WorldWideScience

Sample records for anderson cancer center

  1. Bilateral testicular germ cell tumors: twenty-year experience at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Mingxin; Tamboli, Pheroze; Ro, Jae Y; Park, Dong Soo; Ro, Jung Sil; Amato, Robert J; Ayala, Alberto G

    2002-09-15

    The incidence of testicular carcinoma in the United States has increased significantly over the last two decades. Germ cell tumors form the majority of malignant testicular tumors. With advances in diagnosis and therapeutic approaches, germ cell tumors are now highly sensitive to treatment, providing long-term survival. It has been speculated that the incidence of bilateral germ cell tumors may increase due to the improved survival of patients with unilateral germ cell tumors. In this report, the authors present a study of bilateral germ cell tumors of the testis in men who were treated at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center over a 20-year period with emphasis on their incidence, histologic features, and clinical features. Between 1978 and 1999, 2431 patients with testicular germ cell tumors were treated at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Among these, 24 patients with bilateral germ cell tumors were identified. Clinical records and all available pathology slides of the tumors were reviewed. The overall incidence of bilateral germ cell tumors in the patients with testicular germ cell tumors was 1% (24 of 2431 patients). The incidence was 1.8% (14 of 776 patients) in patients with seminoma and 0.6% (10 of 1655 patients) in patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. Patients with seminoma who were age presentation in patients with seminoma. Thus, patients in the second or third decade of life who presented with seminomas as their initial tumor were more likely to develop a second germ cell tumor compared with patients in the fourth or fifth decade of life. These findings have potentially important implications for clinical management by identifying a population of patients with germ cell tumors who are at risk of developing a second tumor and also for studying risk factors of bilateral germ cell tumors of the testis. Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.

  2. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John

    2003-01-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week

  3. Portuguese validation of the Symptom Inventory of the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Cristina Bernat Kolankiewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the reliability and validity of the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the instrument for symptom assessment, titled MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core. Method A cross-sectional study with 268 cancer patients in outpatient treatment, in the municipality of Ijuí, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Results The Cronbach’s alpha for the MDASI general, symptoms and interferences was respectively (0.857, (0.784 and (0.794. The factor analysis showed adequacy of the data (0.792. In total, were identified four factors of the principal components related to the symptoms. Factor I: sleep problems, distress (upset, difficulties in remembering things and sadness. Factor II: dizziness, nausea, lack of appetite and vomiting. Factor III: drowsiness, dry mouth, numbness and tingling. Factor IV: pain, fatigue and shortness of breath. A single factor was revealed in the component of interferences with life (0.780, with prevalence of activity in general (59.7%, work (54.9% and walking (49.3%. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core showed adequate psychometric properties in the studied population.

  4. MD Anderson's Population Health Approaches to Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxhall, Lewis; Moreno, Mark; Hawk, Ernest

    2018-02-01

    Texas's size and unique population demographics present challenges to addressing the state's cancer burden. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is one of 69 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers across the United States. While these centers traditionally have focused on research, education and training, and providing research-driven patient care, they are in a unique position to collaboratively advance population health through cancer control. Unlike the traditional academic model of a three-legged stool representing research, education, and patient care, MD Anderson's mission includes a fourth leg that incorporates population health approaches. MD Anderson has leveraged state- and national-level data and freely available resources to develop population-health priorities and a set of evidence-based actions across policy, public and professional education, and community-based clinical service domains to address these priorities. Population health approaches complement dissemination and implementation research and treatment, and will be increasingly needed to address the growing cancer burden in Texas and the nation.

  5. Mucosal melanoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses, a contemporary experience from the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Mauricio A; Roberts, Dianna B; Kupferman, Michael E; DeMonte, Franco; El-Naggar, Adel K; Williams, Michelle; Rosenthal, David S; Hanna, Ehab Y

    2010-05-01

    Sinonasal mucosal melanoma is a rare disease associated with a very poor prognosis. Because most of the series extend retrospectively several decades, we sought to determine prognostic factors and outcomes with recent treatment modalities. A retrospective chart review of 58 patients treated for sinonasal melanoma at a tertiary cancer center between 1993 and 2004. The patients were retrospectively staged according to the sinonasal American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Demographic, clinical and pathological parameters were identified and correlated with outcomes. There were 35 males and 23 females with a median age of 63 years; 56 patients were treated surgically and 33 received radiation therapy. According to Ballantyne's clinical staging system, 88% of the patients presented with stage I (local) disease. Classification by the AJCC staging classified yielded 27% of the patients with T1, 33% with T2, 21% with T3, and 19% with T4. T-stage and the degree of tumor pigmentation were associated with a worse survival (P = .0096 and P = .018, respectively), while pseudopapillary architecture was associated with a higher locoregional failure (P = .0144). Postoperative radiation therapy improved locoregional control when a total dose greater than 54 Gy was used (P = .0215), but did not affect overall survival. Tumor stage according to sinonasal AJCC staging system is an effective outcome predictor and should be the staging system of choice. Postoperative radiation therapy improves locoregional control when a higher dose and standard fractionations are used. Histological features such as pigmentation and pseudopapillary architecture are associated with worse outcome. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  6. Acute toxicity and treatment interruption related to electron and photon craniospinal irradiation in pediatric patients treated at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric L.; Allen, Pamela; Wu, Catherine; Ater, Joann; Kuttesch, John; Maor, Moshe H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of acute toxicity and treatment interruption associated with electron and photon craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children treated with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study involving a computerized search of the radiotherapy database at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center identified a total of 79 eligible patients ≤18 years old who had received electron (n=46) or photon (n=33) CSI from October 1980 to March 2000. Acute toxicity was graded according to the 1998 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Chemotherapy sequencing was categorized as before or after CSI or no chemotherapy. The incidences of weight loss and skin toxicity were recorded and differences in treatment interruption and hematologic values with respect to modality used (electron vs. photon), age (≤6 or >6 years), and sequencing of chemotherapy were compared using chi-square tests. Results: The median age of the electron group was lower than that of the photon group (6.7 years and 11.7 years, respectively). The two groups were otherwise well matched in terms of median spinal dose (31.1 vs. 33.3 Gy), fraction size (1.57 vs. 1.63 Gy), and total treatment time (32.4 vs. 30.7 days). Only 2 patients in each group (photon and electron) had a treatment break (>3 days). The mean number of days interrupted was 0.94 (photon) and 1.1 (electron) (p=0.72). The electron and photon groups were well balanced in terms of receiving pre-CSI chemotherapy (37% vs. 41%, p=0.776). Chemotherapy given before radiotherapy vs. after or not at all was associated with an increased incidence of Grade 3-4 leukopenia (76% vs. 49%, p=0.02), thrombocytopenia (90% vs. 10%, p=0), and neutropenia (50% vs. 15%, p=0.005). A younger age was associated with Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia (29% vs. 8.7%, p=0.034), and decreased hemoglobin (29% vs. 6.5%, p=0.014). The incidence of leukocyte depression of Grade 3-4 toxicity was 62% in the electron

