 yr BP, suggesting even stronger SWW influence during the Antarctic Cold Reversal, after which it declined and persisted until 11 000 yr BP. Large increases in arboreal pollen at  ∼  13 000 and  ∼  11 000 yr BP led to the establishment of forests near Lago Edita between 10 000 and 9000 yr BP, suggesting a rise in the regional tree line along the eastern Andean slopes driven by warming pulses at  ∼  13 000 and  ∼  11 000 yr BP and a subsequent decline in SWW influence at  ∼  11 000 yr BP. We propose that the PIS imposed a regional cooling signal along its eastern, downwind margin through T1 that lasted until the separation of the northern and southern Patagonian ice fields along the Andes

  16. Holocene tephra-fall deposits of southern and austral Andes volcanic zones (33-54oS): eruption recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naranjo, J.A.; Polanco, E.; Lara, L; Moreno, H; Stern, C.R

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric 14 C dating is a very useful tool to study the chronostratigraphy of pyroclastic deposits. In addition, 14 C ages are essential parameters for the estimation of the recurrence time of the explosive volcanic activity. The origin, distribution and relative age of mappable Holocene tephra-fall deposits of the Southern Andes Volcanic Zone (SVZ) and Austral Andes Volcanic Zone (AVZ) from 33 o S-54 o S, were studied and their recurrence period is analysed (au)

  17. Where There's Smoke: Using Satellites to Monitor Impact of Human Activities on Agriculture and Glaciers in the Andes and Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, J. L.; Banach, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    Burning of agricultural fields are important sources of black carbon deposition on mountain glaciers in the Andes and Himalayas. Fire is commonly used to support agricultural and pasture management, specifically to remove excess crop residue and other agricultural waste, but these fires can spread into wildland areas during the dry season. Occasionally, agricultural burning causes extreme air pollution events, like occurred in New Delhi, India in October 2016. Satellite data provides a monitoring method of human-caused fire near glaciers that is open-source, easily replicable, and free- to low-cost. We will be able to determine if the climate-smart intervention strategies have reduced or eliminated open burning in these glacier-adjacent agricultural regions. Historic fire and fire emission records have been constructed for the Andean and Himalayan regions, with finer-scale assessments of the regions where farm-level training for conservation agriculture and no-burn techniques are taking place, going back to 2003. Present-day and future (2017-2020) fires and emissions will be mapped and recorded to compare to the historical record, providing an independent assessment and monitoring of how effective the no-burn climate-smart agriculture intervention strategies are at the farm-, village-, region-, and country-level. We can then compare this with our ground-based observations from regional partners for further verification. Using geospatial and geoscience data and methods is important for the success of this project and allows for full transparency of the effectiveness of climate-smart agricultural interventions to improve crop yields for farmers in South America and South Asia while also slowing the melt of the Third Pole.

  18. High-Resolution Modeling of ENSO-Induced Precipitation in the Tropical Andes: Implications for Proxy Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.; Karamperidou, C.

    2017-12-01

    Clastic sediment flux into high-elevation Andean lakes is controlled by glacial processes and soil erosion caused by high precipitation events, making these lakes suitable archives of past climate. To wit, sediment records from Laguna Pallcacocha in Ecuador have been interpreted as proxies of ENSO variability, owing to increased precipitation in the greater region during El Niño events. However, the location of the lake's watershed, the presence of glaciers, and the different impacts of ENSO on precipitation in the eastern vs western Andes have challenged the suitability of the Pallcacocha record as an ENSO proxy. Here, we employ WRF, a high-resolution regional mesoscale weather prediction model, to investigate the circulation dynamics, sources of moisture, and resulting precipitation response in the L. Pallcacocha region during different flavors of El Niño and La Niña events, and in the presence or absence of ice caps. In patricular, we investigate Eastern Pacific (EP), Central Pacific (CP), coastal El Niño, and La Niña events. We validate the model simulations against spatially interpolated station measurements and reanalysis data. We find that during EP events, moisture is primarily advected from the Pacific, whereas during CP events, moisture primarily originates from the Atlantic. More moisture is available during EP events, which implies higher precipitation rates. Furthermore, we find that precipitation during EP events is mostly non-convective in contrast to primarily convective precipitation during CP events. Finally, a synthesis of the sedimentary record and the EP:CP ratio of accumulated precipitation and specific humidity in the L. Pallcacocha region allows us to assess whether past changes in the relative frequency of the two ENSO flavors may have been recorded in paleoclimate archives in this region.

  19. Current state of glaciers in the tropical Andes: a perspective on glacier evolution and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatel, Antoine; Francou, Bernard; Soruco, Alvaro; Gomez, Jesus; Caceres, Bolivar; Ceballos, Jorge-Luis; Vuille, Mathias; Sicart, Jean-Emmanuel; Huggel, Christian

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides a comprehensive overview of the studies of glaciers in the tropical Andes conducted in recent decades leading to the current status of the glaciers in the context of climate change. In terms of changes in surface area and length, we show that the glacier retreat in the tropical Andes over the last three decades is unprecedented since the maximum extension of the LIA (mid 17th - early 18th century). In terms of changes in mass balance, although there have been some sporadic gains on several glaciers, we show that the trend has been quite negative over the past 50 years, with a mean mass balance deficit for glaciers in the tropical Andes that is slightly more negative than the one computed on a global scale. A break point in the trend appeared in the late 1970s with mean annual mass balance per year decreasing from -0.2 m w.e. in the period 1964-1975 to -0.76 m w.e. in the period 1976-2010. In addition, even if glaciers are currently retreating everywhere in the tropical Andes, it should be noted that this is much more pronounced on small glaciers at low altitudes that do not have a permanent accumulation zone, and which could disappear in the coming years/decades. Monthly mass balance measurements performed in Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia show that variability of the surface temperature of the Pacific Ocean is the main factor governing variability of the mass balance at the decadal time scale. Precipitation did not display a significant trend in the tropical Andes in the 20th century, and consequently cannot explain the glacier recession. On the other hand, temperature increased at a significant rate of 0.10°C/decade in the last 70 years. The higher frequency of El Niño events and changes in its spatial and temporal occurrence since the late 1970s together with a warming troposphere over the tropical Andes may thus explain much of the recent dramatic shrinkage of glaciers in this part of the world.

  20. Functional and biological diversity of foliar spectra in tree canopies throughout the Andes to Amazon region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Roberta E; Carranza-Jiménez, Loreli; Sinca, Felipe; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B; Martinez, Paola

    2014-10-01

    Spectral properties of foliage express fundamental chemical interactions of canopies with solar radiation. However, the degree to which leaf spectra track chemical traits across environmental gradients in tropical forests is unknown. We analyzed leaf reflectance and transmittance spectra in 2567 tropical canopy trees comprising 1449 species in 17 forests along a 3400-m elevation and soil fertility gradient from the Amazonian lowlands to the Andean treeline. We developed quantitative links between 21 leaf traits and 400-2500-nm spectra, and developed classifications of tree taxa based on spectral traits. Our results reveal enormous inter-specific variation in spectral and chemical traits among canopy trees of the western Amazon. Chemical traits mediating primary production were tightly linked to elevational changes in foliar spectral signatures. By contrast, defense compounds and rock-derived nutrients tracked foliar spectral variation with changing soil fertility in the lowlands. Despite the effects of abiotic filtering on mean foliar spectral properties of tree communities, the spectra were dominated by phylogeny within any given community, and spectroscopy accurately classified 85-93% of Amazonian tree species. Our findings quantify how tropical tree canopies interact with sunlight, and indicate how to measure the functional and biological diversity of forests with spectroscopy. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roman-Cuesta, R.M.; Carmona-Moreno, C.; Lizcano, G.; New, M.; Silman, M.R.; Knoke, T.; Malhi, Y.; Oliveras Menor, I.; Asbjornsen, H.; Vuille, M.

    2014-01-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in

  2. Distribución y conservación de especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y Andes tropicales Distribution and conservation of endangered species in Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Londoño-Murcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se modeló el nicho ecológico proyectado como distribución potencial de 313 especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y los Andes tropicales, según las listas de la UICN. De estas especies, 285 fueron plantas y 28 fueron vertebrados terrestres. La superposición de las distribuciones de las especies amenazadas cubrió prácticamente toda la región. Ecuador mostró cerca del 30% de su área con 50 especies. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panamá mostraron > 50, aunque en 50% de su área. El Salvador y Honduras, de 11 a 20 en > 50% de su área y México de 1 a 5 especies en > 50% de su área. La distribución de estas especies en áreas transformadas (agricultura y áreas urbanas varió del 11al 30%; El Salvador, Panamá y Guatemala mostraron > 50% de la distribución; Colombia, Honduras y México This study modeled ecological niches projected as potential distributions for 313 endangered species listed in the IUCN for Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes, of which 285 were plants, and 28 terrestrial vertebrates. Overlapping of endangered species distributions covered most of the region. Ecuador showed close to 30% of its area with 50 endangered species. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panama showed more than 50 endangered species in 50% of its area with endangered species (21 to 50 species were Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Panama. El Salvador and Honduras showed > 50% of its area with 11 to 20 endangered species; Mexico showed 50% of endangered species in transformed areas; Colombia, Honduras and Mexico showed < 40%, and Belize and Ecuador showed < 25% of endangered species in transformed areas, respectively. El Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Nicaragua and Mexico showed a high proportion of endangered species in transformed areas for the Classes Amphibia, Liliopsida, Polipodiopsida, and the Orders Asterales, Fabales, Laurales, Myrtales, Scrophulariales and Rubiales. Less than 35% of endangered

  3. British medicine in the Peruvian Andes: the travels of Archibald Smith M.D. (1820-1870 Medicina britânica nos Andes peruanos: as viagens do médico Archibald Smith (1820-1870

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lossio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the travels of the Scottish physician Archibald Smith through the Peruvian Andes between the 1820s and 1860s. Despite his prominent role in the nineteenth-century Peruvian medical scene, almost nothing has been written on Archibald Smith. By exploring Smith's medical activities, publications, and debates, this article intends to uncover unexplored areas of Peruvian medical history, such as the animosity between local and foreign physicians during the post-Independence war era and the important role played by medical geography as a scientific discipline for redefining ethnical and regional issues.O presente artigo traça a vida e obra do médico escocês Archibald Smith durante sua permanência no Peru, entre as décadas de 1820 e 1860. Apesar de sua proeminente contribuição para a medicina peruana, quase nada foi escrito sobre Archibald Smith. Através da investigação das atividades, publicações e debates de que Smith participou, o artigo pretende desvendar áreas inexploradas da história da medicina no Peru, tais como a animosidade entre os médicos locais e estrangeiros no pós-guerra de independência e o papel importante da geografia médica como disciplina científica que redefine questões étnicas e regionais.

  4. Evolution of the Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts, Andes of Neuquén: Insights from structural analysis and apatite fission track dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Mescua, J.; Folguera, A.; Becker, T. P.; Sagripanti, L.; Fennell, L.; Orts, D.; Ramos, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts are located in the western part of the Neuquén basin, an Andean retroarc basin of central-western Argentina. Both belts show evidence of tectonic inversion at the western part during Late Cretaceous times. The eastern part is dominated by late Miocene deformation which also partially reactivated the western structures. This work focuses on the study of the regional structure and the deformational event that shaped the relief of this part of the Andes. Based on new field work and structural data and previously published works a detailed map of the central part of the Neuquén basin is presented. Three regional structural cross sections were surveyed and balanced using the 2d Move™ software. In order to define a more accurate uplift history, new apatite fission track analyses were carried on selected structures. These data was used for new thermal history modeling of the inner part of the Agrio and Chos Malal fold and thrust belts. The results of the fission track analyses improve the knowledge of how these fold and thrust belts have grown trough time. Two main deformational events are defined in Late Cretaceous to Paleocene and Late Miocene times. Based on this regional structural analysis and the fission track data the precise location of the orogenic front for the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene times is reconstructed and it is proposed a structural evolution of this segment of the Andes. This new exhumation data show how the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene event was a continuous and uninterrupted deformational event.

  5. Sources and sinks of methane and nitrous oxide in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Y. A.; Diem, T.; Jones, S.; Oliver, V.; Baggs, E.; Smith, P.; Richards, M.; Meir, P.

    2012-04-01

    Inverse models and remote sensing studies indicate that tropical ecosystems are stronger sources of methane and nitrous oxide than previously predicted by bottom-up emissions inventories. This indicates that prior inventories have either underestimated the strength of existing sources or "missed" key habitats. One of the key areas neglected by previous studies are montane tropical ecosystems. Tropical montane ecosystems are characterized by cooler temperatures (relative to the lowlands), high rainfall, large organic matter pools, and frequent anaerobiosis. These kinds of conditions can promote methane and nitrous oxide production, suggesting that these montane ecosystems may be important contributors to atmospheric budgets of methane and nitrous oxide. In addition, the release of these non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases have the potential to offset the "cooling" effects of plant carbon uptake. However, less is known about these diverse habitats than lowland ecosystems, largely because of their remoteness and inaccessibility. Here we report data on methane and nitrous oxide fluxes from a long elevation gradient in the Peruvian Andes (from 0 to 3500 m.a.s.l.), incorporating a broad range of habitats, from lowland forest to cloud forest. Trace gas fluxes were collected on a monthly basis from 4 elevation bands and over 10 different ecosystem types, including managed and unmanaged habitats. We also conducted high frequency measurement campaigns exploring short-term, weather-driven changes in hydrology on trace gas exchange. Overall these Andean ecosystems were strong sources of nitrous oxide, with emissions equal to or greater than fluxes from the lowland tropics (the single largest source region worldwide). Methane fluxes were much less consistent in direction and magnitude, with some ecosystems acting as net sources while others were weak atmospheric sinks. Nitrous oxide was the dominant global warming agent, offsetting the effects of plant assimilation. The

  6. Paleoclimatic reconstruction in the Bolivian Andes from oxygen isotope analysis of lake sediment cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, B.B.; Aravena, R.; Gibson, J.J.; Abbott, M.B.; Seltzer, G.O.

    2002-01-01

    Cellulose-inferred lake water δ 18 O (δ 18 O lw ) records from Lago Potosi, a seasonally-closed lake in a watershed that is not currently glaciated, and Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota, an overflowing lake in a glaciated watershed, provide the basis for late Pleistocene and Holocene paleoclimatic reconstruction in the Bolivian Andes. Deconvolution of the histories of changing evaporative isotopic enrichment from source water δ 18 O in the lake sediment records is constrained by comparison to the Sajama ice core oxygen isotope profile. At Lago Potosi, the δ 18 O lw record appears to be dominantly controlled by evaporative 18 O-enrichment, reflecting shifts in local effective moisture. Using an isotope-mass balance model, a preliminary quantitative reconstruction of summer relative humidity spanning the past 11,500 cal yr is derived from the Lago Potosi Π 18 O lw record. Results indicate that the late Pleistocene was moist with summer relative humidity values estimated at 10-20% greater than present. Increasing aridity developed in the early Holocene with maximum prolonged dryness spanning 7500 to 6000 cal yr BP at Lago Potosi, an interval characterized by summer relative humidity values that may have been 20% lower than present. Highly variable but dominantly arid conditions persist in the mid- to late Holocene, with average summer relative humidity values estimated at 15% below present, which then increase to about 10-20% greater than present by 2000 cal yr BP. Slightly more arid conditions characterize the last millennium with summer relative humidity values ranging from 5-10% lower than present. Similar long-term variations are evident in the Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota δ 18 O lw profile, except during the early Holocene when lake water evaporative 18 Oenrichment in response to low relative humidity appears to have been offset by enhanced inflow from 18 O-depleted snowmelt or groundwater from the large catchment. Close correspondence occurs between the isotope

  7. Holocene compression in the Acequión valley (Andes Precordillera, San Juan province, Argentina): Geomorphic, tectonic, and paleoseismic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard, M.; Franck, A.; Perucca, L.; Laura, P.; Pantano, Ana; Avila, Carlos R.; Onorato, M. Romina; Vargas, Horacio N.; Alvarado, Patricia; Viete, Hewart

    2016-04-01

    The Matagusanos-Maradona-Acequión Valley sits within the Andes Precordillera fold-thrust belt of western Argentina. It is an elongated topographic depression bounded by the roughly N-S trending Precordillera Central and Oriental in the San Juan Province. Moreover, it is not a piggy-back basin as we could have expected between two ranges belonging to a fold-thrust belt, but a very active tectonic corridor coinciding with a thick-skinned triangular zone, squeezed between two different tectonic domains. The two domains converge, where the Precordillera Oriental has been incorporated to the Sierras Pampeanas province, becoming the western leading edge of the west-verging broken foreland Sierras Pampeanas domain. This latter province has been in turn incorporated into the active deformation framework of the Andes back-arc at these latitudes as a result of enhanced coupling between the converging plates due to the subduction of the Juan Fernández ridge that flattens the Nazca slab under the South American continent. This study focuses on the neotectonics of the southern tip of this N-S elongated depression, known as Acequión (from the homonym river that crosses the area), between the Del Agua and Los Pozos rivers. This depression dies out against the transversely oriented Precordillera Sur, which exhibits a similar tectonic style as Precordillera Occidental and Central (east-verging fold-thrust belt). This contribution brings supporting evidence of the ongoing deformation during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene of the triangular zone bounded between the two leading and converging edges of Precordillera Central and Oriental thrust fronts, recorded in a multi-episodic lake sequence of the Acequión and Nikes rivers. The herein gathered evidence comprise Late Pleistocene-Holocene landforms of active thrusting, fault kinematics (micro-tectonic) data and outcrop-scale (meso-tectonic) faulting and folding of recent lake and alluvial sequences. In addition, seismically

  8. Changing Precipitation Patterns or Waning Glaciers? Identifying Water Supply Vulnerabilities to Climate Change in the Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Z. S.; McIntosh, J. C.; Papuga, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Bolivian Andes have become an iconic example for the impacts of climate change. Glaciers are rapidly melting and some have already completely disappeared. More than 75 percent of the water consumed by 2 million people living on the flanks of the Bolivian Andes comes from mountains and it is often cited that the dwindling ice threatens the water supply of the expanding and destitute population living in the twin cities of La Paz and El Alto. However, the wet and the warm seasons and the cold and dry seasons coincide, causing high precipitation and ice melt—and therefore high streamflows—to occur only in the austral summer (October-March); during the austral winter, cold conditions limit glacier melt. This suggests that reductions in the water supply could be influenced more by changing precipitation amounts than continued glacial mass-wasting. We hypothesize that precipitation is the principal component of groundwater recharge for the aquifers at the base of the central Cordillera Real. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes from rivers partially fed by glaciers, groundwater, and glacial melt water can help determine the relative contribution of precipitation and glacial melt to important water supplies. During the dry season in August 2010, we sampled 23 sites that follow the flow path of water in the Condiriri watershed, beginning in the glacial headwaters and ending several kilometers upriver from Lake Titicaca. We collected five samples at the toe of the Pequeño Alpamayo glacier and four samples from three tributary rivers that drain glaciated headwaters, which include meltwater from the Pequeño Alpamayo glacier. W also collected 14 water samples from shallow and deep wells in rural communities within 40 kilometers of the glaciers. If the isotopic values of groundwater are similar to rain values, as we suspect, precipitation is likely the largest contributor to groundwater resources in the region and will suggest that changing precipitation patterns present the

  9. Seismic studies in the southern Puna plateau and the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto Mory, Frank Jimmy

    I present three studies in two regions, both within the Central Andes. In both regions it is clear that there are significant variations in the subduction geometry. I have used surface wave tomography to investigate the shear wave velocity structure beneath the southern Puna plateau and found evidence of widespread melting of the crust beneath the high elevations which correlates with a gap in intermediate depth seismicity and the recent eruptions of ignimbrite complexes. All of these observations can be explained by the delamination of the lithospheric mantle beneath it. I measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities as a function of frequency and inverted then to obtain shear wave velocities as a function of depth. The results show a high velocity body sitting above the subducting Nazca plate beneath the northern edge of the Cerro Galan ignimbrite. This high velocity body is interpreted to be the delaminated piece of lithosphere that detached and sank leading to a localized upwelling of asthenosphere that, in turn, caused widespread crustal melting leading to the eruption of the most recent ignimbrite complexes. Furthermore it is possible that this upwelling also thermally eroded the slab in this region. It is apparent that there is a significant slab gap or hole where there are very few intermediate depth earthquakes. In addition, I have used shear wave splitting analysis and shear wave splitting tomography in the southern Puna plateau to investigate the patterns of seismic anisotropy and mantle flow. The results show very complex shear wave splitting and seismic anisotropy patterns throughout the southern Puna plateau. The observations suggest that different mechanisms are driving the mantle flow from region to region. The subslab mantle outside the region where delamination took place is mostly driven by slab roll back and small degree of coupling between the subducting slab and the mantle below it. In the region apparently dominated by delamination, the subslab

  10. Climate in the Western Cordillera of the Central Andes over the last 4300 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Zbyněk; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Chuman, Tomáš; Šefrna, Luděk; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The Distichia peat core obtained in the Carhuasanta valley near Nevado Mismi, Cordillera Chila, provides information on climatic and environmental conditions over the last ˜4300 years. The relative changes in the stable carbon isotope composition of plant remains preserved in the core reflect major temperature fluctuations in the Western Cordillera of the southern Peruvian Andes. These temperature variations can be additionally linked with the changes in precipitation patterns by analysing C% and C/N ratio in the core. Relatively warm and moist conditions prevailed from 4280 to 3040 cal. yrs BP (BC 2330-1090) with a short colder dry episode around 3850 cal. yrs BP (BC 1900). The most prominent climate changes recorded in the peat occurred between 3040 and 2750 cal. yrs BP (BC 1090-800) when the initial warming turned to a rapid cooling to temperatures at least 2 °C lower than the mean for the Late Holocene. Initially drier conditions within this event turned to a short wet phase after 2780 cal. yrs BP (BC 830) when the temperature increased again. This event coincides with significant changes in peat and ice core records in the Central Andes matching the timing of the global climate event around 2.8 cal. ka BP. Climatic conditions in the study area became relatively dry and stable after the event for about 800 years. Highly variable temperatures and humidity prevailed during the last 2000 years when an extended warm and relatively humid period occurred between 640 and 155 cal. yrs BP (AD 1310-1795) followed by predominantly colder and drier conditions. The established δ13C peat record represents the first continuous proxy for the temperature in the southern Peruvian Andes dated by the AMS 14C. Distichia peat is wide spread in the Andes and the proposed approach can be applied elsewhere in high altitudes, where no other traditional climate proxies are available.

  11. Agriculture biologique dans les Andes péruviennes | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le défi. Au Pérou, la pauvreté est presque trois fois plus prononcée en milieu rural qu'en milieu urbain, et la situation est encore pire dans les Andes. On dit souvent que l'agriculture biologique permet, de façon durable, d'augmenter le rendement des exploitations agricoles, de réduire la pauvreté, d'atténuer les effets des ...

  12. Quantifying Wide-Area Continental Deformation: Palinspastic Reconstruction of the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, C.; Rodriguez-Corcho, A. F.; Hoyos, N.; Cardona, A.; Bayona, G.

    2017-12-01

    The northern Andes could either be called a very wide plate margin, or an area of intraplate distributed deformation. At its apex, the northern Andes reach 5500 m elevation, nearly 600 km inboard from the margin (this is as far inland as the Sierras Pampeanas in Argentina). This part of the Andean belt is characterized by northeast-trending, wide deformation belts that turn eastwardly to define the sharp southern Caribbean plate boundary to the east. Regardless of kinematic model preferences, or reconstruction methodologies, any attempt to map deformation in the northern Andes and the southern Caribbean plate should honor known strain datasets and chronology of deformation in a way that allows quantification of wide- area deformation. We compiled all available strain datasets. These include shortening estimates, paleomagnetic declination data, and discrete kinematic markers. Shortening in the northern Andes has traditionally been estimated by constructing cross-sections perpendicular to the main structural trends, therefore missing any along-strike deformation. Recent GPS data confirms that modern convergence vectors are oblique to main structural trends, not orthogonal. Despite differences in interpretation and structural style, cross-sections across the Eastern cordillera of Colombia show roughly consistent shortening values. A paleomagnetic dataset shows that large vertical-axis clockwise rotations are dominant in the northwestern corner of South America and southern Caribbean margin, but absent in the Eastern cordillera. Vertical-axis rotations are again large in the Central American arc. Paleogeographic piercing points such as stranded high-grade clasts, displaced metamorphic belts, and provenance analyses, constrain strike-slip faulting, where often several hundreds of kilometers of displacement can be inferred. Combining all of these datasets into a single kinematic reconstruction (using freeware GPlates), that also respects known timing of deformation

  13. Non-metric variation of the Muisca dentition in the northern Andes of Colombia, South America

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Flórez, Carlos David

    2015-01-01

    This article presents dental non-metric data observed in Muisca samples from the central-eastern Andes of Colombia. Permanent teeth of 146 individuals between 5 and 40 years of age belonging to five pre-Hispanic human cemeteries were observe. Fifteen dental traits were score following the ASUDAS method. A comparison between the values of the five samples shows that biological homogeneity did exist within these populations. At least 800 years of genetic continuity and biological interbreeding ...

  14. Slope and climate variability control of erosion in the Andes of central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Carretier, Sébastien; Regard, V.; Vassallo, R.; Aguilar, G.; Martinod, J.; Riquelme, R.; Pepin, E.; Charrier, R.; Hérail, Gérard; Farias, M.; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Vargas, G.; Lagane, Christelle

    2013-01-01

    Climate and topography control millennial-scale mountain erosion, but their relative impacts remain matters of debate. Conflicting results may be explained by the influence of the erosion threshold and daily variability of runoff on long-term erosion. However, there is a lack of data documenting these erosion factors. Here we report suspended-load measurements, derived decennial erosion rates, and Be-10-derived millennial erosion rates along an exceptional climatic gradient in the Andes of ce...

  15. Geophysical and Geochemical Constraints on the Age and Paleoclimate Implications of Holocene Lacustrine Cores from the Central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, R.; Negrini, R. M.; Antinao, J. L.; Maldonado, A.

    2016-12-01

    A Holocene paleoclimate record has been constructed using two lacustrine cores from the high-elevation Chilean Andes at 30° S latitude. Coarser grain sizes, bimodal grain-size distributions, greater carbon and nitrogen weight percentages, and C/N ratios were found to co-vary suggesting increased storm activity and wet climate. The Holocene began with a wet period from 10.9-9.5 cal ka BP, then transitioned to dry conditions from 9.5-5.5 cal ka BP interrupted by wet conditions from 8.3-7.7 cal ka BP. Wet conditions prevailed from 5.5 cal ka BP-present, interrupted by two short arid periods from 4.9-4.4 cal ka BP and 2.6-2.2 cal ka BP. This paleoclimate record is consistent with others from the region and with preliminary pollen data from the same cores. Accordingly, the wet periods with greater storm activity are likely caused by the prevalent influence of the westerlies, while dry conditions are the result of the dominant influence of the Southeast Pacific anticyclone. Furthermore, the increased storminess from 8.3-7.7 cal ka BP may have been sourced from latitudinal shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone, possibly representing a southern hemisphere effect of the widespread 8.2 ka event first detected in Greenland ice cores.

  16. A Stepwise, Participatory Approach to Design and Implement Community Based Adaptation to Drought in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Lasage

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The livelihoods of people in the Andes are expected to be affected by climate change due to their dependence on glacier water. The observed decrease in glacier volume over the last few decades is likely to accelerate during the current century, which will affect water availability in the region. This paper presents an approach for participatory development of community-based adaptation measures to cope with the projected impacts of climate change. It combines in an innovative manner participatory design with physical measurements, modeling and a vulnerability analysis. Vulnerability to drought is made operational for households in a catchment of the Ocoña River basin in Peru. On the basis of a household survey (n = 94 we explore how a vulnerability index (risk divided by response efficacy can be used to assess the distribution of vulnerability over households, and how socio-economic factors determine this vulnerability. Water entitlement, area of irrigated land, income and education are all significantly correlated with vulnerability to drought. The research showed that the main source of spring water is local rainwater, and that water use efficiency is low. The selected adaptation measures aimed to increase water availability close to farmland, and increase water use efficiency of farmers and households.

  17. Climate Change in the Peruvian Andes: A Case Study on Small-Scale Farmers’ Vulnerability in the Quillcay River Basin

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    Anna Heikkinen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that climatic changes in the Peruvian Andes pose a threat to lowland communities, mainly through changes in hydrology. This study uses a case study approach and a mixed qualitative-quantitative method to examine the vulnerability of small-scale farmers in the Quillcay River basin to variations in precipitation and enhanced glacier retreat. The findings of the study show partly contradicting results. On one hand, interpretation of semi-structured interviews suggests a strong relation between climate proxies and increased vulnerability of the smallholders. On the other hand, in the quantitative analysis enhanced glacier retreat seemed to have augmented vulnerability solely to some extent whereas precipitation did not show significant impact. The assessment of the socioeconomic dimension revealed that larger market forces, weak political entitlement and lack of social and economic capital fundamentally increased smallholders’ vulnerability. It is, therefore, suggested that a complex cluster of economic, political and social factors are the root causes of small-scale farmers’ vulnerability in the case study region whereas climate-related changes merely act as multiplying factors.

  18. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  19. Grenvillian remnants in the Northern Andes: Rodinian and Phanerozoic paleogeographic perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Chew, D.; Valencia, V. A.; Bayona, G.; Mišković, A.; Ibañez-Mejía, M.

    2010-01-01

    Grenvillian crust is encountered in several basement inliers in the northern Andes of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and is also represented as a major detrital or inherited component within Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic sedimentary and magmatic rocks. This review of the tectonic and geochronological record of the Grenvillian belt in the northern Andes suggests that these crustal segments probably formed on an active continental margin in which associated arc and back-arc magmatism evolved from ca. 1.25 to 1.16 Ga, possibly extending to as young as 1.08 Ga. The lithostratigraphic and tectonic history of the Grenvillian belt in the northern Andes differs from that of the Sunsas belt on the southwest Amazonian Craton and from the Grenvillian belt of Eastern Laurentia. It is considered that this belt, along with similar terranes of Grenvillian age in Middle America and Mexico define a separate composite orogen which formed on the northwestern margin of the Amazonian Craton. Microcontinent accretion and interaction with the Sveconorwegian province on Baltica is a feasible tectonic scenario, in line with recent paleogeographic reconstructions of the Rodinian supercontinent. Although Phanerozoic tectonics may have redistributed some of these terranes, they are still viewed as para-autocthonous domains that remained in proximity to the margin of Amazonia. Paleogeographic data derived from Phanerozoic rocks suggest that some of the Colombian Grenvillian fragments were connected to northernmost Peru and Ecuador until the Mesozoic, whereas the Mexican terranes where attached to the Colombian margin until Pangea fragmentation in Late Triassic times.

  20. Calculated WIMP signals at the ANDES laboratory: comparison with northern and southern located dark matter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitarese, O.; Fushimi, K. J.; Mosquera, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are possible components of the Universe’s dark matter (DM). The detection of WIMPs is signaled by the recoil of the atomic nuclei which form a detector. CoGeNT at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (SUL) and DAMA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) have reported data on annual modulation of signals attributed to WIMPs. Both experiments are located in laboratories in the Northern Hemisphere. DM detectors are planned to operate (or already operate) in laboratories in the Southern Hemisphere, including SABRE at Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory (SUPL) in Australia, and DM-ICE in Antarctica. In this work we have analyzed the dependence of diurnal and annual modulation of signals, pertaining to the detection of WIMP, on the coordinates of the laboratory, for experiments which may be performed in the planned new Agua Negra Deep Experimental Site (ANDES) underground facility, to be built in San Juan, Argentina. We made predictions for NaI and Ge-type detectors placed in ANDES, to compare with DAMA, CoGeNT, SABRE and DM-ICE arrays, and found that the diurnal modulation of the signals, at the ANDES site, is amplified at its maximum value, both for NaI (Ge)-type detectors, while the annual modulation remains unaffected by the change in coordinates from north to south.

  1. APROPIACIÓN INCA EN LA CORDILLERA DE CHILLA, SUROESTE DE LOS ANDES DEL ECUADOR: EL CASO DEL SITIO GUIÑAYZHU (Inca Appropriation in the Chilla Mountain Range, Southwest of the Andes of Ecuador: the Case of the Guiñayzhu Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jadán V.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se discuten los resultados del trabajo realizado en el sitio Guiñayzhu, al suroeste de los Andes del Ecuador. Esta investigación revela que el sitio, además de presentar evidencias de poblaciones locales, tiene colcas o qullcas para el almacenaje de productos, terrazas de pirca y caminos empedrados entre otras instalaciones. Se interpreta que Guiñayzhu es uno de los sitios de la cordillera de Chilla que refleja la expansión del incario y expresa una efectiva dominación de esta región como un enclave estratégico del imperio en su avance hacia el norte. ENGLISH: In this article, the results of research carried out in Guiñayzhu, located at the southwest of the Andes of Ecuador, are discussed. This work reveals that in addition to presenting evidence of local populations, the site has colcas or qullqas for the storage of products, terraces of pirca, and roads paved with stone, among other constructions. Guiñayzhu is interpreted as one of the sites of the Chilla mountain range that reflects the expansion of the Inca and expresses an effective domination of this region, representing a strategic enclave of the empire in its advance northward.

  2. Raquel Gil Montero. La construcción de Argentina y Bolivia en los Andes meridionales. Población, tierras y ambiente en el siglo xix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Joaquín Pinto Bernal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La historiadora Raquel Gil Montejo, profesora de la Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argentina, reconocida por sus trabajos sobre población y consolidación de regiones de frontera en los Andes meridionales en la época colonial y temprana republicana, presenta en este libro una interesante investigación sobre la conformación de la frontera argentino-boliviana, tema poco tratado debido a la amplia atención que la historiografía argentina ha dedicado a la conformación de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Dicho factor hace de este texto un trabajo excepcional por el uso de variables como la cuestión ambiental, la producción prehispánica y la pugna existente entre los deseos de implementación del orden republicano y la supervivencia del orden prehispánico y colonial.

  3. Flora y vegetación leñosa de los bosques de los Andes en la región de Madidi, La Paz (Bolivia)

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes Claros, Alfredo Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: La región del Madidi en el noroeste de Bolivia es una de las más biodiversas del mundo, por incluir un amplio rango altitudinal desde los 200 hasta más de 6000 m, y floras de los Andes y la Amazonía, dos de las regiones biogeográficas más diversas del mundo. Esta región comprende territorios de tres áreas protegidas de interés nacional (Madidi, Apolobamba y Pilón Lajas), superpuestas a comunidades indígenas, campesinas, y áreas de exploración hidrocarburífera, lo cual ha generad...

  4. Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Barbarán

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From an historic and demographic perspective, as well as the use of natural resources, we analyzed the relationship between human migrations and the economic activities of Los Andes Department, West of the Salta Province, in NW Argentina. Using the residual method, we calculated migratory balances between Argentinean population censuses carried out in 1947,1960, 1970, 1980 and 2001. The migratory balances were negative for all the periods studied. When the train started to run through Ramal C-14, the workers who built it have to find jobs somewhere else. At the same time, the railway made easier for the natives, to find better economicopportunities out of the Puna. The close of mine La Casualidad by the end of the 70’s, the low creation of jobs by the remaining mining operations, focused in to hire qualified technicians no available in Los Andes and the privatization of the railway in early 90’s, were important factors of emigration. Despite of cattle rising as the main economic activity in rural areas, it is practiced without any technology of management. The overgrazing caused for that reason, has reduced almost to the half the quantity of sheep by inhabitant between 1947 and 2001. That is why the local people have to press more on the wildlife, trading illegally with vicuña (Vicugna vicugna fiber. Despite of a touristic development plan, a law promoting sheep rising and a census of vicuña population carried out by the provincial government, these recent actions should be part of a development project of regional scale, oriented to the sustainable use of the natural resources of Los Andes Department. That project would create jobs and discourage emigration.Desde una perspectiva histórica, demográfica y del uso de los recursos naturales, analizamos la relación existente entre las migraciones humanas y las actividades económicas en el departamento Los Andes, ubicado al W de la provincia de Salta, en el Noroeste Argentino. Usando el m

  5. Glacial melt content of water use in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Moulds, Simon; Acosta, Luis; De Bièvre, Bert; Olmos, Carlos; Villacis, Marcos; Tovar, Carolina; Verbist, Koen M. J.

