WorldWideScience

Sample records for andes iahula 1974-2005

  1. Andes 1997 Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Central Andes gravity data (6,151 records) were compiled by Professor Gotze and the MIGRA Group. This data base was received in April, 1997. Principal gravity...

  2. History of Lake Andes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Information about the history and management of Lake Andes is compiled in this report. It is intended to help future refuge managers become acquainted with the...

  3. Mujeres de los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Arango, Luz Gabriela; Arizabaleta de García, María Teresa; Bejarano, Nilse; Borchart de Moreno, Christiana; Bucheli, Rocío Vaca; Cervantes, Elvira Llanos; Cisneros, Tatiana; Defossez, Anne-Claire; Fassin, Didier; Giraldo, Fernando Urrea; Li, Dina; Malaver, José; Montúfar, Verónica; Moscoso, Martha; Ortega, Diego Zapata

    2016-01-01

    El Seminario "Mujeres De Los Andes: Condiciones De Vida Y Salud" tuvo lugar en la ciudad de Quito, del 6 al 10 de junio de 1991. Reunió investigadores de distintas disciplinas académicas y actores de variados campos, de cuatro países del área andina-Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador y Perú-, en los cuales está presente el Instituto Francés de Estudios Andinos, principal instigador del evento. Este libro, que reúne la mayor parte de las ponencias en él presentadas, se inscribe en la línea de las corr...

  4. 77 FR 65574 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Complex. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (72 FR 27328; May, 15, 2007... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft... assessment (EA) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex), which includes Lake Andes...

  5. Charles Darwin in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; Bizzo, Luis Eduardo Maestrelli

    2006-01-01

    Considering geological time as an important epistemological obstacle to the construction of ideas on biological evolution, a study was carried out on the so-called "Darwin Papers". The conclusion was that Charles Darwin's excursion in the Andes during March-April 1835 was a crucial step in this regard. An expedition was carried out in March-April…

  6. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... review and comment following the announcement in the Federal Register on October 29, 2012 ] (77 FR 65574... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final... conservation plan and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife...

  7. The ANDES Deep Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Bertou, X

    2013-01-01

    ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) is a unique opportunity to build a deep underground laboratory in the southern hemisphere. It will be built in the Agua Negra tunnel planned between Argentina and Chile, and operated by the CLES, a Latin American consortium. With 1750m of rock overburden, and no close- by nuclear power plant, it will provide an extremely radiation quiet environment for neutrino and dark matter experiments. In particular, its location in the southern hemisphere should play a major role in understanding dark matter modulation signals.

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1997 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : Updated- 2003 annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1996 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins...

  11. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1999 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins...

  12. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1994 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins...

  13. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1995 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins...

  14. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1998 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins...

  15. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 2000 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000 calendar year. The report begins...

  16. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1961. Existing water supplies are tabulated for each of the four units providing numbers for...

  17. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2009. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  18. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1988. General water uses are discussed for 1988 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  19. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2013. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  20. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1998. General water uses are discussed for 1998 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  1. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1964. Existing water supplies are tabulated for each of the four units providing numbers for...

  2. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1989. General water uses are discussed for 1989 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  3. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2006. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  4. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2000. General water uses are discussed for 2000 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  5. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1982. General water uses are discussed for 1982 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  6. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1984. General water uses are discussed for 1984 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  7. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1966. General water uses are discussed for 1966 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  8. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1963. Existing water supplies are tabulated for each of the four units providing numbers for...

  9. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2008. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  10. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1959. Appears to just be the correspondence letter to the regional supervisor with some data on...

  11. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2005. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  12. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1993. General water uses are discussed for 1993 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  13. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1971. General water uses are discussed for 1971 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  14. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1965. General water uses are discussed for 1965 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  15. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2010. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  16. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2007. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  17. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1990. General water uses are discussed for 1990 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  18. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1968. General water uses are discussed for 1968 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  19. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1970. General water uses are discussed for 1970 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  20. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1995. General water uses are discussed for 1995 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  1. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1960. A short summary of water rights is provided. Existing water supplies, as of January 1961,...

  2. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1969. General water uses are discussed for 1969 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  3. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1947. It provides a table of each unit along with the crest of spill elevation and a recommended...

  4. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1991. General water uses are discussed for 1991 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  5. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2012. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  6. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1999. General water uses are discussed for 1999 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  7. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1994. General water uses are discussed for 1994 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  8. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1983. General water uses are discussed for 1983 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  9. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1987. General water uses are discussed for 1987 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  10. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2004. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report management plan. These forms cover...

  11. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1992. General water uses are discussed for 1992 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  12. Active tectonics of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, J. F.; Lamb, S. H.

    1992-04-01

    Nearly 90 mm a -1 of relative plate convergence is absorbed in the Andean plate-boundary zone. The pattern of active tectonics shows remarkable variations in the way in which the plate slip vector is partitioned into displacement and strain and the ways in which compatibility between different segments is solved. Along any traverse across the plate-boundary zone, the sum of relative velocities between points must equal the relative plate motion. We have developed a kinematic synthesis of displacement and strain partitioning in the Andes from 47°S to 5°N relevant for the last 5 Ma based upon: (1) relative plate motion deduced from oceanic circuits giving a roughly constant azimuth between 075 and 080; (2) moment tensor solutions for over 120 crustal earthquakes since 1960; (3) structural studies of deformed Plio-Pleistocene rocks; (4) topographic/geomorphic studies; (5) palaeomagnetic data; and (6) geodetic data. We recognize four neotectonic zones, with subzones and boundary transfer zones, that are partitioned in different ways. These zones are not coincident with the 'classic' zones defined by the presence or absence of a volcanic chain or differences in finite displacements and strains and tectonic form; the long-term segmentation and finite evolution of the Andes may not occur in constantly defined segments in space and time. In Segment 1 (47°-39°S), the slip vector is partitioned into roughly orthogonal Benioff Zone slip with large magnitude/large slip-surface earthquakes and both distributed dextral shear giving clockwise rotations of up to 50° and dextral slip in the curved Liquine-Ofqui Fault System giving 5°-10° of anticlockwise fore-arc rotation. In Segment 2 (39°-20°S), the slip vector is partitioned into Benioff Zone slip roughly parallel with the slip vector, Andean crustal shortening and a very small component of dextral slip, including that on the Atacama Fault System. Between 39° and 34°S, a cross-strike dextral transfer, which deflects

  13. Fishery Management Plan for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an artificial outlet structure that lowered the water level by 13 feet. Since Lake Andes is...

  14. Recreational Fishery Management Plan for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Current condition of lake Andes (1996) and highlights potential problems and recommendations for improving the lake as a hatchery. Lake Andes was a much larger body...

  15. Fish Population Investigation: Lake Andes, Charles Mix County

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brief background on Lake Andes fishing history, and data on current fish populations. Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an...

  16. Identificación de Hantavirus Andes en Rattus norvegicus Identification of Andes Hantavirus in Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Fernández

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En Chile y Argentina la especie Oligoryzomys longicaudatus ha sido identificada como el principal reservorio para Virus Andes (ANDV. El objetivo de este trabajo es reportar la presencia del virus Andes en Rattus norvergicus, roedor urbano recolectado de un muestreo en San Diego del Cristo, comuna de Melipilla, Región Metropolitana. La presencia del virus Andes en Rattus norvegicus podría indicar la importancia de otros roedores como eventuales vectores virales.In Chile and Argentina Oligoryzomys longicaudatus has been identified as the main reservoir for Hantavirus Andes. The aim of this work was to report the presence of Hantavirus Andes in Rattus norvegicus, an urban rodent collected during sampling in San Diego del Cristo, Melipilla, Metropolitan Region. The existence of Hantavirus Andes in Rattus norvegicus could indicate the importance of other rodents as possible viral vectors.

  17. LANDSAT imagery of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komer, C. A.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    The central Andes of South America extend from approximately 14 deg. S to 28 deg. S as an unbroken chain of mountains and volcanoes over 2000 km long. It is here that the Nazca plate dives under the South American plate at angles varying from 10 deg to 30 deg. Very little is known about the volcanoes comprising this classic, subduction-type plate margin. A catalogue of the volcanoes in the central Andes is being prepared by Dr. P.W. Francis and Dr. C.A. Wood at the NASA Lunar and Planetary Institute. At present, more than 800 volcanoes of Cenozoic age have been recognized in the chain, with an estimated 75-80 major, active Quarternary volcanoes. Approximately one hundred 1536 x 1536 pixel color composite Optronics positives were produced from six full LANDSAT Thermatic Mapper scenes and three partial TM scenes. These positives cover a large portion of the central Andes. The positives were produced from LANDSAT data using the VAX imaging package, LIPS. The scenes were first transferred from magnetic tape to disk. The LIPS package was then used to select volcanically interesting areas which were then electronically enhanced. Finally, the selected areas were transferred back to tape and printed on the Optronics equipment. The pictures are color composites using LANDSAT TM bands 7,4, and 2 in the red, green, and blue filters, respectively.

  18. Changing Student Attitudes using Andes, An Intelligent Homework System

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Brett; Vanlehn, Kurt; Treacy, Don; Shelby, Bob; Wintersgill, Mary

    2007-03-01

    The size of introductory physics lectures often inhibits personal homework assistance and timely corrective feedback. Andes, an intelligent homework help system designed for two semesters of introductory physics, can fill this need by encouraging students to use sound problem solving techniques and providing immediate feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes provides principles-based hints based on previous student actions. A multi-year study at the U.S. Naval Academy demonstrates that students using Andes perform better than students working the same problems as graded pencil and paper homeworks. In addition, student attitude surveys show that Andes is preferred over other homework systems. These findings have implications for student attitudes toward, and mastery of, physics. See http://www.andes.pitt.edu for more information.

  19. Annual narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, and Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Calendar year 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This collection of monthly activity reports summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR during the 1975 calendar year. Resource...

  20. Lake Andes Easement Refuges: Narrative report: September to December, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR between September and December of 1946. Water conditions, waterfowl, furbearers, maintenance and...

  1. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report...

  2. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report...

  3. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report...

  4. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report...

  5. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report...

  6. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report...

  7. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report...

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins...

  11. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins...

  12. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins...

  13. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report...

  14. Climate variability of the tropical Andes since the late Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bräuning

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Available proxy records witnessing palaeoclimate of the tropical Andes are comparably scarce. Major implications of palaeoclimate development in the humid and arid parts of the Andes are briefly summarized. The long-term behaviour of ENSO has general significance for the climatic history of the Andes due to its impact on regional circulation patterns and precipitation regimes, therefore ENSO history derived from non-Andean palaeo-records is highlighted. Methodological constraints of the chronological precision and the palaeoclimatic interpretation of records derived from different natural archives, such as glacier sediments and ice cores, lake sediments and palaeo-wetlands, pollen profiles and tree rings are addressed and complementary results concerning former climatic conditions are discussed in terms of possible implications of former atmospheric circulation patterns and main climatic forcing factors. During the last years, increasing tree-ring information is getting available from the tropical Andes, providing high-resolution climate-sensitive records covering the past centuries for the study of climate variability.

  15. Lithospheric scale model of Merida Andes, Venezuela (GIAME Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, M.; Orihuela, N. D.; Klarica, S.; Gil, E.; Levander, A.; Audemard, F. A.; Mazuera, F.; Avila, J.

    2013-05-01

    Merida Andes (MA) is one of the most important orogenic belt in Venezuela and represents the northern culmination of South America Andes. During the last 60 years, several models have been proposed to explain the shallow and deep structure, using different geological, geophysical, seismological, geochemical and petrologic concepts; nevertheless, most of them have applied local observation windows, and do not represent the major structure of MA. Therefore, a multidisciplinary research group, coordinated by FUNVISIS, in close cooperation with UCV, ULA and PDVSA, is proposed in order to get the outlined goals in the project entitled GIAME ("Geociencia Integral de los Andes de MErida") was established, which aims to generate a lithospheric scale model and the development of a temporal dynamic model for the MA. As a base for lithospheric investigations of the Merida Andes, we are proposing three wide angle seismic profiles across the orogen on three representative sites, in order to determine the inner structure and its relation with the orogen's gravimetric root. To the date, there are no seismic studies at lithospheric scale which cross MA. The wide angle seismic will be complemented with the re-processing and re-interpretation of existing reflection seismic data, which will allow to establish a relationship between MA and its associated flexural basins (Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins). Depending on the results of the VENCORP Project (VENezuelan COntinental Reflection Profiling), which might show some reliable results about crustal features and Moho reflectors along three long seismic profiles at Caribbean Moutain system, a reflection seismic profile across the central portion of MA is proposed. Additional tasks, consisting in MA quaternary deformation studies, using research methods like neotectonics and paleoseismology, georadar, numerical modeling, cinematic GPS, SAR interferometry, thermocronology, detailed studies on regional geology, flexural modeling

  16. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Ande...

  17. Glacier shrinkage and water resources in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Bernard; Coudrain, Anne

    For more than a century glaciers around the world have been melting as air temperatures rise due to a combination of natural processes and human activity. The disappearance of these glaciers can have wide-ranging effects, such as the creation of new natural hazards or changes in stream flow that could threaten water suppliesSome of the most dramatic melting has occurred in the Andes mountain range in South America. To highlight the climatic and glacial change in the Andes and to encourage the scientific community to strengthen the glacier observation network that stretches from Colombia to the Patagonian ice fields, the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Naturales (INRENA), Perú, and the Institute of Research and Development (IRD), France, recently organized the second Symposium on Mass Balance of Andean Glaciers in Huaráz,Perú.

  18. Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M. T.; Tomkin, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes The concept of a "glacial buzzsaw" was spawned by Steve Porter's observation in 1977 and 1988 that the "equilibrium line altitude" (ELA) for alpine glaciation in the Andes parallels the summit elevations of the range. The modern ELA in the Patagonian Andes drops from about 4.5 km at 30 S to about 1 km at 50 S, due to colder temperatures at higher latitudes. The summit elevations decrease steadily by a similar amount over this 2200 km distance. The landscape of the western side of the Patagonian Andes clearly shows that it has long been dominated by glacial erosion. Locally preserved tills indicate that alpine glaciation was active at 7 to 4.6 Ma, if not earlier. The idea of a glacial buzzsaw is that erosion by alpine glaciers is aggressive enough to limit the height of a mountain range. Fission-track cooling ages indicate modest long-term erosion rates (~0.5 to 1 km/Ma) for the Patagonian Andes, which precludes the possibility that the range was trimmed down to size by Quaternary- age glaciations. Furthermore, the range shows clear evidence of growth by continental subduction and tectonic accretion along its eastern margin. Evidence for recent tectonic shortening is based on the observation that the range has an approximately constant taper, as expected for a critical wedge. The width of the range decreases southward in parallel with the decreasing summit elevations. We have developed a general analytical model for coupled wedge growth and glacial erosion that accounts for much of the tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Andes. The model is based on an actively accreting wedge that maintains a constant taper geometry. The size of the wedge is controlled by competition between accretion and glacial erosion. Recent work by one of us (JHT) and Gerard Roe shows that the erosional yield caused by alpine glaciation is approximately proportional to the local elevation difference between the summit of the range and the

  19. Evolution of Parinacota volcano, Central Andes, Northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Clavero R.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Parinacota is an active composite stratovolcano located in the Central Andes of Northern Chile (18°S. During its earlier stage (Parinacota 1 unit, Late Pleistocene, 300-70? ka rhyolitic to andesitic magmas were erupted, forming a voluminous lava-dome complex with its associated pyroclastic fans (mainly block-and-ash flow deposits, essentially deposited towards the Upper Lauca basin (West. It later evolved to a steep-sided composite stratocone (Parinacota 2 unit, Late Pleistocene-Holocene, 70?-8 ka, mainly formed by andesitic lava flows and scoria tephra fallout deposits.Around 8 ka ago the ancestral Parinacota volcano, built during Parinacota 1 and 2, partially collapsed towards the west, in a single and catastrophic event generating the outstanding Parinacota Debris Avalanche deposit.Soon after the collapse a new stratocone started to build with the emission of andesitic lava flows and pyroclastic flows, and their associated fallout deposits (Parinacota 3 unit, Holocene, La evolución del volcán Parinacota, Andes Centrales, norte de Chile. El volcán Parinacota es un estratovolcán activo ubicado en los Andes Centrales del norte de Chile (18°S. Durante su primera etapa de evolución (Unidad Parinacota 1, Pleistoceno Superior, 300-70? ka emitió magmas de composición riolítica a andesítica, formando un voluminoso complejo de lavas-domo con abanicos piroclásticos asociados (esencialmente depósitos de bloques y ceniza, distribuidos principalmente hacia la parte superior de la cuenca del río Lauca (oeste. Posteriormente, evolucionó a un estratocono compuesto, de fuertes pendientes (Unidad Parinacota 2, Pleistoceno-Holoceno, 70?-8 ka, formado principalmente por lavas y depósitos de caída andesíticos. Aproximadamente hace 8 ka el volcán Parinacota ancestral, construido durante las unidades Parinacota 1 y 2, colapsó parcialmente hacia el oeste, en un evento único y catastrófico generando el Depósito de Avalancha de Parinacota. Poco

  20. Rapid millennial-scale vegetation changes in the tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Urrego

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare eight pollen records reflecting climatic and environmental change from the tropical Andes. Our analysis focuses on the last 50 ka, with particular emphasis on the Pleistocene to Holocene transition. We explore ecological grouping and downcore ordination results as two approaches for extracting environmental variability from pollen records. We also use the records of aquatic and shoreline vegetation as markers for lake level fluctuations, and precipitation change. Our analysis focuses on the signature of millennial-scale variability in the tropical Andes, in particular, Heinrich stadials and Greenland interstadials. We identify rapid responses of the tropical vegetation to this climate variability, and relate differences between sites to moisture sources and site sensitivity.

  1. Zeolitización de rocas andesíticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plana, F.

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of some andesites from King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Anctartica has pointed out the existence of a hydrothermal alteration process going rise to a zeolitic secondary minerals of low-temperature assemblages. Two paragenesis have been identified (Smectite-Bytownite-Mordenite, Smectite-Albite-Laumontite which reflecting different conditions durign the hydrothermal alteration of these andesitic rocksEl estudio de rocas andesíticas de la Isla King George (Archipiélago de las Shetland del Sur, Antártida pone de manifiesto la existencia de procesos de alteración hidrotermal con la formación de minerales zeolíticos secundarios pertenecientes a asociaciones de baja temperatura. Se han identificado dos paragénesis (Esmectitas-Bytownita-Mordenita, Esmectitas-AlbitaLaumontita que reflejan distintas condiciones durante la alteración hidrotermal de dichas rocas andesíticas.

  2. Moho topography in the central Andes and its geodynamic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohui Yuan; S. V. Sobolev; Rainer Kind

    2002-01-01

    P-to-S converted waves at the continental Moho together with waves multiply reflected between the Earth's surface and the Moho have been used to estimate the Moho depth and average crustal Vp/Vs variations in the central Andes. Our analysis confirms and significantly complements the Moho depth estimates previously obtained from wide-angle seismic studies and receiver functions. The resulting crustal thickness varies from about 35 km in the forearc region to more than 70 km beneath the plateau...

  3. Diversification of clearwing butterflies with the rise of the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    De-Silva, D. L.; Ellias, M.; Wilmott, K.; Mallet, J; Day, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Despite the greatest butterfly diversity on Earth occurring in the Neotrop- ical Andes and Amazonia, there is still keen debate about the origins of this exceptional biota. A densely sampled calibrated phylogeny for a widespread butterfly subtribe, Oleriina (Nymphalidae: Ithomiini) was used to estimate the origin, colonization history and diversification of this species-rich group. Location Neotropics. Methods Ancestral elevation and biogeographical ranges were reconstructed using data ge...

  4. A Younger Dryas glacierization in the Venezuelan Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, N. D.; Abbott, M. B.; Polissar, P. J.; Bezada, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) was an abrupt climate change event that has been well recorded in marine archives, but is still uncertain in terrestrial records from the tropics. For instance, the YD is recorded in the Cariaco Basin as an event of increased upwelling intensity and decreased terrigenous input; however continental records of a coincident climate change event across the region are inconclusive. Moreover, pollen data from the Colombian Andes suggest that there was a local cold stadial that coincides with the YD, but paleoenvironmental records from the Venezuelan Andes during the same time interval are not clear. Here we present a high-resolution late- glacial sequence from the Pico Espejo region of Venezuela. Our record is based on radiocarbon dated lake sediments that were analyzed using magnetic susceptibility, scanning X-ray fluorescence and loss-on-ignition methods. The sequence contains a period of increased glacial-sedimentary flux between ca. 13,000 and 12,000 cal yr BP, which coincides with the timing of the YD. Glacio-lacustrine sediments also increased between ca. 11,000 to 10,000 cal yr BP. Combined, these data suggest the northern tropical Andes experienced cooling events during the YD, and from ca. 11,000 to 10,000 cal yr BP.

  5. 3D density model of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezzi, Claudia B.; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Schmidt, Sabine

    2009-12-01

    We developed a 3D density model of the continental crust, the subducted plate and the upper mantle of the Central Andes between 20-29°S and 74-61°W through the forward modelling of Bouguer anomaly. The goal of this contribution is to gain insight on the lithospheric structure integrating the available information (geophysical, geologic, petrologic, and geochemical) in a single model. The geometry of our model is defined and constrained by hypocentre location, reflection and refraction on and offshore seismic lines, travel time and attenuation tomography, receiver function analysis, magnetotelluric studies, thermal models and balanced structural cross-sections. The densities allocated to the different bodies are calculated considering petrologic and geochemical data and pressure and temperature conditions. The model consists of 31 parallel E-W vertical planes, where the continental crust comprises distinct bodies, which represent the different morphotectonic units of the Central Andes. We include a partial melting zone at midcrustal depths under the Altiplano-Puna (low-velocity zone) and consider the presence of a rheologically strong block beneath the Salar de Atacama basin, according to recent seismic studies. Contour maps of the depth of the continental Moho, the thickness of the lower crust and the depth to the bottom of the lithosphere below South America are produced. The possible percentage of partial melt in the Central Andes low-velocity zone is estimated. The residual anomaly is calculated by subtracting from the Bouguer anomaly the gravimetric effect of the modelled subducted slab and of the modelled Moho. Isostatic anomalies are calculated from regional and local isostatic Mohos calculated with and without internal loads, derived from our gravity model, which are then compared to the modelled continental Moho. This study contributes to a more detailed knowledge of the lithospheric structure of this region of the Andes and provides an integrated 3D

  6. Vegetation and climatic changes in the Merida Andes during the last 13.000 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the paleoecological results from the Merida Andes, in Venezuela, including different elevations and different mountain ranges is presented. The purpose of this paper is to organize and compare the data from seven stratigraphic sections from Merida Andes in order to identify changes in vegetation and climate in the last 13,000 years. (author)

  7. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Andes. These studies documented a range of impacts on vegetation, birds and mammals; including changes in plant species richness, composition and vegetation cover and the tolerance of wildlife of visitor use. There was little research on the impacts of visitors on soils and aquatic systems and for some ecoregions in the Andes. We identify research priorities across the region that will enhance management strategies to minimise visitor impacts in Andean ecosystems. PMID:25201299

  8. The Iconography of Painted Ceramics from the Northern Andes Title: La iconografía de la cerámica pintada del norte de los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Cárdenas-Arroyo

    1998-01-01

    Felipe Cárdenas-Arroyo, arqueólogo colombiano de la Universidad de Los Andes en Bogotá, erudito de CASVA, especialista en momificación pre-hispánica de huesos humanos.Abstract: Felipe Cárdenas-Arroyo, Colombian archaeologist from the University of Los Andes in Bogotá, CASVA scholar, specialist in pre-Hispanic mummification and human bone.

  9. Capitulo 11. Inseguridad, disturbios y violencia en los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Dollfus, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    La violencia en la historia Que los Andes hayan sido lugares de violencia en el transcurso de los siglos no tiene nada de sorprendente; es ahí donde se encontraban los hombres o por lo menos la mayoría de ellos, es ahí donde estallaban los conflictos y se resolvían después de batallas y represiones. Guerras de la Conquista, donde en cada campo se encontraban indios y hasta españoles a veces; rebeliones “indias” del fin del siglo xviii, de Túpac Amaru en la región del Cusco a Túpac Katari en e...

  10. Large amplitude waves detected with balloons near the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Giraldez, A.

    Spectral results from a vertical sounding of temperature and wind velocity performed with an open stratospheric balloon in Argentina near the Andes mountains between 12 and 25 km of altitude, are reported. The use of sonic anemometers allows for a higher resolution than in previous experiments. The data records are studied in successive subintervals, yielding a good spectral correlation between the ascent and the descent around and below the tropopause. The possibilities of an orographic origin for large amplitude modes observed in the spectra and of wave generation by non linear interactions between them are discussed.

  11. Mujeres de los andes: condiciones de vida y salud

    OpenAIRE

    Defossez, Anne-Claire; Bassin, Didier; Viveros, Mara; Sánchez Parga, José; Vaca Bucheli, Rocío; Llanos Cervantes, Elvira; Li, Dina; Urra Giraldo, Fernando; Zapata Arteaga, Diego; Poloni, Jacques; Moscoso, Martha; Bejarano, Nilse; Arango, Luz Gabriela; Palomino, Nancy; Borchart de Moreno, Cristiana

    1992-01-01

    El Seminario "Mujeres de los Andes: condiciones de vida y salud" tuvo lugar en la ciudad de Quito, del 6 al 10 de junio de 1991, reunió investigadores de distintas disciplinas académicas y actores de variados campos, de cuatro países del área andina Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador y Perú-, en los cuales está presente el Instituto Francés de Estudios Andinos, principal instigador del evento. Este libro, que reúne la mayor parte de las ponencias en él presentadas, se inscribe en la línea de las cor...

  12. The largest holocene eruption of the Central Andes found

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; J. Saavedra; Perez-Torrado, J. F.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Carracedo, Juan Carlos; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading 110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high conte...

  13. Giant evaporite belts of the Neogene central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Ricardo N.; Jordan, Teresa E.; Tabbutt, Kenneth T.; Vandervoort, Dirk S.

    1991-04-01

    Large volumes of continental evaporites accumulated within the central Andes during Neogene uplift of the Altiplano-Puna plateau and development of the Andean volcanic arc. Halite and gypsum are dominant minerals, along with local and economically important borates. Playa conditions have existed since ca. 15 Ma; halite and borate deposition has occurred for the past 7 to 8 m.y. Evaporites formed in salar environments (e.g., playa lakes) and are characterized by complex mineral assemblages, occurrence, zonation, and geochemistry. Evaporite deposition was controlled by volcanism, geothermal activity, closed drainage, and climate. These Andean deposits, and their controls, differ from evaporites in other continental and marine environments.

  14. Desde los Andes al Orinoco y al Amazonas

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Escobar, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    La Orinoquia y la Amazonia con su considerable red hídrica natural y cadena de valor, esperan ver consolidadas dos rutas que pasando por los Andes articulen el Atlántico y el Pacífico, conformando dos corredores logísticos que avanzarían a Bogotá por el río Meta y a Quito por el río Napo; proyectos vitales para la integración de América del Sur y para la identidad y desarrollo de dichas regiones que comprenden el 46,7 % de la superficie sudamericana

  15. Ophiolites in the Eastern Cordillera of the central Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Castroviejo Bolibar, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Feliciano; Tassinari, Colombo G.; Pereira, Eurico; Acosta, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    A discoutinuous NNW-SSE trending belt of scattered ultraiuafic (UM) and subordínate mafic (M) rocks ís exposed alona some 250 km in the Eastern Cordillera of the peruvian Andes (Junin and Huanuco Departnients. -°"-12° S). New data questiou tlieír pieviousty assuuned [1.2] intrusive origin. Work, in progress shows tLat the essential geologic and tecronk featiires are comnion to most of them, as will t e shown on the southeniniost occurrences: Tapo and Acobaniba (Tarraa proviuce). The Tapo mass...

  16. Heinrich I and Younger Dryas Glaciation in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, J.; Zech, R.; May, J.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2009-12-01

    Short term climate reversals, such as Heinrich I (H-I) and the Younger Dryas (YD), are well documented in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the respective response of the climate system in the Southern Hemisphere during these events remains enigmatic. Here we present 10Be surface exposure ages from the Wara Wara Valley (17°S, 66°W), Cordillera Cochabamba, that reveal glacial advances in the Central Andes before 14.3 ka and 11.9 ka. These advances correlate with H-I and YD and coincide with the lake transgression phases Tauca (18-14 ka) and Coipasa (13-11 ka) on the Altiplano. They corroborate the precipitation sensitivity of glacier mass balances in the semi-arid Central Andes. We suggest that sufficient moisture for glacial advances can be explained by enhanced upper tropospheric easterlies as a response to an intensified tropical circulation and sustained la Niña like patterns in the eastern Pacific. This redistribution of the ocean and atmospheric circulation was caused by a southward shift of the ITCZ due to northern hemispheric cooling. At 10.8 ka glacier advanced again attributed to increased moisture supply by enhanced polar advection and SE trade winds during the Early Holocene. Final deglaciation started only at 9.2 ka induced by a change to drier conditions.

  17. Suicide in the Philippines: time trend analysis (1974-2005 and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnell David

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide prevention is given a low priority in many Western Pacific countries due to competing health problems, stigma and poor understanding of its incidence and aetiology. Little is known about the epidemiology of suicide and suicidal behaviour in the Philippines and although its incidence is reported to be low, there is likely to be under-reporting because of its non-acceptance by the Catholic Church and the associated stigma to the family. This study aims to investigate trends in the incidence of suicide in the Philippines, assess possible underreporting and provide information on the methods used and the reasons for suicide. Methods Data for suicide deaths occurring between 1974 and 2005 were obtained from Philippine Health Statistics. Age- and sex-specific trends were examined graphically. Underreporting was investigated by comparing trends in suicides, accidents and deaths of undetermined intent. To provide a fuller picture of suicide in the Philippines, a comprehensive search for published papers, theses and reports on the epidemiology of suicide in the Philippines was undertaken. Results The incidence of suicide in males increased from 0.23 to 3.59 per 100,000 between 1984 and 2005. Similarly, rates rose from 0.12 to 1.09 per 100,000 in females. Amongst females, suicide rates were highest in 15-24 year olds, whilst in males rates were similar in all age groups throughout the study period. The most commonly used methods of suicide were hanging, shooting and organophosphate ingestion. In non-fatal attempts, the most common methods used were ingestion of drugs, specifically isoniazid and paracetamol, or organophosphate ingestion. Family and relationship problems were the most common precipitants. While rates were lower compared to other countries, there is suggestive evidence of underreporting and misclassification to undetermined injury. Recent increases may reflect either true increase or better reporting of suicides. Conclusions While suicide rates are low in the Philippines, increases in incidence and relatively high rates in adolescents and young adults point to the importance of focused suicide prevention programs. Improving data quality and better reporting of suicide deaths is likewise imperative to inform and evaluate prevention strategies.

  18. Suicide in the Philippines: time trend analysis (1974-2005) and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnell David; Lebanan-Dalida May; Redaniel Maria

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Suicide prevention is given a low priority in many Western Pacific countries due to competing health problems, stigma and poor understanding of its incidence and aetiology. Little is known about the epidemiology of suicide and suicidal behaviour in the Philippines and although its incidence is reported to be low, there is likely to be under-reporting because of its non-acceptance by the Catholic Church and the associated stigma to the family. This study aims to investigate...

  19. Primer registro del frutero pechinegro Pipreola lubomirskii (Aves, Cotingidae) en la vertiente occidental de los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Letty Salinas; María Samamé; Irma Franke; Jon Fjeldså

    2013-01-01

    El frutero pechinegro, Pipreola lubomirskii, es un cotíngido registrado como raro y de distribución local en los Andes del Norte. Antes del presente registro sólo había sido reportado para la vertiente oriental del Perú y Ecuador, así como los Andes del sur de Colombia. El presente registro amplia su distribución a los bosques montañosos de la vertiente occidental de los Andes peruanos, habiéndose encontrado en los bosques nublados del valle del río Zaña, en el departamento de Cajamarca (6º50...

  20. Did growth of high Andes slow down Nazca plate subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence velocity rate of the Nazca and South-American plate and its variations during the last 100 My are quite well-known from the global plate reconstructions. The key observation is that the rate of Nazca plate subduction has decreased by about 2 times during last 20 Myr and particularly since 10 Ma. During the same time the Central Andes have grown to its present 3-4 km height. Based on the thin-shell model, coupled with mantle convection, it was suggested that slowing down of Nazca plate resulted from the additional load exerted by the Andes. However, the thin-shell model, that integrates stresses and velocities vertically and therefore has no vertical resolution, is not an optimal tool to model a subduction zone. More appropriate would be modeling it with full thermomechanical formulation and self-consistent subduction. We performed a set of experiments to estimate the influence that an orogen like the Andes could have on an ongoing subduction. We used an enhanced 2D version of the SLIM-3D code suitable to simulate the evolution of a subducting slab in a self-consistent manner (gravity driven) at vertical crossections through upper mantle, transition zone and shallower lower mantle. The model utilizes non-linear temperature- and stress-dependant visco-elasto-plastic rheology and phase transitions at 410 and 660 km depth. We started from a reference case with a similar configuration as both Nazca and South-America plates. After some Mys of slow kinematicaly imposed subduction, to develop a coherent thermo-mechanical state, subduction was totally dynamic. On the other cases, the crust was slowly thickened artificially during 10 My to generate the Andean topography. Although our first results show no substantial changes on the velocity pattern of the subduction, we, however, consider this result as preliminary. At the meeting we plan to report completed and verified modeling results and discuss other possible cases of the late Cenozoic slowing down of

  1. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January to April, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge between January and April of 1951. Water conditions, furbearers, and maintenance...

  2. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Narrative report: January, February, March, and April, 1963: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  5. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  6. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  7. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  8. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  9. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  10. Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  11. Narrative Report : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge [September to December 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by...

  12. Lake Assessment Project Report, Lake Andes: Charles Mix County, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was included in the 1998 South Dakota 303(d) list as an impairment-related Total Maximum Daily Load waterbody. In 1922 Congress passed a bill that...

  13. Lake Andes Waterfowl Production Area: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR- Waterfowl Production Area outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by...

  14. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: May 1, to August 31, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  16. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January to April, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: May 1, to August 31, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  19. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  1. Lake Andes Wetland District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Lake Andes [Wetland Management District]: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: May 1, to August 31, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  6. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September to December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: May 1, to August 31, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: May 1, to August 31, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  11. Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1964: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR and WPA outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. Phase 1 Watershed Assessment Final Report: Lake Andes Watershed, Charles Mix County, South Dakota.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was included in the 1998 South Dakota 303(d) list as an impairment-related Total Maximum Daily Load waterbody. In 1922 Congress passed a bill that...

  15. Record Solar UV Irradiance in the Tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DonatP.Häder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High elevation, thin ozone layer, and clear sky produce intense ultraviolet (UV radiation in the tropical Andes. Recent models suggest that tropical stratospheric ozone will slightly decrease in the coming decades, potentially resulting in more UV anomalies. Data collected between 4,300-5,916 m above sea level (asl in Bolivia show how this trend could dramatically impact surface solar irradiance. During 61 days, two Eldonet dosimeters recorded extreme UV-B irradiance equivalent to a UV index (UVI of 43.3, which is the highest ground value ever reported. If they become more common, events of this magnitude may have societal and ecological implications, which make understanding the process leading to their generation critical. Our data show that this event and other major UV spikes were consistent with rising UV-B/UV-A ratios in the days to hours preceding the spikes, trajectories of negative ozone anomalies (NOAs, and radiative transfer modeling.

  16. ANDES: Statistical tools for the ANalyses of DEep Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denison Mark R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advancements in DNA sequencing technologies have allowed researchers to progress from the analyses of a single organism towards the deep sequencing of a sample of organisms. With sufficient sequencing depth, it is now possible to detect subtle variations between members of the same species, or between mixed species with shared biomarkers, such as the 16S rRNA gene. However, traditional sequencing analyses of samples from largely homogeneous populations are often still based on multiple sequence alignments (MSA, where each sequence is placed along a separate row and similarities between aligned bases can be followed down each column. While this visual format is intuitive for a small set of aligned sequences, the representation quickly becomes cumbersome as sequencing depths cover loci hundreds or thousands of reads deep. Findings We have developed ANDES, a software library and a suite of applications, written in Perl and R, for the statistical ANalyses of DEep Sequencing. The fundamental data structure underlying ANDES is the position profile, which contains the nucleotide distributions for each genomic position resultant from a multiple sequence alignment (MSA. Tools include the root mean square deviation (RMSD plot, which allows for the visual comparison of multiple samples on a position-by-position basis, and the computation of base conversion frequencies (transition/transversion rates, variation (Shannon entropy, inter-sample clustering and visualization (dendrogram and multidimensional scaling (MDS plot, threshold-driven consensus sequence generation and polymorphism detection, and the estimation of empirically determined sequencing quality values. Conclusions As new sequencing technologies evolve, deep sequencing will become increasingly cost-efficient and the inter and intra-sample comparisons of largely homogeneous sequences will become more common. We have provided a software package and demonstrated its

  17. Síndrome pulmonar por hantavirus Andes en Chile CARDIOPULMONARY SYNDROME DUE TO ANDES VIRUS IN CHILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANZA CASTILLO H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde 1993 han ocurrido 204 casos de Síndrome Cardiopulmonar por Hantavirus (SCPH en Chile. Los brotes epidémicos comenzaron en el sur y avanzan hacia el norte del país. Los más afectados son varones jóvenes, obreros agrícolas o forestales. En Chile, el SCPH es causado por el virus Andes, cuyo reservorio es el Oligorizomys longicaudatus (ratón de cola larga, que se distribuye desde la III Región al sur. El cuadro clínico es similar al descrito en EE.UU., caracterizado por una fase prodrómica que simula un estado gripal o cuadro gastrointestinal febril y que agrava por la aparición de edema pulmonar agudo e inestabilidad hemodinámica (fase cardiopulmonar. Sin embargo, cursa con mayores alteraciones hemorragí-paras y compromiso renal. La mortalidad inicial fue sobre 50% y actualmente es de alrededor del 33,3%. La presente revisión incluye: historia de la enfermedad, reservorio, modos de transmisión, patogenia, cuadro clínico, diagnóstico, tratamiento y medidas de prevenciónSince 1993, 204 cases of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS occurred in Chile. Epidemic began in the south and moved thereafter to the northern regions. The disease affected predominantly young males, who worked in agricultural labours or as timber workers. The HCPS in Chile is caused by the Andes virus. The reservoir is the wild rat Oligoryzomis longicaudatus distributed from the III to the XII Region. The clinical features are similar to those described for Sin Nombre Virus. The disease has a prodromal stage characterised by fever, muscular pain, with or without gastrointestinal manifestations, followed by the rapid onset of respiratory insufficiency and haemodynamic unstability. Andes virus courses more often with haemorrhagic disorders and overt renal failure, than Sin Nombre Virus. The initial mortality was over 50% and declined to 33,3% in the last year. History of hantavirus-diseases, reservoir, and mode of contagion, pathogenesis, clinical

  18. Stable isotope evidence for multiple pulses of rapid surface uplift in the Central Andes, Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Leier, Andrew; McQuarrie, Nadine; Garzione, Carmala; Eiler, John

    2013-01-01

    Paleoelevation histories from mountain belts like the Central Andes of Bolivia provide important constraints on the timing and geodynamic mechanisms associated with surface uplift. We present new oxygen and carbon isotope data (δ^(18)O, δ^(13)C, and Δ_(47)) from Oligocene–Miocene strata exposed in the Eastern Cordillera of the Bolivian Central Andes in order to reconstruct both the deformation and paleoelevation history of the region prior to late Miocene time. Paleosol carbonate in strata >2...

  19. An elusive new species of Marsupial Frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca from the Andes of northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of marsupial frog, genus Gastrotheca, is described from high-elevation grasslands in the Andes in Región Amazonas in northernPeru, where even calling males are well hidden in deep moss. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by its unique color pattern that includes a narrow, blackbordered, yellow middorsal stripe. The species apparently belongs to the Gastrotheca plumbea Group, which ranges in the Andes from northern Colombia to northern Peru.

  20. Late Pleistocene deglaciation histories in the central Mérida Andes (Venezuela)

    OpenAIRE

    Angel Ceballos, Isandra Fortuna

    2016-01-01

    The central Mérida Andes (Venezuela) landscape is characterized by the presence of well-preserved glacial landforms located between 2400 and 4978 m a.s.l. Geomorphological studies of these glacial landforms significantly contribute to the Venezuelan Andes glaciations reconstructions. However, Last Glaciation (locally called Mérida Glaciation) was poorly reconstructed because of limited chronological data. This dissertation attempts to contribute to the Last Glaciation reconstruction and paleo...

  1. Phylogenetic relationships between telmatobiinids (Anura, Ceratophryidae, Telmatobiinae) of central Andes based on morphology of larval and adult stages

    OpenAIRE

    César Aguilar; Niels Valencia

    2011-01-01

    Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius are the two genus of Telmatobiinae from the central Andes. Both genera have species with adaptations for life at high altitude in the Andes, with aquatic or semi-aquatic habits in creeks, lagoons and lakes. The objective of this study is to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships between Batrachophrynus and 13 species of Telmatobius from the central Andes using larval and adult morphology including diagnostic characters for Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius, and ...

  2. Tectonic control on denudation rates in the central Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Kober, Florian; Hippe, Kristina; Lendzioch, Theodora; Grischott, Reto; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro; Christl, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Effects of a positive feedback loop between erosion and tectonics have been shown by analogue and numerical models and have been inferred from field observations at the scale of mountain ranges. We present new data from the Bolivian Andes supporting these observations, although common geomorphic parameters do not indicate a simple correlation. The upper Rio Grande segment, located between Cochabamba, Santa Cruz and Sucre, drains a major catchment in the central Bolivian Cordillera, from the Eastern Cordillera (EC) in the W, through the Interandean Zone (IAZ) and the Subandes (SA) in the E. The catchment covers an area of 58939 km² with an altitude range from 400 to 5150 m above sea level. Geologically, the Bolivian Andes comprise (from W to E) the Altiplano, the EC, the IAZ and the SA fold and thrust belts. The Altiplano represents an almost perfectly closed basin with distinct barriers defined by the Western Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera. The Rio Grande does not reach the Altiplano (unlike Rio La Paz and Rio Consata) but has its western drainage divide along the high peaks of the EC that experienced a period of intense shortening between Late Oligocene and Miocene. Near Cochabamba, the EC comprises metasedimentary siliciclastic rocks of Ordovician age. These rocks are overlain by Cretaceous to Paleocene and / or Neogene sediments with an angular unconformity. The IAZ and SA form an east-vergent fold and thrust belt and comprise Paleozoic and Mesozoic units. Farther east, the structures of the SA progressively include Neogene foreland strata of the Chaco foreland basin. The Chaco basin rests on the Brazilian shield east of the Subandean Belt and forms the modern foreland basin, where the lower Rio Grande catchment is sited. We obtained 58 cosmogenic 10Be catchment wide denudation rates for the Rio Grande catchments upstream of Abapó. They range from 7 mm/kyr to 1550 mm/kyr thus integrating at maximum over the last 10.000 years, with a mean of 262 mm/kyr. In

  3. Moho topography in the central Andes and its geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X.; Sobolev, S. V.; Kind, R.

    2002-06-01

    P-to-S converted waves at the continental Moho together with waves multiply reflected between the Earth's surface and the Moho have been used to estimate the Moho depth and average crustal Vp/ Vs variations in the central Andes. Our analysis confirms and significantly complements the Moho depth estimates previously obtained from wide-angle seismic studies and receiver functions. The resulting crustal thickness varies from about 35 km in the forearc region to more than 70 km beneath the plateau and thins (30 km) further to the east in the Chaco plains. Beneath the Andean plateau, the Moho is deeper in the north (Altiplano) and shallower in the south (Puna), where the plateau attains its maximum elevation. A non-linear relation exists between crustal thickness and elevation (and Bouguer gravity), suggesting that the crust shallower than 50-55 km is predominately felsic in contrast to a predominately mafic crust below. Such a relation also implies a 100 km thick thermal lithosphere beneath the Altiplano and with a lithospheric thinning of a few tens of kilometers beneath the Puna. Absence of expected increase in lithospheric thickness in regions of almost doubled crust strongly suggests partial removal of the mantle lithosphere beneath the entire plateau. In the Subandean ranges at 19-20°S, the relation between altitude and crustal thickness indicates a thick lithosphere (up to 130-150 km) and lithospheric flexure. Beneath a relative topographic low at the Salar de Atacama, a thick crust (67 km) suggests that the lithosphere in this region is abnormally cold and dynamically subsided, possibly due to coupling with the subducting plate. This may be related to the strongest (Ms=8.0) known intra-slab earthquake in the central Andes that happened very close to this region in 1950. The average crustal Vp/ Vs ratio is about 1.77 for the Altiplano-Puna and it reaches the highest values (1.80-1.85) beneath the volcanic arc, indicating high ambient crustal temperatures and

  4. Vulnerabilidad, resistividad en el campesinado rural de los Andes tropicales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Stadel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mientras que la colonización agrícola y humana tiene milenios de tradiciones culturales en los Andes tropicales, la agricultura y la superviviencia rural siempre representaban ‘sistemas abiertos’ adaptandose a una gran diversidad de condiciones medioambientales, políticas, culturales, sociales y económicas fluctuando con- tinuamente. Sin embargo, el patrimonio cultural tan variado y rico de los campesinos andinos con sus experiencias y conocimientos en sobrevivir en condiciones locales difíciles y sumamente vulnerables en muchos casos les ayudó a llegar a formas variadas de resistividad y resistencia frente a los estímulos y el estrés internos y externos. Además y dadas las condiciones medio ambientales tan diversas de las regiones andinas con su gran variedad de zonas altitudinales, nichos agrícolas y mosaicos culturales, se ha formado un paisaje rural muy complejo y variado. En este estudio se reconocen y se apoyan las identidades locales y regionales de las formas del uso de las tierras rurales y de las actividades agrícolas, además se examinan los impactos de las influencias supra-regionales y globales que determinan las condiciones climáticas, políticas, económicas y socio-culturales. De esta manera, una alta variabilidad y una baja predictabilidad de las condiciones andinas medioambientales y del desarrollo socio-económico forman los argumentos básicos en este estudio. Se rechaza la validez de un modelo universal del uso de las tierras agrícolas en los Andes así como una exposición inevitable de la agricultura montañesa frente a los riesgos de las fuerzas y los actores globales. Contrariamente, en el artículo se propone toda una serie de modelos locales y regionales para el uso de las tierras rurales que sean flexibles en relación al espacio y al tiempo tomando en cuenta las condiciones locales persistentes así como las nuevas influencias externas. Como resultado de estas consideraciones parece imprescindible

  5. Las guerras de independencia en los andes meridionales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Gil Montero

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo analiza la composición de las milicias regionales que lucharon en la frontera bélica de los Andes Meridionales entre 1810 y 1825. Al interior de las tropas se mantuvo la jererquización y el corporativismo, características propias de la sociedad. Sin embargo, la convivencia y los rigores de la guerra generaron una suerte de "fondo común" con recursos de los grupos socio-étnicos. Entre estos recursos destacamos: la adopción de una organización para la comida basada en el abastecimiento realizado por las mujeres de los soldados; la aceptación de "licencias compulsivas"; o el nombramiento de líderes militares que no eran "bien nacidos". Además se aceptaban prácticas de matar propias de cada grupo y se los distinguía por las armas utilizadas. Estas costumbres compartidas no fueron iguales en todo espacio o tiempo pues dependieron de los elementos originales que se fundieron en la palestra y del contexto que les dio forma.This article analyses the composition of regional militias that participated in the frontier war fought in Southern Andes (1810-1825. It focuses on the relations militiamen established among themselves in a war context. It could be observed that hierarchical and corporative behavior, aspect found in society, was maintained within the troops. However, the act of living together and the severity of war resulted in a kind of pool of different practices belonging to each social-ethnic group. Among these shared practices we highlight: the way officers accepted the food preparation done by the soldiers' women, "compulsive leaves", and the designation of militia leaders who were not patrician. Moreover each group's killing practices were accepted and their weapons distinguished them. But shared practices were not constant through space and time since they depended upon original elements militiamen brought with them to the battlefield and on the context shaping them.

  6. On recent measurements from the Andes Lidar Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Snively, Jonathan; Heale, Christopher; Cao, Bing

    2016-07-01

    The Andes Lidar Observatory is an upper atmosphere observatory located in Cerro Pachón, Chile (30.3S, 70.7W). It houses a Na Wind/Temperature Lidar, an all sky airglow imager, a mesospheric temperature mapper, an infrared imager and a meteor radar. This suite of instrumentation provides comprehensive measurements of the mesopause region and enables detailed study of wave dynamics. With the recent upgrade of the Na lidar, many complex dynamic processes were observed and resolved in detail. I will present several intriguing phenomena seen in the lidar measurement from recent campaigns, and a detailed analysis of a complex wave propagation event, which involved a large vertical wind oscillation exceeding 10 m/s. A nonlinear gravity wave model was able to reproduce most of the observed features. The results suggest that the wave experienced partial reflections at two altitudes and a critical layer in between, resulting in large vertical wind amplitude and multi-layer distribution of wave energy.

  7. Active Folding of the Tame Anticline, Eastern Foothills, Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloza-Fajardo, G.; Taylor, M. H.; Mora, A.; Stockli, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    We integrate neotectonic mapping and interpretation of seismic reflection profiles to evaluate the kinematics of folding and development of the Quaternary Tame anticline and Cusiana fault at 6.5 N Latitude in the eastern foothills of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. The Tame anticline is located approximately 660 km to the east of the Nazca-South America and 810 km to the south of the Caribbean-South America subduction zones plate boundaries in a retroarc foreland basin setting. The Tame anticline is an elongated, N15E trending structure, 14 km long N-S by 6 km wide E-W, that represents the most frontal active structure of the northern Colombian Andes. The Tame fold is related to the east-directed Cusiana fault that day lights to the south. Seismic reflection profiles indicate the Cusiana fault is a listric, west-dipping blind structure. The east flowing antecedent Macaguana creek has incised the Tame fold forming three prominent terrace levels, uplifted approximately 220, 150 and 100 meters, above current river levels. The surfaces were sampled for terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides using the depth profiling approach to account for inheritance. Surface exposure ages from the highest to lowest surfaces are 93.9, 50.8 and 32.4 kyrs at the 1σ level respectively, which were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. Trishear kinematic modeling was used to retrodeform the folding history and based on the surface abandonment ages, we will present shortening rates at millennial timescales.

  8. Linchamientos y conflicto político en Los Andes Lynchings and Political conflict in The Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Vilas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En 2004, los alcaldes de dos municipalidades de la región aimara de los Andes fueron linchados en la aparente culminación de agudos conflictos políticos internos y entre las respectivas comunidades y el Estado central. En este artículo se discuten ambos casos con el fin de ilustrar las transformaciones experimentadas en años recientes en la organización y la dinámica interna de las comunidades andinas, y de la articulación conflictiva de la política local en los procesos e instituciones de más amplio alcance. Precariedad social e incapacidad o renuencia del Estado para responder con eficacia a demandas básicas de determinados grupos de población configuran enmarcamientos socioeconómicos e institucionales de los linchamientos. En contraste con enfoques que enfatizan en factores culturales tradicionales o en un supuesto nacionalismo indígena, en el artículo se destaca la gravitación de fenómenos y procesos político- institucionales recientes en la transformación cultural y política de las comunidades, en el modo en que éstas procesan sus conflictos internos y con el Estado central.In 2004, two municipalitys mayors form the aimara Andes of Peru and Bolivia were subjected to mass lynchings as a result of the apparent culmination of violent political confrontations. This paper deals with these events as dramatic illustrations of the transformations the Andean communities experienced during recent decades in their internal dynamics, as well as in the articulation of local politics to processes and institutions beyond the communal limits. Structural precariousness combined with the state's inability or reluctance to come to terms with social or political demands from relevant segments of the people in the communities set the socioeconomic and institutional stage for lynchings. In contrast with approaches relating these events to an alleged indigenous cultural identity, the analysis points to the impact of the communities' political

  9. Characteristics of Precipitation Features and Annual Rainfall during the TRMM Era in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Slayback, Daniel; Yager, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The central Andes extends from 7 deg to 21 deg S, with its eastern boundary defined by elevation (1000m and greater) and its western boundary by the coastline. The authors used a combination of surface observations, reanalysis, and the University of Utah Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation features (PF) database to understand the characteristics of convective systems and associated rainfall in the central Andes during the TRMM era, 1998-2012. Compared to other dry (West Africa), mountainous (Himalayas), and dynamically linked (Amazon) regions in the tropics, the central Andes PF population was distinct from these other regions, with small and weak PFs dominating its cumulative distribution functions and annual rainfall totals. No more than 10% of PFs in the central Andes met any of the thresholds used to identify and define deep convection (minimum IR cloud-top temperatures, minimum 85-GHz brightness temperature, maximum height of the 40-dBZ echo). For most of the PFs, available moisture was limited (less than 35mm) and instability low (less than 500 J kg(exp -1)). The central Andes represents a largely stable, dry to arid environment, limiting system development and organization. Hence, primarily short-duration events (less than 60 min) characterized by shallow convection and light to light-moderate rainfall rates (0.5-4.0 mm h(exp -1)) were found.

  10. Traditional use of the Andean flicker (Colaptes rupicola as a galactagogue in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froemming Steve

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper explores the use of the dried meat and feathers of the Andean Flicker (Colaptes rupicola to increase the milk supply of nursing women and domestic animals in the Andes. The treatment is of preColumbian origin, but continues to be used in some areas, including the village in the southern Peruvian highlands where I do ethnographic research. I explore the factors giving rise to and sustaining the practice, relate it to other galactagogues used in the Andes and to the use of birds in ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary treatments in general, and situate it within the general tendency in the Andes and elsewhere to replicate human relations in the treatment of valuable livestock. The bird's use as a galactagogue appears to be motivated by both metaphorical associations and its perceived efficacy, and conceptually blends human and animal healthcare domains.