  7. Post-discharge survival outcomes of patients with advanced cancer from UT MD Anderson Cancer Center Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (phase I trials) Inpatient unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Holly; Maiti, Abhishek; Hess, Kenneth; Dempsey, Jennifer; Beatty, Laura; Baldwin, Sarah; Hong, David S.; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Janku, Filip; Karp, Daniel; Reddy, Suresh; Yennu, Sriram; Epner, Daniel; Bruera, Eduardo; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Falchook, Gerald; Subbiah, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced cancer who progress on standard therapy are potential candidates for phase I clinical trials. Due to their aggressive disease and complex co-morbid conditions, these patients often need inpatient admission. This study assessed the outcomes of such patients after they were discharged to hospice care. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with solid tumor malignancies who were discharged to hospice care from the inpatient service. Results One hundred thirty-three patients were included in the study cohort. All patients had metastatic disease and an ECOG PS ≥3. The median survival after discharge to hospice from an inpatient setting was 16 days, with a survival rate of 5% at 3 months after discharge. The median survival after the last cancer treatment was 46 days, with survival of 17% at 3 months, and 5% at 6 months. Patients with LDH >618 IU/L had a median post-discharge survival of 11 days versus 20 days for patients with LDH ≤618 IU/L. Conclusions Patients with metastatic cancer participating in phase I trials who have poor performance status and require inpatient admission have a very short survival after discharge to hospice. A high LDH level predicts an even shorter survival. PMID:27802448

  8. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 8–10mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 18×18cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved

  9. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  10. The Ratio of Positive to Excised Nodes Identifies High-risk Subsets and Reduces Inter-Institutional Differences in Locoregional Recurrence Risk Estimates in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Nodes: An Analysis of Prospective Data From British Columbia and the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Pauline T.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Thames, Howard D.; Ragaz, Joseph; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the power of the nodal ratio (NR) of positive/excised nodes in predicting postmastectomy locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with 1-3 positive nodes (N+) and in identifying cohorts at similar risk across independent data sets. Methods and Materials: Data from 82 patients with 1-3 N+ treated without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in the British Columbia (BC) randomized trial were compared with data from 462 patients treated without PMRT in prospective chemotherapy trials at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). Kaplan-Meier LRR curves were compared between centers using the absolute number of N+ and nodal ratios. Results: The median number of excised nodes was 10 in BC and 16 in MDACC (p 0.20 was associated with LRR >20%, warranting PMRT consideration. Nodal ratio may be useful for extrapolating data from prospective trials to clinical practices in which axillary staging extent vary

  11. University of Texas MD Anderson: Phenotypic Examination of PIK3CA Allelic Series using In Vitro/In Vivo Sensor Platforms | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center utilized an established and operational MCF10A normal breast epithelial cell model to assess the ability of candidate driver aberrations to promote cell grow in anchorage-independent conditions (soft agar assay) and proliferate in the absence of insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF).

  12. Linguistic Validation of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory in Persian-Speaking Iranian Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatpour, Leila; Hemati, Simin; Habibi, Farzaneh; Behzadi, Erfan; Hashemi-Jazi, Marsa Sadat; Kheirabadi, Gholamreza; Mirbagher, Leila; Gholamrezaei, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Various symptoms frequently affect cancer patients' quality of life. Appropriate assessment of these symptoms provides valuable data for cancer management. This study aimed to validate the Persian version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI-P). This cross-sectional study was conducted at four cancer treatment centers in two cities in Iran. Breast cancer and colorectal cancer patients aged 18 years and older were consecutively included in the study. The standard forward-backward translation method was applied. Patients completed the MDASI-P along with the previously validated Persian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30). Construct validity (factor analysis), criterion validity (against the EORTC QLQ-C30), and reliability (Cronbach's alpha) were analyzed. A total of 146 breast cancer and 94 colorectal cancer patients were studied. Factor analysis for the symptom severity items resulted in a three-factor solution, further reduced to a two-factor solution: general symptoms and gastrointestinal symptoms. Correlation of the MDASI-P symptom severity items with corresponding EORTC QLQ-C30 symptom items (r = 0.48-0.75) and MDASI-P interference items with corresponding EORTC QLQ-C30 functioning domains (r = -0.46 to -0.23) supported the criterion validity. Cronbach's alpha was 0.90, 0.88, and 0.77 for the total questionnaire, symptom severity items, and the interference subscale, respectively. The MDASI-P is a feasible, valid, and reliable instrument for evaluation of symptoms in Persian-speaking cancer patients and can be used to improve symptom management in these patients. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  14. FLUDARABINE-MELPHALAN AS PREPARATIVE REGIMEN FOR REDUCED-INTENSITY ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN RELAPSED AND REFRACTORY HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA: THE UPDATED M.D. ANDERSON CANCER CENTER EXPERIENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderlini, Paolo; Saliba, Rima; Acholonu, Sandra; Giralt, Sergio A.; Andersson, Borje; Ueno, Naoto T.; Hosing, Chitra; Khouri, Issa F.; Couriel, Daniel; de Lima, Marcos; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.; Pro, Barbara; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Frederick; Younes, Anas; Munsell, Mark F.; Champlin, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective The role of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in relapsed/refractory (R/R) Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) remains poorly defined. We hereby present an update of our single-center experience with fludarabine-melphalan (FM) as preparative regimen. Design and Methods Fifty-eight patients with R/R HL underwent RIC and allo-SCT from a matched related donor (MRD; n=25) or a matched unrelated donor (MUD; n=33). Forty-eight (83%) had received a prior autologous SCT. Disease status at transplant was refractory relapse (n=28) or sensitive relapse (n=30). Results Cumulative day 100 and 2-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) were 7% and 15%, respectively (day 100 TRM MRD vs. MUD 8% vs. 6%, p=ns; 2-year MRD vs. MUD 13% vs. 16%, p=ns). The cumulative incidence of acute (grade II–IV) GVHD (first 100 days) was 28% (MRD vs. MUD 12% vs. 39%, p=0.04). The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at any time was 73% (MRD vs. MUD 57% vs. 85%, p=0.006). Projected 2-year overall (OS) and progression-free (PFS) survival are 64% (49–76) and 32% (20–45), with 2-year disease progression/relapse (PD) at 55% (43–70). There was no statistically significant difference between MRD and MUD transplants in OS, PFS and PD. There was a trend for the response status pretransplant to favorably impact PFS (p=0.07) and PD (p=0.049), but not OS (p=0.4). Interpretation and Conclusions FM as preparative regimen for RIC allo-SCT in R/R HL is associated with a significant reduction in TRM, with comparable results in MRD and MUD allografts. Optimizing pretransplant response status may improve patient outcome. PMID:18223284