    2017-11-01

    Accelerated melting of glaciers is expected to have a negative effect on the water resources of mountain regions and their adjacent lowlands, with tropical mountain regions being among the most vulnerable. In order to quantify those impacts, it is necessary to understand the changing dynamics of glacial melting, but also to map how glacial meltwater contributes to current and future water use, which often occurs at considerable distance downstream of the terminus of the glacier. While the dynamics of tropical glacial melt are increasingly well understood and documented, major uncertainty remains on how the contribution of tropical glacial meltwater propagates through the hydrological system, and hence how it contributes to various types of human water use in downstream regions. Therefore, in this paper we present a detailed regional mapping of current water demand in regions downstream of the major tropical glaciers. We combine these maps with a regional water balance model to determine the dominant spatiotemporal patterns of the contribution of glacial meltwater to human water use at an unprecedented scale and resolution. We find that the number of users relying continuously on water resources with a high (>25%) long-term average contribution from glacial melt is low (391 000 domestic users, 398 km2 of irrigated land, and 11 MW of hydropower production), but this reliance increases sharply during drought conditions (up to 3.92 million domestic users, 2096 km2 of irrigated land, and 732 MW of hydropower production in the driest month of a drought year). A large proportion of domestic and agricultural users are located in rural regions where climate adaptation capacity tends to be low. Therefore, we suggest that adaptation strategies should focus on increasing the natural and artificial water storage and regulation capacity to bridge dry periods.

  6. Depositación atmosférica de nitrógeno en un transecto valle longitudinal-cordillera de Los Andes, centro-sur de Chile Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen in a transect from the Central Valley to Cordillera de Los Andes, south-central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS E. OYARZÚN

    2002-03-01

    Osorno y Parque Nacional Puyehue, respectivamente. Los resultados se discuten en relación con los posibles efectos ambientales de las crecientes tasas de depositación atmosférica, sobre la acidificación y eutroficación del suelo y aguas subterráneas y de escorrentía, en el valle longitudinal del centro-sur de Chile.Agricultural-livestock activities in south-central Chile, could result in elevated emissions of inorganic N (mainly NH3 compounds into the atmosphere. Ammonia can be transported via air currents and deposited on the vegetation and soil. The present study evaluates the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds (NO3- y NH4+ in the precipitation, in an altitudinal transect of 66 km long, from the vicinity of Osorno (40º 35' S, 72º 57' W, 55 m of altitude to Puyehue National Park, Cordillera de Los Andes (40º 46' S, 72º 11' W, 1,120 m of altitude. In seven sites, from June-1999 to May-2000, precipitation was recorded and water samples were collected monthly, for to determine pH, conductivity and NO3- and NH4+ concentrations. Annual precipitation increased from 1,103 mm near Osorno to 6,799 mm in Antillanca, Puyehue National Park. Annual mean values of pH showed little change from 6.3 in the central valley to 5.8 in the Cordillera de Los Andes. Conductivity showed the maximum values near Osorno (22.9 muS cm-1, intermediate values in transitional sites, and 11.3 muS cm-1 in the Cordillera de Los Andes. The annual mean concentrations of NO3-N changed between 52.3 mug L-1 in the agriculture-cattle area and 6.9 mug L-1 in temperate rainforests in Puyehue National Park. NH4+ concentrations changed between 699.4 mug L-1 in the Osorno sector to 37.8 mug L-1 in Cordillera de Los Andes. Inorganic-N values have a marked seasonal variation in the agricultural region with the maximum values in spring-summer and minimum in wintertime. Annual rates of atmospheric deposition of NO3-N fluctuated between 0.53 and 0.57 kg ha-1 yr-1, and the NH4-N between 6.4 and 2.8 kg

  7. An Epidemic of Oroya Fever in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Marafion River in regions with elevations of 600-2,450 m in Co- the Department of Ancash. Pomabamba Prov- 6 lumbia. Ecuador. Peru. Chile , Bolivia...lipopolysaccharide T’he epidemic began during the rainy season. (Difco laboratories. Detroit. M11) and Brucella November to May. Many of the lPrsi cases re

  8. Organic farming in the Peruvian Andes | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The challenge. Poverty in Peru is almost three times higher in rural areas than in urban areas, and is even worse in the Andean region. Organic agriculture is often promoted as a sustainable way to increase overall farm performance, reduce poverty, mitigate climate change, and improve food security. However, without ...

  9. Del santuario al caserío: acerca de la neolitización en la Cordillera de los Andes Centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1988-01-01

    . Piruru presenta, en el Precerámico Final (3000/2500 - 1800/1500 a.C., un largo período de construcción con fines religiosos antes de que existan, en el Formativo Inicial y Medio (1800/1500 - 800/600 a.C., estructuras de uso doméstico. Esta anterioridad de la arquitectura pública y ceremonial, observable en la escala regional, permite proponer la hipótesis que durante el Precerámico Final, los santuarios de la sierra tienen un rol catalizador, no sólo en lo que concierne al surgimiento y al desarrollo de la arquitectura, sino también en lo referente a la organización espacial de las comunidades en proceso de sedentarización. Durante la larga ocupación del Precerámico Final, más de 1000 años, las primeras fases de la secuencia de Piruru muestran la existencia de templetes que son los más antiguos que se conocen hasta hoy en los Andes Centrales. Luego, la fase más reciente del Templo P1 permite vincular Piruru a los demás santuarios conocidos y definir la tradición Mito, corriente religiosa que se manifiesta durante la segunda parte del Precerámico Final en las sierras de Ancash y Huánuco. En el Formativo Inicial, al mismo tiempo que se introduce la cerámica en el sitio arqueológico, Piruru se transforma en un pequeño hábitat agrupado, primer ejemplo conocido hoy en día en la sierra. En el transcurso de un largo proceso de más de 700 años, las transformaciones en la organización global del asentamiento indican un grado creciente de sedentarismo y muestran la transición desde un caserío utilizado de manera temporal hasta una aldea poblada de modo permanente, pues el sedentarismo parece haber sido adquirido al principio del Formativo Medio. 'From Shrine to Hamlet: About the Neolithic Process in the Central Andes Highlands'. The archaeological evidence found in Piruru opens new perspectives about sedentism and the rise of the village in the Central Andes. Piruru presents, during the Late Preceramic (3000/2500 -1800/1500 BC, a long period of

  10. Mass balance evolution on two glaciers in the ecuadorian Andes (0°28'S) since the mid-20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basantes, Ruben; Rabatel, Antoine; Alvarez, Danilo; Francou, Bernard; Galarraga, Remigio; Maisincho, Luis; Caceres, Bolivar

    2014-05-01

    The glacier mass balance evolution on two glaciers (Antisana Glacier 12 and Antisana Glacier 15α) in the tropical Andes is presented. To this end, photogrammetry technique was applied on aerial images taken at five dates: 1956, 1965, 1979, 1997 and 2009. For each date, digital elevation models (DEMs) were generated with an average vertical accuracy of ±2.2 m. The spatiotemporal volume variation of the glaciers is calculated through the elevations differences between DEMs and a density factor. The outcomes show that after 1970s the glaciers have experimented a strong recession even if a noticeable increase in mass was detected between 1965 and 1979. From 1979 to 1997, the ablation rates have dramatically increased and the average annual mass balance reached very negative values (-1.1 m w.e. yr-1 for Antisana Glacier 15α and -0.8 m w.e. yr-1 for Antisana Glacier 12). In the last study period, from 1997 to 2009, the glaciers average annual mass balances were less negative (-0.6 m w.e. yr-1 for Antisana Glacier 12 and -0.2 m w.e. yr-1 for Antisana Glacier 15α). The later matched with the period of conventional observations allowing compare the results given by both methodologies, i.e. geodetic and glaciological methods. However, some morphological constraints affecting the figures observed in the glaciological mass balance must be considered. Finally, we performed an analysis of the relationship between the glacier changes and the climate conditions over the study periods in order to understand how climate has impacted the glacier retreat in this region. For such an aim, local climate variables, i.e. temperature and precipitation, as well as regional indices, i.e. Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) have been used. The outcomes show a high correlation between the climate signals and the glacier behavior at both annual and decadal time scales.

  11. The impact of Quaternary climate oscillations on divergence times and historical population sizes in Thylamys opossums from the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarla, Thomas C; Jansa, Sharon A

    2015-05-01

    Climate oscillations during the Quaternary altered the distributions of terrestrial animals at a global scale. In mountainous regions, temperature fluctuations may have led to shifts in range size and population size as species tracked their shifting habitats upslope or downslope. This creates the potential for both allopatric speciation and population size fluctuations, as species are either constrained to smaller patches of habitat at higher elevations or able to expand into broader areas at higher latitudes. We considered the impact of climate oscillations on three pairs of marsupial species from the Andes (Thylamys opossums) by inferring divergence times and demographic changes. We compare four different divergence dating approaches, using anywhere from one to 26 loci. Each pair comprises a northern (tropical) lineage and a southern (subtropical to temperate) lineage. We predicted that divergences would have occurred during the last interglacial (LIG) period approximately 125 000 years ago and that population sizes for northern and southern lineages would either contract or expand, respectively. Our results suggest that all three north-south pairs diverged in the late Pleistocene during or slightly after the LIG. The three northern lineages showed no signs of population expansion, whereas two southern lineages exhibited dramatic, recent expansions. We attribute the difference in responses between tropical and subtropical lineages to the availability of 'montane-like' habitats at lower elevations in regions at higher latitudes. We conclude that climate oscillations of the late Quaternary had a powerful impact on the evolutionary history of some of these species, both promoting speciation and leading to significant population size shifts. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Recent trends in human migrations: the case of the Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, M M; Torrealba, R

    1982-01-01

    studies identified that use demographic, economic, or phychosocial approaches have provided partial explanations of the current status of Andean migrations. The explanations they offer, by not transcending the current reality of the migrants, overlook the historical traits of internal migration. Migratory flows do not spring up suddenly. They result from specific socio-political circumstances which, when closely linked to demographic evidence, serve as a basis for understanding the process. Review of studies on internal migration in the Northern Andes, as presented here, reveals a series of distinguishing characteristics: there are 5 migratory patterns--rural to rural, rural to urban, urban to urban, seasonal worker migration, and return migration, and the predominant pattern has been rural to urban; the demographic data show the importance of rural migrants to urban growth in the region and a complementary loss of population in the rural areas; depopulation of the countryside has been selective; and there is a marked disparity in employment remuneration between rural and urban areas.

  13. Late Cenozoic basin evolution and fold-thrust deformation in the southern Central Andes: Initial constraints from synorogenic deposits of the Precordillera, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, M.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Stockli, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    In the Precordillera region of the Argentine Andes, Cenozoic shortening associated with flattening of the Pampean segment of the subducting Nazca plate has resulted in a series of thin skinned fold-thrust systems that partitioned and uplifted Cenozoic foreland basin deposits. The kinematic and temporal evolution of the Andean Precordillera can be approached through detailed analyses of the sedimentary fill now preserved in intermontane regions and the bedrock low-temperature thermochronology of the fold-thrust belt. In this project, we focus on Neogene foreland basin fill exposed in the central and eastern Precordillera along the San Juan River (Quebrada Albarracín and Pachaco regions), on the western flank of the Sierra Talacasto, and in the Loma de las Tapias area near the Ullum dam. The sedimentary successions exposed in these regions record the hinterland development of the Frontal Cordillera (detrital zircon provenance and composition of sandstone and conglomeratic units), regional volcanism (pyroclastic flows and tuffaceous sandstone units), and initial construction of the Precordillera (fault cutoff relationships, growth strata, and paleocurrent changes). We investigate the development and subsequent partitioning and deformation of these synorogenic sections using sediment provenance (detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, conglomerate clast counts, sandstone petrography, and paleocurrent measurements), facies analysis of measured stratigraphic successions, and initial apatite (U-Th)/He cooling histories to constrain the age of uplift-induced exhumation of successive thrust sheets in the Andean Precordillera.

  14. Geoid Model and Altitude at Mount Aconcagua Region (Argentina) from Airborne Gravity Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristina Pacino, M.; Jaeger, Eric; Forsberg, René

    2014-01-01

    Aconcagua is part of the Southern Andes in the Argentine Province of Mendoza and it is the highest mountain in the Americas. The Aconcagua region is mostly inaccessible for land surveys. The existing gravity data are sparsely distributed, and mainly along the route currently used to climb the mou...

  15. Subvolcanic contact metasomatism at El Laco Volcanic Complex, Central Andes Metasomatismo de contacto subvolcánico en el Complejo Volcánico El Laco, Andes centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Naranjo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of drill cores from the Pasos Blancos area at El Laco in the central Andes, northern Chile, give evidence of an intense and extensive subvolcanic contact-metasomatic process. This process resulted from shallow-level emplacement of very volatile-rich iron-oxide magma, with discharge of volatiles that resulted in extensive fracturing of overlying volcanic rocks. The brecciated rocks were altered (mainly extensive scapolitization and formation of pyroxene by hot magmatic fluids emitted from the cooling intrusion , and accompanied by magnetite deposition. With time and decreasing temperature, the metasomatic fluids evolved to fluids of hydrothermal character, and a final recent geothermal event took place that deposited superficial gypsum over a large part of the El Laco Volcanic Complex.Estudios realizados en testigos de sondajes en el area de Pasos Blancos en El Laco, en los Andes Centrales del norte de Chile, dan evidencias de un intenso y extenso proceso subvolcánico de metasomatismo de contacto. Este proceso es el resultado de un emplazamiento a poca profundidad de un magma de óxido de fierro muy rico en volátiles y cuya descarga de gases produjo un intenso fracturamiento de las rocas sobrepuestas. Las rocas brechizadas fueron alteradas (principalmente una extensa escapolitización y formación de piroxeno, junto con la depositación de magnetita, por los fluidos magmáticos calientes emitidos por la intrusión durante su enfriamiento. Los fluidos metasomáticos evolucionaron en el tiempo y con la disminución de temperatura, a fluidos de carácter hidrotermal y finalmente tuvo lugar un evento geotérmico reciente, el cual depositó yeso superficial en gran parte del Complejo Volcánico El Laco.

  16. Sistemática filogenética de las lagartijas del género Stenocercus (Squamata: Iguania de los Andes del norte Phylogenetic systematics of lizards of the genus Stenocercus (Squamata: Iguania from the northern Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Torres-Carvajal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El género Stenocercus está compuesto por 61 especies que se distribuyen principalmente en los Andes y tierras bajas aledañas (0-4 000 m, desde el norte de Colombia y Venezuela hasta el centro de Argentina. En este trabajo se realizaron análisis de parsimonia e inferencia bayesiana para estudiar las relaciones filogenéticas entre las 20 especies de Stenocercus que habitan en los Andes del norte (Ecuador, Colombia y Venezuela, utilizando datos morfológicos y moleculares por separado y en combinación. Los análisis dieron como resultado topologías similares indicando que las especies de Stenocercus de los Andes del norte están divididas en 2 clados. Uno contiene 6 especies distribuidas entre el sur de Ecuador y sur de Colombia, mientras que el otro tiene 13 especies distribuidas desde el sur de Ecuador hasta el norte de Colombia y Venezuela. Los resultados también sugieren que la reciente formación de los Andes del norte ha tenido gran influencia sobre la evolución de Stenocercus.The genus Stenocercus is composed of 61 species that occur mainly in the Andes and adjacent lowland areas (0-4 000 m from northern Colombia and Venezuela to central Argentina. In this study, I performed parsimony and Bayesian analyses to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the 20 species of Stenocercus that occur in the northern Andes (Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela; I analyzed morphological, molecular, and combined datasets. These analyses resulted in similar topologies, which indicate that species of Stenocercus from the northern Andes are nested within 2 major clades. One of these clades contains 6 species occurring between southern Ecuador and southern Colombia, whereas the other clade includes 13 species that occur from southern Ecuador to northern Colombia and Venezuela. The results also suggest that the recent uplift of the northern Andes has had a major impact on the evolution of Stenocercus.

  17. A new species of Alopoglossus lizard (Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae from the tropical Andes, with a molecular phylogeny of the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Torres-Carvajal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of Alopoglossus from the Pacific slopes of the Andes in northern Ecuador based on morphological and molecular evidence. The new species differs most significantly from all other congeners ina double longitudinal row of widened gular scales, lanceolate dorsal scales in transverse rows, 29–32 dorsal scales in a transverse row at midbody, and 4 longitudinal rows of ventrals at midbody. It is most similar in morphology to A. festae, the only species of Alopoglossus currently recognized in western Ecuador. We analyze the phylogenetic relationships among species of Alopoglossus based on the mitochondrial gene ND4. Cis-Andean [east of the Andes] and Trans-Andean [west of the Andes] species are nested in two separate clades, suggesting that the uplift of these mountains had an important effect in the diversification of Alopoglossus. In addition, we present an updated key to the species of Alopoglossus.

  18. Elevation-dependent changes in n-alkane δD and soil GDGTs across the South Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Rohrmann, Alexander; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Sachse, Dirk; Tofelde, Stefanie; Niedermeyer, Eva M.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Mulch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Surface uplift of large plateaus may significantly influence regional climate and more specifically precipitation patterns and temperature, sometimes complicating paleoaltimetry interpretations. Thus, understanding the topographic evolution of tectonically active mountain belts benefits from continued development of reliable proxies to reduce uncertainties in paleoaltimetry reconstructions. Lipid biomarker-based proxies provide a novel approach to stable isotope paleoaltimetry and complement authigenic or pedogenic mineral proxy materials, in particular outside semi-arid climate zones where soil carbonates are not abundant but (soil) organic matter has a high preservation potential. Here we present δD values of soil-derived n-alkanes and mean annual air temperature (MAT) estimates based on branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) distributions to assess their potential for paleoelevation reconstructions in the southern central Andes. We analyzed soil samples across two environmental and hydrological gradients that include a hillslope (26-28°S) and a valley (22-24°S) transect on the windward flanks of Central Andean Eastern Cordillera in NW Argentina. Our results show that present-day n-alkane δD values and brGDGT-based MAT estimates are both linearly related with elevation and in good agreement with present-day climate conditions. Soil n-alkanes show a δD lapse rate (Δ (δD)) of - 1.64 ‰ / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p Colombia and Bolivia and the Equatorial and Peruvian Andes. BrGDGT-derived soil temperatures are similar to monitored winter temperatures in the region and show a lapse rate of ΔT = - 0.51 °C / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.01), comparable with lapse rates from in situ soil temperature measurements, satellite-derived land-surface temperatures at this transect, and weather stations from the Eastern Cordillera at similar latitude. As a result of an increasing leeward sampling position along the valley transect lapse rates are biased towards

  19. A systematic review of the nutritional adequacy of the diet in the Central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. Berti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To examine dietary adequacy in the Andean area, including macro- and micronutrient intakes, with a particular focus on rural communities; to highlight nutrition priorities in the Andes; and to identify opportunities for improvement. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted, identifying published and grey literature in English and Spanish related to diet in the central Andean countries of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Articles reporting data from dietary surveys or nutrition interventions were included. Thirty-four papers or reports published in 1969-2011 were included in the final review. The mean and variation in intakes by sex and age group of all presented nutrients were collated and the mean of means were calculated. RESULTS: Thiamin, niacin, and vitamin C intakes were usually adequate. Intakes of most other micronutrients, including iron, zinc, vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin B12, folate, and zinc were low, likely resulting in high levels of inadequacy. Energy intakes were lower than requirements, but it is unlikely to be a common problem, rather, this result was probably due to the known tendency of most dietary survey tools to underreport intake. However, energy from fat intakes was very low, usually less than 20% of the total, and in some settings, less than 10%. CONCLUSIONS: The inadequate intake of some micronutrients is common in many developing countries, but the extremely low intake of dietary fat found in the central Andes is not. Increased consumption of animal-source foods would increase fat intakes, while addressing micronutrient deficiencies; however, the impact on the fragile ecosystem of the Andes needs considering. Indigenous crops, such as lupine bean, quinoa, and amaranth are also rich in fat or micronutrients.

  20. A systematic review of the nutritional adequacy of the diet in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Peter R; Fallu, Cynthia; Cruz Agudo, Yesmina

    2014-11-01

    To examine dietary adequacy in the Andean area, including macro- and micronutrient intakes, with a particular focus on rural communities; to highlight nutrition priorities in the Andes; and to identify opportunities for improvement. A comprehensive literature search was conducted, identifying published and grey literature in English and Spanish related to diet in the central Andean countries of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Articles reporting data from dietary surveys or nutrition interventions were included. Thirty-four papers or reports published in 1969-2011 were included in the final review. The mean and variation in intakes by sex and age group of all presented nutrients were collated and the mean of means were calculated. Thiamin, niacin, and vitamin C intakes were usually adequate. Intakes of most other micronutrients, including iron, zinc, vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin B12, folate, and zinc were low, likely resulting in high levels of inadequacy. Energy intakes were lower than requirements, but it is unlikely to be a common problem, rather, this result was probably due to the known tendency of most dietary survey tools to underreport intake. However, energy from fat intakes was very low, usually less than 20% of the total, and in some settings, less than 10%. The inadequate intake of some micronutrients is common in many developing countries, but the extremely low intake of dietary fat found in the central Andes is not. Increased consumption of animal-source foods would increase fat intakes, while addressing micronutrient deficiencies; however, the impact on the fragile ecosystem of the Andes needs considering. Indigenous crops, such as lupine bean, quinoa, and amaranth are also rich in fat or micronutrients.

  1. Population dynamics of the rat Microryzomys minutus (Rodentia: Muridae in the Venezuelan Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Cabello

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The population dynamics of the small forest rice rat Microryzomys minutus, a murid rodent that occurs in the high altitudes of the northern and central Andes, was studied in disturbed and primary environments in a cloud forest of the Venezuelan Andes (Juan Pablo Peñaloza National Park, 8º11’N, 71º49’W. We collected 121 animals (66♀♀ and 55♂♂ between 1995 and 1998, using pitfall traps with formalin. Adult males were heavier than adult females. Relative abundance was much greater in the disturbed environments (over 10 individuals in some periods than in the primary cloud forest: 4-8 individuals. In the disturbed environments, the rats were extremely abundant in the first sampling period, and less frequent afterwards. In the cropland, abundance showed some fluctuations during the study and displayed two small abundance peaks in March-June 1997 and 1998. In the mined area, the rats had irregular fluctuations until March-June 1997 and were not recorded in July-October 1997. The occurrence of this rat in both disturbed and natural habitats confirms the wide ecological tolerance of this species. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 651-. Epub 2006 Jun 01.Se analizó la dinámica poblacional de las pequeñas ratas silvestres del arroz Microryzomys minutus en ambientes alterados y primarios, en un bosque nublado de los Andes venezolanos. El estudio fue basado en 121 animales (66♀♀ y 55♂♂ recolectados entre 1995 y 1998, usando trampas que contenían formalina. Esta especie está presente en ambos hábitats lo que confirma su amplia tolerancia ecológica. La abundancia poblacional fue mayor en ambientes alterados que en los no alterados. M. minutus presenta dimorfismo sexual en el peso: los machos son más pesados que las hembras.

  2. Constraints on deformation of the Southern Andes since the Cretaceous from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Hernandez-Moreno, Catalina; Ghiglione, Matias C.; Speranza, Fabio; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-12-01

    The southernmost segment of the Andean Cordillera underwent a complex deformation history characterized by alternation of contractional, extensional, and strike-slip tectonics. Key elements of southern Andean deformation that remain poorly constrained, include the origin of the orogenic bend known as the Patagonian Orocline (here renamed as Patagonian Arc), and the exhumation mechanism of an upper amphibolite facies metamorphic complex currently exposed in Cordillera Darwin. Here, we present results of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) from 22 sites in Upper Cretaceous to upper Eocene sedimentary rocks within the internal structural domain of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). AMS parameters from most sites reveal a weak tectonic overprint of the original magnetic fabric, which was likely acquired upon layer-parallel shortening soon after sedimentation. Magnetic lineation from 17 sites is interpreted to have formed during compressive tectonic phases associated to a continuous N-S contraction. Our data, combined with the existing AMS database from adjacent areas, show that the Early Cretaceous-late Oligocene tectonic phases in the Southern Andes yielded continuous contraction, variable from E-W in the Patagonian Andes to N-S in the Fuegian Andes, which defined a radial strain field. A direct implication is that the exhumation of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex occurred under compressive, rather than extensional or strike-slip tectonics, as alternatively proposed. If we agree with recent works considering the curved Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt as a primary arc (i.e., no relative vertical-axis rotation of the limbs occurs during its formation), then other mechanisms different from oroclinal bending should be invoked to explain the documented radial strain field. We tentatively propose a kinematic model in which reactivation of variably oriented Jurassic faults at the South American continental margin controlled

  3. Geomorphic controls on availability of weathering-derived nutrients across an erosional gradient in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A.; Torres, M. A.; Kleinsasser, E.; Clark, K.; Asner, G. P.; Malhi, Y.; Quesada, C.

    2013-12-01

    Rock-derived nutrients are thought to play important roles in determining ecosystem productivity and function, particularly in tropical forests. Variation in the availability of key nutrients such as P and Ca has been attributed to changes in the supply from chemical weathering of bedrock minerals, with a general conceptual model that younger soils with higher weathering rates are capable of supplying more nutrients compared to older soils with lower weathering rates (e.g. Vitousek et al., 2003). In this study we present data from an elevational gradient in the eastern Andes of Peru, illustrating how the relationship between weathering and nutrient availability is manifest in an active erosional system. Our data suggest that weathering, driven by erosional supply of primary minerals, is important in supplying nutrients. However, there is complexity in this relationship that may be associated with the geomorphic controls on weathering geochemistry and hydrochemistry, including weathering that takes place at greater depths when erosion rates are higher (e.g. West, 2012). We compare measured weathering rates with nutrient status of soils and vegetation across a transect from high elevations in the Andes to low elevations in the foreland floodplain. Weathering rates determined from the dissolved chemistry of river samples are highest at high elevation sites in the Andes. Mineral weathering rates are significant in the floodplain, which we attribute to chemical reworking of material eroded from the Andes, but rates of mineral weathering are not as high in the floodplain as in the montane sites. Although Ca supply is highest in the mountains, the foliar Ca and Ca available in soils is lower than in the floodplain. We will explore hydrochemical reasons for this difference, which may be due to where Ca release takes place relative to the vegetation root zone. We will also explore the supply of P from weathering in relation to observed nutrient availability, based on

  4. Culture and landslide risk in the Central Andes of Bolivia and Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Roberts

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Culture and its heritage play a major role in determining landslide risk in the Central Andes. Examples of some of these many possible influences are provided from natural and social science literature and from the author’s recent work in Bolivia. Landslide risk appears to have generally increased throughout the last millennium, due largely to anthropogenic modification of hazard, exposure, vulnerability and coping capacity. These changes result from both local and distant pressures and from contemporaneous and pervious cultural factors. Consequently, holistic examination of landslide risk necessitates consideration of culture and its heritage.

  5. La Guerra Civil de 1876-1877 en los Andes nororientales colombianos

    OpenAIRE

    Sastoque, Edna Carolina; García, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Este trabajo busca comprender regionalmente las causas de la guerra civil de 1876-1877, en los Andes nororientales colombianos. Se reconstruye y se analiza la malla de asentamientos urbanos de los Santanderes entre 1853 y 1857, se establece la jerarquía de los centros urbanos, las condiciones que contribuyeron al surgimiento de conflictos y los relevos jerárquicos que estos propiciaron. Por otro lado, se identifica a los actores que intervinieron en la guerra y la localización de los aconteci...

  6. Meteorological drivers of ablation processes on a cold glacier in the semiarid Andes of Chile

    OpenAIRE

    S. MacDonell; C. Kinnard; T. Mölg; L. Nicholson; J. Abermann

    2013-01-01

    Meteorological and surface change measurements collected during a 2.5 yr period are used to calculate surface mass and energy balances at 5324 m a.s.l. on Guanaco Glacier, a cold-based glacier in the semi-arid Andes of Chile. Meteorological conditions are marked by extremely low vapour pressures (annual mean of 1.1 hPa), strong winds (annual mean of 10 m s−1), high shortwave radiation receipt (mean annual 295 W m−2) and low precipitation rates (mean annual 45 mm w.e.). Net shortwave radi...

  7. [Fertility and reproductive behavior in Peru: Andes mountains and the Amazon basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, A L

    1992-01-01

    "The article attempts to discuss the historical and contemporary situations of [fertility among] populations residing in the two least studied areas of Peru: the Andes mountains and the Amazon basin. The study starts with a review of the 'demographic catastrophe' that the Spanish presence meant to the people of these areas.... The harmful effects of the 'rubber boom' and, more recently, of the 'oil boom', periods are also reviewed." Fertility trends in the two areas are analyzed, with a focus on marriage, breast-feeding, and contraceptive use. (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  8. Jürgen Stock: From One End of the Andes to the Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, A. K.; Stock, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Jürgen Stock (1923-2004) will always be remembered for his work on astronomical site testing. He led the efforts to find the best place for CTIO, and his work had a large influence in the setting of other observatories in Chile. He was the first director of CTIO (1963-1966). After his time in Chile, he moved to the other end of the Andes and was in charge of the site selection and the construction of the only professional observatory in Venezuela, the Llano del Hato National Observatory.

  9. An integrative water balance model framework for a changing glaciated catchment in the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenkhan, Fabian; Huggel, Christian; García Hernández, Javier; Fluixá-Sanmartín, Javier; Seidel, Jochen; Muñoz Asmat, Randy

    2017-04-01

    In the Santa River catchment [SRC] (Cordillera Blanca, Andes of Peru), human livelihoods strongly depend on year-round streamflow from glaciers and reservoirs, particularly in the dry season and in adjacent arid lowlands. Perennial glacial streamflow represents a buffer to water shortages, annual discharge variability and river contamination levels. However, climate change impacts, consecutive glacier shrinkage as well as new irrigated agriculture and hydropower schemes, population growth and thus water allocation might increase water scarcity in several areas of the SRC. This situation exerts further pressure and conflict potential over water resources and stresses the need to analyze both water supply and demand trends in a multidisciplinary and interlinked manner. In this context, an integrative glacio-hydrological framework was developed based on the Glacier and Snow Melt (GSM) and SOil CONTribution (SOCONT) models using the semi-distributed free software RS MINERVE. This water balance model incorporates hydroclimatic, socioeconomic and hydraulic objects and data at daily scale (with several gaps) for the last 50 years (1965-2015). A particular challenge in this context represents the poor data availability both in quantity and quality. Therefore, the hydroclimatic dataset to be used had to be carefully selected and data gaps were filled applying a statistical copula-based approach. The socioeconomic dataset of water demand was elaborated using several assumptions based on further census information and experiences from other projects in the region. Reservoirs and hydropower models were linked with additional hydraulic data. In order to increase model performance within a complex topography of the 11660 km2 SRC, the area was divided into 22 glaciated (GSM) and 42 non-glaciated (SOCONT) subcatchment models. Additionally, 382 elevation bands at 300 m interval were created and grouped into 22 different calibration zones for the whole SRC. The model was calibrated

  10. Volcanism and tectonics in action along the Southern Andes: space-time analysis of current deformation recorded by GNSS and seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassara, Andres; Giorgis, Scott; Yáñez, Vicente; Garcia, Francisco; Baez, Juan Carlos; Lara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Andean margin is perhaps the best natural laboratory on Earth to study the relationship between volcanism and active tectonics. Convergence between Nazca and Southamerican plates along the Southern Andes is relatively rapid (66 mm/yr) and slightly oblique (15-20°) with respect to the continental margin. The trench-normal component of convergence is mainly released along the megathrust fault by great subduction earthquakes. At the time scale of millions of years, the trench-parallel component has been mostly released by dextral strike-slip along the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), a long-lived (Eocene-Recent) crustal-scale structure more than 1000 km long which is intimately related to the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Andes. Volcanic systems of the SVZ are clustered near intersections of the LOFZ with oblique and inherited basement structures. In contrast with this clear relationship between crustal tectonics and volcanism at long time-scales, little is still known (here and elsewhere) at the time scale of earthquakes and eruptions about the mechanisms by which they actually interact to create the observed long-term relationship. Into this framework, we are taking advantage of the largely unpublished and very unique geodetic and seismic database that is available for us via the project Active Tectonics and Volcanism at the Southern Andes (ACT&VO-SA) in order to gain understanding about the physical link between contemporary tectono-volcanic processes occurred recently along the southern Andean margin and the long-term construction of the LOFZ-SVZ. We will present a characterization of the current surface velocity field along this region deduced from a kinematic analysis of a network of continuous GNSS stations operating since 2007 and relate this with the spatio-temporal evolution of crustal seismicity recorded by seismic networks maintained by Chilean institutions in order to analyze the possible connection between crustal deformation and

  11. Vulnerability assessment in a participatory approach to design and implement community based adaptation to drought in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasage, Ralph; Muis, Sanne; Sardella, Carolina; van Drunen, Michiel; Verburg, Peter; Aerts, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    The livelihoods of people in the Andes are expected to be affected by climate change due to their dependence on glacier meltwater during the growing season. The observed decrease in glacier volume over the last few decades is likely to accelerate during the current century, which will affect water availability in the region. This paper presents the implementation of an approach for the participatory development of community-based adaptation measures to cope with the projected impacts of climate change, which was implemented jointly by the local community and by a team consisting of an NGO, Peruvian ministry of environment, research organisations and a private sector organisation. It bases participatory design on physical measurements, modelling and a vulnerability analysis. Vulnerability to drought is made operational for households in a catchment of the Ocoña river basin in Peru. On the basis of a household survey we explore how a vulnerability index (impacts divided by the households' perceived adaptive capacity) can be used to assess the distribution of vulnerability over households in a sub catchment. The socio-economic factors water entitlement, area of irrigated land, income and education are all significantly correlate with this vulnerability to drought. The index proved to be appropriate for communicating about vulnerability to climate change and its determining factors with different stakeholders. The water system research showed that the main source of spring water is local rainwater, and that water use efficiency in farming is low. The adaptation measures that were jointly selected by the communities and the project team aimed to increase water availability close to farmland, and increase water use efficiency, and these will help to reduce the communities vulnerability to drought.

  12. Meteorological drivers of ablation processes on a cold glacier in the semi-arid Andes of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. MacDonell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological and surface change measurements collected during a 2.5 yr period are used to calculate surface mass and energy balances at 5324 m a.s.l. on Guanaco Glacier, a cold-based glacier in the semi-arid Andes of Chile. Meteorological conditions are marked by extremely low vapour pressures (annual mean of 1.1 hPa, strong winds (annual mean of 10 m s−1, shortwave radiation receipt persistently close to the theoretical site maximum during cloud-free days (mean annual 295 W m−2; summer hourly maximum 1354 W m−2 and low precipitation rates (mean annual 45 mm w.e.. Snowfall occurs sporadically throughout the year and is related to frontal events in the winter and convective storms during the summer months. Net shortwave radiation provides the greatest source of energy to the glacier surface, and net longwave radiation dominates energy losses. The turbulent latent heat flux is always negative, which means that the surface is always losing mass via sublimation, which is the main form of ablation at the site. Sublimation rates are most strongly correlated with net shortwave radiation, incoming shortwave radiation, albedo and vapour pressure. Low glacier surface temperatures restrict melting for much of the period, however episodic melting occurs during the austral summer, when warm, humid, calm and high pressure conditions restrict sublimation and make more energy available for melting. Low accumulation (131 mm w.e. over the period and relatively high ablation (1435 mm w.e. means that mass change over the period was negative (−1304 mm w.e., which continued the negative trend recorded in the region over the last few decades.

  13. Reproductive pattern of the large fruit-eating bat, Artibeus amplus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) in the Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ramoni, Damián; Ramoni-Perazzi, Paolo; Muñoz-Romo, Mariana

    2017-03-01

    Bimodal polyestry is the most common reproductive pattern in tropical bats, and it consists in producing one offspring per female twice a year. Reproductive patterns are closely related to rainfall regimes, frequently occurring twice a year in tropical regions. The goal of our study was to determine the reproductive pattern of the large fruit-eating bat, Artibeus amplus Handley, 1987 in a cave in the Venezuelan Andes inhabited by a large, stable colony. Thus, in this study we describe for the first time this important biological aspect of this unknown Neotropical bat species through the examination of external reproductive characteristics of males (inguinal or scrotal testes) and females (pregnant, lactating, post-lactating), based on 211 individuals (120 males and 91 females) captured between September 2008 and August 2009, in Cueva del Parque Las Escaleras, Estado Táchira, Venezuela. During this period of monthly sampling for a full year, most males displayed large scrotal testes, averaging 10 mm maximum length. The examination of females indicated that although pregnancy was first observed in November 2008, it reached a maximum during January and February 2009. Although adult males with scrotal testes throughout the year could imply that females have more than one pregnancy, our results suggested a seasonally monoestrous reproductive pattern for A. amplus. This study represents the first report of reproductive pattern for this poorly-known Neotropical frugivorous species. The observed monoestrous reproductive pattern supports the existence of synchronization between precipitation and reproduction. This synchronization has been frequently observed in most species of fruit bats. In this study, Artibeus amplus presumably adjust the parturition to anticipate the rainy season, as a strategy that allows maintenance of offspring during high availability of fruits.