  11. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  12. Possible future lakes in the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonia, Daniel; Haeberli, Wilfried; Torres, Judith; Giraldez, Claudia; Schauwecker, Simone; Santiago, Alexzander; Cochachin, Alejo; Huggel, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Climate change has caused large losses of glacier mass in the Andes of Peru. Also, given the projected changes in climate, based on different IPCC scenarios for 2050 and 2080, simulations with a tropical glacier-climate model indicate that glaciers will continue to retreat. According to the national Peruvian glacier inventories 43% of glacier area has disappeared between 1970 and 2003-2010 in the 19 snowy mountain ranges and a total of 8 355 new lakes have formed in deglaciating terrain. With glacier retreat new lakes form in parts of the glacier tongue where there is an overdeepening, and these lakes can be a source of natural hazards to downstrean populations. Therefore, the identification of possible future lakes is important to plan for preventive measures concerning possible lake outbursts as well as to understand changes in freshwater storage in the corresponding source areas. Modeling of glacier-bed overdeepenings and possible future lakes forming in such topographic depressions when becoming ice-free was done using the SRTM DEM from the year 2000 with a 90 m resolution and the 2003-2010 glacier outlines from the recently published national glacier inventory of Perú. The GIS-based analysis followed three main steps: (1) identification of flat glacier areas with less than 10° surface slope as a first-order spatial approximation to possible occurrences of glacier-bed overdeepenings; (2) application, using Google Earth, of three morphological indications of glacier-bed overdeepenings following Frey et al. (2010): steepening surface slope, onset of crevasse formation, lateral flow-narrowing; and (3) verification of the results from steps (1) and (2) by comparison with GlabTop modeling of bed topographies following Linsbauer et al. (2012) using the SRTM DEM, contour lines and constructed branch lines for all glaciers. A pilot study has already been carried out for the Cordillera Blanca. The results show that 31 major new lakes may form in the future. The total

  13. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Mérida Andes and the Santander Massif, NW South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard; Mora, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    New apatite U-Pb and multiphase 40Ar/39Ar data constrain the high to medium temperature (~ 500 °C-~ 300 °C) thermal histories of igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Mérida Andes of Venezuela, and new apatite and zircon fission track data constrain the ~ 500 °C-~ 60 °C thermal histories of pre-Jurassic igneous and metamorphic rocks of the adjacent Santander Massif of Colombia. Computed thermal history envelopes using apatite U-Pb dates and grain size information from an Early Palaeozoic granodiorite in the Mérida Andes suggest that it cooled from > 500 °C to histories. The generally accepted timing of amalgamation of Pangaea along the Ouachita-Marathon suture pre-dates Late Permian to Triassic cooling recorded in basement rocks of the Mérida Andes by > 30 Ma, and its effect on rocks preserved in north-western South America is unknown. We interpret late Permian to Triassic cooling in the Mérida Andes to be driven by exhumation. Previous studies have suggested that a short phase of shortening and anatexis is recorded at ~ 253 Ma in the Maya Block, which may have been adjacent to the basement rocks of the Mérida Andes in the Late Permian. The coeval onset of exhumation in the Mérida Andes may be a result of increased coupling in the magmatic arc, which was located along the western margin of Pangaea. Triassic extension is documented in the Central Cordillera of Colombia and Ecuador between ~ 240 Ma and ~ 215 Ma, although extension at this time has not been clearly identified in the Mérida Andes or the Santander Massif. Permian to Triassic cooling is not recorded in the structurally isolated Caparo Block in the southern Mérida Andes, suggesting that it may have constituted a distinct fault block in the Triassic. New fission track data from the Santander Massif suggest that it started exhuming at ~ 40 Ma during a period of accelerated convergence between the Nazca/Farallòn Plate and the western margin of South America. Exhumation in the Santander

  14. Morphologic evolution of the Central Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Pfiffner, O. Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the morphology of the Andes of Peru and its evolution based on the geometry of river channels, their bedrock profiles, stream gradient indices and the relation between thrust faults and morphology. The rivers of the Pacific Basin incised Mesozoic sediments of the Marañon thrust belt, Cenozoic volcanics and the granitic rocks of the Coastal Batholith. They are mainly bedrock channels with convex upward shapes and show signs of active ongoing incision. The changes in lithology do not correlate with breaks in slope of the channels (or knick points) such that the high gradient indices (K) with values between 2,000-3,000 and higher than 3,000 suggest that incision is controlled by tectonic activity. Our analysis reveals that many of the ranges of the Western Cordillera were uplifted to the actual elevations where peaks reach to 6,000 m above sea level by thrusting along steeply dipping faults. We correlate this uplift with the Quechua Phase of Neogene age documented for the Subandean thrust belt. The rivers of the Amazonas Basin have steep slopes and high gradient indices of 2,000-3,000 and locally more than 3,000 in those segments where the rivers flow over the crystalline basement of the Eastern Cordillera affected by vertical faulting. Gradient indices decrease to 1,000-2,000 within the east-vergent thrust belt of the Subandean Zone. Here a correlation between breaks in river channel slopes and location of thrust faults can be established, suggesting that the young, Quechua Phase thrust faults of the Subandean thrust belt, which involve Neogene sediments, influenced the channel geometry. In the eastern lowlands, these rivers become meandering and flow parallel to anticlines that formed in the hanging wall of Quechua Phase thrust faults, suggesting that the river courses were actively displaced outward into the foreland.

  15. High resolution precipitation climatology for the Andes of South Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachte, Katja; Bendix, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The climate of Ecuador is strongly dominated by the complex structure of the Andes Mountains. Due to their heights and north-south orientation they act like a barrier, which cause delineation between the western and eastern flanks, as well as the inner-Andean areas. Commonly the Ecuadorian climate is classified in three zones, Costa, Interandina and Oriente. Existing precipitation products such as the GPCC or TRMM data are enabled to represent these climate zones, but because of their spatial resolution, they pass to capture the different regimes within a zone. Especially the inner-Andean region (Interandina) with its characteristic complex terrain shows spatially high climate variability. Local circulation systems, e.g. mountain-valley breezes as well as effects of windward and lee-side, drive the climate conditions allowing for the differentiation of air temperature and rainfall distribution on relative small scales. These highly variable patterns are also reflected by the diversity of ecosystems, e.g. rainforest, dry forest and Paramo, in a relative small area. In order to represent the local systems a dynamical downscaling approach for the Ecuadorian region is applied. In doing so the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used. A suitable model setup was evaluated within a sensitivity study, where various parametrization schemes were tested. The most suitable physics combination was used for a 30 year hint cast simulation. The poster presents first results of the high resolution climate simulations. On the basis of the spatial distribution of rainfall patterns distinct precipitation regimes within the Interandina will be shown. The aim is to highlight and discuss the importance of the adequately representation of the terrain in mountainous regions like the Andean Mountains.

  16. Erosion by Ice and Water in the Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This scene on the remote, rugged Argentine/Chilean border in the far southern Andes Mountains offers numerous, dramatic examples of both erosional processes and features of ice and water. The sharp, glaciated crest of the Cerro San Lorenzo (center) exceeds 12,000 feet and casts a long shadow southeastward. Glaciers on its western flank flow into the valley. This Electronic Still Camera photo was taken from the International Space Station, in December 2000 (late spring) when most of the previous winter's snow had melted below an altitude of 6,000 feet. Lago Pueyrredon, and the other lakes visible here, have been excavated by geologically recent episodes of glacier erosion, when glaciers extended all the way onto the lowland plains (top right). Since the last melting of the glaciers (15,000 years ago) three distinct fan deltas (semicircular features, marked with arrows) have formed where rivers flow into the lake. Counterclockwise currents in the lake-driven by strong winds from the west-have generated thin sand spits from each fan-delta. The largest spit (attached to the largest fan-delta, see right arrow) has isolated an approximately 10-kilometer long segment of the south end of the lake. The river that constructed the largest fan presently discharges turbid water to this isolated basin, giving it a lighter color than the rest of the lake. Glacial data collected over the past 50 years indicate that small ice bodies are disappearing at accelerated rates. (EOS, vol 81, no. 24, June 13, 2000) Predictions are that large fluctuations in land ice, with significant implications to society, are possible in the coming decades and centuries due to natural and anthropogenic climate change. Before glacial data can be used to address critical problems pertaining to the world's economic and environmental health, more detailed information about such glaciers is needed. Image ISS001-ESC-5113 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  17. Cretaceous stratigraphy of sierra de Beauvoir, Fuegian Andes, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Martinioni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Cretaceous stratigraphy north of Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, was poorly known until the last decade of the twentieth century. Stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and paleontological observations in sierra de Beauvoir and surroundings enabled the recognition of two main packages of dominant marine mudstone. 1 A more than 450 m thick package of slate, shale and mudstone, constituted by the revised Lower Cretaceous Beauvoir Formation. A type locality in the core of sierra de Beauvoir, with diagnostic Aptian-Albian fossils including inoceramids of the Inoceramus neocomiensis group and Aucellina sp., is proposed for this unit. 2 A more than 1,500 m thick, mudstone-dominated, but sandier upward, package consisting of at least three Upper Cretaceous units. Arroyo Castorera Formation (nom. nov. bears Turonian inoceramids of the I. hobetsensis group and I. cf. lamarcki. Río Rodríguez Formation (nom. nov. has Coniacian inoceramids, cf. Cremnoceramus sp. Policarpo Formation bears poorly preserved ammonites (Grossouvrites sp., Maorites sp., and Diplomoceras sp., together with diagnostic Maastrichtian dinocysts (Manumiella spp. complex, Operculodinium cf. azcaratei, some specimens of Fibrocysta-Exochosphaeridium complex, and Palaeocystodinium granulatum. Both packages were deposited in deep-marine environments and show, as a whole, a coarsening upward trend in the succession of Cretaceous rocks. Beauvoir Formation is part of the back-arc basin-fill of the former Rocas Verdes marginal basin. Arroyo Castorera Formation appears as a transition to the initiating Late Cretaceous Austral foreland basin evolution, clearly represented by turbiditic deposits of Río Rodríguez and Policarpo formations that were progressively accumulated in front of the rising Fuegian Andes.

  18. Glacier loss and emerging hydrologic vulnerabilities in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, B. G.; McKenzie, J. M.; Baraer, M.; Lagos, P.; Lautz, L.; Carey, M.; Bury, J.; Crumley, R.; Wigmore, O.; Somers, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating glacier recession in the tropical Andes is transforming downstream hydrology, while increasing demands for water by end-users (even beyond the watershed limits) is complicating the assessment of vulnerability. Future scenarios of hydro-climatic vulnerability require a better understanding of coupled hydrologic and human systems, involving both multiscale process studies and more robust models of glacier-climate interactions. We synthesize research in two proglacial valleys of glacierized mountain ranges in different regions of Peru that are both in proximity to growing water usage from urban sectors, agriculture, hydroelectric generation, and mining. In both the Santa River watershed draining the Cordillera Blanca and the Shullcas River watershed below Hyuatapallana Mountain in Junin, glaciers have receded over 25% since the 1980s. Historical runoff and glacier data, combined with glacier-climate modeling, show a long-term decrease in discharge resulting from a net loss of stored water. We find evidence that this altered hydrology is transforming proglacial wetland ecology and water quality, even while water resource use has intensified. Beyond glaciers, our results show that over 60% of the dry season base flow in each watershed is groundwater sourced from heterogeneous aquifers. Municipal water supply in Huancayo already relies on 18 groundwater wells. Perceptions of water availability and actual water use practices remain relatively divorced from the actual water resources provided from each mountain range. Critical changes in glacier volume and water supply are not perceived or acknowledged consistently amongst different water users, nor reflected in water management decisions. In order to identify, understand, model, and adapt to climate-glacier-water changes, it is vital to integrate the analysis of water availability and groundwater processes (the domain of hydrologists) with that of water use (the focus for social scientists). Attention must be

  19. Orographic barriers, high-resolution TRMM rainfall, and relief variations along the eastern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    The complex interplay between erosion and tectonics shapes landscapes on various time and length scales. Thus, determining the relative importance of tectonic and climate-driven processes is key for our understanding of the evolution of tectonically active mountain belts. Each mountain belt may exhibit an individual and complex response to these processes that may be characteristic for differently sized sectors of the orogenic system. Here, we focus on small (101km) to medium (102-103km) scale relations along the eastern flank of the meridionally oriented South American Andes. The central Andes and the major part of the northern Andes are subject to strong rainfall and erosion on their eastern side. There, rainfall has a strong gradient with wet, northern and central parts and presently drier areas south of the Andes bend at ~17°S. While lithology and geologic units vary along strike, the general deformation regime of the northern and central eastern Andes is similar with east vergent thrust-fault systems. We use high-resolution Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and SRTM topographic data to characterize elevation, relief, and hillslope angle of peak rainfall at orographic barriers constituting the eastern flank of the orogen. Over a distance of more than 3500km along the eastern flank of the Andes facing the Amazon Basin, we find that peak rainfall (>3.5m/yr) occurs at a mean elevation of 1.3±0.17km, a mean 3- km-relief of 0.95±0.08km, and areas characterized by moderate mean hillslope angles of 18.3±1.7°. We find that topographic relief is the best first-order rainfall predictor. South of the eastward-convex bend of the Andes, rainfall amounts decrease and there exists no distinct, high rainfall peak. The reduction in rainfall is accompanied by a reduction of relief involving several hundred meters at the mountain front as rivers exiting the eastern Andes tend to form large sedimentary fan systems that reduce the distance between minimum and

  20. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy Orogenia activa de los Andes centro-australes estudiada mediante geodesia de GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.Se presentan mediciones GPS del campo de velocidad en los Andes centro-australes entre el extremo norte de Santa Cruz y la faja plegada de Malargüe. Se modela el campo de velocidad intersísmico como la combinación de una señal elástico/efímera asociada con el anclaje del límite principal de placas, y una componente constante, no reversible de desplazamiento asociada con una convergencia localizada en el retroarco y crecimiento del

  1. Evolución tectonomagmática de los Andes bolivianos Tectonomagmaticevolution of the Bolivian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Jiménez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes bolivianos ocuparonuna posición de retroarco durante gran parte del Fanerozoico. En su evoluciónse reconoce una primera etapa, restringida al Paleozoico inferior, en la quehubo una gran transferencia de material sedimentario en la corteza superior, yuna segunda en la que predominó el reciclaje de la masa cortical. A lo largodel Paleozoico inferior, una cuenca marina epicratónica se formó entre elcratón de Amazonia, el macizo Arequipa-Antofalla, y el macizo Pampeanofuncionando inicialmente como cuenca de retroarco y luego como cuenca deantepaís hasta colmatarse en el Paleozoico superior. En este lapso ocurrierontres etapas de deformación: La fase oclóyica (límite Ordovícico-Silúrico decarácter restringido, la fase eohercínica (límite Devónico-Carbonífero, y lafase hercínica (Carbonífero Superior también de influencia areal restringida.En el Mesozoico, se registraron aún breves incursiones marinas antes que en elEoceno comience a edificarse una protocordillera. El solevantamiento general detoda la región centroandina, se inició en el Oligoceno Superior afectando alAltiplano y la Cordillera Oriental actuales. Este solevantamiento ocurrió entres etapas limitadas por la formación de superficies de erosión datadas en 18y 10 Ma. La ladera oeste de la Cordillera Oriental, denominada faja de Huarina,tuvo un rol muy importante en la evolución de la región centroandina. Además decobijar a gran parte del magmatismo de retroarco, en esta faja ocurrió la mayorsubsidencia de la cuenca paleozoica. En esta faja ocurrieron preferentementedurante el Mesozoico, procesos de rifting y de adelgazamiento litosférico. Enel Paleógeno, la faja de Huarinas fue la primera en ser solevantada aislando lacuenca altiplánica del interior del continente, y durante el OligocenoSuperior, se constituyó en el cinturón retrocabalgante del orógeno. Ladeformación en el Altiplano y la Cordillera Oriental concluyó hace 10 Ma cuandose form

  2. Application of remote sensing to understanding fire regimes and biomass burning emissions of the tropical Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Anderson, L.O.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the tropical Andes, there have been very few systematic studies aimed at understanding the biomass burning dynamics in the area. This paper seeks to advance on our understanding of burning regimes in this region, with the first detailed and comprehensive assessment of fire occurrence and the deri

  3. Climate Change in the High Andes:implications and adaptation strategies for small-scale farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, C.; Nicklin, C.; Dangles, O.; Vanek, S.; Sherwood, S.G.; Halloy, S.; Garrett, K.A.; Forbes, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Global climate change represents a major threat to sustainable farming in the Andes. Farmers have used local ecological knowledge and intricate production systems to cope, adapt and reorganize to meet climate uncertainty and risk, which have always been a fact of life. Those traditional sy

  4. Lichenometric dating using Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon in the Patagonian Andes, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibotti, Irene Adriana; Villalba, Ricardo

    2009-05-01

    This study represents the first attempt to develop and apply lichenometric dating curves of Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon for dating glacier fluctuations in the Patagonian Andes. Six glaciers were studied along the Patagonian Andes. Surfaces of known ages (historical evidences and tree-ring analyses) were used as control sites to develop indirect lichenometric dating curves. Dating curves developed for the studied glaciers show the same general logarithmic form, indicating that growth rate of subgenus Rhizocarpon decreases over time. The strong west-east precipitation gradient across the Andean Cordillera introduces statistically significant differences in the growth curves, with faster growth rates in the moist west sites than the drier eastern sites. Latitudinal difference among the studied glaciers does not appear to be a major factor regulating lichen growth rates. Therefore, we developed two lichenometric curves for dating glacier fluctuations in wetter and drier sites in the Patagonian Andes during the past 450 yrs. Application of the developed curves to moraine dating allowed us to complement glacial chronologies previously obtained by tree-ring analyses. A first chronosequence for moraine formation in the Torrecillas Glacier (42°S) is presented. Our findings confirm the utility of lichenometry to date deglaciated surfaces in the Patagonian Andes.

  5. A NEW LOCALITY OF THE HOODED ANTPITTA (GRALLARICULA CUCULLATA: GRALLARIDAE FOR THE COLOMBIAN CENTRAL ANDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSCAR HUMBERTO MARÍN GÓMEZ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a new locality record of the Hooded Anpitta (Grallariculla cucullata, a threatened species inhabiting montane cloud forests of the Colombian and Venezuelan Andes. This is the first record for Quindío department. We present capture-rate data at this site that suggests a resident, relatively large population. 

  6. Magnetotelluric study of Parincota and Lascer volcanoes, central Andes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. This investigation considers two regions of interest, the first one includes the zone around Parinacota (6350 m, 18 deg09'S, 69 deg08'W), a subduction related stratovolcano situated in the limit of Bolivia and Chile, which had its biggest eruptive episodes around 8000 years ago. The second zone is more to the south, around Lascar volcano (5592 m, 23 deg22'S, 67 deg41'W), located on the eastern side of the Salar de Atacama basin in northern Chile, it has been one of the most active volcanoes of the central Andes in the last years. Between September and November 2007, magnetotelluric and audio magnetotelluric sites were built in the area close to Lascar and Parinacota volcanoes. AMT sites were installed in the proximities of the volcanoes, for a more shallow view, and the MT sites, which can reach longer periods and larger depths, were installed on a profile south of Lascar, which goes from the volcanic arc, crossing the Salar de Atacama basin, and as an outer ring in the Parinacota region. Remote reference and robust techniques were used in the data processing. Induction arrows, phase tensor ellipses and strike direction of the conductivity distribution have been calculated for the AMT sites, showing some 3-D behavior for the shallower depths, with induction vectors at the closest sites to the volcanoes pointing away from them, influenced by the topography. For the higher periods, the behavior is more 2-D in both regions, with a more stable strike direction which is coherent with the induction vectors and the largest semi axis of the phase tensor ellipses. All these parameters show a strong influence in the higher periods which seem to be due to a large conductive anomaly in the backarc, according with other studies in the zone, under the Bolivian altiplano. From a first analysis, deep large conductive bodies are not present in these zones around the volcanoes. Topographic corrections have been developed as well as sensitivity

  7. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  8. Fort Niobrara Easement Refuges: Lake Andes, Lake Arconge, Carr, Eagle Creek: Narrative report: Sept. to Dec. 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes, Lake Arconge, Carr, and Eagle Creek Refuges between September and December of 1943. Weather conditions,...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Waterfowl Production Area District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR- Waterfowl Production Area District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins...

  10. The 2000 AD eruption of Copahue Volcano, Southern Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Naranjo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Although all historic eruptions of the Copahue volcano (37°45'S-71°10.2'W, 3,001 m a.s.l. have been of low magnitude, the largest (VEI=2 and longest eruptive cycle occurred from July to October 2000. Phreatic phases characterized the main events as a former acid crater lake was blown up. Low altitude columns were deviated by low altitude winds in variable directions, but slightly predominant to the NNE. The presence of the El Agrio caldera depression to the east of Copahue volcano may have caused the variable plume divergences and disturb the prevailing wind direction which is normally to the southeast. Larger magnitude events, comparable to prehistoric eruptions, could occur in the future at Copahue volcano, seriously impacting the tourist localities on the Argentinean (eastern flanks of this frontier volcano. Unless a constant educational program is implemented, emergency plans will not be enough to prevent catastrophic effects, because the local population strongly believes that only low magnitude eruptions such as those of the sixties, nineties and 2000 AD can be produced at the Copahue volcanoLa erupción de 2000 AD del volcán Copahue, Andes del Sur. Aunque todas las erupciones históricas del volcán Copahue (37°45'S-71°10.2'W, 3.001 m s.n.m. han sido de baja magnitud, entre julio y octubre de 2000 ocurrió el mayor y más prolongado ciclo eruptivo. Las áreas más vulnerables de este volcán fronterizo se ubican sobre su flanco (este argentino. Las fases más características de las principales erupciones fueron del tipo freático, habiendo sido evaporado su habitual lago ácido del cráter activo. Los vientos de baja altura desviaron según variadas direcciones las columnas eruptivas de baja altitud, aunque con cierto predominio hacia el NNE. La presencia de la gran depresión de la caldera El Agrio hacia el este, podría haber causado la distorsión de tan variable dispersión de la pluma eruptiva, modificando la direcci

  11. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  12. Cenozoic foreland-basin evolution in the northern Andes : insights from thermochronology and basin analysis in the Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    The modern foreland basin straddling the eastern margin of the Andean orogen is the prime example of a retro-arc foreland basin system adjacent to a subduction orogen. While widely studied in the central and southern Andes, the spatial and temporal evolution of the Cenozoic foreland basin system in the northern Andes has received considerably less attention. This is in part due to the complex geodynamic boundary conditions, such as the oblique subduction and accretion of the Caribbean plates ...

  13. Holocene tephra-fall deposits of southern and austral Andes volcanic zones (33-54oS): eruption recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiometric 14C dating is a very useful tool to study the chronostratigraphy of pyroclastic deposits. In addition, 14C ages are essential parameters for the estimation of the recurrence time of the explosive volcanic activity. The origin, distribution and relative age of mappable Holocene tephra-fall deposits of the Southern Andes Volcanic Zone (SVZ) and Austral Andes Volcanic Zone (AVZ) from 33oS-54oS, were studied and their recurrence period is analysed (au)

  14. Rainfall hotspots over the southern tropical Andes : spatial distribution, rainfall intensity, and relations with large-scale atmospheric circulation

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Espinoza; Chavez, S.; Ronchail, J.; Junquas, Clémentine; K. Takahashi; W. Lavado

    2015-01-01

    The Andes/Amazon transition is among the rainiest regions of the world and the interactions between large-scale circulation and the topography that determine its complex rainfall distribution remain poorly known. This work provides an in-depth analysis of the spatial distribution, variability, and intensity of rainfall in the southern Andes/Amazon transition, at seasonal and intraseasonal time scales. The analysis is based on comprehensive daily rainfall data sets from meteorological stations...

  15. Surface control on contrasts in deformation between eastern and western margins of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation style and climate between the eastern and western escarpments of the Central Andes are strikingly different. The eastern side is in a tropical climate; it receives annual precipitation amounts of >3500 mm and experiences active shortening and thrusting, while the western side is one of the driest places on Earth and is deformed by long-wavelength warping. Indeed, climate is so dry that the western slopes can go decades without recorded rainfall. Here we show that the modern distribution of deformation in the Central Andes can be a result of enhanced orographic precipitation pattern beginning ca. 7-10 Ma (Norton and Schlunegger, 2011). Reduced erosion on the western side would have steepened the orogen, forcing deformation to shift to the east where high precipitation amounts would have enhanced erosion. We support this hypothesis with low erosion rates and a well-defined retreating knickzone in the Western Andes, and likewise by high erosion rates and channel morphologies indicative of transient orographic feedbacks in the east. Indeed, erosion rates as measured by cosmogenic nuclides are 0.2 mm yr-1, in the east (Safran et al. 2005). Stream profiles from the Western Escarpment are indicative of slow knickzone retreat in the absence of modern tectonic forcing while streams on the Eastern Escarpment are the product of strong climate-tectonic feedbacks, indicated by steep and strongly concave segments in the orographically-affected reach. Reconstructions of the accretionary wedge geometry and high angle fault movements between the Miocene and today further support an erosion driven shift in the locus of deformation. In particular, at orogenic scales, critical taper calculations indicate that the near cessation of erosion on the western side ca. 7-10 Ma ago shifted the orogen into a super-critical state where deformation only occurs along the basal décollement, while the eastern margin resided in sub-critical to critical conditions and experienced

  16. Sediment yield along the Andes: continental budget, regional variations, and comparisons with other basins from orogenic mountain belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Restrepo, Juan D.

    2014-07-01

    We assess the sediment yield at 119 gauging stations distributed from Colombia to Patagonia, covering the different morphotectonic and morphoclimatic settings of the Andes. The most productive areas are the Meta River basin within the northern Andes and the Bolivian and northern Argentina-Chaco systems, which produce an average of 3345, 4909 and 2654 t km2 y- 1 of sediment, respectively. The rivers of the northern and central Andes (excluding the Pacific watersheds of Peru, northern Chile, and central Argentina) have a weighted mean sediment yield of 2045 t km- 2 y- 1 and produce 2.25 GTy- 1 of total sediment. A major constraint estimating the Andean continental budget of sediment yield lies in the lack of gauging data for the Peruvian region. Using the available gauge stations, the regional sediment yield appears underestimated. Assuming a higher value of sediment yield for the Peruvian Andes, the total budget for the whole central Andes could range between 2.57 GT y- 1 and 3.44 GT y- 1. A minimum of ~ 0.55 GT y- 1 and a probable maximum of ~ 1.74 GT y- 1 of sediment are deposited in the intramontane and surrounding proximal sedimentary basins. The magnitude of sediment yield in the Andes is comparable to other rivers draining orogenic belts around the world.

  17. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades. PMID:25796324

  18. Late Pleistocene glaciation in the Central Andes: Temperature versus humidity control — A case study from the eastern Bolivian Andes (17°S) and regional synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, C.; Imhof, S.; Grosjean, M.; Zech, R.; Veit, H.

    2008-01-01

    A glacier-climate model was used to calculate climatic conditions in a test site on the east Andean slope around Cochabamba (17°S, Bolivia) for the time of the maximum Late Pleistocene glaciation. Results suggest a massive temperature reduction of about - 6.4 °C (+ 1.4/- 1.3 °C), combined with annual precipitation rates of about 1100 mm (+ 570 mm/- 280 mm). This implies no major change in annual precipitation compared with today. Summer precipitation was the source for the humidity in the past, as is the case today. This climate scenario argues for a maximum advance of the paleo-glaciers in the eastern cordillera during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 20 ka BP), which is confirmed by exposure age dates. In a synthesized view over the central Andes, the results point to an increased summer precipitation-driven Late Glacial (15-10 ka BP) maximum advance in the western part of the Altiplano (18°S-23°S), a temperature-driven maximum advance during full glacial times (LGM) in the eastern cordillera, and a pre- and post-LGM (32 ka BP/14 ka BP) maximum advance around 30°S related to increased precipitation and reduced temperature on the western slope of the Andes. The results indicate the importance of understanding the seasonality and details of the mass balance-climate interaction in order to disentangle drivers for the observed regionally asynchronous past glaciations in the central Andes.

  19. Transecta Andina: Estudios de interregionalidad y verticalidad en los Andes del sur del Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Reindel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Las poblaciones prehispánicas del sur del Perú desarrollaron sistemas socioeconómicos sofisticados que les permitieron adaptarse a la enorme diversidad ecológica de los Andes. Entre la sierra de los Andes y la costa desértica del Pacífico se formó una regionalización muy marcada. Los sistemas económicos correspondientes se reflejan en los restos de los asentamientos prehispánicos de cada región, que hoy en día se pueden detectar con métodos arqueológicos. El proyecto “Transecta Andina” del I...

  20. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.

  1. A Regional GIS of the Central Andes, South America - Integration of Satellite and Geophysical Data Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, K; F. K. List;  

    1996-01-01

    The Central Andes of northern Chile, southwestern Bolivia and northwestern Argentina are studied by a research project supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB 267). The main topics of these geological and geophysical investigations are the orogeny of the Andean mountains and the crustal development at an active continental margin. The "Andean GIS" is designed as a tool for data collection, management, overview, analysis and mapping. The integration of different data supports the...

  2. Glacier contribution to streamflow in two headwaters of the Huasco River, Dry Andes of Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Gascoin, S.; C. Kinnard; R. Ponce; S. Lhermitte; MacDonell, S; A. Rabatel

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of glacier contribution to present-day streamflow is a prerequisite to the anticipation of climate change impact on water resources in the Dry Andes. In this paper we focus on two glaciated headwater catchments of the Huasco Basin (Chile, 29° S). The combination of glacier monitoring data for five glaciers (Toro 1, Toro 2, Esperanza, Guanaco, Estrecho and Ortigas) with five automatic streamflow records at sites with glacier coverage of 0.4 to 11% allows the estimation ...

  3. Two new species of Siphocampylus (Campanulaceae, Lobelioideae) from the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Laura P; Santamaría-Aguilar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Two species of Siphocampylus (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae) from the Central Andes of Peru and Bolivia are described, illustrated, and discussed with reference to related species. One species, Siphocampylus antonellii, is endemic to high elevation grasslands of Calca, Peru, while the second, Siphocampylus siberiensis, is endemic to cloud forests of Cochabamba, Bolivia. Both species are robust shrubs that produce tubular pink flowers that are likely pollinated by hummingbirds. PMID:26884710

  4. Assessment of future regional precipitation pattern for an Andes region in Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, N.; Rohrer, M.; Acuna, D.; Calanca, P.; Huggel, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Cusco and Apurímac region (Southern Peru) in the outer tropical Andes is characterized by a distinct wet and dry season. The climatology of the Andes region in southern Peru is complex and mainly influenced by tropical and extra tropical upper level-large scale circulation as well as by local convection. For the past decades, observations from station data show a slight negative precipitation trend for the area. Scenarios for the future are associated with large uncertainties. Data from the few available Regional Climate Model simulations, and results from statistical downscaling show neither clear nor consistent future precipitation trends for this region The large biodiversity in the high altitude of the Andes and the critical socio-economic situation of the majority of the local population imply a high vulnerability to climate variability and change. Even small shifts in particular in the precipitation regime (sum, frequency or intensity) can therefore have significant impacts on the livelihood of the rural population. Droughts and flooding events that occurred in the past years have demonstrated the heavy repercussion of extreme events. In our study, we analysed and correlated past regional station observations with large-scale circulation patterns from Renanalyses in order to aim at improving our understanding of the major drivers for precipitation in the Cusco-Apurímac region. First results show an only moderate correlation with ENSO and a relative stronger correlation with moisture transported from the Amazon Basin. Our results are then related to large-scale pattern scenarios provided by GCMs and discussed in view of possible impacts of climate change for the Cusco - Apurímac region. In conclusion, we aim at showing at the example of this specific area of the Andes how process knowledge can be used to support the development of adaptation measures in regions with limited availability of data.

  5. Taller de capacitación en el manejo del gorgojo de Los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. Instituto de la Pequeña Producción Sustentable

    2008-01-01

    El presente documento contiene el desarrollo del taller de manejo del gorgojo de los Andes en la Comunidad Campesina de Santa María, trabajo fue realizado por el equipo del Instituto de la Pequeña Producción Sustentable (IPPS) de la Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina - UNALM, en el marco del desarrollo del proyecto: Desarrollo de capacidades para la adaptación al cambio climático y de mercado en comunidades del Altiplano.

  6. What facilitates adaptation? An analysis of community-based adaptation to environmental change in the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Murtinho

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses the environmental, socio-economic andinstitutional factors that influence community-based adaptation strategies in 16municipalities in the rural Andes of Colombia. The study focuses specifically onthe factors that influence whether communities decide to take measures to managetheir water and micro-watersheds in response to water scarcity caused by climatevariability and land-use changes. The research uses quantitative and qualitativemethods incorporating data from surveys ...

  7. Drivers of atmospheric methane uptake by montane forest soils in the southern Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, S. P.; T. Diem; L. P. Huaraca Quispe; Cahuana, A. J.; D. S. Reay; Meir, P.; Teh, Y. A.

    2016-01-01

    The soils of tropical montane forests can act as sources or sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4). Understanding this activity is important in regional atmospheric CH4 budgets, given that these ecosystems account for substantial portions of the landscape in mountainous areas like the Andes. Here we investigate the drivers of CH4 fluxes from premontane, lower and upper montane forests, experiencing a seasonal climate, in southeastern Peru. Between February 2011 and June 2013, these so...

  8. Revisiting mountain-building in the Andes of Central Chile: constraints from structural geology and thermochronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesner, M.; Lacassin, R.; Simoes, M.; Armijo, R.; Carrizo, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Andes, one of the most significant reliefs on Earth, is the case example of a subduction-type mountain belt. In central Chile and western Argentina, the particular east-vergent structure of the Aconcagua fold-and-thrust belt (AFTB) is found atop a huge basement high with elevations > 4000 m, the Frontal Cordillera. Classical conceptual models consider the Andes as an east-vergent orogen, opposite to the Nazca subduction, and describe the exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera as an eastward in-sequence event that occurred late in the andean deformation (by ~10My). An alternative model recently challenged this view by proposing that the Andes have mainly a primary westward vergence. Within this scheme, the exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera would have begun earlier, by ~25My, synchronous with formation of the AFTB on the western side of the basement high. Here we test these two models by revisiting structural cross-sections of the Andes at the latitude of Santiago de Chile and of the Aconcagua (~33°S). We provide thermochronological constraints on the timing of exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera by (U-Th)/He dating on apatites retrieved from paleozoic granitoids along a 2,3km high nearly vertical section in the core of the basement high. Preliminary results suggest that the Frontal Cordillera exhumation was not a late event and likely began around 25 Ma. Therefore it appears to be synchronous with deformation within the AFTB and the westernmost fold-and-thrust belt at this latitude. We discuss these results and their implications while building a crustal-scale cross section of the range at the latitude of Santiago de Chile.

  9. An InSAR-based survey of volcanic deformation in the central Andes

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. Pritchard; Simons, M.

    2004-01-01

    We extend an earlier interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey covering about 900 remote volcanos of the central Andes (14°–27°S) between the years 1992 and 2002. Our survey reveals broad (10s of km), roughly axisymmetric deformation at 4 volcanic centers: two stratovolcanoes are inflating (Uturuncu, Bolivia, and Hualca Hualca, Peru); another source of inflation on the border between Chile and Argentina is not obviously associated with a volcanic edifice (here called Lazufre); a...

  10. Do climate changes influence dispersal and population dynamics of dragonflies in the western Peruvian Andes?

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    For nine dragonfly species (five aeshnids and four libellulids) all previous and verifiable data are related to the vertical climate zones and nature regions of the western Peruvian Andes and the Peruvian Pacific coast. Climate changes due to the El Niño and La Niña phenomena, as well as the global climate change have an influence on the different natural regions and also restrict aquatic biotopes. These changes influence the dispersal and behavior of some dragonflies and concer...

  11. La implantación de la viruela en los Andes, la historia de un holocausto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel García Cáceres

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La historia de las epidemias de viruela en los Andes tiene el carácter tétrico del relato de un holocausto. Esta presentación está destinada a resaltar las etapas más importantes del proceso de la implantación de la viruela en las poblaciones andinas en general y, en particular, en el Perú, desde principio del siglo XVI hasta nuestros días.

  12. DETERMINATION OF EFFECTIVE ELASTIC THICKNESS OF THE COLOMBIAN ANDES USING SATELLITE-DERIVED GRAVITY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casallas1 Iván

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Gravity anomaly values derived from Global Geopotential Models (calculated from the CHAMP and GRACE satellite missions, are compared with free air ground gravity data to find the best representation of surface data. Using these values and topographical heights extracted from digital topography models, we applied the isostatic response function (admittance to a collection of profiles, to find an average of elastic thickness for the Colombian Andes.

  13. "All they want is to be treated well": Public health care in the rural Ecuadorian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Rokne, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In thesis I describe the meeting between biomedical health care and indigenous patients in rural Ecuadorian Andes. I show how biomedical conceptualization of health and good treatment differs from local understandings. Ecuador is a hierarchical society, where marginalization of the indigenous population has become naturalized. In the community where I did my fieldwork this marginalization became visible through health care. Firstly rural areas have bee...

  14. Two new species of Leptanilloides Mann, 1823 (Formicidae: Dorylinae) from the Andes of southern Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut Delsinne; Gontran Sonet; David A. Donoso

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of Leptanilloides are described: L. copalinga Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., and L. prometea Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., based on workers collected in the leaf litter and soil of the Andes of southern Ecuador. Both species belong to the L. biconstricta species-group (formally diagnosed here). The metatibial gland, considered a synapomorphy for Dorylinae, is observed in L. prometea sp. nov. but seems absent in L. copalinga sp. nov. We provide a COI DNA barcode for both spe...

  15. Adaptive Capacity of Rural Communities to Climate Change in the Andes – Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaurre de Mulczyk, Marolyn

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the major contributing factors to degradation of ecological services, and these in turn are harming many people and causing poverty mainly in rural areas. The information available and the gain of knowledge on how climate change is affecting livelihood resources in the Bolivian Andes are very limited. This research aims to advance in the understanding of adaptive capacity to social and climate change in rural communities whose livelihoods are dependent upon agricultur...

  16. Late Quaternary deglacial history of the Mérida Andes, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, Nathan D.; Abbott, Mark B.; Polissar, Pratigya J.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Bezada, Maximiliano; Rull, Valentí

    2005-10-01

    Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from seven lakes and two bogs spanning the Cordillera de Mérida in the Venezuelan Andes were used to identify and date the regional history of late Pleistocene and Holocene glacial activity. Coring sites were selected at different elevations across a pronounced rain shadow from southeast (wet) to northwest (dry). Sediment lithostratigraphy and magnetic susceptibility, in conjunction with AMS radiocarbon dates on macrofossils and charcoal, were used to constrain deglaciation. The local expression of the Last Glacial Maximum occurred between 22 750 and 19 960 cal. yr BP. On the wetter southeastern side of the Cordillera de Mérida, glaciers had significantly retreated by 15 700 cal. yr BP, followed by several minor glacial advances and retreats between 14 850 and 13 830 cal. yr BP. At least one major glacial readvance occurred between 13 830 and 10 000 cal. yrBP in the wetter southeastern sector of the region. The drier northwest side of the Cordillera de Mérida records initial glacial retreat by 14240cal.yrBP. Multiple sites on both sides of the Mérida Andes record a further phase of extensive deglaciation approximately 10000cal.yrBP. However, the north-northwest facing Mucubají catchment remained partially glaciated until ca. 6000cal.yrBP. Deglacial ages from the Venezuelan Andes are consistently younger than those reported from the Southern Hemisphere Andes, suggesting an inter-hemispheric deglacial lag in the northern tropics of the order of two thousand years.

  17. Simple mixing as the major control of the evolution of volcanic suites in the Ecuadorian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Schiano, Pierre; Monzier, Michel; Eissen, Jean-Philippe; Martin, H; Koga, K. T.

    2010-01-01

    Examination of an extensive major and trace element database for about 700 whole rocks from the Ecuadorian Andes reveals series of local trends typified by three volcanoes: Iliniza and Pichincha from the Western Cordillera and Tungurahua from the Eastern Cordillera. These local trends are included in a more scattered global trend that reflects typical across-arc chemical variations. The scatter of the global trend is attributed to greater crustal contributions or decreasing melt fractions. Tr...

  18. Potential of a Neutrino Detector in the ANDES Underground Laboratory for Geophysics and Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, P A N; Nunokawa, H; Funchal, R Zukanovich

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Agua Negra tunnels that will link Argentina and Chile under the Andes, the world longest mountain range, opens the possibility to build the first deep underground labo- ratory in the Southern Hemisphere. This laboratory has the acronym ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) and its overburden could be as large as \\sim 1.7 km of rock, or 4500 mwe, providing an excellent low background environment to study physics of rare events like the ones induced by neutrinos and/or dark matter. In this paper we investigate the physics potential of a few kiloton size liquid scintillator detector, which could be constructed in the ANDES laboratory as one of its possible scientific programs. In particular, we evaluate the impact of such a detector for the studies of geoneutrinos and galactic supernova neutrinos assuming a fiducial volume of 3 kilotons as a reference size. We emphasize the complementary roles of such a detector to the ones in the Northern Hemisphere neutrino facilities through some adv...

  19. Animal-powered tillage erosion assessment in the southern Andes region of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercon, G.; Govers, G.; Poesen, J.; Sánchez, H.; Rombaut, K.; Vandenbroeck, E.; Loaiza, G.; Deckers, J.

    2007-06-01

    While water erosion has been the focus of past research in the Andes, former studies show that soil erosion could also be related to the methods used in cultivating the fields. The main objective of the present study was to assess (i) tillage erosion caused by the traditional animal-powered "yunta" or ard plough in the Andes and the factors controlling the process and (ii) the implications for soil conservation. Erosion rates were experimentally measured on 27 sites, having slopes from ca. 0% to 60% and soils ranging from Andosols to Cambisols, in the Andes region of Ecuador (Gima, Azuay). Different tillage methods were assessed: (i) tillage parallel to the contour lines ('Paralelo') and (ii) tillage at an angle with the contour lines. Statistical analysis points out that erosion caused by animal-powered tillage is gravity-driven. A strong correlation exists between slope and downslope displacement: furthermore, tillage depth and initial soil condition are important. For the 'Paralelo' tillage method the tillage transportation coefficient ( k) is below 100 kg m - 1 Tillage Pass - 1 , for the combined 'Arado'-'Cruzado' tillage method k may exceed 300 kg m - 1 . Tillage erosion is responsible for the reduction of the slope between the contour strips over a relatively short time period of 20 years, resulting in the formation of terraces and therefore the reduction of the water erosion risk. However, at the same time it may negatively affect soil quality.

  20. Developing services for climate impact and adaptation baseline information and methodologies for the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, C.

    2012-04-01

    Impacts of climate change are observed and projected across a range of ecosystems and economic sectors, and mountain regions thereby rank among the hotspots of climate change. The Andes are considered particularly vulnerable to climate change, not only due to fragile ecosystems but also due to the high vulnerability of the population. Natural resources such as water systems play a critical role and are observed and projected to be seriously affected. Adaptation to climate change impacts is therefore crucial to contain the negative effects on the population. Adaptation projects require information on the climate and affected socio-environmental systems. There is, however, generally a lack of methodological guidelines how to generate the necessary scientific information and how to communicate to implementing governmental and non-governmental institutions. This is particularly important in view of the international funds for adaptation such as the Green Climate Fund established and set into process at the UNFCCC Conferences of the Parties in Cancun 2010 and Durban 2011. To facilitate this process international and regional organizations (World Bank and Andean Community) and a consortium of research institutions have joined forces to develop and define comprehensive methodologies for baseline and climate change impact assessments for the Andes, with an application potential to other mountain regions (AndesPlus project). Considered are the climatological baseline of a region, and the assessment of trends based on ground meteorological stations, reanalysis data, and satellite information. A challenge is the scarcity of climate information in the Andes, and the complex climatology of the mountain terrain. A climate data platform has been developed for the southern Peruvian Andes and is a key element for climate data service and exchange. Water resources are among the key livelihood components for the Andean population, and local and national economy, in particular for

  1. Seismicity, fault plane solutions, depth of faulting, and active tectonics of the Andes of Peru, Ecuador, and southern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, G.; Molnar, P.; Burchfiel, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    The long-period P waveforms observed for 17 earthquakes in the Peruvian Andes during 1963-1976 are compared with synthetic waveforms to obtain fault-plane solutions and focal depths. The morphological units of the Peruvian Andes are characterized: coastal plains, Cordillera Occidental, altiplano and central high plateau, Cordillera Oriental, and sub-Andes. The data base and analysis methodology are discussed, and the results are presented in tables, diagrams, graphs, maps, and photographs illustrating typical formations. Most of the earthquakes are shown to occur in the transition zone from the sub-Andes to the Cordillera Oriental under formations of about 1 km elevation at focal depths of 10-38 km. It is suggested that the sub-Andean earthquakes reflect hinterland deformation of a detached fold and thrust belt, perhaps like that which occurred in parts of the Canadian Rockies. From the total crustal shortening evident in Andean morphology and the shortening rate of the recent earthquakes it is estimated that the topography and crustal root of the Andes have been formed during the last 90-135 Myr.

  2. Salar de Atacama basin: A record of compressional tectonics in the central Andes since the mid-Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, Cesar; Cobbold, Peter R.; Roperch, Pierrick

    2006-02-01

    The Salar de Atacama basin lies in the inner fore arc of northern Chile. Topographically and structurally, it is a first-order feature of the central Andes. The sedimentary fill of the basin constrains the timing and extent of crustal deformation since the mid-Cretaceous. We have studied good exposures along the western edge of the basin and have correlated them with seismic reflection sections and data from an exploration well. Throughout most of its history, the basin developed in a foreland setting, during periods of thin-skinned and thick-skinned thrusting. Growth strata provide evidence for coeval sedimentation and thrust motions during mid-Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene times. Pre-Neogene deformation was significant in the basin and in surounding areas of the early central Andes. Models that attempt to explain the current thickness of the central Andes should consider Late Cretaceous and Paleogene shortening, as well as the more obvious Neogene and Quaternary shortening.

  3. Phylogenetic relationships between telmatobiinids (Anura, Ceratophryidae, Telmatobiinae of central Andes based on morphology of larval and adult stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Aguilar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius are the two genus of Telmatobiinae from the central Andes. Both genera have species with adaptations for life at high altitude in the Andes, with aquatic or semi-aquatic habits in creeks, lagoons and lakes. The objective of this study is to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships between Batrachophrynus and 13 species of Telmatobius from the central Andes using larval and adult morphology including diagnostic characters for Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius, and putative sinapomorphies for Telmatobius. The phylogenetic analysis showed 20 parsimonious trees with 56 steps length. The results of this study hypothesize that the species assigned to Batrachophrynus form a monophyletic group nested within Telmatobius. In this study, most of the synapomorphies that support Telmatobius (including Batrachophrynus come from larval morphology and these sinapomorphies will probably support the whole genus.

  4. Generation of the relationship between glacier area and volume for a tropical glacier in Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Kinouchi, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Tsuda, M.; Iwami, Y.; Asaoka, Y.; Mendoza, J.

    2015-12-01

    In Andes, retreat of tropical glaciers is rapid, thus water resources currently available from glacierized catchments would be changed in its volume and temporal variations due to climate change and glacier shrinkage. The relationship between glacier area and volume is difficult to define however which is important to monitor glaciers especially those are remote or inaccessible. Water resources in La Paz and El Alto in Bolivia, strongly depend on the runoff from glacierized headwater catchments in the Cordillera Real, Andes, which is therefore selected as our study region.To predict annual glacier mass balances, PWRI-Distributed Hydrological Model (PWRI-DHM) was applied to simulate runoff from the partially glacierized catchments in high mountains (i.e. Condoriri-Huayna West headwater catchment located in the Cordillera Real, Bolivian Andes). PWRI-DHM is based on tank model concept in a distributed and 4-tank configuration including surface, unsaturated, aquifer, and river course tanks. The model was calibrated and validated with observed meteorological and hydrological data from 2011 to 2014 by considering different phases of precipitation, various runoff components from glacierized and non-glacierized areas, and the retarding effect by glacial lakes and wetlands. The model is then applied with MRI-AGCM outputs from 1987 to 2003 considering the shrinkage of glacier outlines since 1980s derived from Landsat data. Annual glacier mass balance in each 100m-grid was reproduced, with which the glacier area-volume relationship was generated with reasonable initial volume setting. Out study established a method to define the relationship between glacier area and volume by remote sensing information and glacier mass balances simulated by distributed hydrological model. Our results demonstrated that the changing trend of local glacier had a consistency the previous observed glacier area-volume relationship in the Cordillera Real.

  5. Constraints on deformation of the Southern Andes since the Cretaceous from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Hernandez-Moreno, Catalina; Ghiglione, Matias C.; Speranza, Fabio; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-12-01

    The southernmost segment of the Andean Cordillera underwent a complex deformation history characterized by alternation of contractional, extensional, and strike-slip tectonics. Key elements of southern Andean deformation that remain poorly constrained, include the origin of the orogenic bend known as the Patagonian Orocline (here renamed as Patagonian Arc), and the exhumation mechanism of an upper amphibolite facies metamorphic complex currently exposed in Cordillera Darwin. Here, we present results of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) from 22 sites in Upper Cretaceous to upper Eocene sedimentary rocks within the internal structural domain of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). AMS parameters from most sites reveal a weak tectonic overprint of the original magnetic fabric, which was likely acquired upon layer-parallel shortening soon after sedimentation. Magnetic lineation from 17 sites is interpreted to have formed during compressive tectonic phases associated to a continuous ~ N-S contraction. Our data, combined with the existing AMS database from adjacent areas, show that the Early Cretaceous-late Oligocene tectonic phases in the Southern Andes yielded continuous contraction, variable from ~ E-W in the Patagonian Andes to ~ N-S in the Fuegian Andes, which defined a radial strain field. A direct implication is that the exhumation of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex occurred under compressive, rather than extensional or strike-slip tectonics, as alternatively proposed. If we agree with recent works considering the curved Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt as a primary arc (i.e., no relative vertical-axis rotation of the limbs occurs during its formation), then other mechanisms different from oroclinal bending should be invoked to explain the documented radial strain field. We tentatively propose a kinematic model in which reactivation of variably oriented Jurassic faults at the South American continental margin

  6. Gravity waves above the Andes detected from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles: Jet mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Llamedo, P.; Menéndez, C.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.

    2006-12-01

    A significant wave activity (WA) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, mainly during winter, was detected at midlatitudes in the southern hemisphere (30-40S) above the Andes Range, from an analysis of Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPS RO) temperature profiles retrieved by CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) and SAC-C (Satélite de Aplicaciones Científicas-C) Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, between May 2001 and February 2006. The possible main gravity wave sources in this region are: i) orographic forcing, ii) geostrophic adjustment and iii) deep convection. The available vertical resolution of GPS RO soundings does not rule out any of these alternatives. Based on satellite imaginary, the WA enhancements cannot be attributed to deep convection events. Inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) could be generated after a geostrophic adjustment process, following a perturbation of the zonal jet situated above the Andes Mountains by mountain waves (MWs). The monthly WA intensity follows the zonal wind velocity strength according to its seasonal variability at jet altitudes. As the GPS-LEO lines of sight are roughly meridionally aligned and the morphology of the Andes at middle latitudes is predominantly north-south, it was possible to detect MWs as well as IGWs from GPS RO temperature profiles. This characteristic does not apply for other mountain range alignments. From the analysis of a numerical simulation at the time and location of a single RO event with very strong WA, two main modes of oscillation with horizontal wavelength around 40 and 200 km were identified. The first one is attributed to a MW and the second one to an IGW.

  7. Proglacial lake sediments, cosmogenic ages and stable isotopes reveal Holocene climate changes in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, N.; Rodbell, D. T.; Licciardi, J. M.; Abbott, M. B.; Mark, B. G.; Schweinsberg, A.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment records from lakes and cosmogenic ages on moraine boulders in central Peru document the waxing and waning of alpine glaciers since the end of the late glacial stage. These records from the southern tropical Andes tentatively suggest that a brief re-advance occurred during the early Holocene, even though conditions overall were relatively warm and dry from ~12 to 8 ka. The middle Holocene (between 8 and 4 ka) was marked by a shift to cooler, and possibly wetter conditions in certain regions, leading to glacial advances. Although there were multiple periods of brief ice advances that punctuated the overall late Holocene trend, glaciers in multiple valleys generally retreated from ~4.0 ka through the Medieval Climate Anomaly (1.0 to 0.7 ka). This late Holocene pattern of ice retreat occurred during a period when lake level studies, and both lacustrine and speleothem stable isotopic records indicate wetter conditions, suggesting that higher temperatures contributed to the pattern of ice retreat. Following this period of glacial retreat, multiple proxy records suggest that the start of the Little Ice Age (~0.6 to 0.1 ka) was a colder and wetter time throughout much of the tropical Andes. While there is emerging evidence that the strength of the South American Summer Monsoon increased through the Holocene, these shifting precipitation patterns do not fully explain the record of glaciation in Peru. It is likely that sea surface temperature distributions in the tropical Pacific Ocean also affected atmospheric temperature, precipitation and circulation patterns over the Andes. The combined influences of both Atlantic and Pacific ocean and atmospheric influences thus contributed to the observed pattern of glacial variability during the Holocene.

  8. Land Use Change and Hydrologic Processes in High-Elevation Tropical Watersheds of the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, W. A.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Covino, T. P.; Peña, C.

    2013-12-01

    The humid tropics cover one-fifth of the Earth's land surface and generate the greatest amount of runoff of any biome globally, but remain poorly understood and understudied. Humid tropical regions of the northern and central Andes have experienced greater anthropogenic land-use/land-cover (LULC) change than nearly any other high mountain system in the world. Vast expanses of this region are currently undergoing rapid transformation to farmland for production of potatoes and pasture for cattle grazing. Although the humid tropics have some of the highest runoff ratios, precipitation, and largest river flows in the world, there is a lack of scientific literature that addresses hydrologic processes in these regions and very few field observations are available to inform management strategies to ensure the sustainability of water resources of present and future generations. We seek to improve understanding of hydrologic processes and feedbacks in the humid tropics using existing and new information from two high-elevation watersheds that span a LULC gradient in the Andes Mountains of Colombia. One site is located in the preserved Chingaza Natural National Park in Central Colombia (undisturbed). The second site is located ~60 km to the northwest and has experienced considerable LULC change over the last 40 years. Combined, these watersheds deliver over 80% of the water resources to Bogotá and neighboring communities. These watersheds have similar climatological characteristics (including annual precipitation), but have strong differences in LULC which result in substantial differences in hydrologic response and streamflow dynamics. We present an overview of many of the pressing issues and effects that land degradation and climate change are posing to the long-term sustainability of water resources in the northern Andes. Our overarching goal is to provide process-based knowledge that will be useful to prevent, mitigate, or respond to future water crises along the Andean

  9. Do climate changes influence dispersal and population dynamics of dragonflies in the western Peruvian Andes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Hoffmann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For nine dragonfly species (five aeshnids and four libellulids all previous and verifiable data are related to the vertical climate zones and nature regions of the western Peruvian Andes and the Peruvian Pacific coast. Climate changes due to the El Niño and La Niña phenomena, as well as the global climate change have an influence on the different natural regions and also restrict aquatic biotopes. These changes influence the dispersal and behavior of some dragonflies and concern also loss of habitats as well as alterations of biotic and abiotic factors at and in water. However new waters and habitats also are formed in most nature regions. Specialists like Rhionaeschna peralta, a species of high mountain regions and the Puna, are not able to react to habitat losses by adaptation, while other species such as R. maita and R. marchali do colonize new habitats also in higher altitudes. While the here represented aeshnids change their distribution ranges within the vertical nature regions of the west Andes, this is suspected for three of the four libellulids (Orthemis ferruginea, O. discolor and Pantala flavescens as latitudinally respectively longitudinally immigrations and expansions of their areals. For all species discussed, a seasonally earlier flight beginning is detectable, but for no species an extension of their flight time. Altogether, the above named three libellulid do react more flexibly and faster to the alterations by climate changes than the majority of the five aeshnid species. The influence of increased UV-B and UV-A radiation possibly affects also the site occurrence of some species in high altitudes of the Andes.