  15. Fludarabine-melphalan as a preparative regimen for reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma: the updated M.D. Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderlini, Paolo; Saliba, Rima; Acholonu, Sandra; Giralt, Sergio A; Andersson, Borje; Ueno, Naoto T; Hosing, Chitra; Khouri, Issa F; Couriel, Daniel; de Lima, Marcos; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Pro, Barbara; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Frederick; Younes, Anas; Munsell, Mark F; Champlin, Richard E

    2008-02-01

    The role of reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma remains poorly defined. We here present an update of our single-center experience with fludarabine-melphalan as a preparative regimen. Fifty-eight patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent RIC and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a matched related donor (MRD; n=25) or a matched unrelated donor (MUD; n=33). Forty-eight (83%) had undergone prior autologous stem cell transplantation. Disease status at transplant was refractory relapse (n=28) or sensitive relapse (n=30). Cumulative day 100 and 2-year transplant-related mortality rates were 7% and 15%, respectively (day 100 transplant-related mortality MRD vs. MUD 8% vs. 6%, p=ns; 2-year MRD vs. MUD 13% vs. 16%, p=ns). The cumulative incidence of acute (grade II-IV) graft-versus-host disease in the first 100 days was 28% (MRD vs. MUD 12% vs. 39%, p=0.04). The cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease at any time was 73% (MRD vs. MUD 57% vs. 85%, p=0.006). Projected 2-year overall and progression-free survival rates are 64% (49-76%) and 32% (20-45%), with 2-year disease progression/relapse at 55% (43-70%). There was no statistically significant differences in overall survival progression-free survival, and disease progression/relapse between MRD and MUD transplants. There was a trend for the response status pretransplant to have a favorable impact on progression-free survival (p=0.07) and disease progression/relapse (p=0.049), but not on overall survival (p=0.4) Fludarabine-melphalan as a preparative regimen for reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation in progression-free survival Hodgkin's lymphoma is associated with a significant reduction in transplant-related mortality, with comparable results in MRD and MUD allografts. Optimizing pretransplant response status may improve patients' outcome.

  16. University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Interest Compliance Program Doing Business Code of Ethics Office of Health Policy Employee Resources Employee Resources ... Calculators Clinical Practice Algorithms Physicians Network Products Leadership Employer Contracts Network Providers Education For Professionals Prospective Members ...

  17. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Juan; Jiang, Nan; Li, Zheng; Chen, Xi-Wei; Wang, Pei-Guo; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Yue

    Dysphagia is a common side effect of anticancer treatments in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) and can worsen patients' quality of life. A well-established measure is essential to evaluate dysphagia in HNC patients. The aim of this study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI-C) for HNC patients. A total of 220 subjects were included in the study. Reliability was examined by internal consistency (Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient). Validity was evaluated with Spearman correlations (r). The Cronbach's α and intraclass correlation coefficient of the MDADI-C were .923 and 0.942, respectively. The criterion validity of the MDADI-C was 0.777. The Spearman correlation coefficients of the MDADI-C with the European Organization for Research Into the Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire for Head and Neck Cancer (r = -0.851), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (r = -0.424), radiotherapy dose (r = -0.553), and treatment regimens (r = -0.407) demonstrated good construct validity (all P dysphagia rapidly and evaluate its impact on the quality of life of HNC patients. The MDADI-C could be used to document and monitor the dysphagia level of HNC patients for clinicians, nurses, and researchers. This validated questionnaire will help nurses and doctors to improve dysphagia management in HNC patients and will allow researchers to compare the study results across different countries.

  19. Linguistic Validation of the Turkish Version of the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory - Head and Neck Cancer Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Brandon Gunn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of patient symptom reports with frequent symptom assessment may be preferred over the more commonly used health-related quality of life questionnaires. Aims: We sought to linguistically validate the Turkish version of the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck module (MDASI-HN patient reported outcome questionnaire. Study Design: Validation study. Methods: Following standard forward and backward translation of the original and previously validated English MDASI-HN into a Turkish version (T-MDASI-HN, it was administered to patients with head and neck cancer able to read and understand Turkish. Patients were then cognitively debriefed to evaluate their understanding and comprehension of the T-MDASI-HN. Individual and group responses are presented using descriptive statistics. Results: Twenty-six participants with head and neck cancer completed the T-MDASIHN and accompanying cognitive debriefing. Overall, 97 percent of the individual TMDASI-HN items were completed. Average recorded time to complete the 28 item TMDASI-HN questionnaire was 5.4 minutes (range 2-10. Average overall ease of completion, understandability, and acceptability were favorably rated at 1.0, 1.1, and 0.2, respectively, on scales from 0 to 10. Only 5 of the 26 of participants reported trouble completing any single questionnaire items, namely the “difficulty remembering” item for 3 individuals. Conclusion: The T-MDASI-HN is linguistically valid with ease of completion, relevance, comprehensibility, and applicability and it can be a useful clinical and research tool.

  20. Testicular Cancer Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... had bilateral testicular cancer. In other words, testicular cancer in both testicles, not necessarily at the same time. If you or your family are eligible for this study, please click HERE and send me a brief explanation of ... Advice: Personal Stories --- You or someone ...

  1. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ...

  2. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  3. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1978 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart. Date of birth: 9 January 1908. Date of death: 25 December 1990. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held ...

  4. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams. Date of birth: 3 July 1901. Date of death: 24 February 1984. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held ...

  5. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1978 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart. Date of birth: 9 January 1908. Date of death: 25 December 1990. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India ...

  6. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams. Date of birth: 3 July 1901. Date of death: 24 February 1984. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on ...

  7. UNC Cancer Center Director to Lead NCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    President Donald Trump has selected Norman "Ned" Sharpless, MD, director of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, to lead the NCI. The news was met with widespread approval among cancer researchers, who view Sharpless as a strong communicator who can ably represent the needs of the cancer community in the face of proposed funding cuts. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Kondo-Anderson transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettemann, S.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Varga, I.; Slevin, K.