  14. Experimental Andes virus infection in deer mice: characteristics of infection and clearance in a heterologous rodent host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R Spengler

    Full Text Available New World hantaviruses can cause hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome with high mortality in humans. Distinct virus species are hosted by specific rodent reservoirs, which also serve as the vectors. Although regional spillover has been documented, it is unknown whether rodent reservoirs are competent for infection by hantaviruses that are geographically separated, and known to have related, but distinct rodent reservoir hosts. We show that Andes virus (ANDV of South America, carried by the long tailed pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, infects and replicates in vitro and in vivo in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus, the reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV, found in North America. In experimentally infected deer mice, viral RNA was detected in the blood, lung, heart and spleen, but virus was cleared by 56 days post inoculation (dpi. All of the inoculated deer mice mounted a humoral immune response by 14 dpi, and produced measurable amounts of neutralizing antibodies by 21 dpi. An up-regulation of Ccl3, Ccl4, Ccl5, and Tgfb, a strong CD4⁺ T-cell response, and down-regulation of Il17, Il21 and Il23 occurred during infection. Infection was transient with an absence of clinical signs or histopathological changes. This is the first evidence that ANDV asymptomatically infects, and is immunogenic in deer mice, a non-natural host species of ANDV. Comparing the immune response in this model to that of the immune response in the natural hosts upon infection with their co-adapted hantaviruses may help clarify the mechanisms governing persistent infection in the natural hosts of hantaviruses.

  15. CARACTERIZACIÓN CLIMATICA DE LA ALTA CUENCA DEL RÍO NEUQUÉN, ANDES PATAGONICOS

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    Griselda Ostertag

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available En el desarrollo del presente documento se analizan las principales variables meteorológicas, temperatura y precipitación, que caracterizan y definen el clima de la Cordillera de los Andes en la Patagonia, provincia de Neuquén, particularmente en el área que ocupa la alta cuenca del río Neuquén. En esta etapa, de tipo descriptiva, el análisis estadístico refleja la situación de la climatología regional en el nivel medio histórico mediante la evaluación del comportamiento de las variables mencionadas durante los últimos 25 años. En este período se han registrado eventos extremadamente húmedos como así también situaciones de sequía. El objetivo es realizar una evaluación climática a partir de la información “in situ” de estaciones meteorológicas, información satelital y análisis estadístico para definir a posteriori, en cuál clasificación climática puede encuadrarse la zona de estudio, qué tipos climáticos pueden definirse en función de la bibliografía existente al respecto, y evaluar el grado de ajuste que presentan los climas determinados con los demás componentes del paisaje tales como vegetación y suelos.

  16. Nitrogen limitation of nitrous oxide fluxes in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Y.; Diem, T.; Morley, N.; Baggs, E.

    2013-12-01

    Montane Peruvian ecosystems are a regional atmospheric source of nitrous oxide (N2O) releasing at least 0.80 × 0.44 kg N ha-1 a-1. Field and laboratory experiments across a 3000 m elevation gradient in the Kosñipata Valley, Manu National Park, Peru indicate that nitrogen (N) availability, particularly nitrate (NO3-) content, are central to regulating N2O fluxes. Water-filled pore space (WFPS), soil moisture content, and carbon (C) availability play a secondary role in modulating fluxes. Field-based flux measurements indicate that N2O emissions and NO3- availability were inversely proportional with altitude, with lower elevation ecosystems (premontane forest, lower montane forest) emitting significantly more N2O and containing more NO3- than higher elevation ones (upper montane forest, montane grasslands). In lower elevation ecosystems, where NO3- was more abundant, N2O fluxes were influenced by WFPS, soil moisture, and to lesser extent by C mineralization rates. In contrast, in higher elevation ecosystems, WFPS and soil moisture content played little or no role in modulating fluxes, and N2O fluxes appeared to be more strongly driven by N availability.

  17. An introduction to the bofedales of the Peruvian High Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Maldonado Fonkén

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Peru, the term “bofedales” is used to describe areas of wetland vegetation that may have underlying peat layers. These areas are a key resource for traditional land management at high altitude. Because they retain water in the upper basins of the cordillera, they are important sources of water and forage for domesticated livestock as well as biodiversity hotspots. This article is based on more than six years’ work on bofedales in several regions of Peru. The concept of bofedal is introduced, the typical plant communities are identified and the associated wild mammals, birds and amphibians are described. Also, the most recent studies of peat and carbon storage in bofedales are reviewed. Traditional land use since prehispanic times has involved the management of water and livestock, both of which are essential for maintenance of these ecosystems. The status of bofedales in Peruvian legislation and their representation in natural protected areas and Ramsar sites is outlined. Finally, the main threats to their conservation (overgrazing, peat extraction, mining and development of infrastructure are identified.

  18. Holocene Paleohydrology of the tropical andes from lake records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, M. B., LLNL

    1997-03-03

    Two century-scale time series in northern Bolivia constrain the ages of abrupt changes in the physical, geochemical, and biological characteristics of sediments obtained from lakes that formed during deglaciation from the late Pleistocene glacial maximum. The watersheds of Laguna Viscachani (16{degrees}12`S, 68{degrees}07`W, 3780m) and Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota (16{degrees}13`S, 68{degrees}21`W, 4300m), located on the eastern and western slopes of the Cordillera Real, respectively, contain small cirque glaciers. A high-resolution chronology of the lake sediments is provided by 23 AMS {sup 14}C dates of discrete macro-fossils. Late Pleistocene glaciers retreated rapidly, exposing the lake basins between 10,700 and 9700 {sup 14}C yr B.P. The sedimentary facies suggest that after 8900 {sup 14}C B.P. glaciers were absent from the watersheds and remained so during the middle Holocene. An increase in the precipitation-evaporation balance is indicated above unconformities dated to about 2300 {sup 14}C yr B.P. in both Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota and Laguna Viscachani. An abrupt increase in sediment accumulation rated after 1400 {sup 14}C yr B.P. signals the onset of Neoglaciation. A possible link exists between the observed millennial-scale shifts in the regional precipitation- evaporation balance and seasonal shifts in tropical insolation.

  19. Thermal physiology, disease, and amphibian declines on the eastern slopes of the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catenazzi, Alessandro; Lehr, Edgar; Vredenburg, Vance T

    2014-04-01

    Rising temperatures, a widespread consequence of climate change, have been implicated in enigmatic amphibian declines from habitats with little apparent human impact. The pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), now widespread in Neotropical mountains, may act in synergy with climate change causing collapse in thermally stressed hosts. We measured the thermal tolerance of frogs along a wide elevational gradient in the Tropical Andes, where frog populations have collapsed. We used the difference between critical thermal maximum and the temperature a frog experiences in nature as a measure of tolerance to high temperatures. Temperature tolerance increased as elevation increased, suggesting that frogs at higher elevations may be less sensitive to rising temperatures. We tested the alternative pathogen optimal growth hypothesis that prevalence of the pathogen should decrease as temperatures fall outside the optimal range of pathogen growth. Our infection-prevalence data supported the pathogen optimal growth hypothesis because we found that prevalence of Bd increased when host temperatures matched its optimal growth range. These findings suggest that rising temperatures may not be the driver of amphibian declines in the eastern slopes of the Andes. Zoonotic outbreaks of Bd are the most parsimonious hypothesis to explain the collapse of montane amphibian faunas; but our results also reveal that lowland tropical amphibians, despite being shielded from Bd by higher temperatures, are vulnerable to climate-warming stress. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  20. Diversification in the Andes: age and origins of South American Heliotropium lineages (Heliotropiaceae, Boraginales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebert, Federico; Hilger, Hartmut H; Weigend, Maximilian

    2011-10-01

    The uplift of the Andes was a major factor for plant diversification in South America and had significant effects on the climatic patterns at the continental scale. It was crucial for the formation of the arid environments in south-eastern and western South America. However, both the timing of the major stages of the Andean uplift and the onset of aridity in western South America remain controversial. In this paper we examine the hypothesis that the Andean South American groups of Heliotropium originated and diversified in response to Andean orogeny during the late Miocene and a the subsequent development of aridity. To this end, we estimate divergence times and likely biogeographical origins of the major clades in the phylogeny of Heliotropium, using both Bayesian and likelihood methods. Divergence times of all Andean clades in Heliotropium are estimated to be of late Miocene or Pliocene ages. At least three independent Andean diversification events can be recognized within Heliotropium. Timing of the diversification in the Andean lineages Heliotropium sects.Heliothamnus, Cochranea, Heliotrophytum, Hypsogenia, Plagiomeris, Platygyne clearly correspond to a rapid, late Miocene uplift of the Andes and a Pliocene development of arid environments in South America. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Le temps et l'espace chez les paysans des Andes péruviennes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1974-01-01

    Full Text Available A la lumière de quatre récits populaires, l'auteur essaye de définir l'espace et le temps andins. Ces deux notions fondamentales se présentent avec des caractéristiques propres et sont les signes d'une manière spécifique d'envisager le monde et les choses. Dans la mesure où ces deux notions se distinguent d'autres expressions symboliques, elles offrent la possibilité d'analyser la réalité des Andes comme spécifique et potentiellement capable de résister à la dépendance et à la domination culturelles. El estudio de cuatro textos quechuas permite al autor definir el espacio y el tiempo andinos. Estas dos nociones presentan características propias y son los signos de una visión específica del mundo y de las cosas. De esta manera es posible distinguir la cultura andina de otras expresiones culturales peruanas y encarar la realidad de los Andes como potencialmente capaz de resistir a la dependencia y a la dominación culturales.

  2. Two new species of Leptanilloides Mann, 1823 (Formicidae: Dorylinae from the Andes of southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut Delsinne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Leptanilloides are described: L. copalinga Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., and L. prometea Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., based on workers collected in the leaf litter and soil of the Andes of southern Ecuador. Both species belong to the L. biconstricta species-group (formally diagnosed here. The metatibial gland, considered a synapomorphy for Dorylinae, is observed in L. prometea sp. nov. but seems absent in L. copalinga sp. nov. We provide a COI DNA barcode for both species and a revised key for the worker caste of all known species in the genus. We also describe a single male identified as a potential new Leptanilloides species on the basis of morphology. Furthermore, its mitochondrial COI gene sequence does not match any previously barcoded species. However, we refrain from giving it a specific name because of our lack of knowledge about the worker caste. So far, half of the 14 Leptanilloides species have been discovered above 1500 m in the mountain forests or páramos of the Ecuadorian Andes, confirming, if needed, the biological significance of these threatened habitats.

  3. Temperature and Rainfall Variability in the Northern Andes Over the Past Two Millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, T. M.; Bixler, C. W.; Mora, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies of tropical glaciers have shown that most are retreating rapidly, with some of the most dramatic changes occurring since the mid-1970s, most likely as a result of increasing global temperatures. However, a longer-term perspective is needed to place these changes in the context of natural climate variability. To better understand the climatological factors driving long-term variations in the mass balance of tropical glaciers, we reconstructed changes in precipitation and temperature in the northern tropical Andes using variations in the hydrogen isotope composition of sedimentary leaf waxes and branched GDGT distributions in a high-resolution varved sediment record from Lago Chingaza, Colombia. Br-GDGT derived temperatures are significantly correlated with instrumental temperature data and indicate that recent warming in the northern tropical Andes is unprecedented over the past two millennia. Furthermore, the magnitude of warming since the Little Ice Age is substantially larger than suggested by high latitude temperature reconstructions. Hydrogen isotope data indicated that colder conditions during the Little Ice Age were accompanied by a decrease in rainfall, likely associated with a southward shift in the position of the ITCZ. Over the past few centuries, warmer temperatures were accompanied by an increase in rainfall and a northward expansion of the tropical rainbelt. Together, these data suggest that the dominant control on the retreat of Andean glaciers has been the unprecedented rate and magnitude of recent warming.

  4. Hydrological Modeling of Highly Glacierized Basins (Andes, Alps, and Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Omani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT was used to simulate five glacierized river basins that are global in coverage and vary in climate. The river basins included the Narayani (Nepal, Vakhsh (Central Asia, Rhone (Switzerland, Mendoza (Central Andes, Argentina, and Central Dry Andes (Chile, with a total area of 85,000 km2. A modified SWAT snow algorithm was applied in order to consider spatial variation of associated snowmelt/accumulation by elevation band across each subbasin. In previous studies, melt rates varied as a function of elevation because of an air temperature gradient while the snow parameters were constant throughout the entire basin. A major improvement of the new snow algorithm is the separation of the glaciers from seasonal snow based on their characteristics. Two SWAT snow algorithms were evaluated in simulation of monthly runoff from the glaciered watersheds: (1 the snow parameters are lumped (constant throughout the entire basin and (2 the snow parameters are spatially variable based on elevation bands of a subbasin (modified snow algorithm. Applying the distributed SWAT snow algorithm improved the model performance in simulation of monthly runoff with snow-glacial regime, so that mean RSR decreased to 0.49 from 0.55 and NSE increased to 0.75 from 0.69. Improvement of model performance was negligible in simulations of monthly runoff from the basins with a monsoon runoff regime.

  5. Latitudinal distribution of earthquakes in the Andes and its peculiarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Levin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, there has been growing interest in problems related to searching global spatiotemporal regularities in the distribution of seismic events on the Earth. The worldwide catalogs ISC were used for search of spatial and temporal distribution of earthquakes (EQ in the Pacific part of South America. We extracted all EQ from 1964 to 2004 with Mb>=4.0. The total number of events under study is near 30 000. The entire set of events was divided into six magnitude ranges (MR: 4.0<=Mb<4.5; 4.5<=Mb<5.0; 5.0<=Mb<5.5; 5.5<=Mb<6.0; 6.0<=Mb<6.5; and 6.5<=Mb. Further analysis was performed separately for each MR. The latitude distributions of the EQ number for all MR were studied. The whole region was divided in several latitudinal intervals (size of each interval was either 5° or 10°. The number of events in each latitudinal interval was normalized two times. After normalization we obtained the relative seismic event number generated per one kilometer of plate boundary. The maximum of seismic activity in the Pacific part of the South America is situated in latitude interval 20°–30° S. The comparative analysis was executed for the latitude distributions of the EQ number and the EQ energy released. Then the distributions of EQ hypocenter location in latitude and in depth were studied. The EQ sources for the high latitudes (up to 35° S are located on the depth (H between 20–80 km. It was shown, that full interval of depth in each latitudinal belt generally divides into three parts (clusters with close-cut separation boundaries (K1 – with 0K2 – with 120K3 – with H>=500 km.

  6. Cenozoic basin thermal history reconstruction and petroleum systems in the eastern Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mauricio; Mora, Andres; Ketcham, Richard A.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Almendral, Ariel

    2017-04-01

    Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic retro-arc foreland basins along the eastern margin of the Andes in South America host the world's best detrital record for the study of subduction orogenesis. There, the world's most prolific petroleum system occur in the northernmost of these foreland basin systems, in Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela, yet over 90% of the discovered hydrocarbons there occur in one single province in norteastern Venezuela. A successful industry-academy collaboration applied a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the north Andes with the aim of investigating both, the driving mechanisms of orogenesis, and its impact on hydrocarbon accumulation in eastern Colombia. The Eastern Cordillera is an inversion orogen located at the leading edge of the northern Andes. Syn-rift subsidence favored the accumulation of km-thick organic matter rich shales in a back-arc basin in the early Cretaceous. Subsequent late Cretaceous thermal subsidence prompted the accumulation of shallow marine sandstones and shales, the latter including the Turonian-Cenomanian main hydrocarbon source-rock. Early Andean uplift since the Paleocene led to development of a flexural basin, filled with mainly non-marine strata. We have studied the Meso-Cenozoic thermal evolution of these basins through modeling of a large thermochronometric database including hundreds of apatite and zircon fission-track and (U-Th)/He data, as well as paleothermometric information based on vitrinite reflectance and present-day temperatures measured in boreholes. The detrital record of Andean construction was also investigated through detrital zircon U-Pb geochronometry in outcrop and borehole samples. A comprehensive burial/exhumation history has been accomplished through three main modeling strategies. First, one-dimensional subsidence was used to invert the pre-extensional lithospheric thicknesses, the magnitude of stretching, and the resulting heat flow associated to extension. The amount of eroded section and

  7. [GASTRIC CANCER IN PERUVIAN ANDES: 170 CASES IN HUARAZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva Palacios, Jovita; López De Guimaraes, Douglas; Avila Polo, Francisco; Salinas Mota, Felipe; Mosquera Vasquez, Vitaliano

    2000-01-01

    As a contribution to the knowledge of gastric cancer, a study took place at "Victor Ramos Guardia Hospital" in the city of Huaraz (3,100 meters above sea level), from August 1992 to July 1998. 170 cases were reported. All of them had biopsy exam.The accumulated incidence was of 138.2 cases per 100,000. The annual mean was 35.8 cases per year. The endoscopy incidence was of 16.7%. And 100% were advanced cancer. All of them were from the sierra of Ancash. 52.4% were males. 80% came from rural zones. And 91.7% were dedicated to agriculture. Food was mainly tubers, vegetables, ham and other salad meats. Ingestion of fruits was very scarce. Mean age was 60.6 years (32?90). 61.6 for females and 59.8 for males. When diagnosis was made 81.2% referred abdominal pain, 67.4% were pale, 38.2% had hematemesis/ melena, abdominal tumor was found in 37.7% and 28.8% had pyloric syndrome.97.7% of the biopsies were reported as adenocarcinoma. And 2.3% as linfomas. Of the 166 adenocarcinomas, 72.9% were of the intestinal type and 27.1% the diffuse type. The intestinal type was more frequent on males (77.6%) that on females (67.9%). Otherwise the diffuse type was more frequent on females (32.1%) that on males (22.4%). Lesions were classified as Bormann: I (0.6%), II (22.9%); III (62.4%) and IV (14.1%).Gastric cancer was found in the distal body in 41.7% of cases. In 2 regions: antrum and body in 26.5% and in the proximal body in 11.2%. 8.4% was localized in the cardias. The intestinal type was more frequently found an the distal body (77.5%). And on the medium body (73.3%). The diffuse type was mostly found on the proximal body (42.1%). On the following up 30 patients were lost and by April 1999, 95% were dead.We conclude that gastric cancer, probably, has a high incidence in the sierra of Ancash. The onset is of advanced gastric cancer. The intestinal type is predominant. And it is an important cause of disease and mortality in risk population.

  8. Land use as a driver of soil fertility and biodiversity across an agricultural landscape in the Central Peruvian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valença, De Anne W.; Vanek, Steven J.; Meza, Katherin; Ccanto, Raul; Olivera, Edgar; Scurrah, Maria; Lantinga, Egbert A.; Fonte, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Land use change and intensification in agricultural landscapes of the Andean highlands have resulted in widespread soil degradation and a loss in soil-based ecosystem services and biodiversity. This trend threatens the sustainability of farming communities in the Andes, with important

  9. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in areosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R.J.; Petit, J.R.; Komárek, Jiří; Elster, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2008), s. 1-24 ISSN 1810-6277 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 934; GA MŠk ME 945; GA ČR GA206/05/0253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : bacteria * Andes * Antarctic * Alps Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  10. Kas Arnold Rüütel valetas süümevannet andes? / Anneli Ammas, Garel Püüa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ammas, Anneli, 1962-

    2006-01-01

    Autorite hinnangul tekib 31. augustil Eesti Ekspressis ilmunud artikli põhjal, milles käsitleti Johannes Hindi represseerimist, küsimus, kas Arnold Rüütel on valetanud Eesti Vabariigile korduvalt süümevannet andes. TÜ professori Kalle Meruski seisukoht. Lisa: Rüütel käskis kontrolli tugevdada

  11. Pobladores de los andes. Entre la riqueza y la pobreza The inhabitants of the andes. Between wealth and poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aracely Burgos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    La Región Andina (R.A es uno de los sistemas montañosos más grandes del mundo; atraviesa los países de Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia y Venezuela. Este trabajo describe, hace un acercamiento y propone estrategias en tres aspectos que pueden catalogar la “riqueza” y la “pobreza”de estos países: 1. biodiversidad, 2. producción agropecuaria y 3. cultura alimentaria (expresada como seguridad alimentaria en habitantes sobre los 2000 msnm cuyas características de vida son únicas.La información se obtuvo a partir de revisión debases de datos nacionales e internacionales y enrevistas especializadas en cada área y en cada país.La tendencia fue información generalizada para habitantes de la R.A. en cada país o para Latinoamérica; aunque también se encontraron estudios específicos para habitantes sobre los 2000m. La biodiversidad de esta región, expresadaen número de especies y áreas de bosques, es catalogada como mega y a su vez de prioridad enconservación. La producción agropecuaria, sector de un alto impacto económico, ocupa importantes áreas que son aprovechadas con pocos cultivos; requiere uso eficiente de factores productivos, desarrollo y/o aplicación de innovación tecnológica y ampliación dela capacidad para enfrentar diversos riesgos. Encuanto a cultura alimentaria en la mayoría de los países resulta prioritario incrementar el nivel de salud, especialmente en niños y habitantes rurales. Se podría sintetizar que la R.A. es una de las más ricas y a su vez más pobre, a nivel mundial. Pensarlaen un presente y futuro digno requiere de planteamientos estratégicos contundentes que con lleven a1. superar la inercia mental de la realidad actual de pobreza, 2. investigar, 3. tecnificar, 4. educar y 5.hacer inversión económica. La cooperación internacional entre los países será un elemento decisivo.
    The Andean Region

  12. Tectonic evolution of the La González pull-apart basin in the Mérida Andes: combination of geological data and satellite radar interferometry (InSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Hamid Reza; Dehghani, Maryam; Foroutan, Mohammad; Naeimi, Amir; Roustaei, Mahasa; Saidi, Abdollah; Urbina, Josef Angel

    2016-07-01

    The 500-km-long Boconó strike-slip fault runs as a major active fault along the backbone of the Mérida Andes fold-and-thrust belt. The recent right-lateral motion on the fault led to formation of numerous structures such as pull-apart basins which have formed in releasing bends and/or right-step offsets along the fault strands. The La González pull-apart is the biggest basin generated as an extensional strike-slip duplex in the central part of the fault. This duplex is made up of two strands of the Boconó fault as master/first-order faults, while normal right-lateral faults which formed during evolution of the basin are second-order faults. The extension of the basin is associated with seismic activities and surface offsets along the Boconó fault. InSAR investigations over a 31-month period also support active deformation within the basin. These data indicate that the La González basin is continuously being extended as a result of motion along the Boconó fault and formation of subsequent normal faults. In addition, the basin is being transversely shortened in NW-SE direction due to regional shortening across the Mérida Andes range followed by convergence between the Maracaibo microplate and the Guyana shield.

  13. Glacier monitoring and glacier-climate interactions in the tropical Andes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Bijeesh Kozhikkodan; Wang, Shanshan; Florêncio de Souza, Sergio; Bremer, Ulisses Franz; Simões, Jefferson Cardia

    2017-08-01

    In this review, we summarized the evolution of glacier monitoring in the tropical Andes during the last few decades, particularly after the development of remote sensing and photogrammetry. Advantages and limitations of glacier mapping, applied so far, in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia are discussed in detail. Glacier parameters such as the equilibrium line altitude, snowline and mass balance were given special attention in understanding the complex cryosphere-climate interactions, particularly using remote sensing techniques. Glaciers in the inner and the outer tropics were considered separately based on the precipitation and temperature conditions within a new framework. The applicability of various methods to use glacier records to understand and reconstruct the tropical Andean climate between the Last Glacial Maximum (11,700 years ago) and the present is also explored in this paper. Results from various studies published recently were analyzed and we tried to understand the differences in the magnitudes of glacier responses towards the climatic perturbations in the inner tropics and the outer tropics. Inner tropical glaciers, particularly those in Venezuela and Colombia near the January Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), are more vulnerable to increase in temperature. Surface energy balance experiments show that outer tropical glaciers respond to precipitation variability very rapidly in comparison with the temperature variability, particularly when moving towards the subtropics. We also analyzed the gradients in glacier response to climate change from the Pacific coast towards the Amazon Basin as well as with the elevation. Based on the current trends synthesised from recent studies, it is hypothesized that the glaciers in the inner tropics and the southern wet outer tropics will disappear first as a response to global warming whereas glaciers in the northern wet outer tropics and dry outer tropics show resistance to warming trends due to

  14. Genetic diversity of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in Lutzomyia spp., with special reference to Lutzomyia peruensis, a main vector of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kento; Cáceres, Abraham G; Gomez, Eduardo A; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Korenaga, Masataka; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Katakura, Ken; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Kato, Hirotomo

    2013-05-01

    The genetic divergence caused by genetic drift and/or selection is suggested to affect the vectorial capacity and insecticide susceptibility of sand flies, as well as other arthropods. In the present study, cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequences were determined in 13 species circulating in Peru to establish a basis for analysis of the genetic structure, and the intraspecific genetic diversity was assessed in the Lutzomyia (Lu.) peruensis, a main vector species of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in Peruvian Andes. Analysis of intraspecific genetic diversity in the cyt b gene sequences from 36 Lu. peruensis identified 3 highly polymorphic sites in the middle region of the gene. Haplotype and gene network analyses were performed on the cyt b gene sequences of 130 Lu. peruensis in 9 Andean areas from 3 Departments (Ancash, Lima and La Libertad). The results showed that the populations of La Libertad were highly polymorphic and that their haplotypes were distinct from those of Ancash and Lima, where dominant haplotypes were observed, suggesting that a population bottleneck may have occurred in Ancash and Lima, but not in La Libertad. The present study indicated that the middle region of the cyt b gene is useful for the analysis of genetic structure in sand fly populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A survey of volcano deformation in the central Andes using InSAR: Evidence for deep, slow inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Simons, M.

    2001-12-01

    We use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to survey about 50 volcanos of the central Andes (15-27o S) for deformation during the 1992-2000 time interval. Because of the remote location of these volcanos, the activity of most are poorly constrained. Using the ERS-1/2 C-band radars (5.6 cm), we observe good interferometric correlation south of about 21o S, but poor correlation north of that latitude, especially in southern Peru. This variation is presumably related to regional climate variations. Our survey reveals broad (10's of km), roughly axisymmetric deformation at 2 volcanic centers with no previously documented deformation. At Uturuncu volcano, in southwestern Bolivia, the deformation rate can be constrained with radar data from several satellite tracks and is about 1 cm/year between 1992 and 2000. We find a second source of volcanic deformation located between Lastarria and Cordon del Azufre volcanos near the Chile/Argentina border. There is less radar data to constrain the deformation in this area, but the rate is also about 1 cm/yr between 1996 and 2000. While the spatial character of the deformation field appears to be affected by atmosphere at both locations, we do not think that the entire signal is atmospheric, because the signal is observed in several interferograms and nearby edifices do not show similar patterns. The deformation signal appears to be time-variable, although it is difficult to determine whether this is due to real variations in the deformation source or atmospheric effects. We model the deformation with both a uniform point-source source of inflation, and a tri-axial point-source ellipsoid, and compare both elastic half-space and layered-space models. We also explore the effects of local topography upon the deformation field using the method of Williams and Wadge (1998). We invert for source parameters using the global search Neighborhood Algorithm of Sambridge (1998). Preliminary results indicate that the sources at both

  16. Black carbon and other light-absorbing impurities in the Andes of Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, P. M.; Cordero, R.; Warren, S. G.; Pankow, A.; Jorquera, J.; Schrempf, M.; Doherty, S. J.; Cabellero, M.; Carrasco, J. F.; Neshyba, S.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) and other light-absorbing impurities in snow absorb solar radiation and thus have the potential to accelerate glacial retreat and snowmelt. In Chile, glaciers and seasonal snow are important sources of water for irrigation and domestic uses. In July 2015 (Austral winter) we sampled snow in the western Andes in a north-south transect of Chile from 18 S to 34 S. Most of the sampled snow had fallen during a single synoptic event, during 11-13 July. The snow was melted and passed through 0.4 micrometer nuclepore filters. Preliminary estimates indicate that (1) the ratio of BC to dust in snow increases going south from Northern to Central Chile, and (2) in snow sampled during the two weeks following the snowstorm, the impurities were concentrated in the upper 5 cm of snow, indicating that the surface layer became polluted over time by dry deposition.

  17. Chemical and isotopic investigations of runoff in a mountainous watershed, Venezuelan Andes (Rio Bocono)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornieles, M.; Moreau, A.; Valles, V.; Travi, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Rio Bocono watershed, located in the Western part of Venezuela on the South western side of Andes is considered by the 'Ministerio de1 Ambiente y de los Recursos Naturales Renovables' (MARN) as a priority zone for environmental management. The studies of relation between flow, dissolved elements and solid transport are essential to estimate soil degradation and sediment deposition which provokes loss of depth in the dam reservoir at the Southern margin of the basin. Because of the large surface which reach 1540 km 2 , the lack of equipment and the flash flood character of the river do not enable the flow mechanisms and transit times to be determined using usual hydrologic methods; therefore this problem has been approached by the way of chemical and isotopic investigation

  18. Altitudinal changes in diversity of macroinvertebrates from small streams in the Ecuadorian Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Dean

    2003-01-01

    was dominated by insects, mainly Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera and Diptera at all three altitudes. Odonata and Hemiptera were relatively rich in lowland streams, scarcely present in the midland streams and absent in the highland streams (as was the case for the less diverse orders Lepidoptera and Megaloptera......Altitudinal patterns in diversity of macroinvertebrate families at different spatial scales (stone, stream and altitude) were studied by collecting stone samples from six streams at each of the three altitudes: lowlands (400m), midlands (2000m) and highlands (3800 m), in the equatorial Andes...... of Ecuador. Stream sites were characterised by a number of physico-chemical parameters and the fauna by several indices of richness, diversity and evenness. A MDS ordination on the composition of the fauna clearly separated the streams in three groups according to altitude. The invertebrate fauna...

  19. La Guerra Civil de 1876-1877 en los Andes nororientales colombianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Carolina Sastoque R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo busca comprender regionalmente las causas de la guerra civil de 1876-1877, en los Andes nororientales colombianos. Se reconstruye y se analiza la malla de asentamientos urbanos de los Santanderes entre 1853 y 1857, se establece la jerarquía de los centros urbanos, las condiciones que contribuyeron al surgimiento de conflictos y los relevos jerárquicos que estos propiciaron. Por otro lado, se identifica a los actores que intervinieron en la guerra y la localización de los acontecimientos bélicos. Con base en este análisis se muestra que el grupo que inició la guerra fue el mismo que perdió jerarquía en la malla urbana y que ésta fue una de las causas de la guerra.

  20. SINOPSIS DE CROTON (EUPHORBIACEAE EN LOS ANDES DE MÉRIDA, VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANUEL LUJÁN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una sinopsis taxonómica del género Croton en los Andes de Mérida, Venezuela. Se analizaron caracteres vegetativos en 245 especímenes y se hizo un análisis de agrupamiento que resultó en la identificación de 21 grupos discretos a los cuales les fueron asignadas las identidades taxonómicas específicas más apropiadas. De estas 21 especies, C. pedicellatus representa un nuevo registro para Venezuela, C. fragilis, C. speciosus y C. redolens son nuevos registros para la región andina. Se proponen dos nuevos sinónimos (C. chamanus bajo C. conduplicatus y C. timotensis bajo C. pungens y se designan tres lectotipos (C. pungens, C. ovalifolius y C. speciosus. Se discuten las relaciones entre las especies y se incluye una clave para su identificación.

  1. Macroinvertebrate community response to acid mine drainage in rivers of the High Andes (Bolivia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Damme, Paul Andre; Hamel, Caroli; Ayala, Alfredo; Bervoets, Lieven

    2008-01-01

    Several High Andes Rivers are characterized by inorganic water pollution known as acid mine drainage (AMD). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between metal concentrations in the sediments and the macroinvertebrate communities in two river basins affected by AMD. In general, the taxon diversity of the macroinvertebrate community at the family level was low. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni at mining sites were higher than at unpolluted sites. The pH of the water was alkaline (7.0-8.5) in unpolluted sites, whereas it dropped to very low values (<3) at mining sites. Redundancy Analysis (RDA) showed that pH was the best predictor of macroinvertebrate community richness. The number of macroinvertebrate families decreased gradually with increasing acidity, both in pools and riffles, though it is suggested that riffle communities were more affected because they are in closer contact with the acid water. - Community response to AMD

  2. Hydrogeochemistry Characterization of Hot Springs Located in The Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinicio Carrera-Villacrés, David; Hidalgo-Hidalgo, Alexander; Guevara-García, Paulina; Vivero-Balarezo, María; Delgado-Rodríguez, Vicente

    2016-10-01

    The formation of several sources of hot springs in the Andes from Ecuador is the result of an intense volcanic activity due to the subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate under the South American continental plate. The aim of this study was to describe the hydrogeochemistry water geothermal origin, its chemical classification and relationship with the complex geology of Ecuador, using different hydro chemical diagrams (Stiff, Piper and Schoeller-Berkaloff). Geothermal waters can be divided into two groups. The first group, associated with an extinct volcanic activity produced in the Cenozoic, represents the Na+-Cl- type. The second group is associated with a young Quaternary volcanic activity and its types of water are Mg2+-HCO3-, Na+-HCO3-, Na+-SO42-, Mg2+-SO42-.

  3. Les Andes Centrales Tropicales vues par deux géographes: Isaiah Bowman et Carl Troll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Deux visions des Andes vues par deux géographes, Isaiah BOWMAN et Carl TROLL, au caractère et au milieu intellectuel différents. L'auteur étudie dans l'un et l'autre cas la méthode d'analyse de l'espace géographique et les conclusions tirées par chacun d'eux. I. BOWMAN, Américain, convaincu qu'une économie mercantiliste fondée sur l'exportation permettra aux Etats andins d'accéder à un modèle de développement, décrit les vastes contrées amazoniennes comme un futur El Dorado entre les mains de colons. L'aménagement des basses plaines selon des schémas nord-américains est le pilier de l'économie alors que les Andes abritant les communautés indigènes constituent un frein au développement. De ce fait il laisse de côté l'étude des paysanneries andines. Toute différente est la démarche de Carl TROLL dont la formation à la fois en sciences humaines et naturelles, lui permet de cerner l'espace géographique comme cadre de vie des sociétés. L'utilisation des étages écologiques, le développement de l'Empire Inca fondé sur l'étage des 'punas', la démarche historique des analyses minutieuses de Carl TROLL donne un éclairage nouveau aux relations des sociétés andines et des milieux naturels avec lesquels elles composent. Dos puntos de vista de los Andes por dos geógrafos, Isaiah BOWMAN y Carl TROLL con carácter y medio intelectual distintos. El autor estudia en ambos casos el método de análisis del espacio geográfico y las conclusiones sacadas por cada uno de ellos. I. BOWMAN, americano, convencido que una economía mercantil fundada sobre la exportación permitirá a los estados andinos acceder a un modelo de desarrollo, describe las extensas llanuras amazónicas como un El Dorado futuro entre las manos de los colonos. El desarrollo de las llanuras bajas según esquemas norteamericanos constituye el pilar de la economía mientras los Andes abrigando las comunidades indígenas se comportan como un freno al

  4. Tecnología apropiada: Sus inicios en la Universidad de los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista de Ingeniería

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available El origen de la tecnología apropiada en la Universidad de los Andes debe entenderse no sólo a partir de las inquietudes de algunos profesores de la Facultad de Ingeniería, sino que debe leerse en sintonía con una serie de eventos de índole nacional e internacional que permitieron su desarrollo. En los años 70, Estados Unidos sufrió una crisis energética, ante la cual se debió buscar alternativas que pudieran suplir la necesidad de energía y la dificultad de remplazar el petróleo. Se generó, entonces, un movimiento cuyo objetivo era desarrollar energías renovables basadas en recursos naturales.

  5. A new species of iguanid lizard, genus Stenocercus (Squamata, Iguania), from the Central Andes in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Pablo J; Echevarría, Lourdes Y; García-Burneo, Karla; Koch, Claudia

    2016-12-04

    We describe a new species of Stenocercus from the montane forest of the right margin of the Marañón river in the northern portion of the Central Andes in northern Peru (Amazonas and La Libertad departments), at elevations ranging from 2300 to 3035 m. Stenocercus omari sp. nov. differs from other Stenocercus species, with the exception of S. amydrorhytus, S. chrysopygus, S. cupreus, S. johaberfellneri, S. latebrosus, S. melanopygus, S. modestus, S. ornatissimus, S. orientalis, and S. stigmosus, by having granular scales on the posterior surfaces of thighs, a conspicuous antehumeral fold and by lacking a vertebral crest. However, Stenocercus omari sp. nov. is easily distinguished from the aforementioned species, except S. orientalis, by the presence of prominently keeled dorsal head scales. The new species differs from S. orientalis by lacking a prominent oblique neck fold and by having a distinct deep postfemoral mite pocket.

  6. Privatizing Water in the Chilean Andes: The Case of Las Vegas de Chiu-Chiu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Prieto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean water model has been described as a textbook example of a free-market water system. This article contributes to the critiques of this model by showing the effect of its implementation in the Atacameño community of Chiu-Chiu, located in the Atacama Desert in the south-central Andes. In this community, the privatization of water rights ignored local water management practices that had produced a high-altitude wetland (known as a vega. This led to the inhabitants’ dispossession of crucial water rights and to wetland degradation. This process belies statements that the Chilean model relies on an unregulated market and instead highlights the state’s role in marginalizing local irrigation practices by reducing the water consumption of the indigenous population while keeping the copper mining industry (the main source of Chilean income and related growing urban populations supplied with water.