  10. Strike-slip faults in the southernmost Andes and the development of the Patagonian orocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, W. Dickson

    1993-02-01

    The Patagonian orocline is the 90° bend in the southernmost Andes between 50°S and 56°S. Paleomagnetic and structural data indicate that the orocline is, at least in part, the product of tectonic rotation. Recent field work in the Beagle Channel region of southernmost Chile provides evidence for widespread left-lateral strike-slip faulting in the internal zones of the mountain belt. Both arms of the Beagle Channel are interpreted to be left-lateral strike-slip faults based on detailed study of mesoscale strike-slip faults (Riedel shears) observed in coastal outcrops. Although much of the evidence indicates Cenozoic brittle strike-slip faulting, other fabric data, including vertical foliation zones containing horizontal quartz stretching lineations and ductile left-lateral kinematic indicators, suggest that Mesozoic ductile strike-slip or oblique-slip shearing also occurred. The implication is that the mid-Cretaceous Andean orogeny involved the transpressional inversion of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and that transpression has been the dominant deformational regime in the region for the last 120 Ma. Regional left-lateral strike-slip faults are now recognized in all lithotectonic provinces of the southernmost Andes. A statistical study of regional lineament trends using aerial photographs and satellite imagery suggests that many unstudied lineaments are also strike-slip faults. A new model is proposed that integrates the development of strike-slip faulting and the structural evolution and uplift of the southernmost Andes with the rotational development of the orocline. The Patagonian orocline appears to be the product of broad interplate shearing accommodated by strike-slip faulting, block rotation, and contraction and is probably continuing to evolve today.

  11. Assembly patterns of mixed-species avian flocks in the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado, Gabriel J; Rodewald, Amanda D

    2015-03-01

    The relative contribution of deterministic and stochastic processes in the assembly of biotic communities is a central issue of controversy in community ecology. However, several studies have shown patterns of species segregation that are consistent with the hypothesis that deterministic factors such as competition and niche-partitioning structure species assemblages in animal communities. Community assembly provides a theoretical framework for understanding these processes, but it has been seldom applied to social aggregations within communities. In this research, we assessed patterns of non-randomness in Andean mixed-species flocks using three assembly models: (i) co-occurrence patterns; (ii) guild proportionality; and (iii) constant body-size ratios using data from 221 species of resident and Neotropical migrant birds participating in 311 mixed-species flocks at 13 regions distributed in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Significant assembly patterns for mixed-species flocks based on co-occurrence models and guild proportionality models suggest that competitive interactions play an important role in structuring this social system in the Andes. Distribution of species among foraging guilds (i.e. insectivore, frugivore, omnivore, nectivore) was generally similar among flocks, though with some regional variation. In contrast, we found little evidence that structuring of mixed-species flocks in the Andes was mediated by body size. Rather, we found greater than expected variance of body-size ratios within flocks, indicating that birds did not segregate morphologically. Overall, our findings suggest that deterministic factors associated to competitive interactions are important contributors to mixed-species flock assemblages across the Andes. PMID:25283441

  12. Millennial-scale vegetation changes in the tropical Andes using ecological grouping and ordination methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Dunia H.; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Rama-Corredor, Oscar; Martrat, Belen; Grimalt, Joan O.; Thompson, Lonnie; Bush, Mark B.; González-Carranza, Zaire; Hanselman, Jennifer; Valencia, Bryan; Velásquez-Ruiz, César

    2016-03-01

    We compare eight pollen records reflecting climatic and environmental change from northern and southern sites in the tropical Andes. Our analysis focuses on the last 30 000 years, with particular emphasis on the Pleistocene to Holocene transition. We explore ecological grouping and downcore ordination results as two approaches for extracting environmental variability from pollen records. We also use the records of aquatic and shoreline vegetation as markers for lake level fluctuations and moisture availability. Our analysis focuses on the signature of millennial-scale climate variability in the tropical Andes, in particular Heinrich stadials (HS) and Greenland interstadials (GI). The pollen records show an overall warming trend during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, but the onset of post-glacial warming differs in timing among records. We identify rapid responses of the tropical vegetation to millennial-scale climate variability. The signatures of HS and the Younger Dryas are generally recorded as downslope upper forest line (UFL) migrations in our transect, and are likely linked to air temperature cooling. The GI1 signal is overall comparable between northern and southern records and indicates upslope UFL migrations and warming in the tropical Andes. Our marker for lake level changes indicated a north-to-south difference that could be related to moisture availability. The air temperature signature recorded by the Andean vegetation was consistent with millennial-scale cryosphere and sea surface temperature changes but suggests a potential difference between the magnitude of temperature change in the ocean and the atmosphere. We also show that arboreal pollen percentage (AP %) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) scores are two complementary approaches to extract environmental variability from pollen records.

  13. Miocene-Quaternary structural evolution of the Uyuni-Atacama region, Andes of Chile and Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Tibaldi, A.; Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca; Corazzato, C.; Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca; Rovida, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Miocene-Quaternary geological-structural evolution of the region between the Salar de Uyuni and de Atacama, Andes of Chile and Bolivia. We recognised four main tectonic events based on fold geometry, fault kinematics and stratigraphic data. The oldest event, of Miocene age, is characterized by folding and reverse faulting of the sedimentary successions with an E-W direction of shortening in the northern part of the studied area and a WNW-ESE shortening in the southern part. Th...

  14. SINOPSIS DE CROTON (EUPHORBIACEAE) EN LOS ANDES DE MÉRIDA, VENEZUELA

    OpenAIRE

    MANUEL LUJÁN; YELITZA LEÓN; RICARDA RIINA

    2015-01-01

    Se realizó una sinopsis taxonómica del género Croton en los Andes de Mérida, Venezuela. Se analizaron caracteres vegetativos en 245 especímenes y se hizo un análisis de agrupamiento que resultó en la identificación de 21 grupos discretos a los cuales les fueron asignadas las identidades taxonómicas específicas más apropiadas. De estas 21 especies, C. pedicellatus representa un nuevo registro para Venezuela, C. fragilis, C. speciosus y C. redolens son nuevos registros para la región andina. Se...

  15. Trophic polymorphism, habitat and diet segregation in Percichthys trucha (Pisces : Percichthyidae) in the Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzzante, D.E.; Walde, S.J.; Cussac, V.E.;

    1998-01-01

    Percichthys trucha, a fish endemic to temperate South America. In a series of lakes located in the southern Andes, we found two morphs of P. trucha that could be distinguished on the basis of gill raker length and five other morphological measures, most of which are likely associated with the use of food...... resources. The differences were consistent across all lakes examined, and were correlated with habitat use and diet. Individuals with longer gill rakers were more abundant in the littoral zone (littoral morph) while the short gill-raker morph was more abundant at 10 m depth and deeper (deep benthic morph...

  16. Muerte en los Andes: sociedad colonial y mortalidad en las haciendas andinas (Ecuador, 1743-1857)

    OpenAIRE

    María José Vilalta

    2015-01-01

    Resumen La vida cotidiana en las haciendas coloniales implicó la introducción de una forma de administración de poblaciones impuesta sobre la sociedad indígena y regulada por las Leyes de Indias. En la zona norte de los Andes, el concertaje de indios y la abundancia de trabajos en la agricultura y en los obrajes fueron factores de atracción que generaron la tendencia a un crecimiento poblacional de larga duración. Más allá del debate inconcluso sobre la catástrofe demográfica en las Indias, e...

  17. Integrated Assessment of Climate Variability and Change in the Tropical Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, P.

    2004-12-01

    Considering that the intensity and frequency of recurrent extreme events associated with flooding, droughts and freezes observed in the tropical Peruvian Andes could change with future global warming, an effort has begun to: (1) investigate the causes of such extreme events using correlation and principal component analysis; (2) generate future climate scenarios using statistical and dynamical downscaling; (3) integrate with the studies of vulnerability and adaptation strategies in the region. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of this effort, which is part of the national plan to strengthen the capacity to manage the impacts of climate change.

  18. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Ledru, M.-P.; Jomelli, V; Samaniego, P.; M. Vuille; S. Hidalgo; M. Herrera; Ceron, C.

    2013-01-01

    To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analyzed the pollen content of a 1150-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the Andean forest to the bog (T) and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P), was defined. This index was use...

  19. Amalgamation and small-scale gold mining in the ancient Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, William E.; Schwörbel, Gabriela; Castillo, Luis Enrique

    2013-01-01

    In 1532, the volume of gold provided by Atahualpa, the Inka king, as ransom for his release from the Spanish was hard evidence for the efficient small-scale gold mining that took place before European contact and the number of gold occurrences in the Andes. At Huancavelica, Perú, mercury occurs as a native metal and as cinnabar [HgS], which was used for pigments, funeral preparations, and retorted to obtain mercury. Using Inductively Coupled Plasma analysis (ICP), an average of 15 ppm (parts...

  20. Assessment of climate change impacts on the hydrology of the Peruvian Amazon-Andes basin

    OpenAIRE

    Casimiro, W. S. L.; Labat, D.; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Ardoin Bardin, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we propose an investigation of the modifications of the hydrological response of two Peruvian AmazonasAndes basins in relationship with the modifications of the precipitation and evapotranspiration rates inferred by the IPCC. These two basins integrate around 10% of the total area of the Amazonian basin. These estimations are based on the application of two monthly hydrological models, GR2M and MWB3, and the climatic projections come from BCM2, CSMK3 and MIHR models for A1B a...

  1. Effect of Vandetanib on Andes virus survival in the hamster model of Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Dodd, Kimberly A; Erickson, Bobbie R; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-08-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe disease caused by hantavirus infection of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells leading to microvascular leakage, pulmonary edema, pleural effusion and high case fatality. Previously, we demonstrated that Andes virus (ANDV) infection caused up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and concomitant downregulation of the cellular adhesion molecule VE-cadherin leading to increased permeability. Analyses of human HPS-patient sera have further demonstrated increased circulating levels of VEGF. Here we investigate the impact of a small molecule antagonist of the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) activation in vitro, and overall impact on survival in the Syrian hamster model of HPS. PMID:27233645

  2. Prediction of extreme floods in the Central Andes by means of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Barbosa, Henrique; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Based on a non-linear synchronisation measure and complex network theory, we present a novel framework for the prediction of extreme events of spatially embedded, interrelated time series. This method is general in the sense that it can be applied to any type of spatially sampled time series with significant interrelations, ranging from climate observables to biological or stock market data. In this presentation, we apply our method to extreme rainfall in South America and show how this leads to the prediction of more than 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of Bolivia and northern Argentina, with only 1% false alarms. From paleoclimatic to decadal time scales, the Central Andes continue to be subject to pronounced changes in climatic conditions. In particular, our and past work shows that frequency as well as magnitudes of extreme rainfall events have increased significantly during past decades, calling for a better understanding of the involved climatic mechanisms. Due to their large spatial extend and occurrence at high elevations, these extreme events often lead to severe floods and landslides with disastrous socioeconomic impacts. They regularly affect tens of thousands of people and produce estimated costs of the order of several hundred million USD. Alongside with the societal value of predicting natural hazards, our study provides insights into the responsible climatic features and suggests interactions between Rossby waves in polar regions and large scale (sub-)tropical moisture transport as a driver of subseasonal variability of the South American monsoon system. Predictable extreme events result from the propagation of extreme rainfall from the region of Buenos Aires towards the Central Andes given characteristic atmospheric conditions. Our results indicate that the role of frontal systems originating from Rossby waves in polar latitudes is much more dominant for controlling extreme rainfall in

  3. Deep Convection Events Above The Tunuyan Valley Near The Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Torre, A.; Teitelbaum, H.

    Two cases of deep convection developed during spring and summer above the Tunuyan valley, Argentina (33.5S, 69W) at the East of the Andes range are presented. The trig- gering mechanism for the beginning of the moist air updraft is provided by anabatic winds generated inside the valley. With the use of cloud tops temperature images, radiosoundings and ECMWF analyses data, we compute the top cloud altitude, the specific moist enthalpy convergence near the ground and the convective available po- tential energy. In both cases, a noticeable agreement with the maximum cloud top detected and the level of neutral buoyancy is obtained.

  4. On the Extension of the Analytic Nodal Diffusion Solver ANDES to Sodium Fast Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa Valero, Raquel; Herrero Carrascosa, José Javier; García Herranz, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the Collaborative Project for a European Sodium Fast Reactor, the reactor physics group at UPM is working on the extension of its in-house multi-scale advanced deterministic code COBAYA3 to Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR). COBAYA3 is a 3D multigroup neutron kinetics diffusion code that can be used either as a pin-by-pin code or as a stand-alone nodal code by using the analytic nodal diffusion solver ANDES. It is coupled with thermalhydraulics codes such as COB...

  5. Salud mental y resilencia en estudiantes de Arte, Universidad de los Andes, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    González González, Julio César

    2015-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Psiquiatría. Fecha de lectura: 15-04-2015 El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo hacer una evaluación del estado de salud mental y de la capacidad resiliente de los estudiantes de la Escuela de Artes Visuales y Diseño Gráfico de la Facultad de Arte de la Universidad de Los Andes. La muestra estuvo constituida por 318 cursantes entre principio, mitad y final de la carrera, 119 (44.07 %) ...

  6. Structural Evolution of the Central Venezuelan Andes: Changes From Compression to Strike-slip and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervouet, Y.; Dhont, D.; Backe, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Venezuelan Andes form a N50°E-trending belt extending from the colombian border in the SW to the Caribbean sea in the NE. The belt is 100 km wide and its highest summits reach 5000 m in its central part. Uplift of the belt is a consequence of the relative convergence between the triangular-shaped Maracaibo crustal block on the west and the Guyana shield belonging to South America. The Maracaibo block is cut by a series of strike-slip faults separating several crustal units. Among these, the easternmost Trujillo triangular block is limited on the west by the N-S left-lateral Valera fault and on the south-east by the NE-trending right-lateral Bocono fault. Our methodology, based on the analysis of radar satellite and digital elevation model imagery and implemented by structural field work and the compilation of seismotectonic data, presents a new understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Venezuelan Andes during the Neogene-Quaternary. We have characterized three stages of deformation. The first, Mio-Pliocene in age, corresponds to the NW-SE Andean compression responsible for the uplift of the Venezuelan Andes. The second tectonic stage is consitent with a strike-slip regime of deformation marked by shearing along the Bocono and Valera faults and hence individualizing the Trujillo block, which has been cut into two smaller triangular wedges. This strike-slip faulting- dominated compressional-extensional tectonic regime started at some point between the Pliocene and the Quaternary and allowed the Trujillo crustal block to move towards the NE. The third stage of deformation corresponds to extension in the Trujillo block and is still active today. The present-day distribution of the deformation in the Venezuelan Andes is consistent with strain partitioning. While compression is restricted on both flanks of the belt, strike-slip and extension occurs in the central part of the mountain range. Extension is associated with the motion of crustal blocks moving

  7. Surface Uplift History of the Central Andes: Implications for the Growth of Orogenic Plateaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzione, C. N.; Hoke, G. D.; Libarkin, J. C.; MacFadden, B. J.; Withers, S.

    2007-05-01

    Sedimentation, paleoelevation, and incision histories provide important constraints on the timing and magnitude of regional surface uplift of mountain belts that point to specific processes that led to surface uplift. The sedimentary record and stable isotopic compositions of carbonates are used to reconstruct the late Miocene subsidence history, paleoenvironment, and paleoelevation of the northern Altiplano basin. Multiple paleoelevation proxies, including paleoleaf physiognomy, δ18O paleoaltimetry, and Δ47 paleothermometry, suggest that the Altiplano rose by 2.5±0.5 km to 3.5±0.5 km to its current elevation between ~10 and 7 Ma. Geomorphic evidence from widespread, low-relief paleosurfaces on both the eastern and western flanks of the Andes also shows that the onset of rapid incision of paleosurfaces occurred between ~10 and 6.5 Ma over the entire width of the mountain belt and over at least 5° latitude. Stream profile analysis of the drainage systems that incise these paleosurfaces has been inferred to reflect ~1 to 2 km of surface uplift of the flanks of the Andes. Combining geomorphic evidence with paleoelevation constraints, the paleotopographic evolution of the Andes is reconstructed over the late Miocene. Late Miocene regional surface uplift requires the removal of mantle lithosphere as the dominant geodynamic mechanism for raising the plateau during this time. However, crustal thickening and redistribution of crust by erosion/sedimentation and/or lower crustal flow set the limit of surface uplift. Regional surface uplift of the Andean plateau in the late Miocene predicts a decrease in the horizontal deviatoric stress in the plateau that is consistent with observations of upper crustal shortening, sedimentation rates, and magmatism in the plateau. Shortening ceased across the plateau between 10 and 7 Ma, coincident with widespread ignimbrite eruptions and an abrupt decrease in sedimentation rates. The combination of geodynamic processes that appear to

  8. Transient analysis in the 3D nodal kinetics and thermal-hydraulics ANDES/COBRA coupled system

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Montero, Juan Andrés; Aragonés Beltrán, José María; García Herranz, Nuria

    2008-01-01

    Neutron kinetics has been implemented in the 3D nodal solver ANDES, which has been coupled to the core thermal-hydraulics (TH) code COBRA-III for core transient analysis. The purpose of this work is, first, to discuss and test the ability of the kinetics solver ANDES to model transients; and second, by means of a systematic analysis, including alternate kinetics schemes, time step size, nodal size, neutron energy groups and spectrum, to serve as a basis for the development of more accurate an...

  9. Distribución del género Gallinago Brisson 1760 (Aves: Scolopacidae) en los Andes Orientales de Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Arango Gonzalo

    1986-01-01

    El género Gallinago Brisson 1760 se compone de 6 especies y 9 subespecies en el Neotrópico; de ellas cinco especies y cuatro subespecies están presentes en los Andes Orientales de Colombia y áreas adyacentes (BLAKE 1977), La especie ausente corresponde a Gallinago andina Tackzonowski 1875, especie típica del altiplano de los Andes Centrales. El génera comprende las aves con mayor especialización del pico para la captura de anélidos y otros invertebrados cavadores del suelo. Ocupa todos los pi...

  10. Quaternary Ice-Age dynamics in the Colombian Andes: developing an understanding of our legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghiemstra, Henry; Van der Hammen, Thomas

    2004-02-29

    Pollen records from lacustrine sediments of deep basins in the Colombian Andes provide records of vegetation history, the development of the floristic composition of biomes, and climate variation with increasing temporal resolution. Local differences in the altitudinal distribution of present-day vegetation belts in four Colombian Cordilleras are presented. Operating mechanisms during Quaternary Ice-Age cycles that stimulated speciation are discussed by considering endemism in the asteraceous genera Espeletia, Espeletiopsis and Coespeletia. The floristically diverse lower montane forest belt (1000-2300 m) was compressed by ca. 55% during the last glacial maximum (LGM) (20 ka), and occupied the slopes between 800 m and 1400 m during that period. Under low LGM atmospheric pCO2 values, C4-dominated vegetation, now occurring below 2200 m, expanded up to ca. 3500 m. Present-day C3-dominated paramo vegetation is therefore not an analogue for past C4-dominated vegetation (with abundant Sporobolus lasiophyllus). Quercus immigrated into Colombia 478 ka and formed an extensive zonal forest from 330 ka when former Podocarpus-dominated forest was replaced by zonal forest with Quercus and Weinmannia. During the last glacial cycle the ecological tolerance of Quercus may have increased. In the ecotone forests Quercus was rapidly and massively replaced by Polylepis between 45 and 30 ka illustrating complex forest dynamics in the tropical Andes. PMID:15101574

  11. Two new species of Leptanilloides Mann, 1823 (Formicidae: Dorylinae from the Andes of southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut Delsinne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Leptanilloides are described: L. copalinga Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., and L. prometea Delsinne & Donoso sp. nov., based on workers collected in the leaf litter and soil of the Andes of southern Ecuador. Both species belong to the L. biconstricta species-group (formally diagnosed here. The metatibial gland, considered a synapomorphy for Dorylinae, is observed in L. prometea sp. nov. but seems absent in L. copalinga sp. nov. We provide a COI DNA barcode for both species and a revised key for the worker caste of all known species in the genus. We also describe a single male identified as a potential new Leptanilloides species on the basis of morphology. Furthermore, its mitochondrial COI gene sequence does not match any previously barcoded species. However, we refrain from giving it a specific name because of our lack of knowledge about the worker caste. So far, half of the 14 Leptanilloides species have been discovered above 1500 m in the mountain forests or páramos of the Ecuadorian Andes, confirming, if needed, the biological significance of these threatened habitats.

  12. Rainfall and Cloud Dynamics in the Andes: A Southern Ecuador Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin Campozano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mountain regions worldwide present a pronounced spatiotemporal precipitation variability, which added to scarce monitoring networks limits our understanding of the generation processes involved. To improve our understanding of clouds and precipitation dynamics and cross-scale generation processes in mountain regions, we analyzed spatiotemporal rainfall patterns using satellite cloud products (SCP in the Paute basin (900–4200 m a.s.l. and 6481 km2 in the Andes of Ecuador. Precipitation models, using SCP and GIS data, reveal the spatial extension of three regimes: a three-modal (TM regime present across the basin, a bimodal (BM regime, along sheltered valleys, and a unimodal (UM regime at windward slopes of the eastern cordillera. Subsequently, the spatiotemporal analysis using synoptic information shows that the dry season of the BM regime during boreal summer is caused by strong subsidence inhibiting convective clouds formation. Meanwhile, in UM regions, low advective shallow cap clouds mainly cause precipitation, influenced by water vapor from the Amazon and enhanced easterlies during boreal summer. TM regions are transition zones from UM to BM and zones on the windward slopes of the western cordillera. These results highlight the suitability of satellite and GIS data-driven statistical models to study spatiotemporal rainfall seasonality and generation processes in complex terrain, as the Andes.

  13. Modeling modern glacier response to climate changes along the Andes Cordillera: A multiscale review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Alfonso; Mark, Bryan G.

    2016-03-01

    Here we review the literature preferentially concerned with modern glacier-climate modeling along the Andes. We find a diverse range of modeling approaches, from empirical/statistical models to relatively complex energy balance procedures. We analyzed these models at three different spatial scales. First, we review global approaches that have included the Andes. Second, we depict and analyze modeling exercises aimed at studying Andean glaciers as a whole. Our revision shows only two studies dealing with glacier modeling at this continental scale. We contend that this regional approach is increasingly necessary because it allows for connecting the "average-out" tendency of global studies to local observations or models, in order to comprehend scales of variability and heterogeneity. Third, we revise small-scale modeling, finding that the overwhelming number of studies have targeted glaciers in Patagonia. We also find that most studies use temperature-index models and that energy balance models are still not widely utilized. However, there is no clear spatial pattern of model complexity. We conclude with a discussion of both the limitations of certain approaches, as for example the use of short calibration periods for long-term modeling, and also the opportunities for improved understanding afforded by new methods and techniques, such as climatic downscaling. We also propose ways to future developments, in which observations and models can be combined to improve current understanding of volumetric glacier changes and their climate causes.

  14. Bare Rocks and Fallen Angels: Environmental Change, Climate Perceptions and Ritual Practice in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Paerregaard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the many dimensions of globalization is climate change that in recent years has caused much concern in the developed world. The aim of this article is to explore how people living on the margins of the global world conceive climate change. Drawing on ethnographic field data from the 1980s and today it examines how the ritual practice and the religious belief of a rural community in the Peruvian Andes has changed during the last 27 years and how the villagers perceive this change. It argues that the villagers traditionally conceive the environment as co-habited by humans and non-humans but that recent environmental change in the Andes has caused a shift in this world-view. Today, many villagers have adopted the global vocabulary on climate change and are concerned with their own impact in the environment. However, the villagers reject the idea that it is human activities in other parts of the world that cause environmental problems in their community and claim that these must be addressed locally. It suggests that even though the villagers’ reluctance to subscribe to the global discourse of climate change makes them look like the companions of climate skeptics in the developed world, their reasons are very different.

  15. Regionalisation of Hydrological Indices to Assess Land-Use Change Impacts in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, W.; Ochoa Tocachi, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    Andean ecosystems are major water sources for cities and communities located in the Tropical Andes; however, there is a considerable lack of knowledge about their hydrology. Two problems are especially important: (i) the lack of monitoring to assess the impacts of historical land-use and cover change and degradation (LUCCD) at catchment scale, and (ii) the high variability in climatic and hydrological conditions that complicate the evaluation of land management practices. This study analyses how a reliable LUCCD impacts assessment can be performed in an environment of high variability combined with data-scarcity and low-quality records. We use data from participatory hydrological monitoring activities in 20 catchments distributed along the tropical Andes. A set of 46 hydrological indices is calculated and regionalized by relating them to 42 physical catchment properties. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is performed to maximise available data while minimising redundancy in the sets of variables. Hydrological model parameters are constrained by estimated indices, and different behavioural predictions are assembled to provide a generalised response on which we assess LUCCD impacts. Results from this methodology show that the attributed effects of LUCCD in pair-wise catchment comparisons may be overstated or hidden by different sources of uncertainty, including measurement inaccuracies and model structural errors. We propose extrapolation and evaluation in ungauged catchments as a way to regionalize LUCCD predictions and to provide statistically significant conclusions in the Andean region. These estimations may deliver reliable knowledge to evaluate the hydrological impact of different watershed management practices.

  16. Back-Arc Extension in the Southern Andes: A Review and Critical Reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, I. W. D.

    1981-03-01

    The interpretation that the mafic 'rocas verdes' (green rocks) complex of the southern Andes represents part of the uplifted floor of a Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous back-arc basin has proved particularly useful in understanding the geological evolution of the southern Andes, the north Scotia Ridge and the Antarctic Peninsula. Clear field evidence of the back-arc setting of the 'rocas verdes' gabbro-sheeted dyke - pillow lava ophiolitic assemblages has encouraged fruitful petrological and geochemical comparison with mid-ocean ridge and marginal basin basalts, other onshore ophiolite complexes, and Archaean greenstone belts. Uncertainty still surrounds estimates of the original width and depth of the basin, as well as the proportion of new mafic crust, compared with relict sialic crust, in the basin floor. These questions are unresolved, owing mainly to the considerable Lower Cretaceous turbiditic basin infill and the effects of mid-Cretaceous compressional deformation. While the field relations clearly indicate that the 'rocas verdes' basin is not an older piece of ocean floor 'trapped' behind a volcanic arc, it is not yet clear whether the basin is directly subduction-related or falls in the category of back-arc 'leaky transforms' like the proto-Gulf of California or apparent 'rip-off' features like the Andaman Sea.

  17. Comparative Phylogeography of Direct-Developing Frogs (Anura: Craugastoridae: Pristimantis) in the Southern Andes of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-R, Juan C.; Crawford, Andrew J.; Mendoza, Ángela María; Ospina, Oscar; Cardenas, Heiber; Castro, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The Andes of South America hosts perhaps the highest amphibian species diversity in the world, and a sizable component of that diversity is comprised of direct-developing frogs of the genus Pristimantis (Anura: Craugastoridae). In order to better understand the initial stages of species formation in these frogs, this study quantified local-scale spatial genetic structuring in three species of Pristimantis. DNA sequences of two mitochondrial gene fragments (16S and COI) were obtained from P. brevifrons, P. palmeri and P. jubatus at different locations in the Cordillera Occidental. We found high levels of genetic diversity in the three species, with highly structured populations (as measured by FST) in P. brevifrons and P. palmeri while P. jubatus showed panmixia. Large effective population sizes, inferred from the high levels of genetic diversity, were found in the three species and two highly divergent lineages were detected within P. jubatus and P. palmeri. Estimated divergence times among populations within P. brevifrons and P. palmeri coincide with the Pleistocene, perhaps due to similar responses to climatic cycling or recent geological history. Such insights have important implications for linking alpha and beta diversity, suggesting regional scale patterns may be associated with local scale processes in promoting differentiation among populations in the Andes. PMID:23049941

  18. Intraseasonal variability of organized convective systems in the Central Andes: Relationship to Regional Dynamical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, K. I.; Slayback, D. A.; Nicholls, S.; Yager, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Andes extend from the west coast of Colombia (10N) to the southern tip of Chile (53S). In southern Peru and Bolivia, the Central Andes is split into separate eastern and western cordilleras, with a high plateau (≥ 3000 m), the Altiplano, between them. Because 90% of the Earth's tropical mountain glaciers are located in the Central Andes, our study focuses on this region, defining its zonal extent as 7S-21S and the meridional extent as the terrain 1000 m and greater. Although intense convection occurs during the wet season in the Altiplano, it is not included in the lists of regions with frequent or the most intense convection. The scarcity of in-situ observations with sufficient density and temporal resolution to resolve individual storms or even mesoscale-organized cloud systems and documented biases in microwave-based rainfall products in poorly gauged mountainous regions have impeded the development of an extensive literature on convection and convective systems in this region. With the tropical glaciers receding at unprecedented rates, leaving seasonal precipitation as an increasingly important input to the water balance in alpine valley ecosystems and streams, understanding the nature and characteristics of the seasonal precipitation becomes increasingly important for the rural economies in this region. Previous work in analyzing precipitation in the Central Andes has emphasized interannual variability with respect to ENSO, this is the first study to focus on shorter scale variability with respect to organized convection. The present study took advantage of the University of Utah's Precipitation Features database compiled from 14 years of TRMM observations (1998-2012), supplemented by field observations of rainfall and streamflow, historical gauge data, and long-term WRF-simulations, to analyze the intraseasonal variability of precipitating systems and their relationship regional dynamical features such as the Bolivian High. Through time series and

  19. Kas Arnold Rüütel valetas süümevannet andes? / Anneli Ammas, Garel Püüa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ammas, Anneli, 1962-

    2006-01-01

    Autorite hinnangul tekib 31. augustil Eesti Ekspressis ilmunud artikli põhjal, milles käsitleti Johannes Hindi represseerimist, küsimus, kas Arnold Rüütel on valetanud Eesti Vabariigile korduvalt süümevannet andes. TÜ professori Kalle Meruski seisukoht. Lisa: Rüütel käskis kontrolli tugevdada

  20. Late Pleistocene glaciations of the arid subtropical Andes and new results from the Chajnantor Plateau, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dylan J.; Cesta, Jason M.; Galewsky, Joseph; Sagredo, Esteban

    2015-11-01

    The spatiotemporal pattern of glaciation along the Andes Mountains is an important proxy record reflecting the varying influence of global and regional circulation features on South American climate. However, the timing and extent of glaciation in key parts of the orogen, particularly the deglaciated arid Andes, are poorly constrained. We present new cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl exposure ages for glacial features on and near the Chajnantor Plateau (23 °S). The new dates, although scattered due to cosmogenic inheritance, imply that the most recent extensive glacial occupation ended before or during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We discuss this new record in the context of published glacial chronologies from glacial features in Peru, Bolivia, and northern Chile rescaled using the latest cosmogenic 10Be production rate calibration for the tropical Andes. The results imply regionally synchronous moraine stabilization ca. 25-40 ka, 15-17 ka, and 12-14 ka, with the youngest of these moraines absent in records south of ˜20 °S, including in our new Chajnantor area chronology. This spatial pattern implicates easterly moisture in generating sufficient snowfall to glaciate the driest parts of the Andes, while allowing a role for westerly moisture, possibly modulated by the migration of the Southern Westerly Wind belt, in the regions near and south of the Atacama Desert.

  1. Uplift and volcanism of the SE Colombian Andes in relation to Neogene sedimentation in the Upper Magdalena Valley.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van der A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study deals with the relation between Neogene uplift and volcanism of the SE Colombian Andes and sedimentation processes in the Upper Magdalena Valley. The southernmost part of the Upper Magdalena Valley, the S. Neiva Basin, is located between latitudes 2°08'-2°31 N and longitudes 75°22'

  2. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in areosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R.J.; Petit, J.R.; Komárek, Jiří; Elster, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2008), s. 1-24. ISSN 1810-6277 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 934; GA MŠk ME 945; GA ČR GA206/05/0253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : bacteria * Andes * Antarctic * Alps Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  3. Ensayos metodologicos para la investigacion de reservorios de Leishmania spp en los Andes venezolanos Methodological assay for research of reservoirs of Leishmania spp. in the Venezuelan Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lugo Yarbuh

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen dos técnicas, presuntiva y confirmativa, para la investigación de mamíferos que pudieran ser reservorios de Leishmania que parasitan al hombre. Se investigan los cambios en los títulos de inmovilización y aglutinación de promastigotos de cultivo por los sueros de animales normales y expuestos una o varias veces a la inoculación intradérmica de pequeñas dosis de promastigotos vivos. Se registra una caída de los títulos de aglutinación en los sueros de hamsteres, de Holochilus venezuelae y de Didelphis marsupialis después de la inoculación con L. mexicana mexicana de Panamá y de L. gamhami de la región de los Andes venezolanos. Se discute la natureza de estos fenómenos. Se han hecho xenodiagnósticos con Lutzomyia townsendi en Holochilus venezuelae y Sigmodon hispidus infectados experimentalmente com L. mexicana mexicana, L. mexicana amazonensis, L. braziliensis y L. garnhami. Las pruebas fueron leidas mediante el examen microscópico de las gotitas de heces excretadas entre las 108 y 132 horas después de la ingesta infectante, tras colorearlas con Giemsa. Se obtuvieron resultados positivos en 23% de los experimentos usando mamíferos con lesiones localizadas, dejando a los flebótomos ingurgitarse libremente sobre animales anestesiados que poseian una hasta varias lesiones localizadas.Presumptive and confirmative techniques for searching mammals which could be reservoirs for Leishmania parasites from man are described. The changes of immobilising and agglutinating titers for promastigotes from culture by sera from normal and exposed mammals after single or repeated intradermal inoculation of promastigotes are described. A fall in titers of agglunation is observed in sera from hamsters, Holochilus venezuelae and Didelphis marsupialis after inoculation with L. mexicana mexicana from Panama and L. garnhami from the Venezuelan Andes region. The nature of this phenomenon is discussed. Xenodiagnoses were made with

  4. Estimation de l'aléa sismique dans les Andes nord équatoriennes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Les Andes Nord équatoriennes ont connu de nombreux séismes historiques destructeurs. Pour caractériser l’aléa sismique de la région andine, nous avons fait une révision critique de la sismicité historique et de l’ensemble des failles actives de l’Équateur. Les deux sources majeures de l’aléa sismique sont respectivement la subduction superficielle pour la région côtière et le système transpressif des hautes Andes pour la région andine. Ce système est composé de failles décrochantes dextres d’orientation N30-35°E (failles du Rio Chingual-La Sofia et Pallatanga qui limitent respectivement au Nord et au Sud des failles inverses N-S du relais compressif de la vallée interandine (failles de Quito et de Latacunga. L’étude des mécanismes au foyer superficiels des Andes équatoriennes nous a permis de calculer une vitesse de raccourcissement crustal de 4.6 mm/a selon une direction N92°E et d’estimer des temps de récurrence et des périodes de retour. Un séisme de Mw = 5 pourrait se produire tous les 0.5 an, de Mw = 6 tous les 4.5 ans, de Mw = 7 tous les 45.4 ans. De même, sur une période de temps de 33 ans, 66 séismes de Mw=5 peuvent être attendus, 7 séismes de Mw=6 et 1 séisme de Mw=7. Enfin, nous avons estimé pour l’ensemble des sources sismogènes de la région andine des magnitudes maximales probables et des temps de récurrence. Un séisme de magnitude 7 à 7.5 peut se produire sur la faille du Rio Chingual tous les 400±440 ans et de magnitude 6.7 à 7.2 tous les 380±320 ans sur la faille de Pallatanga. Dans la vallée interandine, la faille de Quito est susceptible d’engendrer un séisme de magnitude 6.6 à 7.6 tous les 930±300 ans. LA AMENAZA SÍSMICA EN LOS ANDES ECUATORIANOS. Los Andes del Norte del Ecuador son una región sismogénica mayor, donde se puede contabilizar muchos terremotos históricos destructores. A fin de determinar la amenaza sísmica sobre la región andina, se hizo la asociaci

  5. What controls millennial-scale denudation rates across the Central Andes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kober, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable planning of erosion control measures in the Central Andes requires robust knowledge about natural denudation rates. We explore a large dataset combining new and published 10Be (and 26Al) catchment-wide denudation rates from a swath at 17 to 19° S spanning the Western Cordillera that rises from sea level to 5500 m elevation; the Altiplano at ~4000 m; the Eastern Cordillera with elevations up to 6500 m; the Interandean Zone; the Subandean Zone; and the Chaco Plain at 300 m. The selected catchments span a large spread regarding morphometric and climate properties where mean slope angles range from 1 to 31°, and mean precipitation from 100 to 3900 mm/a. The denudation rates (0.0036 to 1.93 mm/a) are averaged over millennia, and reveal two to three magnitudes difference across the Central Andes. The regional distribution of denudation rates clearly demonstrates a more complex interaction of geomorphological, geological and meteorological parameters with the dominant geomorphological processes. In order to elucidate the key controls on denudation, we use multivariate statistics such as principal component analysis in order to remove potentially redundant predictors of denudation in the studied catchments. These predictors include catchment elevation, topographic relief, hillslope inclination, mean precipitation, tree cover, specific stream power, channel steepness indices, sinuosity, drainage density and hypsometric index that we derived from the SRTM 90 m Digital Elevation Database, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and the Terra MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields dataset. Additionally, the rock strength index (PLI) was estimated based on geological units. Preliminary results allow distinguishing five different longitudinal domains of denudation on the basis of climatic regime, hillslope steepness, and the degree of accumulated crustal deformation. We find that the pattern of 10Be catchment-wide denudation rates in the Central Andes

  6. Sr and Nd isotopic and trace element compositions of Quaternary volcanic centers of the southern Andes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic compositions of samples from six Quaternary volcanoes located in the northern and southern extremities of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ, 33-460S) of the Andes and from four centers in the Austral Volcanic Zone (AVZ, 49-540S) range for 87Sr/86Sr from 0.70280 to 0.70591 and for 143Nd/144Nd from 0.51314 to 0.51255. Basalts and basaltic andesites from three centers just north of the Chile Rise-Trench triple junction have 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, La/Yb, Ba/La and Hf/Lu that lie within the relatively restricted ranges of the basic magmas erupted from the volcanic centers as far north as 350S in the SVZ of the Andes. The trace element and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of these magmas may be explained by source region contamination of subarc asthenosphere, with contaminants derived from subducted pelagic sediments and seawater-altered basalts by dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. In the northern extremity of the SVZ between 330 and 340S, basaltic andesites and andesites have higher 87Sr/86Sr, Rb/Cs, and Hf/Lu, and lower 143Nd/144Nd than basalts and basaltic andesites erupted farther south in the SVZ, which suggests involvement of components derived from the continental crust. In the AVZ, the most primitive sample, high-Mg andesite from the southernmost volcanic center in the Andes (540S) has Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and K/Rb and Ba/La similar to MORB. The high La/Yb of this sample suggests formation by small degrees of partial melting of subducted MORB with garnet as a residue. Samples from centers farther north in the AVZ show a regionally regular northward increase in SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, Ba/La, and 87Sr/86Sr and decrease in MgO, Sr, K/Rb, Rb/Cs, and 143Nd/144Nd, suggesting increasingly greater degrees of fractional crystallization and associated intra-crustal contamination. (orig./SHOE)

  7. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Strain partitioning is a common process at obliquely convergent plate margins dividing oblique convergence into margin-normal slip on the plate-bounding fault and horizontal shearing on a strike-slip system parallel to the subduction margin. In subduction zones, strain partitioning in the upper continental plate is mainly controlled by the shear forces acting on the plate interface and the strength of the continental crust. The plate interface forces are influenced by the subducting plate dip angle and the obliquity angle between the normal to the plate margin and the convergence velocity vector, and the crustal strength of the continent is strongly affected by the presence or absence of a volcanic arc, with the presence of the volcanic arcs being common at steep subduction zones. Along the ˜7000 km western margin of South America the convergence obliquity, subduction dip angles and presence of a volcanic arc all vary, but strain partitioning is only observed along parts of it. This raises the questions, to what extent do subduction zone characteristics control strain partitioning in the overriding continental plate, and which factors have the largest influence? We address these questions using lithospheric-scale 3D numerical geodynamic experiments to investigate the influence of subduction dip angle, convergence obliquity, and weaknesses in the crust owing to the volcanic arc on strain partitioning behavior. We base the model design on the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (5° N - 2° S), characterized by steep subduction (˜ 35°), a convergence obliquity between 31° -45° and extensive arc volcanism, and where strain partitioning is observed. The numerical modelling software (DOUAR) solves the Stokes flow and heat transfer equations for a viscous-plastic creeping flow to calculate velocity fields, thermal evolution, rock uplift and strain rates in a 1600 km x 1600 km box with depth 160 km. Subduction geometry and material properties are based on a

  8. Macroinvertebrate community response to acid mine drainage in rivers of the High Andes (Bolivia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several High Andes Rivers are characterized by inorganic water pollution known as acid mine drainage (AMD). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between metal concentrations in the sediments and the macroinvertebrate communities in two river basins affected by AMD. In general, the taxon diversity of the macroinvertebrate community at the family level was low. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni at mining sites were higher than at unpolluted sites. The pH of the water was alkaline (7.0-8.5) in unpolluted sites, whereas it dropped to very low values (<3) at mining sites. Redundancy Analysis (RDA) showed that pH was the best predictor of macroinvertebrate community richness. The number of macroinvertebrate families decreased gradually with increasing acidity, both in pools and riffles, though it is suggested that riffle communities were more affected because they are in closer contact with the acid water. - Community response to AMD

  9. Altitudinal changes in diversity of macroinvertebrates from small streams in the Ecuadorian Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Dean

    2003-01-01

    that among streams within regions. The mean number of families was 8.2, 4.9 and 4.1 per stone, 26.5, 19 and 13.3 per locality (stream), and 44, 37 and 27 per region at the three altitudes, respectively. Thus, both local and regional richness decreased approximately linearly with increasing altitude......Altitudinal patterns in diversity of macroinvertebrate families at different spatial scales (stone, stream and altitude) were studied by collecting stone samples from six streams at each of the three altitudes: lowlands (400m), midlands (2000m) and highlands (3800 m), in the equatorial Andes...... of Ecuador. Stream sites were characterised by a number of physico-chemical parameters and the fauna by several indices of richness, diversity and evenness. A MDS ordination on the composition of the fauna clearly separated the streams in three groups according to altitude. The invertebrate fauna...

  10. Macroinvertebrate community response to acid mine drainage in rivers of the High Andes (Bolivia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Damme, Paul Andre [Asociacion Faunagua, Cochabamba (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Centre of Limnology and Aquatic Resources, University of San Simon, Casilla 5263, Cochabamba (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Hamel, Caroli; Ayala, Alfredo [Centre of Limnology and Aquatic Resources, University of San Simon, Casilla 5263, Cochabamba (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Bervoets, Lieven [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)], E-mail: lieven.bervoets@ua.ac.be

    2008-12-15

    Several High Andes Rivers are characterized by inorganic water pollution known as acid mine drainage (AMD). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between metal concentrations in the sediments and the macroinvertebrate communities in two river basins affected by AMD. In general, the taxon diversity of the macroinvertebrate community at the family level was low. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni at mining sites were higher than at unpolluted sites. The pH of the water was alkaline (7.0-8.5) in unpolluted sites, whereas it dropped to very low values (<3) at mining sites. Redundancy Analysis (RDA) showed that pH was the best predictor of macroinvertebrate community richness. The number of macroinvertebrate families decreased gradually with increasing acidity, both in pools and riffles, though it is suggested that riffle communities were more affected because they are in closer contact with the acid water. - Community response to AMD.

  11. Diversity of the genus Polylepis (Rosaceae, Sanguisorbeae in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Mendoza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study provides information on the diversity of Peruvian species of Polylepis. Nineteen (19 species are reported here (more than 70% of the 27 species registered for the whole Andean region. As a result, Peru could be considered as the country with the largest diversity of Polylepis species, in comparison with Bolivia (13, Ecuador (7, Argentina (4, Colombia (3, Chile (2, and Venezuela (1. The species occur in 19 departments of Peru, with the majority of them in Cusco (10 and Ayacucho (8. Species diversity is mostly concentrated in the Peruvian southern Andes (15 species, with the region becoming the potential center of diversification of the genus Polylepis. Regarding their altitudinal distribution, the greatest diversity (18 is found between 3000 and 4000 m.

  12. Mapping advanced argillic alteration zones with ASTER and Hyperion data in the Andes Mountains of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Yuddy; Goïta, Kalifa; Péloquin, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Hyperion hyperspectral sensor datasets to detect advanced argillic minerals. The spectral signatures of some alteration clay minerals, such as dickite and alunite, have similar absorption features; thus separating them using multispectral satellite images is a complex challenge. However, Hyperion with its fine spectral bands has potential for good separability of features. The Spectral Angle Mapper algorithm was used in this study to map three advanced argillic alteration minerals (alunite, kaolinite, and dickite) in a known alteration zone in the Peruvian Andes. The results from ASTER and Hyperion were analyzed, compared, and validated using a Portable Infrared Mineral Analyzer field spectrometer. The alterations corresponding to kaolinite and alunite were detected with both ASTER and Hyperion (80% to 84% accuracy). However, the dickite mineral was identified only with Hyperion (82% accuracy).

  13. Horizontal subduction zones, convergence velocity and the building of the Andes

    CERN Document Server

    Martinod, Joseph; Roperch, Pierrick; Guillaume, Benjamin; Espurt, Nicolas; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.09.010

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the relationships between Andean shortening, plate velocities at the trench, and slab geometry beneath South America. Although some correlation exists between the convergence velocity and the westward motion of South America on the one hand, and the shortening of the continental plate on the other hand, plate kinematics neither gives a satisfactory explanation to the Andean segmentation in general, nor explains the development of the Bolivian orocline in Paleogene times. We discuss the Cenozoic history of horizontal slab segments below South America, arguing that they result from the subduction of oceanic plateaus whose effect is to switch the buoyancy of the young subducting plate to positive. We argue that the existence of horizontal slab segments, below the Central Andes during Eocene-Oligocene times, and below Peru and North-Central Chile since Pliocene, resulted (1) in the shortening of the continental plate interiors at a large distance from the trench, (2) in stronger interplate coupling and...

  14. Privatizing Water in the Chilean Andes: The Case of Las Vegas de Chiu-Chiu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Prieto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean water model has been described as a textbook example of a free-market water system. This article contributes to the critiques of this model by showing the effect of its implementation in the Atacameño community of Chiu-Chiu, located in the Atacama Desert in the south-central Andes. In this community, the privatization of water rights ignored local water management practices that had produced a high-altitude wetland (known as a vega. This led to the inhabitants’ dispossession of crucial water rights and to wetland degradation. This process belies statements that the Chilean model relies on an unregulated market and instead highlights the state’s role in marginalizing local irrigation practices by reducing the water consumption of the indigenous population while keeping the copper mining industry (the main source of Chilean income and related growing urban populations supplied with water.

  15. High-resolution temperature profiles measured with stratospheric balloons near the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Giraldez, A.

    1997-05-01

    A spectral analysis of two balloon soundings of temperature performed in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Andes Mountains in Argentina with a vertical resolution of 10 m has been performed. The first and second soundings, launched at the same location, were performed during unusually calm and disturbed atmospheric conditions respectively. Considerable deviations from the -3 value predicted for the spectral slopes in the power-law range by current saturation theories are found. These departures are reduced if the data resolution at disposal is diminished, thereby eliminating the highest wavelength harmonics. Slopes do not clearly steepen with increasing height as suggested by other authors and topography seems to be responsible for this fact at low altitudes. The spectral amplitude increase with height detected from recent lidar data is corroborated only in the sounding with calm atmospheric conditions. Spectra are found to scale with the buoyancy frequency not as simply as suggested by the saturation models.

  16. How well do Important Bird Areas represent species and minimize conservation conflict in the tropical Andes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Dea, Niall; Bastos Araujo, Miguel; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Where high species richness and high human population density coincide, potential exists for conflict between the imperatives of species conservation and human development. We examine the coincidence of at-risk bird species richness and human population in the countries of the tropical Andes. We...... then compare the performance of the expert-driven Important Bird Areas (IBA) scheme against a hypothetical protected-areas network identified with a systematic reserve selection algorithm seeking to maximize at-risk bird species representation. Our aim is to assess the degree to which: IBAs contain a higher...... richness of at-risk species than would be expected by chance, IBAs contain more people than would be expected by chance, and IBAs are congruent with complementary areas that maximize species representation with an equivalent number of sites. While the correlation of richness and population was low...

  17. The Bolivian and Maipo Oroclines: Two first scale structural features of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    Two remarkable curvatures of the orogenic system of the Central Andes are the Bolivian and the Maipo Oroclines. While the former has been widely studied, the latter in central Chile, where few, geographically restricted, paleomagnetic studies have been carried out, knowledge about vertical-axis rotations is scarce. Here we show the results of the paleomagnetic studies carried out in the last years along the Central Andes within the Bolivian and Maipo Oroclines. Along-strike variations in horizontal shortening in the back- arc provided an efficient mechanism to explain the Bolivian Orocline and block rotations of the forearc region in northern Chile and southern Peru. As a first approximation, it appears reasonable that the arcuate shape of the Maipo Orocline could be accompanied by a significant pattern of rotations about a vertical axis in the forearc region and by a progressive decrease of crustal shortening and the resulting topography from north to south in the back-arc region. Furthermore, although the Maipo Orocline is located more than 1000 km south of the axial zone of the Central Andes, south of 30, clockwise rotations of up to 20 could have occurred during the evolution of the Bolivian Orocline. While the northern segment of the Maipo orocline corresponds with the ongoing subduction of the Pampean flat slab segment which proceeds nearly horizontally beneath the South American lithosphere, the southern segment coincides with the normal subduction segment developed to the south of 33S. The Maipo Orocline is thought to be result of collision of the Challenger Fracture Zone and Juan Fernández Ridge with the continent since 25 Ma. The southern flank of the Maipo Orocline can be traced along strike to around 38S. North of 33S, previous studies show no evidence for significant tectonic rotations. In contrary, south of 33S, both in the Coastal Cordillera and High Andes, clockwise block rotations have been observed and attributed to in situ block rotations in

  18. Isotopic evidence for cooler and drier conditions in the tropical Andes during the last glacial stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Germán; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2001-06-01

    Documentation of paleoclimatic conditions during the last glacial stage in the tropical Andes is sparse despite the importance of understanding past climate changes in the tropics. To reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions in the alpine neotropics, we measured the oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic composition of authigenic kaolinite within weathering profiles of the Bogota basin (Colombia) because of the strong dependence of isotopic values on both surface temperature and rainfall. While kaolinite isotope data from Holocene soils in the basin reflect modern mean annual temperature and mean weighted rainwater isotopic composition of the basin, kaolinite isotope data from paleosols developed during the last glacial stage suggest 6 ± 2 °C cooler temperatures. Moreover, the isotope data indicate higher isotopic values of paleorainwater, interpreted to reflect drier conditions. The combination of reduced rainfall, temperature, and pCO2 significantly affected the distribution of tropical montane flora during the last glacial stage.

  19. Contrasting response of glacierized catchments in the Central Himalaya and the Central Andes to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Silvan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Immerzeel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The Andes of South America and the Himalaya in high-mountain Asia are two regions where advanced simulation models are of vital importance to anticipate the impacts of climate change on water resources. The two mountain systems hold the largest ice masses outside the polar regions. Major rivers originate here and downstream regions are densely populated. In the long run, glacier recession generates concerns about the sustainability of summer runoff. This study benefits from recent efforts of carefully planned short-term field experiments in two headwater catchments in the Central Andes of Chile and in the Central Himalaya in Nepal. The two study catchments contrast in terms of their climate and in the characteristics of their glaciers. A systematic approach is developed, built upon the available local data, to reduce the predictive uncertainty of a state-of-the-art glacio-hydrological model used for the projection of 21st century glacier changes and catchment runoff. The in-situ data are used for model development and step-wise, multivariate parameter calibration. Catchment runoff and remotely sensed MODIS and Landsat snow cover are used for model validation. The glacio-hydrological model simulates the water cycle with a high temporal (hourly time steps) and spatial (100 m grid cells) resolution and accounts for processes typical of both regions like glacier melt under debris cover or mass redistribution through avalanching. Future projections are based on the outputs of twelve stochastically downscaled global climate models for two emission scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). This is one of the first truly intercomparative modeling studies at the catchment scale across mountain regions of the world to assess and compare future changes in glaciers and snow cover and associated impacts on streamflow production. Both catchments will experience significant glacier mass loss throughout the twenty-first century. However, the trajectories of simulated future runoff and

  20. Chemical and isotopic investigations of runoff in a mountainous watershed, Venezuelan Andes (Rio Bocono)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rio Bocono watershed, located in the Western part of Venezuela on the South western side of Andes is considered by the 'Ministerio de1 Ambiente y de los Recursos Naturales Renovables' (MARN) as a priority zone for environmental management. The studies of relation between flow, dissolved elements and solid transport are essential to estimate soil degradation and sediment deposition which provokes loss of depth in the dam reservoir at the Southern margin of the basin. Because of the large surface which reach 1540 km2, the lack of equipment and the flash flood character of the river do not enable the flow mechanisms and transit times to be determined using usual hydrologic methods; therefore this problem has been approached by the way of chemical and isotopic investigation

  1. Palm harvest impact in the western Amazon, Andes and Pacific lowlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    palms are managed and we propose sustainable methods to local farmers, governments, NGOs and other interested parties. Finally we study national level mechanisms that govern extraction, trade and commercialization of palm products, to identify positive and negative policies in relation to resilience of......Palms are the most useful group of plants in tropical American forests and in this project we study the effect of extraction and trade of palms on forests in the western Amazon, Andes, and Pacific lowlands. We determine the size of the resource by making palm community studies in the different...... ecosystems and use this to propose sustainable policies to the governments. The results are disseminated in a variety of ways, depending on need and stake holders, from popular leaflets and videos for farmers, reports for policy makers to scientific publications for the research community. The team behind...

  2. Senecio canoi (Compositae, una especie nueva de los Andes de Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montesinos-Tubée, Daniel B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Senecio canoi, a new species of Compositae of the high Andes of Southern Peru, Puno department, is described and illustrated. Senecio canoi is a perennial species differing from others in the ser. Suffruticosi subser. Caespitosi by having tufted habit, oblong-spathulate leaves with toothed margin, glabrous, and white flowers.Se describe e ilustra una nueva especie de Compositae, Senecio canoi, de la región altoandina del sur de Perú, departamento de Puno. Senecio canoi es una especie perenne que se diferencia de otras especies de la ser. Suffruticosi subser. Caespitosi por tener el hábito cespitoso, hojas oblongo-espatuladas, glabras, con margen dentado y flores blancas.

  3. Tecnología apropiada: Sus inicios en la Universidad de los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista de Ingeniería

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available El origen de la tecnología apropiada en la Universidad de los Andes debe entenderse no sólo a partir de las inquietudes de algunos profesores de la Facultad de Ingeniería, sino que debe leerse en sintonía con una serie de eventos de índole nacional e internacional que permitieron su desarrollo. En los años 70, Estados Unidos sufrió una crisis energética, ante la cual se debió buscar alternativas que pudieran suplir la necesidad de energía y la dificultad de remplazar el petróleo. Se generó, entonces, un movimiento cuyo objetivo era desarrollar energías renovables basadas en recursos naturales.

  4. Pablo Palacio: Corporal Violence on Impossible Identities in the Zone of the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falconí Travez, Diego Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Palacio was an Ecuadorian writer who, in the 1920’s, built within his narrative a catalog of rare bodies with ambiguous and disturbing sexualities, characterizations that are quite different from ones portrayed in the Andean tradition to which Palacio belongs. Nonetheless one of the most issues striking facts of these characters is that their bodies are disciplined by certain discourses of power in a violent way. This paper explores trough literary theory such abuse and violence on women and homosexual identities in two of his stories. The aim of the paper is to investigate issues such as violence, economy of representation, its relationship with the literary text and vulnerability, as a sine qua non norm of abuse, in certain bodies in the area of the Andes.