    2012-03-01

    Dilute magnetic impurities in a disordered Fermi liquid are considered close to the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). Critical power-law correlations between electron wave functions at different energies in the vicinity of the AMIT result in the formation of pseudogaps of the local density of states. Magnetic impurities can remain unscreened at such sites. We determine the density of the resulting free magnetic moments in the zero-temperature limit. While it is finite on the insulating side of the AMIT, it vanishes at the AMIT, and decays with a power law as function of the distance to the AMIT. Since the fluctuating spins of these free magnetic moments break the time-reversal symmetry of the conduction electrons, we find a shift of the AMIT, and the appearance of a semimetal phase. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature TK is derived at the AMIT, in the metallic phase, and in the insulator phase. This allows us to find the quantum phase diagram in an external magnetic field B and at finite temperature T. We calculate the resulting magnetic susceptibility, the specific heat, and the spin relaxation rate as a function of temperature. We find a phase diagram with finite-temperature transitions among insulator, critical semimetal, and metal phases. These new types of phase transitions are caused by the interplay between Kondo screening and Anderson localization, with the latter being shifted by the appearance of the temperature-dependent spin-flip scattering rate. Accordingly, we name them Kondo-Anderson transitions.

  9. Administrative Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An administrative assistant position is available immediately in the Laboratory of Genome Integrity (LGI) within the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) in the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The LGI is actively looking for someone with administrative skills who will facilitate personnel, travel and related demands that support the laboratory chief, all principal investigators and postdoctoral fellows and laboratory support staff. 

  10. CCR Interns | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Research Interns (CRI) Summer Program was inaugurated in 2004 to provide an open door for students looking for an initial training opportunity. The goal is to enhance diversity within the CCR (Center for Cancer Research) training program and we have placed 338 students from 2004 to 2017, in labs and branches across the division.  The CCR and the Center for Cancer Training’s Office of Training and Education provide stipend support, some Service & Supply funds, and travel support for those students who meet the financial eligibility criteria (

  11. Effect of coulomb interaction on Anderson localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waintal, X.

    1999-01-01

    We study the quantum mechanics of interacting particles in a disordered system, and in particular, what happens to Anderson localisation when interaction is taken into account. In the first part, one looks at the excited states of two particles in one dimension. For this model, it has been shown (Shepelyansky 1994) that a local repulsive interaction can partially destroy Anderson localisation. Here, we show that this model has similarities with the three-dimensional Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition. In particular, the maximum of rigidity obtained in the spectral statistics correspond to some intermediary statistics that cannot be described by random matrix theory neither by a Poisson statistics. The wave functions show a multifractal behaviour and the spreading of the center of mass of a wave packet is logarithmic in time. The second part deals with the ground state of a finite density of spinless fermions in two dimensions. After the scaling theory of localisation, it was commonly accepted that there was no metal in two dimensions. This idea has been challenged by the observation of a metal-insulator transition in low density electron gas (Kravchenko et al. 1994). We propose a scenario in which a metallic phase occurs between the Anderson insulator and the pinned Wigner crystal. This intermediate phase is characterized by an alignment of the local currents flowing in the system. (author)

  12. Validation of the Swedish M. D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) in patients with head and neck cancer and neurologic swallowing disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Sigrid; Rydén, Anna; Rudberg, Ingrid; Bove, Mogens; Bergquist, Henrik; Finizia, Caterina

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the Swedish version of the dysphagia-specific quality-of-life questionnaire, the M. D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI). Patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia due to neurologic disease (n = 30) and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients with post-treatment subjective dysphagia (n = 85) were compared to an age- and gender-matched nondysphagic control group (n = 115). A formal forward-backward translation was performed and followed international guidelines. Validity and reliability were tested against the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Internal-consistency reliability was calculated by means of Cronbach's α coefficient. Test-retest reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation (ICC). Convergent and discriminant validity were assessed by correlations between MDADI, SF-36, and HADS. Known-group validity was examined and statistically tested. Of 126 eligible patients, 115 agreed to participate (response rate = 91.3%). The age of the participants ranged between 37 and 92 years. Most of the MDADI items showed good variability and only minor floor or ceiling effects in solitary items were found. The internal-consistency reliability (Cronbach's α) of the MDADI total score was 0.88 (after correction for systematic errors in the subjects' responses to two reversed questions). All estimates reached over the satisfactory >0.70 reliability standard for group-level comparison. ICC ranged between 0.83 and 0.97 in the test-retest. The mean MDADI total score was 66.9 (SD = 14.7) for the H&N cancer patients, 65.0 (16.9) for the neurologic patients, and 97.5 (4.4) for the control group (P dysphagia-related quality of life. It was also shown to be a reliable instrument after correction for systematic errors in the subjects' responses to two reversed questions. Its known-group validity enables the differentiation between dysphagic and nondysphagic patients for group-level research.

  13. Cancer Biotechnology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology advances continue to underscore the need to educate NCI fellows in new methodologies. The Cancer Biotechnology course will be held on the NCI-Frederick campus on January 29, 2016 (Bldg. 549, Main Auditorium) and the course will be repeated on the Bethesda campus on February 9, 2016 (Natcher Balcony C). The latest advances in DNA, protein and image analysis will be presented. Clinical and postdoctoral fellows who want to learn about new biotechnology advances are encouraged to attend this course.

  14. CCR Interns | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Research Interns (CRI) Summer Program was inaugurated in 2004 to increase the diversity of trainee applicants to the Center for Cancer Research (CCR). We have placed 339 students from 2004 to 2017, in labs and branches across the CCR. The Division provides the training dollars, some Service & Supply funds, and travel support for those students who meet the financial eligibility criteria (View and/or print the 2018 flier).

  15. An interacting multielectron Anderson model

    CERN Document Server

    Zenk, H

    2003-01-01

    This article is a first tiny step towards a rigorous description of an interacting multielectron system in a random potential of Anderson type. Deterministic spectrum and a Wegner estimate for this model are proven.