  7. Tectonic, volcanic, and climatic geomorphology study of the Sierras Pampeanas Andes, northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. L.; Strecker, M. R.; Fielding, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A proposed analysis of Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) data extends current research in the Sierras Pampeanas and the Puna of northwestern Argentina to the determination - by the digital analysis of mountain-front sinuousity - of the relative age and amount of fault movement along mountain fronts of the late-Cenozoic Sierras Pampeanas basement blocks; the determination of the age and history of the boundary across the Andes at about 27 S latitude between continuing volcanism to the north and inactive volcanism to the south; and the determination of the age and extent of Pleistocene glaciation in the High Sierras, as well as the comparative importance of climatic change and tectonic movements in shaping the landscape. The integration of these studies into other ongoing geology projects contributes to the understanding of landform development in this active tectonic environment and helps distinguish between climatic and tectonic effects on landforms.

  8. Pablo Palacio: Corporal Violence on Impossible Identities in the Zone of the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falconí Travez, Diego Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Palacio was an Ecuadorian writer who, in the 1920’s, built within his narrative a catalog of rare bodies with ambiguous and disturbing sexualities, characterizations that are quite different from ones portrayed in the Andean tradition to which Palacio belongs. Nonetheless one of the most issues striking facts of these characters is that their bodies are disciplined by certain discourses of power in a violent way. This paper explores trough literary theory such abuse and violence on women and homosexual identities in two of his stories. The aim of the paper is to investigate issues such as violence, economy of representation, its relationship with the literary text and vulnerability, as a sine qua non norm of abuse, in certain bodies in the area of the Andes.

  9. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Strain partitioning is a common process at obliquely convergent plate margins dividing oblique convergence into margin-normal slip on the plate-bounding fault and horizontal shearing on a strike-slip system parallel to the subduction margin. In subduction zones, strain partitioning in the upper continental plate is mainly controlled by the shear forces acting on the plate interface and the strength of the continental crust. The plate interface forces are influenced by the subducting plate dip angle and the obliquity angle between the normal to the plate margin and the convergence velocity vector, and the crustal strength of the continent is strongly affected by the presence or absence of a volcanic arc, with the presence of the volcanic arcs being common at steep subduction zones. Along the ˜7000 km western margin of South America the convergence obliquity, subduction dip angles and presence of a volcanic arc all vary, but strain partitioning is only observed along parts of it. This raises the questions, to what extent do subduction zone characteristics control strain partitioning in the overriding continental plate, and which factors have the largest influence? We address these questions using lithospheric-scale 3D numerical geodynamic experiments to investigate the influence of subduction dip angle, convergence obliquity, and weaknesses in the crust owing to the volcanic arc on strain partitioning behavior. We base the model design on the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (5° N - 2° S), characterized by steep subduction (˜ 35°), a convergence obliquity between 31° -45° and extensive arc volcanism, and where strain partitioning is observed. The numerical modelling software (DOUAR) solves the Stokes flow and heat transfer equations for a viscous-plastic creeping flow to calculate velocity fields, thermal evolution, rock uplift and strain rates in a 1600 km x 1600 km box with depth 160 km. Subduction geometry and material properties are based on a

  10. Novel Strain of Andes Virus Associated with Fatal Human Infection, Central Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Cristhopher D.; Vallejo, Efrain; Agudo, Roberto; Vargas, Jorge; Blazes, David L.; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2012-01-01

    To better describe the genetic diversity of hantaviruses associated with human illness in South America, we screened blood samples from febrile patients in Chapare Province in central Bolivia during 2008–2009 for recent hantavirus infection. Hantavirus RNA was detected in 3 patients, including 1 who died. Partial RNA sequences of small and medium segments from the 3 patients were most closely related to Andes virus lineages but distinct (1 hantaviruses; the highest prevalence was among agricultural workers. Because of the high level of human exposure to hantavirus strains and the severity of resulting disease, additional studies are warranted to determine the reservoirs, ecologic range, and public health effect of this novel strain of hantavirus. PMID:22515983

  11. Glaciers et évolution climatique dans les Andes boliviennes. Glacier de Zongo et glacier de Chacaltaya Cordillère Royale, 16°S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE HUANCANE FORMATION (NEOCOMIAN OF THE CUSCO REGION AND ITS RELATION TO SEA LEVEL VARIATIONS. The Huancane formation (Neocomian of the Cusco region is mainly composed of quartz sandstones which are deposited in fluvial environments. The facies recognized are organized in a vertical sequence: fluvial sheet sandstones, oxidized or eroded surface, the shale facies of alluvial plain and unusual limestone facies of possible marine origin. These vertical facies sequences show that eustatic sea level variations controlled the fluvial sedimentation. The rivers came from the NE and were fed by the erosion of the Brazilian Shield. The sedimentation developed above the boundary of the SW edge of the Eastern basin, and the Cusco-Puno Swell which had locale horst and grabens inherited from pre-neocomian relief. GLACIARES Y EVOLUCIÓN CLIMÁTICA EN LOS ANDES BOLIVIANOS GLACIAR DE ZONGO Y GLACIAR DE CHACALTAYA, CORDILLERA REAL, 16°S. Por su sensibilidad y su plazo de respuesta breve, el glaciar es de un gran interés para analizar la evolución y la variabilidad actuales del clima entre los trópicos. Se presentan los métodos de determinación del balance de masas y del balance hidrológico, con una frecuencia de mediciones mensual. Los resultados recogidos durante tres años (1991-1994 muestran una grande variabilidad. Ésta es controlada sobre todo por la extensión del periodo de precipitaciones en medio de la temporada cálida que dura más o menos 6 meses. Los eventos ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation son asociados a balances netamente negativos, lo que es demostrado por la respuesta del glaciar al episodio de 1991-1992 y por la reconstrucción de los balances efectuados en base a los datos hidrológicos durante los dos últimos decenios. El retroceso acelerado de los glaciares tropicales desde los años 1980 es vinculado a la vez a una sucesión de eventos ENSO y al recalentamiento atmosférico. GLACIERS AND CLIMATIC EVOLUTION IN

  12. Hydro-climatic variability over the Andes of Colombia associated with ENSO: a review of climatic processes and their impact on one of the Earth's most important biodiversity hotspots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, German; Alvarez, Diana M. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, School of Geosciences and Environment, Medellin (Colombia); Rueda, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, School of Geosciences and Environment, Medellin (Colombia); Grupo HTM, Medellin (Colombia)

    2011-06-15

    The hydro-climatic variability of the Colombian Andes associated with El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is reviewed using records of rainfall, river discharges, soil moisture, and a vegetation index (NDVI) as a surrogate for evapotranspiration. Anomalies in the components of the surface water balance during both phases of ENSO are quantified in terms of their sign, timing, and magnitude. During El Nino (La Nina), the region experiences negative (positive) anomalies in rainfall, river discharges (average and extremes), soil moisture, and NDVI. ENSO's effects are phase-locked to the seasonal cycle, being stronger during December-February, and weaker during March-May. Besides, rainfall and river discharges anomalies show that the ENSO signal exhibits a westerly wave-like propagation, being stronger (weaker) and earlier (later) over the western (eastern) Andes. Soil moisture anomalies are land-cover type dependant, but overall they are enhanced by ENSO, showing very low values during El Nino (mainly during dry seasons), but saturation values during La Nina. A suite of large-scale and regional mechanisms cooperating at the ocean-atmosphere-land system are reviewed to explaining the identified hydro-climatic anomalies. This review contributes to an understanding of the hydro-climatic framework of a region identified as the most critical hotspot for biodiversity on Earth, and constitutes a wake-up call for scientists and policy-makers alike, to take actions and mobilize resources and minds to prevent the further destruction of the region's valuable hydrologic and biodiversity resources and ecosystems. It also sheds lights towards the implementation of strategies and adaptation plans to coping with threats from global environmental change. (orig.)

  13. Duck plague in free-flying waterfowl observed during the Lake Andes epizootic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, S.J.; Pearson, G.L.; Leibovitz, Louis

    1975-01-01

    The first major epizootic of duck plague in free-flying waterfowl occurred at Lake Andes, South Dakota, in January and February, 1973. Duck plague was diagnosed in black ducks, mallards, pintail-mallard hybrids, redheads, common mergansers, common golden eyes, canvasbacks, American widgeon, wood ducks, and Canada geese, indicating the general susceptibility of ducks to duck plague. Clinical signs observed in mallards were droopiness, polydipsia, lethargy, reduced wariness, weakness, reluctance to fly, swimming in circles, bloody diarrhea, bloody fluid draining from the nares and bill, and terminal convulsions.Because the mallard was the most numerous and heavily infected species during the Lake Andes epizootic, gross and microscopic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, heart, lung, bone marrow, pancreas, and ovaries were described. Lesions of the esophagus and cloaca were in the stratified submucosal glands. In the small and large intestine, lesions were located in lymphocytic aggregates, lamina propria, and crypt epithelium. Hemorrhages and necrosis of hepatocytes and bile duct epithelium were noted in the liver. Diffuse necrosis of lymphocytic and reticuloendothelial tissue were evident in the spleen, bursa of Fabricius, and thymus. Hemorrhages in other tissues such as the lung and heart were often associated with lymphoid nodules, while those in organs such as the pancreas were associated with acinar necrosis. Intranuclear inclusion bodies were seen in stratified squamous epithelium of the esophagus and cloaca, crypt epithelium of the intestine, hepatocytes, bile duct epithelium, cells of Hassel's corpuscles, splenic periarteriolar reticular cells, and epithelial cells in the bursa of Fabricius.

  14. Volcanic impediments in the progressive development of pre-Columbian civilizations in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Minard L.; Mothes, Patricia A.

    2008-10-01

    Archaeological investigations in Ecuador have proposed that there appear to be hiatus or anomalous jumps in the progressive development of pre-Columbian indigenous cultures, based upon the fact that their ceramics and tools demonstrate abrupt advances in their sophistication at several horizons in the soil profile. Because some of these horizons are clearly associated with volcanic ash layers, archaeologists have sought a causal relation with volcanism, that is, the eruptive events or their products severely interfered with the early inhabitants, resulting in their abandonment of certain areas. Geological studies of the young volcanoes in the Ecuadorian Andes carried out during the past two decades now allow us to make a more thorough evaluation of the role of volcanism during the Holocene. This contribution briefly describes the principal Holocene volcanic events and the distribution of the corresponding eruptive products found along the InterAndean Valley, from southern Colombia to central Ecuador. Only those events that were sufficiently large that they could have had a detrimental effect on the valley's early residents are discussed. Dacitic and rhyolitic ash flows, as well as numerous debris flows (lahars) have occurred frequently and their deposits cover many valleys and floodplains, where early inhabitants probably settled. The enormous Chillos Valley lahar, associated with the 4500 yBP eruption of Cotopaxi volcano, buried soils containing ceramics of the early Formative Period. However, the greatest impact upon mankind was probably not these short-lived violent events, but rather the burying of settlements and agricultural fields by ash fallout, the effect of which may have lasted hundreds of years. Ash fall layers are observed in pre-Columbian cultural horizons in the soil profile, occurring in the InterAndean Valley, the lower flanks of the Andes, and along Ecuador's Pacific coast, the oldest corresponding to the 5800 yBP eruption of Cotopaxi. This brief

  15. Prevalence of sarcopenia and associated factors in the healthy older adults of the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Alessandra; Veronese, Nicola; Sergi, Giuseppe; Manzato, Enzo; Rodriguez-Hurtado, Diana; Maggi, Stefania; Trevisan, Caterina; De Zaiacomo, Francesca; Giantin, Valter

    To assess the prevalence of sarcopenia and associated factors in a population of older people living in a rural area of the Peruvian Andes. The study concerned 222 people aged ≥65 years. Sarcopenia was diagnosed on the basis of skeletal muscle mass, measured using bioimpedance analysis, and gait speed, measured with the 4-m walking test, as recommended by the International Working Group on sarcopenia. Self-reported physical activity, the Short Physical Performance Battery, and the Six-Minute Walking Test also contributed information on participants' physical performance status. Disabilities were investigated by assessing participants' self-reported difficulties in performing one or more basic or instrumental activities of daily living. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 17.6%. Compared with participants without sarcopenia, individuals who were found sarcopenic were significantly older, female and were less frequently farmers, had fewer children, had a worse nutritional status, a significantly lower physical performance, and higher levels of disability in the instrumental activities of daily living. After adjusting for potential confounders, age, female sex, a low body mass index, a self-reported low physical activity level, a worse Six-Minute Walking Test scores, and a low number of children were significantly associated with sarcopenia. The prevalence of sarcopenia seems to be quite high among community-dwelling older subjects in the Peruvian Andes. Age, female sex, a low body mass index, little physical activity, a poor Six-Minute Walking Test scores, and a low number of children could be associated with this condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathogenesis and host response in Syrian hamsters following intranasal infection with Andes virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Safronetz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS, also referred to as hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS, is a rare but frequently fatal disease caused by New World hantaviruses. In humans HPS is associated with severe pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock; however, the pathogenesis of this disease remains unclear largely due to a lack of suitable animal models for the study of disease progression. In this study we monitored clinical, virological, pathophysiological parameters and host immunological responses to decipher pathological factors and events in the lethal Syrian hamster model of HPS following intranasal inoculation of Andes virus. Transcriptional profiling of the host gene responses demonstrated a suppression of innate immune responses in most organs analyzed during the early stage of infection, except for in the lung which had low level activation of several pro-inflammatory genes. During this phase Andes virus established a systemic infection in hamsters, with viral antigen readily detectable in the endothelium of the majority of tissues analyzed by 7-8 days post-inoculation. Despite wide-spread infection, histological analysis confirmed pathological abnormalities were almost exclusively found in the lungs. Immediately preceding clinical signs of disease, intense activation of pro-inflammatory and Th1/Th2 responses were observed in the lungs as well as the heart, but not in peripheral organs, suggesting that localized immune-modulations by infection is paramount to pathogenesis. Throughout the course of infection a strong suppression of regulatory T-cell responses was noted and is hypothesized to be the basis of the aberrant immune activations. The unique and comprehensive monitoring of host immune responses to hantavirus infection increases our understanding of the immuno-pathogenesis of HPS and will facilitate the development of treatment strategies targeting deleterious host immunological responses.

  17. Nutritional status, physical performance and disability in the elderly of the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Alessandra; Veronese, Nicola; Giantin, Valter; Manzato, Enzo; Rodriguez-Hurtado, Diana; Trevisan, Caterina; De Zaiacomo, Francesca; Sergi, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Although nutritional status plays an important part in the physical performance and disability of older people, this relationship has been little studied in developing countries. A study on the effects of nutritional status on the physical performance and functional status of elderly people living in rural areas of the Peruvian Andes. The study concerned 222 people aged ≥65 years living in a rural area of the Peruvian Andes. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) was used to classify participants as malnourished (MNA = 24). The short physical performance battery (SPPB) and six-minute walking test (6MWT) were used to measure participants' physical performance. Disabilities were investigated by assessing participants' self-reported difficulty in performing one or more basic activities of daily living (ADL), and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). The prevalence of malnutrition was 9.4 %, and more than half of our samples were at risk of malnutrition. After adjusting for potential confounders, malnourished individuals performed significantly worse than the other MNA groups in the SPPB (p for trend=0.001), 6MWT and IADL (p for trend disability in IADL (OR 5.36, 95 % CI 1.02-56.94; p = 0.05), and poor performance in the 6MWT (OR 2.73, 95 % CI 1.06-12.08; p = 0.03) and SPPB (OR 4.94, 95 % CI 1.01-24.07; p = 0.04). Poor nutritional status was found significantly associated with poor physical performance and poor functional status in elderly Peruvian individuals.

  18. [Epidemiological characterization of bites on people, as emergency care record: Province of Los Andes, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagra, Vania; Cáceres, Dante; Alvarado, Sergio; Salinas, Elizabeth; Caldera, M Loreto; Lucero, Erick; Viviani, Paola; Torres, Marisa

    2017-06-01

    Bites constitute a public health problem worldwide. To characterize epidemiologically bites by animals happened in the province of Los Andes (2005-2007). Descriptive, retrospective epidemiological study. Studied variables: Bitten person (BP), accident by bite, biting animal and bite. It was not feasible to obtain more updated information by law of patient protection. 2,360 BP were assisted in the emergency unit of San Juan de Dios Hospital and Rio Blanco clinic. An annual average rate of 729 BP/100,000 inhabitants and 1.99 daily average was recorded. The male gender was most affected (53.5%) and the age group from 6 to 10 years old. (Rate: .521/100,000). Most frequent topographic location was the lower limb, except in children under 5 year olds in whom predominated head and neck. The biting animal according to frequency was: the dog (67.1%) spider (7.1%) and cat (3.9%). The animal property was 35.6% known and 30.7% own. The most frequent problems were: nonspecific allergy; toxic effect by spider bites and among the infections, the disease made by cat’s scratch stands out. Regarding the record system, the biting animal complaint was applied to 47.6% of the BP and the 92.8% of the recorded information was incomplete. Bites reported higher rates in the province of Los Andes than the average of the country (729 versus 188/100,000), standing out the higher magnitude in 6 to 10 year-old-children. It is noticed that the record is low and incomplete. In this province, no bite control programs or updated studies have been carried out.

  19. Exploring pain in the Andes--learning from the Quichua (Inca) people experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incayawar, Mario; Saucier, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    There is a mounting recognition that culture profoundly shapes human pain experience. The 28 million indigenous people of the Andes in South America, mainly the Quichua (Inca) people, share a distinctive culture. However, little is known about their pain experience and suffering. The aim of the present study was to explore how Quichua adults perceive, describe, and cope with the pain. An exploratory qualitative/descriptive study was conducted with a convenience sample of 40 Quichua adults, including 15 women and 25 men, in the Northern Highlands of Ecuador. Data were collected through structured interviews of approximately 3 h, using a Quichua questionnaire called "The Nature of Pain" [Nanay Jahua Tapuicuna]. The interviews covered the notions of causation of pain, vulnerability to pain, responses to pain, aggravating factors, frequent locations of pain, types of pain, duration, characteristics of pain, control of pain, pathways to care, and preventive measures of pain. Basic descriptive analyses were performed. The Quichuas' pain experience is complex and their strategies to cope with it are sophisticated. According to the Quichuas, emotions, life events, co-morbid conditions, and spirits, among others factors play an important role in the origin, diagnosis, and treatment of pain. They strongly embrace biomedicine and physicians as well as Quichua traditional medicine and traditional healers. Family members and neighbors are also valuable sources of health care and pain control. The pathway to pain care that the Quichua people prefer is inclusive and pluralistic. The knowledge of the Quichua ethnographic "emic" details of their belief system and coping strategies to control pain are clinically useful not only for the health professional working in the Andes, some Quichua cultural characteristics related to pain could be useful to the culturally competent health practitioner who is making efforts to provide high-quality medical care in rural and multicultural

  20. Ethnoecology of the tropical Andes avian indicators of landscape change in highland Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmiento, F. O.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Four Andean birds offer clues to rethink the ethnoecology of neotropical cloud forests, challenging the notion of conservation based only in water resources and biodiversity. Using both archaeological and actuoecological evidence, the role of humans in shaping high Andean landscapes' location and maintenance is argued as an important factor for conservation priorities of tropical montane cloud forests, particularly in the equatorial mountains. Avian examples demonstrate intricate linkages of culture and nature in the tropical Andes. Traditional knowledge associated to ornithological clues, helps understanding the dynamics of cultural landscapes, with birds as proxy of synergisms affecting the complexities of both, nature and culture. A paradox of conservation is highlighted with avian indicators. The four selected species were cases where landscape change and biodiversity help in determining ethnoecological insights. Unlike the preservation of absolute nature reserves, landscape stewardship, conservation easements and cultural la^tdscapes are listed as options for inclusion in the repertoire of conservation scenarios for cloud forests survival, which includes sacred places and spiritual domains as intangibles worth protecting in the Tropical Andes.

    [fr] Quatre oiseaux andins nous donnent des raisons pour repenser Vethnoécologie des forêts néotropicales humides, ce qui met en question l'idée de la conservation basée sur les ressources d'eau et la biodiversité seules. En se servant des évidences archéologiques et écologiques actuelles, on soutient que les êtres humains ont un rôle dans la formation des hauts paysages andins. On soutient aussi que l'entretien est un facteur important dans la conservation des forêts tropicales humides en montagne, surtout dans les montagnes équatoriales. Les exemples aviaires démontrent les liens compliqués entre la culture et la nature dans les Andes tropicales. Les connaissances

  1. Current state of glaciers in the tropical Andes: a multi-century perspective on glacier evolution and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatel, A.; Francou, B.; Soruco, A.; Gomez, J.; Cáceres, B.; Ceballos, J. L.; Basantes, R.; Vuille, M.; Sicart, J.-E.; Huggel, C.; Scheel, M.; Lejeune, Y.; Arnaud, Y.; Collet, M.; Condom, T.; Consoli, G.; Favier, V.; Jomelli, V.; Galarraga, R.; Ginot, P.; Maisincho, L.; Mendoza, J.; Ménégoz, M.; Ramirez, E.; Ribstein, P.; Suarez, W.; Villacis, M.; Wagnon, P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide the community with a comprehensive overview of the studies of glaciers in the tropical Andes conducted in recent decades leading to the current status of the glaciers in the context of climate change. In terms of changes in surface area and length, we show that the glacier retreat in the tropical Andes over the last three decades is unprecedented since the maximum extension of the Little Ice Age (LIA, mid-17th-early 18th century). In terms of changes in mass balance, although there have been some sporadic gains on several glaciers, we show that the trend has been quite negative over the past 50 yr, with a mean mass balance deficit for glaciers in the tropical Andes that is slightly more negative than the one computed on a global scale. A break point in the trend appeared in the late 1970s with mean annual mass balance per year decreasing from -0.2 m w.e. in the period 1964-1975 to -0.76 m w.e. in the period 1976-2010. In addition, even if glaciers are currently retreating everywhere in the tropical Andes, it should be noted that this is much more pronounced on small glaciers at low altitudes that do not have a permanent accumulation zone, and which could disappear in the coming years/decades. Monthly mass balance measurements performed in Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia show that variability of the surface temperature of the Pacific Ocean is the main factor governing variability of the mass balance at the decadal timescale. Precipitation did not display a significant trend in the tropical Andes in the 20th century, and consequently cannot explain the glacier recession. On the other hand, temperature increased at a significant rate of 0.10 °C decade-1 in the last 70 yr. The higher frequency of El Niño events and changes in its spatial and temporal occurrence since the late 1970s together with a warming troposphere over the tropical Andes may thus explain much of the recent dramatic shrinkage of glaciers in this part of the world.

  2. Intra-arc Seismicity: Geometry and Kinematic Constraints of Active Faulting along Northern Liquiñe-Ofqui and Andean Transverse Fault Systems [38º and 40ºS, Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielfeld, G.; Lange, D.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Intra-arc crustal seismicity documents the schizosphere tectonic state along active magmatic arcs. At oblique-convergent margins, a significant portion of bulk transpressional deformation is accommodated in intra-arc regions, as a consequence of stress and strain partitioning. Simultaneously, crustal fluid migration mechanisms may be controlled by the geometry and kinematics of crustal high strain domains. In such domains shallow earthquakes have been associated with either margin-parallel strike-slip faults or to volcano-tectonic activity. However, very little is known on the nature and kinematics of Southern Andes intra-arc crustal seismicity and its relation with crustal faults. Here we present results of a passive seismicity study based on 16 months of data collected from 33 seismometers deployed along the intra-arc region of Southern Andes between 38˚S and 40˚S. This region is characterized by a long-lived interplay among margin-parallel strike-slip faults (Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System, LOFS), second order Andean-transverse-faults (ATF), volcanism and hydrothermal activity. Seismic signals recorded by our network document small magnitude (0.2P and 2,796 S phase arrival times have been located with NonLinLoc. First arrival polarities and amplitude ratios of well-constrained events, were used for focal mechanism inversion. Local seismicity occurs at shallow levels down to depth of ca. 16 km, associated either with stratovolcanoes or to master, N10˚E, and subsidiary, NE to ENE, striking branches of the LOFS. Strike-slip focal mechanisms are consistent with the long-term kinematics documented by field structural-geology studies. Unexpected, well-defined NW-SE elongated clusters are also reported. In particular, a 72-hour-long, N60˚W-oriented seismicity swarm took place at Caburgua Lake area, describing a ca. 36x12x1km3 faulting crustal volume. Results imply a unique snapshot on shallow crustal tectonics, contributing to the understanding of faulting processes

  3. Caracterización morfométrica de la microcuenca de la quebrada los Andes, El Carmen de Viboral, Antioquia-Colombia Morphometrical characterization in los Andes watershed, El Carmen de Viboral, Antioquia-Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimmy Montoya Moreno

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron algunas características morfométricas básicas en la microcuenca de la quebrada Los Andes en el departamento de Antioquia (Colombia. La microcuenca tiene un área pequeña (Some morphometric characteristic were evaluated in the watershed of creek Los Andes department of Antioquia (Colombia. The headwater has a small area (<20km² with main direction in the axis S-N, with an elevation range between 2.700 and 2.200 m. asl. It presents a network of drainage well structured, for which presents a time of concentration of the water over 5 hours. The watershed is of class Kc2 with a high slope and a system of drainage subdendritic. This research permitted to identify the uses of the soil, being the adequate use the one that presented greater percentage (55% and the use is recommended conservationist in general for all headwater.

  4. Nuclear Data for Safe Operation and Waste Transmutation: ANDES (Accurate Nuclear Data for nuclear Energy Sustainability); Datos nucleares para la operacion segura y la transmutacion de residuos: Andes (Datos Nucleares Precisos para la Sostenibilidad de la Energia Nuclear)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear research within the 7th Framework Program (FP7 and FP7+2) of EURATOM has devoted a significant fraction of its efforts to the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles and reactor concepts, mainly fast reactors, aiming to improve the long term sustainability by reduction of the final wastes, optimal use of natural resources and improvement of safety in the present and future nuclear installations. The new design need more accurate basic nuclear data for isotopes, like minor actinides, potentially playing an important role in the operation, fuel concept, safety or final wastes of those reactors and fuel cycles. Four projects, ANDES, ERINDA, EUFRAT and CHANDA, supported by EURATOM within the FP7 and FP7+2, have put together most of the European Nuclear Data community to respond efficiently and in a coordinated way to those needs. This paper summarizes the objectives, and main achievements of ANDES, the project responsible for most of the measurements and technical achievements that was coordinated by CIEMAT. Indeed, CIEMAT has coordinated the nuclear data R and D projects within EURATOM during the last 7 years (NUDATRA domain of EUROTRANS, and ANDES) and will continue this coordination in the CHANDA project till 2017. (Author)

  5. Satellite-Based Estimation of Water Discharge and Runoff in the Magdalena River, Northern Andes of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, J. D.; Escobar Correa, R.; Kettner, A.; Brakenridge, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The Magdalena River and its most important tributary, the Cauca, drain the northern Andes of Colombia. During the wet season, flood events affect the whole region and cause huge damage in low-income communities. Mitigation of such natural disasters in Colombia lacks science-supported tools for evaluating river response to extreme climate events. Here we introduce near-real-time estimations of river discharge towards technical capacity building for evaluation of flood magnitudes and variability along the Magdalena and Cauca. We use the River Watch version 3 system of the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) at five selected measurement sites on the two rivers. For each site, two different rating curves were constructed to transform microwave signal from TRMM, AMSR-E, AMRS-2, and GPM satellites into river discharge. The first rating curves were based on numerical discharge estimates from a global Water Balance Model (WBM); the second were obtained from the relationship between satellite signal and measured river discharge at ground gauging stations at nearby locations. Determination coefficients (R2) between observed versus satellite-derived daily discharge data, range from 0.38 to 0.57 in the upper basin, whereas in the middle of the basin R2 values vary between 0.47 and 0.64. In the lower basin, observed R2 values are lower and range from 0.32 to 0.4. Once time lags between the microwave satellite signal and river discharge from either WBM estimates or ground-based gauging stations are taken into account, the R2 values increase considerably. The time series of satellite-based river discharge during the 1998 - 2016 period show high inter-annual variability as well as strong pulses associated with the ENSO (La Niña/El Niño) cycle. Numerical runoff magnitude estimates at peaks of extreme climatic anomalies are more correlated than stream flows measured at ground-based gauging stations. In fluvial systems such as the Magdalena, characterized by high spatial variability

  6. Provenance of Miocene Hinterland Basins in Ecuador: Implications for the Growth of Topographic Barriers in the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S. W. M.; Horton, B. K.; Vallejo, C.; Nogales, V.

    2017-12-01

    Establishment of the Eastern Cordillera of Ecuador as an Andean topographic barrier caused significant drainage reorganization, perhaps even as dramatic as the reversal of the Amazon River. Cenozoic growth of this barrier coincided with substantial increases in speciation rates in Andean and Amazonian environments. Situated in the Interandean Depression between the Eastern Cordillera and Western Cordillera of Ecuador, a series of well-preserved Miocene intermontane basins offer a unique opportunity to constrain the along-strike development of the flanking north-trending cordilleras as drainage divides in the Northern Andes. Here were provide detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological results for 17 samples from Ecuadorian hinterland basins (Cuenca, Giron-Santa Isabel, Nabón, Loja, and Vilcabamba), supplemented with measured sections in the Cuenca Basin, to provide insights on orogenic development of the cordilleras of Ecuador during the Miocene. In addition, we characterize the age distributions of basement units to more precisely determine sediment routing patterns through time. Detrital zircon geochronological data yields regional upsection trends throughout Miocene stratigraphic sections marked by: (1) middle Miocene deposits containing a strong syndepositional age peak, with a complementary Eocene-Oligocene peak in varying abundances, and subsidiary low-intensity Paleozoic-Proterozoic age peaks; and (2a) upper Miocene deposits maintaining similar trends to that of the middle Miocene, or (2b) upper Miocene deposits showing a dramatic shutoff of most Cenozoic populations and a switch to Paleozoic-Proterozoic sources, as seen in the Nabón and Loja basins. Syndepositional signatures reflect derivation from the magmatic arc, while varying inputs of Eocene-Oligocene zircons were derived from the Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks that comprise the effective basement of much of the Interandean Depression. The late Miocene shift to Paleozoic-Proterozoic sources observed in

  7. Landscape-based discretization for modeling of hydrological processes in the semi-arid Andes Cordillera: a case study in Morales Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla Giering, Y. A., III; McPhee, J. P.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Improved understanding of cryosphere processes in the Subtropical Andes is essencial to secure water supply in Central Chile. An ongoing challenge is to identify the main controls on snow accumulation and ablation at multiple scales. In this study, we use the Cold Regions hydrological model (CRHM) to simulate the evolution of seasonal snow cover in the basin of the Estero Morales between the period 2000-2016. The model was forced with radiation, temperature, humidity, wind and precipitation data obtained from downscaled Era-Interim outputs. The basin was disaggregated spatially through representative hydrological processes and and geomorphological into HRU's. 22% of snow in the basin is subject to reallocation by topographic effects, while net short wave radiation would explain major changes in snowmelt. 80% of summer runoff comes from glacial melting, while temperature and soil properties are key factors controlling infiltration and contribution to the runoff at all times of the year. The model results indicate that 78.2% of precipitation corresponds to snow while 21.8% to rain. The flow rates of snowmelting are the main component in the water balance, accounting for approximately 62.8% of the total rainfall. It is important to point out that during the total period of modeling (2010-2016), it was noted that the 23.08% of the total annual flow corresponds to glacial melting, however for the period 2010 - 2015 this percentage increases to 45.3%, in spite of this were not observed variations in the volume of subsurface and groundwater flow. This suggests first: that systems such as analyzed in this article, have a great importance because they are fragile in terms of response and the ground due to its topographic features (such as slope and conductivity) is not able to store large percentages of resources until the end of the summer season; and second, to understand that mountain systems with presence of glaciers, naturally are regulated compared to sudden changes

  8. Holocene environmental changes in the highlands of the southern Peruvian Andes (14° S) and their impact on pre-Columbian cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittek, K.; Forbriger, M.; Mächtle, B.; Schäbitz, F.; Wennrich, V.; Reindel, M.; Eitel, B.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude peatlands of the Andes still remain relatively unexploited although they offer an excellent opportunity for well-dated palaeoenvironmental records. To improve knowledge about climatic and environmental changes in the western Andes of southern Peru, we present a high-resolution record of the Cerro Llamoca peatland for the last 8600 years. The 10.5 m long core consists of peat and intercalated sediment layers and was examined for all kinds of microfossils. We chose homogeneous peat sections for pollen analysis at decadal to centennial resolution. The inorganic geochemistry was analysed in 2 mm resolution (corresponding >2 years) using an ITRAX X-ray fluorescence core scanner. We interpret phases of relatively high abundances of Poaceae pollen in our record as an expansion of Andean grasslands during humid phases. Drier conditions are indicated by a significant decrease of Poaceae pollen and higher abundances of Asteraceae pollen. The results are substantiated by changes in arsenic contents and manganese/iron ratios, which turned out to be applicable proxies for in situ palaeoredox conditions. The mid-Holocene period of 8.6-5.6 ka is characterised by a series of episodic dry spells alternating with spells that are more humid. After a pronounced dry period at 4.6-4.2 ka, conditions generally shifted towards a more humid climate. We stress a humid/relatively stable interval between 1.8 and 1.2 ka, which coincides with the florescence of the Nasca culture in the Andean foothills. An abrupt turn to a sustained dry period occurs at 1.2 ka, which is contemporaneous with the demise of the Nasca/Wari society in the Palpa lowlands. Markedly drier conditions prevail until 0.75 ka, providing evidence of the presence of a Medieval Climate Anomaly. Moister but hydrologically highly variable conditions prevailed again after 0.75 ka, which allowed re-expansion of tussock grasses in the highlands, increased discharge into the Andean foreland and resettling of the

  9. Distribución de Stenocercus guentheri (Sauria: Iguanidae en el sur de los Andes de Colombia

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    Castro Herrera Fernando

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of a population of Stenocercus guentherifrom Colombia is described in detail and compared to information from ecuadorean specimens. The range of the species is extended northward to include the colombian departments (provinces of Nariño and Cauca along the Andes. Some field observations about bahavior, habitat, and reproduction are included.El presente trabajo describe las características de Stenocercus guentheri, en las poblaciones del sur de Colombia y hace una comparación con la información del Ecuador. Se amplía su rango de distribución geográfica hacia el norte de Suramérica, incluyendo los departamentos de Nariño y Cauca en los Andes de Colombia. Se incluyen datos de campo sobre hábitat, hábitos y reproducción.

  10. CARACTERIZACIÓN FÍSIOGRÁFICA DE LA PUNA DE SAJAMA, CORDILLERA OCCIDENTAL DE LOS ANDES (BOLIVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Javier Santa Cecilia Mateos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo aproxima a la realidad física de la cordillera Occidental de los Andes. Un espacio geográfico donde los caracteres geológicos relacionados con el vulcanismo adquieren una relevancia especial en la configuración del paisaje andino. Los nevados y llanuras intermedias o altiplanos, son los dos elementos que constituyen la imagen de la puna andina, un territorio situado por encima de los 4.000 metros, ámbito intermedio entre los valles húmedos o yungas y las más altas cumbres de los Andes. A la singularidad volcánica habría que añadir la relacionada con el modelado glaciar, los aspectos hidrográficos y la biogeografia en esta área. El artículo toma como ejemplo de estudio la puna de Sajama en eldepartamento de Oruro, en la frontera boliviano-chilena.Abstract. This article approaches the physical reality of the Western Cordillera of the Andes. A geographical space where characters related geological volcanism are of particular importance in shaping the landscape Andean. The intermediate plains or mountains and plateaus, are the two elements that make up the image of the Andean puna, an area located above 4,000 meters, the middle ground between Yungas wet valley and the highest peaks of the Andes. A volcanic uniqueness should add that related to glacier modeling, hydrographic aspects and biogeography in this area. The article uses the example of the highlands of Sajama study in thedepartment of Oruro in Bolivian-Chilean border.

  11. Stepwise colonization of the Andes by Ruddy Ducks and the evolution of novel β-globin variants

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Fuentes, Violeta; Cortázar-Chinarro, M.; Lozano-Jaramillo, M.; McCracken, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    Andean uplift played a key role in Neotropical bird diversification, yet past dispersal and genetic adaptation to high-altitude environments remain little understood. Here we use multilocus population genetics to study population history and historical demographic processes in the ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), a stiff-tailed diving duck comprising three subspecies distributed from Canada to Tierra del Fuego and inhabiting wetlands from sea level to 4500 m in the Andes. We sequenced the mit...