  5. La Guerra Civil de 1876-1877 en los Andes nororientales colombianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Carolina Sastoque R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo busca comprender regionalmente las causas de la guerra civil de 1876-1877, en los Andes nororientales colombianos. Se reconstruye y se analiza la malla de asentamientos urbanos de los Santanderes entre 1853 y 1857, se establece la jerarquía de los centros urbanos, las condiciones que contribuyeron al surgimiento de conflictos y los relevos jerárquicos que estos propiciaron. Por otro lado, se identifica a los actores que intervinieron en la guerra y la localización de los acontecimientos bélicos. Con base en este análisis se muestra que el grupo que inició la guerra fue el mismo que perdió jerarquía en la malla urbana y que ésta fue una de las causas de la guerra.

  6. What facilitates adaptation? An analysis of community-based adaptation to environmental change in the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Murtinho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the environmental, socio-economic andinstitutional factors that influence community-based adaptation strategies in 16municipalities in the rural Andes of Colombia. The study focuses specifically onthe factors that influence whether communities decide to take measures to managetheir water and micro-watersheds in response to water scarcity caused by climatevariability and land-use changes. The research uses quantitative and qualitativemethods incorporating data from surveys to 104 water user associations,precipitation and land-use data, municipal socio-economic information, and semistructured interviews with key informants. The results reveal 1 the links betweenenvironmental change and the type of adaptation that communities implement,and 2 how, in face of water scarcity changes, external funding facilitatesadaptation. The findings of this study contributes to the common-pool resourceand adaptation literatures by highlighting the important role that external actorsmay have in shaping collective action to adapt to environmental change.

  7. High-resolution satellite-gauge merged precipitation climatologies of the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Bastian; Buytaert, Wouter; Zulkafli, Zed; Lavado, Waldo; Willems, Bram; Robles, Luis Alberto; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Juan-Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Satellite precipitation products are becoming increasingly useful to complement rain gauge networks in regions where these are too sparse to capture spatial precipitation patterns, such as in the Tropical Andes. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (TPR) was active for 17 years (1998-2014) and has generated one of the longest single-sensor, high-resolution, and high-accuracy rainfall records. In this study, high-resolution (5 km) gridded mean monthly climatological precipitation is derived from the raw orbital TPR data (TRMM 2A25) and merged with 723 rain gauges using multiple satellite-gauge (S-G) merging approaches. The resulting precipitation products are evaluated by cross validation and catchment water balances (runoff ratios) for 50 catchments across the Tropical Andes. Results show that the TPR captures major synoptic and seasonal precipitation patterns and also accurately defines orographic gradients but underestimates absolute monthly rainfall rates. The S-G merged products presented in this study constitute an improved source of climatological rainfall data, outperforming the gridded TPR product as well as a rain gauge-only product based on ordinary Kriging. Among the S-G merging methods, performance of inverse distance interpolation of satellite-gauge residuals was similar to that of geostatistical methods, which were more sensitive to gauge network density. High uncertainty and low performance of the merged precipitation products predominantly affected regions with low and intermittent precipitation regimes (e.g., Peruvian Pacific coast) and is likely linked to the low TPR sampling frequency. All S-G merged products presented in this study are available in the public domain.

  8. Disappearance of the glacier on Mama Cotacachi: ethnoecological research and climate change in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhoades, R.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A first documented case study of a disappearing glacier in the snow capped volcano Cotacahi in Ecuador is presented with the studies belonging to the social sciences in relation to climate change and its impact on the population of the Equatorial Andes. With the use of multiple source methodology, including ethnographic analyzes, visual representations, repetitive photography, critical mapping by the local communities, longitudinal surveys, even archival research, as well as interviews to social actors and utilization of spatial data in a geographical information system (GIS. It is concluded that the documented disappearance of the glacier on the Cotacahi serves as an urgent call for action to the important dearth of social research related to global change from the ethnoecological perspective, with a cultural, local approach.

    Se presenta el primer estudio documentado de la desaparición del glaciar del nevado Cotacachi en el Ecuador, con los estudios que corresponden a las ciencias sociales en relación con el cambio climático y su impacto en la población de los Andes ecuatoriales. Mediante el uso de una metodología que incluye análisis etnográficos, representaciones visuales, fotografía repetitiva, mapeo crítico por parte de las comunidades locales, encuestas longitudinales e incluso investigación de archivos, así como también entrevistas a actores sociales, y utilización de los datos espaciales en un sistema de información geográfica (SIG. Se concluye que la desaparición documentada del glaciar del Cotacachi sirve como una llamada de atención urgente a la importante falta de investigaciones sociales relacionadas con el cambio global desde el punto de vista etnoecológico, con un enfoque cultural local.

  9. Carbonatite diversity in the Central Andes: the Ayopaya alkaline province, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Frank; Lehmann, Bernd; Tawackoli, Sohrab; Rössling, Reinhard; Belyatsky, Boris; Dulski, Peter

    2004-12-01

    The Ayopaya province in the eastern Andes of Bolivia, 100 km NW of Cochabamba, hosts a Cretaceous alkaline rock series within a Palaeozoic sedimentary sequence. The alkaline rock association comprises nepheline-syenitic/foyaitic to ijolitic intrusions, carbonatite, kimberlite, melilititic, nephelinitic to basanitic dykes and diatremes, and a variety of alkaline dykes. The carbonatites display a wide petrographic and geochemical spectrum. The Cerro Sapo area hosts a small calciocarbonatite intrusion and a multitude of ferrocarbonatitic dykes and lenses in association with a nepheline-syenitic stock. The stock is crosscut by a spectacular REE-Sr-Th-rich sodalite-ankerite-baryte dyke system. The nearby Chiaracke complex represents a magnesiocarbonatite intrusion with no evidence for a relationship to igneous silicate rocks. The magnesiocarbonatite (Σ REE up to 1.3 wt%) shows strong HREE depletion, i.e. unusually high La/Yb ratios (520 1,500). Calciocarbonatites (Σ REE up to 0.5 wt%) have a flatter REE distribution pattern (La/Yb 95 160) and higher Nb and Zr contents. The sodalite-ankerite-baryte dyke system shows geochemical enrichment features, particularly in Na, Ba, Cl, Sr, REE, which are similar to the unusual natrocarbonatitic lavas of the recent volcano of Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania. The Cerro Sapo complex may be regarded as an intrusive equivalent of natrocarbonatitic volcanism, and provides an example for carbonatite genesis by late-stage crystal fractionation and liquid immiscibility. The magnesiocarbonatite intrusion of Chiaracke, on the other hand, appears to result from a primary carbonatitic mantle melt. Deep seated mantle magmatism/metasomatism is also expressed by the occurrence of a kimberlite dyke. Neodymium and strontium isotope data (ɛNd 1.4 5.4, 87Sr/86 Sr

  10. Tectonic and lithological controls on denudation rates in the central Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, F.; Zeilinger, G.; Hippe, K.; Marc, O.; Lendzioch, T.; Grischott, R.; Christl, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Zola, R.

    2015-08-01

    The topographic signature of a mountain belt depends on the interplay of tectonic, climatic and erosional processes, whose relative importance changes over times, while quantifying these processes and their rates at specific times remains a challenge. The eastern Andes of central Bolivia offer a natural laboratory in which such interplay has been debated. Here, we investigate the Rio Grande catchment which crosses orthogonally the eastern Andes orogen from the Eastern Cordillera into the Subandean Zone, exhibiting a catchment relief of up to 5000 m. Despite an enhanced tectonic activity in the Subandes, local relief, mean and modal slopes and channel steepness indices are largely similar compared to the Eastern Cordillera and the intervening Interandean Zone. Nevertheless, a dataset of 57 new cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al catchment wide denudation rates from the Rio Grande catchment reveals up to one order of magnitude higher denudation rates in the Subandean Zone (mean 0.8 mm/yr) compared to the upstream physiographic regions. We infer that tectonic activity in the thrusting dominated Subandean belt causes higher denudation rates based on cumulative rock uplift investigations and due to the absence of a pronounced climate gradient. Furthermore, the lower rock strength of the Subandean sedimentary units correlates with mean slopes similar to the ones of the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean Zone, highlighting the fact, that lithology and rock strength can control high denudation rates at low slopes. Low denudation rates measured at the outlet of the Rio Grande catchment (Abapo) are interpreted to be a result of a biased cosmogenic nuclide mixing that is dominated by headwater signals from the Eastern Cordillera and the Interandean zone and limited catchment sediment connectivity in the lower river reaches. Therefore, comparisons of short- (i.e., sediment yield) and millennial denudation rates require caution when postulating tectonic and/or climatic forcing without

  11. Vertical-axis rotations determined from paleomagnetism of Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata of the Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David R.; Butler, Robert F.; Sempere, Thierry

    2004-07-01

    Thermal demagnetization and principal component analysis allowed determination of characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) directions from 256 sites at 22 localities in Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary strata of the Bolivian Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera. An inclination-only fold test of site-mean ChRM directions from Cenozoic units (principally the Santa Lucía Formation) indicates optimum unfolding at 97.1% unfolding, consistent with a primary origin for the ChRM. For Mesozoic strata, optimum unfolding occurred at 89.2%, perhaps indicating secondary remagnetization at some locations. For Cenozoic units, comparison of locality-mean directions with expected paleomagnetic directions indicates vertical-axis rotations from 33° counterclockwise to 24° clockwise. Euler pole analysis of along-strike variation in crustal shortening within the Subandean and Interandean zones indicates 18° clockwise rotation south of the axis of curvature of the Bolivian Andes and 6° counterclockwise rotation northwest of the axis during the past 10 m.y. Along-strike variation of shortening within the Eastern Cordillera indicates 8° clockwise rotation south of the axis and 8° counterclockwise rotation northwest of the axis from 35 to 10 Ma. These vertical-axis rotations produced by along-strike variations in crustal shortening during development of the Bolivian fold-thrust belt agree well with observed rotations determined from paleomagnetism of Cenozoic rocks in the Eastern Cordillera and in the Subandean and Interandean zones. However, local rotations are required to account for complex rotations in the Cochabamba Basin and within the Altiplano. The curvature of the Bolivian Andes has been progressively enhanced during Cenozoic fold-thrust belt deformation.

  12. Contenidos de uranio de lavas recientes en el sector sur de los Andes centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerra, N.

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the distribution of U in modern lava -flows of the southern part from the Central Andes (16°-28° S. For a given SiO2, content of the rocks, U abundance increases from west to east in a transects to the Andean Belt, while the depth of the subduction zone increases and the thickness of the continental curst decreases. Besides, U content tends to inerease steadly with the latitude, while the thick of the continental crust and the depth of the seismic zone decreases southward. Thus, on the basis of the available data, we are in a position to suggest that the U behavior in the studied lavas depends on the alkalanity and magmatic history of each volcanic center.

    Se presenta un estudio de distribución de U en lavas modernas del sector sur de los Andes centrales (16°-28° S. Para rocas de contenidos similares en SiO2 la abundancia de U crece de oeste a este en un perfil transversal al cordón andino, mientras que aumenta la profundidad de subducción, y disminuye la potencia de la corteza continental. Además, mientras la potencia de la corteza continental y la profundidad de la zona sísmica de Benioff disminuyen hacia el sur, U tiende a aumentar con la latitud. Así, y basado en los datos disponibles, estamos en posición de sugerir que el comportamiento de U en las rocas estudiadas, depende de la alcalinidad y de la historia magmática de cada centro volcánico.

  13. Subduction and collision processes in the Central Andes constrained by converted seismic phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X; Sobolev, S V; Kind, R; Oncken, O; Bock, G; Asch, G; Schurr, B; Graeber, F; Rudloff, A; Hanka, W; Wylegalla, K; Tibi, R; Haberland, C; Rietbrock, A; Giese, P; Wigger, P; Röwer, P; Zandt, G; Beck, S; Wallace, T; Pardo, M; Comte, D

    The Central Andes are the Earth's highest mountain belt formed by ocean-continent collision. Most of this uplift is thought to have occurred in the past 20 Myr, owing mainly to thickening of the continental crust, dominated by tectonic shortening. Here we use P-to-S (compressional-to-shear) converted teleseismic waves observed on several temporary networks in the Central Andes to image the deep structure associated with these tectonic processes. We find that the Moho (the Mohorovicić discontinuity--generally thought to separate crust from mantle) ranges from a depth of 75 km under the Altiplano plateau to 50 km beneath the 4-km-high Puna plateau. This relatively thin crust below such a high-elevation region indicates that thinning of the lithospheric mantle may have contributed to the uplift of the Puna plateau. We have also imaged the subducted crust of the Nazca oceanic plate down to 120 km depth, where it becomes invisible to converted teleseismic waves, probably owing to completion of the gabbro-eclogite transformation; this is direct evidence for the presence of kinetically delayed metamorphic reactions in subducting plates. Most of the intermediate-depth seismicity in the subducting plate stops at 120 km depth as well, suggesting a relation with this transformation. We see an intracrustal low-velocity zone, 10-20 km thick, below the entire Altiplano and Puna plateaux, which we interpret as a zone of continuing metamorphism and partial melting that decouples upper-crustal imbrication from lower-crustal thickening. PMID:11140679

  14. Reasons for an outstanding plant diversity in the tropical Andes of Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term field studies in the scope of a multidisciplinary project in southern Ecuador revealed extraordinary high species numbers of many organismic groups. This article discusses reasons for the outstanding vascular plant diversity using a hierarchical scale-oriented top-down approach (Grüninger 2005, from the global scale to the local microscale. The global scale explains general (paleo- ecological factors valid for most parts of the humid tropics, addressing various hypotheses and theories, such as the “greater effective evolutionary time”, constant input of “accidentals”, the “seasonal variability hypothesis”, the “intermediate disturbance hypothesis”, and the impact of soil fertility. The macroscale focuses on the Andes in northwestern South America. The tropical Andes are characterised by many taxa of restricted range which is particularly true for the Amotape-Huancabamba region, i.e. the so called Andean Depression, which is effective as discrete phytogeographic transition as well as barrier zone. Interdigitation of northern and southern flora elements, habitat fragmentation, geological and landscape history, and a high speciation rate due to rapid genetic radiation of some taxa contribute to a high degree of diversification. The mesoscale deals with the special environmental features of the eastern mountain range, the Cordillera Real and surrounding areas in southern Ecuador. Various climatic characteristics, the orographic heterogeneity, the geologic and edaphic conditions as well as human impact are the most prominent factors augmenting plant species diversity. On microscale, prevailing regimes of disturbance and environmental stresses, the orographic basement, as well as the general role on the various mountain chains are considered. Here, micro-habitats e.g. niches for epiphytes, effects of micro-relief patterns, and successions after small-sized disturbance events are screened. Direct effects of human impact are

  15. On the uplift anomaly of the Arica Bend, Western Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madella, Andrea; Delunel, Romain; Szidat, Sönke; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    The architecture of the Western Andes is remarkably constant between southern Peru and northern Chile. An exception, however, is present near Arica at 18°S, where the Andes change their strike direction by ca. 50° and the Coastal Cordillera is absent over a lateral width of 50 km. Here, we propose a large-scale model to explain the Ma-long low-uplift rate of the Arica Bend in connection with interplate coupling and continental wedge-top basin evolution. We complement new geomorphic and sedimentological observations with structural, stratigraphic and seismic data compiled from the literature. We additionally present a new set of 14C ages to infer the Holocene uplift pattern of the region, which we support with stream profile analysis. Results show that the absence of a sediment barrier and the amphitheater-shaped topography at the Arica Bend has conditioned a relatively high sediment discharge to the corresponding trench segment since 2.7 Ma and possibly earlier. However, the 14C ages and the river profile analyses yield contradicting high coastal uplift rates for the past 10 ka. It appears that, at the large scale, higher sediment supply likely reduced the friction at the interplate boundary, keeping the uplift push at lower levels and the Coastal Cordillera submerged below Arica, thereby explaining the lower frequency of large subduction earthquakes in the area. Nonetheless, at a smaller scale, Quaternary sea-level fluctuations repeatedly shifted the water-load on the accretionary wedge, thereby inducing short-term elastic buckling, which has perturbed the trunk stream's profile.

  16. Drivers of atmospheric methane uptake by montane forest soils in the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam P.; Diem, Torsten; Huaraca Quispe, Lidia P.; Cahuana, Adan J.; Reay, Dave S.; Meir, Patrick; Arn Teh, Yit

    2016-07-01

    The soils of tropical montane forests can act as sources or sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4). Understanding this activity is important in regional atmospheric CH4 budgets given that these ecosystems account for substantial portions of the landscape in mountainous areas like the Andes. We investigated the drivers of net CH4 fluxes from premontane, lower and upper montane forests, experiencing a seasonal climate, in south-eastern Peru. Between February 2011 and June 2013, these soils all functioned as net sinks for atmospheric CH4. Mean (standard error) net CH4 fluxes for the dry and wet season were -1.6 (0.1) and -1.1 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the upper montane forest, -1.1 (0.1) and -1.0 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the lower montane forest, and -0.2 (0.1) and -0.1 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the premontane forest. Seasonality in CH4 exchange varied among forest types with increased dry season CH4 uptake only apparent in the upper montane forest. Variation across these forests was best explained by available nitrate and water-filled pore space indicating that nitrate inhibition of oxidation or diffusional constraints imposed by changes in water-filled pore space on methanotrophic communities may represent important controls on soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange. Net CH4 flux was inversely related to elevation; a pattern that differs to that observed in Ecuador, the only other extant study site of soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange in the tropical Andes. This may result from differences in rainfall patterns between the regions, suggesting that attention should be paid to the role of rainfall and soil moisture dynamics in modulating CH4 uptake by the organic-rich soils typical of high-elevation tropical forests.

  17. A statistical study of Weinmannia pollen trajectories across the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Pérez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent airborne pollen records data from Northern Patagonia (San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina, Lat. 41.1435° S, Long. 71.375° W, 800 m elevation suggest that pollen transport takes place from the west to the east slope of the Andes. However, the atmospheric characteristics responsible of this transport have not yet been studied. The aim of this paper is to assess potential source areas and to describe the involved atmospheric mechanisms of the trans-Andean pollen transport. Methodology relies on the analysis of backward trajectories of air masses calculated with the HYSPLIT 4.9 regional model for particular days where airborne pollen of Weinmannia trichosperma Cav. was detected east of the Andes. This pollen type was selected because it is found regularly at localities in eastern Patagonia beyond its present-day distribution. Weinmannia's substantial presence during early Holocene times would also benefit from better knowledge of its transport mechanisms. Correspondence between atmospheric trajectories and the position of sources was checked using GIS maps. Mode T, Principal Component Analysis (PCA with Varimax rotation was used to identify the main spatial structure of geopotential height anomalies producing the calculated trajectories. Eighty-eight cases showed that the calculated directions of trajectories trended from the Northwest to Southwest passing over the Chilean region of W. trichosperma distribution. PCs results showed two patterns of negative anomalies over southern Patagonia. The prevailing circulation pattern which drives airborne transport is the presence of a trough located south of 37 to 40° S with its axis over western Patagonia. The synoptic situations for two cases highly correlated with principal component scores were described.

  18. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1 There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2 There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3 Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  19. Proliferation of Hydroelectric Dams in the Andean Amazon and Implications for Andes-Amazon Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics. PMID:22529979

  20. On the Nature of Severe Orographic Thunderstorms near the Andes in Subtropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kristen Lani Emi

    Identifying common features and differences between the mechanisms producing extreme convection near major mountain ranges of the world is an essential step toward a general understanding of orographic precipitation on a global scale. The overarching objective of this dissertation is to understand and examine orographic convective processes in general, while specifically focusing on systems in the lee of the Andes Mountains. Diagnosing the key ingredients necessary for generating high impact weather near extreme topography is crucial to our understanding of orographic precipitating systems. An investigation of the most intense storms in 11 years of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data has shown a tendency for squall lines to initiate and develop east of the Andes with a mesoscale organization similar to storms in the U.S. Great Plains (Rasmussen and Houze 2011). In subtropical South America, however, the topographical influence on the convective initiation and maintenance of the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) is unique. The Andes and other mountainous terrain of Argentina focus deep convective initiation in the foothills of western Argentina (Romatschke and Houze 2010; Rasmussen and Houze 2011). Subsequent to initiation, the convection often evolves into propagating MCSs similar to those seen over the U.S. Great Plains sometimes producing damaging tornadoes, hail and floods across a wide agricultural region (Rasmussen and Houze 2011; Rasmussen et al. 2014b). The TRMM satellite was designed to determine the spatial and temporal variation of tropical and subtropical rainfall amounts and storm structures around the globe with the goal of understanding the factors controlling the precipitation. However, the TRMM PR algorithm significantly underestimates surface rainfall in deep convection over land (Nesbitt et al. 2004; Iguchi et al. 2009; Kozu et al. 2009). When the algorithm rates are compared to a range of conventional Z-R relations, the rain bias tends to be

  1. Ethnoecology of the tropical Andes avian indicators of landscape change in highland Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmiento, F. O.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Four Andean birds offer clues to rethink the ethnoecology of neotropical cloud forests, challenging the notion of conservation based only in water resources and biodiversity. Using both archaeological and actuoecological evidence, the role of humans in shaping high Andean landscapes' location and maintenance is argued as an important factor for conservation priorities of tropical montane cloud forests, particularly in the equatorial mountains. Avian examples demonstrate intricate linkages of culture and nature in the tropical Andes. Traditional knowledge associated to ornithological clues, helps understanding the dynamics of cultural landscapes, with birds as proxy of synergisms affecting the complexities of both, nature and culture. A paradox of conservation is highlighted with avian indicators. The four selected species were cases where landscape change and biodiversity help in determining ethnoecological insights. Unlike the preservation of absolute nature reserves, landscape stewardship, conservation easements and cultural la^tdscapes are listed as options for inclusion in the repertoire of conservation scenarios for cloud forests survival, which includes sacred places and spiritual domains as intangibles worth protecting in the Tropical Andes.

    [fr] Quatre oiseaux andins nous donnent des raisons pour repenser Vethnoécologie des forêts néotropicales humides, ce qui met en question l'idée de la conservation basée sur les ressources d'eau et la biodiversité seules. En se servant des évidences archéologiques et écologiques actuelles, on soutient que les êtres humains ont un rôle dans la formation des hauts paysages andins. On soutient aussi que l'entretien est un facteur important dans la conservation des forêts tropicales humides en montagne, surtout dans les montagnes équatoriales. Les exemples aviaires démontrent les liens compliqués entre la culture et la nature dans les Andes tropicales. Les connaissances

  2. Evapofacieshalítica en el Salar del Rincón, departamento Los Andes, Salta Halitefacies in the salar del Rincon, Andes Department, Salta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ovejero Toledo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El salar delRincón se encuentra ubicado en el departamento Los Andes, provincia de Salta enel extremo noroeste de la Puna Austral, a una altura media de 3.660 m s.n.m. Eneste trabajo se dan a conocer los resultados de la correlación de sondeos, quepermitieron determinar facies de halita, texturas, estructuras, materialesclásticos intersticiales, mineralogía, composición química de la salmuera y losparámetros hidráulicos del acuífero, determinados a lo largo de una transectaeste-oeste que cubre aproximadamente 30 km². La fase cristalina estácompuesta mayoritariamente de halita, con yeso, mirabilita, thenardita,glauberita, hidroglauberita, eugsterita, calcita y ulexita solo en el sectoroeste de la transecta. Se identificaron las siguientes evapofacies halítica:costra salina, geodas y halita bandeada. Las texturas observadas incluyen:cristales hoppers, pirámides chevron, halita intersticial muddyhalite y halita cloudy. La composición de la salmuera es denaturaleza clorurada sódica con variaciones en profundidad de sulfato y borato.Los cationes son Ca, Mg, Li y K, la relación K/Li es de 20/1. El cálculo dereserva a nivel de recurso mineral, en sectores con distinta porosidad eficaz,dio para Li+ 208,2 kt y para K+ 4231,9 kt (> 30 %; yLi+ 14,9 kt y K+ 302, 9 kt (Salar del Rincón is located at 3,660 m.a.s.l. in the Andes district, Salta province, andnortheast of the Southern Puna. This paper shows the results of theborehole correlation that helped determine the halite facies, textures,structures, interstitial clastic material, mineralogy, chemical composition ofthe brine and the aquifer hydraulic parameters determineted in an E-W transectthat covers approximately 30 km². The crystalline phase is mainlymade up of halite with gypsum, mirabilite, thenardite, glauberite,hydroglauberite, eugsterite, calcite, and ulexite only in the western area oftransect. The following halite evapofacies were identified: saline crust,geodes and banded

  3. Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Barbarán, Francisco R.; Humberto Arias

    2009-01-01

    From an historic and demographic perspective, as well as the use of natural resources, we analyzed the relationship between human migrations and the economic activities of Los Andes Department, West of the Salta Province, in NW Argentina. Using the residual method, we calculated migratory balances between Argentinean population censuses carried out in 1947,1960, 1970, 1980 and 2001. The migratory balances were negative for all the periods studied. When the train started to run through Ramal C...

  4. Parasite loads and altitudinal distribution of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes Cargas parasitarias y distribución de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central

    OpenAIRE

    JOHN H. CAROTHERS; Jaksic, Fabián M

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the distributions of ten species of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes to the distributions of four types of parasites: malaria-causing Plasmodium, gut nematodes, ticks, and mites. We wanted to see if parasite numbers might be a factor in determining distributional limits of the lizards. We found that there was no evidence of malarial infestation of the lizards, that ticks were almost absent, that more often than not mite numbers decreased at the distributional...

  5. Nuclear Data for Safe Operation and Waste Transmutation: ANDES (Accurate Nuclear Data for nuclear Energy Sustainability); Datos nucleares para la operacion segura y la transmutacion de residuos: Andes (Datos Nucleares Precisos para la Sostenibilidad de la Energia Nuclear)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear research within the 7th Framework Program (FP7 and FP7+2) of EURATOM has devoted a significant fraction of its efforts to the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles and reactor concepts, mainly fast reactors, aiming to improve the long term sustainability by reduction of the final wastes, optimal use of natural resources and improvement of safety in the present and future nuclear installations. The new design need more accurate basic nuclear data for isotopes, like minor actinides, potentially playing an important role in the operation, fuel concept, safety or final wastes of those reactors and fuel cycles. Four projects, ANDES, ERINDA, EUFRAT and CHANDA, supported by EURATOM within the FP7 and FP7+2, have put together most of the European Nuclear Data community to respond efficiently and in a coordinated way to those needs. This paper summarizes the objectives, and main achievements of ANDES, the project responsible for most of the measurements and technical achievements that was coordinated by CIEMAT. Indeed, CIEMAT has coordinated the nuclear data R and D projects within EURATOM during the last 7 years (NUDATRA domain of EUROTRANS, and ANDES) and will continue this coordination in the CHANDA project till 2017. (Author)

  6. Origin and dissemination across the Colombian Andes mountain range of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Vladimir; Murillo, Claribel; Echeverry, Diego F; Benavides, Julie; Pearce, Richard J; Roper, Cally; Guerra, Angela P; Osorio, Lyda

    2010-08-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria is unevenly distributed in Colombia. The Andes mountain range separates regions in the west where malaria is endemic from those in the east and constitutes a barrier against gene flow and the dispersal of parasite populations. The distribution of dhfr and dhps genotypes of 146 P. falciparum samples from the eastern Amazon and Orinoco basins and Northwest and Southwest Pacific regions of Colombia was consistent with the documented levels of therapeutic efficacy of SP. The diversity of four dhfr- and dhps-linked microsatellites indicated that double- and triple-mutant alleles for both resistance loci have a single origin. Likewise, multilocus association genotypes, including two unlinked microsatellite loci, suggested that genetic exchanges between the eastern Orinoco and Northwest Pacific populations has taken place across the Andes, most probably via migration of infected people. PMID:20498318

  7. Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes. The shrub Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae is reported for the first time as a host plant for three Neotropical Polyommatini (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Polyommatinae: Hemiargus ramon (Dognin, 1887, Leptotes trigemmatus (Butler, 1881 and Nabokovia faga (Dognin, 1895, based on two collections performed in the western slopes of the northern Chilean Andes in two consecutive summers. The relative abundance was always above 90% for N. faga while it was always less than 5% for H. ramon and L. trigemmatus. Furthermore, N. faga was not found on inflorescences of other native Fabaceae examined in the study site. This pattern suggests a close relationship between N. faga and D. pennellii var. chilensis, at least at a local scale.

  8. Identificación, caracterización y dinámica de las geoformas glaciales y periglaciales en la Cordillera de los Andes a través de sensores remotos

    OpenAIRE

    Falaschi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    El presente trabajo de Tesis Doctoral tuvo el objetivo de estudiar los glaciares y glaciares de escombros en tres regiones montañosas a lo largo de la Cordillera de los Andes Argentina: Monte San Lorenzo (Provincia de Santa Cruz), Volcán Domuyo (Provincia de Neuquén), y Nevados de Cachi (Provincia de Salta). Cada uno de estos sitios presenta características climáticas propias, representativas de tres porciones particulares de los Andes: Andes Patagónicos Meridionales, Andes Centrales Meridion...

  9. Pre-collisional extensional tectonics in convergent continental margins: the cretaceous evolution of the central cordillera of the Colombian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata Henao, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes continental margin is characterized by continuous convergence that allowed the formation of continental volcanic arcs, back arc basins, extensional divergent tectonics and accretion of exotic terranes. Such a record, particularly the extensional phases, is commonly hidden by the overimposition of deformational events associated with evolution of the subduction configuration, collision of exotic terranes and strike slip fragment...

  10. Quantitative Temperature Reconstructions from Holocene and Late Glacial Lake Sediments in the Tropical Andes using Chironomidae (non-biting midges)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews-Bird, F.; Gosling, W. D.; Brooks, S. J.; Montoya, E.; Coe, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Chironomidae (non-biting midges) is a family of two-winged aquatic insects of the order Diptera. They are globally distributed and one of the most diverse families within aquatic ecosystems. The insects are stenotopic, and the rapid turnover of species and their ability to colonise quickly favourable habitats means chironomids are extremely sensitive to environmental change, notably temperature. Through the development of quantitative temperature inference models chironomids have become important palaeoecological tools. Proxies capable of generating independent estimates of past climate are crucial to disentangling climate signals and ecosystem response in the palaeoecological record. This project has developed the first modern environmental calibration data set in order to use chironomids from the Tropical Andes as quantitative climate proxies. Using surface sediments from c. 60 lakes from Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador we have developed an inference model capable of reconstructing temperatures, with a prediction error of 1-2°C, from fossil assemblages. Here we present the first Lateglacial and Holocene chironomid-inferred temperature reconstructions from two sites in the tropical Andes. The first record, from a high elevation (4153 m asl) lake in the Bolivian Andes, shows persistently cool temperatures for the past 15 kyr, punctuated by warm episodes in the early Holocene (9-10 kyr BP). The chironomid-inferred Holocene temperature trends from a lake sediment record on the eastern Andean flank of Ecuador (1248 m asl) spanning the last 5 millennia are synchronous with temperature changes in the NGRIP ice core record. The temperature estimates suggest along the eastern flank of the Andes, at lower latitudes (~1°S), climate closely resemble the well-established fluctuations of the Northern Hemisphere for this time period. Late-glacial climate fluctuations across South America are still disputed with some palaeoecological records suggesting evidence for Younger Dryas

  11. Assessment of soil fertility change and sustainability of agroecological management in different land use systems of the southern Ecuadorian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Bahr, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    The thesis was conducted to investigate soil fertility changes and assess the sustainability of agroecological management in different land-use systems of the southern Ecuadorian Andes using quantitative and qualitative methods. Ecuador still holds the highest deforestation rate of all Latin American countries which also has a large impact in the research area by forest conversion into agricultural land. Agricultural land-use systems in the research area are multifaceted due to heterogeneous ...

  12. Prediction of the most extreme rainfall events in the South American Andes: A statistical forecast based on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Barbosa, Henrique; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2015-04-01

    During the monsoon season, the subtropical Andes in South America are exposed to spatially extensive extreme rainfall events that frequently lead to flashfloods and landslides with severe socio-economic impacts. Since dynamical weather forecast has substantial problems with predicting the most extreme events (above the 99th percentile), alternative forecast methods are called for. Based on complex network theory, we developed a general mathematical framework for statistical prediction of extreme events in significantly interrelated time series. The key idea of our approach is to make the internal synchronization structure of extreme events mathematically accessible in terms of the topology of a network which is constructed from measuring the synchronization of extreme events at different locations. The application of our method to high-spatiotemporal resolution rainfall data (TRMM 3B42) reveals a migration pattern of large convective systems from southeastern South America towards the Argentinean and Bolivian Andes, against the direction of the northwesterly low-level moisture flow from the Amazon Basin. Once these systems reach the Andes, they lead to spatially extensive extreme events up to elevations above 4000m, leading to substantial risks of associated natural hazards. Based on atmospheric composites, we could identify an intricate interplay of frontal systems approaching from the South, low-level moisture flow from the Amazon Basin to the North, and the Andean orography as responsible climatic mechanism. These insights allow to formulate a simple forecast rule predicting 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of extreme rainfall events at the eastern slopes of the subtropical Andes. The rule can be computed from readily available rainfall and pressure data and is already being tested by local institutions for disaster preparation.

  13. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    OpenAIRE

    Picard, D; Sempéré, Thierry; Plantard, O.

    2008-01-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida. a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures ...

  14. The analytic nodal diffusion solver ANDES in multigroups for 3D rectangular geometry: Development and performance analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Montero, Juan Andrés; García Herranz, Nuria; Ahnert Iglesias, Carolina; Aragonés Beltrán, José María

    2008-01-01

    In this work we address the development and implementation of the analytic coarse-mesh finite-difference (ACMFD) method in a nodal neutron diffusion solver called ANDES. The first version of the solver is implemented in any number of neutron energy groups, and in 3D Cartesian geometries; thus it mainly addresses PWR and BWR core simulations. The details about the generalization to multigroups and 3D, as well as the implementation of the method are given. The transverse integration procedure i...

  15. Development and performance of the analytic nodal diffusion solver 'ANDES' in multi-groups for 3D rectangular geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference method is developed in detail for multi-group and multi-dimensional diffusion calculations, including the general and particular modal solutions in the complex space for any number of groups. For rectangular multidimensional geometries, the Chao's generalized relations with transverse integration provide a high-order approximation of the ACMFD method, where all energy groups are coupled by matrix-vector FD relations and the errors are limited to the ones incurred by the interpolation of the transverse interface currents, in a non-linear iterative scheme. The implementation of the method in a multigroup 3D rectangular geometry nodal solver called ANDES is discussed, pointing out the encapsulation achieved for integration of the solver as an optional module within larger code systems. The performance of the ANDES solver in 3D rectangular (X-Y-Z) geometry and multi-groups is verified by its application to several 2D-3D model and international benchmarks (NEA-OECD), with given diffusion cross section sets in few-groups (2 to 8). The extensive verification, always required for new methods and codes, shows a quite fast convergence of ANDES in both the eigenvalue and transverse leakage iteration loops and with the nodal coarse-mesh size, allowing to reach the conclusion that quite high accuracy is achieved with rather large nodes, one node or four nodes per PWR fuel assembly, as compared with reference solutions obtained with fine-mesh finite-difference diffusion calculations using mesh sizes 64 to 128 times smaller than the ANDES nodes. (authors)

  16. The analytic nodal diffusion solver ANDES in multigroups for 3D rectangular geometry: Development and performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we address the development and implementation of the analytic coarse-mesh finite-difference (ACMFD) method in a nodal neutron diffusion solver called ANDES. The first version of the solver is implemented in any number of neutron energy groups, and in 3D Cartesian geometries; thus it mainly addresses PWR and BWR core simulations. The details about the generalization to multigroups and 3D, as well as the implementation of the method are given. The transverse integration procedure is the scheme chosen to extend the ACMFD formulation to multidimensional problems. The role of the transverse leakage treatment in the accuracy of the nodal solutions is analyzed in detail: the involved assumptions, the limitations of the method in terms of nodal width, the alternative approaches to implement the transverse leakage terms in nodal methods - implicit or explicit -, and the error assessment due to transverse integration. A new approach for solving the control rod 'cusping' problem, based on the direct application of the ACMFD method, is also developed and implemented in ANDES. The solver architecture turns ANDES into an user-friendly, modular and easily linkable tool, as required to be integrated into common software platforms for multi-scale and multi-physics simulations. ANDES can be used either as a stand-alone nodal code or as a solver to accelerate the convergence of whole core pin-by-pin code systems. The verification and performance of the solver are demonstrated using both proof-of-principle test cases and well-referenced international benchmarks

  17. Modeling glacier melt and runoff in a high-altitude headwater catchment in the Cordillera Real, Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Kinouchi, T; Liu, T.; J. Mendoza; Asaoka, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Runoff from catchments with partial glacier cover is an integrated process of glacier melt, snowmelt, and surface and subsurface runoff of meltwater and rain from glacierized and non-glacierized areas. Additionally, inherent characteristics of the tropical Andes such as large meteorological variability, high elevation and steep slopes, hydrological effects of wetlands and lakes, and rapid glacier retreat make it difficult to model glacio-hydrological responses ...

  18. Mama Cotacachi: History, local perceptions, and social impacts of climate change and glacier retreat in the Ecuadorian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Robert E.; Zapata Ríos, X.; Aragundy Ochoa, J.

    2007-01-01

    Through the lens of the complete loss of the glacier on Mount Cotacachi in northern Ecuador, this book chapter explores the human and environment interface between the impacts of global warming and the people living in the Andes Mountains. Using a transdisciplinary approach, the researchers analyze photographic records and sketches back to the late eighteen hundreds, oral histories of the local people, and scientific monitoring of changes in water level in local lakes and rivers. The response...

  19. Seismic imaging of a convergent continental margin and plateau in the central Andes (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96))

    OpenAIRE

    Onno Oncken; Stephan V. Sobolev; Manfred Stiller; Günter Asch; Christian Haberland; James Mechie; Xiaohui Yuan; E. Lüchen; P. Giese; P. Wigger; Stefan Lüth; E. Scheuber; H.-J. Götze; H. Brasse; S. Buske

    2003-01-01

    A 400-km-long seismic reflection profile (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96)) and integrated geophysical experiments (wide-angle seismology, passive seismology, gravity, and magnetotelluric depth sounding) across the central Andes (21°S) observed subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American continent. An east dipping reflector (Nazca Reflector) is linked to the down going oceanic crust and shows increasing downdip intensity before gradual breakdown below 80 km. We ...

  20. The stratigraphy of cretaceous mudstones in the eastern Fuegian Andes: new data from body and trace fossils

    OpenAIRE

    Olivero, Eduardo B.; Francisco A. Medina; María I. López C.

    2009-01-01

    The stratigraphy of Cretaceous marine mudstones in the Fuegian Andes, roughly equivalent to Charles Darwin's clay-slate formation, remains a still unsolved problem. Previous records of Albian, Turonian-Coniacian, and Santonian-Campanian bivalves are combined with new findings of the Late Albian inoceramid Inoceramus anglicus Woods, and the Maastrichtian ammonites Diplomoceras sp., Anagaudryceras sp., Maorites densicostatus (Kilian and Reboul), Maorites sp., and Pachydiscus (Neodesmoceras) sp....

  1. A Stepwise, Participatory Approach to Design and Implement Community Based Adaptation to Drought in the Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Ralph Lasage; Sanne Muis; Carolina S. E. Sardella; Michiel A. van Drunen; Peter H. Verburg; Aerts, Jeroen C.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    The livelihoods of people in the Andes are expected to be affected by climate change due to their dependence on glacier water. The observed decrease in glacier volume over the last few decades is likely to accelerate during the current century, which will affect water availability in the region. This paper presents an approach for participatory development of community-based adaptation measures to cope with the projected impacts of climate change. It combines in an innovative manner participa...

  2. Análisis filo geográfico de matudaea colombiana lozano (hamamelidaceae) de los andes colombianos

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Arias, Gustavo Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Matudaea presenta dos especies alopátricas, M. trinervia (distribuida en Meso y Centroamérica) y M. colombiana (distribuida en Los Andes colombianos). La evidencia fósil de Matudaea data del periodo Oligoceno de Europa Central, lo que sugiere una distribución pasada en bosques boreotropicales del Terciario. Para el presente se realizaron análisis p...

  3. ISOSTATICALLY DISTURBED TERRAIN OF NORTHWESTERN ANDES MOUNTAINS FROM SPECTRALLY CORRELATED FREE-AIR AND GRAVITY TERRAIN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández P Orlando

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently revised models on global tectonics describe the convergence of the North Andes, Nazca, Caribbean and South American Plates and their seismicity, volcanism, active faulting and extreme
    topography. The current plate boundaries of the area are mainly interpreted from volcanic and seismic datasets with variable confidence levels. New insights on the isostatic state and plate boundaries of
    the northwestern Andes Mountains can be obtained from the spectral analysis of recently available gravity and topography data.
    Isostatically disturbed terrain produces free-air anomalies that are highly correlated with the gravity effects of the terrain. The terrain gravity effects (TGE and free air gravity anomalies (FAGA of the
    Andes mountains spectral correlation data confirms that these mountains are isostatically disturbed. Strong negative terrain-correlated FAGA along western South America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles are consistent with anomalously deepened mantle displaced by subducting oceanic plates.

    Inversion of the compensated terrain gravity effects (CTGE reveals plate subduction systems with alternating shallower and steeper subduction angles. The gravity modeling highlights crustal
    deformation from plate collision and subduction and other constraints on the tectonism of the plate boundary zones for the region.

  4. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y.; Venegas, Pablo J.; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000–1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543–1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122–1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported. PMID:26798310

  5. Transient analysis in the 3D nodal kinetics and thermal-hydraulics ANDES/COBRA coupled system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron kinetics has been implemented in the 3D nodal solver ANDES, which has been coupled to the core thermal-hydraulics (TH) code COBRA-III for core transient analysis. The purpose of this work is, first, to discuss and test the ability of the kinetics solver ANDES to model transients; and second, by means of a systematic analysis, including alternate kinetics schemes, time step size, nodal size, neutron energy groups and spectrum, to serve as a basis for the development of more accurate and efficient neutronics/thermal-hydraulics tools for general transient simulations. The PWR MOX/UO2 transient benchmark provided by the OECD/NEA and US NRC was selected for these goals. The obtained ANDES/COBRA-III results were consistent with other solutions to the benchmark; the differences in the TH feedback led to slight differences in the core power evolution, whereas very good agreements were found in the other requested parameters. The performed systematic analysis highlighted the optimum kinetics iterative scheme, and showed that neutronics spatial discretization effects have stronger influence than time discretization effects, in the semi-implicit scheme adopted, on the numerical solution. On the other hand, the number of energy groups has an important influence on the transient evolution, whereas the assumption of using the prompt neutron spectrum for delayed neutrons is acceptable as it leads to small relative errors. (authors)

  6. Mycorrhizal and Dark-Septate Fungi in Plant Roots above 4270 Meters Elevation in the Andes and Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Steven K. [University of Colorado; Sobieniak-Wiseman, L. Cheyanne [University of Colorado; Kageyama, Stacy A. [Oregon State University; Halloy, Stephen [Instituto de Ecologia, Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz, Bolivia; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark-septate endophytic (DSE) fungi were quantified in plant roots from high-elevation sites in the Cordillera Vilcanota of the Andes (Per ) and the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains (U.S.A.). At the highest sites in the Andes (5391 m) AM fungi were absent in the two species of plants sampled (both Compositae) but roots of both were heavily colonized by DSE fungi. At slightly lower elevations (5240 5250 m) AM fungi were present in roots while DSE fungi were rare in plants outside of the composite family. At the highest sites sampled in Colorado (4300 m) AM fungi were present, but at very low levels and all plants sampled contained DSE fungi. Hyphae of coarse AM fungi decreased significantly in plant roots at higher altitude in Colorado, but no other structures showed significant decreases with altitude. These new findings indicate that the altitudinal distribution of mycorrhizal fungi observed for European mountains do not necessarily apply to higher and drier mountains that cover much of the Earth (e.g. the Himalaya, Hindu Kush, Andes, and Rockies) where plant growth is more limited by nutrients and water than in European mountains. This paper describes the highest altitudinal records for both AM and DSE fungi, surpassing previous reported altitudinal maxima by about 1500 meters.

  7. Age of Terrestrial Biomarkers in Fluvial Transit Across the Andes-Amazon Reveal Timescales of Carbon Storage and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, C.; Feakins, S. J.; West, A. J.; Galy, V.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental signatures carried by fluvially-exported terrestrial organic matter are shaped by storage, remineralization and replacement at various spatial and temporal scales. Uncertainties in the timescales of these processes are key caveats in the accurate interpretation of sedimentary records. As part of a multi-isotope leaf wax biomarker project, we report the age of biomarkers transported by rivers from mountain to floodplain across the Andes-Amazon transition in southern Peru. We tracked the age of organic carbon using the radiocarbon (14ΔC) composition of plant leaf waxes extracted from particulate organic carbon (POC) in river suspended sediments. Leaf waxes from POC are younger in mountain headwaters (1000 yrs). Downstream aging is associated with the greater storage potential and residence times in lowland mineral soils and sedimentary sequences that include Pleistocene age eroding river terraces. Given three key observations that 1) carbon loading in suspended sediment does not substantively change from Andes to Amazon, 2) ~80% of sediment is sourced in the Andes, and 3) age increases downstream (this study); we find proof of the decoupling of organic carbon from sediment, which we attribute to loss of Andean carbon and replacement during transport.

  8. 18,000 years of environmental change in the Eastern Cordillera of the Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. J.; Gosling, W. D.; Coe, A. L.; Brooks, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Mountainous regions are considered to be early warning sites for climatic change because narrow vertical species ranges mean even small temperature/precipitation variation can result in species movement. This is especially true in the tropical Andes where the complex topography of the Andean valleys allows biodiverse woodland to be separated from grassland and snow dominated peaks by just a few kilometers, with microclimates clearly playing an important role. To begin to predict the likely impacts of future climatic changes and to help protect Andean woodlands, an understanding of baseline ecological conditions and previous responses to longer-term climatic shifts is vital. The Cochabamba Basin and surrounding mountain peaks is situated within the Eastern Andean Cordillera on the margin between the Altiplano and Yungas cloud forest. We present here multi-proxy data from two high elevation (>3400 m) lake sediment records which reveal sub-500 year ecosystem response to climatic shifts since the last glacial period and the impact of pre-Hispanic human populations. The sediment cores recovered from Lakes Challacaba (17°33’ S, 65°34’ W, 3400 m) and Khomer Kocha (17°16’ S, 65°43’ W, 4153 m) span the last c. 4000 and c. 18,000 years respectively. The two sites are only 35 km apart but are positioned within very different climatic and vegetation zones; Challacaba is within a cold and seasonally dry valley, and Khomer Kotcha is located on the steep slopes above the Yungas cloud forests. Analysis of pollen, chironomid, charcoal, geochemical and physical proxies from within the sediment cores provided insight into the drivers of environmental change at a local and regional scale. The Challacaba and Khomer Kocha records are the first from the eastern flank of the Bolivian Andes to record the last 4000 years and help to fill a gap in our understanding of vegetation succession and subsequent climatic variability since the late glacial. Our results suggest that, prior

  9. Constraints on sediment transfer from the Andes to the coast of northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Steven; Liermann, Ariane; Dunai, Tibor; Dewald, Alfred; Heinze, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    While rates of denudation have been suggested as having the potential to link tectonic processes with climate in many settings, the roles that sediment transport must also play have been largely neglected. It is the transport, or not, of eroded material, not necessarily the rate at which that material is produced which is the critical factor in many models of tectonic-climatic interactions. The notable lack of sediment in sections of the Peru-Chile trench has been implicated as a key control of subduction zone processes and consequently Andean mountain building, but little empirical data on sediment transport in the region exists. Here, we present the initial results of a study aiming to constrain the westward transfer of sediment from the Andes Mountains to the Pacific Coast of northern Chile by using in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides. Fluvial sediments were collected at the mouths of several large catchments between 19° S and 26° S, where they drain into the Pacific, and also from upstream locations within each catchment. Sample sites were selected in order to investigate the cosmogenic nuclide derived basin-averaged denudation rates of the western flank of the Andes, and to compare this with the cosmogenic nuclide concentrations of fluvial sediments further downstream where the catchments exit to the coast. A simplistic interpretation of the cosmogenic 10Be concentrations as denudation rates gives results varying between ~10 and 300 m/Myr. We would expect the most rapid erosion to occur on the steeper, wetter western Andean flank and for slower erosion to be recorded from the more gentle sloping, hyperarid/arid regions between the foothills of the Andes and the Pacific coast. This pattern is observed in some basins but in others the nuclide concentrations imply the opposite, with several-fold higher erosion rates measured for the large catchments sampled at the coast in comparison to their mountainous Andean headwaters. One explanation for this unusual

  10. TRMM- and GPM-based precipitation analysis and modelling in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Bastian; Buytaert, Wouter; Zulkafli, Zed; Onof, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Despite wide-spread applications of satellite-based precipitation products (SPPs) throughout the TRMM-era, the scarcity of ground-based in-situ data (high density gauge networks, rainfall radar) in many hydro-meteorologically important regions, such as tropical mountain environments, has limited our ability to evaluate both SPPs and individual satellite-based sensors as well as accurately model or merge rainfall at high spatial resolutions, particularly with respect to extremes. This has restricted both the understanding of sensor behaviour and performance controls in such regions as well as the accuracy of precipitation estimates and respective hydrological applications ranging from water resources management to early warning systems. Here we report on our recent research into precipitation analysis and modelling using various TRMM and GPM products (2A25, 3B42 and IMERG) in the tropical Andes. In an initial study, 78 high-frequency (10-min) recording gauges in Colombia and Ecuador are used to generate a ground-based validation dataset for evaluation of instantaneous TRMM Precipitation Radar (TPR) overpasses from the 2A25 product. Detection ability, precipitation time-series, empirical distributions and statistical moments are evaluated with respect to regional climatological differences, seasonal behaviour, rainfall types and detection thresholds. Results confirmed previous findings from extra-tropical regions of over-estimation of low rainfall intensities and under-estimation of the highest 10% of rainfall intensities by the TPR. However, in spite of evident regionalised performance differences as a function of local climatological regimes, the TPR provides an accurate estimate of climatological annual and seasonal rainfall means. On this basis, high-resolution (5 km) climatological maps are derived for the entire tropical Andes. The second objective of this work is to improve the local precipitation estimation accuracy and representation of spatial patterns of

  11. Surface uplift and convective rainfall along the southern Central Andes (Angastaco Basin, NW Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Heiko; Mulch, Andreas; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Cottle, John; Hynek, Scott A.; Poletti, Jacob; Rohrmann, Alexander; Schmitt, Axel K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-04-01

    Stable-isotopic and sedimentary records from the orogenic Puna Plateau of NW Argentina and adjacent intermontane basins to the east furnish a unique late Cenozoic record of range uplift and ensuing paleoenvironmental change in the south-central Andes. Today, focused precipitation in this region occurs along the eastern, windward flanks of the Eastern Cordillera and Sierras Pampeanas ranges, while the orogen interior constitutes high-elevation regions with increasingly arid conditions in a westward direction. As in many mountain belts, such hydrologic and topographic gradients are commonly mirrored by a systematic relationship between the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of meteoric water and elevation. The glass fraction of isotopically datable volcanic ash intercalated in sedimentary sequences constitutes an environmental proxy that retains a signal of the hydrogen-isotopic composition of ancient precipitation. This isotopic composition thus helps to elucidate the combined climatic and tectonic processes associated with topographic growth, which ultimately controls the spatial patterns of precipitation in mountain belts. However, between 25.5 and 27°S present-day river-based hydrogen-isotope lapse rates are very low, possibly due to deep-convective seasonal storms that dominate runoff. If not accounted for, the effects of such conditions on moisture availability in the past may lead to misinterpretations of proxy-records of rainfall. Here, we present hydrogen-isotope data of volcanic glass (δDg), extracted from 34 volcanic ash layers in different sedimentary basins of the Eastern Cordillera and the Sierras Pampeanas. Combined with previously published δDg records and our refined U-Pb and (U-Th)/He zircon geochronology on 17 tuff samples, we demonstrate hydrogen-isotope variations associated with paleoenvironmental change in the Angastaco Basin, which evolved from a contiguous foreland to a fault-bounded intermontane basin during the late Mio

  12. Classification of debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Jason R.; Bellisario, Antonio C.; Ferrando, Francisco A.