  16. Lithuania 1940 / Herbert Foster Anderson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Foster Anderson, Herbert

    2004-01-01

    Stseenid Leedu ennesõjaaegsest pealinnast Kaunasest briti ärimehe H. Foster Andersoni silme läbi 1940. aastal. Lühikokkuvõte raamatust: Foster Anderson, Herbert. Borderline Russia. London : Cresset press, 1942

  17. The Price-Anderson Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Price-Anderson Act establishes nuclear liability law in the United States. First passed in 1957, it has influenced other nuclear liability legislation around the world. The insurer response the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 demonstrates the application of the Act in a real life situation. The Price-Anderson Act is scheduled to be renewed in 2002, and the future use of commercial nuclear power in tge United States will be influenced by this renewal. (author)

  18. Postdoctoral Fellows | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Oncogenomics section of the Genetics Branch is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary translational research programmatic effort with the goal of utilizing genomics to develop novel immunotherapies for cancer. Our group is applying high throughput applied genomics methods including single cell RNAseq, single cell TCR sequencing, DNA sequencing, CRISPR/Cas9, bioinformatics combined with T cell based therapeutics to identify and develop novel immunotherapeutics for human cancer. We work with other investigators within the intramural program as well as industrial and pharmaceutical partners to rapidly translate our findings to the clinic. The program takes advantage of the uniqueness of the National Cancer Institute, (NCI), Center for Cancer Research (CCR) intramural program in that it spans high-risk basic discovery research in immunology, genomics and tumor biology, through preclinical translational research, to paradigm-shifting clinical trials. The position is available immediately. The appointment duration is up to 5 years. Stipends are commensurate with education and experience. Additional information can be found on Dr. Khan’s profile page: https://ccr.cancer.gov/Genetics-Branch/javed-khan

  19. Research Associate | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives.  The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for Cancer Research (CCR).  The dedicated units provide electron microscopy, protein characterization, protein expression, optical microscopy and nextGen sequencing. These research efforts are an integral part of CCR at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.  CRTP scientists also work collaboratively with intramural NCI investigators to provide research technologies and expertise. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES We are seeking a highly motivated Research Associate II to join the newly established Single Cell Analysis Facility (SCAF) of the CCR at NCI.  The SCAF will house state of the art single cell sequencing technologies including 10xGenomics Chromium, BD Genomics Rhapsody, DEPPArray, and other emerging single cell technologies. This person will work under the guidance of SCAF senior staff to carry out single cell sequencing experiments.

  20. Strategic performance evaluation in cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rigoberto I; Langabeer, James R

    2009-01-01

    Most research in healthcare strategy has focused on formulating or implementing organizational plans and strategies, and little attention has been dedicated to the post-implementation control and evaluation of strategy, which we contend is the most critical aspect of achieving organizational goals. The objective of this study was to identify strategic control approaches used by major cancer centers in the country and to relate these practices to financial performance. Our intent was to expand the theory and practice of healthcare strategy to focused services, such as oncology. We designed a 17-question survey to capture elements of strategy and performance from our study sample, which comprised major cancer hospitals in the United States and shared similar mandates and resource constraints. The results suggest that high-performing cancer centers use more sophisticated analytical approaches, invest greater financial resources in performance analysis, and conduct more frequent performance reviews than do low-performing organizations. Our conclusions point to the need for a more robust approach to strategic assessment. In this article, we offer a number of recommendations for management to achieve strategic plans and goals on the basis of our research. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to concentrate on the area of strategic control.

  1. Senior Clinician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR), NCI, NIH, HHS is seeking to fill several Senior Clinician positions with outstanding oncologists with research experience and expertise in one of the following areas:  1) genitourinary malignancies, 2) thoracic malignancies; 3) gastrointestinal malignancies; 4) lymphomas; 5) pediatric cancers; or 6) genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. These positions are located at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The NIH Clinical Center is the world’s largest research hospital which offers state-of-the-art facilities, collaborative opportunities, and core facilities for advanced technologies.  The Senior Clinician will have available resources including funding for clinical trials, nurse practitioners, research nurses, and patient care coordinators.  In addition, the senior clinician will have access to a robust clinical trials infrastructure including data management, training, protocol support office, regulatory support, information systems and technology, and data safety monitoring.  The CCR’s collaborative culture also offers research staff access to a wide array of intellectual and technological assets, including high-quality technology cores dedicated to pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, protein chemistry, natural products chemistry, biophysics, mass spectrometry, imaging, microscopy, proteomics and genomics, bioinformatics/biostatistics, and flow cytometry.  For an overview of CCR, please visit http://ccr.cancer.gov/.  For more information contact Lori Holliday at hollidal@mail.nih.gov.

  2. 50 Years of Anderson Localization

    CERN Document Server

    Abrahams, Elihu

    2010-01-01

    In his groundbreaking paper Absence of diffusion in certain random lattices (1958), Philip W. Anderson originated, described and developed the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of the localization of quantum objects due to disorder. Anderson's 1977 Nobel Prize citation featured that paper, which was fundamental for many subsequent developments in condensed matter theory and technical applications. After more than a half century, the subject continues to be of fundamental importance. In particular, in the last 25 years, the phenomenon of localization has proved to be crucial for the

  3. Flow Cytometry Scientist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Basic Science Program (BSP) pursues independent, multidisciplinary research in basic and applied molecular biology, immunology, retrovirology, cancer biology, and human genetics. Research efforts and support are an integral part of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Flow Cytometry Core (Flow Core) in the Cancer and Inflammation Program (CIP) is a service core which supports the research efforts of the CCR by providing expertise in the field of flow cytometry (fluorescence cell sorting) with the goal of gaining a more thorough understanding of the biology of the immune system, cancer, and inflammation processes. The Flow Core provides service to 12-15 CIP laboratories and more than 22 non-CIP laboratories. Flow core staff provide technical advice on the experimental design of applications, which include immunological phenotyping, cell function assays, and cell cycle analysis. Work is performed per customer requirements, and no independent research is involved. Flow Cytometry Scientist - The individual will be responsible for: Daily management of the Flow Cytometry Core, to include the supervision and guidance of technical staff members Monitor performance of and maintain high-dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Operate high-dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Provide scientific expertise to the user community and facilitate the development of cutting-edge technologies Interact with Flow Core users and customers, and provide technical and scientific advice, and guidance regarding their experiments, including possible collaborations Train staff and scientific end users on the use of flow cytometry in their research, as well as teach them how to operate and troubleshoot the bench-top analyzer instruments Prepare and deliver lectures, as well as one-on-one training sessions, with customers/users Ensure that protocols are up

  4. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  5. Anderson's Relevant Deontic and Eubouliatic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokhorst, G.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    We present axiomatizations of the deontic fragment of Anderson's relevant deontic logic (the logic of obligation and related concepts) and the eubouliatic fragment of Anderson's eubouliatic logic (the logic of prudence, safety, risk, and related concepts).