  12. Selection of astrophysical/astronomical/solar sites at the Argentina East Andes range taking into account atmospheric components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piacentini, R.D.; García, B.; Micheletti, M.I.; Salum, G.; Freire, M.; Maya, J.; Mancilla, A.; Crinó, E.; Mandát, Dušan; Pech, M.; Bulik, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 12 (2016), s. 2559-2574 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14AR005; GA MŠk LE13012; GA MŠk LG14019; GA MŠk LM2015046 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : astrophysical * astronomical * solar: sites * Argentina-Andes: atmospheric components Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.401, year: 2016

  13. The analytic nodal diffusion solver ANDES in multigroups for 3D rectangular geometry: Development and performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, Juan-Andres; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Ahnert, Carol; Aragones, Jose-Maria

    2008-01-01

    In this work we address the development and implementation of the analytic coarse-mesh finite-difference (ACMFD) method in a nodal neutron diffusion solver called ANDES. The first version of the solver is implemented in any number of neutron energy groups, and in 3D Cartesian geometries; thus it mainly addresses PWR and BWR core simulations. The details about the generalization to multigroups and 3D, as well as the implementation of the method are given. The transverse integration procedure is the scheme chosen to extend the ACMFD formulation to multidimensional problems. The role of the transverse leakage treatment in the accuracy of the nodal solutions is analyzed in detail: the involved assumptions, the limitations of the method in terms of nodal width, the alternative approaches to implement the transverse leakage terms in nodal methods - implicit or explicit -, and the error assessment due to transverse integration. A new approach for solving the control rod 'cusping' problem, based on the direct application of the ACMFD method, is also developed and implemented in ANDES. The solver architecture turns ANDES into an user-friendly, modular and easily linkable tool, as required to be integrated into common software platforms for multi-scale and multi-physics simulations. ANDES can be used either as a stand-alone nodal code or as a solver to accelerate the convergence of whole core pin-by-pin code systems. The verification and performance of the solver are demonstrated using both proof-of-principle test cases and well-referenced international benchmarks

  14. Effects of loading–unloading and wetting–drying cycles on geomechanical behaviors of mudrocks in the Colombian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Suarez, Mario Camilo; Alarcon-Guzman, Adolfo; Berdugo-De Moya, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The mudrocks in the Colombian Andes, particularly those exhibiting low cementation (bonding), are susceptible to degradation when the environmental conditions change, which are challenging issues for engineering works. In this paper, the changes in physico-mechanical properties of mudrocks were monitored in laboratory, and some influential factors on the mechanical competence of geomaterials were studied. The geotechnical characteristics and experimental designs were developed from physical, ...

  15. A large and unusually colored new snake species of the genus Tantilla (Squamata; Colubridae) from the Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Claudia; Venegas, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    A new colubrid species of the genus Tantilla from the dry forest of the northern Peruvian Andes is described on the basis of two specimens, which exhibit a conspicuous sexual dimorphism. Tantilla tjiasmantoi sp. nov. represents the third species of the genus in Peru. The new species is easily distinguished from its congeners by the combination of scalation characteristics and the unusual transversely-banded color pattern on the dorsum. A detailed description of the skull morphology of the new...

  16. Quantitative Temperature Reconstructions from Holocene and Late Glacial Lake Sediments in the Tropical Andes using Chironomidae (non-biting midges)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews-Bird, F.; Gosling, W. D.; Brooks, S. J.; Montoya, E.; Coe, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Chironomidae (non-biting midges) is a family of two-winged aquatic insects of the order Diptera. They are globally distributed and one of the most diverse families within aquatic ecosystems. The insects are stenotopic, and the rapid turnover of species and their ability to colonise quickly favourable habitats means chironomids are extremely sensitive to environmental change, notably temperature. Through the development of quantitative temperature inference models chironomids have become important palaeoecological tools. Proxies capable of generating independent estimates of past climate are crucial to disentangling climate signals and ecosystem response in the palaeoecological record. This project has developed the first modern environmental calibration data set in order to use chironomids from the Tropical Andes as quantitative climate proxies. Using surface sediments from c. 60 lakes from Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador we have developed an inference model capable of reconstructing temperatures, with a prediction error of 1-2°C, from fossil assemblages. Here we present the first Lateglacial and Holocene chironomid-inferred temperature reconstructions from two sites in the tropical Andes. The first record, from a high elevation (4153 m asl) lake in the Bolivian Andes, shows persistently cool temperatures for the past 15 kyr, punctuated by warm episodes in the early Holocene (9-10 kyr BP). The chironomid-inferred Holocene temperature trends from a lake sediment record on the eastern Andean flank of Ecuador (1248 m asl) spanning the last 5 millennia are synchronous with temperature changes in the NGRIP ice core record. The temperature estimates suggest along the eastern flank of the Andes, at lower latitudes (~1°S), climate closely resemble the well-established fluctuations of the Northern Hemisphere for this time period. Late-glacial climate fluctuations across South America are still disputed with some palaeoecological records suggesting evidence for Younger Dryas

  17. Effect of climatic variables on seasonal morphological changes in the testis and epididymis in the wild rodent Microcavia australis from the andes mountains, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Silvina; Sassi, Paola L; Borghi, Carlos E; Monclus, María A; Fornés, Miguel W

    2010-10-01

    It has been shown that seasonal changes, especially in arid areas have a large influence on gonadal changes of the species that inhabit these areas. We studied a wild hystricomorph Microcavia australis in its natural habitat in the arid Andes Mountains. Sampling of adult males was carried out every 2 months. After autopsy, testes and epididymides were weighed and processed to obtain histological samples. Testes were analyzed with a microscope to measure seminiferous tubule area and diameter for each sampled month. Epididymides were used to determine spermatozoon storage in the cauda region. Results illustrate morphological changes in the testis and epididymis along the year. A high output of sperm cells was detected from middle winter to middle summer and a complete shutdown of spermatogenesis at the end of summer. The initiation of testicular activity coincided with month with the shortest day length, in dry season and very low temperature. On the other hand, gonadal regression started in the middle of summer with long day length, in the wet season, and high temperatures. Rainfall, temperature, and day length seem to be important for the testis cycle. We suggest that photoperiod could be a good predictor for an oncoming period suitable for breeding, and males may probably use it as a signal to regulate gonadal activity.

  18. Petroleum systems at the triple point between the Merida Andes, the eastern cordillera of Colombia and the Guayana shield: The petroleum geology of the Colombian-Venezuelan Border

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigne, N.; Loureiro, D.; Rojas, L. [and others

    1996-08-01

    The sinistral Bramon-Bucaramanga shear zone, in conjunction with the southeastern vergent Falla Borde Llanero and the northwestern vergent frontal thrust of the Merida Andes, defines a complex area where tectonic transport shows crustal scale shift. Palinspastic restorations have been used as a base for the identification and reconstruction of the evolving petroleum systems, showing that several of the discontinuities within this collage served as barriers for major oil accumulations. The main oil generating unit of the region is a 200-m-thick sequence of Cenomanian-Turonian rocks representing a variety of facies, from siliciclastic mudstones to finely laminated limestones. Sequence stratigraphy at well-log scale combined with seismic profiles has helped to identify and map the most important reservoir-seal couples within Late Cretaceous and late Eocene-Early Miocene megasequences. One- and two-dimensional modelling of kerogen maturation suggest a major phase of oil expulsion during Early Miocene. Loading of the source rock below Upper Miocene to Holocene thrust and/or coeval foredeep sediments has developed a petroleum system that is active today. Oil migrated toward the local highs from active kitchens located to the west-southwest.

  19. Molecular analysis of the parallel domestication of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Mesoamerica and the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Giardini, Alessandro; Rau, Domenico; Rodriguez, Monica; Biagetti, Eleonora; Santilocchi, Rodolfo; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi; Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the nucleotide diversity of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, which is characterized by two independent domestications in two geographically distinct areas: Mesoamerica and the Andes. This provides an important model, as domestication can be studied as a replicate experiment. We used nucleotide data from five gene fragments characterized by large introns to analyse 214 accessions (102 wild and 112 domesticated). The wild accessions represent a cross-section of the entire geographical distribution of P. vulgaris. A reduction in genetic diversity in both of these gene pools was found, which was three-fold greater in Mesoamerica compared with the Andes. This appears to be a result of a bottleneck that occurred before domestication in the Andes, which strongly impoverished this wild germplasm, leading to the minor effect of the subsequent domestication bottleneck (i.e. sequential bottleneck). These findings show the importance of considering the evolutionary history of crop species as a major factor that influences their current level and structure of genetic diversity. Furthermore, these data highlight a single domestication event within each gene pool. Although the findings should be interpreted with caution, this evidence indicates the Oaxaca valley in Mesoamerica, and southern Bolivia and northern Argentina in South America, as the origins of common bean domestication. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y.; Venegas, Pablo J.; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000–1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543–1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122–1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported. PMID:26798310

  1. Genome of Plant Maca (Lepidium meyenii) Illuminates Genomic Basis for High-Altitude Adaptation in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Tian, Yang; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Guanghui; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Jiajin; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yuntao; Long, Ni; Wang, Yangzi; Ma, Yujin; He, Yuqi; Xue, Yu; Hao, Shumei; Yang, Shengchao; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Liangsheng; Dong, Yang; Chen, Wei; Sheng, Jun

    2016-07-06

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp, 2n = 8x = 64), belonging to the Brassicaceae family, is an economic plant cultivated in the central Andes sierra in Peru (4000-4500 m). Considering that the rapid uplift of the central Andes occurred 5-10 million years ago (Ma), an evolutionary question arises regarding how plants such as maca acquire high-altitude adaptation within a short geological period. Here, we report the high-quality genome assembly of maca, in which two closely spaced maca-specific whole-genome duplications (WGDs; ∼6.7 Ma) were identified. Comparative genomic analysis between maca and closely related Brassicaceae species revealed expansions of maca genes and gene families involved in abiotic stress response, hormone signaling pathway, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis via WGDs. The retention and subsequent functional divergence of many duplicated genes may account for the morphological and physiological changes (i.e., small leaf shape and self-fertility) in maca in a high-altitude environment. In addition, some duplicated maca genes were identified with functions in morphological adaptation (i.e., LEAF CURLING RESPONSIVENESS) and abiotic stress response (i.e., GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEINS and DNA-DAMAGE-REPAIR/TOLERATION 2) under positive selection. Collectively, the maca genome provides useful information to understand the important roles of WGDs in the high-altitude adaptation of plants in the Andes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of time series of optical and SAR images in the estimation of snow cover for the optimization of water use in the Andes of Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas de Salmuni, Graciela; Cabezas Cartes, Ricardo; Menicocci, Felix

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the progress in the bilateral cooperation project between academic and water resources management institutions from the Andes region of Argentina and Chile. The study zone is located in fragile ecosystems and mountain areas of the Andes (limit zone between the Province of San Juan, Argentina, and the IV Region of Coquimbo, Chile), with arid climate, where snow precipitates in the headwaters of watershed feed the rivers of the region by melting, which are the only source of water for human use, productive and energetic activities, as well as the native flora and fauna. CONAE, the Argentine Space Agency, participates in the Project through the provision of satellite data to the users and by this it contributes to ensuring the continuity of the results of the project. Also, it provides training in digital image processing. The project also includes the participation of water resource management institutions like Secretaria de Recursos Hidricos of Argentina and the Centro de Información de Recursos Naturales de Chile (CIREN), and of academic institution like the University of San Juan (Argentina) and University of La Serena (Chile). These institutions benefit from the incorporation of new methodologies advanced digital image processing and training of staff (researcher, lecturers, PhD Students and technical). Objectives: 1-Improve water distribution incorporating space technology for application in the prediction models of the stream flow. 2- Conduct an inventory of glaciers as well as studies in selected watersheds in the Andean region, aiming to know the water resource, its availability and potential risks to communities in the region. 3. Contribute to vulnerability studies in biodiversity Andean watersheds. Results: For estimation Snow cover Area, the MODIS images are appropriate due their high temporal resolution and allows for monitoring large areas (greater than 10 km) The proposed methodology (Use of snow index, NSDI) is appropriate for

  3. Intra- and interspecific tree growth across a long altitudinal gradient in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Joshua M; Silman, Miles R; Clark, James S; Girardin, Cecile A J; Galiano, Darcy; Tito, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Tree growth response across environmental gradients is fundamental to understanding species distributional ecology and forest ecosystem ecology and to predict future ecosystem services. Cross-sectional patterns of ecosystem properties with respect to climatic gradients are often used to predict ecosystem responses to global change. Across sites in the tropics, primary productivity increases with temperature, suggesting that forest ecosystems will become more productive as temperature rises. However, this trend is confounded with a shift in species composition and so may not reflect the response of in situ forests to warming. In this study, we simultaneously studied tree diameter growth across the altitudinal ranges of species within a single genus across a geographically compact temperature gradient, to separate the direct effect of temperature on tree growth from that of species compositional turnover. Using a Bayesian state space modeling framework we combined data from repeated diameter censuses and dendrometer measurements from across a 1700-m altitudinal gradient collected over six years on over 2400 trees in Weinmannia, a dominant and widespread genus of cloud forest trees in the Andes. Within species, growth showed no consistent trend with altitude, but higher-elevation species had lower growth rates than lower-elevation species, suggesting that species turnover is largely responsible for the positive correlation between productivity and temperature in tropical forests. Our results may indicate a significant difference in how low- and high-latitude forests will respond to climate change, since temperate and boreal tree species are consistently observed to have a positive relationship between growth and temperature. If our results hold for other tropical species, a positive response in ecosystem productivity to increasing temperatures in the Andes will depend on the altitudinal migration of tree species. The rapid pace of climate change, and slow observed

  4. Differential lymphocyte and antibody responses in deer mice infected with Sin Nombre hantavirus or Andes hantavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schountz, Tony; Quackenbush, Sandra; Rovnak, Joel; Haddock, Elaine; Black, William C; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a rodent-borne disease with a high case-fatality rate that is caused by several New World hantaviruses. Each pathogenic hantavirus is naturally hosted by a principal rodent species without conspicuous disease and infection is persistent, perhaps for life. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the natural reservoirs of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the etiologic agent of most HCPS cases in North America. Deer mice remain infected despite a helper T cell response that leads to high-titer neutralizing antibodies. Deer mice are also susceptible to Andes hantavirus (ANDV), which causes most HCPS cases in South America; however, deer mice clear ANDV. We infected deer mice with SNV or ANDV to identify differences in host responses that might account for this differential outcome. SNV RNA levels were higher in the lungs but not different in the heart, spleen, or kidneys. Most ANDV-infected deer mice had seroconverted 14 days after inoculation, but none of the SNV-infected deer mice had. Examination of lymph node cell antigen recall responses identified elevated immune gene expression in deer mice infected with ANDV and suggested maturation toward a Th2 or T follicular helper phenotype in some ANDV-infected deer mice, including activation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) pathway in T cells and B cells. These data suggest that the rate of maturation of the immune response is substantially higher and of greater magnitude during ANDV infection, and these differences may account for clearance of ANDV and persistence of SNV. Hantaviruses persistently infect their reservoir rodent hosts without pathology. It is unknown how these viruses evade sterilizing immune responses in the reservoirs. We have determined that infection of the deer mouse with its homologous hantavirus, Sin Nombre virus, results in low levels of immune gene expression in antigen-stimulated lymph node cells and a poor antibody response. However, infection of deer mice with a

  5. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  6. Complex controls on nitrous oxide flux across a large-elevation gradient in the tropical Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Diem

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current bottom–up process models suggest that montane tropical ecosystems are weak atmospheric sources of N2O, although recent empirical studies from the southern Peruvian Andes have challenged this idea. Here we report N2O flux from combined field and laboratory experiments that investigated the process-based controls on N2O flux from montane ecosystems across a large-elevation gradient (600–3700 m a.s.l. in the southern Peruvian Andes. Nitrous oxide flux and environmental variables were quantified in four major habitats (premontane forest, lower montane forest, upper montane forest and montane grassland at monthly intervals over a 30-month period from January 2011 to June 2013. The role of soil moisture content in regulating N2O flux was investigated through a manipulative, laboratory-based 15N-tracer experiment. The role of substrate availability (labile organic matter, NO3− in regulating N2O flux was examined through a field-based litter-fall manipulation experiment and a laboratory-based 15N–NO3− addition study, respectively. Ecosystems in this region were net atmospheric sources of N2O, with an unweighted mean flux of 0.27 ± 0.07 mg N–N2O m−2 d−1. Weighted extrapolations, which accounted for differences in land surface area among habitats and variations in flux between seasons, predicted a mean annual flux of 1.27 ± 0.33 kg N2O–N ha−1 yr−1. Nitrous oxide flux was greatest from premontane forest, with an unweighted mean flux of 0.75 ± 0.18 mg N–N2O m−2 d−1, translating to a weighted annual flux of 0.66 ± 0.16 kg N2O–N ha−1 yr−1. In contrast, N2O flux was significantly lower in other habitats. The unweighted mean fluxes for lower montane forest, montane grasslands, and upper montane forest were 0.46 ± 0.24 mg N–N2O m−2 d−1, 0.07 ± 0.08 mg N–N2O m−2 d−1, and 0.04 ± 0.07 mg N–N2O m−2 d−1

  7. Linking climate variations with the hydrological cycle over the semi-arid Central Andes of Argentina. Past, present and future, with emphasis on streamflow droughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Juan Antonio; Araneo, Diego; Penalba, Olga; Villalba, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    In the Central Andes of Argentina (CAA, located between 28° and 38°S), an arid to semi-arid region, the irrigation and a variety of socio-economical activities are highly dependent on river streamflows. Permanent and semi-permanent rivers originate mainly from snowmelt and glacier ablation, enabling the development of large agricultural oasis and the construction of numerous dams and reservoirs for irrigation and power generation. Most of its 2.5 million inhabitants and the main economic activities are located in a small irrigated fraction of the territory, where the variations in the timing and amount of water resources largely determine the socio-economic vulnerability of the region. In this context, the links between climatic variability and the hydrological cycle were assessed considering daily streamflow records from 21 streamgauges in the main rivers of the study area. Principal component analysis of annual hydrographs from 1931 to 2015 allowed to discriminate between precipitation- and temperature-related components associated with variations in snow accumulation (51% of variance) and advances/delays of the streamflow annual peak (16% of variance), respectively. The components related to intraseasonal variability account for 7% and 6% of variance, respectively, mixing both precipitation and thermal factors. The contribution of the precipitation-related component was the main driver of the 2010-15 streamflow drought conditions, although the thermal contribution was relevant during specific seasonal drought events. Based on an empirical decomposition methodology we identified the main modes of streamflow drought variability, which are linked to El Niño-Southern Oscillation on interannual time scales and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) for the decadal variations. This result shows the influence of the tropical Pacific Ocean in the development of streamflow drought conditions and its relevance for potential predictability of hydroclimatic variations

  8. The GalileoMobile starts its South American voyage - Astronomy education goes on tour through the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Today marks the beginning of the GalileoMobile Project, a two-month expedition to bring the wonder and excitement of astronomy to young people in Chile, Bolivia and Peru. Supported by ESO and partners, a group of astronomers and educators will travel through a region of the Andes Mountains aboard the GalileoMobile, offering astronomical activities, such as workshops for students and star parties for the general public. Professional filmmakers on the trip will produce a multilingual documentary capturing the thrill of discovery through science, culture and travel. The GalileoMobile is a Special Project of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009), which is a global celebration commemorating the first use of a telescope to view the Universe by the Italian astronomer Galileo four hundred years ago. The project will promote basic science education through astronomy by visiting schools and communities that have limited access to outreach programmes. The GalileoMobile will provide these underserved groups with hands-on activities and educational material from international partners. The van is fully equipped to offer unique sky-observing opportunities for young students and other locals, with star parties at night and solar observations during the day. The team will use various tools including IYA2009's handy Galileoscopes, which will be donated to the schools after the visits. By stimulating curiosity, critical thinking and a sense of wonder and discovery for the Universe and our planet, the GalileoMobile Project aims to encourage interest in astronomy and science, and exchange culturally different visions of the cosmos. Spearheading the initiative is a group of enthusiastic Latin American and European PhD students from the European Southern Observatory, the Max Planck Society, the University Observatory Munich, and the Stockholm University Observatory. This itinerant educational programme is intended to reach about 20 000 people during eight weeks in October

  9. A phytosociological analysis and synopsis of the dry woodlands and succulent vegetation of the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-DE-Mera, Antonio; Sánchez-Vega, Isidoro; Linares-Perea, Eliana; Campos, José; Montoya, Juan; Vicente-Orellana, José A

    2016-01-01

    A phytosociological approach to dry forest and cactus communities on the occidental slopes of the Peruvian Andes is presented in base of 164 plots carried out following the Braun-Blanquet method. From them, 52 have been made recently, and the other 112 were taken from the literature. After a multivariate analysis, using a hierarchical clustering and a detendred correspondence analysis, the Acacio-Prosopidetea class (dry forest and cactus communities, developed on soils with some edaphic humidity or precipitations derived from El Niño Current), the Opuntietea sphaericae class (cactus communities of central and southern Peru, on few stabilized rocky or sandy soils) and the Carico-Caesalpinietea class (dry forests of the Peruvian coastal desert, influenced by the maritime humidity of the cold Humboldt Current), are differentiated. Within the Acacio-Prosopidetea class, two alliances are commented: the Bursero-Prosopidion pallidae (with two new associations Loxopterygio huasanginis-Neoraimondietum arequipensis and Crotono ruiziani-Acacietum macracanthae), and the new alliance Baccharido-Jacarandion acutifoliae (with the new associations Armatocereo balsasensis-Cercidietum praecocis and Diplopterydo leiocarpae-Acacietum macracanthae). For the Opuntietea sphaericae class, the association Haageocereo versicoloris-Armatocereetum proceri (Espostoo-Neoraimondion) is described on the basis of plots from hyperarid localities of central Peru. Finally, a typological classification of the studied plant communities is given.

  10. A phytosociological analysis and synopsis of the dry woodlands and succulent vegetation of the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO GALÁN-DE-MERA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A phytosociological approach to dry forest and cactus communities on the occidental slopes of the Peruvian Andes is presented in base of 164 plots carried out following the Braun-Blanquet method. From them, 52 have been made recently, and the other 112 were taken from the literature. After a multivariate analysis, using a hierarchical clustering and a detendred correspondence analysis, the Acacio-Prosopidetea class (dry forest and cactus communities, developed on soils with some edaphic humidity or precipitations derived from El Niño Current, the Opuntietea sphaericae class (cactus communities of central and southern Peru, on few stabilized rocky or sandy soils and the Carico-Caesalpinietea class (dry forests of the Peruvian coastal desert, influenced by the maritime humidity of the cold Humboldt Current, are differentiated. Within the Acacio-Prosopidetea class, two alliances are commented: the Bursero-Prosopidion pallidae (with two new associations Loxopterygio huasanginis-Neoraimondietum arequipensis and Crotono ruiziani-Acacietum macracanthae, and the new alliance Baccharido-Jacarandion acutifoliae (with the new associations Armatocereo balsasensis-Cercidietum praecocis and Diplopterydo leiocarpae-Acacietum macracanthae. For the Opuntietea sphaericae class, the association Haageocereo versicoloris-Armatocereetum proceri (Espostoo-Neoraimondion is described on the basis of plots from hyperarid localities of central Peru. Finally, a typological classification of the studied plant communities is given.

  11. Distribution models and species discovery: the story of a new Solanum species from the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkinen, Tiina; Gonzáles, Paúl; Knapp, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Solanum sect. Solanum from Peru is described here. Solanum pseudoamericanum Särkinen, Gonzáles & S.Knapp sp. nov. is a member of the Morelloid clade of Solanum, and is characterized by the combination of mostly forked inflorescences, flowers with small stamens 2.5 mm long including the filament, and strongly exerted styles with capitate stigmas. The species was first thought to be restricted to the seasonally dry tropical forests of southern Peru along the dry valleys of Río Pampas and Río Apurímac. Results from species distribution modelling (SDM) analysis with climatic predictors identified further potential suitable habitat areas in northern and central Peru. These areas were visited during field work in 2013. A total of 17 new populations across the predicted distribution were discovered using the model-based sampling method, and five further collections were identified amongst herbarium loans. Although still endemic to Peru, Solanum pseudoamericanum is now known from across northern, central and southern Peru. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of SDM for predicting new occurrences of rare plants, especially in the Andes where collection densities are still low in many areas and where many new species remain to be discovered. PMID:24399901

  12. Distribution models and species discovery: the story of a new Solanum species from the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Sarkinen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Solanum sect. Solanum from Peru is described here. Solanum pseudoamericanum Särkinen, Gonzáles & S.Knapp sp. nov. is a member of the Morelloid clade of Solanum, and is characterized by the combination of mostly forked inflorescences, flowers with small stamens 2.5 mm long including the filament, and strongly exerted styles with capitate stigmas. The species was first thought to be restricted to the seasonally dry tropical forests of southern Peru along the dry valleys of Río Pampas and Río Apurímac. Results from species distribution modelling (SDM analysis with climatic predictors identified further potential suitable habitat areas in northern and central Peru. These areas were visited during field work in 2013. A total of 17 new populations across the predicted distribution were discovered using the model-based sampling method, and five further collections were identified amongst herbarium loans. Although still endemic to Peru, S. pseudoamericanum is now known from across northern, central and southern Peru. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of SDM for predicting new occurrences of rare plants, especially in the Andes where collection densities are still low in many areas and where many new species remain to be discovered.

  13. Agriculture at the Edge: Landscape Variability of Soil C Stocks and Fluxes in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Peña, C.

    2015-12-01

    Paramos, or tropical alpine grasslands occurring right above the forest tree-line (2,800 - 4,700 m), are among the most transformed landscapes in the humid tropics. In the Tropical Andes, Paramos form an archipelago-like pattern from Northern Colombia to Central Peru that effectively captures atmospheric moisture originated in the Amazon-Orinoco basins, while marking the highest altitude capable of sustaining vegetation growth (i.e., 'the edge'). This study investigates the role of land management on mediating soil carbon stocks and fluxes in Paramo ecosystems of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. Observations were collected at a Paramo site strongly modified by land use change, including active potato plantations, pasture, tillage, and land abandonment. Results show that undisturbed Paramos soils have high total organic carbon (TOC), high soil water content (SWC), and low soil CO2 efflux (RS) rates. However, Paramo soils that experience human intervention show lower TOC, higher and more variable RS rates, and lower SWC. This study demonstrates that changes in land use in Paramos affect differentially the accumulation and exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere and offers implications for management and protection strategies of what has been deemed the fastest evolving biodiversity ecosystem in the world.

  14. Poder y sociedad en los Andes: Manuel Isidoro Belzu, un caudillo popular. Bolivia, 1848-1855

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Javier Ortíz Mesa

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available En este ensayo quiero referirme a un gobernante boliviano, Manuel Isidoro Belzu, presidente entre los años de 1848 y 1855. Con una larga carrera militar de casi 25 años, en un ambiente de permanente inestabilidad política y con una fascinante estrategia, Belzu ha sido percibido por algunos historiadores y literatos como un «Caudillo del Pueblo», otros lo calificaron como un demagogo y algunos más como el presidente para la Bolivia de entonces. Manuel Isidoro Belzu nació al tiempo que se vislumbraba la Bolivia Republicana en 1808. Fue un hombre pobre como muchos de sus conciudadanos, predominantemente indígenas. No obstante, Belzu fue un mestizo, expresión de los cambios raciales que desde la Colonia se produjeron en la población de la Audiencia de Charcas cuya sede y capital fue Chuquisaca o Sucre, donde tuvo asiento el emporio minero más importante y productivo de los Andes, el Cerro Rico de Potosí.

  15. Subduction controls on the compositions of lavas from the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Kurz,; Larson, P.; Hall, M.; Geist, D.; Barragan, R.

    1998-01-01

    Three volcanoes of the Ecuadorian Andes, Atacazo, Antisana, and Sumaco, lie in a transect perpendicular to the trench and the main trend of the Andean arc. Each of the volcanoes lies on crust of substantially different age, composition, and thickness. Few compositional or isotopic features correspond in a straightforward way to the type of the crust through which the magmas have passed. Isotopic data limit assimilation to Antisana's lavas are intermediate in almost every respect. These features are consistent with devolatilization of the subducted slab controlling the extent of partial melting of a depleted mantle source. A mixing and melting model suggests the volcanic front magmas are made by large extent of partial melting (~15%) and include a large slab input (1.1% added to the depleted mantle). The magmas of the middle belt of volcanoes are made by smaller extent of partial melting (3%), induced by moderate amounts of slab-derived fluid (0.06%). The back arc magmas result from small degrees of melting (2%) and small slab input.

  16. Endocytic Pathways Used by Andes Virus to Enter Primary Human Lung Endothelial Cells.

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    Cheng-Feng Chiang

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV is the major cause of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS in South America. Despite a high fatality rate (up to 40%, no vaccines or antiviral therapies are approved to treat ANDV infection. To understand the role of endocytic pathways in ANDV infection, we used 3 complementary approaches to identify cellular factors required for ANDV entry into human lung microvascular endothelial cells. We screened an siRNA library targeting 140 genes involved in membrane trafficking, and identified 55 genes required for ANDV infection. These genes control the major endocytic pathways, endosomal transport, cell signaling, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. We then used infectious ANDV and retroviral pseudovirions to further characterize the possible involvement of 9 of these genes in the early steps of ANDV entry. In addition, we used markers of cellular endocytosis along with chemical inhibitors of known endocytic pathways to show that ANDV uses multiple routes of entry to infect target cells. These entry mechanisms are mainly clathrin-, dynamin-, and cholesterol-dependent, but can also occur via a clathrin-independent manner.

  17. Estimates of Carbon Reservoirs in High-Altitude Wetlands in the Colombian Andes

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    Enrique Javier Peña

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The observed increase in emission of greenhouse gases, with attendant effects on global warming, have raised interests in identifying sources and sinks of carbon in the environment. Terrestrial carbon (C sequestration involves capture of atmospheric C through photosynthesis and storage in biota, soil and wetlands. Particularly, wetland systems function primarily as long-term reservoirs for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 and as sources of atmospheric methane (CH4. The objective of this study was to evaluate the patterns of carbon reservoirs in two high-altitude wetlands in the central Andean mountain of Colombia. Carbon cycle in both systems is related mainly with the plant biomass dynamics from the littoral zone. Thus, total organic carbon concentrate an average up to 329 kg of N ha-1 and 125 kg of P ha-1 every year vs only 17 kg N ha-1 and 6 kg P ha-1 in the water column of the limnetic zone in the wetland, evidencing spatial differences in carbon concentrations for these types of ecosystems. Results revealed that these systems participate in the balance and sequestration of carbon in the Colombian Andes.

  18. Leaf Litterfall and Decomposition of Polylepis reticulata in the Treeline of the Ecuadorian Andes

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    Juan Pinos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaf litterfall contributes significantly to carbon fluxes in forests. A crucial open question for the sustainability of mountain forests is how climate change will affect this and other carbon fluxes (eg photosynthesis and respiration. Leaf litterfall and decomposition of Polylepis reticulata, an endemic species of the Andes, were analyzed during a period of 1 year at 6 experimental plots located in the Andean páramo between 3700 and 3900 m above sea level in Cajas National Park, Ecuador. Litterfall was collected in each plot using 5 randomly distributed traps. Every trap had a 40-cm diameter (0.125 m2 and was suspended 0.8 to 1.0 m above the ground. The decomposition rate of the leaf litter was analyzed using litter bags. Eighteen bags with approximately 20 g of dry litter were placed in the litter layer in each experimental plot and collected 30, 60, 90, 150, 210, 300, and 365 days after they were installed. The mean annual litterfall recorded was 3.77 Mg ha−1, representing 51% of the leaf biomass present in the canopy, so the leaf life span of P. reticulata in Cajas National Park is 1.98 years. Litterfall occurred all year, with no significant seasonal pattern. The mean decomposition rate (k obtained for this study period was 0.38 year−1. This study contributes to the information gap on litterfall and decomposition in natural forests located at the highest elevations in the world.

  19. High altitude C(4) grasslands in the northern Andes: relicts from glacial conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom, A; Mora, G; Cleef, A M.; Hooghiemstra, H

    2001-06-01

    The altitudinal vegetation distribution in the northern Andes during glacial time differed from the present-day conditions as a result of temperature and precipitation change. New evidence indicate that as a response to a reduced atmospheric partial CO(2) pressure (pCO(2)), the competitive balance between C(3) and C(4) plants have changed. Effects may have remained virtually undetected in pollen records, but can be observed using a stable carbon isotope analysis. Vegetation dominated by C(4) taxa, belonging to the families Cyperaceae (e.g. Bulbostylis and Cyperus) and Poaceae (e.g. Muhlenbergia, Paspalum and Sporobolus), may have been able to replace for a significant part the modern type C(3) taxa (e.g. species belonging to Carex, Rhynchospora, Aciachne, Agrostis, Calamagrostis, and Chusquea). Impact of reduced glacial atmospheric pCO(2) levels and lower glacial temperatures on the composition and the elevational distribution of the vegetation types is discussed. The present high Andean vegetation communities may differ from the glacial equivalents (non-modern analogue situation). We identified dry Sporobolus lasiophyllus tussock grassland and Arcytophyllum nitidum dwarfshrub paramo as the possible relict communities from glacial time. The effect on previous estimates of paleo-temperatures is estimated to be small.

  20. Paleohidrología de los últimos 25000 años en los Andes bolivianos

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    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available PALÉOHYDROLOGIE DES DERNIÈRES 25 000 ANNÉES DANS LES ANDES BOLIVIENNES. Nous présentons une reconstruction climatique de haute résolution de l’Altiplano bolivien (Andes Centrales basée sur des données géomorphologiques, sédimentologiques, palynologiques et provenant de l’analyse des faunes d’ostracodes. Nous avons déterminé (1, de manière semi-quantitative, la température ainsi que (2 de façon quantitative, les variations des niveaux lacustres depuis la fin du Pléistocène (25 000 ans BP. Les principaux résultats obtenus sont les suivants: de 25 000 à 18 000 ans BP, les températures atmosphériques sont basses ainsi que les niveaux des lacs entre 18 000 et 15 000/14 000 ans BP, la présence d’une lacune de sédimentation est indicatrice d’une phase climatique sèche pendant le Tardi-Glaciaire (15 000/14 000 - 10 500, les lacs (phase Tauca et les glaciers se sont étendus de 10 500 à 8000 ans BP, les lacs et les glaciers reculent très rapidement pendant que la température globale moyenne augmente à l’Holocène moyen (8 000-3 900 ans BP, le climat régional est globalement de type sec autour de 3900 ans BP, le niveau du lac Titicaca monte fortement des conditions relativement humides s’installent alors et se maintiennent par la suite pendant le Petit âge de la Glace (16ème-19ème siècles, des conditions froides et humides prévalent. En base a datos geomorfológicos, sedimentológicos, palinológicos y el análisis de fauna de ostrácodos, se ha determinado (1, de manera semicuantitativa, la temperatura así como (2 los cambios cuantificados de las variaciones de los niveles lacustres desde el final del Pleistoceno (25 000 años BP. Los principales resultados obtenidos son los siguientes: de 25 000 a 18 000 años BP, las temperaturas atmosféricas son bajas así como los niveles de los lagos entre 18 000 y 15 000/14 000 años BP, una fase climática seca es definida por la presencia de una laguna de sedimentaci

  1. Caracterización de semillas de lupino (Lupinus mutabilis sembrado en los Andes de Colombia

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    Ortega-David Eduar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se identificaron las propiedades físicas, composicionales y fisicoquímicas de la semilla de Lupino (Lupinus mutabilis cultivado en Nariño (Andes de Colombia. Su composición se determinó realizando análisis proximales de semilla completa, tegumento y cotiledones. Además se determinó el contenido de minerales y su composición elemental. Se estableció cuantitativamente el contenido de alcaloides presentes y su perfil composicional. Se determinaron propiedades físicas como la forma y el tamaño de la semilla. Se determinaron las propiedades fisicoquímicas como la capacidad de retención de agua y el pH. Las cantidades de nutrientes de la semilla son menores que los valores reportados en la literatura. Se presenta una variación en cuanto al perfil de alcaloides, siendo la esparteína la segunda sustancia de mayor presencia. La hidratación de la semilla conduce a un incremento de 1.72 veces su tamaño original. Se puede sugerir que la proteína posee afinidad hidrofílica evidenciada por la elevada capacidad de retención de agua de la semilla. La identificación de estas propiedades permite reconocer el potencial de la semilla para su futuro aprovechamiento.

  2. ENTERRANDO HERÓIS, PATRIARCAS, SUICIDAS E TRAIDORES: SOLIDARIEDADE E OSTRACISMO NOS ANDES COLOMBIANOS

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    Alvarez Santiago

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo discute diferenças e hierarquias encontradas nos ritos fúnebres de uma comunidade camponesa na região sudeste dos andes colombianos. Nessa comunidade - afetada por diferentes expressões de violência -, os funerais emergem como formas seletivas de manifestação de solidariedade social. De fato, na população analisada foram observadas notáveis diferenças quantitativas e qualitativas na organização e evolução de tais cerimônias fúnebres. As diferenças estão relacionadas ao sexo e à posição social do morto, bem como à forma pela qual ele ou ela morreu. Em um extremo das representações e práticas sociais relacionadas à morte encontram-se os enterros de homens jovens, mortos tragicamente. Estes são objeto de um culto particular, sendo glorificados pela comunidade. No outro extremo, a comunidade expressa sua rejeição às mulheres suicidas, rejeição que se coloca em evidência, especialmente, durante a evolução dos funerais.