    2015-07-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from true glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. Internal ice is preserved by an insulating cover of thick debris, which acts as a storage reservoir to release water during the summer and early fall. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the central Andes; however, the existing legislation only recognizes uncovered or semicovered glaciers as a water resource. Glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being altered or removed by mining operations to extract valuable minerals from the mountains. In addition, agricultural expansion and population growth in this region have placed additional demands on water resources. In a warmer climate, as glaciers recede and seasonal water availability becomes condensed over the course of a snowmelt season, rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers contribute a larger component of base flow to rivers and streams. As a result, identifying and locating these features to implement sustainable regional planning for water resources is important. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on the interpretation of satellite imagery and aerial photographs. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris-covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (class 1) and fully covered (class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. Based on field observations, the amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced

  13. Methane fluxes from a wet puna ecosystem in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Diem, Torsten; Priscila Huaraca Quispe, Lidia; Quispe Ccahuana, Adan Julian; Meir, Patrick; Arn Teh, Yit

    2014-05-01

    Discrepancies exist between top-down and bottom-up estimates of the tropical South American atmospheric methane budget. This suggests that current source-sink inventories fail to adequately characterise the landscapes of the region. This may be particularly true of Andean environments where very few field observations have been made. The high tropical Andes, between tree and permanent snow-lines, is home to diverse grass, shrub and giant rosette dominated ecosystems known variously from Venezuela to northern Chile and Argentina as paramo, jalca and puna. In humid regions these are characterised by wet, organic-rich mineral soils, peat-forming wetlands and shallow lakes. Such conditions are likely to promote methane production and potentially represent a regionally significant source to the atmosphere that should be considered. We report on methane fluxes from a bunch-grass dominated puna habitat at 3500 m above sea level in south-eastern Peru. Mean annual temperature and precipitation are 11 °C and 2500 mm, respectively. Temperature is aseasonal but experiences considerable diurnal variations with overnight frosting common-place. In contrast, rainfall is intensely episodic and has a pronounced wet season between September and March. Sampling encompassed a range of topographic features, such as grassland on freely draining, gently inclined or steep slopes and depressions containing bogs, over a 3 ha ridge to basin transition. Monthly sampling was carried out between January 2011 and June 2013 to investigate seasonal variability in methane fluxes. Intensive sampling campaigns were conducted to investigate spatial and short-term variations on a daily basis in two nine-day campaigns during wet and dry season. The site was a net source of methane to the atmosphere during the period of study. Methane fluxes were dominated by emissions from bogs, whereas, freely draining grassland exhibited weak source or marginal sink activity. Temporal variations were most notable at

  14. Intra- and interspecific tree growth across a long altitudinal gradient in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Joshua M; Silman, Miles R; Clark, James S; Girardin, Cecile A J; Galiano, Darcy; Tito, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Tree growth response across environmental gradients is fundamental to understanding species distributional ecology and forest ecosystem ecology and to predict future ecosystem services. Cross-sectional patterns of ecosystem properties with respect to climatic gradients are often used to predict ecosystem responses to global change. Across sites in the tropics, primary productivity increases with temperature, suggesting that forest ecosystems will become more productive as temperature rises. However, this trend is confounded with a shift in species composition and so may not reflect the response of in situ forests to warming. In this study, we simultaneously studied tree diameter growth across the altitudinal ranges of species within a single genus across a geographically compact temperature gradient, to separate the direct effect of temperature on tree growth from that of species compositional turnover. Using a Bayesian state space modeling framework we combined data from repeated diameter censuses and dendrometer measurements from across a 1700-m altitudinal gradient collected over six years on over 2400 trees in Weinmannia, a dominant and widespread genus of cloud forest trees in the Andes. Within species, growth showed no consistent trend with altitude, but higher-elevation species had lower growth rates than lower-elevation species, suggesting that species turnover is largely responsible for the positive correlation between productivity and temperature in tropical forests. Our results may indicate a significant difference in how low- and high-latitude forests will respond to climate change, since temperate and boreal tree species are consistently observed to have a positive relationship between growth and temperature. If our results hold for other tropical species, a positive response in ecosystem productivity to increasing temperatures in the Andes will depend on the altitudinal migration of tree species. The rapid pace of climate change, and slow observed

  15. Large-amplitude gravity waves above the southern Andes, the Drake Passage, and the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Hierro, R.; Llamedo, P.; Rolla, A.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Above the southern Andes range and its prolongation in the Antarctic Peninsula, large-amplitude mountain and shear gravity waves observed with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations during winter 2009 are analyzed. Two specific reasons motivated this study: (1) a decade of satellite observations of temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere, allowing us to infer that this region may be launching the largest-amplitude gravity waves into the upper atmosphere, and (2) the recent design of a research program to investigate these features in detail, the Southern Andes Antarctic Gravity wave Initiative (SAANGRIA). The simulations are forced with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The approach selected for the regional downscaling is based on consecutive integrations with weekly reinitialization with 24 h of spin-up, and the outputs during this period are excluded from the analysis. From 1 June to 31 August 2009, five case studies were selected on the basis of their outstanding characteristics and large wave amplitudes. In general, one or two prevailing modes of oscillation are identified after applying continuous wavelet transforms at constant pressure levels and perpendicularly to the nominal orientation of the dominant wave crests. In all cases, the dominant modes are characterized by horizontal wavelengths around 50 km. Their vertical wavelengths, depending on a usually strong background wind shear, are estimated to be between 2 and 11 km. The corresponding intrinsic periods range between 10 and 140 min. In general, the estimated vertical wavelength (intrinsic period) maximizes (minimizes) around 250-300 hPa. The synoptic circulation for each case is described. Zonal and meridional components of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum are shown in detail for each case, including possible horizontal wavelengths between 12 and 400 km. Large values of this flux are observed at higher pressure

  16. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, FréDéRique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-12-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 Mw = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 Mw = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 Mw = 8.0 Pisco and the Mw = 7.7 Tocopilla earthquakes. We find that the data require a highly heterogeneous ISC pattern and that, overall, areas with large seismic slip coincide with areas which remain locked in the interseismic period (with high ISC). Offshore Lima where the ISC is high, a Mw˜8.6-8.8 earthquake occurred in 1746. This area ruptured again in a sequence of four Mw˜8.0 earthquakes in 1940, 1966, 1974 and 2007 but these events released only a small fraction of the elastic strain which has built up since 1746 so that enough elastic strain might be available there to generate a Mw > 8.5 earthquake. The region where the Nazca ridge subducts appears to be mostly creeping aseismically in the interseismic period (low ISC) and seems to act as a permanent barrier as no large earthquake ruptured through it in the last 500 years. In southern Peru, ISC is relatively high and the deficit of moment accumulated since the Mw˜8.8 earthquake of 1868 is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.4 earthquake. Two asperities separated by a subtle aseismic creeping patch are revealed there. This aseismic patch may arrest some rupture as happened during the 2001 Arequipa earthquake, but the larger earthquakes of 1604 and 1868 were able to rupture through it. In northern Chile, ISC is very high and the rupture of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake has released only 4% of the elastic strain that has accumulated since 1877. The deficit of moment which has accumulated there is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.7 earthquake. This study thus

  17. The Continental Distillery: Building Thick Continental Crust in the Central Andes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.; Minaya, E.; Biryol, C. B.; Bishop, B.; Eakin, C. M.; Franca, G.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Ryan, J. C.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Young, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of stable continental crust and the associated development and destruction of mantle lithospheric roots is central to our understanding of plate tectonics, both at its inception and as an ongoing process today. Subduction zones play an important role in the creation and refinement of continental crust, and also serve as a possible mechanism for the removal of residual mantle material. The central Andes provide an intriguing laboratory for the study of these processes. Up to 400 km wide, 1500 km long, and with an average elevation of 4 km, the Altiplano Plateau is the largest orogen on earth associated with an ocean-continent subduction zone. This is much larger than adjacent 'normal' sections of the Andes, raising the question of why this portion of South American crust became so much more substantial than surrounding areas. Over the past several years, new seismic data have made it possible for us to develop a more complete picture of the lithospheric and asthenospheric processes involved in the development of the Altiplano Plateau and the adjacent narrower orogen further to the north. The 'Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography' (CAUGHT) comprises in part a broadband deployment of 50 stations across the northern flank of the Altiplano Plateau in southern Peru and northern Bolivia. The adjacent 'PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment' (PULSE) includes 40 broadband stations that cover the region directly north of the CAUGHT deployment, encompassing the northern edge of the Altiplano, the transition to 'normal' width orogen, and the transition in slab geometry from normal to flat from south to north across the study area. Uplift of the Altiplano Plateau is likely due to some combination shortening, isostasy due to lithospheric destruction or changes in crustal density, magmatic addition to the crust, and/or flow within the thickened crust. Our studies indicate pervasive low velocities across the Altiplano consistent with a

  18. Future runoff from glacierized catchments in the Central Andes could substantially decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Marlene; Schauwecker, Simone; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Drenkhan, Fabian; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Kaser, Georg; Suarez, Wilson; García Hernández, Javier; Fluixá-Sanmartín, Javier; Ayros, Edwin; Rohrer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    In Peru, about 50% of the energy is produced from hydropower plants. An important amount of this energy is produced with water from glaciated catchments. In these catchments river streamflow is furthermore needed for other socio-economic activities such as agriculture. However, the amount and seasonality of water from glacial melt is expected to undergo strong changes. As glaciers are projected to further decline with continued warming, runoff will become more and more sensitive to possible changes in precipitation patterns. Moreover, as stated by a recent study (Neukom et al., 2015), wet season precipitation sums in the Central Andes could decrease up to 19-33 % by the end of the 21st century compared to present-day conditions. Here, we investigate future runoff availability for selected glacierized catchments in the Peruvian Andes. In a first step, we apply a simplified energy balance and runoff model (ITGG-2.0-R) for current conditions. Thereafter, we model future runoff for different climate scenarios, including the possibility of strongly reduced precipitation. Preliminary findings indicate (i) changes in the seasonal distribution of runoff and (ii) significant reductions of the annual runoff in future for the mentioned scenario with significant precipitation decreases. During early phases of glacier recession, melt leads to increased runoff - respectively compensates for the precipitation reduction in the corresponding scenario - depending on the fraction of catchment glaciation. Glaciers are acting as natural water reservoirs and may buffer the decreasing precipitation in glacierized catchments for a limited period. However, strongly reduced precipitation will have noticeable consequences on runoff, particularly when glacier melt contribution gets smaller and finally is completely missing. This will have consequences on the water availability for hydropower production, agriculture, mining and other water uses. Critical conditions may emerge in particular

  19. Magnetic signatures of the orogenic crust of the Patagonian Andes with implication for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Michelena, Marina; Kilian, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    The Patagonian Andes represent a good scenario of study because they have outcrops of diverse plutonic rocks representative of an orogenic crust on Earth and other planets. Furthermore, metamorphic surface rocks provide a window into deeper crustal lithologies. In such remote areas, satellite and aerial magnetic surveys could provide important geological information concerning exposed and not exposed rocks, but they integrate the magnetic anomalies in areas of kilometres. For the southernmost Andes long wavelength satellite data show clear positive magnetic anomalies (>+100 nT) for the Patagonian Batholith (PB), similar as parts of the older martian crust. This integrated signal covers regions with different ages and cooling histories during magnetic reversals apart from the variability of the rocks. To investigate the complex interplay of distinct magnetic signatures at short scale, we have analysed local magnetic anomalies across this orogen at representative sites by decimeter-scale magnetic ground surveys. As expected, the investigated sites have positive and negative local anomalies. They are related to surface and subsurface rocks, and their different formation and alternation processes including geomagnetic inversions, distinct Curie depths of the magnetic carriers, intracrustal deformation among other factors. Whole rock chemistry (ranging from 45 to >80 wt.% SiO2 and from 1 to 18 wt.% FeOtot.), magnetic characteristics (susceptibilities, magnetic remanence and Königsberger ratios) as well as the composition and texture of the magnetic carriers have been investigated for representative rocks. Rocks of an ultramafic to granodioritic intrusive suite of the western and central PB contain titanomagnetite as major magnetic carrier. Individual magnetic signatures of these plutonic rocks reflect their single versus multidomain status, complex exolution processes with ilmenite lamella formations and the stoichiometric proportions of Cr, Fe and Ti in the oxides. At

  20. Crustal-scale active deformation along the Ecuadorian Andes using Persistent Scatterers SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champenois, J.; Baize, S.; Audin, L.; Pinel, V.; Alvarado, A.; Jomard, H.; Yepes, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Located in the Northern Andes along the active subduction zone of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continent, Ecuador is highly exposed to seismic hazard. For the last ten years, numerous multidisciplinary studies focused on major seismicity related to the subduction, whereas few investigations concentrated on M>7 crustal seismicity in the upper plate (like 1797 Riobamba earthquake, ML 8.3, 12.000 deaths). The active faults producing these earthquakes are poorly known in term of slip rate and for some cases are even not identified yet. Additionnally, Ecuador is one of the most active volcanic areas of the northern Andean volcanic zone. Three among the nine active volcanoes are actually erupting (Reventador, Tungurahua, and Sangay). For the last 5 years, geodetic networks have been deployed in Ecuador to enhance crustal deformation monitoring, but these point-wise techniques cannot provide spatially dense maps of ground deformation and are quite expensive methods. To address this issue, we applied the Persistent Scatterers SAR Interferometry technique (StaMPS/MTI freeware developed by A. Hooper) to ENVISAT SAR data between 2003 and 2009. Using these cost-effective techniques, we are able to investigate both tectonic and volcanic surface deformations with an unprecedented spatial density of measurements. This study presents new PS-InSAR results along the Ecuadorian Andes, close to the area of Riobamba. We generated average velocity maps and consistent time-series of displacements measured along the radar line of sight. These results evidence large scale deformation localized on the Pallatanga fault system (locked fault) compatible with a model of locked strike slip fault. Moreover, these results show an important growth of the Tungurahua volcanic complex (maximum rate about 9 mm/yr) with a rapid uplift prior and post 2006 explosive eruption. We investigate the time-series of displacement for 22 images. Our results permitted to propose two crustal source

  1. Control tectónico de la red de drenaje de los Andes del norte argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mon

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Los ríos transversales que drenan la vertiente oriental de los Andes del norte argentino muestran bruscos desvíos hacia cursos longitudinales, inmediatamente al oeste de la traza de grandes cabalgamientos o de los bordes de láminas levantadas por fallas ubicadas en el lado opuesto de ellos. Los ríos desviados colectan otros ríos transversales antes de emerger en la dirección opuesta y de atravesar el frente montañoso. El desvío de los ríos se interpreta como la respuesta al levantamiento progresivo y al crecimiento lateral de cinturones fallados o de anticlinales propagados a lo largo de fallas ciegas. La mayor parte de los ríos de la región fueron desviados, pocos de ellos mantuvieron sus cursos a través de las estructuras en desarrollo. La reorganización del drenaje por el desarrollo de una topografía controlada estructuralmente influyó en la ubicación y en la concentración de los desagües de los ríos en el frente montañoso. Este segmento de los Andes, que se extiende a lo largo de más de 600 km, tiene sólo tres desagües representados por los ríos troncales Bermejo, Juramento y Salí-Dulce. El drenaje evolucionó desde el levantamiento de la Puna (12- 15 Ma, después de la regresión marina final. El desvío de los ríos puede haber empezado después del levantamiento de la Cordillera Oriental (10 Ma y prosiguió con el levantamiento de nuevas montañas hacia el este. El levantamiento de las cadenas montañosas avanzó de oeste a este. Los cinturones más orientales del Sistema Subandino y de las Sierras Pampeanas septentrionales se levantaron después de los 3 Ma. El levantamiento rápido de los obstáculos tectónicos puede explicar la tendencia al desvío de los ríos de esta región.

  2. Lichenometric Dating of Little Ice Age Moraines in the Cordillera Vilcabamba, Southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, J. R.; Licciardi, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Lateral and end moraines deposited by two valley glaciers were mapped on the south side of Nevado Tucarhuay (5910 m asl) and on the east side of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m asl) in the Cordillera Vilcabamba in the southern Peruvian Andes (~13°S latitude). The geomorphic expression of outer and inner moraine sequences in these two drainages mimics that of a previously studied pair of moraines in the upper Rio Blanco valley on the south side of Nevado Salcantay. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating has yielded ages of 9.0 ± 0.3 ka and 195 ± 24 years, respectively, for these outer and inner Rio Blanco moraines. In all three valleys, prominent outer moraines occur ~3-5 km from headwalls and inner moraine ridges are found ~2.5-3 km from headwalls. Recessional moraines found exclusively on the east side of Salcantay indicate multiple early- to late-Holocene glacier pauses, rather than continuous retreat, prior to the latest Holocene glacier readvance. Diameters of the lichen Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon were measured on moraine boulders from the inner moraines in all three valleys. Lichen diameters on the two undated inner moraines are consistent with diameters on the inner 10Be-dated Rio Blanco moraine, which signifies similar lichenometric ages and supports synchronous glacier culminations in all three drainages during the Little Ice Age. The new lichen measurements and age estimates provide a critical link between previous lichen studies in the Cordillera Blanca to the north and in the Cordillera Real to the south, thereby increasing spatial coverage of terrestrial paleoclimate information. Moreover, the extensive lichen measurements gathered on the inner 10Be-dated Rio Blanco moraine define a new control point for the Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon growth curve in the tropical Peruvian- Bolivian Andes, which will increase the accuracy of lichenometric age estimates in this region. 10Be exposure dating of the inner moraines in adjacent valleys is underway

  3. Concentration and distribution of heavy metals in two Andisols of the Azuay Andes (Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria; Ugalde, Sandra; Tonon, Luis; Larriva, Giovani

    2013-04-01

    At present many governmental and environmental bureaus are interested in establishing reliable soil quality criteria for heavy metals to enable the detection of polluted sites. To evaluate the variation of heavy metal natural concentration and to assess heavy metal contamination in soils, it is necessary to survey heavy metal baseline levels in order to understand their migration and distribution during pedogenesis. Many nationwide projects report elemental baseline values in soils. Baseline levels of heavy metals in soils have also been determined at local scales. Data is scarce on qualitative and quantitative trace elements content of Ecuatorian soils. The soils in the Azuay Andes (S of Ecuador) are thought to be generally non-contaminated. The objective of this study is to determine and evaluate the natural concentrations and distribution of seven heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in Andisol of Azuay Andes. Soil samples were grounded in an agate mill prior to pseudototal heavy metal analysis. Cadmium, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined by a masses spectrometer (MS-ICP) after aqua regia extraction according to ISO standard procedures. Soil particle size distribution, organic carbon, electrical conductivity and pH have been previously determined. Andisols are dominated by amorphous aluminium silicates and Al-organic complexes. The soils of volcanic area usually have an Ah-Bh-Bhs/Bw-C horizon sequence. The Ah horizon is dark-coloured and normally very high in organic matter, ranging from 6.4 to 15.2 %. A strong rise in pH upon addition of a fluoride solution is used to signal the presence of allophane. The pH usually rises to 10.5 bellow 20 cm. The range of total soil values in mgkg-1 is as follows: Cd (0.03-0.3), Co (0.8-5), Cr (7-15), Cu (9-25), Ni (2-4), Pb (11-41) and Zn (12-37). All heavy metal contents, except for Cd, are strongly correlated with pH. For the pseudototal fraction, there was significant difference between the soil horizons in

  4. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  5. Aridity changes in the temperate-Mediterranean transition of the Andes since ad 1346 reconstructed from tree-rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, Duncan A.; Quesne, Carlos le [Universidad Austral de Chile, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); Boninsegna, Jose A.; Morales, Mariano S.; Villalba, Ricardo [Instituto Argentino de Nivologia, Glaciologia y Ciencias Ambientales, IANIGLA, Departamento de Dendrocronologia e Historia Ambiental, Mendoza (Argentina); Cleaveland, Malcolm K.; Stahle, David W. [University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Tree-Ring Laboratory, Department of Geosciences, Fayetteville, AR (United States); Lara, Antonio [Universidad Austral de Chile, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Austral de Chile, Forest Ecosystem Services under Climatic Fluctuations (Forecos), Valdivia (Chile); Mudelsee, Manfred [Climate Risk Analysis, Hanover (Germany); Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The Andes Cordillera acts as regional ''Water Towers'' for several countries and encompasses a wide range of ecosystems and climates. Several hydroclimatic changes have been described for portions of the Andes during recent years, including glacier retreat, negative precipitation trends, an elevation rise in the 0 isotherm, and changes in regional streamflow regimes. The Temperate-Mediterranean transition (TMT) zone of the Andes (35.5 -39.5 S) is particularly at risk to climate change because it is a biodiversity hotspot with heavy human population pressure on water resources. In this paper we utilize a new tree-ring network of Austrocedrus chilensis to reconstruct past variations in regional moisture in the TMT of the Andes by means of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). The reconstruction covers the past 657 years and captures interannual to decadal scales of variability in late spring-early summer PDSI. These changes are related to the north-south oscillations in moisture conditions between the Mediterranean and Temperate climates of the Andes as a consequence of the latitudinal position of the storm tracks forced by large-scale circulation modes. Kernel estimation of occurrence rates reveals an unprecedented increment of severe and extreme drought events during the last century in the context of the previous six centuries. Moisture conditions in our study region are linked to tropical and high-latitude ocean-atmospheric forcing, with PDSI positively related to Nino-3.4 SST during spring and strongly negatively correlated with the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) during summer. Geopotential anomaly maps at 500-hPa show that extreme dry years are tightly associated with negative height anomalies in the Ross-Amundsen Seas, in concordance with the strong negative relationship between PDSI and AAO. The twentieth century increase in extreme drought events in the TMT may not be related to ENSO but to the positive AAO trend during late-spring and

  6. [Breastfeeding, complimentary feeding practices and childhood malnutrition in the Bolivian Andes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Agudo, Yesmina; Jones, Andrew D; Berti, Peter R; Larrea Macías, Sergio

    2010-03-01

    Northern Potosi is one of the poorest parts of Bolivia with the highest indicators of rural poverty, malnutrition and food insecurity in the Bolivian Andes. The objective of this research was to characterize the levels of malnutrition and describe infant feeding practices in Potosi, Bolivia and use this information to develop an effective, gender sensitive and culturally relevant intervention encouraging good infant feeding practices. Standard methods were used to collect anthropometric data. Weight and height data were collected for 400 children under five years of age from 30 communities. In six of these communities, interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 33 mothers and other families in addition to household observational data that were collected to describe infant feeding practices. Nearly 20% of children were underweight; stunting was widespread as well. 38% of mothers initiated breastfeeding 12 hours or more after birth. 39% of mothers initiated complementary feeding in the first three months following birth. The type of complementary food given to children was usually inadequate. With this research we could see that nutritional deficiencies often begin when the mother starts breastfeeding and when first introduced complementary feeding. Interventions aimed at improving maternal and child nutrition will require changes in parents' behavior, greater recognition and community support of the importance of child feeding, and the inclusion of strategies to reach young people, involve men, and make high quality nutrition promotion more widely available in the communities. PMID:21090271

  7. Caracterización de semillas de lupino (Lupinus mutabilis sembrado en los Andes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduar Ortega-David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se identificaron las propiedades físicas, composicionales y fisicoquímicas de la semilla de Lupino (Lupinus mutabilis cultivado en Nariño (Andes de Colombia. Su composición se determinó realizando análisis proximales de semilla completa, tegumento y cotiledones. Además se determinó el contenido de minerales y su composición elemental. Se estableció cuantitativamente el contenido de alcaloides presentes y su perfil composicional. Se determinaron propiedades físicas como la forma y el tamaño de la semilla. Se determinaron las propiedades fisicoquímicas como la capacidad de retención de agua y el pH. Las cantidades de nutrientes de la semilla son menores que los valores reportados en la literatura. Se presenta una variación en cuanto al perfil de alcaloides, siendo la esparteína la segunda sustancia de mayor presencia. La hidratación de la semilla conduce a un incremento de 1.72 veces su tamaño original. Se puede sugerir que la proteína posee afinidad hidrofílica evidenciada por la elevada capacidad de retención de agua de la semilla. La identificación de estas propiedades permite reconocer el potencial de la semilla para su futuro aprovechamiento.

  8. A satellite geodetic survey of large-scale deformation of volcanic centres in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Matthew E.; Simons, Mark

    2002-07-01

    Surface deformation in volcanic areas usually indicates movement of magma or hydrothermal fluids at depth. Stratovolcanoes tend to exhibit a complex relationship between deformation and eruptive behaviour. The characteristically long time spans between such eruptions requires a long time series of observations to determine whether deformation without an eruption is common at a given edifice. Such studies, however, are logistically difficult to carry out in most volcanic arcs, as these tend to be remote regions with large numbers of volcanoes (hundreds to even thousands). Here we present a satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey of the remote central Andes volcanic arc, a region formed by subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate beneath continental South America. Spanning the years 1992 to 2000, our survey reveals the background level of activity of about 900 volcanoes, 50 of which have been classified as potentially active. We find four centres of broad (tens of kilometres wide), roughly axisymmetric surface deformation. None of these centres are at volcanoes currently classified as potentially active, although two lie within about 10km of volcanoes with known activity. Source depths inferred from the patterns of deformation lie between 5 and 17km. In contrast to the four new sources found, we do not observe any deformation associated with recent eruptions of Lascar, Chile.

  9. Lead-isotopic signatures of porphyry copper deposits in oceanic and continental settings, Colombian Andes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three discrete sub-belts of porphyry copper-type mineralization are recognized in the Colombian Andes; a western Eocene sub-belt, an eastern Jurassic to early Cretaceous sub-belt and, between them, a central Miocene sub-belt. Pb-isotopic ratios were determined for pyrite samples collected from 6 porphyry copper centers, 3 in the western sub-belt, 2 in the eastern sub-belt, and one in the central sub-belt. Ratios fall into 3 discrete populations; the most radiogenic values represent the western sub-belt, the least radiogenic represent the eastern sub-belt, and an intermediate value corresponds to the central sub-belt. Ratios therefore become progressively less radiogenic from the western oceanic domain to the eastern cratonic domain. Comparison of the Pb-isotopic ratios with those given in the literature for possible source materials for Columbian porphyry copper leads enables the subcontinental mantle wedge, subducted oceanic crust and subducted metalliferous sediments to be discounted as principal sources. The relatively radiogenic signatures of 5 of the porphyry copper centers appear to be broadly compatible with either a subducted pelagic sediment source or an upper continental crust source, whereas the sixth center, Mocoa, is characterized by a distinctly less radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb ratio. The results are discussed. (author)

  10. Low temperature resistance in saplings and ramets of Polylepis sericea in the Venezuelan Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Fermín; García-Núñez, Carlos; Rangel, Sairo

    2009-09-01

    The frequent occurrence of all year-round below zero temperatures in tropical high mountains constitutes a most stressful climatic factor that plants have to confront. Polylepis forests are found well above the continuous forest line and are distributed throughout the Andean range. These trees require particular traits to overcome functional limitations imposed on them at such altitudes. Considering seedling and sapling stages as filter phases in stressful environments, some functional aspects of the regeneration of Polylepis sericea, a species associated to rock outcrops in the Venezuelan Andes, were studied. We characterized microclimatic conditions within a forest, in a forest gap and surrounding open páramo and determined low temperature resistance mechanisms in seedlings, saplings and ramets. Conditions in the forest understory were more stable compared to the forest gaps and open surrounding páramo. Minimum temperatures close to the ground were 3.6 °C lower in the open páramo compared to the forest understory. Maximum temperatures were 9.0 °C higher in the open páramo. Ice nucleation and injury temperatures occurred between -6 and -8 °C for both ramets and saplings, an evidence of frost avoidance to low nighttime temperatures. In this particular forest, this resistance ability is determinant in their island-like distribution in very specific less severe temperature habitats.

  11. Does external funding help adaptation? Evidence from community-based water management in the Colombian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtinho, Felipe; Eakin, Hallie; López-Carr, David; Hayes, Tanya M

    2013-11-01

    Despite debate regarding whether, and in what form, communities need external support for adaptation to environmental change, few studies have examined how external funding impacts adaptation decisions in rural resource-dependent communities. In this article, we use quantitative and qualitative methods to assess how different funding sources influence the initiative to adapt to water scarcity in the Colombian Andes. We compare efforts to adapt to water scarcity in 111 rural Andean communities with varied dependence on external funding for water management activities. Findings suggest that despite efforts to use their own internal resources, communities often need external support to finance adaptation strategies. However, not all external financial support positively impacts a community's abilities to adapt. Results show the importance of community-driven requests for external support. In cases where external support was unsolicited, the results show a decline, or "crowding-out," in community efforts to adapt. In contrast, in cases where communities initiated the request for external support to fund their own projects, findings show that external intervention is more likely to enhance or "crowds-in" community-driven adaptation. PMID:23979525

  12. Long-term carbon accumulation in two tropical mountain peatlands, Andes Mountains, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Chimner

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropical peatlands form in at least two distinct altitudinal zones, namely lowlands and high mountains. Unlike lowland tropical peatlands, which are typically forested, tropical mountain peatlands are dominated by cushion plants, bryophytes and herbaceous plants. Tropical mountain peatlands are poorly understood and little information is available on their ages, whether their peat bodies are relicts or actively accumulating carbon, the amount of carbon they contain, or the rate at which they can accumulate carbon. Our objective in this paper is to quantify carbon accumulation rates in two peatlands in the Andes Mountains of Ecuador, South America. At each site, we collected peat cores which were analysed for bulk density, mineral content and % C and we calculated the amount of carbon stored. Due to the high amount of mineral sediment in the Cotopaxi peatland, carbon dating was not done at this site. The Cayambre-Coca peat body was 4 m thick, ca. 3,000 years old, and had accumulated 140 kgC m-2. The approximate long-term rate of carbon accumulation (LARCA is 46 gC m-2 yr-1. However, a significant part of the depth of accumulation is due to high levels of mineral sediment input from steep side slopes and volcanic ash input.

  13. Meteorological drivers of ablation processes on a cold glacier in the semiarid Andes of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. MacDonell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological and surface change measurements collected during a 2.5 yr period are used to calculate surface mass and energy balances at 5324 m a.s.l. on Guanaco Glacier, a cold-based glacier in the semi-arid Andes of Chile. Meteorological conditions are marked by extremely low vapour pressures (annual mean of 1.1 hPa, strong winds (annual mean of 10 m s−1, high shortwave radiation receipt (mean annual 295 W m−2 and low precipitation rates (mean annual 45 mm w.e.. Net shortwave radiation provides the greatest source of energy to the glacier surface, and net longwave radiation dominates energy losses. The turbulent latent heat flux is always negative, which means that the surface is always losing mass via sublimation, which is the main form of ablation at the site. Sublimation rates are most strongly correlated with net shortwave radiation, incoming shortwave radiation, albedo and vapour pressure. Low glacier surface temperatures restrict melting for much of the period, however episodic melting occurs during the austral summer, when warm, humid, calm and high pressure conditions restrict sublimation and make more energy available for melting. Low accumulation (131 mm w.e. over the period and relatively high ablation (1435 mm w.e. means that mass change over the period was negative (−1304 mm w.e., which continued the negative trend recorded in the region over the last few decades.

  14. Caracterización de semillas de lupino (Lupinus mutabilis sembrado en los Andes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega-David Eduar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se identificaron las propiedades físicas, composicionales y fisicoquímicas de la semilla de Lupino (Lupinus mutabilis cultivado en Nariño (Andes de Colombia. Su composición se determinó realizando análisis proximales de semilla completa, tegumento y cotiledones. Además se determinó el contenido de minerales y su composición elemental. Se estableció cuantitativamente el contenido de alcaloides presentes y su perfil composicional. Se determinaron propiedades físicas como la forma y el tamaño de la semilla. Se determinaron las propiedades fisicoquímicas como la capacidad de retención de agua y el pH. Las cantidades de nutrientes de la semilla son menores que los valores reportados en la literatura. Se presenta una variación en cuanto al perfil de alcaloides, siendo la esparteína la segunda sustancia de mayor presencia. La hidratación de la semilla conduce a un incremento de 1.72 veces su tamaño original. Se puede sugerir que la proteína posee afinidad hidrofílica evidenciada por la elevada capacidad de retención de agua de la semilla. La identificación de estas propiedades permite reconocer el potencial de la semilla para su futuro aprovechamiento.

  15. Does External Funding Help Adaptation? Evidence from Community-Based Water Management in the Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtinho, Felipe; Eakin, Hallie; López-Carr, David; Hayes, Tanya M.

    2013-11-01

    Despite debate regarding whether, and in what form, communities need external support for adaptation to environmental change, few studies have examined how external funding impacts adaptation decisions in rural resource-dependent communities. In this article, we use quantitative and qualitative methods to assess how different funding sources influence the initiative to adapt to water scarcity in the Colombian Andes. We compare efforts to adapt to water scarcity in 111 rural Andean communities with varied dependence on external funding for water management activities. Findings suggest that despite efforts to use their own internal resources, communities often need external support to finance adaptation strategies. However, not all external financial support positively impacts a community’s abilities to adapt. Results show the importance of community-driven requests for external support. In cases where external support was unsolicited, the results show a decline, or “crowding-out,” in community efforts to adapt. In contrast, in cases where communities initiated the request for external support to fund their own projects, findings show that external intervention is more likely to enhance or “crowds-in” community-driven adaptation.

  16. The powers of water-user associations: on multiplicity, fluidity, and durability in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Verzijl

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use insights from institutional bricolage and actor network theory to make sense of an Andean water user association (WUA and its bricoleurs in the Region of Ayacucho, Peru. Rather than being designed and clearly defined, we see natural resource institutions as continuously performed and patched together, through heterogeneous elements and practices, by those that live, experience and enact these institutions every day and by those who make sense of them. We present three cases, three supra-community efforts to secure water livelihoods, in which the Ayacucho water user association is enacted differently. Similar actors and practices like, water law, local customs, water bodies, and ecological services are performed in alternate ways for diverse purposes. It is this range of co-existing performances or enactments and the fluidity of actors and bricoleurs which enables an institution to adapt and adjust. We hold that an Andean WUA can be a bureaucratic imposition, but in many ways the WUA is something else too: a strategic ally; a prerequisite for subsidy consideration, a marketplace for exchanging goods and services and more. In the setting of the contemporary Peruvian Andes, the durability of natural resource institutions can be understood through the fluidity and multiplicity of performances and purposes. This has normative and political implications for researchers and policymakers as to what enactment they consider and target.

  17. Parameterisation of incoming longwave radiation over glacier surfaces in the semiarid Andes of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonell, Shelley; Nicholson, Lindsey; Kinnard, Christophe

    2013-02-01

    A good understanding of radiation fluxes is important for calculating energy, and hence, mass exchange at glacier surfaces. This study evaluates incoming longwave radiation measured at two nearby glacier stations in the high Andes of the Norte Chico region of Chile. These data are the first published records of atmospheric longwave radiation measurements in this region. Nine previously published optimised parameterisations for clear sky emissivity all produced results with a root mean square error (RMSE) ~20 W m-2 and bias within ±5 W m-2, which is inline with findings from other regions. Six optimised parameterisations for incoming longwave in all sky conditions were trialled for application to this site, five of which performed comparably well with RMSE on daytime data <18 W m-2 and bias within ±6 W m-2 when applied to the optimisation site and RMSE <20 W m-2 and bias within ±10 W m-2 when applied to the validation site. The parameterisation proposed by Mölg et al. (J Glaciol 55:292-302, 2009) was selected for use in this region. Incorporating the proposed elevation modification into the equation reduced the bias in the modelled incoming longwave radiation for the validation site. It was found that applying the parameterisation optimised in the original work at Kilimanjaro produced good results at both the primary and validation site in this study, suggesting that this formulation may be robust for different high mountain regions.

  18. A satellite geodetic survey of large-scale deformation of volcanic centres in the central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Matthew E; Simons, Mark

    2002-07-11

    Surface deformation in volcanic areas usually indicates movement of magma or hydrothermal fluids at depth. Stratovolcanoes tend to exhibit a complex relationship between deformation and eruptive behaviour. The characteristically long time spans between such eruptions requires a long time series of observations to determine whether deformation without an eruption is common at a given edifice. Such studies, however, are logistically difficult to carry out in most volcanic arcs, as these tend to be remote regions with large numbers of volcanoes (hundreds to even thousands). Here we present a satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey of the remote central Andes volcanic arc, a region formed by subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate beneath continental South America. Spanning the years 1992 to 2000, our survey reveals the background level of activity of about 900 volcanoes, 50 of which have been classified as potentially active. We find four centres of broad (tens of kilometres wide), roughly axisymmetric surface deformation. None of these centres are at volcanoes currently classified as potentially active, although two lie within about 10 km of volcanoes with known activity. Source depths inferred from the patterns of deformation lie between 5 and 17 km. In contrast to the four new sources found, we do not observe any deformation associated with recent eruptions of Lascar, Chile. PMID:12110886

  19. Orographic effects related to deep convection events over the Andes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro, R.; Pessano, H.; Llamedo, P.; de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Odiard, A.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we analyze a set of 39 storms which took place between 2006 and 2011 over the South of Mendoza, Argentina. This is a semiarid region situated at mid-latitudes (roughly between 32S and 36S) at the east of the highest Andes tops which constitutes a natural laboratory where diverse sources of gravity waves usually take place. We consider a cultivated subregion near San Rafael district, where every summer a systematic generation of deep convection events is registered. We propose that the lift mechanism required to raise a parcel to its level of free convection is partially supplied by mountain waves (MWs). From Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations and radar network data, we calculate the evolution of convective available potential energy and convective inhibition indices during the development of each storm. Global Final Analysis is used to construct initial and boundary conditions. Convective inhibition indices are compared with the vertical kinetic energy capable of being supplied by the MWs, in order to provide a rough estimation of this possible triggering mechanism. Vertical velocity is chosen as an appropriate dynamical variable to evidence the presence of MWs in the vicinity of each detected first radar echo. After establishing a criterion based on a previous work to represent MWs, the 39 storms are split into two subsets: with and without the presence of MWs. 12 cases with considerable MWs amplitude are retained and considered. Radar data differences between the two samples are analyzed and the simulated MWs are characterized.

  20. Gravity waves above Andes detected from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles: Mountain forcing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.

    2005-09-01

    A significant wave activity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere at midlatitudes (30-40S) above the Andes Range was recently detected from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPS RO) temperature profiles, retrieved from SAC-C (Satélite de Aplicaciones Cientficas-C) and CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) satellites. Previously, large amplitude, long vertical wavelength structures have been reported in this region, as detected from other limb-sounding devices and have been identified as mountain waves (MWs). The capability of GPS RO observations to detect typical MWs with horizontal wavelengths shorter than 150 km, as well as the proper association of the observed wave activity to mountain forcing is put in doubt. Other three possible sources are discussed. In particular, the generation of inertio-gravity waves by geostrophic adjustment near to a permanent jet situated above the mountains, may constitute another important mechanism in this region. These waves may possess longer horizontal and perhaps shorter vertical wavelengths than those typically expected in MWs and could be more easily detected from limb-sounding profiles. The ``jet'' mechanism will be discussed in a second paper.

  1. Geodetic observations of megathrust earthquakes and backarc wedge deformation across the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J. R.; Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Bevis, M. G.; Echalar, A.; Caccamise, D.; Heck, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data offer an opportunity to investigate active orogenic wedges yet surface velocity fields are available for only a few examples worldwide. More observations are needed to link deformation processes across multiple timescales and to better understand strain accumulation and release in active wedge settings. Here we present a new GPS velocity field for the central Andes and the backarc orogenic wedge comprising the southern Subandes of Bolivia (SSA), a region previously thought to be mostly isolated from the plate boundary earthquake cycle. The time span of our observations (2000 to mid-2014) includes two megathrust earthquakes along the Chile trench that affected the SSA. The 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake resulted in a regional postseismic decrease in the eastward component of horizontal surface velocities. Preliminary analysis of the deformation field from the April 01 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua, Chile earthquake also indicates a postseismic signal extending into the SSA. We create an interseismic velocity field for the SSA by correcting campaign GPS site velocities for the seasonal cycles estimated from continuous GPS site time series. We remove the effects of both megathrust events by estimating coseismic steps and fitting linear and logarithmic functions to the postseismic GPS site motions. The velocity estimates at most locations increase after correcting for the transients. This finding suggests that forces leading to shortening and earthquakes in the backarc wedge are not as temporally consistent as previously considered.

  2. Conservationist Systems, one environmental alternative for the agriculture of the Northeastern Andes of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article shows the results of a proposal of alternative handling of the agriculture ecosystem tobacco-bean-maize, main agricultural activity of the Northeastern Andes of Colombia. This system is the base of the economic and alimentary security and the main factor of degradation of the natural resources of the region. The work looks for to develop the diversified rotations, as essential component of biological diversity, the reduced works as strategy of protection of the soil and the promotion of the agriculture ecology like new model of agricultural development. The results of the work show that the high volume of organic residuals coming from the rotation tobacco bean maize, become compost in the field and the reduction of the farm, they promote the stability of the productive components of the soils and their agricultural yields. The biggest levels of organic matter and of total porosity, generated by the biggest biological activity, they indicate that the technological alternatives of the proposal slow the effects of the degradation originated by the conventional agriculture. These alternatives can be included in the regional programs of agricultural production, like solution principle and as strategy for the sustainable development of the region

  3. Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) forcing on the late Holocene Cauca paleolake dynamics, northern Andes of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J. I.; Obrochta, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Battarbee, R. W.

    2015-07-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), is a major driving climate mechanism, in the eastern Caribbean Sea and the South Atlantic Ocean in relation to the dynamics of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS) for the late Holocene. Here we document the AMO signal in the San Nicolás-1 core of the Cauca paleolake (Santa Fé-Sopetrán Basin) in the northern Andes. Wavelet spectrum analysis of the gray scale of the San Nicolás-1 core provides evidence for a 70 yr AMO periodicity for the 3750 to 350 yr BP time interval, whose pattern is analogous to the one documented for the Cariaco Basin. This supports a possible correlation between enhanced precipitation and ENSO variability with a positive AMO phase during the 2000 to 1500 yr BP interval, and its forcing role on the Cauca ria lake deposits, which led to increased precipitation and to the transition from a igapo (black water) to a varzea (white water) environment ca. 3000 yr BP.

  4. Genesis of adakite-like lavas of Licancabur volcano (Chile—Bolivia, Central Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Oscar; Déruelle, Bernard; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    The Licancabur volcano is located on the Bolivia—Chile Altiplano (Central Andes). The lavas are andesites and dacites. Numerous mineralogic features attest that magma mixing occurred. Andesites have concave (spoon-shaped) REE patterns whereas dacites have steep slopes. A spectacular crossover of patterns occurs with increasing SiO 2. Most geochemical discrimination criteria of adakites are satisfied by Licancabur dacites, except their high Sr-isotope compositions (> 0.7075). For the genesis of the Licancabur adakite-like lavas, a four-step model is proposed: (1) partial melting (5 to 10 wt %) of a subducted altered oceanic crust; (2) hybridation (< 10 wt %) of the magmas with melts derived from the overlying lithospheric mantle; (3) contamination (≈ 1 wt %) of these hybrid magmas by TTG-type granodiorites of the Archean lower continental crust (with present-day Sr-isotope ratios ≈ 0.820); (4) evolution and differentiation by crystal fractionation (< 6 wt %) and magma mixing at upper crustal levels.

  5. Estimates of Carbon Reservoirs in High-Altitude Wetlands in the Colombian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Javier Peña

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The observed increase in emission of greenhouse gases, with attendant effects on global warming, have raised interests in identifying sources and sinks of carbon in the environment. Terrestrial carbon (C sequestration involves capture of atmospheric C through photosynthesis and storage in biota, soil and wetlands. Particularly, wetland systems function primarily as long-term reservoirs for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 and as sources of atmospheric methane (CH4. The objective of this study was to evaluate the patterns of carbon reservoirs in two high-altitude wetlands in the central Andean mountain of Colombia. Carbon cycle in both systems is related mainly with the plant biomass dynamics from the littoral zone. Thus, total organic carbon concentrate an average up to 329 kg of N ha-1 and 125 kg of P ha-1 every year vs only 17 kg N ha-1 and 6 kg P ha-1 in the water column of the limnetic zone in the wetland, evidencing spatial differences in carbon concentrations for these types of ecosystems. Results revealed that these systems participate in the balance and sequestration of carbon in the Colombian Andes.

  6. From the Andes to the Atlantic: the Evolution of Organic Matter in the Amazon River System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Mayorga, E.; Hedges, J. I.; McClain, M. E.; Llerena, C. A.; Quay, P. D.; Krusche, A. V.; Richey, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    We compare the compositions of dissolved, fine and coarse particulate organic matter fractions (DOM, FPOM and CPOM respectively) from 31 river sites in Bolivia and Peru with 18 sites along the Amazon mainstem. The diversity of sites - ranging from wet and dry Andean headwater environments, to depositional foreland reaches, to major lowland rivers - allows us to assess the compositional evolution of organic matter along a 5000 km transect draining Peru and a 3000 km transect draining Bolivia. Organic matter size fractions were assessed by concentration, elemental (%OC, %N, C/N), isotopic (13C, 14C, 15N), lignin phenol, hydrolysable amino acid, and mineral surface area analyses. Similar to previous results from the lower Amazon and from Bolivian tributaries, the degree of mineral association was the most important factor in determining the composition of riverine organic matter. However, organic matter within a size class evolves considerably from the Andes to the lowlands. The Bolivian transect showed OM fractions becoming more diagenetically altered downstream, but the Peruvian transect showed a more complicated picture. Together, data suggest that underlying changes to sediment surface area and mineralogy may be the primary control of organic matter composition with fractions, as well as between fractions. These findings highlight the importance of organo-mineral associations and the need to describe mineral phases associated with riverine organic matter.

  7. Accesible hydrological monitoring for better decision making and modelling: a regional initiative in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bievre, B.; Célleri, R.; Crespo, P.; Ochoa, B.; Buytaert, W.; Tobón, C.; Villacís, M.; Villazon, M. F.; Llerena, C.; Rodriguez, M.; Viñas, P.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the Hydrological Monitoring of Andean Ecosystems Initiative is to improve the conservation and management of High-Andean ecosystems by providing information on the hydrological response of these ecosystems and how different land-uses affect their water yield and regulation capacity. The initiative fills a gap left by widespread hydrological modeling exercises that suffer from lack of data, and by glacier monitoring under climate change. The initiative proposes a hydrological monitoring system involving precipitation, discharge and land cover monitoring in paired catchments. The methodology is accessible for non-specialist organizations, and allows for generation of evidence of land use impact on hydrology on the short term (i.e. a few years). Nevertheless, long term monitoring is pursued with the aim of identifying trends in hydrological response (as opposed to trends in climate) under global change. In this way it supports decision making on the preservation of the hydrological services of the catchment. The initiative aims at a high number of paired catchment sites along the Andes, in order to draw regional conclusions and capture variability, and is connected to more detailed hydrological research sites of several Andean universities. We present preliminary results of a dozen of sites from Venezuela to Bolivia, summarized in hydrological performance indicators that were agreed upon among hydrologists, local stakeholders, and water authorities. The success factors, as well as limitations, of the network are discussed.

  8. Aguapanela, a new tarantula genus from the Colombian Andes (Araneae, Theraphosidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perafán, Carlos; Cifuentes, Yeimy; Estrada-Gomez, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    A new monotypic genus of Theraphosidae is described from Colombia: Aguapanela Perafán & Cifuentes gen. nov. with only the type species Aguapanela arvi Perafán, Cifuentes & Estrada sp. nov., from Caldas and Medellin, Antioquia, Colombian Andes. The new genus differs from other theraphosid spiders mainly in the presence of stridulatory setae on the palps and legs I and II, together with the presence of type III and IV urticating setae. Males lack a tibial apophysis on leg I and have a simple palpal bulb with the subtegulum less extended than usual in Theraphosinae, elongated curved embolus, ventrally concave, and with two prolateral keels very flat and developed on the dorsal edge. The female spermathecae have two digitiform elongated and granulated seminal receptacles attached to a semicircular wide membranous base. We describe, diagnose and illustrate the new genus and give some biological remarks. Morphological, systematic and biogeographic aspects are discussed. Chromatographic and electrophoretic profiles of its venom are analyzed. PMID:26624422

  9. Methodology for Evaluating the Quality of Ecosystem Maps: A Case Study in the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolors Armenteras

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty in thematic maps has been tested mainly in maps with discrete or fuzzy classifications based on spectral data. However, many ecosystem maps in tropical countries consist of discrete polygons containing information on various ecosystem properties such as vegetation cover, soil, climate, geomorphology and biodiversity. The combination of these properties into one class leads to error. We propose a probability-based sampling design with two domains, multiple stages, and stratification with selection of primary sampling units (PSUs proportional to the richness of strata present. Validation is undertaken through field visits and fine resolution remote sensing data. A pilot site in the center of the Colombian Andes was chosen to validate a government official ecosystem map. Twenty primary sampling units (PSUs of 10 × 15 km were selected, and the final numbers of final sampling units (FSUs were 76 for the terrestrial domain and 46 for the aquatic domain. Our results showed a confidence level of 95%, with the accuracy in the terrestrial domain varying between 51.8% and 64.3% and in the aquatic domain varying between 75% and 92%. Governments need to account for uncertainty since they rely on the quality of these maps to make decisions and guide policies.

  10. Structure andevolution of the austral basin fold-thrust belt, Southern Patagonian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías C. Ghiglione

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuseson the evolution of the Southern Patagonian Andes fold-thrust belt and theadjacent non-deformed foreland of the Austral basin between 49°45' and52°00'SL. This sector involves mainly Late Cretaceous sequences of the firstregressive cycle (Lago Viedma Cycle of the Austral basin foreland stage, andCampanian to Paleogene sequences associated with tectonic uplift of its westernboundary. From a stratigraphic-sedimentary point of view, a first-orderincrease in the fillthickness and depth to the basement exists from north tosouth including the presence of deeper depositional environments in the samedirection. Furthermore, there are strong along-strike variations in width andlateral position of the structural domains following the same trend. Based uponprevious interpretations, is concluded that the distribution of extensionaldepocenters from the early extensional phase of the basin controlled theseimportant sedimentary and structural N-S contrasts. Furthermore, in ourpresented model, East-west oriented transition zones are interpreted asaccommodation zones separating synrift sub-basins.

  11. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  12. Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO forcing on the late Holocene Cauca paleolake dynamics, northern Andes of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Martínez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO, is a major driving climate mechanism, in the eastern Caribbean Sea and the South Atlantic Ocean in relation to the dynamics of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS for the late Holocene. Here we document the AMO signal in the San Nicolás-1 core of the Cauca paleolake (Santa Fé–Sopetrán Basin in the northern Andes. Wavelet spectrum analysis of the gray scale of the San Nicolás-1 core provides evidence for a 70 yr AMO periodicity for the 3750 to 350 yr BP time interval, whose pattern is analogous to the one documented for the Cariaco Basin. This supports a possible correlation between enhanced precipitation and ENSO variability with a positive AMO phase during the 2000 to 1500 yr BP interval, and its forcing role on the Cauca ria lake deposits, which led to increased precipitation and to the transition from a igapo (black water to a varzea (white water environment ca. 3000 yr BP.

  13. High-resolution dynamic downscaling of CMIP5 output over the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichler, Thomas; Andrade, Marcos; Ohara, Noriaki

    2015-04-01

    Our project is targeted towards making robust predictions of future changes in climate over the tropical part of the South American Andes. This goal is challenging, since tropical lowlands, steep mountains, and snow covered subarctic surfaces meet over relatively short distances, leading to distinct climate regimes within the same domain and pronounced spatial gradients in virtually every climate quantity. We use an innovative approach to solve this problem, including several quadruple nested versions of WRF, a systematic validation strategy to find the version of WRF that best fits our study region, spatial resolutions at the kilometer scale, 20-year-long simulation periods, and bias-corrected output from various CMIP5 simulations that also include the multi-model mean of all CMIP5 models. We show that the simulated changes in climate are consistent with the results from the global climate models and also consistent with two different versions of WRF. We also discuss the expected changes in snow and ice, derived from off-line coupling the regional simulations to a carefully calibrated snow and ice model.

  14. Effects of loadingeunloading and wettingedrying cycles on geomechanical behaviors of mudrocks in the Colombian Andes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Camilo Torres-Suarez; Adolfo Alarcon-Guzman; Rafael Berdugo-De Moya

    2014-01-01

    The mudrocks in the Colombian Andes, particularly those exhibiting low cementation (bonding), are susceptible to degradation when the environmental conditions change, which are challenging issues for engineering works. In this paper, the changes in physico-mechanical properties of mudrocks were moni-tored in laboratory, and some influential factors on the mechanical competence of geomaterials were studied. The geotechnical characteristics and experimental designs were developed from physical, chem-ical, mechanical and compositional points of view. In the tests, the techniques such as vapor equilibrium technique (VET) were employed to apply wettingedrying cycles and to control relative humidity (suction-controlled) and loadingeunloading cycles through ultrasonic wave velocities technique. The results show that the main failure mechanisms for the laminated mudrocks start on the microscopic scale by fissures coalescence, exhibiting physico-chemical degradation as well;the global geomechanical behavior presents a state between a ductile, like rock, and a fragile, like soil. The obtained results can provide engineering values according to monitoring laboratory set, when compared with in situ conditions.

  15. Molecular method for the detection of Andes hantavirus infection: validation for clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Cecilia; Martinez-Valdebenito, Constanza; Rios, Susana; Martinez, Jessica; Vial, Pablo A; Ferres, Marcela; Rivera, Juan C; Perez, Ruth; Valdivieso, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome is a severe disease caused by exposure to New World hantaviruses. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of specific initial symptoms. Antihantavirus antibodies are usually negative until late in the febrile prodrome or the beginning of cardiopulmonary phase, while Andes hantavirus (ANDV) RNA genome can be detected before symptoms onset. We analyzed the effectiveness of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as a diagnostic tool detecting ANDV-Sout genome in peripheral blood cells from 78 confirmed hantavirus patients and 166 negative controls. Our results indicate that RT-qPCR had a low detection limit (~10 copies), with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 94.9%. This suggests the potential for establishing RT-qPCR as the assay of choice for early diagnosis, promoting early effective care of patients, and improving other important aspects of ANDV infection management, such as compliance of biosafety recommendations for health personnel in order to avoid nosocomial transmission. PMID:26508102

  16. Estructura litosférica de los Andes centrales a partirde un modelo gravimétrico 3D Lithosphericstructure of the Central Andes based ona 3D gravimetric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia B. Prezzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A través del modelado directode la anomalía de Bouguer se desarrolló un modelo de densidades en 3D de lacorteza continental, la placa subducida y el manto superior, para los AndesCentrales entre los 20-29°S y los 74-61°O. El objetivo de este trabajo escontribuir a un mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica, integrando lainformación disponible (geofísica, geológica, petrológica y geoquímica en unúnico modelo. La geometría del modelo está definida y limitada por la ubicaciónde hipocentros, líneas sísmicas de reflexión y refracción, tomografías deatenuación y de tiempos de arribo, estudios magnetotelúricos, modelos térmicosy secciones estructurales balanceadas. Las densidades asignadas a losdiferentes cuerpos fueron calculadas a partir de datos petrológicos ygeoquímicos, estimando las condiciones de presión y temperatura. El modeloconsiste de 31 planos verticales E-O paralelos, donde la corteza continentalestá compuesta por distintos cuerpos que representan a las diferentes unidadesmorfotectónicas de los Andes Centrales. Se generaron mapas isocóricos del techode la placa subducida, del Moho continental y del techo de la astenósferadebajo de Sudamérica. Se calculó la anomalía residual mediante la sustracciónde los efectos gravimétricos de la placa subducida modelada y del Moho modeladode la anomalía de Bouguer. Este estudio demuestra como el modelado gravimétrico3D, integrando información geofísica, geológica y petrológica, puede contribuiral mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica de los Andes Centrales.We developed a 3Ddensity model of the conti nental crust, the subducted plate and the uppermantle of the Central Andes between 20-29°S and 74-61°W through theforward modelling of Bouguer anomaly. The goal of this contribution is to gaininsight on the lithospheric structure of the area, integrating the availableinformation (geophysical, geologic, petrologic, and geochemical in a singlemodel

  17. Cronología y paleogeografía del Terciario de la Cuenca Intermontana de Iglesia septentrional, Andes de San Juan, Argentina Geochronology and paleogeographic of the Tertiary intermontaneous basin of northern Iglesia, Andes of San Juan, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    G.H. Ré; T.E. Jordan; Kelley, S.

    2003-01-01

    El sector norte de la cuenca no-marina de Iglesia, una cuenca a cuestas (piggyback) del sistema plegado y corrido de Precordillera y al este de la Cordillera de los Andes, está subdividida en cinco subcuencas por altos estructurales con tendencia de orientación norte. La combinación de datos estratigráficos, de sísmica de reflexión y de geología de superficie con datos de estratigrafía magnética y dataciones de circones por trazas de fisión de depósitos volcánicos intercalados, permitieron de...

  18. Distribución y conservación de especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y Andes tropicales Distribution and conservation of endangered species in Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes

    OpenAIRE

    María Cecilia Londoño-Murcia; Víctor Sánchez-Cordero

    2011-01-01

    En este estudio se modeló el nicho ecológico proyectado como distribución potencial de 313 especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y los Andes tropicales, según las listas de la UICN. De estas especies, 285 fueron plantas y 28 fueron vertebrados terrestres. La superposición de las distribuciones de las especies amenazadas cubrió prácticamente toda la región. Ecuador mostró cerca del 30% de su área con 50 especies. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panamá mostraron > 50, aunque en...