  6. Research Associate | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Basic Science Program (BSP) pursues independent, multidisciplinary research in basic and applied molecular biology, immunology, retrovirology, cancer biology, and human genetics. Research efforts and support are an integral part of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES - Research Associate III Dr. Zbigniew Dauter is the head investigator of the Synchrotron Radiation Research Section (SRRS) of CCR’s Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory. The Synchrotron Radiation Research Section is located at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois; this is the site of the largest U.S. synchrotron facility. The SRRS uses X-ray diffraction technique to solve crystal structures of various proteins and nucleic acids of biological and medical relevance. The section is also specializing in analyzing crystal structures at extremely high resolution and accuracy and in developing methods of effective diffraction data collection and in using weak anomalous dispersion effects to solve structures of macromolecules. The areas of expertise are: Structural and molecular biology Macromolecular crystallography Diffraction data collection Dr. Dauter requires research support in these areas, and the individual will engage in the purification and preparation of samples, crystallize proteins using various techniques, and derivatize them with heavy atoms/anomalous scatterers, and establish conditions for cryogenic freezing. Individual will also participate in diffraction data collection at the Advanced Photon Source. In addition, the candidate will perform spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses of protein and nucleic acid samples in the context of their purity, oligomeric state and photophysical properties.

  7. Phil Anderson and Gauge Symmetry Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Edward

    In this article, I describe the celebrated paper that Phil Anderson wrote in 1962 with early contributions to the idea of gauge symmetry breaking in particle physics. To set the stage, I describe the work of Julian Schwinger to which Anderson was responding, and also some of Anderson's own work on superconductivity that provided part of the context. After describing Anderson's work I describe the later work of others, leading to the modern understanding of gauge symmetry breaking in weak interactions...

  8. The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hait, William

    2004-01-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention...

  9. Protocol Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the consid erable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  10. New targets for immunotherapy-based treatment of HPV-related cancers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the Center for Cancer Research and three other cancer research institutions show that immunotherapy treatments that resulted in complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer largely targeted two non-viral antigens. Read more…  

  11. Physician Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  12. Administrative Resource Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Quality of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy in developing countries: a comparison of surgical and oncologic outcomes between a comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Nick, Alpa M; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Frumovitz, Michael; Soliman, Pamela T; Buitrago, Carlos A; Borrero, Mauricio; Angel, Gonzalo; Reis, Ricardo Dos; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2012-05-01

    To help determine whether global collaborations for prospective gynecologic surgery trials should include hospitals in developing countries, we compared surgical and oncologic outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia. Records of the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston (between April 2004 and July 2007) and the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent the same procedure at the Instituto de Cancerología-Clínica las Américas in Medellín (between December 2008 and October 2010) were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference in median patient age (US 41.9 years [range 23-73] vs. Colombia 44.5 years [range 24-75], P=0.09). Patients in Colombia had a lower median body mass index than patients in the US (24.4 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 kg/m(2), P=0.002). Compared to patients treated in Colombia, patients who underwent surgery in the US had a greater median estimated blood loss (200 mL vs. 79 mL, P<0.001), longer median operative time (328.5 min vs. 235 min, P<0.001), and longer postoperative hospital stay (2 days vs. 1 day, P<0.001). Surgical and oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy were not worse at a cancer center in a developing country than at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States. These results support consideration of developing countries for inclusion in collaborations for prospective surgical studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Programmer Analyst | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) provides technology development, scientific consultation, collaboration, data analysis and training to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and staff. The Core Infrastructure and Systems Biology (CISB) group in ABCC strives to streamline and provide innovative solutions for the NCI/NIH community to access and use biological information collected across different sources and formats. Integrating diverse data sources to enable disease agnostic access and analysis, variant impact annotation, identifier conversions across species, and merging clinical and research data enables translation from basic to the goal of precision medicine. CISB is looking for an experienced analyst to support the database and application management efforts at the NCI’s Molecular Targets Program (MTP). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Provide data management and analysis support Maintain scientific applications and databases on single-user personal computer through the multi-user, multi-processor large memory mainframe Communicate with the experts in the MTP, gather requirements and provide support Provide training to researchers on a variety of platforms and applications Evaluate and develop methodologies to allow utilization of new software tools and generate the information required by MTP researchers Determine methods and procedures on new assignments Document approaches and mechanisms clearly and comprehensively

  15. Patient Care Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  16. Developmental Scientist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  17. [The French Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the French oncology landscape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiffers, Josy

    2013-06-01

    For more than 60 years, the French Comprehensive Cancer Centers participate in public hospital service and are exclusively dedicated to the fight against cancer. This article returns on their history, their model, their group strategy with the creation of UNICANCER, their place in French cancer research and treatments today, their contribution to the cancer plans and the challenges and issues they will face in the next 10 years.

  18. NCI designated cancer center funding not influenced by organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Margaret E; Yagoda, Daniel; Thurman, Paul W; Luna, Jorge M; Figg, William Douglas

    2009-05-01

    National Cancer Institutes (NCI) designated cancer centers use one of three organizational structures. The hypothesis of this study is that there are differences in the amount of annual NCI funding per faculty member based on a cancer center's organizational structure. The study also considers the impact of secondary factors (i.e., the existence of a clinical program, the region and the size of the city in which the cancer center is located) on funding and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators at each cancer center. Of the 63 cancer centers, 44 use a matrix structure, 16 have a freestanding structure, and three have a Department of Oncology structure. Kruskal-Wallis tests reveal no statistically significant differences in the amount of funding per faculty member or the number of HHMI investigators between centers with a matrix, freestanding or Department of Oncology structure. Online research and telephone interviews with each cancer center were used to gather information, including: organizational structure, the presence of a clinical program, the number of faculty members, and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. Statistical tests were used to assess the impact which organizational structure has on the amount of funding per faculty member and number of HHMI investigators. While the results seem to suggest that the organizational structure of a given cancer center does not impact the amount of NCI funding or number of HHMI investigators which it attracts, the existence of this relationship is likely masked by the small sample size in this study. Further studies may be appropriate to examine the effect organizational structure has on other measurements which are relevant to cancer centers, such as quality and quantity of research produced.

  19. Benedict Andersons forestillede fællesskaber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsson, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen diskuterer Benedict Andersons analyse af nationalismens opståen i en kolonial kontekst og den kritik som Partha Chatterjee har rejst mod denne. Udgivelsesdato: Januar 2008......Artiklen diskuterer Benedict Andersons analyse af nationalismens opståen i en kolonial kontekst og den kritik som Partha Chatterjee har rejst mod denne. Udgivelsesdato: Januar 2008...

  20. Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics, which forms the third cycle CCNE Program at Stanford University, is a consortium that has three highly synchronized Projects and three Cores.

  1. The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence: magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian; Fiering, Steve N; Griswold, Karl E; Hoopes, P Jack; Kekalo, Katerina; Ndong, Christian; Paulsen, Keith; Petryk, Alicea A; Pogue, Brian; Shubitidze, Fridon; Weaver, John

    2015-01-01

    The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence - one of nine funded by the National Cancer Institute as part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - focuses on the use of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer diagnostics and hyperthermia therapy. It brings together a diverse team of engineers and biomedical researchers with expertise in nanomaterials, molecular targeting, advanced biomedical imaging and translational in vivo studies. The goal of successfully treating cancer is being approached by developing nanoparticles, conjugating them with Fabs, hyperthermia treatment, immunotherapy and sensing treatment response.