  3. Hydrothermal System of the Lastarria Volcano (Central Andes) Imaged by Magnetotellurics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, D.

    2015-12-01

    Lazufre volcanic complex, located in the central Andes, is recently undergoing an episode of uplift, conforming one of the most extensive deforming volcanic systems worldwide. Recent works have focused on the subsurface of this volcanic system at different scales, using surface deformation data, seismic noise tomography and magnetotellurics. Here we image the electrical resistivity structure of the Lastarria volcano, one of the most important features in the Lazufre area, using broadband magnetotelluric data at 30 locations around the volcanic edifice. Results from 3-D modeling show a conductive zone at 6 km depth south of the Lastarria volcano interpreted as a magmatic heat source, which is connected to a shallower conductive area beneath the volcanic edifice and its close vicinity. This shallow highly conductive zone fits with geochemical analysis results of thermal fluid discharges, related to fumaroles present in this area, in terms of depth extent and possible temperatures of fluids, and presents also a good correlation with seismic tomography results. The horizontal extension of this shallow conductive zone, related to the hydrothermal system of Lastarria, suggests that it has been draining one of the lagoons in the area (Laguna Azufrera), forming a sulfur rich area which can be observed at the southern side of this lagoon. Joint modeling of the hydrothermal system using magnetotellurics and seismic data is part of the current work.

  4. Hungry earth and vengeful stars: soul loss and identity in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, C

    1998-10-01

    This article contributes to the cross-cultural literature on fright sickness and soul loss with an analysis of cases among Quechua indians (runa) in a rural community in the southern Peruvian Andes. One of the aims of this article is to incorporate an emic understanding of the intersection of the cosmological and social landscapes into discussions of Quechua conceptions of health and illness. It outlines Quechua constructions of body, self, and cosmos that are relevant to explaining the concepts of soul/spirit, interior/exterior, and runa/nonruna that are related to soul loss. The illness suffered by victims of fright sickness embodies the Quechua construction of self and is linked not only to broader sociopolitical realities of Peru but also to cosmological beliefs. The diagnosis of spirit loss and fright in this cultural context reveals a crisis of identity: sufferers represent nonruna, or nonhumans. They succumb to fright or soul loss because of an emic concept of vulnerability that transcends the characteristics of gender and age usually associated with soul loss cross-culturally. Treatments, therefore, involve a reaffirmation of ethnic identity and a reintegration of patients into their families in terms of a culturally specific understanding of identity, community, and cosmos. rights reserved

  5. A rapid method for infectivity titration of Andes hantavirus using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Gonzalo P; Martínez-Valdebenito, Constanza; Galeno, Héctor; Ferrés, Marcela; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2013-11-01

    The focus assay is currently the most commonly used technique for hantavirus titer determination. This method requires an incubation time of between 5 and 11 days to allow the appearance of foci after several rounds of viral infection. The following work presents a rapid Andes virus (ANDV) titration assay, based on viral nucleocapsid protein (N) detection in infected cells by flow cytometry. To this end, an anti-N monoclonal antibody was used that was developed and characterized previously. ANDV N could be detected as early as 6 h post-infection, while viral release was not observed until 24-48 h post-infection. Given that ANDV detection was performed during its first round of infection, a time reduction for titer determination was possible and provided results in only two days. The viral titer was calculated from the percentage of N positive cells and agreed with focus assay titers. Furthermore, the assay was applied to quantify the inhibition of ANDV cell entry by patient sera and by preventing endosome acidification. This novel hantavirus titration assay is a highly quantitative and sensitive tool that facilitates infectivity titration of virus stocks, rapid screening for antiviral drugs, and may be further used to detect and quantify infectious virus in human samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A; Gramlich, G; Kellerhals, T; Tobler, L; Rehren, Th; Schwikowski, M

    2017-01-31

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200-800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700-50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures.

  7. Disruptions in adaptation of sudden-onset and slow-onset risks: insights from a local case in the Andes of Peru for global policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, Christian; Carey, Mark; Frey, Holger; Jurt, Christine; Mechler, Reinhard; Motschmann, Alina; Vicuña, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Climatic changes involve emergence and changes of both sudden-onset and slow-onset risks. In the field of disaster risk reduction a solid range of strategies and measures has been developed to address sudden-onset risks such as floods, mass movements or storms. Comparably less experience is available for management of slow-onset risks. While, for instance, drought prone regions do have important knowledge how to cope with such conditions in other regions where climatic changes have induced new challenges and risks there is limited experience about how to adapt to slow-onset processes and risks. Examples are impacts of sea level rise in coastal regions or glacier shrinkage in mountain regions. The lack of understanding of how to address impacts from slow-onset processes has recently also been highlighted by the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) acting under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). In climate change science, practice and policy it is often assumed that risk management and climate change adaptation would see a seamless continuum when addressing both sudden-onset and slow-onset risks. Here we draw on recent experiences from the Andes of Peru showing that management of, and adaptation to combined sudden-onset and slow-onset impacts of climate change may involve serious social disruption. Carhuaz, a city in the Cordillera Blanca of Peru with a number of local communities pertaining to it, is affected by multiple effects of climate change and glacier shrinkage. After a flood event from glacier lake 513 a flood early warning system has been developed and installed. Multiple use and demand of glacier melt water makes water resource management a challenge and conflicts arise especially during the dry season when water is scarce. The drought at the end of 2016 over much of the tropical Andes has resulted in a situation where local communities started to vigorously and violently turn

  8. Maize (Zea mays) consumption in the southern andes (30°-31° S. Lat): Stable isotope evidence (2000 BCE-1540 CE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Durruty, Marta; Troncoso, Andrés; Larach, Pablo; Becker, Cristian; Misarti, Nicole

    2017-09-01

    The timing and dietary role of maize agriculture is central to archaeological discussions in the Andean region. In the semi-arid region of northern Chile (SARNC), archaeological models propose that maize was adopted during the Early Ceramic period in tandem with pottery and sedentism. Through stable isotope (SI) analyses, of bone collagen and apatite, this study assesses the timing of maize introduction, diachronic changes (2,000 BCE to 1,540 CE.), and synchronic dietary variability in the prehistoric SARNC. Fifty-two prehistoric individuals from SARNC were analyzed for δ 13 C ap , δ 13 C col, and δ 15 N. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the results by period and location (inland and coast). Between-periods (ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests), and synchronic comparisons (inland vs. coast; Student's t-tests), were conducted. A SIAR model was run to further evaluate dietary changes. Dietary interpretations are based on food web data. Coastal groups show significant changes in the diet during the Middle (900-1,000CE; enrichment in δ 13 C), and Late Intermediate periods (100-1450CE; when the Δ 13 C ap-col is above 5.2‰). In the inland, significant changes in SI occurred in the Late Intermediate period (δ 13 C enrichment). In the Late period, the inland diet became enriched for δ 15 N. Synchronic comparisons showed coastal individuals to have higher δ 15 N. The popularization of maize in the SARNC was not associated with the appearance of pottery and/or sedentism, and its role as a dietary staple was a late phenomenon (c.a. 1,000CE). The results obtained in this study show that the adoption and consumption of maize varied dramatically in the Southern Andes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Under-side of the Andes: Using Receiver Functions to Map the North Central Andean Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project is an interdisciplinary project to investigate connections between lithospheric removal, crustal shortening and surface uplift in the northern Bolivia and southern Peru region of the South American Andean orogen. The central Andes are defined by six major tectonomorphic provinces; the forearc, the volcanically active Western Cordillera (WC, ~6 km elevation), the internally drained Altiplano (~4 km elevation), an inactive fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Cordillera (EC, ~6 km elevation), a lower elevation active fold and thrust belt in the Subandean (SA) zone and the Beni, a foreland basin. Forty seismic stations installed for the CAUGHT project were deployed between 13° and 18° S latitude, covering the transition zone where the Altiplano region pinches out in southern Peru, in an effort to better constrain the changing character of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Geologic studies across the northern Bolivian portion of the eastern Andean margin (15-17° S) have documented a total of 275 km of upper crustal shortening (McQuarrie et al, Tectonics, v27, 2008), which may be associated with crustal thickening and/or the removal of lithospheric material as a thickened lithosphere root becomes unstable. For this receiver function (converted wave) study, we have little coverage in the forearc and foreland, ~75 km spacing in most of the array, and a relatively dense ~20 km spaced profile along the Charaña-La Paz-Yucumo transect, the eastern portion of which is nearly coincident with the balanced cross-section of McQuarrie et al. (2008). Using the first year of available data, more than 1200 receiver functions have been calculated using an iterative deconvolution method, and stacked using the common conversion point (CCP) method, along profiles parallel to and nearly coincident to those used for the geologic shortening estimates. We identified arrivals for the Moho and generated a 3D map of

  10. Slab flattening, dynamic topography and normal faulting in the Cordillera Blanca region (northern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, A.; Robert, X.; Laurence, A.; Gautheron, C.; Bernet, M.; Simon-Labric, T.; Hall, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Processes driving surface uplift in the Andes are still debated and the role of subduction processes as slab flattening on surface uplift and relief building in the Andes is not well understood. Some of the highest Andean summits, the Cordillera Blanca (6768 m) and the Cordillera Negra (5187 m), are located above a present flat subduction zone (3-15°S), in northern Peru. In this area, both the geometry and timing of the flattening of the slab are well constrained (Gutscher et al., 1999; Rosenbaum et al., 2005). This region is thus a perfect target to explore the effect of slab flattening on the Andean topography and uplift. We obtained new apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages from three vertical profiles located in the Cordillera Blanca and the Cordillera Negra. Time-temperature paths obtained from inverse modeling of the thermochronological data indicates a Middle Miocene cooling for both Cordillera Negra profiles. We interpret it as regional exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental starting in Middle Miocene, synchronous with the onset of the subduction of the Nazca ridge (Rosenbaum et al., 2005). We propose that the Nazca ridge subduction at 15 Ma and onset of slab flattening in northern Peru drove regional positive dynamic topography and thus enhanced exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental. This study provides new evidence of the impact subduction processes and associated dynamic topography on paleogeography and surface uplift in the Andes.

  11. Distribución y conservación de especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y Andes tropicales Distribution and conservation of endangered species in Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes

    OpenAIRE

    María Cecilia Londoño-Murcia; Víctor Sánchez-Cordero

    2011-01-01

    En este estudio se modeló el nicho ecológico proyectado como distribución potencial de 313 especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y los Andes tropicales, según las listas de la UICN. De estas especies, 285 fueron plantas y 28 fueron vertebrados terrestres. La superposición de las distribuciones de las especies amenazadas cubrió prácticamente toda la región. Ecuador mostró cerca del 30% de su área con 50 especies. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panamá mostraron > 50, aunque en...

  12. De Los ríos profundos a Lituma en los andes: La respuesta de Mario Vargas Llosa a José María Arguedas

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    Marie-Madeleine Gladieu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available La novela de Mario Vargas Llosa Lituma en los Andes1 poco tiene que ver, aparentemente, con el mundo narrativo de José María Arguedas: las nuevas aventuras de un personaje ficticio bien conocido de los lectores, presente en varias obras anteriores de aquel autor, en nada se asemejan a las del niño Ernesto ni a las de otro protagonista arguediano. Los Andes sirven de decorado para los dos relatos, pero entre la naturaleza y los pueblos que se suceden en Los ríos profundos2en toda su diversidad, y los paisajes hoscos y siempre peligrosos por los que cruza Lituma, apenas reconoce el lector aquella parte del sur peruano. Algunos detalles, sin embargo, al examinar bien el texto y el contexto de Lituma en los Andes, llaman la atención.

  13. Cenozoic structural evolution of the Argentinean Andes at 34°40'S: A close relationship between thick and thin-skinned deformation Evolución estructural Cenozoica de los Andes Argentinos a los 34°40'S: una estrecha relación entre deformación de piel fina y piel gruesa

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    Martín Turienzo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Argentinean side of the Andes at 34°40'S, the Cenozoic Andean orogeny produced the thick-skinned Malargüe fold-and-thrust belt and the easternmost basement uplift of the Cordillera Frontal. Integrating balanced structural cross-sections with previous studies of Cenozoic synorogenic rocks and 40Ar/39Ar ages of coeval volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, we propose a Miocene to Quaternary sequential structural evolution of this sector of the Andes. Andean deformation in the study area begun around 14.5 Ma with the growth of thick-skinned structures at the western region, formed by large basement wedges that propagated along detachment horizons within the cover generating thin-skinned structures. The development of these genetically linked thick and thin-skinned structures finished with the insertion of a third basement wedge and its associated deformation in cover rocks along the Sosneado thrust, before the extrusion of 10.8 Ma volcanic rocks. These structures imply ~10 km of shortening, representing an important Middle Miocene compressive period (2.7 mm/a. Systems of fractures measured in basement, cover and subvolcanic rocks indicate an E-W direction of compression. A supercritical Coulomb wedge attained after the Middle Miocene deformation, was responsible of new basement-involved faulting into the foreland, the west-dipping Carrizalito thrust. The absence of efficient detachment levels in the cover rocks of the eastern region difficulted the development of large basement wedges and instead important backthrusting occurred in the hangingwall of the Carrizalito thrust. Widespread subvolcanic rocks (10.5 to 5.5 Ma exposed in this region suggest a close relationship between magmatism and antithetic faulting. With continuing compression, the Carrizalito thrust breaks through to the surface thrusting pre-Jurassic and Mesozoic sequences over Cenozoic rocks although in the southern region it remains as a blind thrust. This different configuration

  14. Extreme hydrometeorological events in the Peruvian Central Andes during austral summer and their relationship with the large-scale circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulca, Juan C.

    In this Master's dissertation, atmospheric circulation patterns associated with extreme hydrometeorological events in the Mantaro Basin, Peruvian Central Andes, and their teleconnections during the austral summer (December-January-February-March) are addressed. Extreme rainfall events in the Mantaro basin are related to variations of the large-scale circulation as indicated by the changing strength of the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low (BH-NL) system. Dry (wet) spells are associated with a weakening (strengthening) of the BH-NL system and reduced (enhanced) influx of moist air from the lowlands to the east due to strengthened westerly (easterly) wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels. At the same time extreme rainfall events of the opposite sign occur over northeastern Brazil (NEB) due to enhanced (inhibited) convective activity in conjunction with a strengthened (weakened) Nordeste Low. Cold episodes in the Mantaro Basin are grouped in three types: weak, strong and extraordinary cold episodes. Weak and strong cold episodes in the MB are mainly associated with a weakening of the BH-NL system due to tropical-extratropical interactions. Both types of cold episodes are associated with westerly wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels aloft the Peruvian Central Andes, which inhibit the influx of humid air masses from the lowlands to the east and hence limit the potential for development of convective cloud cover. The resulting clear sky conditions cause nighttime temperatures to drop, leading to cold extremes below the 10-percentile. Extraordinary cold episodes in the MB are associated with cold and dry polar air advection at all tropospheric levels toward the central Peruvian Andes. Therefore, weak and strong cold episodes in the MB appear to be caused by radiative cooling associated with reduced cloudiness, rather than cold air advection, while the latter plays an important role for extraordinary cold episodes only.

  15. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in aerosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Komárek, J.; Elster, J.

    2008-04-01

    Four different communities and one culture of pigmented microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation in mineral medium of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area) and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia), from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville) and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas). Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed the identification of sequences belonging to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria), Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified) and the maritime Antarctic soil the poorest (only one). Snow samples from Col du midi (Alps) and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones). These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clone). The only microorganism identified in the maritime Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp.) was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. The two snow samples from the Alps only shared one common microorganism. Most of the identified microorganisms have been detected previously in cold environments (Dietzia kujamenisi, Pseudonocardia Antarctica, Hydrogenophaga palleronii and Brebundimonas sp.), marine sediments (Aquiflexus balticus, Pseudomonas pseudoalkaligenes, Pseudomonas sp. and one uncultured Alphaproteobacteria), and soils and rocks (Pseudonocardia sp., Agrobactrium sp., Limnobacter sp. and two uncultured Alphaproteobacetria clones). Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those

  16. Vernal Point and Seismic Activity in Tibet Mountains and Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Sumarriva, Israel; Chavez-Campos, Teodosio; Chavez S, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    The gravitational influence of the sun and moon on the equatorial bulges of the mantle of the rotating earth causes the precession of the earth. The retrograde motion of the vernal point through the zodiacal band is 26,000 years and passes through each constellation in an average of 2000 years (Milankovitch subcycle). The vernal point retrogrades one precessional degree approximately in 72 years (Gleissberg-cycle), and approximately enters into the Aquarius constellation (declination 11.5° S) on March 20, 1940. On earth this entry was verify through: a) stability of the magnetic equator in the south central zone of Peru and in the north zone of Bolivia (11.5º South latitude) since 1940 b) the greater intensity of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in Peru and Bolivia since 1940. Besides, there was a long history of studies of coupling between earthquake-ionosphere. In IUGG (Italy-2007), Cusco was proposed as a prime meridian that was based on: (1) the new prime meridian (72º W == 0º) was parallel to the Andes and its projection the meridian (108° E == 180º) intersects the Tibetan plate (Asia). (2) On earth these two areas present the greatest thickness of the crust with an average depth of 70 kilometers. The aim was to synchronize the earth sciences phenomena (e.g. geology, geophysics, etc.). The coordinate system had the vernal point from meridian (72º W== 0º) and March 20, 1940. The retrograde movement of the vernal point was the first precessional degree (2012 = 1940 + 72). The west coast of South America (parallel to meridian 72º W== 0º) was a segment of the circum-pacific seismic belt where more than two thirds of major earthquakes in the world happened. During the first precessional degree (1940 +72 ==2012) seismic activity were: (a) near the new prime meridian (72° W == 0°) occurs in: (a1) Haiti (18.4° N, 72.5° W), January 12, 2010 with magnitude of 7.0 Mw. (a2) Chile (36.28° S, 73.23° W), February 27, 2010 with Magnitude of 8.8 Mw. (a3) Chile (35

  17. La Cordillera de los Andes: presentación de los problemas geomorfológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1974-01-01

    Full Text Available Le soulèvement en voussoir ponto-pliocène a donné aux Andes leur volume montagneux actuel. Il a porté à plus de 4000 m des surfaces d'érosion élaborées au cours du Tertiaire et, pour la surface dite de la 'puna', principalement au cours du Miocène. Cependant, ces surfaces sont très généralement polygéniques et polycycliques. Elles sont dominées par de grandes cordillères orientées qui sont le plus souvent des horsts signalant les secteurs de surrection maximale. Certains horsts sont encore actifs comme celui de la Cordillère Blanche au Pérou. Ces surfaces sont déformées tant sur les bordures des bassins intérieurs que sur les flancs de la montagne ou elles sont disséquées et réduites à l'état de lanières. Elles ont pu disparaître par suite du recoupement vers le haut des versants des grandes vallées, notamment aux extrémités de la chaîne, là ou les Andes sont plus étroites. En contrebas, des aplanissements se développent au Pliocène et même au Quaternaire ancien dans des secteurs relativement stables: ainsi des glacis d'érosion tronquent des séries plissées au Pliocène sur l'Altiplano péruvo-bolivien et des surfaces d'abrasion sont retouchées en glacis sur les bourrelets côtiers péruvo-chiliens. Il convient de faire la distinction entre les surfaces qui recoupent les séries plissées en roche dure (calcaires, grès, rhyolites, etc. et dont la durée d'élaboration a été longue, et les glacis qui recoupent ou retouchent des volumes tendres (pélites, cinérites, conglomérats, à élaboration rapide. Les grandes vallées sont, les unes, adaptées aux grandes directions structurales consécutives aux mouvements de la fin du Tertiaire (l'adaptation d'ensemble s'accompagne souvent de nombreuses inadaptations locales, les autres suivent les anciennes directions structurales antérieures au soulèvement. Le Quaternaire se marque par une succession de périodes froides, accompagnées de glaciations dans

  18. Da Amazônia ao Pacífico cruzando os Andes

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    Enrique Amayo Zevallos

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available A Área Amazônica (AA é compartilhada por oito países sul-americanos independentes. Desde os tempos coloniais sentiu-se a necessidade da construção de uma via de união da AA com o Oceano Pacífico. Mas os Andes, em termos técnicos e econômicos, foram barreira insuperável até as últimas décadas do século XIX. Nos últimos anos, para o Brasil - país que tem perto de 60% da AA -, esta via vem se tornando cada vez mais importante em termos de exportação, especialmente para o mercado japonês, de grãos, madeira, polpa de madeira etc., ao mesmo tempo em que o Japão também deseja acesso direto à AA. Brasil e Peru, segundo país da AA, com a maior e mais ocidental costa no Pacífico, têm desenvolvido projetos para a construção de uma estrada, contando para isso com apoio financeiro oferecido pelo Japão em diversas oportunidades. Tais projetos tentam conciliar não apenas os interesses de Brasil e Peru, mas também os da Bolívia, país mediterrâneo que poderia finalmente ter acesso livre à costa do Pacífico. Os Estados Unidos, porém, opõem-se a construção da mencionada via e, o projeto está a espera de que o financiamento anteriormente aventado permita sua concretização. Parece que, na construção da projetada estrada, interesses estratégicos das grandes potências mundiais estão envolvidos.The Amazon Area (AA is shared by 8 independent south american countries. Since colonial times it was felt the need of a road linking the AA to the Pacific Ocean. Up to the last decades of the 19th Century the Andes were, in technical and economical terms, almost an insuperable challenge. In the last years for Brazil, the country that has about 60% of the AA, that road has become almost a need for exporting grains, timber, woodpulp etc. (mainly to Japan. And Japan also wants an acess to that area. So, Brasil, together with Peru - the second, after Brazil, AA country that has the largest and westernmost coast in the Pacific - have

  19. Test of an Hypothesis of Magnetization, Tilt and Flow in an Hypabyssal Intrusion, Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, S.; MacDonald, W. D.; Estrada, J. J.; Sierra, G. M.

    2002-05-01

    Magnetic remanence in the Miocene Clavijo intrusion in the Cauca Valley, adjacent to the Cordillera Central, plunges steeply northward (MacDonald et al., 1996). Assuming magnetization in a normal magnetic field, the expected remanence direction is approximately I= 10o, D= 000o; the observed remanence is I=84o, D=003o. The discrepancy could be explained by a 74o rotation about a horizontal E-W axis, i.e., about an axis normal to the nearby N-S trending Romeral fault zone. If the intrusion is the shallow feeder of a now-eroded andesitic volcano, then perhaps the paleovertical direction is preserved in flow lineations and provides a test of the tilt/rotation of the remanence. In combination, the steep remanence direction, vertical flow, and the inferred rotation of the volcanic neck lead to the hypothesis of a shallow-plunging southward lineation for this body. Using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) as a proxy for the flow lineation, it is predicted that the K1 (maximum susceptibility) axis in this body plunges gently south. This hypothesis was tested using approximately 50 oriented cores from 5 sites near the west margin of the Clavijo intrusion. The results suggest a NW plunging lineation, inconsistent with the initial hypothesis. However, a relatively consistent flow lineation is suggested by the K1 axes. If this flow axis represents paleovertical, it suggests moderate tilting of the Clavijo body towards the southeast. The results are encouraging enough to suggest that AMS may be useful for determining paleo-vertical in shallow volcanic necks and hypabyssal intrusions, and might ultimately be useful in a tilt-correction for such bodies. Other implications of the results will be discussed. MacDonald, WD, Estrada, JJ, Sierra, GM, Gonzalez, H, 1996, Late Cenozoic tectonics and paleomagnetism of North Cauca Basin intrusions, Colombian Andes: Dual rotation modes: Tectonophysics, v 261, p. 277-289.

  20. Pre-Andean peraluminous and metaluminous leucogranitoid suites in the High Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Miguel A.

    Two distinct pre-Andean leucogranitoid suites are recognized in the High Andes of Central Chile (30°31'S): the Hacienda Vieja and Monte Grande Suites (HVS and MGS). Both represent the transition from upper Paleozoic orogenic magmatism to Andean orogenic igneous activity (post-Triassic). The HVS comprises medium-grained peraluminous leucogranites and leucogranodiorites, whereas the MGS includes medium- to fine-grained and porphyritic leucogranites of metaluminous character. The mineralogy of the HVS leucogranitoids consists mainly of plagioclase, quartz, interstitial microcline, biotite ± muscovite ± cordierite, and small andalusite-bearing inclusions. The MGS leucogranites are characterized by large amounts of quartz, plagioclase, and perthitic K-feldspar, and minor Fe-hornblende, Fe-hedenbergite, and biotite. The two suites have a small range of composition caused mainly by intrasuite plagioclase-dominated fractionation. Calculations based on compositions of feldspar, muscovite, biotite, and FeTi oxides indicate that the HVS plutons crystallized at higher total pressure (˜3.0 Kb), lower temperature (˜670°) and higher oxygen fugacities than those of the MGS (P,˜1 Kb; T,˜750°C). Although fractionation of a mantle-derived magma is not ruled out in the origin of the MGS, the two suites may be the products of partial fusion at different crustal depths, and hence H 2O contents of semipelitic protolith in the case of the HVS, and Ca-poor quartzo-feldspathic ( s.l.) rocks in the case of the MGS. Crustal melting was probably induced by a long-lived thermal perturbation caused by voluminous upper Paleozoic mantle-derived magma injection and decompression of the crust linked to an extensional tectonic regime.

  1. The paradigm of paraglacial megafans of the San Juan river basin, Central Andes, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvires, Graciela M.

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution and several morphometric characteristics of the Quaternary alluvial fans of the San Juan River, in the province of San Juan, at the Central and Western part of Argentina, have been studied to classify them as paraglacial megafans, as well to ratify its depositional environmental conditions. The high sedimentary load exported by San Juan river from the Central Andes to the foreland depressions is estimated about 3,682,200 hm3. The large alluvial fans of Ullum-Zonda and Tulum valleys were deposited into deep tectonic depressions, during the Upper Pleistocene deglaciation stages. The outcome of collecting remotely sensed data, map and DEM data, geophysical data and much fieldwork gave access to morphometric, morphographic and morphogenetic data of these alluvial fans. The main drainage network was mapped on processed images using QGis (vers.2.0.1). Several fan morphometric parameters were measured, such as the size, the shape, the thickness, the surface areas and the sedimentary volume of exported load. The analyzed fans were accumulated in deep tectonic depressions, where the alluvium fill reaches 700 to 1200 m thick. Such fans do not reach the large size that other world megafans have, and this is due to tectonic obstacles, although the sedimentary fill average volume surpasses 514,000 hm3. The author proposes to consider Ullum-Zonda and Tulum alluvial fans as paraglacial megafans. According to the stratigraphic relationships of the tropical South American Rivers, the author considers that the San Juan paraglacial megafans would have occurred in the period before 24 ka BP , possibly corresponding to Middle Pleniglacial (ca 65-24ka BP). They record colder and more humid conditions compared with the present arid and dry conditions.

  2. Thermophilization of adult and juvenile tree communities in the northern tropical Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Alvaro; Stevenson, Pablo R; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2015-08-25

    Climate change is expected to cause shifts in the composition of tropical montane forests towards increased relative abundances of species whose ranges were previously centered at lower, hotter elevations. To investigate this process of "thermophilization," we analyzed patterns of compositional change over the last decade using recensus data from a network of 16 adult and juvenile tree plots in the tropical forests of northern Andes Mountains and adjacent lowlands in northwestern Colombia. Analyses show evidence that tree species composition is strongly linked to temperature and that composition is changing directionally through time, potentially in response to climate change and increasing temperatures. Mean rates of thermophilization [thermal migration rate (TMR), °C ⋅ y(-1)] across all censuses were 0.011 °C ⋅ y(-1) (95% confidence interval = 0.002-0.022 °C ⋅ y(-1)) for adult trees and 0.027 °C ⋅ y(-1) (95% confidence interval = 0.009-0.050 °C ⋅ y(-1)) for juvenile trees. The fact that thermophilization is occurring in both the adult and juvenile trees and at rates consistent with concurrent warming supports the hypothesis that the observed compositional changes are part of a long-term process, such as global warming, and are not a response to any single episodic event. The observed changes in composition were driven primarily by patterns of tree mortality, indicating that the changes in composition are mostly via range retractions, rather than range shifts or expansions. These results all indicate that tropical forests are being strongly affected by climate change and suggest that many species will be at elevated risk for extinction as warming continues.

  3. Crustal-scale electrical conductivity anomaly beneath inflating Lazufre volcanic complex, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budach, Ingmar; Brasse, Heinrich; Díaz, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Large-scale surface deformation was observed at Lazufre volcanic center in the Central Andes of Northern Chile/Northwestern Argentina by means of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). Uplift started there after 1998 and increased dramatically in the following years up to a rate of 3 cm/a. Lazufre is now one of the largest deforming volcano systems on Earth, but the cause for uplift - likely influx of magmatic material into the crust - is still poorly understood. In the beginning of 2010 a magnetotelluric survey was conducted to delineate the electrical conductivity distribution in the area. Several long-period magnetotelluric (LMT) sites and two broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) sites were set up on an EW trending profile crossing the volcanic center; furthermore some LMT sites were arranged circularly around Lazufre complex and adjacent Lastarria volcano. Data were processed using an algorithm for robust and remote reference transfer function estimation. Electrical strike directions were estimated and induction arrows were derived. Although electrical strike is rather ambiguous, in a first step a 2-D resistivity model was calculated. The most prominent feature of this model is a well conducting structure rising from the upper mantle to the shallow crust beneath the center of elevation. This can be interpreted as partial melts ascending from the asthenospheric wedge and feeding a potential magma reservoir beneath Lazufre volcanic center. An improved model is finally achieved by 3-D inversion, supporting this feature. We assume that these rising melts are the source of the observed uplift at Lazufre complex.

  4. In vitro and in vivo activity of ribavirin against Andes virus infection.

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    David Safronetz

    Full Text Available Pathogenic hantaviruses are a closely related group of rodent-borne viruses which are responsible for two distinct diseases in humans, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS, otherwise known as hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, HCPS. The antiviral effect of ribavirin against Old World hantaviruses, most notably Hantaan virus, is well documented; however, only a few studies have addressed its inhibitory effect on New World hantaviruses. In the present study, we demonstrate that ribavirin is highly active against Andes virus (ANDV, an important etiological agent of HPS, both in vitro and in vivo using a lethal hamster model of HPS. Treatment of ANDV infected Vero E6 cells with ribavirin resulted in dose-dependent reductions in viral RNA and protein as well as virus yields with a half maximal inhibitory concentration between 5 and 12.5 µg ml(-1. In hamsters, treatment with as little as 5 mg kg(-1 day(-1 was 100% effective at preventing lethal HPS disease when therapy was administered by intraperitoneal injection from day 1 through day 10 post-infection. Significant reductions were observed in ANDV RNA and antigen positive cells in lung and liver tissues. Ribavirin remained completely protective when administered by intraperitoneal injections up to three days post-infection. In addition, we show that daily oral ribavirin therapy initiated 1 day post-infection and continuing for ten days is also protective against lethal ANDV disease, even at doses of 5 mg kg(-1 day(-1. Our results suggest ribavirin treatment is beneficial for postexposure prophylaxis against HPS-causing hantaviruses and should be considered in scenarios where exposure to the virus is probable. The similarities between the results obtained in this study and those from previous clinical evaluations of ribavirin against HPS, further validate the hamster model of lethal HPS and demonstrate its usefulness in screening antiviral agents against

  5. Elevational Ranges of Montane Birds and Deforestation in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela

    Full Text Available Deforestation causes habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, and can ultimately cause extinction of the remnant species. Tropical montane birds face these threats with the added natural vulnerability of narrower elevational ranges and higher specialization than lowland species. Recent studies assess the impact of present and future global climate change on species' ranges, but only a few of these evaluate the potentially confounding effect of lowland deforestation on species elevational distributions. In the Western Andes of Colombia, an important biodiversity hotspot, we evaluated the effects of deforestation on the elevational ranges of montane birds along altitudinal transects. Using point counts and mist-nets, we surveyed six altitudinal transects spanning 2200 to 2800 m. Three transects were forested from 2200 to 2800 m, and three were partially deforested with forest cover only above 2400 m. We compared abundance-weighted mean elevation, minimum elevation, and elevational range width. In addition to analysing the effect of deforestation on 134 species, we tested its impact within trophic guilds and habitat preference groups. Abundance-weighted mean and minimum elevations were not significantly different between forested and partially deforested transects. Range width was marginally different: as expected, ranges were larger in forested transects. Species in different trophic guilds and habitat preference categories showed different trends. These results suggest that deforestation may affect species' elevational ranges, even within the forest that remains. Climate change will likely exacerbate harmful impacts of deforestation on species' elevational distributions. Future conservation strategies need to account for this by protecting connected forest tracts across a wide range of elevations.

  6. Land Cover Change in the Andes of Southern Ecuador—Patterns and Drivers

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    Giulia F. Curatola Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the megadiverse tropical mountain forest in the Andes of southern Ecuador, a global biodiversity hotspot, the use of fire to clear land for cattle ranching is leading to the invasion of an aggressive weed, the bracken fern, which is threatening diversity and the provisioning of ecosystem services. To find sustainable land use options adapted to the local situation, a profound knowledge of the long-term spatiotemporal patterns of land cover change and its drivers is necessary, but hitherto lacking. The complex topography and the high cloud frequency make the use of remote sensing in this area a challenge. To deal with these conditions, we pursued specific pre-processing steps before classifying five Landsat scenes from 1975 to 2001. Then, we quantified land cover changes and habitat fragmentation, and we investigated landscape changes in relation to key spatial elements (altitude, slope, and distance from roads. Good classification results were obtained with overall accuracies ranging from 94.5% to 98.5% and Kappa statistics between 0.75 and 0.98. Forest was strongly fragmented due to the rapid expansion of the arable frontier and the even more rapid invasion by bracken. Unexpectedly, more bracken-infested areas were converted to pastures than vice versa, a practice that could alleviate pressure on forests if promoted. Road proximity was the most important spatial element determining forest loss, while for bracken the altitudinal range conditioned the degree of invasion in deforested areas. The annual deforestation rate changed notably between periods: ~1.5% from 1975 to 1987, ~0.8% from 1987 to 2000, and finally a very high rate of ~7.5% between 2000 and 2001. We explained these inconstant rates through some specific interrelated local and national political and socioeconomic drivers, namely land use policies, credit and tenure incentives, demography, and in particular, a severe national economic and bank crisis.

  7. Global climate change increases risk of crop yield losses and food insecurity in the tropical Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tito, Richard; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2018-02-01

    One of the greatest current challenges to human society is ensuring adequate food production and security for a rapidly growing population under changing climatic conditions. Climate change, and specifically rising temperatures, will alter the suitability of areas for specific crops and cultivation systems. In order to maintain yields, farmers may be forced to change cultivation practices, the timing of cultivation, or even the type of crops grown. Alternatively, farmers can change the location where crops are cultivated (e.g., to higher elevations) to track suitable climates (in which case the plants will have to grow in different soils), as cultivated plants will otherwise have to tolerate warmer temperatures and possibly face novel enemies. We simulated these two last possible scenarios (for temperature increases of 1.3°C and 2.6°C) in the Peruvian Andes through a field experiment in which several traditionally grown varieties of potato and maize were planted at different elevations (and thus temperatures) using either the local soil or soil translocated from higher elevations. Maize production declined by 21%-29% in response to new soil conditions. The production of maize and potatoes declined by >87% when plants were grown under warmer temperatures, mainly as a result of the greater incidence of novel pests. Crop quality and value also declined under simulated migration and warming scenarios. We estimated that local farmers may experience severe economic losses of up to 2,300 US$ ha -1  yr -1 . These findings reveal that climate change is a real and imminent threat to agriculture and that there is a pressing need to develop effective management strategies to reduce yield losses and prevent food insecurity. Importantly, such strategies should take into account the influences of non-climatic and/or biotic factors (e.g., novel pests) on plant development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Muerte en los Andes: sociedad colonial y mortalidad en las haciendas andinas (Ecuador, 1743-1857

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    María José Vilalta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La vida cotidiana en las haciendas coloniales implicó la introducción de una forma de administración de poblaciones impuesta sobre la sociedad indígena y regulada por las Leyes de Indias. En la zona norte de los Andes, el concertaje de indios y la abundancia de trabajos en la agricultura y en los obrajes fueron factores de atracción que generaron la tendencia a un crecimiento poblacional de larga duración. Más allá del debate inconcluso sobre la catástrofe demográfica en las Indias, este estudio investiga los perfiles y la incidencia de la mortalidad ordinaria y catastrófica como factor de regulación del crecimiento de la población en una parroquia de hacienda en la etapa final de los tiempos coloniales. La investigación se fundamenta en el vaciado nominal completo de libros de entierros incluidos en series de registros parroquiales. Los datos de la mortalidad analizados se extienden desde pocos años después de la fundación de la parroquia hasta 1857, momento de la supresión del tributo indígena, que se considera como año final de observación a pesar de la continuidad del registro. Las evidencias muestran una realidad marcada por una mortalidad de ciclo demográfico antiguo, dominada por el peso de las condiciones de vida adversas y el trabajo en la hacienda. Además, los datos permiten adentrarse en el universo de las rígidas clasificaciones sociales del mundo colonial.