  19. Reconstruction of cryospheric changes in the Maipo and Juncal river basins, central Andes of Chile: an integrative geomorphological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; García, Juan L.; Gómez, Gabriel; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Salzmann, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Water in the central Andes (32-38° S), a semi-arid mountainous area with elevations over 6000 m asl., is of great importance and a critical resource especially in the dry summer months. Ice bodies, such as glaciers and rock glaciers (permafrost) in the high mountains, provide a substantial part of the fresh-water resources but also for intensive economical use for the lowlands including Santiago metropolitan region, Chile. However the evolution of these ice bodies since the last deglaciation (i.e., Holocene, last ˜12,000 years), and in particular during historical times, and their feedback with climate is fairly unknown. In view of projected climate change, this is striking because it is also unknown whether these natural resources could be used as sustainable fresh-water source in the future. Within the presented project, we develop and apply an integrative geomorphologic approach to study glaciers and their long-term evolution in the central Andes of Chile. Apart from glaciers (with variable debris-coverage), rock glaciers have evolved over time as striking geomorphological landforms in this area. We combine geomorphologic mapping using remote-sensing and in-situ data with an innovative surface exposure dating technique to determine the ages of distinct moraine ridges at three study sites in watersheds of the Santiago region: Juncal Norte, Loma Larga and Nieves Negras glaciers. First results of the project are presented, including a detailed geomorphological mapping and first analysis of the landform dynamics. At all three sites, we distinguished at least three moraine systems of a Holocene putative age. These prominent moraine belts show that glaciers were at least 5 km longer than at present. Deglaciation from these ice marginal positions was gradual and complex in response to the detrital cover on the glaciers. Differences in ice thickness of the main glaciers in the respective valleys amount to about 100 m. Due to the partial, extensive debris coverage, the

  20. Reconstructing glacier mass balances in the Central Andes of Chile and Argentina using local and regional hydro-climatic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Masiokas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great number and variety of glaciers in southern South America, in situ glacier mass balance records are extremely scarce and glacier–climate relationships are still poorly understood in this region. Here we use the longest (> 35 years and most complete in situ mass balance record, available for glaciar Echaurren Norte in the Andes at ~34° S, to develop a minimal glacier surface mass balance model that relies on nearby monthly precipitation and air temperature data as forcing. This basic model is able to explain 78 % of the variance in the annual glacier mass balance record over the 1978–2013 calibration period. An attribution assessment indicates that precipitation variability constitutes the most important forcing modulating annual glacier mass balances at this site. A regionally-averaged series of mean annual streamflow records from both sides of the Andes is then used to estimate, through simple linear regression, this glacier's annual mass balance variations since 1909. The reconstruction model captures 68 % of the observed glacier mass balance variability and shows three periods of sustained positive mass balances embedded in an overall negative trend totaling almost −42 m w.eq. over the past 105 years. The three periods of sustained positive mass balances (centered in the 1920s–1930s, in the 1980s and in the first decade of the 21st century coincide with several documented glacier advances in this region. Similar trends observed in other shorter glacier mass balance series suggest the glaciar Echaurren Norte reconstruction is representative of larger-scale conditions and could be useful for more detailed glaciological, hydrological and climatological assessments in this portion of the Andes.

  1. Holocene changes in monsoon precipitation in the Andes of NE Peru based on δ18O speleothem records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M. G.; Cruz, F. W.; Vuille, M.; Apaéstegui, J.; Strikis, N.; Panizo, G.; Novello, F. V.; Deininger, M.; Sifeddine, A.; Cheng, H.; Moquet, J. S.; Guyot, J. L.; Santos, R. V.; Segura, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    Two well-dated δ18O-speleothem records from Shatuca cave, situated on the northeastern flank of the Peruvian Andes (1960 m asl) were used to reconstruct high-resolution changes in precipitation during the Holocene in the South American Summer Monsoon region (SASM). The records show that precipitation increased gradually throughout the Holocene in parallel with the austral summer insolation trend modulated by the precession cycle. Additionally the Shatuca speleothem record shows several hydroclimatic changes on both longer- and shorter-term time scales, some of which have not been described in previous paleoclimatic reconstructions from the Andean region. Such climate episodes, marked by negative excursions in the Shatuca δ18O record were logged at 9.7-9.5, 9.2, 8.4, 8.1, 5.0, 4.1, 3.5, 3.0, 2.5, 2.1 and 1.5 ka b2k, and related to abrupt multi-decadal events in the SASM. Some of these events were likely associated with changes in sea surface temperatures (SST) during Bond events in the North Atlantic region. On longer time scales, the low δ18O values reported between 5.1-5.0, 3.5-3.0 and 1.5 ka b2k were contemporaneous with periods of increased sediment influx at Lake Pallcacocha in the Andes of Ecuador, suggesting that the late Holocene intensification of the monsoon recorded at Shatuca site may also have affected high altitudes of the equatorial Andes further north. Numerous episodes of low SASM intensity (dry events) were recorded by the Shatuca record during the Holocene, in particular at 10.2, 9.8, 9.3, 6.5, 5.1, 4.9, 2.5 and 2.3 ka b2k, some of them were synchronous with dry periods in previous Andean records.

  2. 3D geological modeling of the Trujillo block: Insights for crustal escape models of the Venezuelan Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Damien; Monod, Bernard; Hervouët, Yves; Backé, Guillaume; Klarica, Stéphanie; Choy, José E.

    2012-11-01

    The Venezuelan Andes form a N50°E-trending mountain belt extending from the Colombian border in the SW to the Caribbean Sea in the NE. The belt began to rise since the Middle Miocene in response to the E-W collision between the Maracaibo block to the NW and the Guyana shield belonging to South America to the SE. This oblique collision led to strain partitioning with (1) shortening along opposite-vergent thrust fronts, (2) right-lateral slip along the Boconó fault crossing the belt more or less along-strike and (3) crustal escape of the Trujillo block moving towards the NE in between the Boconó fault and the N-S-striking left-lateral Valera fault. The geology of the Venezuelan Andes is well described at the surface, but its structure at depth remains hypothetic. We investigated the deep geometry of the Mérida Andes by a 3D model newly developed from geological and geophysical data. The 3D fault model is restricted to the crust and is mainly based on the surface data of outcropping fault traces. The final model reveals the orogenic float concept where the mountain belt is decoupled from its underlying lithosphere over a horizontal décollement located either at the upper/lower crust boundary. The reconstruction of the Boconó and Valera faults results in a 3D shape of the Trujillo block, which floats over a mid-crustal décollement horizon emerging at the Boconó-Valera triple junction. Motion of the Trujillo block is accompanied by a widespread extension towards the NE accommodated by normal faults with listric geometries such as for the Motatan, Momboy and Tuñame faults. Extension is explained by the gravitational spreading of the upper crust during the escape process.

  3. Near-surface temperature lapse rates in a mountainous catchment in the Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala; Schauwecker, S.; Pellicciotti, F.; McPhee, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    In mountainous areas, and in the Chilean Andes in particular, the irregular and sparse distribution of recording stations resolves insufficiently the variability of climatic factors such as precipitation, temperature and relative humidity. Assumptions about air temperature variability in space and time have a strong effect on the performance of hydrologic models that represent snow processes such as accumulation and ablation. These processes have large diurnal variations, and assumptions that average over longer time periods (days, weeks or months) may reduce the predictive capacity of these models under different climatic conditions from those for which they were calibrated. They also introduce large uncertainties when such models are used to predict processes with strong subdiurnal variability such as snowmelt dynamics. In many applications and modeling exercises, temperature is assumed to decrease linearly with elevation, using the free-air moist adiabatic lapse rate (MALR: 0.0065°C/m). Little evidence is provided for this assumption, however, and recent studies have shown that use of lapse rates that are uniform in space and constant in time is not appropriate. To explore the validity of this approach, near-surface (2 m) lapse rates were calculated and analyzed at different temporal resolution, based on a new data set of spatially distributed temperature sensors setup in a high elevation catchment of the dry Andes of Central Chile (approx. 33°S). Five minutes temperature data were collected between January 2011 and April 2011 in the Ojos de Agua catchment, using two Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) and 13 T-loggers (Hobo H8 Pro Temp with external data logger), ranging in altitude from 2230 to 3590 m.s.l.. The entire catchment was snow free during our experiment. We use this unique data set to understand the main controls over temperature variability in time and space, and test whether lapse rates can be used to describe the spatial variations of air

  4. Abundance and Morphological Effects of Large Woody Debris in Forested Basins of Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, A.; Comiti, F.; Lenzi, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Southern Andes mountain range represents an ideal location for studying large woody debris (LWD) in streams draining forested basins thanks to the presence of both pristine and managed woodland, and to the general low level of human alteration of stream corridors. However, no published investigations have been performed so far in such a large region. The investigated sites of this research are three basins (9-13 km2 drainage area, third-order channels) covered by Nothofagus forests: two of them are located in the Southern Chilean Andes (the Tres Arroyos in the Malalcahuello National Reserve and the Rio Toro within the Malleco Natural Reserve) and one basin lies in the Argentinean Tierra del Fuego (the Buena Esperanza basin, near the city of Ushuaia). Measured LWD were all wood pieces larger than 10 cm in diameter and 1 m in length, both in the active channel and in the adjacent active floodplain. Pieces forming log jams were all measured and the geometrical dimensions of jams were taken. Jam type was defined based on Abbe and Montgomery (2003) classification. Sediment stored behind log-steps and valley jams was evaluated approximating the sediment accumulated to a solid wedge whose geometrical dimensions were measured. Additional information relative to each LWD piece were recorded during the field survey: type (log, rootwad, log with rootwads attached), orientation to flow, origin (floated, bank erosion, landslide, natural mortality, harvest residuals) and position (log-step, in-channel, channel-bridging, channel margins, bankfull edge). In the Tres Arroyos, the average LWD volume stored within the bankfull channel is 710 m3 ha-1. The average number of pieces is 1,004 per hectare of bankfull channel area. Log-steps represent about 22% of all steps, whereas the elevation loss due to LWD (log-steps and valley jams) results in 27% loss of the total stream potential energy. About 1,600 m3 of sediment (assuming a porosity of 20%) is stored in the main channel

  5. Long-lasting wrenching tectonism in the Fuegian Andes: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Christian; Ghiglione, Matias

    2016-04-01

    Beyond its formal beauty, the geodynamic complexity of the connection between the Southernmost Andes and the Scotia plate, through the active Magallanes-Fagnano Fault system (MFF) and North Scotia Ridge (NSR), ask for proper geodynamic model(s), which could account for the discrepencies between long-term and actual co-seismic deformation and earthquake recurrence time. We focus here on the most recent and current deformation of the region, including a synthesis on the fault system carving the area, together with a critical review of the available kinematic and micro-tectonic data, an overview of the seismicity and paleoseismicity leading to current fault mechanism and actual seismic deformation, which then could be compared to geodetically-related deformation observed by GPS. Fault kinematic studies are coherent with main shortening consistently oriented NE-SW, without significant rotation of the axes across the orogen. These observation, together with the stability of the stress pattern and orientation of the shortening axes on a bigger scale reflects a steady E-W to NNE-SSW σ1/shortening direction since middle Eocene times, reflecting that the global left-lateral motion between Antarctica-Scotia-South America plate circuit, is the main driving forced for the entire area and in particular for the southernmost Andes, over the last 40 or 50 Ma. In terms of seismicity, elastic rebound theory predicts that the major earthquakes on a fault are time dependent, as they are linked to a period of built-up energy (interseismic) with abrupt relaxation stages (coseismic). Regarding both the short-term geodetic and the long-term geological observation, slip rates of the MFF system are pretty low (c.a. 5 mm/yr). Therefore, the time span between major earthquakes should be larger than the one obtained over the last 2 or 3 centuries. Considering a simple tectonic setting of a pure left-lateral strike-slip fault with a constant 5 mm/yr slip rate able to generate ~6 m of left

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the endemic and threatened killifish Orestias ascotanensis Parenti, 1984 (Cyprinodontiformes, Cyprinodontidae) from the High Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada-Romegialli, Claudio; Guerrero, Claudia Jimena; Véliz, David; Vila, Irma

    2016-07-01

    The killifish Orestias ascotanensis is endemic to the small isolated springs of Ascotán salt pan in the Central High Andes, Chile. Due to small populations, mining activity, and increasing aridity, this species is catalogued in danger of extinction. The complete mitochondrial genome of O. ascotanesis was assembled with an Ion Torrent sequencer (chip 318) that produced 2.61 million of reads. The 16 617 bp of the entire genome consisted of 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 13 protein-coding genes, and a control region, showing that the gene composition and arrangement match to that reported for most fishes. PMID:26152352

  7. Landscape structure and live fences in Andes Colombian agrosystems: upper basin of the Cane-Iguaque River

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Otero; Miren Onaindia

    2009-01-01

    Changes in land use have generated a new landscape configuration in the Andino orobiome (mountain range) of the tropical Andes, resulting in a mosaic of cultivation and pastures interrupted by small fragments of forest and live fences. This has resulted in an ongoing decrease in the biodiversity of this biome. In the upper basin of the Cane-Iguaque River (Villa de Levya-Boyacá, Colombia), located 2 600-3 000 m above the Cordillera Oriental, over three time periods in 1960, 1984, and 2004, we ...

  8. Effects of post-harvest treatments on the carbohydrate composition of yacon roots in the Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Graefe, Sophie; M. Hermann; Manrique, I.; Golombek, S.; Bürkert, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius [Poepp. & Endl.] H. Robinson) is an under-exploited native root crop of the Andes, which stores oligofructans (fructo-oligosaccharides, FOS) as its main component of dry matter (DM). FOS are of increasing economic interest because of their low caloric value in human diets and bifidogenic benefits on colon health. Two on-farm experiments were conducted to: (i) determine the effect of shaded, short-term storage at 1990 and 2930 m a.s.l. in the Andean highlands...

  9. A study of stratospheric GW fluctuations and sporadic E at midlatitudes with focus on possible orographic effect of Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, Klemens; Tsuda, Toshitaka; de la Torre, Alejandro

    2002-10-01

    Longitudinal dependences of stratospheric gravity wave (GW) fluctuations and lower ionospheric irregularities (sporadic E) at midlatitudes are studied by means of radio occultation data of the Global Positioning System/Meteorology Experiment (GPS/MET) satellite mission. The zonal average of temperature variance of GW fluctuations with vertical scales less than 7 km at northern midlatitudes is observed to be similar to that at southern midlatitudes, but there is a significant interhemispheric difference in the longitudinal dependence of GW fluctuations. The GPS/MET data at northern midlatitudes show a rapid change of the gravity wave distribution from 25 to 35 km height, resulting in a broad maximum of temperature variance located over the Atlantic and Eurasia. We only find in the wave distribution at h = 25 km some weak traces of possible orographic effects. On the other hand, the distribution of GW fluctuations at southern midlatitudes has a strong and sharp maximum over Andes, which is obviously due to orographic wave generation by the interaction of surface wind with the Andean mountain ridge. This observation of the new GPS radio occultation technique is in agreement with previous measurements of spaceborne microwave and infrared limb sounders. The amplitude of the average wave field increases with height over Andes, while the amplitude maximum moves westward, against the prevailing wind. The temperature fluctuations have an apparent, dominant vertical wavelength of around 6 km. In situ measurements by a balloon-borne rawinsonde at Ushuaia, Argentina (54.7°S, 68.1°W) are compared to a simultaneous GPS/MET temperature profile. The balloon observations of temperature and horizontal wind are interpreted by a large amplitude mountain wave propagating to the upper stratosphere. Wave characteristics and atmospheric background conditions are investigated in detail for this mountain wave observation. Finally, the GPS/MET experiment indicates enhanced sporadic E in

  10. Introducción a la Geología de los Andes Centrales Meridionales: El Noroeste Argentino

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo Piñol, Ferrán; Queralt Mitjans, Ignacio; I.A. Petrinovic

    1999-01-01

    Bajo el título genérico de "Geología de los Andes Centrales Meridionales: El Noroeste Argentino" se recopilan un conjunto de trabajos realizados en los últimos años en sectores del Noroeste Argentino. Las investigaciones realizadas se localizan en la región andina de la provincia de Salta y territorios adyacentes. Este volumen monográfico reúne trabajos que constituyen el esfuerzo conjunto de veinticinco autores de diferentes países,europeos y suramericanos,trabajando en proyectos de colabora...

  11. Taller Internacional Ocupación Inka y Dinámicas Regionales en los Andes (siglos XV-XVII)

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera Casanovas , Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Entre el 3 y 5 de agosto se realizó en La Paz el Taller Internacional Ocupación Inka y Dinámicas Regionales en los Andes. Este evento fue organizado por el Instituto Francés de Estudios Andinos (IFEA) y tuvo el apoyo del Programa de Investigación Estratégica en Bolivia (PIEB), del Museo Nacional de Etnografía y Folklore (MUSEF) y del Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas y Arqueológicas (IIAA) de la Universidad Mayor de San Andrés. Este taller de carácter interdisciplinario reunió a un...

  12. El cambio climático y los recursos hídricos en los Andes tropicales

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias Vuille

    2013-01-01

    En este documento se describen los desafíos que plantea el uso actual y futuro del agua en los Andes tropicales, comenzando por un análisis del ciclo hidrológico proyectado presente y futuro, así como los efectos previstos sobre los servicios ambientales que suministran los glaciares y la vegetación de los humedales. Luego se abordarán en detalle las tensiones y conflictos que existen en este momento en relación con el uso del agua desde una perspectiva socioeconómica. Por último, se hará hin...

  13. Initiation of the Magallanes foreland basin: Timing of the southernmost Patagonian Andes orogeny revised by detrital zircon provenance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fildani, A.; Cope, T.D.; Graham, S.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    New sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry U-Pb detrital zircon data establish the timing of onset of foreland basin subsidence in the Magallanes basin and the age of the Patagonian Andes in southernmost Chile. Initiation of the Magallanes foreland basin is signaled by the abrupt occurrence of sandstone of the Punta Barrosa Formation, loosely dated as upper Albian-Cenomanian from biofacies assemblages. Detrital zircon analyses demonstrate that the Punta Barrosa Formation is not older than 92 ?? 1 Ma and that the linked Andean belt started forming in the Turonian.

  14. Cenozoic crustal shortening and thickening contributions to Andean orogenesis: Preliminary results from structural mapping in the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, N.; Horton, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    Estimates of Cenozoic crustal shortening and thickening from the southern Peruvian Andes are necessary to address ongoing debates regarding growth of the Andes and Altiplano plateau. However, limited regional studies in southern Peru prevent accurate assessments of the structural contributions to high topography. This study provides new structural mapping along a >200 km transect spanning the northernmost Altiplano to Subandes at 13-15.5°S and fills the gap between existing central Peruvian and northern Bolivian studies. New stratigraphic data, fault relationships and fold orientations are used to create an updated geologic map and provide insights into the style, timing and magnitude of crustal deformation. Preliminary cross sections accompanying these map transects illustrate deformation style and provide first-order estimates of shortening. Further cross section analyses will be balanced and provide estimates of total crustal shortening and associated thickening in southern Peru. The study transect is subdivided into belts according to the age of exposed rocks and style of deformation. From west to east these belts include: Cretaceous strata dominated by tight folds, closely spaced faults and multiple detachments; Permo-Triassic strata dominated by thicker thrust sheets and fault-fold orientations departing from typical Andean trends; and Paleozoic rocks characterized by thick thrust sheets and deformation focused near major faults. The Cretaceous belt is composed of marine limestones and upward coarsening, siltstone to coarse sandstone progradational sequences. Disharmonic and detachment folds in the Cretaceous section demonstrate the importance of interbedded gypsum and mudstone layers. Fault relationships suggest local shortening during the Early Cretaceous. The Permo-Triassic belt is composed of thick Permian carbonates (Copacabana Formation) and interbedded sandstones, conglomerates and volcanics of the Mitu Formation. This study defines the orientation of

  15. The Andes Hantavirus NSs Protein Is Expressed from the Viral Small mRNA by a Leaky Scanning Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Solis, Loretto; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Pino, Karla; Tischler, Nicole D.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The small mRNA (SmRNA) of all Bunyaviridae encodes the nucleocapsid (N) protein. In 4 out of 5 genera in the Bunyaviridae, the smRNA encodes an additional nonstructural protein denominated NSs. In this study, we show that Andes hantavirus (ANDV) SmRNA encodes an NSs protein. Data show that the NSs protein is expressed in the context of an ANDV infection. Additionally, our results suggest that translation initiation from the NSs initiation codon is mediated by ribosomal subunits that have bypa...

  16. Neoproterozoic ultramafic and mafic magmatism in the Eastern Cordillera of the central peruvian Andes: the Tapo Massif

    OpenAIRE

    Tassinari, Colombo G.; Castroviejo Bolibar, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Jose F.; Acosta, Jorge; Pereira, Eurico

    2010-01-01

    A highly dismembered assemblage of ultramafic and mafic rocks is exposed in the Eastern Cordillera of the Central Peruvian Andes, extending along a discontinuous NW-SE belt over some 250 km between 12° and 9° S of latitude. One of the most important occurrences is the Tapo Mafic-Ultramafic Complex, which occurs at 3750 to 4200 m above sea level, 2 km to the west of Tapo locality, in the Tarma province, about 200 Km west of Lima. The Tapo complex is a lens-shaped body, 5 km long and 1-2...

  17. A 2,300-year-long annually resolved record of the South American summer monsoon from the Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Broxton W.; Abbott, Mark B.; Vuille, Mathias; Donald T. Rodbell; Stansell, Nathan D.; Rosenmeier, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Decadal and centennial mean state changes in South American summer monsoon (SASM) precipitation during the last 2,300 years are detailed using an annually resolved authigenic calcite record of precipitation δ18O from a varved lake in the Central Peruvian Andes. This unique sediment record shows that δ18O peaked during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) from A.D. 900 to 1100, providing evidence that the SASM weakened considerably during this period. Minimum δ18O values occurred during the Litt...

  18. Phytogeography of the vascular páramo flora of Ramal de Guaramacal (Andes, Venezuela) and its ties to other páramo floras

    OpenAIRE

    Cuello, Nidia L.; Cleef, Antoine M.; Aymard, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    Ramal de Guaramacal is an outlier and lower elevation mountain range located at the northeastern end of the Venezuelan Andes. Phytogeographical patterns and affinities of the low altitude and wet vascular páramo flora of Ramal de Guaramacal, have been studied with emphasis in to the analysis of the floristic connections of the Guaramacal páramo flora with the neighboring dry páramos of the Sierra Nevada de Mérida and other páramo floras of the northern Andes and Central America. A total of 25...

  19. Drought increases the freezing resistance of high-elevation plants of the Central Chilean Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Almeida, Angela; Reyes-Bahamonde, Claudia; Cavieres, Lohengrin A

    2016-08-01

    Freezing temperatures and summer droughts shape plant life in Mediterranean high-elevation habitats. Thus, the impacts of climate change on plant survival for these species could be quite different to those from mesic mountains. We exposed 12 alpine species to experimental irrigation and warming in the Central Chilean Andes to assess whether irrigation decreases freezing resistance, irrigation influences freezing resistance when plants are exposed to warming, and to assess the relative importance of irrigation and temperature in controlling plant freezing resistance. Freezing resistance was determined as the freezing temperature that produced 50 % photoinactivation [lethal temperature (LT50)] and the freezing point (FP). In seven out of 12 high-Andean species, LT50 of drought-exposed plants was on average 3.5 K lower than that of irrigated plants. In contrast, most species did not show differences in FP. Warming changed the effect of irrigation on LT50. Depending on species, warming was found to have (1) no effect, (2) to increase, or (3) to decrease the irrigation effect on LT50. However, the effect size of irrigation on LT50 was greater than that of warming for almost all species. The effect of irrigation on FP was slightly changed by warming and was sometimes in disagreement with LT50 responses. Our data show that drought increases the freezing resistance of high-Andean plant species as a general plant response. Although freezing resistance increases depended on species-specific traits, our results show that warmer and moister growing seasons due to climate change will seriously threaten plant survival and persistence of these and other alpine species in dry mountains. PMID:27053321

  20. Validation of TRMM multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA) products in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantas, V. M.; Liu, Z.; Caro, C.; Pereira, A. J. S. C.

    2015-09-01

    The relevance of accurate and timely rainfall estimates cannot be overstated. The rainfall gauge network is still insufficient across significant areas worldwide. Rainfall estimates from spaceborne sensors present an opportunity to supplement the existing network and enable the development of critical, near real time applications. However, the societal benefits of such systems can only be realized if the estimates are properly validated and the performance of existing products accurately described. In this study, two products generated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) are validated for the Peruvian Andes. This is a region of complex topography that poses significant challenges to the retrieval of rainfall values from space. The TMPA products, both research grade (3B42V7) and near real time (3B42RT), are compared against in situ data. Different observation lengths are studied and the results are analyzed in light of geographic, topographic and climatic constraints. The Time Series of the science grade product were also studied under Dynamic Time Warping and Hierarchical Clustering to streamline inter-tile comparisons. The TMPA products show a good agreement with the gauge values, especially for more prolonged observation periods (over 8 days). The validation results display a strong regional dependence as a consequence of differences in the climate and topography. This region-specific performance calls for additional, detailed case studies and localized validation efforts. Overall the TMPA was found to perform adequately and provide quality information for a number of applications requiring timely estimates in convenient formats.

  1. Miocene-Quaternary structural evolution of the Uyuni-Atacama region, Andes of Chile and Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, A.; Corazzato, C.; Rovida, A.

    2009-06-01

    We describe the Miocene-Quaternary geological-structural evolution of the region between the Salar de Uyuni and de Atacama, Andes of Chile and Bolivia. We recognized four main tectonic events based on fold geometry, fault kinematics and stratigraphic data. The oldest event, of Miocene age, is characterized by folding and reverse faulting of the sedimentary successions with an E-W direction of shortening in the northern part of the studied area and a WNW-ESE shortening in the southern part. The following two events, of Pliocene age, are characterized by lower shortening amounts; they occurred first by reverse faulting with a NW-SE-trending greatest principal stress ( σ1, computed with striated fault planes) and a vertical least principal stress ( σ3), followed by pervasive strike-slip faulting with the same NW-SE-trending σ1 and a horizontal NE-SW σ3. The fourth event, dating to the late Pliocene-Quaternary is characterized by normal faulting: the σ3 still trends NE-SW, whereas the intermediate principal stress σ2 exchanged with σ1. Volcanism accompanied both the contractional, transcurrent and extensional tectonic phases. The Mio-Pliocene compression appears directly linked to a rapid convergence and an apparently important coupling between the continental and oceanic plates. The E-W to WNW-ESE direction of shortening of the Miocene structures and the NW-SE σ1 of the Pliocene structures seem to be more linked to an intra-Andean re-orientation of structures following the WNW-directed absolute motion of the South-American Plate. The extensional deformations can be interpreted as related to gravity forces affecting the highest parts of the volcanic belt in a sort of asymmetrical (SW-ward) collapse of the belt.

  2. Quantifying modern erosion rates and river-sediment contamination in the Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Giovanni; Ghielmi, Giacomo; Mondaca, Gonzalo; Resentini, Alberto; Villarroel, Elena Katia; Padoan, Marta; Gentile, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    We use petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical data on modern river sediments of the Tupiza basin in the Bolivian Andes to investigate the relationships among human activity, heavy-metal contamination of sediments and modern erosion rates in mountain fluvial systems. Forward mixing model was used to quantify the relative contributions from each main tributary to total sediment load of the Tupiza River. The absolute sediment load was estimated by using the Pacific Southwest Inter Agency Committee model (PSIAC, 1968) after two years of geological field surveys (2009; 2010), together with data obtained from the Instituto Nacional del Agua public authority (INA, 2007), and suspended-load data from Aalto et al. (2006). Our results indicate that the sediment yield in the drainage basin is 910 ± 752 ton/km2year and the mean erosion rate is 0.40 ± 0.33 mm/year. These values compare well with erosion rates measured by Insel et al. (2010) using 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide concentrations in Bolivian river sediments. More than 40% of the Tupiza river load is produced in the upper part of the catchment, where highly tectonized and weathered rocks are exposed and coupled with sporadic land cover and intense human activity (mines). In the Rio Chilco basin strong erosion of upland valleys produce an increase of erosion (˜10 mm/year) and the influx of large amounts of sediment by mass wasting processes. The main floodplain of the Tupiza catchment represents a significant storage site for the heavy metals (˜657 ton/year). Fluvial sediments contain zinc, lead, vanadium, chromium, arsenic and nickel. Since the residence time of these contaminants in the alluvial plain may be more than 100 years, they may represent a potential source of pollution for human health.

  3. Engineering masterpieces : from the Andes to Siberia, Canadian talent is in demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, G.

    2001-03-05

    Canadian oilfields are a prime breeding ground for talent, technology and industrial management. This paper described how Canadian talent was recognized in 2001 for three major projects which included a cold-ocean production platform in the Sea of Okhotsk in Siberia, a mountain pipeline project in South America, and an in-situ underground extraction technology in the oilsands of Alberta. The cold-ocean production platform project was recruited by Sakhalin Energy Investment Co., an international consortium originally led by Marathon Oil Co which is now led by Royal Dutch Shell. The oil production platform is stationed 16 kilometres offshore of Sakhalin Island in the Sea of Okhotsk. Sakhalin Energy bought and converted the Molikpaq, an innovative platform made in the 1980s for the Beaufort Sea by Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. The second project included Calgary's Hydroconsult EN3 Services Ltd. which was responsible for the construction of the 940-km GasAtacama 24-inch diameter pipeline between gas fields in northern Argentina and Chile through a 4,000 metre high mountain pass through the Andes. The formidable terrain meant that riverbeds were the only practical route. Pipeline was laid under the rivers, deep enough to escape the forces of wet-season runoff. During the construction, local irrigation systems were kept going with pumps. The final project involved an innovative technology known as steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) for enhanced recovery of the Alberta oilsands. Compared to strip-mining, SAGD has several advantages. The process separates the oil from the sand beneath the ground with paris of heat-injection and production wells. The system avoids the use of huge machinery, vast open pits and lake-size waste water ponds. The challenge is to ensure that environmental effects are monitored during the lifespan of any project. 6 figs.

  4. Plant leaf wax biomarkers capture gradients in hydrogen isotopes of precipitation from the Andes and Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Salinas, Norma; Shenkin, Alexander; Blonder, Benjamin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Ponton, Camilo; Arvin, Lindsay J.; Wu, Mong Sin; Peters, Tom; West, A. Joshua; Martin, Roberta E.; Enquist, Brian J.; Asner, Gregory P.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2016-06-01

    Plant leaf waxes have been found to record the hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation and are thus used to reconstruct past climate. To assess how faithfully they record hydrological signals, we characterize leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions in forest canopy trees across a highly biodiverse, 3 km elevation range on the eastern flank of the Andes. We sampled the dominant tree species and assessed their relative abundance in the tree community. For each tree we collected xylem and leaf samples for analysis of plant water and plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions. In total, 176 individuals were sampled across 32 species and 5 forest plots that span the gradient. We find both xylem water and leaf wax δD values of individuals correlate (R2 = 0.8 and R2 = 0.3 respectively) with the isotopic composition of precipitation (with an elevation gradient of -21‰ km-1). Minimal leaf water enrichment means that leaf waxes are straightforward recorders of the isotopic composition of precipitation in wet climates. For these tropical forests we find the average fractionation between source water and leaf wax for C29n-alkanes, -129 ± 2‰ (s.e.m., n = 136), to be indistinguishable from that of temperate moist forests. For C28n-alkanoic acids the average fractionation is -121 ± 3‰ (s.e.m., n = 102). Sampling guided by community assembly within forest plots shows that integrated plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions faithfully record the gradient of isotopes in precipitation with elevation (R2 = 0.97 for n-alkanes and 0.60 for n-alkanoic acids). This calibration study supports the use of leaf waxes as recorders of the isotopic composition of precipitation in lowland tropical rainforest, tropical montane cloud forests and their sedimentary archives.

  5. Evapofacieshalítica en el Salar del Rincón, departamento Los Andes, Salta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ovejero Toledo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El salar delRincón se encuentra ubicado en el departamento Los Andes, provincia de Salta enel extremo noroeste de la Puna Austral, a una altura media de 3.660 m s.n.m. Eneste trabajo se dan a conocer los resultados de la correlación de sondeos, quepermitieron determinar facies de halita, texturas, estructuras, materialesclásticos intersticiales, mineralogía, composición química de la salmuera y losparámetros hidráulicos del acuífero, determinados a lo largo de una transectaeste-oeste que cubre aproximadamente 30 km². La fase cristalina estácompuesta mayoritariamente de halita, con yeso, mirabilita, thenardita,glauberita, hidroglauberita, eugsterita, calcita y ulexita solo en el sectoroeste de la transecta. Se identificaron las siguientes evapofacies halítica:costra salina, geodas y halita bandeada. Las texturas observadas incluyen:cristales hoppers, pirámides chevron, halita intersticial muddyhalite y halita cloudy. La composición de la salmuera es denaturaleza clorurada sódica con variaciones en profundidad de sulfato y borato.Los cationes son Ca, Mg, Li y K, la relación K/Li es de 20/1. El cálculo dereserva a nivel de recurso mineral, en sectores con distinta porosidad eficaz,dio para Li+ 208,2 kt y para K+ 4231,9 kt (> 30 %; yLi+ 14,9 kt y K+ 302, 9 kt (< 10 %. Los contenidos deLi+ y K+ en toda la transecta son 223,1 kt y 4534,8 ktrespectivamente. El estudio permitió determinar una concentración promedio de0,4 g/l de litio y 8 g/l de potasio.

  6. Land Cover Change in the Andes of Southern Ecuador—Patterns and Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia F. Curatola Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the megadiverse tropical mountain forest in the Andes of southern Ecuador, a global biodiversity hotspot, the use of fire to clear land for cattle ranching is leading to the invasion of an aggressive weed, the bracken fern, which is threatening diversity and the provisioning of ecosystem services. To find sustainable land use options adapted to the local situation, a profound knowledge of the long-term spatiotemporal patterns of land cover change and its drivers is necessary, but hitherto lacking. The complex topography and the high cloud frequency make the use of remote sensing in this area a challenge. To deal with these conditions, we pursued specific pre-processing steps before classifying five Landsat scenes from 1975 to 2001. Then, we quantified land cover changes and habitat fragmentation, and we investigated landscape changes in relation to key spatial elements (altitude, slope, and distance from roads. Good classification results were obtained with overall accuracies ranging from 94.5% to 98.5% and Kappa statistics between 0.75 and 0.98. Forest was strongly fragmented due to the rapid expansion of the arable frontier and the even more rapid invasion by bracken. Unexpectedly, more bracken-infested areas were converted to pastures than vice versa, a practice that could alleviate pressure on forests if promoted. Road proximity was the most important spatial element determining forest loss, while for bracken the altitudinal range conditioned the degree of invasion in deforested areas. The annual deforestation rate changed notably between periods: ~1.5% from 1975 to 1987, ~0.8% from 1987 to 2000, and finally a very high rate of ~7.5% between 2000 and 2001. We explained these inconstant rates through some specific interrelated local and national political and socioeconomic drivers, namely land use policies, credit and tenure incentives, demography, and in particular, a severe national economic and bank crisis.

  7. Elevational Ranges of Montane Birds and Deforestation in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela

    Full Text Available Deforestation causes habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, and can ultimately cause extinction of the remnant species. Tropical montane birds face these threats with the added natural vulnerability of narrower elevational ranges and higher specialization than lowland species. Recent studies assess the impact of present and future global climate change on species' ranges, but only a few of these evaluate the potentially confounding effect of lowland deforestation on species elevational distributions. In the Western Andes of Colombia, an important biodiversity hotspot, we evaluated the effects of deforestation on the elevational ranges of montane birds along altitudinal transects. Using point counts and mist-nets, we surveyed six altitudinal transects spanning 2200 to 2800 m. Three transects were forested from 2200 to 2800 m, and three were partially deforested with forest cover only above 2400 m. We compared abundance-weighted mean elevation, minimum elevation, and elevational range width. In addition to analysing the effect of deforestation on 134 species, we tested its impact within trophic guilds and habitat preference groups. Abundance-weighted mean and minimum elevations were not significantly different between forested and partially deforested transects. Range width was marginally different: as expected, ranges were larger in forested transects. Species in different trophic guilds and habitat preference categories showed different trends. These results suggest that deforestation may affect species' elevational ranges, even within the forest that remains. Climate change will likely exacerbate harmful impacts of deforestation on species' elevational distributions. Future conservation strategies need to account for this by protecting connected forest tracts across a wide range of elevations.

  8. Facilitative interactions do not wane with warming at high elevations in the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Sierra-Almeida, Angela

    2012-10-01

    Positive interactions between species are known to play an important role in the structure and dynamics of alpine plant communities. The balance between negative and positive interactions is known to shift along spatial and temporal gradients, with positive effects prevailing over negative ones as the environmental stress increases. Thus, this balance is likely to be affected by climate change. We hypothesized that increases in temperature (a global warming scenario) should decrease the importance of positive interactions for the survival and growth of alpine plant species. To test this hypothesis, we selected individuals of the native grass species Hordeum comosum growing within the nurse cushion species Azorella madreporica at 3,600 m.a.s.l. in Los Andes (Chile), and performed nurse removal and seedling survival experiments under natural and warmer conditions. For warmer conditions, we used open-top chambers, which increased the temperature by 4 °C. After two growing seasons, we compared the effect of nurse removal on the survival, biomass, and photochemical efficiency of H. comosum individuals under warmer and natural conditions. Nurse removal significantly decreased the survival, biomass, and photochemical efficiency of H. comosum, demonstrating the facilitative effects of nurse cushions. Seedling survival was also enhanced by cushions, even under warmer conditions. However, warmer conditions only partially mitigated the negative effects of nurse removal, suggesting that facilitative effects of cushions do not wane under warmer conditions. Thus, facilitative interactions are vital to the performance and survival of alpine species, and these positive interactions will continue to be important in the warmer conditions of the future in high-alpine habitats. PMID:22481305

  9. The Tropical Andes without Snow and Ice - Impacts, Uncertainties and Challenges Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change has lead to significant glacier retreat in the tropical Andes over the past several decades. Despite the apparent hiatus in warming along the Pacific coast, temperature continues to rise at higher elevations, putting smaller glaciers in lower lying mountain ranges on the verge of complete disappearance. As a result water availability and water quality in glacier-fed river systems will be reduced during the dry season. The lack of a seasonal snow cover in the tropics, which provides for an additional hydrologic buffer in mid-latitude mountain ranges, further exacerbates the situation. Altered precipitation regimes, including changes in total precipitation amount, changes in the rain/snow ratio, or changes in the wet season length will also affect water availability, but projections of these changes are currently fraught with uncertainty. The importance of glacier-fed water supply varies between regions and depends on the presence of other water regulators (reservoirs, wetlands), the length of the dry season and the trajectory of water demand (population growth, expanding economic activities). Here we will review downscaled CMIP5 model results for some of these mountain ranges and discuss the consequences of future warming and projected precipitation changes for the Andean cryosphere, while considering uncertainties associated with downscaling methodology, model dependency and choice of emission scenario. Adaptation strategies will be evaluated in the light of these results, discussing the need to pursue no-regret strategies, when implementing water conservation measures. Lessons learned from past adaptation and capacity building activities in the region will be discussed, emphasizing a) the need to strengthen the institutional standing of authorities involved in glacier research, b) alignment of capacity building and international cooperation with the national and regional needs and c) improvements to long-term climate and glacier monitoring programs

  10. Giant magmatic water reservoir beneath Uturuncu volcano and Altiplano-Puna region (Central Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonier, Mickael; Gaillard, Fabrice; Muir, Duncan; Blundy, Jon; Unsworth, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism at continental arcs is the surface manifestation of long-lived crustal magmatic processes whereby mantle-derived hydrous basalt magma differentiates to more silica-rich magmas by a combination of crystallization and crustal melting. What erupts is just a fraction of the total volume of magma produced by these processes; the unerupted, plutonic residues solidify and are inaccessible to direct study until millions of years of uplift and erosion bring them to the surface. In contrast, geophysical surveys, using electromagnetic and seismic waves, can provide real-time images of subduction zone magmatic systems. Several such studies have revealed that arc volcanoes are underlain by large partially molten regions at depths of >10 km, the largest known example being the Altiplano-Puna magma body (APMB) in central Andes. Interpreting such geophysical images in terms of amount, composition and distribution of partial melts is limited by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of silicate melts at elevated pressures and temperatures. Here we present high-pressure, in situ experimental data showing that the electrical conductivity of andesitic melts is primarily controlled by their dissolved water contents. Linking our new measurements to petrological constraints from andesites erupted on the Altiplano, we show that the APMB is composed of 10-20% of an andesitic melt containing 8-10 wt% dissolved water. This implies that the APMB is a giant water anomaly in the global subduction system, with a total mass of dissolved magmatic water about half of the water contained within the Adriatic Sea. In addition to the controls on the physical properties of the melts, the abundance of dissolved water governs the structural levels of magma ponding, equivalent to the depth of water saturation, where degassing and crystallisation promote partial melting and weakening of the upper crust. Unexpectedly, very high concentrations of water in andesite magmas shall impede their

  11. Spatial and temporal variability in denudation across the Bolivian Andes from multiple geochronometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Nadja; Ehlers, Todd A.; Schaller, Mirjam; Barnes, Jason B.; Tawackoli, Sohrab; Poulsen, Christopher J.

    2010-10-01

    We quantify spatial and temporal variations in denudation rates across the central Andean fold-thrust belt in Bolivia with particular focus on the Holocene. Measured and predicted 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentrations in river sediments are used to (1) calculate catchment-averaged denudation rates from 17 basins across two transects at different latitudes, and (2) evaluate the sensitivity of Holocene climate change on the denudation history recorded by the CRN data. Estimated denudation rates vary by two orders of magnitude from 0.04 to 1.93 mm yr - 1 with mean values of 0.40 ± 0.29 mm yr - 1 in northern Bolivia and 0.51 ± 0.50 mm yr - 1 in the south. Results demonstrate no statistically significant correlation between denudation rates and morphological parameters such as relief, slope or drainage basin size. In addition, the CRN-derived denudation rates do not reflect present-day latitudinal variations in precipitation. Comparison to ˜ 130 previously published denudation rates calculated over long (thermochronology-derived; > 10 6 yrs), medium (CRN-derived; 10 2-10 4 yrs), and short timescales (sediment flux-derived; 10 1 yrs) indicate temporal variations in denudation rates that increase between 0 and 200% over the last ˜ 5 ka. CRN modeling results suggest that the CRN-derived denudation rates may not be fully adjusted to wetter climate conditions recorded in the central Andes since the mid-Holocene. We conclude that large spatial variability in CRN denudation may be due to local variations in tectonics (e.g. faulting), while large temporal variability in denudation may be due to temporal variations in climate.

  12. New highland distribution records of multiple Anopheles species in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Fiona F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent climate change reviews have stressed the possibility of some malaria vectors occupying regions of higher altitudes than previously recorded. Indeed, highland malaria has been observed in several African nations, possibly attributable to changes in land use, vector control and local climate. This study attempts to expand the current knowledge of the distribution of common Anopheles species in Ecuador, with particular attention to highland regions (> 500 m of the Andes. Methods Extensive field collections of larvae were undertaken in 2008, 2009 and 2010 throughout all regions of Ecuador (except the lower-altitude Amazonian plain and compared to historical distribution maps reproduced from the 1940s. Larvae were identified using both a morphological key and sequencing of the 800 bp region of the CO1 mitochondrial gene. In addition, spatial statistics (Getis-Ord Hotspot Analysis: Gi* were used to determine high and low-density clusters of each species in Ecuador. Results Distributions have been updated for five species of Anopheles in Ecuador: Anopheles albimanus, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, Anopheles punctimacula, Anopheles eiseni and Anopheles oswaldoi s.l.. Historical maps indicate that An. pseudopunctipennis used to be widespread in highland Andean valleys, while other species were completely restricted to lowland areas. By comparison, updated maps for the other four collected species show higher maximum elevations and/or more widespread distributions in highland regions than previously recorded. Gi* analysis determined some highland hot spots for An. albimanus, but only cold spots for all other species. Conclusions This study documents the establishment of multiple anopheline species in high altitude regions of Ecuador, often in areas where malaria eradication programs are not focused.

  13. Cloud forest restoration for erosion control in a Kichwa community of the Ecuadorian central Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, L.; Giordanengo, J.; Sacatoro, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Denver Professional Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) has begun conducting erosion control projects in the Kichwa communities of Malingua Pamba in the Andes Mountains south of Quito, Ecuador. In many high elevation areas in this region, erosion of volcanic soils on steep hillsides (i.e., erosion sites, the multidisciplinary Erosion Control team traveled to Malingua Pamba in October 2012 to conduct final design and project implementation at 5 sites. In partnership with the local communities, we installed woody cloud forest species, grass (sig-sig) contour hedges, erosion matting, and rock structures (toe walls, plunge pools, bank armoring, cross vanes, contour infiltration ditches, etc.) to reduce incision rates and risk of slump failures, facilitate aggradation, and hasten revegetation. In keeping with the EWB goal of project sustainability, we used primarily locally available resources. High school students of the community grew 5000 native trees and some naturalized shrubs in a nursery started by the school principal, hand weavers produced jute erosion mats, and rocks were provided by a nearby quarry. Where possible, local rock was harvested from landslide areas and other local erosion features. Based on follow up reports and photographs from the community and EWB travelers, the approach of using locally available materials installed by the community is successful; plants are growing well and erosion control structures have remained in place throughout the November to April rainy season. The community has continued planting native vegetation at several additional erosion sites. Formal monitoring will be conducted in October 2013, followed by analysis of data to determine if induced meandering and other low-maintenance erosion control techniques are working as planned. For comparison of techniques, we will consider installing check dams in comparable gullies. The October 2013 project will also focus on training the community how to conduct erosion

  14. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from (210)Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ~1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our (14)C and (210)Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ~1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ~1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 microg g(-1). The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution. PMID

  15. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from 210Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ∼ 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our 14C and 210Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ∼ 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ∼ 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 μg g-1. The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution

  16. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Colin A. [Department of Geology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada)], E-mail: cacooke@ualberta.ca; Abbott, Mark B. [Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada); Section of Anthropology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from {sup 210}Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning {approx} 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our {sup 14}C and {sup 210}Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins {approx} 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after {approx} 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude

  17. The paradigm of paraglacial megafans of the San Juan river basin, Central Andes, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvires, Graciela M.

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution and several morphometric characteristics of the Quaternary alluvial fans of the San Juan River, in the province of San Juan, at the Central and Western part of Argentina, have been studied to classify them as paraglacial megafans, as well to ratify its depositional environmental conditions. The high sedimentary load exported by San Juan river from the Central Andes to the foreland depressions is estimated about 3,682,200 hm3. The large alluvial fans of Ullum-Zonda and Tulum valleys were deposited into deep tectonic depressions, during the Upper Pleistocene deglaciation stages. The outcome of collecting remotely sensed data, map and DEM data, geophysical data and much fieldwork gave access to morphometric, morphographic and morphogenetic data of these alluvial fans. The main drainage network was mapped on processed images using QGis (vers.2.0.1). Several fan morphometric parameters were measured, such as the size, the shape, the thickness, the surface areas and the sedimentary volume of exported load. The analyzed fans were accumulated in deep tectonic depressions, where the alluvium fill reaches 700 to 1200 m thick. Such fans do not reach the large size that other world megafans have, and this is due to tectonic obstacles, although the sedimentary fill average volume surpasses 514,000 hm3. The author proposes to consider Ullum-Zonda and Tulum alluvial fans as paraglacial megafans. According to the stratigraphic relationships of the tropical South American Rivers, the author considers that the San Juan paraglacial megafans would have occurred in the period before 24 ka BP , possibly corresponding to Middle Pleniglacial (ca 65-24ka BP). They record colder and more humid conditions compared with the present arid and dry conditions.

  18. Comparative phylogeography of co-distributed Phrygilus species (Aves, Thraupidae) from the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Varas, R; González-Acuña, D; Vianna, J A

    2015-09-01

    The Neotropical ecoregion has been an important place of avian diversification where dispersal and allopatric events coupled with periods of active orogeny and climate change (Late Pliocene-Pleistocene) have shaped the biogeography of the region. In the Neotropics, avian population structure has been sculpted not only by geographical barriers, but also by non-allopatric factors such as natural selection and local adaptation. We analyzed the genetic variation of six co-distributed Phrygilus species from the Central Andes, based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers in conjunction with morphological differentiation. We examined if Phrygilus species share patterns of population structure and historical demography, and reviewed the intraspecific taxonomy in part of their geographic range. Our results showed different phylogeographic patterns between species, even among those belonging to the same phylogenetic clade. P. alaudinus, P. atriceps, and P. unicolor showed genetic differentiation mediated by allopatric mechanisms in response to specific geographic barriers; P. gayi showed sympatric lineages in northern Chile, while P. plebejus and P. fruticeti showed a single genetic group. We found no relationship between geographic range size and genetic structure. Additionally, a signature of expansion was found in three species related to the expansion of paleolakes in the Altiplano region and the drying phase of the Atacama Desert. Morphological analysis showed congruence with molecular data and intraspecific taxonomy in most species. While we detected genetic and phenotypic patterns that could be related to natural selection and local adaptation, our results indicate that allopatric events acted as a major factor in the population differentiation of Phrygilus species. PMID:25987531

  19. The potential of stalagmites from the Patagonian Andes as sub-annually-resolved paleoclimate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Rolf; Schimpf, Daniel; Mangini, Augusto; Kronz, Andreas; Wörner, Gerhard; Simon, Klaus; Spötl, Christoph; Arz, Helge

    2010-05-01

    Stalagmites of the superhumid southern Andes are occasionally formed in small non-carst caves in a metamorphic and/or granitoid basement. They originate from coastal erosion in fracture zones during periods of higher sea levels. These small and relatively open caves are equilibrated with outside temperatures. Their drip rates reflect regional precipitation related to westerly wind intensities. To evaluate the reproducibility of proxies of different stalagmites we have investigated three U/Th-dated stalagmites (each one with 14-16 ages) from a single cave which grew simultaneously during the last 5 Ka. The host rocks provide a large variety of fine-grained siliciclastic minerals which are deposited on the stalagmite. Thin sections, scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, and cave monitoring show that up to 3 wt% of siliciclastic minerals was accumulated successively on top of the stalagmites, depending on the individual drip rates above a certain threshold level. The amount of detritus was determined by the contents of detrital elements like Y and HREE, which were measured by ICP-MS (LAM-ICP-MS) from drill-holes (1-1.5 mm diameter) and laser ablation (5-10 μm steps). The LAM-ICP-MS pattern of e.g. Y and Al show a monthly resolution with clear seasonal cycles for the last 5 Kyrs. The presumable annual cycles match well into the time span in-between single Th/U ages. The seasonality results from two times higher drip rates in southern hemisphere summer (stronger westerlies) compared to winter. The time series show annual as well as typical sun-spot-related cyclicities (~11, 90, 210 years). Since these proxies are only sensitive to precipitation (and westerly changes) we suggest that the westerly intensities are controlled indirectly by changes in the sun's activity. Typically acid soil water with pH values of 3-5 leach several elements (U, Sr, Fe, Mg etc.) from the surrounding rocks, leading to high Mg/Ca ratios in the stalagmite during less humid periods

  20. Long-Term Single-Dose Efficacy of a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Andes Virus Vaccine in Syrian Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Prescott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV is highly pathogenic in humans and is the primary etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in South America. Case-fatality rates are as high as 50% and there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies for infection. Our laboratory has recently developed a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based vaccine that expressed the glycoproteins of Andes virus in place of the native VSV glycoprotein (G. This vaccine is highly efficacious in the Syrian hamster model of HCPS when given 28 days before challenge with ANDV, or when given around the time of challenge (peri-exposure, and even protects when administered post-exposure. Herein, we sought to test the durability of the immune response to a single dose of this vaccine in Syrian hamsters. This vaccine was efficacious in hamsters challenged intranasally with ANDV 6 months after vaccination (p = 0.025, but animals were not significantly protected following 1 year of vaccination (p = 0.090. The decrease in protection correlated with a reduction of measurable neutralizing antibody responses, and suggests that a more robust vaccination schedule might be required to provide long-term immunity.

  1. Boron isotope composition of geothermal fluids and borate minerals from salar deposits (central Andes/NW Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemann, Simone A.; Meixner, Anette; Erzinger, Jörg; Viramonte, José G.; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Franz, Gerhard

    2004-06-01

    We have measured the boron concentration and isotope composition of regionally expansive borate deposits and geothermal fluids from the Cenozoic geothermal system of the Argentine Puna Plateau in the central Andes. The borate minerals borax, colemanite, hydroboracite, inderite, inyoite, kernite, teruggite, tincalconite, and ulexite span a wide range of δ11B values from -29.5 to -0.3‰, whereas fluids cover a range from -18.3 to 0.7‰. The data from recent coexisting borate minerals and fluids allow for the calculation of the isotope composition of the ancient mineralizing fluids and thus for the constraint of the isotope composition of the source rocks sampled by the fluids. The boron isotope composition of ancient mineralizing fluids appears uniform throughout the section of precipitates at a given locality and similar to values obtained from recent thermal fluids. These findings support models that suggest uniform and stable climatic, magmatic, and tectonic conditions during the past 8 million years in this part of the central Andes. Boron in fluids is derived from different sources, depending on the drainage system and local country rocks. One significant boron source is the Paleozoic basement, which has a whole-rock isotopic composition of δ11B=-8.9±2.2‰ (1 SD); another important boron contribution comes from Neogene-Pleistocene ignimbrites ( δ11B=-3.8±2.8‰, 1 SD). Cenozoic andesites and Mesozoic limestones ( δ11B≤+8‰) provide a potential third boron source.