  2. National Cancer Center Singapore: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Melissa; Soo, Khee Chee

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore, comprising almost 30% of annual deaths. The incidence and prevalence continue to rise, resulting in Singapore having the highest age-standardized rate of cancer in southeast Asia. A review of national health policies in 1992 resulted in the creation of a National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) in 1999. The current NCCS, with its three pillars of clinical service, research and education, manages about 70% of all new cancer cases in the countries public healthcare system. As it outgrows its current outfit and looks to the new NCCS building in 2020, the goal must be for strategic planning to attract and retain the best minds and heart in the field of cancer if it were to continue to be successful in achieving its vision and mission. This article chronicles the NCCS's history and details the foundation of its strategic plans.

  3. Designing Trojan Horses | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waging battle against cancer cells without inflicting damage on normal tissue has long been a goal for cancer treatment. A new type of drug called immunotoxins may help make this goal a reality. Much like the Greeks used a wooden horse to get soldiers inside the gates of Troy, immunotoxins use clever genetic engineering to get a lethal toxin inside cancer cells. Each immunotoxin consists of two components an antibody and a toxin that are fused together. The custom-designed antibody acts as a homing signal, seeking out a specific target present on the surface of cancer cells. When the antibody binds its target, the whole immunotoxin is brought inside the cell. Unwittingly, the cancer cell has exposed itself to a powerful poison, a mistake that will likely condemn it to death.

  4. Shifting cancer care towards Multidisciplinarity: the cancer center certification program of the German cancer society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Christoph; Graeven, Ullrich; von Kalle, Christof; Lang, Hauke; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Burchardt, Martin; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Fichtner, Jan; Grabbe, Stephan; Hoffmann, Hans; Iro, Heinrich; Post, Stefan; Scharl, Anton; Schlegel, Uwe; Seufferlein, Thomas; Stummer, Walter; Ukena, Dieter; Ferencz, Julia; Wesselmann, Simone

    2017-12-14

    Over the last decades numerous initiatives have been set up that aim at translating the best available medical knowledge and treatment into clinical practice. The inherent complexity of the programs and discrepancies in the terminology used make it difficult to appreciate each of them distinctly and compare their specific strengths and weaknesses. To allow comparison and stimulate dialogue between different programs, we in this paper provide an overview of the German Cancer Society certification program for multidisciplinary cancer centers that was established in 2003. In the early 2000s the German Cancer Society assessed the available information on quality of cancer care in Germany and concluded that there was a definite need for a comprehensive, transparent and evidence-based system of quality assessment and control. This prompted the development and implementation of a voluntary cancer center certification program that was promoted by scientific societies, health-care providers, and patient advocacy groups and based on guidelines of the highest quality level (S3). The certification system structures the entire process of care from prevention to screening and multidisciplinary treatment of cancer and places multidisciplinary teams at the heart of this program. Within each network of providers, the quality of care is documented using tumor-specific quality indicators. The system started with breast cancer centers in 2003 and colorectal cancer centers in 2006. In 2017, certification systems are established for the majority of cancers. Here we describe the rationale behind the certification program, its history, the development of the certification requirements, the process of data collection, and the certification process as an example for the successful implementation of a voluntary but powerful system to ensure and improve quality of cancer care. Since 2003, over 1 million patients had their primary tumors treated in a certified center. There are now over 1200

  5. Opportunities for Improving Cancer Prevention at Federally Qualified Health Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Claire L.; Harris, Jeffrey R.; Hannon, Peggy A.; Parrish, Amanda T.; Hammerback, Kristen; Craft, John; Gray, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    As the Affordable Care Act unfolds, federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) will likely experience an influx of newly insured, low-income patients at disparate risk for cancer. Cancer-focused organizations are seeking to collaborate with FQHCs and the Primary Care Associations (PCAs) that serve them, to prevent cancer and reduce disparities. To guide this collaboration, we conducted 21 interviews with representatives from PCAs and FQHCs across four western states. We asked about: FQHC prio...

  6. Paul Carlson | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Carlson, Ph.D. March 28 Principal Investigator Laboratory of Mucosal Pathogens and Cellular Immunology Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), FDA Topic:  "Research and Regulation of novel biologic products at the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research"

  7. Chromatin Pioneers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking advantage of their ability to explore provocative ideas, NCI investigators pioneered the study of chromatin to demonstrate its functional importance and lay the groundwork for understanding its role in cancer and other diseases.

  8. The HPV Vaccine | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two researchers leveraged CCR’s unique environment of investigator-driven inquiry to pursue studies of two cancer-causing genes that eventually led to the development of a vaccine against two forms of human papillomavirus.

  9. Cellular Imaging | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovative imaging methods developed and refined within CCR revealed atomic-level structures of biological molecules and unveiled dynamic views of a cell’s interior that are driving the design of new treatments and diagnostics for cancer.

  10. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    st century in the crusade against breast disorders. The project will continue utilizing a multidisciplinary approach as the standard of care for...on decreasing the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer among American women. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Biorepository, Biomedical Informatics, Focused...morbidity and mortality of breast cancer among American women with a specific focus on the problem as it pertains to the active duty military

  11. Physician Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    counseling within the boundaries of his/her specialty area of education and clinical preparation (pediatrics, adults, urologic, surgical, etc.). Review assigned patient resident reports and carry and answer the resident pager. Provide coverage for the post-call resident’s patients, while working closely with the Inpatient/Fellowship staff.  Support in-patient and out-patient care of subjects enrolled in experimental protocols and clinical trials. Work as a member of a multidisciplinary clinical team to provide comprehensive care to patients in a research environment. Write prescriptions. Explain the care management/discharge plan to all members of the covering team (inpatient NPs, attendings) at signout. This position is located in Bethesda, Maryland in support of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

  12. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highly motivated postdoctoral fellows sought to work on tumor immunology with a strong background in biology preferentially cellular immunology. The tumor immunology group in the laboratory is exploring mechanisms of improving vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer, especially by discovering new principles to enhance and steer T cell immune responses. The group is focusing on negative immunoregulatory mechanisms used for immune evasion by cancer cells. The postdoctoral fellow will work on a project to understand the negative regulatory mechanisms of tumor immunity especially the mechanisms initiated by NKT cells. Group members also have an opportunity to gain knowledge of HIV/mucosal immunology by interacting with the HIV research group in the lab.