  9. Ilustración arqueológica en los Andes (1850-1890

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    Joanne Pillsbury

    Full Text Available Resumen En términos generales, es posible trazar en las publicaciones europeas sobre los Andes una trayectoria histórica en el curso de cuatro siglos, desde un sistema de representación que está íntimamente atado – y afiliado – a la palabra escrita, a uno donde las imágenes se convierten en la razón de ser de la publicación. Esta trayectoria refleja el campo de la arqueología en sí mismo, desde sus orígenes en una tradición de anticuarios dominada por las preocupaciones filológicas durante los siglos XVI y XVII, al siglo XIX, donde las evidencias fotográficas ganan fuerza frente a las escritas. Este documento se centra en el pico de esta trayectoria: los atlas arqueológicos creados entre 1850 y 1890, en particular el trabajo de Wilhelm Reiss y Alphons Stübel y su publicación en tres volúmenes titulada “The necropolis of Ancon in Peru” (“La necrópolis de Ancón en el Perú”. El presente estudio analiza el papel de la ilustración arqueológica en la iluminación, la difusión y comprensión de un pasado pre-inca durante el siglo XIX, y en última instancia, cómo las imágenes dan forma a la construcción del conocimiento.

  10. Elevational Ranges of Montane Birds and Deforestation in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Pimm, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Deforestation causes habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, and can ultimately cause extinction of the remnant species. Tropical montane birds face these threats with the added natural vulnerability of narrower elevational ranges and higher specialization than lowland species. Recent studies assess the impact of present and future global climate change on species' ranges, but only a few of these evaluate the potentially confounding effect of lowland deforestation on species elevational distributions. In the Western Andes of Colombia, an important biodiversity hotspot, we evaluated the effects of deforestation on the elevational ranges of montane birds along altitudinal transects. Using point counts and mist-nets, we surveyed six altitudinal transects spanning 2200 to 2800 m. Three transects were forested from 2200 to 2800 m, and three were partially deforested with forest cover only above 2400 m. We compared abundance-weighted mean elevation, minimum elevation, and elevational range width. In addition to analysing the effect of deforestation on 134 species, we tested its impact within trophic guilds and habitat preference groups. Abundance-weighted mean and minimum elevations were not significantly different between forested and partially deforested transects. Range width was marginally different: as expected, ranges were larger in forested transects. Species in different trophic guilds and habitat preference categories showed different trends. These results suggest that deforestation may affect species' elevational ranges, even within the forest that remains. Climate change will likely exacerbate harmful impacts of deforestation on species' elevational distributions. Future conservation strategies need to account for this by protecting connected forest tracts across a wide range of elevations.

  11. Fiction and Friction on Imaginaries of the Rural World: the Andes in Luis Figueroa’s Los perros hambrientos

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    Mónica Delgado

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As opposed to other Peruvian films, where the Andes appear showcased as a transit territory which must be fled, in Los Perros Hambrientos (1976, Cuzquean filmmaker Luis Figueroa shares a view of the mountains and fields as a political place of possibility and resistance against the landowner’s arrogance. While it dramatically differs from the original novel by Ciro Alegría, it also finds in the text the necessary basis to show the moral decadence of the landowner, to abandon the bucolic nostalgia and the animal parable of the text, and submerge itself in the savage dichotomies of rich man / poor man and peasant versus landowner.

  12. Forecasting the impact of global changes on the water resources of a mountainous catchment in the Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelland, D.; Campéon, C.; Dezetter, A.; Jourde, H.

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to simulate the complex interrelationships between climate forcing, human pressure and dynamics of groundwater and surface water of the upper Elqui catchment (5 660 km2) in the Chilean Andes. The water resources of this mountainous, semi-arid catchment has been undergoing a growing pressure because of high climate variability and of the economic mutations of various sectors (agriculture, tourism), which have impacted water availability of the area. Due to the agriculture-based development in the region, water scarcity is thus a matter of great concern for this basin. Hydrological simulations were performed with a conceptual model that takes into account a shallow reservoir supplied by precipitation and feeding evapotranspiration, surface/sub-surface runoff and infiltration, and (ii) a deep reservoir fed by infiltration and generating the baseflow. A third reservoir, in which fluxes are controlled by temperature, has been introduced to account for the snowmelt regime of the catchment. A 30-year period (1979-2008) was chosen to capture long-term hydro-climatic variability due to alternating ENSO and LNSO events. Then water uses (dam functioning, agricultural and domestic withdrawals) were integrated into the model. The model was calibrated and validated with streamflow data on the basis of a multi-objective function that aggregates a variety of goodness-of-fit criteria. Prospective climatic and anthropogenic scenarios were finally elaborated and forced into the model in order to propose midterm (2050 horizon) simulations. The model correctly reproduces the observed discharge at the basin outlet. Depending on the modelling complexity, NSE coefficients are about 0.82-0.90 over the calibration period (1979-1990) and 0.78-0.84 over the validation period (1991-2008). The volume error between observation and simulation is lower than 15% over the whole period studied. The dynamics of both the water level in the deep conceptual reservoir and the water table

  13. The Impact of Rise of the Andes and Amazon Landscape Evolution on Diversification of Lowland terra-firme Forest Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixo, Alexandre; Wilkinson, M. Justin

    2011-01-01

    . The youngest landsurfaces thus lie furthest from the mountains. In this scenario major drainages were also reoriented in wholesale fashion away from a northerly orientation generally towards the east and an Atlantic Ocean outlet. The advance of megafans is best seen by the location of axial rivers such as the Orinoco and Mamore which lie against the cratonic margins furthest from the Andes, at the distal ends of major megafan ramparts. More importantly, other major river courses in western-central Amazonia will have been established at progressively younger dates with distance eastward. If this landscape-sequence scenario is accurate, it parallels the progressive younging of the passerine lineages. The bird DNA data appears to confirm strongly the pervasive role of Amazonian rivers--as primary barriers separating sister lineages of birds, and thus probably as facilitaters of bird speciation. We show for the first time that a general spatio-temporal pattern of diversification for terra-firme lineages in the Amazon is associated with rivers ("younging-eastward"), and furthermore parallels a specific scenario of regional drainage evolution.

  14. Late Holocene summer temperatures in the central Andes reconstructed from the sediments of high-elevation Laguna Chepical, Chile (32° S

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    R. de Jong

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution reconstructions of climate variability that cover the past millennia are necessary to improve the understanding of natural and anthropogenic climate change across the globe. Although numerous records are available for the mid- and high-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, global assessments are still compromised by the scarcity of data from the Southern Hemisphere. This is particularly the case for the tropical and subtropical areas. In addition, high elevation sites in the South American Andes may provide insight into the vertical structure of climate change in the mid-troposphere. This study presents a 3000 yr-long austral summer (November to February temperature reconstruction derived from the 210Pb- and 14C-dated organic sediments of Laguna Chepical (32°16' S, 70°30' W, 3050 m a.s.l., a high-elevation glacial lake in the subtropical Andes of central Chile. Scanning reflectance spectroscopy in the visible light range provided the spectral index R570/R630, which reflects the clay mineral content in lake sediments. For the calibration period (AD 1901–2006, the R570/R630 data were regressed against monthly meteorological reanalysis data, showing that this proxy was strongly and significantly correlated with mean summer (NDJF temperatures (R3 yr = −0.63, padj = 0.01. This calibration model was used to make a quantitative temperature reconstruction back to 1000 BC. The reconstruction (with a model error RMSEPboot of 0.33 °C shows that the warmest decades of the past 3000 yr occurred during the calibration period. The 19th century (end of the Little Ice Age (LIA was cool. The prominent warmth reconstructed for the 18th century, which was also observed in other records from this area, seems systematic for subtropical and southern South America but remains difficult to explain. Except for this warm period, the LIA was generally characterized by cool summers. Back to AD 1400, the results from this study compare remarkably well

  15. Santuarios, peregrinaciones y fiestas patronales en la cultura regional boyacense

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    Cesar Moreno

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo muestra resultados parciales del estudio relacionado con la religiosidad católica de los campesinos de los Andes Orientales colombianos, particularmente de las partes altas del Departamento de Boyacá. El tema central se organiza en torno al simbolismo de los santuarios donde se efectúan peregrinaciones y fiestas patronales que son elementos de construcción de identidad cultural y de memoria colectiva entre estas sociedades a nivel local y regional.Este artículo hace parte de la tesis doctoral, en la Universidad de Paris 8 en marzo de 2005.

  16. New views on "old" carbon in the Amazon River: Insight from the source of organic carbon eroded from the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K. E.; Hilton, R. G.; West, A. J.; Malhi, Y.; Gröcke, D. R.; Bryant, C. L.; Ascough, P. L.; Robles Caceres, A.; New, M.

    2013-05-01

    rivers play a key role in the delivery of particulate organic carbon (POC) to large river systems and the ocean. Due to the extent of its drainage area and runoff, the Amazon River is one of Earth's most important biogeochemical systems. However, the source of POC eroded from the humid region of the Eastern Andes and the input of fossil POC from sedimentary rocks (POCfossil) remains poorly constrained. Here we collected suspended sediments from the Kosñipata River during flood events to better characterize Andean POC, measuring the nitrogen to organic carbon ratio (N/C), stable carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) and radiocarbon (Δ14Corg). Δ14Corg values ranged from -711‰ to -15‰, and significant linear trends between Δ14Corg, N/C and δ13Corg suggested that this reflects the mixing of POCfossil with very young organic matter (Δ14Corg 50‰) from the terrestrial biosphere (POCnon-fossil). Using N/C and Δ14Corg in an end-member mixing analysis, we quantify the fraction of POCfossil (to within 0.1) and find that it contributes a constant proportion of the suspended sediment mass (0.37 ± 0.03%) and up to 80% of total POC. In contrast, the relative contribution of POCnon-fossil was variable, being most important during the rising limb and peak discharges of flood events. The new data shed light on published measurements of "old" POC (low Δ14Corg) in Andean-fed tributaries of the Amazon River, with their Δ14Corg and δ13Corg values consistent with variable addition of POCfossil. The findings suggest a greater persistence of Andean POC in the lowland Amazon than previously recognized.

  17. Indigenous Food Systems and Climate Change: Impacts of Climatic Shifts on the Production and Processing of Native and Traditional Crops in the Bolivian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleman Saxena, Alder; Cadima Fuentes, Ximena; Gonzales Herbas, Rhimer; Humphries, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    Inhabitants of the high-mountain Andes have already begun to experience changes in the timing, severity, and patterning of annual weather cycles. These changes have important implications for agriculture, for human health, and for the conservation of biodiversity in the region. This paper examines the implications of climate-driven changes for native and traditional crops in the municipality of Colomi, Cochabamba, Bolivia. Data were collected between 2012 and 2014 via mixed methods, qualitative fieldwork, including participatory workshops with female farmers and food preparers, semi-structured interviews with local agronomists, and participant observation. Drawing from this data, the paper describes (a) the observed impacts of changing weather patterns on agricultural production in the municipality of Colomi, Bolivia and (b) the role of local environmental resources and conditions, including clean running water, temperature, and humidity, in the household processing techniques used to conserve and sometimes detoxify native crop and animal species, including potato (Solanum sp.), oca (Oxalis tuberosa), tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis), papalisa (Ullucus tuberosus), and charke (llama or sheep jerky). Analysis suggests that the effects of climatic changes on agriculture go beyond reductions in yield, also influencing how farmers make choices about the timing of planting, soil management, and the use and spatial distribution of particular crop varieties. Furthermore, household processing techniques to preserve and detoxify native foods rely on key environmental and climatic resources, which may be vulnerable to climatic shifts. Although these findings are drawn from a single case study, we suggest that Colomi agriculture characterizes larger patterns in what might be termed, "indigenous food systems." Such systems are underrepresented in aggregate models of the impacts of climate change on world agriculture and may be under different, more direct, and more immediate threat

  18. Indigenous Food Systems and Climate Change: Impacts of climatic shifts on the production and processing of native and traditional crops in the Bolivian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alder eKeleman Saxena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhabitants of the high-mountain Andes have already begun to experience changes in the timing, severity, and patterning of annual weather cycles. These changes have important implications for agriculture, for human health, and for the conservation of biodiversity in the region. This paper examines the implications of climate-driven changes for native and traditional crops in the municipality of Colomi, Cochabamba, Bolivia. Data was collected between 2012 and 2014 via mixed-methods, qualitative fieldwork, including participatory workshops with female farmers and food preparers, semi-structured interviews with local agronomists, and participant observation. Drawing from this data, the paper describes a the observed impacts of changing weather patterns on agricultural production in the municipality of Colomi, Bolivia; and b the role of local environmental resources and conditions, including clean running water, temperature, and humidity, in the household processing techniques used to conserve and sometimes detoxify native crop and animal species, including potato (Solanum sp., oca (Oxalis tuberosa, tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis, papalisa (Ullucus tuberosus, and charkay (llama or sheep jerky. Analysis suggests that the effects of climatic changes on agriculture go beyond reductions in yield, also influencing how farmers make choices about the timing of planting, soil management, the use and spatial distribution of particular crop varieties. Further, household processing techniques to preserve and detoxify native foods rely on key environmental and climatic resources, which may be vulnerable to climatic shifts. While these findings are drawn from a single case-study, we suggest that Colomi agriculture characterizes larger patterns in what might be termed, indigenous food systems. Such systems are underrepresented in aggregate models of the impacts of climate change on world agriculture, and may be under different, more direct, and more immediate threat

  19. An InSAR survey of the central Andes: Constraints on magma chamber geometry and mass balance in a volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Simons, M.

    2002-12-01

    The central Andes (14-28o S) has a high density of volcanoes, but a sparse human population, such that the activity of most volcanoes is poorly constrained. We use InSAR to conduct the first systematic observations of deformation at nearly 900 volcanoes (about 50 of which are classified ``potentially active'') during the 1992-2002 time interval. We find volcanic deformation in four locations. Subsidence is seen at Robledo (or Cerro Blanco) caldera, Argentina. We observe inflation at the stratovolcano Uturuncu, Bolivia, near stratovolcano Hualca Hualca, Peru, and in a region not associated with any known edifice on the border between Chile and Argentina that we call ``Lazufre'' because it lies between volcanoes Lastarria and Cordon del Azufre. The deformation pattern can be well explained by a uniform point-source source of inflation or deflation, but we compare these model results with those from a tri-axial point-source ellipsoid to test the robustness of estimated source depth and source strength (inferred here to be volume change). We further explore the sensitivity of these parameters to elastic half-space and layered-space models of crustal structure, and the influence of local topography. Because only one satellite look direction is available for most time periods, a variety of models are consistent with our observations. If we assume that inflation is due solely to magmatic intrusion, we can compare the rate of magma intrusion to volcanic extrusion during the decade for which data is available and the longer-term geologic rate. For the last decade, the ratio of volume intruded to extruded is between about 1-10, which agrees with previous geologic estimates in this and other volcanic arcs. The combined rate of intrusion and extrusion is within an order of magnitude of the inferred geologic rate.

  20. Deciphering the Role of Tectonic and Climatic Processes on the Landscape Development of the Patagonian Andes Along the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscher, J.; Morata, D.; Arancibia, G.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Transpressional plate boundaries often exhibit a correlation between plate obliquity and crustal deformation, but establishing spatial and temporal constraints on this relationship is challenging. The presence of continuous rugged topography along many transpressional fault zones as well as along-fault translation of crustal blocks can obscure the link between plate boundary geometry and mountain belt development. The Liquiñe-Ofqui fault system in the Patagonian Andes is an intra-arc dextral-reverse fault zone linked to oblique plate convergence between the Nazca and South America plates that represents a model setting for studying transpressional landscape development. The topography along the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault system is characterized by glacially and fluvially carved rocks of the Patagonian batholith interspersed by a chain of volcanoes that extends subparallel to the fault zone. Available structural and low-temperature thermochronometry data from the region suggest that both transpressional exhumation and glacial erosion have contributed to the long-term development of the orogen (Cembrano et al., 2002; Thomson, 2002; Thomson et al., 2010). Of particular interest is a near-field locus of young cooling ages thought to reflect shear heating along the fault zone (Thomson, 2002) or focused glacial erosion (Thomson et al., 2010; Herman and Brandon, 2015). To help quantify the topographic response to tectonic and climatic processes along the fault zone, we have evaluated first-order topographic features (gross distribution of elevation, relief and slope) and conducted river profile analyses (stream length-gradient, normalized channel steepness and stream convexity indices) using SRTM digital elevation data for comparison with low-temperature thermochronometry data. Preliminary results suggest that the distribution of topographic and river profile features varies with location along the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault system.

  1. Mesozoic–Cenozoic Evolution of the Western Margin of South America: Case Study of the Peruvian Andes

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    Laura Gonzalez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the structural style and physiographic criteria, the Central Andes of Peru can be divided into segments running parallel to the Pacific coast. The westernmost segment, the Coastal Belt, consists of a Late Jurassic–Cretaceous volcanic arc sequence that was accreted to the South American craton in Cretaceous times. The Mesozoic strata of the adjacent Western Cordillera represent an ENE-vergent fold-and-thrust belt that formed in Eocene times. Tight upright folds developed above a shallow detachment horizon in the West, while more open folds formed above a deeper detachment horizon towards the East and in the neighboring Central Highlands. A completely different style with steeply dipping reverse faults and open folds affecting the Neoproterozoic crystalline basement is typical for the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean Zone is characterized by mainly NE-vergent imbricate thrusting which occurred in Neogene times. A quantitative estimate of the shortening of the orogen obtained from balanced cross-sections indicates a total shortening of 120–150 km (24%–27%. This shortening was coevel with the Neogene westward drift of South America, occurred at rates between 3 and 4.7 mm/year and was responsible for the high elevation of the Peruvian Andes.

  2. Response of pollen diversity to the climate-driven altitudinal shift of vegetation in the Colombian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chengyu; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Duivenvoorden, Joost F

    2007-02-28

    Change in diversity of fossil pollen through time is used as a surrogate for biodiversity history. However, there have been few studies to explore the sensitivity of the measured pollen diversity to vegetation changes and the relationship between pollen diversity and plant diversity. This paper presents results of a study to assess the relationship between pollen diversity and relative abundance of pollen from different altitudinal vegetation belts (subandean forest, Andean forest, subparamo and grassparamo) in three records from the tropical Andes in Colombia. The results indicated that plant diversity in the vegetation declined with altitude and pollen diversity is positively correlated to the abundance of pollen from lower altitude vegetation belts and negatively correlated to that from the grassparamo. These results, therefore, suggest that pollen diversity coarsely reflects the diversity of the surrounding vegetation. Using this interpretation, we were able to predict changes in plant diversity over the past 430000 years in the Colombian Andes. Results indicated that under warmer climatic conditions, more species-diverse vegetation of low elevation moved upslope to contribute more pollen diversity to the study sites, and under colder conditions, species-poor grassparamo moved downslope and observed pollen diversity was lower. This study concludes that fossil pollen diversity may provide an important proxy to reconstruct the temporal changes in plant diversity.

  3. Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic deformation and exhumation of the Chilean Frontal Cordillera (28°-29°S), Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Parra, Mauricio; Arriagada, César; Mora, Andrés; Bascuñan, Sebastián; Peña, Matías

    2017-11-01

    The Frontal Cordillera in northern Chile is located over the flat-slab subduction segment of the Central Andes. This tectonic province is characterized by a thick-skinned structural style showing evidence of tectonic inversion and basement-involved compressive structures. Field data, U-Pb geochronological and apatite fission track data were used to unravel partially the tectonic history of the area. Previous U-Pb ages of synorogenic deposits exposed on the flanks of basement-core anticlines indicate that Andean deformation started probably during Late Cretaceous with the tectonic inversion of Triassic and Jurassic half-grabens. New U-Pb ages of the synorogenic Quebrada Seca Formation suggest that this deformation continued during Paleocene (66-60 Ma) with the reverse faulting of pre-rift basement blocks. The analysis of new apatite fission-track data shows that a rapid and coeval cooling related to exhumation of the pre-rift basement blocks occurred during Eocene times. This exhumation event is interpreted for first time in the Chilean Frontal Cordillera and it could have occurred simultaneously with the propagation of basement-involved structures. The age of this exhumation event coincides with the Incaic orogenic phase, which is interpreted as the most important to the Central Andes in terms of shortening, uplift and exhumation.

  4. Long-Term Single-Dose Efficacy of a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Andes Virus Vaccine in Syrian Hamsters

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    Joseph Prescott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV is highly pathogenic in humans and is the primary etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in South America. Case-fatality rates are as high as 50% and there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies for infection. Our laboratory has recently developed a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based vaccine that expressed the glycoproteins of Andes virus in place of the native VSV glycoprotein (G. This vaccine is highly efficacious in the Syrian hamster model of HCPS when given 28 days before challenge with ANDV, or when given around the time of challenge (peri-exposure, and even protects when administered post-exposure. Herein, we sought to test the durability of the immune response to a single dose of this vaccine in Syrian hamsters. This vaccine was efficacious in hamsters challenged intranasally with ANDV 6 months after vaccination (p = 0.025, but animals were not significantly protected following 1 year of vaccination (p = 0.090. The decrease in protection correlated with a reduction of measurable neutralizing antibody responses, and suggests that a more robust vaccination schedule might be required to provide long-term immunity.

  5. Las puntas y rejas prehispánicas de metal en los Andes y su continuidad hasta el presente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Les pointes et les socs préhispaniques en métal dans les Andes et leur continuité jusqu’à aujourd’hui Résumé: Cet article tente de montrer la continuité entre les instruments à usages multiples composés de pointes et des socs en cuivre arsenical insérés sur des manches en bois qui ont été élaborés à partir de 900 d. C. par les Sicán de Batán Grande, département de Lambayeque (Pérou, et certains instruments en acier utilisés actuellement dans les Andes du nord du Pérou et du sud de l’Équateur : les barretas, barretillas, barretones et les petites pelles. Il s’agit d’indiquer, sur la base d’informations ethnographiques, la relation entre ces instruments et les allachus, kituchis et chaquitacllas dont se servent les paysans des hautes terres du centre et du sud du Pérou, ceci dans le but de contribuer à l’élaboration d’une histoire de la technologie andine. Este artículo intenta, por un lado, mostrar la continuidad entre las herramientas multiusos elaboradas a partir de 900 d.C. por los sicanes de Batán Grande, departamento de Lambayeque (Perú, compuestas por puntas y rejas de cobre arsenical insertadas en cabos de madera y algunos de los instrumentos de acero utilizados actualmente en los Andes del norte del Perú y del sur del Ecuador: barretas, barretillas, barretones y pequeñas lampas. Y por otro, indicar, en base a datos etnográficos, la relación entre estos instrumentos y los allachus, kituchis y chaquitacllas que emplean los campesinos de las tierras alto andinas del centro y el sur del Perú. Esto con la finalidad de abogar para la elaboración de una historia de la tecnología andina. Prehispanic metal points and ploughshares in the Andes and their continuity until the present Abstract: This article shows the continuity in the production of multiple use tools that where made beginning AD 900 by the Sicán people of Batán Grande, in the Department of Lambayeque, Peru. These tools are arsenical cooper

  6. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  7. Actividad microbiológica y biomasa microbiana en suelos cafetaleros de los Andes venezolanos

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    Jorge E. Paolini Gómez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available En Venezuela el café (Coffea arabica L. ocupa un área aproximada de 200 000 ha, distribuidos principalmente en las zonas montañosas de Los Andes. Tradicionalmente, el café se cultiva con pocos insumos bajo la sombra de árboles de la familia de las leguminosas y de otros arbustos. En años recientes con la adopción de cultivares de alta productividad, notable precocidad y tamaño reducido se está produciendo café a plena exposición solar con fertilización mineral y uso de pesticidas. Las propiedades microbiológicas del suelo especialmente aquellas relacionadas con el flujo de energía y el reciclaje de nutrientes responden de forma rápida y sensible a los cambios de las condiciones del suelo mucho antes que por ejemplo el carbono orgánico, y de este modo, suministran una información anticipada sobre las alteraciones de la calidad del mismo. En este estudio se comparó la actividad microbiológica (respiración basal, la biomasa microbiana y los parámetros ecofisiológicos en suelos a nivel superficial (0-5 cm de ocho fincas cafetaleras en los municipios de Mérida y Trujillo donde se encuentran tres sistemas de producción: tradicional, convencional y orgánico. Las fincas con agricultura orgánica presentaron los mayores valores de carbono orgánico total, carbono hidrosoluble, respiración basal y biomasa microbiana en comparación con las de manejo tradicional y convencional; con lo cual la producción orgánica es un sistema de manejo más sostenible por la mayor conservación de los recursos naturales y la producción más amigable y armónica con el ambiente. En el caso del manejo convencional, la adición de fertilizantes y pesticidas afecta de forma negativa el bienestar de los microorganismos y los hace más ineficientes en el uso del carbono y la energía.

  8. Application of enzyme leach soil analysis for epithermal gold exploration in the Andes of Ecuador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.M.; Gunn, A.G. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Enzyme Leach (EL) soil surveys were undertaken over known epithermal Au mineralisation at El Mozo and Llano Largo, Azuay, Ecuador to assess the utility of the technique for identifying such deposits in the Ecuadorian Andes. The results indicate the development of both apical- and oxidation-type EL anomalies over auriferous structures at the two sites, the former systematically incorporating Au, and the latter Cl and Br. The spectrum of elements responsive to mineralisation at El Mozo (Cl, Br, I, La, Ce, Nd, Cu, Pb, Au, As, Sb, Ag, Zr, Sr) was found to be considerably greater than at Llano Largo (Cl, Br, Au, As, Sb, Ag, Zn), probably reflecting the contrasting high- and low-sulphidation assemblages of the two prospects. Ratios of EL versus aqua-regia extractable trace element concentrations ranged from 1: < 100 for Mn to 1: >400 for chalcophile elements such as Pb, Sb, As, Bi and Ag. Strong correlations between the concentrations of several analytes (including Mn, Sr, Cu, Co, As) extracted by the two procedures indicate, however, that EL datasets are extensively influenced by bulk matrix composition. Spatial variations of EL extractable Mn were found to exert no major influence on apical or oxidation suite anomaly patterns at El Mozo. However, Mn-normalisation of halogen data for Llano Largo elucidated otherwise obscure oxidation features, potentially related to Au mineralisation. Ratios between elements subject to apical enrichment and those of the oxidation suite (e.g. Cl/Au and Bi/Br) were found to highlight known Au targets with improved clarity. The formation mechanism of the recorded Au anomalies is uncertain, but may involve physical enrichment of Au in the soil during pedogenesis with subsequent in-situ formation of (EL soluble) Au halide complexes. The strength of such apical features is, in part, probably a function of the minimal depths to mineralisation which characterise El Mozo and Llano Largo. Oxidation halos formed by volatile non-metallic elements

  9. An InSAR-based survey of volcanic deformation in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Simons, M.

    2004-02-01

    We extend an earlier interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey covering about 900 remote volcanos of the central Andes (14°-27°S) between the years 1992 and 2002. Our survey reveals broad (10s of km), roughly axisymmetric deformation at 4 volcanic centers: two stratovolcanoes are inflating (Uturuncu, Bolivia, and Hualca Hualca, Peru); another source of inflation on the border between Chile and Argentina is not obviously associated with a volcanic edifice (here called Lazufre); and a caldera (Cerro Blanco, also called Robledo) in northwest Argentina is subsiding. We explore the range of source depths and volumes allowed by our observations, using spherical, ellipsoidal and crack-like source geometries. We further examine the effects of local topography upon the deformation field and invert for a spherical point-source in both elastic half-space and layered-space crustal models. We use a global search algorithm, with gradient search methods used to further constrain best-fitting models. Inferred source depths are model-dependent, with differences in the assumed source geometry generating a larger range of accepted depths than variations in elastic structure. Source depths relative to sea level are: 8-18 km at Hualca Hualca; 12-25 km for Uturuncu; 5-13 km for Lazufre, and 5-10 km at Cerro Blanco. Deformation at all four volcanoes seems to be time-dependent, and only Uturuncu and Cerro Blanco were deforming during the entire time period of observation. Inflation at Hualca Hualca stopped in 1997, perhaps related to a large eruption of nearby Sabancaya volcano in May 1997, although there is no obvious relation between the rate of deformation and the eruptions of Sabancaya. We do not observe any deformation associated with eruptions of Lascar, Chile, at 16 other volcanoes that had recent small eruptions or fumarolic activity, or associated with a short-lived thermal anomaly at Chiliques volcano. We posit a hydrothermal system at Cerro Blanco to explain the

  10. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  11. Evaluating sourcing and fluvial integration of plant wax biomarkers from the Peruvian Andes to Amazonian lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. S.; Feakins, S. J.; Ponton, C.; West, A. J.; Galy, V.

    2017-12-01

    The carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions (respectively δ13C and δD) of plant wax biomarkers have been widely used to reconstruct past climate and environment. To understand how leaf waxes are sourced within a river catchment, and how their isotopic signature is transferred from source to sink, we study δ13C and δD of C29 n-alkanes and C30 n-alkanoic acids in the Madre de Dios River catchment along the eastern flank of the Peruvian Andes. We sampled soils across a 3.5km elevation transect and find gradients in δ13Cwax (ca. +1.5‰/km) and δDwax (ca. -10 ‰/km) similar to gradients in tree canopy leaves (Feakins et al., 2016 GCA; Wu et al., 2017 GCA). We also collected river suspended sediment samples along the Madre de Dios River and its tributaries, which together drain an area of 75,400 km2 and 6 km of elevation. We utilize soil data and a digital elevation model to construct isoscapes, delineate catchments for each river sampling location, predict river values assuming spatial uniform integration, and compare our predictions with observed values. Although both compounds generally follow isotopic gradients defined by catchment elevations, the dual isotope and compound-class comparison reveals additional processes. For C30 n-alkanoic acid we find an up to 1km lower-than-expected catchment signal, indicating degradation of upland contributions in transit and replacement with lowland inputs. In contrast, mountain-front river locations are susceptible to upland-biases (up to 1km higher sourcing) in C29 n-alkane sourcing, likely due to enhanced erosion and higher leaf wax stock in Andean soil compared to the lowland, and greater persistence of n-alkanes than n-alkanoic acids. For both compounds, the bias is eliminated with several hundred km of river transit across the floodplain. In one location, we identify significant petrogenic contamination of n-alkanes but not n-alkanoic acids. These results indicate the power in combining dual compound classes and

  12. The ethno-politics of water security: contestations of ethnicity and gender in strategies to control water in the Andes of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera-Delgado, J.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is the result of a multidisciplinary research which tries to explain water injustices and the threats to water rights access and control experienced by indigenous peasants of the Peruvian Andes. It attempts to contribute to the analysis of the interactions between ethnicity and gender,

  13. The Neogene rise of the tropical Andes facilitated diversification of wax palms (Ceroxylon: Arecaceae) through geographic colonization and climatic niche separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanín, M.J.; Kissling, W.D.; Bacon, C.D.; Borchsenius, F.; Galeano, G.; Svenning, J.-C.; Olivera, J.; Ramírez, R.; Trénel, P.; Pintaud, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The tropical Andes are a biodiversity hotspot, partly due to their rich and complex floristic composition. A fundamental question regarding this outstanding biodiversity is what role the Andean orogeny has played in species diversification. Ceroxylon is a genus of endemic Andean palms that stands

  14. The Neogene rise of the tropical Andes facilitated diversification of wax palms (Ceroxylon: Arecaceae) through geographical colonization and climatic niche separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanín, María José; Kissling, W. Daniel; Bacon, Christine D.

    2016-01-01

    The tropical Andes are a biodiversity hotspot, partly due to their rich and complex floristic composition. A fundamental question regarding this outstanding biodiversity is what role the Andean orogeny has played in species diversification. Ceroxylon is a genus of endemic Andean palms that stands...

  15. The ethno-politics of water security: contestations of ethnicity and gender in strategies to control water in the Andes of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera-Delgado, J.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is the result of a multidisciplinary research which tries to explain water injustices and the threats to water rights access and control experienced by indigenous peasants of the Peruvian Andes. It attempts to contribute to the analysis of the interactions between ethnicity and

  16. Astronomical tuning of long pollen records reveals the dynamic history of montane biomes and lake levels in the tropical high Andes during the Quaternary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, V.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Lourens, L.; Tzedakis, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Long pollen records from two sediment cores of the basin of Bogotá (Colombia) are presented, reflecting the dynamic history of environmental and vegetation changes in the tropical high Andes during the Quaternary. An astronomically tuned age model has been developed by using the visual correlation

  17. Killing the snake of poverty : local perceptions of poverty and well-being and people’s capabilities to improve their lives in the Southern Andes of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miyashita, A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the generalised image of comuneros of the Southern Andes of Peru as living in poverty, a closer examination of the daily lives of the campesinos provides a more dynamic perspective. Some households claim that their lives are improving, others that their lives are the same, while many report

  18. The Real of Community, the Desire for Development and the Performance of Egalitarianism in the Peruvian Andes: A Materialist–Utopian Account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a materialist–utopian perspective for explaining the persistence of community in the Andes by drawing upon Lacanian theory and the thought of the Peruvian Marxist José Carlos Mariátegui. What characterizes the Andean comunidad are not notions of belonging and identity, but the

  19. Las especies nativas y la deforestación en los Andes. Una visión histórica, social y cultural en Cochabamba, Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1993-01-01

    los «Cronistas» de los siglos XVI y XVII, de los exploradores y los trabajos actuales de los investigadores constituyen elementos que nos permiten imaginar los tipos de bosques y las formas vegetales que existían antes. A partir de un análisis de los modos de uso del espacio por las diferentes sociedades que han poblado los Andes, sus valles y sus zonas de altura, desde la prehistoria hasta nuestra época, se interpreta las causas del proceso de deforestación, tan alarmante hoy. Así, se analizan los efectos del aumento de la población, la presión del ganado, el papel de las minas, la construcción de los ferrocarriles desde el ángulo de sus influencias sobre la vegetación nativa. También se consideran las implicaciones de la fabricación de la chicha, de la tenencia de la tierra y de las numerosas guerras o batallas militares, con el medio ambiente y su degradación. El conocimiento del pasado lleva, en conclusión, a plantear elementos de trabajos futuros, técnicos y sociales para disminuir el proceso de deforestación. NATIVE SPECIES AND DEFORESTATION IN THE ANDEAN REGION - AN HISTORICAL, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL VISION IN COCHABAMBA, BOLIVIA. This paper presents the results of field observations and informal conversations with the local campesinos over a period of 3 years, supplemented by a large bibliographic review. Through an historical, social and cultural reconstruction, it tries to demonstrate the regressive dynamic of the Andean vegetation, especially in the Cochabamba region, Bolivia. The remaining forests, the XVI and XVII century chronicles, explorers' accounts and the results of contemporary researchers let us imagine how the vegetation could be. An analysis of the human use of rural areas by Andean societies in the valleys and highlands, from prehistory to our time serves as the basis of the interpretation of the causes of alarming deforestation. Population increase, pressure of livestock, the role of the mines, the construction of the railways

  20. A arquitetura e o planejamento urbano-regional emface do processo de mundialização

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Ventura; Carlos Eduardo Zahn; José Luiz Ronca Caruso

    2003-01-01

    1. Main characteristics of the current process ofglobalization; instability created by the formation ofthe global society; changes in the relations of space-time in architecture and urbanism; 2. The physical planning in the face of changes;contributions of four Chartes Atenas, LaTourrette, Andes and UIA / Beijing-, of geographersand economists for the field of regional planning andarchitecture; the current changes and theirconsequences in the process of physical planning; 3. The modular prod...

  1. Combining Traditional Hydrometric Data, Isotope Tracers and Biophysical Landscape Characteristics to Improve the Understanding of Landscape Hydrology in the Humid Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, G.; Lazo, P.; Célleri, R.; Wilcox, B. P.; Breuer, L.; Windhorst, D.; Crespo, P.