  2. Estimation of slip scenarios of mega-thrust earthquakes and strong motion simulations for Central Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, N.; Tavera, H.; Aguilar, Z.; Chlieh, M.; Calderon, D.; Sekiguchi, T.; Nakai, S.; Yamazaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a methodology for the estimation of slip scenarios for megathrust earthquakes based on a model of interseismic coupling (ISC) distribution in subduction margins obtained from geodetic data, as well as information of recurrence of historical earthquakes. This geodetic slip model (GSM) delineates the long wavelength asperities within the megathrust. For the simulation of strong ground motion it becomes necessary to introduce short wavelength heterogeneities to the source slip to be able to efficiently simulate high frequency ground motions. To achieve this purpose we elaborate "broadband" source models constructed by combining the GSM with several short wavelength slip distributions obtained from a Von Karman PSD function with random phases. Our application of the method to Central Andes in Peru, show that this region has presently the potential of generating an earthquake with moment magnitude of 8.9, with a peak slip of 17 m and a source area of approximately 500 km along strike and 165 km along dip. For the strong motion simulations we constructed 12 broadband slip models, and consider 9 possible hypocenter locations for each model. We performed strong motion simulations for the whole central Andes region (Peru), spanning an area from the Nazca ridge (16^o S) to the Mendana fracture (9^o S). For this purpose we use the hybrid strong motion simulation method of Pulido et al. (2004), improved to handle a general slip distribution. Our simulated PGA and PGV distributions indicate that a region of at least 500 km along the coast of central Andes is subjected to a MMI intensity of approximately 8, for the slip model that yielded the largest ground motions among the 12 slip models considered, averaged for all assumed hypocenter locations. This result is in agreement with the macroseismic intensity distribution estimated for the great 1746 earthquake (M~9) in central Andes (Dorbath et al. 1990). Our results indicate that the simulated PGA and PGV for

  3. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  4. Killing the snake of poverty : local perceptions of poverty and well-being and people’s capabilities to improve their lives in the Southern Andes of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Miyashita

    2009-01-01

    Despite the generalised image of comuneros of the Southern Andes of Peru as living in poverty, a closer examination of the daily lives of the campesinos provides a more dynamic perspective. Some households claim that their lives are improving, others that their lives are the same, while many report

  5. The Real of Community, the Desire for Development and the Performance of Egalitarianism in the Peruvian Andes: A Materialist–Utopian Account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a materialist–utopian perspective for explaining the persistence of community in the Andes by drawing upon Lacanian theory and the thought of the Peruvian Marxist José Carlos Mariátegui. What characterizes the Andean comunidad are not notions of belonging and identity, but the exi

  6. Mallas y flujos : acción colectiva, cambio social, quinua y desarrollo regional indígena en los Andes Bolivianos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laguna, P.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies collective action and social change in indigenous rural organisations (IRO) in the Bolivian Andes. I focus on the effects and importance that these organisations have in the historical process of regional development as social spaces that encapsulate different projects of social,

  7. SANREM CRSP LTR4: Adapting to change in the Andes: Practices and strategies to address market and climate risks in vulnerable ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Valdivia, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes the work of the SANREM CRSP Long term research activity 4 (LTRA-4), "Adapting to Change in the Andes: Practices and Strategies to Address Market and Climate Risks in Vulnerable Ecosystems." The objectives of the project are to address: LTRA-4 (Practices and Strategies for Vulnerable Agro-Ecosystems)

  8. A new genus of Toads (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) from the Pacific Slopes of the Andes in Northern Ecuador and Southern Colombia, with the description of two new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The genus Andinophryne, characterized by the presence of an omosternum, an externally visible tympanum, elongate parotoids and extensively webbed hands and feet is described from the Pacific versant of the Andes in northwestern Ecuador and southwestern Colombia. Two new species, Andinophryne colomai

  9. Paleoclimatic reconstruction in the Bolivian Andes from oxygen isotope analysis of lake sediment cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellulose-inferred lake water δ18O (δ18Olw) records from Lago Potosi, a seasonally-closed lake in a watershed that is not currently glaciated, and Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota, an overflowing lake in a glaciated watershed, provide the basis for late Pleistocene and Holocene paleoclimatic reconstruction in the Bolivian Andes. Deconvolution of the histories of changing evaporative isotopic enrichment from source water δ18O in the lake sediment records is constrained by comparison to the Sajama ice core oxygen isotope profile. At Lago Potosi, the δ18Olw record appears to be dominantly controlled by evaporative 18O-enrichment, reflecting shifts in local effective moisture. Using an isotope-mass balance model, a preliminary quantitative reconstruction of summer relative humidity spanning the past 11,500 cal yr is derived from the Lago Potosi Π18Olw record. Results indicate that the late Pleistocene was moist with summer relative humidity values estimated at 10-20% greater than present. Increasing aridity developed in the early Holocene with maximum prolonged dryness spanning 7500 to 6000 cal yr BP at Lago Potosi, an interval characterized by summer relative humidity values that may have been 20% lower than present. Highly variable but dominantly arid conditions persist in the mid- to late Holocene, with average summer relative humidity values estimated at 15% below present, which then increase to about 10-20% greater than present by 2000 cal yr BP. Slightly more arid conditions characterize the last millennium with summer relative humidity values ranging from 5-10% lower than present. Similar long-term variations are evident in the Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota δ18Olw profile, except during the early Holocene when lake water evaporative 18Oenrichment in response to low relative humidity appears to have been offset by enhanced inflow from 18O-depleted snowmelt or groundwater from the large catchment. Close correspondence occurs between the isotope-inferred paleohumidity

  10. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  11. Asynchronous Glacial Chronologies in the Central Andes (15-40°S) and Paleoclimatic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, R.; Kull, C.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2006-12-01

    We have established glacial chronologies along a N-S transect over the Central Andes using 10Be surface exposure dating. Our results show that maximum glacial advances occurred asynchronously and reflect the varying influence and shifts of the major atmospheric circulation systems during the Late Quaternary: the tropical circulation in the north and the westerlies in the south. In Bolivia (three research areas in the Cordillera Real and the Cordillera Cochabamba, ~15°S) glacial advances could be dated to ~20 and 12 ka BP. This is in good agreement with published exposure age data from moraines in Bolivia and Peru (provided that all ages are calculated following the same scaling system). Accordingly, the maximum glaciation there probably occurred roughly synchronous to the temperature minimum of the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the lateglacial cold reversals. Strict correlation with neither the Younger Dryas in the northern hemisphere, nor the Antarctic Cold Reversal is possible due to the current systematic exposure age uncertainties (~10%). Glacier-Climate-Modelling corroborates the sensitivity of the reconstructed glaciers to temperature changes, rather than precipitation. On the contrary, there is good evidence for the dominant role of precipitation changes on the glacial chronologies in the lee of the Cordillera Occidental, i.e. on the Altiplano and further south. The pronounced lateglacial wet phase, which is well documented in lake transgression phases as far south as 28°S (-> tropical moisture source), seems to have caused glacial advances even at ~30°S. In two research areas in Chile at that latitude, we were able to date several lateglacial moraines. Besides, the maximum datable glaciation there occurred at ~30 ka BP. That is significantly earlier than the LGM (sensu strictu) and points to favourable climate conditions for glaciation at that time (particularly increased precipitation). We conclude that the westerlies were more intensive or

  12. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-P. Ledru

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analyzed the pollen content of a 1150-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the Andean forest to the bog (T and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P, was defined. This index was used to distinguish changes in the atmospheric moisture from the soil moisture content of the páramo and their associated patterns of interdecadal El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO variability and South American summer monsoon (SASM activity. Results show that between 850 and 1250 AD, the Medieval Climate Anomaly interval was warm and moist with a high transported pollen/Poaceae pollen (T/P index linked to high ENSO variability and weak SASM activity. Between 1250 and 1550 AD, a dry climate prevailed, characterized by an abrupt decrease in the T/P index and therefore no upslope cloud convection, related to lower ENSO variability and with significant impact on the floristic composition of the páramo. During the Little Ice Age, two phases were observed: first, a wet phase between 1550 and 1750 AD linked to low ENSO variability in the Pacific and warm south equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs favored the return of a wet páramo, and then a cold and dry phase between 1750 and 1800 AD associated with low ENSO variability and weak SASM activity resulted in drying of the páramo. The current warm period marks the beginning of a climate characterized by high convective activity – the highest in the last millennium – and weaker SASM activity modifying the water storage of the páramo. Our results show that the páramo is progressively losing its capacity for water storage and that the interdecadal variability of both tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTs matter for

  13. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledru, M.-P.; Jomelli, V.; Samaniego, P.; Vuille, M.; Hidalgo, S.; Herrera, M.; Ceron, C.

    2013-02-01

    To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analyzed the pollen content of a 1150-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the Andean forest to the bog (T) and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P), was defined. This index was used to distinguish changes in the atmospheric moisture from the soil moisture content of the páramo and their associated patterns of interdecadal El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability and South American summer monsoon (SASM) activity. Results show that between 850 and 1250 AD, the Medieval Climate Anomaly interval was warm and moist with a high transported pollen/Poaceae pollen (T/P) index linked to high ENSO variability and weak SASM activity. Between 1250 and 1550 AD, a dry climate prevailed, characterized by an abrupt decrease in the T/P index and therefore no upslope cloud convection, related to lower ENSO variability and with significant impact on the floristic composition of the páramo. During the Little Ice Age, two phases were observed: first, a wet phase between 1550 and 1750 AD linked to low ENSO variability in the Pacific and warm south equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) favored the return of a wet páramo, and then a cold and dry phase between 1750 and 1800 AD associated with low ENSO variability and weak SASM activity resulted in drying of the páramo. The current warm period marks the beginning of a climate characterized by high convective activity - the highest in the last millennium - and weaker SASM activity modifying the water storage of the páramo. Our results show that the páramo is progressively losing its capacity for water storage and that the interdecadal variability of both tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTs matter for Andean climate

  14. Leaf Wax δ13C Varies with Elevation in the Peruvian Andes and Western Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. S.; Feakins, S. J.; Ponton, C.; Peters, T.; West, A. J.; Galy, V.; Bentley, L. P.; Salinas, N.; Shenkin, A.; Martin, R.; Asner, G. P.; Malhi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Plant leaf wax carbon isotopic composition (δ13Cwax) reflects the net isotopic effects associated with diffusion into the leaf, fixation of carbon by Rubisco and biosynthesis of individual leaf wax biochemicals. As declining pCO2 with elevation affects the first two fractionations, we expect to find an isotopic gradient in δ13Cwax, if the fractionation of leaf wax biosynthesis is constant. To test this, we report δ13Cwax values from 500 samples of leaves collected by tree-climbers from the upper canopy from 9 forest-inventory plots spanning a 3.5km elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes and western Amazonia during the CHAMBASA field campaign. These samples provide a unique opportunity to study the relationship between δ13Cwax and pCO2 in diverse species across this remote tropical montane forest and lowland rainforest. The very wet climate throughout (2-5 m rainfall per year) minimizes fractionation effects due to stomatal restrictions (i.e. water use efficiency) that may be an important factor elsewhere. Preliminary results show δ13Cwax values on average increase with elevation by ~1.5‰/km, a trend consistent with bulk plant δ13C in previous studies. The mean epsilon between bulk and C29 n-alkane is -7.3±2.2‰. Inter-sample differences are large on the order of 10‰. Shaded leaves and understory leaves are found to be depleted relative to sunlit leaves, presumably due to a lower photosynthetic rate and use of respired CO2 in the understory. C29 n-alkanes are on average ~2.5‰ more depleted than C30 n-alkanoic acids, indicating fractionation during selective decarboxylation. We further compare results from plants with soil and river sediments to provide insights into how leaf wax signals are archived in soils and exported from the landscape. We find a ~1.4‰/km gradient in forest soils similar to plants. We observe a ~2‰ offset between C29 n-alkane in plant leaves and in soils across the elevation profile, which is likely a signal of degradation

  15. Application of enzyme leach soil analysis for epithermal gold exploration in the Andes of Ecuador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.M.; Gunn, A.G. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Enzyme Leach (EL) soil surveys were undertaken over known epithermal Au mineralisation at El Mozo and Llano Largo, Azuay, Ecuador to assess the utility of the technique for identifying such deposits in the Ecuadorian Andes. The results indicate the development of both apical- and oxidation-type EL anomalies over auriferous structures at the two sites, the former systematically incorporating Au, and the latter Cl and Br. The spectrum of elements responsive to mineralisation at El Mozo (Cl, Br, I, La, Ce, Nd, Cu, Pb, Au, As, Sb, Ag, Zr, Sr) was found to be considerably greater than at Llano Largo (Cl, Br, Au, As, Sb, Ag, Zn), probably reflecting the contrasting high- and low-sulphidation assemblages of the two prospects. Ratios of EL versus aqua-regia extractable trace element concentrations ranged from 1: < 100 for Mn to 1: >400 for chalcophile elements such as Pb, Sb, As, Bi and Ag. Strong correlations between the concentrations of several analytes (including Mn, Sr, Cu, Co, As) extracted by the two procedures indicate, however, that EL datasets are extensively influenced by bulk matrix composition. Spatial variations of EL extractable Mn were found to exert no major influence on apical or oxidation suite anomaly patterns at El Mozo. However, Mn-normalisation of halogen data for Llano Largo elucidated otherwise obscure oxidation features, potentially related to Au mineralisation. Ratios between elements subject to apical enrichment and those of the oxidation suite (e.g. Cl/Au and Bi/Br) were found to highlight known Au targets with improved clarity. The formation mechanism of the recorded Au anomalies is uncertain, but may involve physical enrichment of Au in the soil during pedogenesis with subsequent in-situ formation of (EL soluble) Au halide complexes. The strength of such apical features is, in part, probably a function of the minimal depths to mineralisation which characterise El Mozo and Llano Largo. Oxidation halos formed by volatile non-metallic elements

  16. Precipitation intensity and vegetation controls on geomorphology of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, M. L.; Poulsen, C. J.; Ehlers, T. A.; Yanites, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Field observations and landscape evolution models indicate that landscape processes in active mountain belts are strongly dependent on vegetation and climate. In fluvial landscapes, erosional efficiency is commonly thought to depend on the intensity, frequency, and duration of precipitation events. We use Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations to test the importance of precipitation intensity in determining geomorphology at the mountain belt scale. Precipitation metrics, including mean annual precipitation, and the mean intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation events, are derived from the TRMM 3B42v7 product. The new precipitation datasets are then compared with different topographic metrics of the central Andes. Statistical analyses, including multiple linear regression, are used to quantify the importance of different precipitation metrics in controlling the regional topographic characteristics. In addition to climate properties, spatial variations in tectonic regime, bedrock lithology, and the amount and type of vegetation cover are accounted for in the statistical analyses. Our analysis indicates that in regions with high vegetation cover (>80%), mean precipitation intensity and mean interval correlate most strongly with mean hillslope (r = -0.51 and r = -0.66 respectively). In these regions, mean hillslope decreases from ~25° to ~ 10° with increasing mean event precipitation intensity (from 10 to 40 mm/day). In contrast, in sparsely vegetated (control on critical erosion thresholds at the landscape scale. Furthermore, the property of precipitation that governs surface processes is dependent on the amount and type of vegetation cover. Both grass and trees effectively increase erosion thresholds and act to stabilize the landscape. Only precipitation events that are capable of exceeding the erosion threshold set by the vegetation can do geomorphic work. High mean slopes (15 - 33°) develop where the mean precipitation intensity is

  17. An InSAR-based survey of volcanic deformation in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Simons, M.

    2004-02-01

    We extend an earlier interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey covering about 900 remote volcanos of the central Andes (14°-27°S) between the years 1992 and 2002. Our survey reveals broad (10s of km), roughly axisymmetric deformation at 4 volcanic centers: two stratovolcanoes are inflating (Uturuncu, Bolivia, and Hualca Hualca, Peru); another source of inflation on the border between Chile and Argentina is not obviously associated with a volcanic edifice (here called Lazufre); and a caldera (Cerro Blanco, also called Robledo) in northwest Argentina is subsiding. We explore the range of source depths and volumes allowed by our observations, using spherical, ellipsoidal and crack-like source geometries. We further examine the effects of local topography upon the deformation field and invert for a spherical point-source in both elastic half-space and layered-space crustal models. We use a global search algorithm, with gradient search methods used to further constrain best-fitting models. Inferred source depths are model-dependent, with differences in the assumed source geometry generating a larger range of accepted depths than variations in elastic structure. Source depths relative to sea level are: 8-18 km at Hualca Hualca; 12-25 km for Uturuncu; 5-13 km for Lazufre, and 5-10 km at Cerro Blanco. Deformation at all four volcanoes seems to be time-dependent, and only Uturuncu and Cerro Blanco were deforming during the entire time period of observation. Inflation at Hualca Hualca stopped in 1997, perhaps related to a large eruption of nearby Sabancaya volcano in May 1997, although there is no obvious relation between the rate of deformation and the eruptions of Sabancaya. We do not observe any deformation associated with eruptions of Lascar, Chile, at 16 other volcanoes that had recent small eruptions or fumarolic activity, or associated with a short-lived thermal anomaly at Chiliques volcano. We posit a hydrothermal system at Cerro Blanco to explain the

  18. A glaciological baseline for the upper Olivares basin, Chilean Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriaux, T.; Bown, F.; Burger, F.; Cisternas, S.; Gacitúa, G.; Hernández, J.; Malmros, J.; Muñoz, C.; Oberreuter, J.; Rivera, A.; Silva, R.

    2013-12-01

    Santiago de Chile, with near 6.7 million of inhabitants, is located at the foot of the Andes, in the Maipo river basin, where there are approximately 424 km2 of ice, being the biggest glaciers, those located at the upper Olivares basin. Very little has been researched in recent years about the ongoing changes taking place in the area or about the glacier meltwater contribution or about the human impact on the glaciers. In order to tackle this deficiency, we began a research program in 2012, aiming to complete a glaciological baseline for this area, including glacier mass, energy and hydrological studies. For this purpose, we have established a detailed monitoring program on two glaciers where we installed 3 automatic weather stations, two arrays of stakes for mass balance studies, two automatic photographic cameras for monitoring albedo changes and two runoff stations, among several other instruments. Also, we have surveyed 5 glaciers with our airborne radar and lidar systems, allowing mapping their surface topographies at different seasons and the bedrocks underneath the ice. Analysis of satellite images shows generalized glacier area shrinkage, with a mean area lost of 25.5% since 1967 (total of 68.6 km2 in 1967 among 6 studied glaciers). The collected radar ice thickness data (maximum ice thickness of 223 m), allowed calculating a total volume of water equivalent of 3 km3 storage in 5 main glaciers of the basin. The GPS surveys of several stakes resulted in surface ice velocities between 1 and 5 m/yr. The mass balance studies showed high summer ablation rates, with an important role of sublimation, expressed as penitentes with heights of up to 1.5 m. Runoff contributed by Olivares Alfa glacier averaged 461 l/s between January and April 2013 with peaks of up to 2000 l/s, confirming the importance of glacier meltwater for the basin during summer months (January-March). The above numbers are some of the results obtained in the area, illustrating the importance of

  19. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the Eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-P. Ledru

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analysed the pollen content of a 1100-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the Eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the andean forest to the bog (T and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P, was defined to distinguish the atmospheric moisture from the soil moisture content of the páramo. Results showed that between 900 AD and 1230 AD, the Medieval Climate Anomaly interval was warm and moist with high T/P index linked to a high ENSO variability and a weak South American Summer Monsoon (SASM activity. Between 1230 and 1650 AD, a dry climate prevailed characterized by an abrupt decrease in the T/P index related to lower ENSO variability with significant impact on the floristic composition of the páramo. During the Little Ice Age, two phases were observed, first a wet phase between 1650 and 1750 AD linked to low ENSO variability in the Pacific and warm south equatorial Atlantic SSTs favored the return of a wet páramo, and a cold and dry phase between 1750 and 1810 AD associated with low ENSO variability and weak SASM activity resulting in drying of the páramo. The Current Warm Period marks the beginning of a climate characterized by high convective activity, the highest in the last millennium, and weaker SASM activity modifying the water stock of the páramo. Our results show that the páramo is progressively loosing its capacity for water storage and that the variability of both tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTs matters for Andean climate patterns although many teleconnection mechanisms are still poorly understood.

  20. Implicaciones criminológicas de los casos legales recibidos en una unidad de Psiquiatría: Resultados preliminares/ Legal cases received in a Psychiatric unit and it’s criminological implications: Preliminary results

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    Odalis Tibisay Parra Izarra (Venezuela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un estudio descriptivo de tipo cuantitativo y de carácter retrospectivo, de la frecuencia con la que las instituciones de control social formal refieren “casos legales” a la Unidad de Psiquiatría del Instituto Autónomo Hospital Universitario de Los Andes (IAHULA, en Mérida, Venezuela, desde 1996 hasta el 2009, encontrando un aumento exponencial de estas demandas en el transcurso de los catorce años estudiados, con un total de 2216 referencias, correspondiendo el mayor número al Consejo de Protección del Niño, Niña y Adolescente (CPNNA (55%, como también a quien la Consulta Externa de Psiquiatría le envió el mayor número de respuestas (42%, de igual manera el CPNNA fue la institución con más solicitudes de evaluación psicológica (50,6%. El delito no fue mencionado en la gran mayoría (88,1% de referencias legales de las instituciones de control social formal. Concluyendo que hay pertinencia criminológica en los “casos legales” referidos a la Unidad de Psiquiatría del IAHULA y, se sugiere, que un profesional como el criminólogo clínico, de ser considerado en ambas instancias, pudiera fungir de puente entre la Unidad de Psiquiatría y las instituciones de control social formal. There is realized a descriptive study of quantitative type and of retrospective character, of the frequency with which the institutions of social formal control recount “legal cases” to the Psychiatry Unit of the IAHULA, in Merida, Venezuela, from 1996 until 2009, finding an exponential increase of these demands in the course of fourteen studied years, with a total of 2216 references, corresponding the major number to the Protection Advice of the Child, Girl and Teenager (PACGT (55%, since also to whom the External Consultation of Psychiatry sent the major number of answers (42%, of equal way PACGT it was the Institution with more requests of psychological evaluation (50,6%. The crime was not mentioned in the great majority (88

  1. Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Early and Latest Holocene Moraines on Nevado Salcantay in the Southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    A two-fold sequence of nested lateral and end moraines was mapped in a glacial trough emanating from the southwest flank of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m; ~13°S latitude), the highest peak in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of southern Peru. The field area is situated 25 km due south of the archaeological site of Machu Picchu. Outer and inner moraines in the sequence were deposited by valley glaciers that terminated ~5 km and ~3 km, respectively, from their headwall on the Salcantay summit massif. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of granitic boulders sampled on the Salcantay moraines is underway and has provided the first numerical ages for these deposits. Initial results indicate ages of 8.1 ± 0.1 10Be ka for the outer moraine and 200 ± 20 10Be years for the sharp-crested inner moraine. These ages are derived using the CRONUS-Earth 10Be exposure age calculator (version 2.0) and expressed with respect to the Lal- Stone production rate scaling scheme using the standard atmosphere. The outer and inner moraine ages correspond to glacial events during the early and latest Holocene, respectively. Further 10Be dating of the mapped moraines and similar deposits observed in adjacent drainages on Nevado Salcantay is anticipated to yield a high-resolution chronology of valley glaciation in this segment of the southern Peruvian Andes. The new results bridge an important gap between existing Andean glacier records to the north and south, and complement available ice core and lacustrine paleoclimate records in the vicinity, thereby expanding spatial and temporal coverage for identifying patterns of Holocene climate change in the tropical Andes. Notably, the inner moraine age correlates with the timing of the Little Ice Age as defined in northern mid- and high latitude glacier records, and suggests considerable expansion of valley glaciers in the southern Peruvian Andes during this climatic minimum. Apart from their paleoclimatic significance, the initial results also demonstrate

  2. VIOLENCIA POLÍTICA, ASISTENCIA MILITAR DE ESTADOS UNIDOS Y PRODUCCIÓN DE COCA EN LOS ANDES CENTRALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Arce

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ¿Tiene la violencia política un impacto significativo sobre la producción de drogas en los Andes Centrales? ¿Disminuye la ayuda militar estadounidense la oferta de drogas ilícitas que se origina en los Andes Centrales? ¿Qué otros factores ayudan a explicar dicha producción? ¿Tiene la lucha estadounidense contra el narcotráfico las mismas consecuencias en cada país? Este trabajo evalúa de manera empírica los efectos de la violencia política y la ayuda exterior de Estados Unidos (EE.UU. en los tres países productores de droga más prolíficos de América Latina: Colombia, Bolivia y Perú. Los resultados guardan relación directa con la literatura existente que recalca los obstáculos que los gobiernos enfrentan cuando pretenden regular los mercados de bienes de contrabando. Un análisis comparativo de la política antidrogas de EE.UU. aclara los éxitos y las limitaciones de la estrategia que actualmente se lleva a cabo, particularmente en Colombia, donde la violencia política ha facilitado el fortalecimiento del narcotráfico a nivel internacionalWhat is the effect of political violence on the production of coca in the Central Andes? Does U.S. military aid reduce the amount of drugs that originate from this region? What other factors help explain the production of coca? Are the effects of U.S. military aid the same across the Andean nations? This paper tests the effects of political violence and U.S. military aid in the drug producing nations of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru. Our results are consistent with existing literature that emphasizes the obstacles that governments face as they attempt to suppress markets for prohibited goods. Our comparative analysis sheds new light on the limitations of the current U.S. policy, particularly in Colombia, where political violence has strengthened the global drug trade

  3. Estructura litosférica de los Andes centrales a partirde un modelo gravimétrico 3D

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    Claudia B. Prezzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A través del modelado directode la anomalía de Bouguer se desarrolló un modelo de densidades en 3D de lacorteza continental, la placa subducida y el manto superior, para los AndesCentrales entre los 20-29°S y los 74-61°O. El objetivo de este trabajo escontribuir a un mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica, integrando lainformación disponible (geofísica, geológica, petrológica y geoquímica en unúnico modelo. La geometría del modelo está definida y limitada por la ubicaciónde hipocentros, líneas sísmicas de reflexión y refracción, tomografías deatenuación y de tiempos de arribo, estudios magnetotelúricos, modelos térmicosy secciones estructurales balanceadas. Las densidades asignadas a losdiferentes cuerpos fueron calculadas a partir de datos petrológicos ygeoquímicos, estimando las condiciones de presión y temperatura. El modeloconsiste de 31 planos verticales E-O paralelos, donde la corteza continentalestá compuesta por distintos cuerpos que representan a las diferentes unidadesmorfotectónicas de los Andes Centrales. Se generaron mapas isocóricos del techode la placa subducida, del Moho continental y del techo de la astenósferadebajo de Sudamérica. Se calculó la anomalía residual mediante la sustracciónde los efectos gravimétricos de la placa subducida modelada y del Moho modeladode la anomalía de Bouguer. Este estudio demuestra como el modelado gravimétrico3D, integrando información geofísica, geológica y petrológica, puede contribuiral mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica de los Andes Centrales.

  4. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Damien; Sempere, Thierry; Plantard, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes, biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida, a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures and thus thrives above 2.0-2.5 km in these tropical highlands. The Peruvian populations of this species exhibit a clear evolutionary pattern with deeper, more ancient lineages occurring in Andean southern Peru and shallower, younger lineages occurring progressively northwards. Genetically diverging G. pallida populations thus progressively colonized highland areas as these were expanding northwards, demonstrating that altitude in the Peruvian Andes was acquired longitudinally from south to north, i.e. in the direction of decreasing orogenic volume. This phylogeographic structure is recognized in other, independent highland biotaxa, and point to the Central Andean Orocline (CAO) as the region where high altitudes first emerged. Moreover, molecular clocks relative to Andean taxa, including the potato-tomato group, consistently estimate that altitudes high enough to induce biotic radiation were first acquired in the Early Miocene. After calibration by geological and biological tie-points and intervals, the phylogeny of G. pallida is used as a molecular clock, which estimates that the 2.0-2.5 km threshold elevation range was reached in the Early Miocene in southernmost Peru, in the Middle and Late Miocene in the Abancay segment (NW southern Peru), and from the latest Miocene in central and northern Peru. Although uncertainties attached to phylochronologic ages are significantly larger than those derived from geochronological methods, these results are fairly consistent with coeval

  5. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in aerosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Toril

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Four different communities and one culture of pigmented microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation in mineral medium of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia, from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed the identification of sequences belonging to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified and the maritime Antarctic soil the poorest (only one. Snow samples from Col du midi (Alps and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones. These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clone. The only microorganism identified in the maritime Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp. was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. The two snow samples from the Alps only shared one common microorganism. Most of the identified microorganisms have been detected previously in cold environments (Dietzia kujamenisi, Pseudonocardia Antarctica, Hydrogenophaga palleronii and Brebundimonas sp., marine sediments (Aquiflexus balticus, Pseudomonas pseudoalkaligenes, Pseudomonas sp. and one uncultured Alphaproteobacteria, and soils and rocks (Pseudonocardia sp.,

  6. Altitudinal vegetation belts in the high-Andes of central Chile (33°S Pisos altitudinales de vegetación en los Andes de Chile central (33°S

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    Lohengrin A. Cavieres

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The limits of alpine vegetation belts have been established mainly based on physiognomic criteria. However, a more objective approach for fixing limits of vegetation belts are methods based on species composition and relative abundance of each species. While these methods are more time consuming, they are more detailed and permit the detection of physical factors affecting the limits of vegetation belts. In this paper we: 1 describe the altitudinal changes of vegetation above timberline, 2 compare vegetation belts defined with physiognomy and two floristic methods (a qualitative one based on altitudinal changes in species composition, and a quantitative one based on changes in dominant species; and 3 detect some environmental factors responsible for the altitudinal distribution of alpine vegetation between 2100 and 3700 masl in the Andes of Santiago, central Chile (33°S. There was a complete agreement between the different methods in delimiting the subalpine belt. However, in the lower alpine belt (the cushion's belt floristic methods subdivided it in 2-3 sub-belts. In the floristic methods, elevations 3500-3700 that formed the higher alpine belt segregated in separate ways because they have no species in common. Physiognomic descriptions lose relevant information about species distribution, especially at higher elevations. Mean annual temperature and nitrogen content of soil are the main environmental factors affecting the altitudinal limits of vegetation belts in the central Chilean AndesLa delimitación de los pisos altitudinales de vegetación andina se ha basado principalmente en criterios fisionómicos. Sin embargo, un criterio más objetivo para la delimitación es usar métodos basados en la composición y abundancia relativa de las especies presentes. Mientras estos métodos requieren de un mayor esfuerzo de muestreo, son más detallados y permiten detectar factores físicos involucrados en la delimitación altitudinal de la vegetaci

  7. Cenozoic structural evolution of the Argentinean Andes at 34°40'S: A close relationship between thick and thin-skinned deformation Evolución estructural Cenozoica de los Andes Argentinos a los 34°40'S: una estrecha relación entre deformación de piel fina y piel gruesa

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Turienzo; Luis Dimieri; Cristina Frisicale; Vanesa Araujo; Natalia Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    In the Argentinean side of the Andes at 34°40'S, the Cenozoic Andean orogeny produced the thick-skinned Malargüe fold-and-thrust belt and the easternmost basement uplift of the Cordillera Frontal. Integrating balanced structural cross-sections with previous studies of Cenozoic synorogenic rocks and 40Ar/39Ar ages of coeval volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, we propose a Miocene to Quaternary sequential structural evolution of this sector of the Andes. Andean deformation in the study area begun a...

  8. Tectonique Cénozoïque du Haut Plateau de la Puna, Nord Ouest Argentin, Andes Centrales.

    OpenAIRE

    Coutand, Isabelle

    1999-01-01

    Mémoires de Géosciences Rennes, n° 92, 381 p., ISBN: 2-905532-91-2 Les Andes Centrales sont l'exemple type d'une chaîne se développant le long d'une marge active en contexte non collisionel et résultent de la subduction légèrement oblique (-N75°E) de la plaque océanique Nazca sous le continent sud-américain. Elles sont caractérisées par la présence du haut plateau de l'Altiplano-Puna s'étendant depuis le Pérou au Nord jusqu'en Argentine au Sud et présentant une altitude moyenne avoisinant ...

  9. Olivier Dollfus, amauta y hombre de los Andes. Un recorrido entre los territorios, la cultura y la historia

    OpenAIRE

    Zambrano, Vidal Pino

    2013-01-01

    Conocí a Olivier Dollfus, hace más de 20 años, una mañana llena de sol en la ciudad del Cusco, esa ciudad que élama y quiere tanto. Él salía de la biblioteca del Centro Bartoloméde Las Casas donde había compartido la mañana —y tal vez muchos días— con otros estudiantes buscando la información necesaria para entender ese mundo tan fascinante y complejocomo son los Andes. Pasó un tiempo y lo vi nuevamente pero esta vez en el campo, en el Valle Sagrado de los Incas, conversando con las personas ...

  10. Procesos de isomorfismo en la Facultad de Administración de la Universidad de los Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexánder Guzmán Vásquez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo partimos de los siguientes interrogantes: ¿Ha cambiado la relación entre las facultades de Administración en Colombia y sus profesores en los últimos 15 años? Y si efectivamente ha cambiado ¿por qué se han presentado estos cambios? Buscando respuestas revisamos literatura en teoría organizacional y observamos la experiencia de la Facultad de Administración de la Universidad de los Andes. Gracias a lo anterior planteamos la coexistencia de procesos de isomorfi smo en las organizaciones, la presencia de mecanismos que facilitan el desarrollo de estos procesos y resaltamos la importancia del aprendizaje organizacional para el éxito de los mismos.

  11. Early last glacial maximum in the Southern Central Andes reveals northward shift of the westerlies at ~39 ka

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    R. Zech

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The latitudinal position of the southern westerlies has been suggested to be a key parameter for the climate on Earth. According to the general notion, the southern westerlies were shifted equatorward during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: ~24–18 ka, resulting in reduced deep ocean ventilation, accumulation of "old dissolved carbon", and low atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In order to test this notion, we applied surface exposure dating on moraines in the Southern Central Andes, where glacial mass balances are particularly sensitive to changes in precipitation, i.e. to the latitudinal position of the westerlies. Our results provide robust evidence that the maximum glaciation occurred already at ~39 ka, significantly predating the global LGM. This questions the role of the westerlies for atmospheric CO2, and it highlights our limited understanding of the forcings of atmospheric circulation.

  12. Early last glacial maximum in the southern Central Andes reveals northward shift of the westerlies at ~39 ka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The latitudinal position of the southern westerlies has been suggested to be a key parameter for the climate on Earth. According to the general notion, the southern westerlies were shifted equatorward during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: ~24–18 ka, resulting in reduced deep ocean ventilation, accumulation of old dissolved carbon, and low atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In order to test this notion, we applied surface exposure dating on moraines in the southern Central Andes, where glacial mass balances are particularly sensitive to changes in precipitation, i.e. to the latitudinal position of the westerlies. Our results provide robust evidence that the maximum glaciation occurred already at ~39 ka, significantly predating the global LGM. This questions the role of the westerlies for atmospheric CO2, and it highlights our limited understanding of the forcings of atmospheric circulation.

  13. Terres d'altitude, terres de risque : la lutte contre l'érosion dans les Andes équatoriennes

    OpenAIRE

    De Noni, Georges; Viennot, Marc; Asseline, Jean; Trujillo, G.

    2001-01-01

    L'Equateur est un pays montagneux et volcanique, représentatif de la cordillère des Andes dans son segment situé entre les tropiques. La montagne, appelée "Sierra", présente une situation singulière : à la suite d'un processus de réforme agraire aux résultats contestables, un grand nombre de petits paysans ont été déplacés vers les versants et les hautes terres, qui portent un damier formé de nombreuses petites parcelles de cultures faiblement productives, le minifundio. Cet agrosystème d'alt...

  14. Quantitative ethnobotany of palms in northwestern South America: a comparative analysis in Amazonia, Andes and Chocó

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cámara-Leret, Rodrigo

    This Doctoral Thesis is the result of an interdisciplinary work between 2010-2014 to document and analyze the use patterns and traditional knowledge of palms (Arecaceae) in northwestern South America. The work is based on field data collected over 18 months in four countries (Colombia, Ecuador......, Peru and Bolivia), three ecoregions (Amazon, Andes, Chocó), three human groups (indigenous, mestizos, afro-americans), 55 Amerindian groups, 68 communities and 2201 informants. Altogether, 140 useful palm species, 2262 different uses and 87,886 use records were found. The Doctoral student conducted...... fieldwork collected more information than the existing literature on most of the analyzed scales, and represents the first empirical evidence that ethnobotanical knowledge is poorly documented in northwestern South America. Given our findings, we hope to stimulate the formulation of plans to systematically...

  15. Landslides in the Andes and the need to communicate on an interandean level on landslide mapping and research

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    Reginald L Hermanns

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Landslides in the Andes are some of the highest natural threats to society with single events killing up to several thousand people. Landslide mapping and landslide research became a more widely spread discipline in geosciences in the Andean countries. However efforts today by far do not match the threat and both more investigations and more mapping activities are needed to support decision makers in land use planning. In this communication we discussed five key issues that we suggest to focus on in upcoming years: Impact of climatic change on landslides occurrence, landslides susceptibility and hazard maps, prediction of megalandslides, seismically triggered landslides, and temporal spatial distribution of mud and debris flows potential.

  16. Distribution of the Neotropical Otter Lontra longicaudis in the Venezuelan Andes: Habitat and Status of its Population

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    González I.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The current distribution and status of Lontra longicaudis annectens on the Southern slope of the Venezuelan Andes was established by carrying out interviews with local people. Following this, 25 rivers were surveyed for direct evidence of the presence of this species. The species was recorded on 23 of these rivers, and a clear decreasing trend in the species' population was detected. Based on these results, the main threats for the species appear to be reduction of their natural habitat and the contamination of watercourses, with illegal poaching of secondary importance. It is suggested that more detailed studies are carried out to quantify species' abundance, identify more precisely the potential factors determining population decrease, and detect optimal sites for its protection.

  17. Climatic and paleoclimatic forcing of erosion in the southern Central Andes and the northwestern Himalaya (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The windward flanks of the tectonically active southern Central Andes and the NW Himalaya are characterized by steep climatic, tectonic, and topographic gradients. The first windward topographic rise of these mountain ranges constitutes a significant orographic barrier resulting in high orographic rainfall causing some of the wettest places on Earth. However, the higher-elevation areas of the windward flanks of both regions become progressively drier, until arid conditions are attained in the orogen interiors (i.e., the Altiplano-Puna and Tibet plateaus). Both areas have experienced significant paleoclimatic changes with deeper penetration of moisture into the orogen and thus an orogenward shift of the climate gradient. Some of the world's largest rivers with high sediment loads emerge from these mountain belts, and understanding the relation between climate and erosion is key in predicting mass fluxes, assessing the impacts of climate variability, and long-term climate forcing of erosion on landscape evolution. Here, we quantify the impact of the climatic gradients and their spatial shifts during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. We rely on sedimentary archives, digital topography, and cosmogenic inventories of river sands (10Be) and bedrock-erosion rates (10Be and 26Al) from the Puna Plateau in NW Argentina and the interior of the western Himalaya in NW India. We make three key observations that underline the importance of present-day climatic parameters and paleoclimatic changes on the effiency of surface processes in both areas: (1) First-order spatial erosion patterns follow the climatic gradient and catchment-mean erosion rates vary by three orders of magnitude from the wet mountain fronts to the dry orogen interior. In NW Argentina, our measurements represent the fluvial transport rates and indicate very low fluvial activity in the interior of the Puna Plateau during the Late Pleistocene; (2) the spatial distribution of erosion rates can be explained by a

  18. Summer energy balance and ablation of high elevation glaciers in the central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Benjamin; Rivera, Andres; Burger, Flavia; Bravo, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers of the semi-arid central Chilean Andes are an important freshwater source for the populous Central Valley region of Chile, but have been shrinking in recent decades. The surface energy balance of these glaciers is of high scientific interest as summer ablation occurs through both sublimation and melt. During the 2012-13 Austral Summer a glacio-meteorological monitoring programme was established on Olivares Alfa (3.9 km2, 4130-4800 m elevation) and Beta (8.3 km2, 3620-4850 m elevation) Glaciers and their forelands in the Upper Olivares Valley, 33°00'-33°11' S, 70°05'-70°15' W, approximately 50 km north-east of Santiago. This included complete automatic weather stations (AWSs) with sonic rangers to record surface ablation on the ablation zones of the two glaciers, and one AWS in the proglacial area of Olivares Alfa Glacier including precipitation gauge. To complement these point data, daily images of the glaciers were captured with fixed cameras in order to calculate snow cover and albedo distributions. To calculate the surface energy balance and rates of melt and sublimation, a model was developed which uses direct AWS measurements of the radiative fluxes and calculates the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat using the bulk aerodynamic approach. The model also calculates the subsurface heat flux and includes a simple scheme to estimate refreezing of melt water within surface snow or ice. Meteorological data and model results for the December to May period will be presented in this paper. Model calculations match closely the cumulative ablation curve of the sonic ranger at Olivares Alfa, with a slight overestimation, and overestimate cumulative ablation recorded by the sonic ranger at Olivares Beta, possibly due, at least in part, to uncertain snow density values. Modelled cumulative ablation in the December-April period is 2.2 m water equivalent (w.e.) at Olivares Alfa (0.10 m sublimation, 2.10 m melt) and 2.34 m w.e. at Olivares Beta (0.18 m

  19. Evolución tectonomagmática de los Andes bolivianos

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    Néstor Jiménez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes bolivianos ocuparonuna posición de retroarco durante gran parte del Fanerozoico. En su evoluciónse reconoce una primera etapa, restringida al Paleozoico inferior, en la quehubo una gran transferencia de material sedimentario en la corteza superior, yuna segunda en la que predominó el reciclaje de la masa cortical. A lo largodel Paleozoico inferior, una cuenca marina epicratónica se formó entre elcratón de Amazonia, el macizo Arequipa-Antofalla, y el macizo Pampeanofuncionando inicialmente como cuenca de retroarco y luego como cuenca deantepaís hasta colmatarse en el Paleozoico superior. En este lapso ocurrierontres etapas de deformación: La fase oclóyica (límite Ordovícico-Silúrico decarácter restringido, la fase eohercínica (límite Devónico-Carbonífero, y lafase hercínica (Carbonífero Superior también de influencia areal restringida.En el Mesozoico, se registraron aún breves incursiones marinas antes que en elEoceno comience a edificarse una protocordillera. El solevantamiento general detoda la región centroandina, se inició en el Oligoceno Superior afectando alAltiplano y la Cordillera Oriental actuales. Este solevantamiento ocurrió entres etapas limitadas por la formación de superficies de erosión datadas en 18y 10 Ma. La ladera oeste de la Cordillera Oriental, denominada faja de Huarina,tuvo un rol muy importante en la evolución de la región centroandina. Además decobijar a gran parte del magmatismo de retroarco, en esta faja ocurrió la mayorsubsidencia de la cuenca paleozoica. En esta faja ocurrieron preferentementedurante el Mesozoico, procesos de rifting y de adelgazamiento litosférico. Enel Paleógeno, la faja de Huarinas fue la primera en ser solevantada aislando lacuenca altiplánica del interior del continente, y durante el OligocenoSuperior, se constituyó en el cinturón retrocabalgante del orógeno. Ladeformación en el Altiplano y la Cordillera Oriental concluyó hace 10 Ma cuandose form

  20. Modelling and monitoring vegetation and evapotranspiration on an anthropogenic grassland succession in the Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Andes of southern Ecuador the infestation of pasture (mostly C4-grass Setaria sphacelata) by the aggressive bracken fern (Pteridium sp.) still is an unsolved problem. Environmental and exogenous factors and direct plant competition have been hypothesized to drive bracken occurrence. Special attention is given to pasture burning, which stimulates bracken growth, and is common in the relative dry season (Oct-Dec). However, no knowledge is available for a quantitative hypothesis investigation on bracken occurrence under current and future local climate. In this work a modeling approach is presented, in which initial investigations support the application of a two-big-leaf model, and parameterization and model forcing are made with extensive data on physiological traits and on the physical environment. Our main aims here are (i) to show field investigations on a plant scale, which are the basis for a proper model parameterization; and (ii) to provide initialization data, which is based on estimation of green leaf area index from very-high and high resolution optical remote sensing (air-photos and Quickbird images); (iii) to simulate vegetation succession after burn on an experimental site, using in situ climate data and future climate-change scenarios. The modeling approach is based in the main on the vegetation dynamic model called Southern Bracken Competition Model (SoBraCoMo), which has been coupled to a hydrological model written on the catchment model framework (CMF), to simulate soil-vegetation dynamics. Main initialization variables are biochemical parameters (quantum and carboxylation efficiency) and the green leaf area index (green-LAI). Forcing data include soil, leaf and air temperature, soil and air humidity and radiation. The model has been developed and tested on the experimental site (2100 m asl) in the Rio San Francisco Valley, Ecuador. Simulation results on the burn experiment of 2009 showed that stimulation by fire could not boost fern

  1. Late Cretaceous-early Eocene counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes and evolution of the Patagonia-Antarctic Peninsula system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, F.; Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Ruffet, G.; Ramírez de Arellano, C.; Hervé, F.; Poujol, M.

    2016-02-01

    The southernmost Andes of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego present a prominent arc-shaped structure: the Patagonian Bend. Whether the bending is a primary curvature or an orocline is still matter of controversy. New paleomagnetic data have been obtained south of the Beagle Channel in 39 out of 61 sites. They have been drilled in Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sediments and interbedded volcanics and in mid-Cretaceous to Eocene intrusives of the Fuegian Batholith. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured at each site and the influence of magnetic fabric on the characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) in plutonic rocks was corrected using inverse tensors of anisotropy of remanent magnetizations. Normal polarity secondary magnetizations with west-directed declination were obtained in the sediments and they did not pass the fold test. These characteristic directions are similar to those recorded by mid Cretaceous intrusives suggesting a remagnetization event during the normal Cretaceous superchron and describe a large (> 90°) counterclockwise rotation. Late Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the Fueguian Batholith, record decreasing counterclockwise rotations of 45° to 30°. These paleomagnetic results are interpreted as evidence of a large counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes related to the closure of the Rocas Verdes Basin and the formation of the Darwin Cordillera during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Bend can thus be described as the formation of a progressive arc from an oroclinal stage during the closure of the Rocas Verdes basin to a mainly primary arc during the final stages of deformation of the Magallanes fold and thrust belt. Plate reconstructions show that the Antarctic Peninsula would have formed a continuous margin with Patagonia between the Early Cretaceous and the Eocene, and acted as a non-rotational rigid block facilitating the development of the Patagonian Bend.

  2. The stratigraphy of cretaceous mudstones in the eastern Fuegian Andes: new data from body and trace fossils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo B. Olivero

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The stratigraphy of Cretaceous marine mudstones in the Fuegian Andes, roughly equivalent to Charles Darwin's clay-slate formation, remains a still unsolved problem. Previous records of Albian, Turonian-Coniacian, and Santonian-Campanian bivalves are combined with new findings of the Late Albian inoceramid Inoceramus anglicus Woods, and the Maastrichtian ammonites Diplomoceras sp., Anagaudryceras sp., Maorites densicostatus (Kilian and Reboul, Maorites sp., and Pachydiscus (Neodesmoceras sp. to further constrain the Cretaceous stratigraphy of the eastern Fuegian Andes. In addition, new records of distinctive trace fossils and ichnofabric are meaningful for stratigraphic division and delineation of paleoenvironmental settings in these Cretaceous mudstones. The Lower Cretaceous ichnoassemblage of Chondrites targioni (Brongniart and Zoophycos isp. is consistent with the inferred slope-volcaniclastic apron settings of the Yahgan Formation; Nereites missouriensis (Weller reflects distal basin plain depositional settings for the Beauvoir Formation. In the Upper Cretaceous, the "Estratos de Buen Suceso" record the earliest extensively bioturbated horizons, reflecting prolonged well-oxygenated bottom conditions. In the Bahía Thetis Formation, organic-rich, channel margin or distal basin slaty mudstones record the last occurrence of inoceramid bivalves in the Austral Basin; the generalized absence of trace fossils is consistent with dysoxic bottom conditions. The thoroughly bioturbated Policarpo Formation, records a marked change in paleoceanographic conditions. The strong contrast in the intensity of bioturbation between the Upper Campanian-Maastrichtian Bahía Thetis Formation, almost devoid of trace fossils, and the highly bioturbated Maastrichtian-Danian Policarpo Formation reflects a change from dysoxic-anoxic to well ventilated conditions, probably associated with a cooling trend of bottom waters in the austral deep oceans.

  3. Fluctuations of Glaciar Esperanza Norte in the North Patagonian Andes of Argentina during the past 400 yr

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    L. Ruiz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of studies of Little Ice Age (LIA glacier fluctuations in Southern South America has increased in recent years but is largely biased towards sites in the South Patagonian Andes. In this paper we present a detailed record of length and areal fluctuations of Glaciar Esperanza Norte (GEN, in the North Patagonian Andes of Argentina, during the past four centuries. The GEN record was reconstructed through the dendro-geomorphological dating of moraines and the analysis of satellite imagery, aerial photographs and documentary material complemented with extensive field surveys. The maximum LIA extent at GEN was associated with an outer moraine dated to the mid 17th century. At least 19 subsequent readvances or standstills evidenced by morainic ridges were identified inside the most extensive LIA moraine. The dating and spacing of these moraines and the additional information available indicate that the ice front retreated much more rapidly during the 20th century than during earlier centuries. Comparison with the record of LIA fluctuations of Glaciar Frías, an ice mass of similar characteristics located 110 km to the north of GEN, shows a similar pattern of recession over the past 400 yr. Both glacier records have the peak LIA event occurring roughly during the same interval and show a minor readvance during the 1970s, but there are still a few discrepancies in the dating of some inner moraines. These differences may be due to local, specific factors or associated with the inherent uncertainties in the dating of the moraines. The chronologies of GEN and Frías are among the most detailed currently available in Patagonia, but a larger number of study sites is needed to develop robust, regionally representative glacier chronologies. Detailed glaciological, geomorphological and meteorological data are also needed to understand the glacier-climate relationships in this region and develop reliable paleoclimatic reconstructions.

  4. Investigating links between climate and orography in the central Andes: Coupling erosion and precipitation using a physical-statistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Lauren E. L.; Barros, Ana P.

    2014-06-01

    Prior studies evaluated the interplay between climate and orography by investigating the sensitivity of relief to precipitation using the stream power erosion law (SPEL) for specified erosion rates. Here we address the inverse problem, inferring realistic spatial distributions of erosion rates for present-day topography and contemporaneous climate forcing. In the central Andes, similarities in the altitudinal distribution and density of first-order stream outlets and precipitation suggest a direct link between climate and fluvial erosion. Erosion rates are estimated with a Bayesian physical-statistical model based on the SPEL applied at spatial scales that capture joint hydrogeomorphic and hydrometeorological patterns within five river basins and one intermontane basin in Peru and Bolivia. Topographic slope and area data were generated from a high-resolution (˜90 m) digital elevation map, and mean annual precipitation was derived from 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42v.7 product and adjusted with rain gauge data. Estimated decadal-scale erosion rates vary between 0.68 and 11.59 mm/yr, with basin averages of 2.1-8.5 mm/yr. Even accounting for uncertainty in precipitation and simplifying assumptions, these values are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than most millennial and million year timescale estimates in the central Andes, using various geological dating techniques (e.g., thermochronology and cosmogenic nuclides), but they are consistent with other decadal-scale estimates using landslide mapping and sediment flux observations. The results also reveal a pattern of spatially dependent erosion consistent with basin hypsometry. The modeling framework provides a means of remotely estimating erosion rates and associated uncertainties under current climate conditions over large regions. 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The Plutón Diorítico Moat: Mildly alkaline monzonitic magmatism in the Fuegian Andes of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Guillot, M.; Escayola, M.; Acevedo, R.; Pimentel, M.; Seraphim, G.; Proenza, J.; Schalamuk, I.

    2009-12-01

    The Plutón Diorítico Moat (Moat Dioritic Pluton, PDM) is the largest of several isolated Cretaceous plutons exposed in the Fuegian Andes of Argentina. It is made of a large variety of rock types ranging from ultramafic bodies (pyroxenites and hornblendites) to syenites. The petrological diversity is thought to have been originated by fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived magma combined with minor assimilation of continental crust (AFC). Its geochemical characteristics indicate a mildly-alkaline monzonitic affinity, contrasting with the typical calc-alkaline plutons of the Southern Patagonian Batholith (PB) to the south, in the Chilean archipelago. The PDM original magma is arc-related and its crystallization, as indicated by the Rb-Sr mineral isochron age of 115 ± 3 Ma, is coeval with some plutons of the PB. Therefore a similar tectonic regime is assumed for the emplacement of these plutonic bodies, both south and north of the Beagle channel. Differences in magma sources and degree of partial melting are inferred to account for the contrasting lithological and geochemical characteristics of the PB and PDM. The data suggest that the original magmas of the PDM were generated at greater depths in the mantle, by a smaller degree of partial melting, compared with the PB. The Barros Arana basalts, exposed to the north in Chile, forming a back-arc volcanic complex, display the same mildly-alkaline shoshonitic affinity, and are considered in this study as the volcanic equivalents of the PDM. All the plutons in the Argentinean Fuegian Andes display similar lithological and geochemical characteristics and are, therefore, grouped in this work under the name of Magmatismo Potásico Fueguino ( Fuegian Potassic Magmatism).

  6. Non-explosive magma water interaction in a continental setting: Miocene examples from the Eastern Cordillera (central Andes; NW Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Luigina; Matteini, Massimo; Hauser, Natalia; Omarini, Ricardo; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Acocella, Valerio

    2009-07-01

    The Middle-Upper Miocene Las Burras Almagro-El Toro (BAT) igneous complex within the Eastern Cordillera of the central Andes (˜24°S; NW Argentina) has revealed evidence of non-explosive interaction of andesitic magma with water or wet clastic sediments in a continental setting, including peperite generation. We describe and interpret lithofacies and emplacement mechanisms in three case studies. The Las Cuevas member (11.8 Ma) comprises facies related to: (i) andesite extruded in a subaqueous setting and generating lobe-hyaloclastite lava; and (ii) marginal parts of subaerial andesite lava dome(s) in contact with surface water, comprising fluidal lava lobes, hyaloclastite, and juvenile clasts with glassy rims. The Lampazar member (7.8 Ma) is represented by a syn-volcanic andesite intrusion and related peperite that formed within unconsolidated, water-saturated, coarse-grained volcaniclastic conglomerate and breccia. The andesite intrusion is finger-shaped and grades into intrusive pillows. Pillows are up to 2 m wide, tightly packed near the intrusion fingers, and gradually become dispersed in the host sediment ≥50 m from the parent intrusion. The Almagro A member (7.2 Ma) shows evidence of mingling between water-saturated, coarse-grained, volcaniclastic alluvial breccia and intruding andesite magma. The resulting intrusive pillows are characterized by ellipsoidal and tubular shape and concentric structure. The high-level penetration of magma in this coarse sediment was unconfined and irregular. Magma was detached in apophyses and lobes with sharp contacts and fluidal shapes, and without quench fragmentation and formation of a hyaloclastite envelope. The presence of peperite and magma water contact facies in the BAT volcanic sequence indicates the possible availability of water in the system between 11 7 Ma and suggests a depositional setting in this part of the foreland basin of the central Andes characterized by an overall topographically low coastal floodplain

  7. Evaluación del estado de conservación de los bosques montanos en los Andes tropicales

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    N. Tejedor Garavito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes tropicales constituyen una región única con una alta diversidad de hábitats, producto de complejos gradientes espaciales y ambientales. Los bosques montanos de esta región son considerados como una prioridad global de conservación, debido principalmente a su elevada riqueza biológica y de endemismos. Sin embargo su biodiversidad es de las menos conocidas de toda la región tropical, aunque se reconoce la amplia gama de servicios ambientales que prestan, incluyendo la regulación del clima regional y la captura y almacenamiento de carbono. Este artículo ofrece una perspectiva general del estado de conservación de los bosques montanos tropicales andinos y de los retos que esta implica. Asimismo, proporciona información sobre sus amenazas, identificando aquéllas que con mayor probabilidad sean responsables de aumentar el riesgo de extinción de especies. Se resalta la necesidad de disponer de más información sobre el estado de conservación de las especies para identificar las futuras prioridades de conservación en la región. La reciente iniciativa de la "Lista Roja y planeación para la conservación de especies de árboles montanos de los Andes Tropicales", formada por delegados de varios países de la región, constituirá una sólida base para el desarrollo y enfoque de políticas y respuestas de manejo dirigidas a la reducción de la deforestación y pérdida de especies en estos bosques, incluyendo acciones para promover la creación de áreas protegidas, restauración forestal y manejo forestal sostenible.

  8. The influence of topography on vertical velocity of air in relation to severe storms near the Southern Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Pessano, H.; Hierro, R.; Santos, J. R.; Llamedo, P.; Alexander, P.

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of 180 storms which took place between 2004 and 2011 over the province of Mendoza (Argentina) near to the Andes Range at southern mid-latitudes, we consider those registered in the northern and central crop areas (oases). The regions affected by these storms are currently protected by an operational hail mitigation project. Differences with previously reported storms detected in the southern oasis are highlighted. Mendoza is a semiarid region situated roughly between 32S and 37S at the east of the highest Andes top. It forms a natural laboratory where different sources of gravity waves, mainly mountain waves, occur. In this work, we analyze the effects of flow over topography generating mountain waves and favoring deep convection. The joint occurrence of storms with hail production and mountain waves is determined from mesoscale numerical simulations, radar and radiosounding data. In particular, two case studies that properly represent diverse structures observed in the region are considered in detail. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to each variable and profile to detect the main oscillation modes present. Simulated temperature profiles are validated and compared with radiosounding data. Each first radar echo, time and location are determined. The necessary energy to lift a parcel to its level of free convection is tested from the Convective Available Potential Energy and Convection Inhibition. This last parameter is compared against the mountain waves' vertical kinetic energy. The time evolution and vertical structure of vertical velocity and equivalent potential temperature suggest in both cases that the detected mountain wave amplitudes are able to provide the necessary energy to lift the air parcel and trigger convection. A simple conceptual scheme linking the dynamical factors taking place before and during storm development is proposed.