    2014-12-01

    Only few catchments in the Andean mountain range are currently monitored. Most basins in the region remain ungauged, and as a result, little knowledge is available on the processes governing their hydrological behavior. In particular, despite the importance of tropical alpine grasslands of the northern Andes (commonly known as the páramo) as providers of abundant high-quality water for downstream populations as well as a variety of other environmental services, very little is known about their hydrologic functioning. To improve this situation, an analysis of 1) the isotopic signature of oxygen-18, and 2) the relations between various landscape attributes and hydrologic behavior in the Zhurucay River experimental catchment (7.53 km2) was conducted. The catchment is located in southern Ecuador between 3200 and 3900 m a.s.l. The isotopic analysis was conducted in water samples collected in rainfall, streamflow, and soils. The influence of soil type, vegetation cover, catchment area, geology, and topography on runoff coefficient, and streamflow rates was investigated using linear regression analysis. Results reveal that water yield accounts for a high percentage of the water budget; runoff coefficient, and high and moderate streamflow rates are highly correlated with the extent of Histosols soils (Andean páramo wetlands), and increase with catchment size; and low streamflow rates are highly correlated with steep slopes. Results from the tracer analysis show that pre-event water stored in the Histosols is the primary source of runoff generation, demonstrating hydrologic connectivity between the Histosols (mainly located at the bottom of the valley) and the drainage network; while the most common soils, the Andosols (mainly located on the steep slopes), laterally drain the infiltrated rainfall recharging the lower situated Histosols. Overall, these findings depict that the combination of different methodologies for investigating hydrological processes at catchment

  2. The use of the linear reservoir concept to quantify the impact of changes in land use on the hydrology of catchments in the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Buytaert

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The high Andes region of South Ecuador (The Páramo is characterised by a cold and wet climate. Most soils of the Páramo region are Andosols and Histosols, with a very high water retention capacity that is affected irreversibly by drying. This key property of Páramo soils buffers catchment outflow, resulting in an almost uniform outflow pattern which, notwithstanding the variability in rainfall, can be very variable in space and time. These soils serve as the most important reservoir of drinking and irrigation water for the densely populated inter-Andean depression region. The Páramo has long served only as an extensive grazing area but recent population pressure and land scarcity have increased cultivation. Two small Páramo catchments (about 2 km2 were monitored intensively for precipitation and discharge for over a year to assess the effect of such land-use changes on the hydrological properties. One catchment is in an undisturbed area and grazed intensively while in the other, local farmers started intensive drainage for cultivation of potatoes about five years ago. The linear reservoir concept has been used to assess the overall retention capacity of the catchments in terms of both peak response and base flow. In this model, every catchment is considered as a series of independent parallel reservoirs, each characterised by mean residence times (T. In every catchment, three major mean residence times can be distinguished. In the undisturbed catchment, an immediate response, characterised by a T of 5.4 hours, is followed by a slower response with a T of 44.3 h. The base flow has a mean T value of 360 h. The response of the cultivated catchment is similar with T values of 3.6 h, 27.2 h and 175 h, respectively. As a result, in the disturbed catchment, water release is about 40% faster than in the undisturbed catchment, so that the base flow falls rapidly to lower levels. The linear reservoir model is a simple way of quantifying the impact of

  3. El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Úbeda Palenque

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate studies are of main importance to explain the external geodynamics of the Pacific Basin of the Central Andes between 15°S and 19°S. This is because the processes by which the relief modeling or morphogenesis develop are controlled by pluviometric variables and phyto stabilization. Moreover, the internal geodynamic of the region is related to the climatic conditions that determine the amounts of sediments aported to the Ocean basin (Kulm et al. 1977, affecting the erosion rate by subduction in the plane of contact between the tectonic plates and the composition of the magazas formed below the Andean erogene.In this paper we analyze the climatic effects in the external geodynamics, within a theoric framework that considers a morphoclimatic system as a set formed by the morphogenetic agents and processes that work the relief modeling in a territory, in function of its bioclimatic characteristics; and a morphoclimatic dominion is the spatial environment where a specific morphoclimatic system develops.First, we present the clima of the Central Andes, the factors that control its mean configuration and its main characteristics with diagrams made from the pluviometric data collected in a series of stations regularly distributed in the region. Second, we differentiate two climatic dominions, one in the Altiplano, related to Amazonia precipitations and the other at the Pacific side, associated to the anticyclonic permanency in the western cordillera. Third, we propose a subdivision of the western façade of the cordillera in altitudinal intervals or bioclimatics sections using bioindicators such as the vegetation absence or presence with altitudinal change. Fourth, we give a new division in altitudinal intervals or morphoclimatic zones, using the existence of some geoindicators, such as the endemic geomorphic units of each morphoclimatic zone.El estudio del clima es imprescindible para explicar la geodinámica externa en la vertiente del Pac

  4. Tectogénesis, orogénesis y volcanismo en los Andes del Sur del Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available Dans le Sud du Pérou, les plissements andins (tectogenèse n'ont pas été générateurs de reliefs importants, alors que les mouvements épéirogéniques ont véritablement créé le relief des Andes (orogenèse et ont donné lieu à un volcanisme d'une puissance considérable. Du point de vue géomorphologique, les structures mises en place par les mouvements tangentiels andins ont cessé de s'exprimer topographiquement vers le milieu du Miocène par suite de l'aplanissement général de la région (surface de la Puna. De même, les reliefs importants créés par les mouvements épéirogéniques et les accumulations volcaniques qui les accompagnaient (Volcanisme Toquepala de l'Eocène et Volcanisme Tacaza de l'Oligo-Miocène, ont été complètement arasés. Dans ces conditions, l'essentiel du volume actuel des Andes fut l’œuvre de l'orogenèse et du volcanisme des 15 derniers millions d'années. La mise en place s'est effectuée en deux étapes. La première a commencé par des accumulations ignimbritiques (Formation Huaylillas qui ont fossilisé la surface d'aplanissement dans tout le Sud du Pérou. Ce volcanisme fissural correspondait au début d'une période de distension qui se traduisit par le soulèvement des Andes à la fin du Miocène. Apres une courte interruption (pendant laquelle il faut placer une phase de compression au cours du Pliocène, la deuxième étape a été marquée par le soulèvement de toute la région, zone côtière comprise. Le début de cette nouvelle phase de distension a donné lieu à des émissions ignimbritiques et pyroclastiques (Formation Maure, Sillar, Formations Sencca et Capillune dont les produits ont comblé les bassins d'érosion résultant du rajeunissement de la surface de la Puna. Par la suite, à mesure que le soulèvement a pris de l'ampleur (Pléistocène, le volcanisme a changé de caractère, et, sur la couverture d'ignimbrites et de pyroclastites, la construction de grands strato

  5. Cold episodes in the Peruvian Central Andes: Composites, Types, and their Impacts over South America (1958-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Roundy, P. E.; Trasmonte, G.; Silva, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Mantaro basin (MB) is located in the central Peruvian Andes. Occasionally, cold episodes are observed during austral summer (January-March), that strongly damage crops. However, little is known about the causes and impacts of such cold episodes. The main goal of this study is thus to characterize cold episodes in the MB and assess their large-scale circulation and teleconnections over South America (SA) during austral summer. To identify cold events in the MB daily minimum temperature (Tmin) for the period 1958-2014 from Huayao station, located within the MB was used. A cold episode is defined when daily minimum temperature drops below its 10-percentile for at least one day. Additionally, to study the sensitivity between physical mechanisms associated with cold episodes and temperature, cold episodes are classified in three groups: Weak cold episodes (7.5 ≤ Tmin ≤ 10 percentile), strong cold episodes (Tmin ≤ 2.5 percentile), but excluding the 9 coldest events (Tmin ≤ 0 ͦ C), henceforth referred to as extraordinary cold episodes. Several gridded reanalysis were used to characterize the large-scale circulation, cloud cover and rainfall over SA associated with these events. Weak and strong cold episodes in the MB are mainly associated with a weakening of the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low system by tropical-extratropical interactions. Both types of cold episodes are associated with westerly wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels aloft the Peruvian Central Andes, which inhibit the influx of humid air masses from the lowlands to the east and hence limit the development of cloud cover (e.g., positive OLR anomalies over MB). The resulting clear sky conditions cause nighttime temperatures to drop, leading to cold extremes below 10-percentile. Simultaneously, northeastern Brazil (NEB) registers negative OLR anomalies, strong convection and enhanced cloud cover because displacement of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) toward the northeast of

  6. Climatic Controls on Fluvial Cut-and-Fill Cycles in Drainages with In-stream Wetlands in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, J. A.; Latorre, C.

    2004-12-01

    Fluvial systems that possess in-stream wetlands, or marshes, are common in arid environments where water-tables are emergent and large discharge events uncommon. These streambeds are protected from erosion by a dense cover of hydrophyllic and phreatophytic vegetation. Along the Pacific slope of the Central Andes in northern Chile (~20°-26°S), which includes some of the driest sectors of the Atacama Desert, in-stream wetlands occur in deeply incised bedrock canyons on the Andean slope and piedmont. Over the last several years we have compiled a detailed record of late Pleistocene and Holocene vegetation changes along the Pacific slope of the Andes through the collection, analysis, and radiocarbon determination of over 180 rodent middens. Rodent middens record past changes in precipitation levels by tracking the downslope migrations of plant species into the hyperarid desert. We have also assembled a record of the cut-and-fill cycles of several fluvial systems with in-stream wetlands located at various distances (5-50 km) from the zone of ground-water recharge in the High Andes through stratigraphic mapping and the radiocarbon dating of over 100 samples of organic material within these wetlands. Combined, this well-dated record of hillslope vegetation and stream aggradation and incision allows us to assess the influence of climatic change on stream processes, including the nature of stream response, the sensitivity of different stream systems to climatic change, and the response times of streams to climate changes that vary in distance from ground-water recharge zones. The combined data set shows that in-stream wetland aggradation is directly linked to changes in climate, with aggradation occurring during wetter climatic periods when water tables are high. Incision occurs during dry climatic periods when water tables are lower and streambed sediments are no longer anchored by dense vegetation. Streams that are closer to ground-water recharge zones are more

  7. Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Early and Latest Holocene Moraines on Nevado Salcantay in the Southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    A two-fold sequence of nested lateral and end moraines was mapped in a glacial trough emanating from the southwest flank of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m; ~13°S latitude), the highest peak in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of southern Peru. The field area is situated 25 km due south of the archaeological site of Machu Picchu. Outer and inner moraines in the sequence were deposited by valley glaciers that terminated ~5 km and ~3 km, respectively, from their headwall on the Salcantay summit massif. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of granitic boulders sampled on the Salcantay moraines is underway and has provided the first numerical ages for these deposits. Initial results indicate ages of 8.1 ± 0.1 10Be ka for the outer moraine and 200 ± 20 10Be years for the sharp-crested inner moraine. These ages are derived using the CRONUS-Earth 10Be exposure age calculator (version 2.0) and expressed with respect to the Lal- Stone production rate scaling scheme using the standard atmosphere. The outer and inner moraine ages correspond to glacial events during the early and latest Holocene, respectively. Further 10Be dating of the mapped moraines and similar deposits observed in adjacent drainages on Nevado Salcantay is anticipated to yield a high-resolution chronology of valley glaciation in this segment of the southern Peruvian Andes. The new results bridge an important gap between existing Andean glacier records to the north and south, and complement available ice core and lacustrine paleoclimate records in the vicinity, thereby expanding spatial and temporal coverage for identifying patterns of Holocene climate change in the tropical Andes. Notably, the inner moraine age correlates with the timing of the Little Ice Age as defined in northern mid- and high latitude glacier records, and suggests considerable expansion of valley glaciers in the southern Peruvian Andes during this climatic minimum. Apart from their paleoclimatic significance, the initial results also demonstrate

  8. Altitudinal vegetation belts in the high-Andes of central Chile (33°S Pisos altitudinales de vegetación en los Andes de Chile central (33°S

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    Lohengrin A. Cavieres

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The limits of alpine vegetation belts have been established mainly based on physiognomic criteria. However, a more objective approach for fixing limits of vegetation belts are methods based on species composition and relative abundance of each species. While these methods are more time consuming, they are more detailed and permit the detection of physical factors affecting the limits of vegetation belts. In this paper we: 1 describe the altitudinal changes of vegetation above timberline, 2 compare vegetation belts defined with physiognomy and two floristic methods (a qualitative one based on altitudinal changes in species composition, and a quantitative one based on changes in dominant species; and 3 detect some environmental factors responsible for the altitudinal distribution of alpine vegetation between 2100 and 3700 masl in the Andes of Santiago, central Chile (33°S. There was a complete agreement between the different methods in delimiting the subalpine belt. However, in the lower alpine belt (the cushion's belt floristic methods subdivided it in 2-3 sub-belts. In the floristic methods, elevations 3500-3700 that formed the higher alpine belt segregated in separate ways because they have no species in common. Physiognomic descriptions lose relevant information about species distribution, especially at higher elevations. Mean annual temperature and nitrogen content of soil are the main environmental factors affecting the altitudinal limits of vegetation belts in the central Chilean AndesLa delimitación de los pisos altitudinales de vegetación andina se ha basado principalmente en criterios fisionómicos. Sin embargo, un criterio más objetivo para la delimitación es usar métodos basados en la composición y abundancia relativa de las especies presentes. Mientras estos métodos requieren de un mayor esfuerzo de muestreo, son más detallados y permiten detectar factores físicos involucrados en la delimitación altitudinal de la vegetaci

  9. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  10. Climate Variability, Andean Livelihood Strategies, Development and Adaptation in the Andean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, C.; Quiroz, R.; Zorogastua, P.; Baigorrea, G.

    2002-05-01

    Development programs in the Andes have failed to recognize climate variability as an element that is crucial to the adoption of new alternatives. Dairy, potatoes, improved sheep, forages are all part of the history of development in this region. A combination of climate variability, changes in the economy, the political environment, and land tenure reform shape rural livelihoods and welfare. Diversification, linking to markets, and networking are some elements that contribute to the resilience of families in the Andes. Strategies change, are flexible, and may incorporate non-agricultural activities. While some farmers are able to improve their welfare through the life cycle, others become poorer. Climate variability increases the vulnerability of some groups; in other cases, because of diversification and assets, households build economic portfolios that are more resilient to the elements. The many projects provide insights into how in the long run households improve their environment, hinting at mechanisms to adapt to climate change. In order to understand changing composition of portfolios in future scenarios of spatial heterogeneous areas such as mountains (Andes), estimates of models predicting climate change at a global scale are not useful because their resolution. Therefore, downscaling tools are useful. Spatial heterogeneity is assessed through agroecozoning. Both production and the impact on some environmental indicators are simulated through process-based models, for the Ilave-Huenque watershed in Peru that help in discussing scenarios of adaptation.

  11. Los Andes Fueguinos: el registro micropaleontológico de los mayores acontecimientos paleooceanográfícos australes del Campaniano al Mioceno The Fuegian Andes: the micropaleontological record of the major Campanian-Miocene paleocea-nographic austral events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Malumián

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available La sucesión de las asociaciones de microfósiles de la casi completa columna estratigráfica marina del Cretácico Tardío-Mioceno de los Andes Fueguinos, en el margen orogénico de la Cuenca Austral, revela una estrecha relación con los acontecimientos tectónicos locales, las transgresiones-regresiones atlánticas sobre la Plataforma Patagónica y los mayores acontecimientos paleooceanográfícos globales. La secuencia fueguina campaniana tardía-eocena temprana, dominada por asociaciones de foraminiferos aglutinados tipo 'flysch' y ambientes deficientes en oxígeno de acotada profundidad, es coherente con cuencas aportilladas en un período de estiramiento cortical. El Maastrichtiano (Formación Policarpo con foraminiferos aglutinados cosmopolitas contrasta con la asociación calcárea endémica Austral de la primera transgresión atlántica patagónica. En la transición Paleoceno/Eoceno, las estratigráficamente restringidas asociaciones de microfósiles calcáreos exhiben el mayor recambio del Cenozoico, con el pasaje de una asociación cosmopolita tipo 'Midway' (Formación La Barca a otra fuertemente endémica (Formación Punta Noguera, donde aparecen los géneros cenozoicos patagónicos-fueguinos característicos. El Paleógeno temprano no registra taxones filotérmicos, y sólo un episodio fugaz de calizas briozoales (Formación Río Bueno y el bajo porcentaje de ostrácodos de la Familia Hemicytheridae insinúa un período cálido. La secuencia eocena media tardía (Grupo La Despedida se inicia con una transgresión distribuida en la Cuenca Austral (Formaciones Leticia, Man Aike, Río Turbio, capas con Boltovskoyella coeva con un pico de temperatura en 42 Ma, que porta una fauna fueguina retrógrada y nodosáridos de gran porte, los cuales fueron reemplazados a través del Eoceno Tardío (Formación Cerro Colorado por típicos géneros antarticos, reflejando la decreciente temperatura que culmina en la Zona de Tenuitella ins

  12. From the Andes to the Outback: Transnational Trajectories and Cultural Identity

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    Philippa Collin

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises questions about the development of cultural identity as it will transform and impact upon the process of regional integration in the Asia Pacific Rim, through a consideration of the post-national tendencies created by migrant populations, in this case the Chilean diasporic community. I am specifically interested in how nationalisms impact on regional integration projects and how a post-national reading of the region might be beneficial in developing strategies in regional integration.

  13. A further contribution to the knowledge of two inadequately known species of geophilid centipedes from the Andes of South-Central Chile, currently assigned to the genus Plateurytion Attems, 1909 (Chilopoda: Geophilomorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luis Alberto

    2015-10-06

    Two poorly known species of geophilid centipedes from the Andes of South-Central Chile, i.e., Plateurytion mundus (Chamberlin, 1955) and Plateurytion zapallar (Chamberlin, 1955) (Myriapoda: Chilopoda: Geophilomorpha), are herein redescribed and illustrated after type specimens of both taxa and new material of the latter, rectifying the condition of the coxosternites of the second maxillae, which are medially joined through a narrow, hyaline and non-areolate membranous isthmus only (instead of "broadly fused as in Pachymerium", as stated by Chamberlin), this being consistent with the current generic assignment of these species under Plateurytion Attems, 1909. New data on many morphological features of specific value, until now unknown, are also given for both taxa. Plateurytion zapallar is reported for the first time from Coquimbo region, 11 Km N of Los Vilos (Elqui province), Valparaíso region, Quebrada Huaquén, Pichicuy (Petorca province), La Campana National Park (Quillota province), and Quebrada el Tigre, Cachagua (Valparíso province). A key for identification of the South American species currently included in Plateurytion is given.

  14. Geochemical Background and Baseline Values Determination and Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soils of the Andes Mountain Range (Cajamarca-Huancavelica, Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Alonso Rojo, Pilar; García Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and one metalloid (As) as well as various parameters (pH, organic carbon, granulometric analysis and cation exchange capacity) were analyzed in 77 soil samples collected in the mining areas of La Zanja and Colquirrumi (Department of Cajamarca) and Julcani (Department of Huancavelica). Our study proposed geochemical baseline values for heavy metals in a natural region (La Zanja) from samples collected during the period of the environmental impact study (2006), that is, from an earlier period which occurred at the beginning of the exploitation of the current gold mine. The baseline values obtained were as follows: 8.26 mg·kg−1 for Cr; 56.97 mg·kg−1 for Ni; 22, 20 mg·kg−1 for the Cu; 47.42 mg·kg−1 for Zn; 27.50 mg·kg−1 for As; 4.36 mg·kg−1 for Cd; 4.89 mg·kg−1 for Hg, and 44.87 mg·kg−1 for Pb. Through the use of different indices of heavy metal contamination (geo-accumulation index (Igeo), improved Nemerow index (IIN) and potential ecological risk index (RI)), the degree of pollution caused by mining activities in two areas, Colquirrumi and Julcani, which have a high density of mining sites in operation, was determined. The values obtained from these indices indicated that the Colquirrumi region was the most contaminated, followed by Julcani. The area of La Zanja, despite being free of mining operations, presented slight diffuse pollution. Several positive correlations were obtained, with a high level of significance, between pH, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, and the Cr, Pb and Ni concentrations of the soils. The spatial distribution of the heavy metals was realized by means of the interpolation method of ordinary kriging. The results obtained and the experience gained in this work were necessary to facilitate the identification of soil contamination processes in high altitude areas of the Andes Western Cordillera (Peru) as a basis for taking appropriate

  15. Leveraging Multi-Sensor Time Series Datasets to Map Short- and Long-Term Tropical Forest Disturbances in the Colombian Andes

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    Paulo J. Murillo-Sandoval

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of disturbances in Andean tropical forests and protected areas has commonly been calculated using bi or tri-temporal analysis because of persistent cloud cover and complex topography. Long-term trends of vegetative decline (browning or improvement (greening have thus not been evaluated despite their importance for assessing conservation strategy implementation in regions where field-based monitoring by environmental authorities is limited. Using Colombia’s Cordillera de los Picachos National Natural Park as a case study, we provide a temporally rigorous assessment of regional vegetation change from 2001–2015 with two remote sensing-based approaches using the Breaks For Additive Season and Trend (BFAST algorithm. First, we measured long-term vegetation trends using a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-based Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC time series, and, second, we mapped short-term disturbances using all available Landsat images. MAIAC-derived trends indicate a net greening in 6% of the park, but in the surrounding 10 km area outside of the park, a net browning trend prevails at 2.5%. We also identified a 12,500 ha area within Picachos (4% of the park’s total area that has shown at least 13 years of consecutive browning, a result that was corroborated with our Landsat-based approach that recorded a 12,642 ha (±1440 ha area of disturbed forest within the park. Landsat vegetation disturbance results had user’s and producer’s accuracies of 0.95 ± 0.02 and 0.83 ± 0.18, respectively, and 75% of Landsat-detected dates of disturbance events were accurate within ±6 months. This study provides new insights into the contribution of short-term disturbance to long-term trends of vegetation change, and offers an unprecedented perspective on the distribution of small-scale disturbances over a 15-year period in one of the most inaccessible national parks in the Andes.

  16. Geochemical Background and Baseline Values Determination and Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soils of the Andes Mountain Range (Cajamarca-Huancavelica, Peru).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Martinez-Graña, Antonio; Alonso Rojo, Pilar; García Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-07-31

    Concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and one metalloid (As) as well as various parameters (pH, organic carbon, granulometric analysis and cation exchange capacity) were analyzed in 77 soil samples collected in the mining areas of La Zanja and Colquirrumi (Department of Cajamarca) and Julcani (Department of Huancavelica). Our study proposed geochemical baseline values for heavy metals in a natural region (La Zanja) from samples collected during the period of the environmental impact study (2006), that is, from an earlier period which occurred at the beginning of the exploitation of the current gold mine. The baseline values obtained were as follows: 8.26 mg kg-1 for Cr; 56.97 mg kg-1 for Ni; 22, 20 mg kg-1 for the Cu; 47.42 mg kg-1 for Zn; 27.50 mg kg-1 for As; 4.36 mg kg-1 for Cd; 4.89 mg kg-1 for Hg, and 44.87 mg kg-1 for Pb. Through the use of different indices of heavy metal contamination (geo-accumulation index (Igeo), improved Nemerow index (IIN) and potential ecological risk index (RI)), the degree of pollution caused by mining activities in two areas, Colquirrumi and Julcani, which have a high density of mining sites in operation, was determined. The values obtained from these indices indicated that the Colquirrumi region was the most contaminated, followed by Julcani. The area of La Zanja, despite being free of mining operations, presented slight diffuse pollution. Several positive correlations were obtained, with a high level of significance, between pH, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, and the Cr, Pb and Ni concentrations of the soils. The spatial distribution of the heavy metals was realized by means of the interpolation method of ordinary kriging. The results obtained and the experience gained in this work were necessary to facilitate the identification of soil contamination processes in high altitude areas of the Andes Western Cordillera (Peru) as a basis for taking appropriate measures when restoring

  17. Modelling and monitoring vegetation and evapotranspiration on an anthropogenic grassland succession in the Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Andes of southern Ecuador the infestation of pasture (mostly C4-grass Setaria sphacelata) by the aggressive bracken fern (Pteridium sp.) still is an unsolved problem. Environmental and exogenous factors and direct plant competition have been hypothesized to drive bracken occurrence. Special attention is given to pasture burning, which stimulates bracken growth, and is common in the relative dry season (Oct-Dec). However, no knowledge is available for a quantitative hypothesis investigation on bracken occurrence under current and future local climate. In this work a modeling approach is presented, in which initial investigations support the application of a two-big-leaf model, and parameterization and model forcing are made with extensive data on physiological traits and on the physical environment. Our main aims here are (i) to show field investigations on a plant scale, which are the basis for a proper model parameterization; and (ii) to provide initialization data, which is based on estimation of green leaf area index from very-high and high resolution optical remote sensing (air-photos and Quickbird images); (iii) to simulate vegetation succession after burn on an experimental site, using in situ climate data and future climate-change scenarios. The modeling approach is based in the main on the vegetation dynamic model called Southern Bracken Competition Model (SoBraCoMo), which has been coupled to a hydrological model written on the catchment model framework (CMF), to simulate soil-vegetation dynamics. Main initialization variables are biochemical parameters (quantum and carboxylation efficiency) and the green leaf area index (green-LAI). Forcing data include soil, leaf and air temperature, soil and air humidity and radiation. The model has been developed and tested on the experimental site (2100 m asl) in the Rio San Francisco Valley, Ecuador. Simulation results on the burn experiment of 2009 showed that stimulation by fire could not boost fern

  18. Amazon River dissolved load: temporal dynamics and annual budget from the Andes to the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Crave, Alain; Viers, Jérôme; Filizola, Naziano; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina; Sánchez, Liz Stefanny Hidalgo; Lagane, Christelle; Casimiro, Waldo Sven Lavado; Noriega, Luis; Pombosa, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to estimate the export fluxes of major dissolved species at the scale of the Amazon basin, to identify the main parameters controlling their spatial distribution and to identify the role of discharge variability in the variability of the total dissolved solid (TDS) flux through the hydrological cycle. Data are compiled from the monthly hydrochemistry and daily discharge database of the "Programa Climatologico y Hidrologico de la Cuenca Amazonica de Bolivia" (PHICAB) and the HYBAM observatories from 34 stations distributed over the Amazon basin (for the 1983-1992 and 2000-2012 periods, respectively). This paper consists of a first global observation of the fluxes and temporal dynamics of each geomorphological domain of the Amazon basin. Based on mean interannual monthly flux calculations, we estimated that the Amazon basin delivered approximately 272 × 10(6) t year(-1) (263-278) of TDS during the 2003-2012 period, which represents approximately 7 % of the continental inputs to the oceans. This flux is mainly made up by HCO3, Ca and SiO2, reflecting the preferential contributions of carbonate and silicate chemical weathering to the Amazon River Basin. The main tributaries contributing to the TDS flux are the Marañon and Ucayali Rivers (approximately 50 % of the TDS production over 14 % of the Amazon basin area) due to the weathering of carbonates and evaporites drained by their Andean tributaries. An Andes-sedimentary area-shield TDS flux (and specific flux) gradient is observed throughout the basin and is first explained by the TDS concentration contrast between these domains, rather than variability in runoff. This observation highlights that, under tropical context, the weathering flux repartition is primarily controlled by the geomorphological/geological setting and confirms that sedimentary areas are currently active in terms of the production of dissolved load. The log relationships of concentration vs discharge have

  19. Comparison of the chemical composition of Valeriana parviflora essential oils collected in the Venezuelan Andes in two different seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Sammy; Rondón, María; Rojas, Janne; Morales, Antonio; Rojas-Fermin, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of the aerial parts of Valerianaparviflora (Trevir) BM Vadillo, an endemic species of the Venezuelan Andes, collected from the same location in two different seasons (dry and rainy) of the year, were analyzed by GC/MS. The essential oil obtained during the dry season showed linalool (11.9%), eugenol (8.9%), p-menth-l-en-9-al (8.7%) and α-terpineol (7.7%) as main components, while the oil obtained from the rainy season collection showed o-xylol (16.2%), 3-methyl isovaleric acid (10.6%) and geranial (9.5%) as major compounds. Some of the differences in the composition of these oils might be due to the climatic conditions at the time of harvesting.

  20. A large and unusually colored new snake species of the genus Tantilla (Squamata; Colubridae) from the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    A new colubrid species of the genus Tantilla from the dry forest of the northern Peruvian Andes is described on the basis of two specimens, which exhibit a conspicuous sexual dimorphism. Tantilla tjiasmantoi sp. nov. represents the third species of the genus in Peru. The new species is easily distinguished from its congeners by the combination of scalation characteristics and the unusual transversely-banded color pattern on the dorsum. A detailed description of the skull morphology of the new species is given based on micro-computed tomography images. The habitat of this new species is gravely threatened due to human interventions. Conservation efforts are urgently needed in the inter-Andean valley of the Maranon River. PMID:27994975

  1. A large and unusually colored new snake species of the genus Tantilla (Squamata; Colubridae from the Peruvian Andes

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    Claudia Koch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new colubrid species of the genus Tantilla from the dry forest of the northern Peruvian Andes is described on the basis of two specimens, which exhibit a conspicuous sexual dimorphism. Tantilla tjiasmantoi sp. nov. represents the third species of the genus in Peru. The new species is easily distinguished from its congeners by the combination of scalation characteristics and the unusual transversely-banded color pattern on the dorsum. A detailed description of the skull morphology of the new species is given based on micro-computed tomography images. The habitat of this new species is gravely threatened due to human interventions. Conservation efforts are urgently needed in the inter-Andean valley of the Maranon River.

  2. Description of Thecavermiculatus andinus n.sp. (Meloidoderidae), a Round Cystoid Nematode from the Andes Mountains of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, A M; Franco, J; Jatala, P; Astogaza, E

    1983-07-01

    Thecavermiculatus andinus n.sp. is described and illustrated from Oxalis tuberosa originally collected in the vicinity of Lake Titicaca high in the Andes mountains of southern Peru. This new species differs markedly front the other two species in the genus, especially in having a much greater female vulval-anal distance and annules with lined punctation on most of the female body with a lacelike pattern restricted to the posterior portion, particularly at the vulva and anus which do not protrude. Females are essentially spherical with protruding neck, white to yellowish in color, and can easily be mistaken for potato cyst nematodes. Among the dozen or more known weed and crop host plants are potato and eggplant. In order to accommodate this new species, the genus Thecavermieulatus is emended. A key to the species of this genus is presented.

  3. A new species of the Pristimantis orestes group (Amphibia: Strabomantidae) from the high Andes of Ecuador, Reserva Mazar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guayasamin, Juan M; Arteaga, Alejandro F

    2013-02-21

    We describe a new Pristimantis from La Libertad and Rumiloma, Reserva Mazar, Andes of Southeastern Ecuador, at elevations between 2895-3415 m. This species is assigned to the P. orestes group, from whose members it differs by its small body size (adult males ≤ 18.1 mm; adult females ≤ 23.7 mm), usually reticulated ventral pattern, and visible tympanum. The vocalization of the new species consists of a series of calls; each call is composed by a pulsed, non-modulated note in frequency, and with a dominant frequency of 3122-3171 Hz. A molecular phylogeny based on a fragment of the mitochondrial gene 12S shows that the new species is sister to Pristimantis simonbolivari.

  4. A large and unusually colored new snake species of the genus Tantilla (Squamata; Colubridae) from the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Claudia; Venegas, Pablo J

    2016-01-01

    A new colubrid species of the genus Tantilla from the dry forest of the northern Peruvian Andes is described on the basis of two specimens, which exhibit a conspicuous sexual dimorphism. Tantilla tjiasmantoi sp. nov. represents the third species of the genus in Peru. The new species is easily distinguished from its congeners by the combination of scalation characteristics and the unusual transversely-banded color pattern on the dorsum. A detailed description of the skull morphology of the new species is given based on micro-computed tomography images. The habitat of this new species is gravely threatened due to human interventions. Conservation efforts are urgently needed in the inter-Andean valley of the Maranon River.

  5. Evidence for a cosmogenic origin of fired glaciofluvial beds in the northwestern Andes: Correlation with experimentally heated quartz and feldspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, William C.; Krinsley, David; Kalm, Volli

    2010-11-01

    Fired sediment, considered equivalent to the 'Black Mat' impact of 12.9 ka, has been located and analyzed in the Andes of northwestern Venezuela. The 'Black Mat' refers to possible fallout from the Encke Comet airburst presumed to have occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet, the impact spreading ejecta over large portions of North America and Europe, making it an interhemispheric event of considerable magnitude. These possible equivalent beds in the northern Andes, first considered to result from a lightning-induced conflagration adjacent to the retreating Late Wisconsinan (Mérida Glaciation) ice, are now known to have undergone intense heating upon impact to a temperature much higher than what would occur in a wet, first-stage, successional tundra. Analyses carried out by SEM and FESEM, in SE and BSE modes, show massive micro-disruption on grain surfaces, fractures diminishing with depth toward grain interiors and C welded onto quartz and plagioclase minerals. Bubbles on some grains, possibly the result of exclusion of water-of-crystallization, are seen on some samples, principally quartz. The presence of copious monazite in the carbonaceous coatings is considered part of the incoming ejecta, as it is not a common indicator mineral in the local lithology. Analysis by SEM and FESEM of quartz and plagioclase subjected experimentally to temperatures ranging from 500 to 900 °C shows that intense heating affects resident mineralogies to differing extents, with grain disruption more prevalent along cleavage planes deep into grain interiors. The intergrowth of carbonaceous "black mat" material with thermally disrupted and fragmented quartz and feldspar, a "welded" patina of 100-400 nm thickness could only occur with temperatures in excess of 900 °C, the event interpreted here to be of cosmogenic origin.

  6. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Martha; Grajales, Alejandro; Sierra, Roberto; Rojas, Alejandro; González-Almario, Adriana; Vargas, Angela; Marín, Mauricio; Fermín, Gustavo; Lagos, Luz E; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Bernal, Adriana; Salazar, Camilo; Restrepo, Silvia

    2011-02-09

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana) and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum), all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a) and one mitochondrial (Cox1) region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  7. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region

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    Grünwald Niklaus J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum, all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a and one mitochondrial (Cox1 region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Results Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. Conclusions The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  8. Review article of the current state of glaciers in the tropical Andes: a multi-century perspective on glacier evolution and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatel, A.; Francou, B.; Soruco, A.; Gomez, J.; Cáceres, B.; Ceballos, J. L.; Basantes, R.; Vuille, M.; Sicart, J.-E.; Huggel, C.; Scheel, M.; Lejeune, Y.; Arnaud, Y.; Collet, M.; Condom, T.; Consoli, G.; Favier, V.; Jomelli, V.; Galarraga, R.; Ginot, P.; Maisincho, L.; Mendoza, J.; Ménégoz, M.; Ramirez, E.; Ribstein, P.; Suarez, W.; Villacis, M.; Wagnon, P.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide the community with a comprehensive overview of the studies of glaciers in the tropical Andes conducted in recent decades leading to the current status of the glaciers in the context of climate change. In terms of changes in surface area and length, we show that the glacier retreat in the tropical Andes over the last three decades is unprecedented since the maximum extension of the LIA (mid 17th-early 18th century). In terms of changes in mass balance, although there have been some sporadic gains on several glaciers, we show that the trend has been quite negative over the past 50 yr, with a mean mass balance deficit for glaciers in the tropical Andes that is slightly more negative than the computed global average. A break point in the trend appeared in the late 1970s with mean annual mass balance per year decreasing from -0.2 m w.e. in the period 1964-1975 to -0.76 m w.e. in the period 1976-2010. In addition, even if glaciers are currently retreating everywhere in the tropical Andes, it should be noted that as a percentage, this is much more pronounced on small glaciers at low altitudes that do not have a permanent accumulation zone, and which could disappear in the coming years/decades. Monthly mass balance measurements performed in Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia showed that variability of the surface temperature of the Pacific Ocean is the main factor governing variability of the mass balance variability at the interannual to decadal time scale. Precipitation did not display a significant trend in the tropical Andes in the 20th century, and consequently cannot explain the glacier recession. On the other hand, temperature increased at a significant rate of 0.10 °C decade-1 in the last 70 yr. The higher frequency of El Niño events and changes in its spatial and temporal occurrence since the late 1970s together with a warming troposphere over the tropical Andes may thus explain much of the recent dramatic shrinkage of glaciers in

  9. Ecología y ocupación del espacio en los Andes Tropicales durante los últimos veinte milenios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available Les Andes tropicales sont constituées par un ensemble de facettes écologiques dont le nombre est fonction du volume montagneux, du régime thermique a la base, de la diversité des modelés, du stock floristique, des effets de façade et d'abri, des modalités d'utilisation de l'espace. L'utilisation de ces facettes par les sociétés d'abord non agricoles, ensuite agricoles, a été très différente. Dans cette zone climatique les changements du climat au cours du Quaternaire ont moins affecté le milieu qu'aux latitudes moyennes, a l'exception des cotes touchées par les variations eustatiques. Aussi, une remarque importante est la constance de l'habitat au cours des 20 derniers millénaires, variant cependant en fonction des diverses facettes écologiques dont le comportement était différent suivant les modifications climatiques. Les glaciations dans les Andes sont relativement synchrones de celles des montagnes des latitudes moyennes, au moins pour le Quaternaire récent elles seraient dues a une meilleure distribution des précipitations au cours de l'année, a une nébulosité plus constante et a un abaissement des températures compris entre 5 et 9º.