  9. Seismic imaging of a convergent continental margin and plateau in the central Andes (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncken, O.; Asch, G.; Haberland, C.; Metchie, J.; Sobolev, S.; Stiller, M.; Yuan, X.; Brasse, H.; Buske, S.; Giese, P.; GöRze, H.-J.; Lueth, S.; Scheuber, E.; Shapiro, S.; Wigger, P.; Yoon, M.-K.; Bravo, P.; Vieytes, H.; Chong, G.; Gonzales, G.; Wilke, H.-G.; Lüschen, E.; Martinez, E.; RöSsling, R.; Ricaldi, E.; Rietbrock, A.

    2003-07-01

    A 400-km-long seismic reflection profile (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96)) and integrated geophysical experiments (wide-angle seismology, passive seismology, gravity, and magnetotelluric depth sounding) across the central Andes (21°S) observed subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American continent. An east dipping reflector (Nazca Reflector) is linked to the down going oceanic crust and shows increasing downdip intensity before gradual breakdown below 80 km. We interpret parts of the Nazca Reflector as a fluid trap located at the front of recent hydration and shearing of the mantle, the fluids being supplied by dehydration of the oceanic plate. Patches of bright (Quebrada Blanca Bright Spot) to more diffuse reflectivity underlie the plateau domain at 15-30 km depth. This reflectivity is associated with a low-velocity zone, P to S wave conversions, the upper limits of high conductivity and high Vp/Vs ratios, and to the occurrence of Neogene volcanic rocks at surface. We interpret this feature as evidence of widespread partial melting of the plateau crust causing decoupling of the upper and lower crust during Neogene shortening and plateau growth. The imaging properties of the continental Moho beneath the Andes indicate a broad transitional character of the crust-mantle boundary owing to active processes like hydration of mantle rocks (in the cooler parts of the plate margin system), magmatic underplating and intraplating under and into the lowermost crust, mechanical instability at Moho, etc. Hence all first-order features appear to be related to fluid-assisted processes in a subduction setting.

  10. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, G.A.M.; Ambrizzi, T. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Marengo, J.A. [National Inst. for Space Studies, Cachoeira Paulista, SP (Brazil). Center for Weather Forecasts and Climate Studies

    2009-07-01

    The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Nino (EN) and La Nina (LN) events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ). For the austral summer period of 1977-2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency. During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ) around 30 S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP) anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years. (orig.)

  11. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. M. Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Niño (EN and La Niña (LN events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ. For the austral summer period of 1977–2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency.

    During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ around 30° S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years.

  12. The interaction between parent material, climate and volcanism as the major soil forming factor in the Ecuadorian high Andes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, W.; Duyck, H.; Dercon, G.; Deckers, J.; Wyseure, G.

    2003-04-01

    The high Andes region of Ecuador and Colombia (>3500m a.s.l.) is covered by the so-called páramo ecosystem, characterised by a cold climate, a typical grass or small shrub vegetation and volcanic soils. Soil profiles of the paramo in the Austro Ecuatoriano, South Ecuador, were studied in order to reveal genetic relationships with geology, volcanic ash deposits, climate and land use. A gradual diminuation of Andic properties was found, related to the distance of the pedon to the active volcanoes of the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Pedons in the north of the region, closer to these volcanoes (Sangay, Tungurahua) are classified as non-allophanic Histic Andosols. The influence of the vicinity of the volcanoes leads to a higher oxalate extractable aluminium and iron. The genesis of the Andosols seems to be strongly related to the presence and thickness of volcanic ash depositions. The limit of these depositions is situated south of the city of Cuenca. Pedons further to the south are classified as Histosols. However, they also have clear Andic properties. Several differences in chemical properties between the Western and Eastern cordilleras where found, that are most probable related with a difference in mother material, and maybe also a different climatic regime. Correlation of the chemical properties with land use reveals that no chemical differences can be found that are invoked by occupying natural Andosols for agricultural purposes, within the first five years of cultivation. At last, the conclusions were used to revisit the World Reference Base for Soil Resources in order to sharpen up differenciation between Andosols and Histosols.

  13. Review article of the current state of glaciers in the tropical Andes: a multi-century perspective on glacier evolution and climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rabatel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide the community with a comprehensive overview of the studies of glaciers in the tropical Andes conducted in recent decades leading to the current status of the glaciers in the context of climate change. In terms of changes in surface area and length, we show that the glacier retreat in the tropical Andes over the last three decades is unprecedented since the maximum extension of the LIA (mid 17th–early 18th century. In terms of changes in mass balance, although there have been some sporadic gains on several glaciers, we show that the trend has been quite negative over the past 50 yr, with a mean mass balance deficit for glaciers in the tropical Andes that is slightly more negative than the computed global average. A break point in the trend appeared in the late 1970s with mean annual mass balance per year decreasing from −0.2 m w.e. in the period 1964–1975 to −0.76 m w.e. in the period 1976–2010. In addition, even if glaciers are currently retreating everywhere in the tropical Andes, it should be noted that as a percentage, this is much more pronounced on small glaciers at low altitudes that do not have a permanent accumulation zone, and which could disappear in the coming years/decades. Monthly mass balance measurements performed in Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia showed that variability of the surface temperature of the Pacific Ocean is the main factor governing variability of the mass balance variability at the interannual to decadal time scale. Precipitation did not display a significant trend in the tropical Andes in the 20th century, and consequently cannot explain the glacier recession. On the other hand, temperature increased at a significant rate of 0.10 °C decade−1 in the last 70 yr. The higher frequency of El Niño events and changes in its spatial and temporal occurrence since the late 1970s together with a warming troposphere over the tropical Andes may thus explain much of the

  14. Histoires de déglaciation pendant le Pléistocène Supérieur dans les Andes centrales de Mérida (Venezuela)

    OpenAIRE

    Angel Ceballos, Isandra Fortuna

    2016-01-01

    Les Andes de Mérida (Venezuela) est caractérisé par la présence de morphologie glaciaire bien préservée entre 2400-4978 m. Les études de ces morphologies glaciares font la contribution pour mieux comprendre et reconstruire la Dernière Glaciation aux Andes Vénézuéliennes. La reconstruction de la Dernière Glaciation (connue dans la région comme Glaciation Mérida) était limitée par la disponibilité de chronologie glaciaire. Cette thèse fait sa contribution à la reconstruction de la Dernière Glac...

  15. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  16. Pluri-decadal (1955–2014) evolution of glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile (30–33° S)

    OpenAIRE

    Monnier, S.; C. Kinnard

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with relationships between debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the central Andes of Chile. Three glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms are investigated over the last decades in order to highlight and question the significance of their landscape evolution and dynamics. We use series of historical air photos and Geoeye satellite images together with common remote sensing operations including imagery orthorectification, digital elevation model generation, an...

  17. Remote sensing and climate data as a key for understanding fasciolosis transmission in the Andes: review and update of an ongoing interdisciplinary project

    OpenAIRE

    Màrius V. Fuentes

    2006-01-01

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica in various South American countries located on the slopes of the Andes has been recognized as an important public health problem. However, the importance of this zoonotic hepatic parasite was neglected until the last decade. Countries such as Peru and Bolivia are considered to be hyperendemic areas for human and animal fasciolosis, and other countries such as Chile, Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela are also affected. At the beginning of the 1990s a multi...

  18. Spatio-temporal variability of snow water equivalent in the extra-tropical Andes Cordillera from distributed energy balance modeling and remotely sensed snow cover

    OpenAIRE

    E. Cornwell; Molotch, N. P.; McPhee, J

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover is the primary water source for human use and ecosystems along the extratropical Andes Cordillera. Despite its importance, relatively little research has been devoted to understanding the properties, distribution and variability of this natural resource. This research provides high-resolution (500 m), daily distributed estimates of end-of-winter and spring snow water equivalent over a 152 000 km2 domain that includes the mountainous reaches of central Chi...

  19. Spatio-temporal variability of snow water equivalent in the extra-tropical Andes cordillera from a distributed energy balance modeling and remotely sensed snow cover

    OpenAIRE

    E. Cornwell; Molotch, N. P.; McPhee, J

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover is the primary water resource precursor for human use and environmental sustain along the extratropical Andes Cordillera. Despite its importance, relatively little research has been devoted to understanding the properties, distribution and variability of this natural resource. This research provides high-resolution distributed estimates of end-of-winter and spring snow water equivalent over a 152 000 km2 domain that includes the mountainous reaches of ...

  20. A multi-institutional and interdisciplinary approach to the assessment of vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Peruvian Central Andes: problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Martínez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A local integrated assessment of the vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Mantaro River Basin, located in Peruvian Central Andes, was developed between years 2003 to 2005. In this paper we present some lessons learned during the development of this study, emphasizing the multi-institutional and interdisciplinary efforts, briefly showing the methodological aspects, and pointing out the main problems found.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar ages from blueschists of the Jambaló region, Central Cordillera of Colombia : implications on the styles of accretion in the Northern Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante, A.; Juliani, C.; C. M. Hall; Essene, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first argon dating of blueschists from the Jambaló area (Cauca Department) in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar spectra were obtained for mica from several lenses of blueschists including greenschist facies rocks. The blueschists are mainly constituted of preserved lenticular cores in strongly mylonitic rocks, which resulted from retrometamorphic processes that affected the high pressure rocks during their exhumation. The majority of...

  2. Extension of the analytic nodal diffusion solver ANDES to triangular-Z geometry and coupling with COBRA-IIIc for hexagonal core analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Montero, Juan Andrés; Jiménez Escalante, Javier; García Herranz, Nuria; Aragonés Beltrán, José María

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the extension of the multigroup nodal diffusion code ANDES, based on the Analytic Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (ACMFD) method, from Cartesian to hexagonal geometry is presented, as well as its coupling with the thermal–hydraulic (TH) code COBRA-IIIc for hexagonal core analysis. In extending the ACMFD method to hexagonal assemblies, triangular-Z nodes are used. In the radial plane, a direct transverse integration procedure is applied along the three directions that are orthog...

  3. Mallas y flujos : acción colectiva, cambio social, quinua y desarrollo regional indígena en los Andes Bolivianos

    OpenAIRE

    Laguna, P.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies collective action and social change in indigenous rural organisations (IRO) in the Bolivian Andes. I focus on the effects and importance that these organisations have in the historical process of regional development as social spaces that encapsulate different projects of social, political and economic modernity. I reconstruct the practices and situations that turn rural indigenous organisations into significant spaces in which individuals and groups of people put into pra...

  4. Evolucion paleogeografica del Paleozoico medio y superior de los Andes centrales (14°-18°S) en Bolivia : evidencia del desplazamiento latitudinal de la cuenca de antepais

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacson, P.E.; Diaz Martinez, Enrique

    1994-01-01

    El estudio estratigrafico, sedimentologico y paleontologico de la secuencia del Devonico a Permico del oeste de Bolivia permite la reconstruccion de la paleogeografia de una parte de los Andes Centrales (14 a 18oS), cuya historia sedimentaria puede dividirse en cuatro fases: 1) Sedimentacion siliciclastica en una cuenca marina somera durante la mayor parte del Devonico (Lochkoviano a Frasniano), con un aumento de la sedimentacion durante el Emsiano y Eifeliano, y aparentes interrupciones dura...

  5. Holocene climate variability and vegetation dynamics inferred from the (11700 cal. yr BP) Laguna Rabadilla de Vaca sediment record, southeastern Ecuadorian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Niemann, Holger; Haberzettl, Torsten; Behling, Hermann

    2009-01-01

    Palaeoenvironmental changes, inferred from a 492 cm long lake sediment core from Laguna Rabadilla de Vaca (3312 m) in Podocarpus National Park, southeastern Ecuadorian Andes, were investigated using multiple proxies. Pollen, spore and charcoal analyses, as well as x-ray fluorescence and magnetic susceptibility scanning reflect the last c. 11 700 cal. yr BP of climate and vegetation history. Pollen data indicate that the herb-paramo was the main vegetation type at Laguna Rabadilla de Vaca duri...

  6. Le lait des Andes vaut-il de l'or ? Logiques paysannes et insertion marchande de la production fromagère andine

    OpenAIRE

    Aubron, Claire

    2006-01-01

    In Peru, milk and farm cheese made from it both participate in elaborating the agricultural income of numerous Andean peasant families. Based upon a detailed study of the adoption of this dairy orientation by a peasant community of the western side of the central Andes, this thesis explores the issue of Andean dairy farming, using the methodological frame of Compared Agriculture. In the dry and uneven mountainous environment of the area, setting-up irrigation systems allowed landowners that l...

  7. Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change on Mountain Hydrology : Development of a Methodology through a Case Study in the Andes of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara, Walter; Deeb, Alejandro; Leino, Irene; Kitoh, Akio; Escobar, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    The objective of study of the impacts of climate change on mountain hydrology is to develop a methodology to assess the net impacts of climate change on the hydrological response in mountainous regions. This is done through a case study in the Peruvian Andes. There are few examples of predictions of the impact of climate change on resource availability and even fewer examples of the applic...

  8. The use of the linear reservoir concept to quantify the impact of changes in land use on the hydrology of catchments in the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Buytaert, W; B. De Bièvre; Wyseure, G.; J. Deckers

    2004-01-01

    The high Andes region of South Ecuador (The Páramo) is characterised by a cold and wet climate. Most soils of the Páramo region are Andosols and Histosols, with a very high water retention capacity that is affected irreversibly by drying. This key property of Páramo soils buffers catchment outflow, resulting in an almost uniform outflow pattern which, notwithstanding the variability in rainfall, can be very variable in space and time. These soils serve as the most imp...

  9. The use of the linear reservoir concept to quantify the impact of changes in land use on the hydrology of catchments in the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Buytaert, W; B. De Bièvre; Wyseure, G.; J. Deckers

    2004-01-01

    The high Andes region of South Ecuador (The Páramo) is characterised by a cold and wet climate. Most soils of the Páramo region are Andosols and Histosols, with a very high water retention capacity that is affected irreversibly by drying. This key property of Páramo soils buffers catchment outflow, resulting in an almost uniform outflow pattern which, notwithstanding the variability in rainfall, can be very variable in space and time. These soils ...

  10. A study of the energy balance and melt regime on Juncal Norte Glacier, semi-arid Andes of central Chile, using melt models of different complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Pellicciotti, Francesca; Helbing, Jakob; Rivera, Andrés; Favier, Vincent; Corripio, Javier; Araos, José; Sicart, Jean-Emmanuel; Carenzo, Marco

    2008-01-01

    We use meteorological data from two automatic weather stations (AWS) on Juncal Norte Glacier, central Chile, to investigate the glacier-climate interaction and to test ablation models of different complexity. The semi-arid Central Andes are characterized by dry summers, with precipitation close to zero, low relative humidity and intense solar radiation. We show that katabatic forcing is dominant both on the glacier tongue and in the fore field, and that low humidity and absence of clouds caus...

  11. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, Silvina; Petrinovic, Ivan [CONICET -IBIGEO. Museo de Cs. Naturales, Universidad de Salta, Mendoza 2 (4400), Salta (Argentina)], E-mail: guzmansilvina@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  12. Distribución y conservación de especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y Andes tropicales Distribution and conservation of endangered species in Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Londoño-Murcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se modeló el nicho ecológico proyectado como distribución potencial de 313 especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y los Andes tropicales, según las listas de la UICN. De estas especies, 285 fueron plantas y 28 fueron vertebrados terrestres. La superposición de las distribuciones de las especies amenazadas cubrió prácticamente toda la región. Ecuador mostró cerca del 30% de su área con 50 especies. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panamá mostraron > 50, aunque en 50% de su área. El Salvador y Honduras, de 11 a 20 en > 50% de su área y México de 1 a 5 especies en > 50% de su área. La distribución de estas especies en áreas transformadas (agricultura y áreas urbanas varió del 11al 30%; El Salvador, Panamá y Guatemala mostraron > 50% de la distribución; Colombia, Honduras y México This study modeled ecological niches projected as potential distributions for 313 endangered species listed in the IUCN for Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes, of which 285 were plants, and 28 terrestrial vertebrates. Overlapping of endangered species distributions covered most of the region. Ecuador showed close to 30% of its area with 50 endangered species. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panama showed more than 50 endangered species in 50% of its area with endangered species (21 to 50 species were Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Panama. El Salvador and Honduras showed > 50% of its area with 11 to 20 endangered species; Mexico showed 50% of endangered species in transformed areas; Colombia, Honduras and Mexico showed < 40%, and Belize and Ecuador showed < 25% of endangered species in transformed areas, respectively. El Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Nicaragua and Mexico showed a high proportion of endangered species in transformed areas for the Classes Amphibia, Liliopsida, Polipodiopsida, and the Orders Asterales, Fabales, Laurales, Myrtales, Scrophulariales and Rubiales. Less than 35% of endangered

  13. Quantifying the change in equilibrium-line altitude during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Subtropical Andes using a mass-balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, L.; Galewsky, J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying changes in equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) can be used to better understand past regional climates. We use a glacial mass-balance model in conjunction with global climate model (GCM) output data to calculate the change in ELA between modern and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 ka) climates in the presently hyper-arid subtropical Andes. The region is currently unglaciated, despite cold enough temperatures, as there is too little moisture to sustain glaciers. Previous studies suggest this area was glaciated during the LGM, however, little is known about the extent of the glaciation or the climate required to sustain it. The mass-balance model used in this study calculates the change in ELA using the positive degree-day (PDD) sum, the sum of daily mean air temperatures that are above zero. The PDD sum is used to calculate ablation, which is then assumed to be proportional to temperature, in order to calculate the change in ELA. Using output from several GCM simulations, we compare the change in ELA between LGM and modern climates across the different models for the subtropical Andes. These simulations suggest that the changes in climate resulted in a lowering of ELAs to the extent that parts of the subtropical Andes were glaciated during the LGM.

  14. Parasite loads and altitudinal distribution of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes Cargas parasitarias y distribución de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN H. CAROTHERS

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the distributions of ten species of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes to the distributions of four types of parasites: malaria-causing Plasmodium, gut nematodes, ticks, and mites. We wanted to see if parasite numbers might be a factor in determining distributional limits of the lizards. We found that there was no evidence of malarial infestation of the lizards, that ticks were almost absent, that more often than not mite numbers decreased at the distributional limits of the lizards, and that gut nematodes confined to the herbivorous lizards in our sample may well be beneficial rather than detrimental. Rather than parasitism, other biotic interactions (e.g., predation or competition are more likely candidates as factors influencing lizard elevational distributions, as are abiotic characteristics such as microhabitat availabilities and thermal factorsEste estudio compara las distribuciones de diez especies de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central, con las distribuciones de cuatro tipos de parásitos: Plasmodium causantes de malaria, nemátodos intestinales, garrapatas y ácaros. Quisimos verificar si los números de parásitos pudieran ser un factor determinante de los límites de distribución de las lagartijas. Encontramos que no había evidencia de infestación por malaria en las lagartijas; que las garrapatas estaban casi ausentes; que los números de ácaros más a menudo decrecían que aumentaban en los límites distribucionales de las lagartijas; y que los nemátodos intestinales confinados a las lagartijas herbívoras en nuestra muestra bien podían ser beneficiosos antes que dañinos. Más bien que parasitismo, otras interacciones bióticas (e.g., depredación o competencia son candidatos más probables como factores que influyen las distribuciones altitudinales de las lagartijas, además de características abióticas tales como la disponibilidad de microhábitats y los factores térmicos

  15. Breeding system of Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae in two populations on different slopes of the Andes Sistema reproductivo de Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae en dos poblaciones ubicadas en diferentes laderas de los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA E ROVERE

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant breeding systems are considered to reflect species' life history characteristics, selection due to biotic or abiotic factors, pollination conditions, or a combination of these. Reproductive systems may vary over ecological gradients. The breeding system of the ornithophilous Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae from temperate South America was studied by pollination treatments: manual self-pollination, manual cross-pollination, automatic self-pollination, and natural pollination. These treatments were conducted in a coastal western and an Andean eastern population. Embothrium coccineum was found to be self-incompatible and highly dependent on the pollinating agent at both sites. However, pollen limitations were greater in the coastal population, as breeding efficiency was lower. Populations have different floral visitors whose identity differentially affects reproductive efficiency and pollen flow in E. coccineumLos sistemas de compatibilidad reproductiva en las plantas son considerados una manifestación de la historia de vida, de la selección ante factores abióticos ó bióticos, de las condiciones de polinización o una de combinación de esos factores. El sistema reproductivo de una especie puede variar a lo largo de un gradiente ecológico-ambiental. El sistema reproductivo de Embothrium coccineum (Proteaceae, un árbol ornitófilo endémico de los bosques templados de sur de Sudamérica, fue estudiado mediante experimentos de polinización: autopolinización manual, polinización manual cruzada, autopolinización automática y polinización natural en flores descubiertas. Este trabajo se realizó en una población costera al oeste de la cordillera de los Andes y una población andina ubicada al este de la cordillera de los Andes. En ambas poblaciones se encontró que E. coccineum es autoimcompatible y altamente dependiente de los agentes polinizadores en ambos sitios. Sin embargo, la limitación por polen fue mayor en la poblaci

  16. A glassy lava flow from Toconce volcano and its relation with the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body in Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, B.; Rodriguez, I.; Aguilera, F.

    2012-12-01

    Toconce is a composite stratovolcano located at the San Pedro - Linzor volcanic chain (SPLVC). This volcanic chain distributes within the Altiplano-Puna region (Central Andes) which is characterized by extensive rhyodacitic-to-rhyolitic ignimbritic fields, and voluminous domes of dacitic-to-rhyolitic composition (de Silva, 1989). The felsic melts that gave origin to ignimbrites and domes at this area were generated by mixing of mantle-derived magmas and anatectic melts assimilated during their ascent through the thick crust. Thus, partially molten layers exist in the upper crust below the APVC (de Silva et al., 2006). Evidence of large volumes of such melts has been also proposed by geophysical methods (i.e. the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body; Chmielowsky et al., 1999) In this work, petrography and whole rock, mineralogical and melt inclusions geochemistry of a glassy lava flow of Toconce volcano are presented. Petrographically, this lava flow shows a porphyric texture, with euhdral to subhedral plagioclase, ortho- and clino-pyroxene phenocrysts immersed in a glassy groundmass. Geochemically, the lava flow has 64.7% wt. SiO2. The glassy groundmass (~70% wt. SiO2) is more felsic than all the lavas in the volcanic chain (47-68% wt., Godoy et al., 2011). Analyzed orthopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions show an even higher SiO2 content (72-75% wt.), and a decreasing on Al2O3, Na2O, and CaO content with differentiation. Crystallization pressures of this lava flow, obtained using Putirka's two-pyroxene and clinopyroxene-liquid models (Putirka, 2008), range between 6 and 9 kbar. According to crystallization pressures, and major element composition, a felsic source located at shallow crustal pressures - where plagioclase is a stable mineralogical phase - originated the inclusions. This could be related to the presence of the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (APMB) located below SPLVC. On the other hand, glassy groundmass, and disequilibrium textures in minerals of this lava flow could

  17. River runoff and regional climate of a small glaciated catchment area in the Andes in southernmost Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C.; Moritz, M.; Kilian, R.

    2003-04-01

    The river runoff from a small partly glaciated catchment area in southernmost Patagonian Andes in Chile is measured to analyse the influence of regional precipitation and climate dependent glacier ablation on runoff. The first data from March to September 2002 were compared to climate data recorded at an automatic weather station in the area. The poster presents the first detailed hydrometeorological investigation from this part of the Andes. The investigation area is located at 53°S in southernmost South America exactly east of the main divide of the mountain range of the Andes at 72.5°W. The catchment area of about 15 km2 comprises parts of the Gran Campo Nevado Ice Cap reaching up to 1500 m asl, and the outlet glacier Glaciar Lengua which ends at a proglacial lake at 100 m asl. The Gran Campo Nevado Ice Cap is the major ice mass between the Southern Patagonian Ice field in the north and the Strait of Magallan to the South. Climate in the area is characterised by whole-year round cool and super-humid conditions with a mean annual air temperature of 5,6°C at sea level and an annual precipitation sum of approximately 7,000 mm. The Río Lengua itself meets approximately 3.5 km downstreams from the proglacial lake into the fjord system of Canal Garjado which is a branch of Seno Skyring. A continuous hourly record of water levels in the river was obtained from two digital water depth sensors. Runoff was calibrated against river level by measuring runoff at different times with the tracer method of salt dilution and with velocity measurements employing a hydrometric vane. Mean runoff was computed to about 3 m3/s with peak flows exceeding 10 m3/s. Ablation on the glacier was estimated using the degree-day method with a degree-day factor that has been calibrated previously using data from a temporal energy balance weather station on Glacíar Lengua. The correlation between runoff and air temperature and precipitation returned significant correlation coefficients of rt

  18. Holocene compression in the Acequión valley (Andes Precordillera, San Juan province, Argentina): Geomorphic, tectonic, and paleoseismic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard, M.; Franck, A.; Perucca, L.; Laura, P.; Pantano, Ana; Avila, Carlos R.; Onorato, M. Romina; Vargas, Horacio N.; Alvarado, Patricia; Viete, Hewart

    2016-04-01

    The Matagusanos-Maradona-Acequión Valley sits within the Andes Precordillera fold-thrust belt of western Argentina. It is an elongated topographic depression bounded by the roughly N-S trending Precordillera Central and Oriental in the San Juan Province. Moreover, it is not a piggy-back basin as we could have expected between two ranges belonging to a fold-thrust belt, but a very active tectonic corridor coinciding with a thick-skinned triangular zone, squeezed between two different tectonic domains. The two domains converge, where the Precordillera Oriental has been incorporated to the Sierras Pampeanas province, becoming the western leading edge of the west-verging broken foreland Sierras Pampeanas domain. This latter province has been in turn incorporated into the active deformation framework of the Andes back-arc at these latitudes as a result of enhanced coupling between the converging plates due to the subduction of the Juan Fernández ridge that flattens the Nazca slab under the South American continent. This study focuses on the neotectonics of the southern tip of this N-S elongated depression, known as Acequión (from the homonym river that crosses the area), between the Del Agua and Los Pozos rivers. This depression dies out against the transversely oriented Precordillera Sur, which exhibits a similar tectonic style as Precordillera Occidental and Central (east-verging fold-thrust belt). This contribution brings supporting evidence of the ongoing deformation during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene of the triangular zone bounded between the two leading and converging edges of Precordillera Central and Oriental thrust fronts, recorded in a multi-episodic lake sequence of the Acequión and Nikes rivers. The herein gathered evidence comprise Late Pleistocene-Holocene landforms of active thrusting, fault kinematics (micro-tectonic) data and outcrop-scale (meso-tectonic) faulting and folding of recent lake and alluvial sequences. In addition, seismically

  19. Controls on the isotopic composition of surface water and precipitation in the Northern Andes, Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Joel E.; Mora, Andrés; Horton, Brian K.; Nie, Junsheng

    2009-12-01

    Empirical datasets provide the constraints on the variability and causes of variability in stable isotope compositions (δD or δ 18O) of surface water and precipitation that are essential not only for models of modern and past climate but also for investigations of paleoelevation. This study presents stable isotope data for 76 samples from four elevation transects and three IAEA GNIP stations in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and the northern Andean foreland. These data are largely consistent with theories of stable isotope variability developed based on a global dataset. On a monthly basis, the precipitation-amount effect exerts the dominant control on δD p and δ 18O p values at the IAEA GNIP stations. At the Bogotá station (2547 m), the δD p and δ 18O p values vary seasonally, with isotopic minima correlating with maxima in precipitation-amount. Although surface water samples from Eastern Cordilleran streams and rivers fall on the Global Meteoric Water Line, samples from three of four lakes (2842-3459 m) have evaporatively elevated δD sw and δ 18O sw values. The IAEA GNIP station data averaged over multiple years, combined with stream and river water data, define vertical lapse rates of -1.8‰ km -1 for Δδ 18O and -14.6‰ km -1 for ΔδD, and are a close fit to a common thermodynamically based Rayleigh distillation model. Elevation uncertainties for these relationships are also evaluated. Comparison of this Colombian dataset with the elevation uncertainties generated by the thermodynamically based model shows that the model underestimates uncertainty at high Δδ 18O and ΔδD values while overestimating it for low Δδ 18O and ΔδD values. This study presents an independent, empirical assessment of stable isotope-based elevation uncertainties for the northern Andes based on a dataset of sufficient size to ensure statistical integrity. These vertical lapse rates and associated uncertainties form the basis for stable isotope paleoelevation studies

  20. Long-term erosion and exhumation of the “Altiplano Antioqueño”, Northern Andes (Colombia) from apatite (U Th)/He thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Moreno, Sergio A.; Foster, David A.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Parra-Sánchez, Luis N.

    2009-02-01

    The Antioqueño Plateau (AP) in the northern Cordillera Central, Colombia, is the largest high elevation erosional surface in the Northern Andes. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry (AHe) of samples collected from two elevation profiles spanning ˜ 2 km of exhumed crustal sections reveal the long-term erosional exhumation of the AP. Sample profiles exhibit AHe ages that increase with elevation from ca. 22 Ma (˜ 760 m) at the bottom of regional scarps to ca. 49 Ma (˜ 2350 m) on top of the AP. A marked inflection point in age versus elevation data at ca. 25 Ma defines the bottom of the exhumed post-Oligocene He partial retention zone (He-PRZ). Elevation-invariant ages below ca. 25 Ma record the onset of rapid exhumation and surface uplift of the AP that led to river incision. A subtle change in slope within the He-PRZ, ca. 41 Ma, is interpreted as a less intense, exhumation-related cooling episode. These two exhumation pulses coincide with the Proto-Andina and Pre-Andina orogenic phases previously proposed for the Colombian Andes, and are synchronous with tectonically driven exhumation events reported for the Peruvian, Bolivian and Argentinean Andes, and for some orogenic systems in the Caribbean. The pulses are correlated with variations in the rates of convergence between Nazca (Farallon) and South America documented for the Middle Eocene and the Late Oligocene suggesting continental-scale controls on uplift and denudation throughout the Andean range. AHe data provide an average erosion rate of ˜ 0.04 mm/yr for the last 25 million years. Erosion rates during the exhumation pulses were in the order of ˜ 0.2-0.4 mm/yr. Similarity between AHe profiles indicates the whole AP was uplifted and exhumed as a coherent structural block, corroborating previous structural evidence for the rigidity and coherence of this crustal block in the Northern Andes. Our results are in agreement with tectonostratigraphic data in the Magdalena and Cauca basins and with proposed

  1. Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes Migraciones en la puna: su relación con el uso de los recursos naturales del departamento Los Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Barbarán

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From an historic and demographic perspective, as well as the use of natural resources, we analyzed the relationship between human migrations and the economic activities of Los Andes Department, West of the Salta Province, in NW Argentina. Using the residual method, we calculated migratory balances between Argentinean population censuses carried out in 1947,1960, 1970, 1980 and 2001. The migratory balances were negative for all the periods studied. When the train started to run through Ramal C-14, the workers who built it have to find jobs somewhere else. At the same time, the railway made easier for the natives, to find better economicopportunities out of the Puna. The close of mine La Casualidad by the end of the 70’s, the low creation of jobs by the remaining mining operations, focused in to hire qualified technicians no available in Los Andes and the privatization of the railway in early 90’s, were important factors of emigration. Despite of cattle rising as the main economic activity in rural areas, it is practiced without any technology of management. The overgrazing caused for that reason, has reduced almost to the half the quantity of sheep by inhabitant between 1947 and 2001. That is why the local people have to press more on the wildlife, trading illegally with vicuña (Vicugna vicugna fiber. Despite of a touristic development plan, a law promoting sheep rising and a census of vicuña population carried out by the provincial government, these recent actions should be part of a development project of regional scale, oriented to the sustainable use of the natural resources of Los Andes Department. That project would create jobs and discourage emigration.Desde una perspectiva histórica, demográfica y del uso de los recursos naturales, analizamos la relación existente entre las migraciones humanas y las actividades económicas en el departamento Los Andes, ubicado al W de la provincia de Salta, en el Noroeste Argentino. Usando el m

  2. Resilience and adaptations of rural communities and agricultural land use in the tropical Andes: Coping with environmental and socio-economic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadel, Ch.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a long settlement history of the tropical Andes, rural farming communities have always been exposed to conditions of ecological and economic vulnerability, risks, and even disasters. This has resulted, at certain times and in some regions, to a destabilization of livelihoods and to a manifestation of various forms of marginalization, to poverty or outmigration. However, Andean communities , over a long time, have given admirable testimonies of resilience and adaptations in the face of adverse conditions or new challenges. This paper examines the potentials and different facets of resilience and adaptation strategies of the rural campesinado in the tropical Andes. It emphasizes the proven traditional concepts of verticality, complementarity, reciprocity, and mutual community support, which to date support the feasibility and sustainability of Andean farming and community survival. In spite of this recognition, it is argued that Andean rural livelihoods always had to adapt to new developments, to threats and challenges, as well as to opportunities and alternative potentials. In the face of an almost ubiquitous penetration of modernization, new technologies, and economic and cultural globalization, the fundamental question arises, whether this can be considered as a path to progress and development, or as a threat to the survival of small-scale farming and rural community living. The paper concludes by formulating, albeit in a tentative form, some general suggestions for ‘development’ approaches and for research priorities in the rural Andes.

    A pesar de una tradición muy extensa del asentamiento humano en los Andes tropicales, las comunidades campesinas siempre enfrentaron condiciones de vulnerabilidad ecológica y económica, con varios riesgos, y aun desastres. Eso ha resultado, en diversos tiempos y en algunas regiones, en una estabilización de la superviviencia humana y en varias manifestaciones de marginalización, de

  3. Comparison of Three Supervised Learning Methods for Digital Soil Mapping: Application to a Complex Terrain in the Ecuadorian Andes

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    Martin Hitziger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A digital soil mapping approach is applied to a complex, mountainous terrain in the Ecuadorian Andes. Relief features are derived from a digital elevation model and used as predictors for topsoil texture classes sand, silt, and clay. The performance of three statistical learning methods is compared: linear regression, random forest, and stochastic gradient boosting of regression trees. In linear regression, a stepwise backward variable selection procedure is applied and overfitting is controlled by minimizing Mallow’s Cp. For random forest and boosting, the effect of predictor selection and tuning procedures is assessed. 100-fold repetitions of a 5-fold cross-validation of the selected modelling procedures are employed for validation, uncertainty assessment, and method comparison. Absolute assessment of model performance is achieved by comparing the prediction error of the selected method and the mean. Boosting performs best, providing predictions that are reliably better than the mean. The median reduction of the root mean square error is around 5%. Elevation is the most important predictor. All models clearly distinguish ridges and slopes. The predicted texture patterns are interpreted as result of catena sequences (eluviation of fine particles on slope shoulders and landslides (mixing up mineral soil horizons on slopes.

  4. Effects of loading–unloading and wetting–drying cycles on geomechanical behaviors of mudrocks in the Colombian Andes

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    Mario Camilo Torres-Suarez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The mudrocks in the Colombian Andes, particularly those exhibiting low cementation (bonding, are susceptible to degradation when the environmental conditions change, which are challenging issues for engineering works. In this paper, the changes in physico-mechanical properties of mudrocks were monitored in laboratory, and some influential factors on the mechanical competence of geomaterials were studied. The geotechnical characteristics and experimental designs were developed from physical, chemical, mechanical and compositional points of view. In the tests, the techniques such as vapor equilibrium technique (VET were employed to apply wetting–drying cycles and to control relative humidity (suction-controlled and loading–unloading cycles through ultrasonic wave velocities technique. The results show that the main failure mechanisms for the laminated mudrocks start on the microscopic scale by fissures coalescence, exhibiting physico-chemical degradation as well; the global geomechanical behavior presents a state between a ductile, like rock, and a fragile, like soil. The obtained results can provide engineering values according to monitoring laboratory set, when compared with in situ conditions.

  5. Selection of astrophysical/astronomical/solar sites at the Argentina East Andes range taking into account atmospheric components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, R. D.; García, B.; Micheletti, M. I.; Salum, G.; Freire, M.; Maya, J.; Mancilla, A.; Crinó, E.; Mandat, D.; Pech, M.; Bulik, T.

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we analyze sites in the Argentinian high Andes mountains as possible places for astrophysical/astronomical/solar observatories. They are located at: San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) and El Leoncito/CASLEO region: sites 1 and 2. We consider the following atmospheric components that affect, in different and specific wavelength ranges, the detection of photons of astronomical/astrophysical/solar origin: ozone, microscopic particles, precipitable water and clouds. We also determined the atmospheric radiative transmittance in a day near the summer solstice at noon, in order to confirm the clearness of the sky in the proposed sites at SAC and El Leoncito. Consequently, all the collected and analyzed data in the present work, indicate that the proposed sites are very promising to host astrophysical/astronomical/solar observatories. Some atmospheric components, like aerosols, play a significant role in the attenuation of light (Cherencov and/or fluorescence) detected in cosmic rays (particles or gamma photons) astrophysical observatories, while others, like ozone have to be considered in astronomical/solar light detection.

  6. Estimating glacier and snowmelt contributions to stream flow in a Central Andes catchment in Chile using natural tracers

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    M. Rodriguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for hydrograph separation in high elevation watersheds, which aims at identifying individual flow sources such as snow- and ice melt, rainfall and soil water. Daily summer and bi-daily spring water samples from the outlet of the Juncal River were analyzed for all major ions as well as stable water isotopes, δ18O and δ2H. Additionally, various water sources such as rain, springs, snow- and glacial melt were sampled throughout the catchment. A principal component analysis (PCA was performed in order to reduce the dimensionality of the problem. Potential sources were identified in a two-component U space that explains 77% of variability. Hydrograph separation (HS was performed through three models: (i Isotopic model, (ii Mixing–PCA model, and (iii Informative–Bayesian model, with very similar results in each case. At the Juncal River outlet, summer flows were composed by at least 50% of water originating in highly glaciarized headwaters in 2011–2012 (a dry period in the Central Andes. Autumn and winter flows were highly influenced by soil water and affect total annual discharge. Before the high flow season, snow melt accounted for approximately 25% of streamflow, However during summer, when streamflow was highest, snowmelt contribution was minimal, while glacier melt and soil water were the most important sources.

  7. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

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    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  8. Contrasting climate change impact on river flows from high-altitude catchments in the Himalayan and Andes Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Silvan; Immerzeel, Walter W; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2016-08-16

    Mountain ranges are the world's natural water towers and provide water resources for millions of people. However, their hydrological balance and possible future changes in river flow remain poorly understood because of high meteorological variability, physical inaccessibility, and the complex interplay between climate, cryosphere, and hydrological processes. Here, we use a state-of-the art glacio-hydrological model informed by data from high-altitude observations and the latest climate change scenarios to quantify the climate change impact on water resources of two contrasting catchments vulnerable to changes in the cryosphere. The two study catchments are located in the Central Andes of Chile and in the Nepalese Himalaya in close vicinity of densely populated areas. Although both sites reveal a strong decrease in glacier area, they show a remarkably different hydrological response to projected climate change. In the Juncal catchment in Chile, runoff is likely to sharply decrease in the future and the runoff seasonality is sensitive to projected climatic changes. In the Langtang catchment in Nepal, future water availability is on the rise for decades to come with limited shifts between seasons. Owing to the high spatiotemporal resolution of the simulations and process complexity included in the modeling, the response times and the mechanisms underlying the variations in glacier area and river flow can be well constrained. The projections indicate that climate change adaptation in Central Chile should focus on dealing with a reduction in water availability, whereas in Nepal preparedness for flood extremes should be the policy priority. PMID:27482082

  9. A gravity waves study close to the Andes mountains in Patagonia and Antarctica with GPS radio occultation observations

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    Alexander, P.; Luna, D.; Llamedo, P.; Torre, A. de la [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    We first study the seasonal and geographical behavior of gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere over the southernmost Andes mountains and their prolongation in the Antarctic Peninsula by global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) temperature profiles, obtained between years 2002 and 2005 by the CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) mission. The observed features complement observations in the same zone by other satellite passive remote sensing instruments, which are able to detect different height regions and other spectral intervals of the wave spectrum. Comparisons with previous GPS RO studies in smaller areas than the one covered in our analysis are also established. Significant seasonal variation of wave activity is observed in our work, in agreement with results from other instruments. The locations of significant cases indicate that topography is an important source. Some strong wave activity is also found over open ocean. Critical level filtering is shown to have an attenuation effect, implying that a large fraction of the observed activity can be considered to be an outcome of mountain waves. The studied region has a significant advantage as compared to other regions of our planet: it generates wavefronts nearly aligned with the North-South direction (almost parallel to the mountains), whereby this geometry favors the wave detection by the nearly meridional line of sight characterizing most of the GPS RO observations used. A distribution of the observed gravity waves in terms of amplitudes and wavelengths is also presented. (orig.)

  10. A gravity waves study close to the Andes mountains in Patagonia and Antarctica with GPS radio occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P.; Luna, D.; Llamedo, P.; de La Torre, A.

    2010-02-01

    We first study the seasonal and geographical behavior of gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere over the southernmost Andes mountains and their prolongation in the Antarctic Peninsula by global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) temperature profiles, obtained between years 2002 and 2005 by the CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) mission. The observed features complement observations in the same zone by other satellite passive remote sensing instruments, which are able to detect different height regions and other spectral intervals of the wave spectrum. Comparisons with previous GPS RO studies in smaller areas than the one covered in our analysis are also established. Significant seasonal variation of wave activity is observed in our work, in agreement with results from other instruments. The locations of significant cases indicate that topography is an important source. Some strong wave activity is also found over open ocean. Critical level filtering is shown to have an attenuation effect, implying that a large fraction of the observed activity can be considered to be an outcome of mountain waves. The studied region has a significant advantage as compared to other regions of our planet: it generates wavefronts nearly aligned with the North-South direction (almost parallel to the mountains), whereby this geometry favors the wave detection by the nearly meridional line of sight characterizing most of the GPS RO observations used. A distribution of the observed gravity waves in terms of amplitudes and wavelengths is also presented.

  11. The kinetic to potential energy ratio and spectral separability from high-resolution balloon soundings near the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Giraldez, A.

    The ratio R between the spectral kinetic and potential energies as a function of vertical wavenumber has been calculated from high-resolution data obtained with open stratospheric balloons near the Andes Mountains. Two segments of altitude in the troposphere and stratosphere respectively were analyzed. The ratio values are larger in both the troposphere and stratosphere than those predicted from the separability of wavenumber and frequency spectra. A comparison was made with previous statistical results from soundings over flat terrain extending up to log m (cy/m) = -2.0. Our calculations prolong this interval to -2.0 ≤ log m ≤ -0.7. In the stratosphere, a remarkable similarity between that earlier work and ours is observed. This also happens in the troposphere, but only up to log m = -1.4. As suggested by the other authors, the enhanced R values might be explained by the propagation of inertial gravity waves generated in the mountain relief (this is supported by rotational spectra calculated here). Previous evidence in favor of spectral separability obtained by other authors has been extended here for larger wavenumbers by the observed constancy of the ratio between the temperature and vertical velocity spectra. In both the troposphere and the stratosphere, this ratio appears to be fairly uniform and similar to previous results obtained by other authors at lower resolution.

  12. A Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF, coordinates and velocities for South American stations: contributions to Central Andes geodynamics

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    M. V. Mackern

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite positioning systems allow the fixing of the location of a point on the Earth's surface with very good precision and accuracy. To do this, however, it is necessary to determine the point coordinates taking account the reference system and the movements that affect them because of tectonic plate movements. These reference systems are materialized by a significant number of continuous measurement stations in South America. In SIRGAS (Sistema de Referencia Geocéntrico para las Américas, there are four Analysis Centers that process the data collected from satellites of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS, with the primary purpose to maintain the international terrestrial reference frame through calculation of the coordinates and velocities of the continuous GNSS stations of the SIRGAS-CON Network.

    In this work, we demonstrate the quality of the solutions from CIMA, one of the SIRGAS official processing centers operating in Mendoza, Argentina, in comparison with other South American processing centers. The importance of precise calculations of coordinates and velocities in a global frame is also shown. Finally, we give estimations of velocities from stations located within deformation zones in the Central Andes.

  13. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in Deforested and Pristine Upland (2400m) Forest Catchments in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Haberer, J.; McClain, M.; Ramos, O.; Gardner, W.; McCarthy, M.; Brandes, J.

    2001-12-01

    Nitrogen and carbon cycling were examined within two upland (2400m) forest catchments in the Peruvian Andes. One catchment was partially deforested within the last 3 years, while the other has remained untouched. Tracer amended samples were analyzed to determine the pathways and rates of nitrogen cycling in streams draining each catchment. Both streams exhibited very low inorganic nitrogen levels, on the order of 1 to 2 uM. A large percentage (>1/3) of the total fixed nitrogen flux from these systems was in the form of particulates. Preliminary results suggest a very high rate of nitrogen cycling in these systems. Isotopic measurements of plant samples from both catchments also suggest that these forests are highly efficient in trapping and using atmospheric nitrogen sources. The partially deforested catchment had significantly more species using C4 and CAM carbon fixation pathways. Leaf litter from both streams and leaves from trees in the area were also analyzed for carbon and nitrogen isotopes to compare and contrast nitrogen and carbon cycling between the two sites. This and other data to be presented suggest that deforestation has subtle but significant effects upon the ability of tropical upland forests to retain and use nutrients.

  14. Late Quaternary vegetation, fire and climate history reconstructed from two cores at Cerro Toledo, Podocarpus National Park, southeastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunschön, Corinna; Behling, Hermann

    2009-11-01

    The last ca. 20,000 yr of palaeoenvironmental conditions in Podocarpus National Park in the southeastern Ecuadorian Andes have been reconstructed from two pollen records from Cerro Toledo (04°22'28.6"S, 79°06'41.5"W) at 3150 m and 3110 m elevation. Páramo vegetation with high proportions of Plantago rigida characterised the last glacial maximum (LGM), reflecting cold and wet conditions. The upper forest line was at markedly lower elevations than present. After ca. 16,200 cal yr BP, páramo vegetation decreased slightly while mountain rainforest developed, suggesting rising temperatures. The trend of increasing temperatures and mountain rainforest expansion continued until ca. 8500 cal yr BP, while highest temperatures probably occurred from 9300 to 8500 cal yr BP. From ca. 8500 cal yr BP, páramo vegetation re-expanded with dominance of Poaceae, suggesting a change to cooler conditions. During the late Holocene after ca. 1800 cal yr BP, a decrease in páramo indicates a change to warmer conditions. Anthropogenic impact near the study site is indicated for times after 2300 cal yr BP. The regional environmental history indicates that through time the eastern Andean Cordillera in South Ecuador was influenced by eastern Amazonian climates rather than western Pacific climates.

  15. Trends and ENSO/AAO Driven Variability in NDVI Derived Productivity and Phenology alongside the Andes Mountains

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    Francisco J. Meza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing water use and droughts, along with climate variability and land use change, have seriously altered vegetation growth patterns and ecosystem response in several regions alongside the Andes Mountains. Thirty years of the new generation biweekly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI3g time series data show significant land cover specific trends and variability in annual productivity and land surface phenological response. Productivity is represented by the growing season mean NDVI values (July to June. Arid and semi-arid and sub humid vegetation types (Atacama desert, Chaco and Patagonia across Argentina, northern Chile, northwest Uruguay and southeast Bolivia show negative trends in productivity, while some temperate forest and agricultural areas in Chile and sub humid and humid areas in Brazil, Bolivia and Peru show positive trends in productivity. The start (SOS and length (LOS of the growing season results show large variability and regional hot spots where later SOS often coincides with reduced productivity. A longer growing season is generally found for some locations in the south of Chile (sub-antarctic forest and Argentina (Patagonia steppe, while central Argentina (Pampa-mixed grasslands and agriculture has a shorter LOS. Some of the areas have significant shifts in SOS and LOS of one to several months. The seasonal Multivariate ENSO Indicator (MEI and the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO index have a significant impact on vegetation productivity and phenology in southeastern and northeastern Argentina (Patagonia and Pampa, central and southern Chile (mixed shrubland, temperate and sub-antarctic forest, and Paraguay (Chaco.

  16. A Stepwise, Participatory Approach to Design and Implement Community Based Adaptation to Drought in the Peruvian Andes

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    Ralph Lasage

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The livelihoods of people in the Andes are expected to be affected by climate change due to their dependence on glacier water. The observed decrease in glacier volume over the last few decades is likely to accelerate during the current century, which will affect water availability in the region. This paper presents an approach for participatory development of community-based adaptation measures to cope with the projected impacts of climate change. It combines in an innovative manner participatory design with physical measurements, modeling and a vulnerability analysis. Vulnerability to drought is made operational for households in a catchment of the Ocoña River basin in Peru. On the basis of a household survey (n = 94 we explore how a vulnerability index (risk divided by response efficacy can be used to assess the distribution of vulnerability over households, and how socio-economic factors determine this vulnerability. Water entitlement, area of irrigated land, income and education are all significantly correlated with vulnerability to drought. The research showed that the main source of spring water is local rainwater, and that water use efficiency is low. The selected adaptation measures aimed to increase water availability close to farmland, and increase water use efficiency of farmers and households.

  17. Snow water equivalent spatiotemporal variability estimation in the Andes Cordillera through distributed energy balance modeling and intensive-study catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, J. P.; Cornwell, E.; Molotch, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal snow cover is the primary water resource precursor for human use and environmental sustain along the extratropical Andes Cordillera. This research provides high-resolution distributed estimates of end-of-winter and spring snow water equivalent over a 152,000-km2 domain, based on remotely sensed snow cover and a simplified snowpack energy balance model. Important data for model validation was obtained through a sustained effort aimed at monitoring snow conditions throughout the domain from newly installed sensors and snow surveys. Peak SWE estimates show an overall coefficient of determination R2 of 0.61 compared to observations at 12 automatic snow water equivalent sensors distributed across the model domain between latitudes 30º S and 37º S, with R2 values between 0.32 and 0.88. Estimated patterns of snow accumulation reflect appropriately the dominant effect of elevation, and suggest that the current government operational snow observation network may be inadequate under future climate change scenarios. Several insights can be obtained by analyzing the shortcomings of the modeling results when compared with high-resolution time series of energy and mass balance, as well as with distributed SWE observations obtained at experimental catchments. The results presented here have the potential of informing applications such as seasonal forecast model assessment and improvement, regional climate model validation, as well as evaluation of observational networks and water resource infrastructure development.

  18. Soluble iron inputs to the Southern Ocean through recent andesitic to rhyolitic volcanic ash eruptions from the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonella, L. E.; Palomeque, M. E.; Croot, P. L.; Stein, A.; Kupczewski, M.; Rosales, A.; Montes, M. L.; Colombo, F.; García, M. G.; Villarosa, G.; Gaiero, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    Patagonia, due to its geographic position and the dominance of westerly winds, is a key area that contributes to the supply of nutrients to the Southern Ocean, both through mineral dust and through the periodic deposits of volcanic ash. Here we evaluate the characteristics of Fe dissolved (into soluble and colloidal species) from volcanic ash for three recent southern Andes volcanic eruptions having contrasting features and chemical compositions. Contact between cloud waters (wet deposition) and end-members of andesitic (Hudson volcano) and rhyolitic (Chaitén volcano) materials was simulated. Results indicate higher Fe release and faster liberation rates in the andesitic material. Fe release during particle-seawater interaction (dry deposition) has higher rates in rhyolitic-type ashes. Rhyolitic ashes under acidic conditions release Fe in higher amounts and at a slower rate, while in those samples containing mostly glass shards, Fe release was lower and faster. The 2011 Puyehue eruption was observed by a dust monitoring station. Puyehue-type eruptions can contribute soluble Fe to the ocean via dry or wet deposition, nearly reaching the limit required for phytoplankton growth. In contrast, the input of Fe after processing by an acidic eruption plume could raise the amount of dissolved Fe in surface ocean waters several times, above the threshold required to initiate phytoplankton blooms. A single eruption like the Puyehue one represents more than half of the yearly Fe flux contributed by dust.

  19. How do two Lupinus species respond to temperature along an altitudinal gradient in the Venezuelan Andes? ¿Cómo responden dos especies de Lupinus a la temperatura en un gradiente altitudinal en los Andes venezolanos?

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    FERMÍN RADA

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature determines plant formations and species distribution along altitudinal gradients. Plants in the tropical high Andes, through different physiological and morphological characteristics, respond to freezing night temperatures and high daytime energy inputs which occur anytime of the year. The main objective of this study was to characterize day and night temperature related responses of two Lupinus species with different altitudinal ranges (L. meridanus, 1,800-3,600 and L. eromonomos, 3,700-4,300 m of altitude. Are there differences in night low temperature resistance mechanisms between the species along the gradient? How do these species respond, in terms of optimum temperature for photosynthesis, to increasing altitude? Lupinus meridanus shows frost avoidance, in contrast to L. eromonomos, which tolerates freezing at higher altitudes. Optimum temperature for photosynthesis decreases along the gradient for both species. Maximum C0(2 assimilation rates were higher in L. meridanus, while L. eromonomos showed decreasing C0(2 assimilation rates at the higher altitude. In most cases, measured daily leaf temperature is always within the 80 % of optimum for photosynthesis. L. meridanus7 upper distribution limit seems to be restricted by cold resistance mechanisms, while L. eromonomos7 to a combination of both cold resistance and to C0(2 assimilation responses at higher altitudes.La temperatura determina las formaciones vegetales y la distribución de especies a lo largo de gradientes altitudinales. Las plantas en los altos Andes tropicales, a través de diferentes características morfológicas y fisiológicas, responden a temperaturas congelantes nocturnas y altas entradas energéticas durante el día en cualquier momento del año. El objetivo principal de este estudio fue caracterizar las respuestas relacionadas con temperaturas diurnas y nocturnas en dos especies de Lupinus con diferente distribución altitudinal (L. meridanus, 1

  20. LA CUEVA ALIHUÉN, NUEVOS REGISTROS DE PINTURAS RUPESTRES EN LA VEGA DE MAIPÚ (SAN MARTÍN DE LOS ANDES, PATAGONIA, ARGENTINA (The Alihuén Cave, New Records of Cave Paintings in the Maipú Valley (San Martín de los Andes, Patagonia, Argentina

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    Alberto Enrique Pérez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el resultado de las nuevas investigaciones de pinturas rupestres en la vega Maipú, San Martín de los Andes, Neuquén, Argentina; donde se destaca la presencia de motivos zoomorfos, especialmente camélidos, de escasa representación hasta la fecha en el registro zooarqueológico local. El sitio Cueva Alihuén amplía la diversidad de motivos y técnicas de las pinturas rupestres de la vega Maipú, lo que nos permite plantear aspectos tanto biogeográficos respecto a la fauna como sobre la circulación de información y movilidad. Ambos aspectos nos permiten, nuevamente, aunar ambas vertientes de la cordillera de los Andes, compartiendo, integrando y complementando cada vez más características con el resto de los sitios que componen la cuenca hidrográfica de Valdivia, cuyo sector inferior constituye nuestra área de estudio. ENGLISH: New results from research on the cave paintings of the Maipú Valley, San Martín de los Andes, Neuquén, Argentina, highlight the presence of zoomorphic motifs, especially camelids which have been underrepresented in the local zooarchaeological record. The Alihuén cave site expands the range of motifs and techniques known from the cave paintings of the Maipú Valley that allows us to raise issues regarding both biogeographic wildlife, and on the flow of information and human mobility. These aspects allow us to share and integrate the increasingly complementary features on both sides of the Andes with the rest of the sites that comprise the Valdivia River basin, whose lower section composed our study area.