  13. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhiqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Yang Kunyu [Cancer Centre, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu Guangying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beiijng Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing (China); Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Charles [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  14. MBCP - Approach - Immunotherapy | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy CCR investigators pioneered the use of the tuberculosis vaccine—Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)—in the treatment of bladder cancer. In cases where the tumor burden is not too high and direct contact can be made with the urothelium surface of the bladder, BCG application appears to elicit an immune response that attacks the tumor as well as the attenuated virus. Ongoing clinical trials focusing on enhancing the patient’s immune system are listed below.

  15. Scientists repurpose HPV vaccine technology to fight eye cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uveal melanoma is a rare eye cancer that affects about 1,600 people in the United States. A study by scientists in the Center for Cancer Research and Aura Biosciences, Cambridge, Mass., published December 14, 2017, in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, provides new hope for the early treatment of uveal melanoma. Read more…

  16. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  17. A Patient-Centered Perspective on Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Zebrack

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients’ physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people’s experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  18. A patient-centered perspective on cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrack, Brad

    2015-04-15

    Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients' physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people's experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails) in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  19. Language barriers and patient-centered breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Hwang, E Shelley; Nickleach, Dana; Kaplan, Celia P

    2011-08-01

    Provision of high quality patient-centered care is fundamental to eliminating healthcare disparities in breast cancer. We investigated physicians' experiences communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer patients. Survey of a random sample of California oncologists and surgeons. Of 301 respondents who reported treating LEP patients, 46% were oncologists, 75% male, 68% in private practice, and on average 33% of their patients had breast cancer. Only 40% reported at least sometimes using professional interpretation services. Although 75% felt they were usually able to communicate effectively with LEP patients, more than half reported difficulty discussing treatment options and prognosis, and 56% acknowledged having less-patient-centered treatment discussions with LEP breast cancer patients. In multivariate analysis, use of professional interpreters was associated with 53% lower odds of reporting less-patient-centered treatment discussions (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.26-0.85). California surgeons and oncologists caring for breast cancer patients report substantial communication challenges when faced with a language barrier. Although use of professional interpreters is associated with more patient-centered communication, there is a low rate of professional interpreter utilization. Future research and policy should focus on increasing access to and reimbursement for professional interpreter services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [NEURO-ONCOLOGY A NEW FIELD IN DAVIDOFF CANCER CENTER AT RABIN MEDICAL CENTER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Abu-Shkara, Ramez; Siegal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    Neuro-oncology is a subspecialty attracting physicians from medical disciplines such as neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and radiotherapy. It deals with diagnosis and management of primary brain tumors, as well as metastatic and non-metastatic neurological manifestations that frequently affect cancer patients including brain metastases, paraneoplastic syndromes and neurological complications of cancer treatment. A neuro-oncology unit was established in Davidoff Cancer Center at Rabin Medical Center. It provides a multidisciplinary team approach for management of brain tumors and services, such as expert outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations for the departments of oncology, hematology, bone marrow transplantation and other departments in the Rabin Medical Center. In addition, expert consultation is frequently provided to other hospitals that treat cancer patients with neurological manifestations. The medical disciplines that closely collaborate for the daily management of neuro-oncology patients include radiotherapy, hematology, oncology, neuro-surgery, neuro-radiology and neuro-pathology. The neuro-oncology center is also involved in clinical and laboratory research conducted in collaboration with researchers in Israel and abroad. The new service contributes substantially to the improved care of cancer patients and to the advance of research topics in the field of neuro-oncology.

  1. Cancer prevention and detection centers: an overview and critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, L J; Lester, P

    1989-01-01

    Cancer screening is ideally carried out in free standing centers that are located near shopping centers, are quite visible, and have a warm, friendly appearance. This chapter describes the basic elements of such a center, including the use of a mobile mammogram van based at the center. While the precise size, location, and design of a center will vary depending on the specific demographics of an area, these data should facilitate such planning. Programs that can be carried out in this center are described utilizing information from preceding chapters. This chapter enlarges upon their application and then outlines criteria and services. Furthermore, a large section on general or whole-body screening is included. As in other programs, those at risk and the benefits are discussed. While not a high volume, income producer, this program is a requisite component offering great service to the customer.

  2. Learning from Cancer Precursors | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancers that are preceded by distinct nonmalignant lesions provide an opportunity to study cancer progression and develop early detection and intervention strategies. Multiple myeloma—a cancer of the bone marrow that originates in a type of white blood cell called plasma cells—is consistently preceded by one of two nonmalignant precursor diseases: monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or smoldering myeloma. Ola Landgren, M.D., Ph.D., and Adam Waxman, B.A., of the CCR Medical Oncology Branch recently published a case presentation and review in JAMA that discusses current understanding of myeloma precursor diseases and future opportunities for improving personalized management of patients with these conditions.

  3. Researchers studying alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new phase I clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is evaluating the safety and tolerability, or the degree to which any side effects can be tolerated by patients, of a two-drug combination as a potential alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients. The trial targets patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) whose cancers have stopped responding to traditional therapies. Read more...

  4. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A postdoctoral fellowship is currently available for productive, highly-motivated, and energetic individuals in the Inflammation and Tumorigenesis Section of Dr. Yinling Hu at the NCI-Frederick campus.  A dynamic research environment and outstanding resources are available for enthusiastic individuals.  Requirements include a Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent degree and experience in Immunology, Molecular Biology, and/or Signaling Research. Candidate must have excellent verbal, written communication and organizational skills, and the ability to handle multiple projects simultaneously. The project will be to investigate mechanisms of IKK/NF-B-involved auto-immunity, infection, innate immunity in mouse models of carcinogenesis/cancer biology, tumor initiating cells, and lymphoid organ development.

  5. Administrative Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are looking for a pleasant, organized, dependable person to serve as an administrative assistant at the National Cancer Institute on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  Work supports a busy clinical program in the world’s largest dedicated research hospital patients call the “House of Hope.”  Tasks involve calendar management, arranging travel, scheduling conferences and meetings, drafting and handling correspondence, timekeeping, placing purchase requests, office property management, greeting visitors, and office work, such as copying, filing, and scanning.  Ability to work with basic computer office software (such as Word, Excel, and PowerPoint) required. Some administrative experience, including calendar management preferred.  Full-time position, business hours. NIH is metro accessible.

  6. Childhood cancer frequency in the center of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Nabiha; Khouzemi, Mehdi; Landolsi, Hanene; Jaidene, Lilia; Abdelkrim, Soumaya Ben; Abdelkader, Atef Ben; Beizig, Nadia; Yaacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Hmissa, Sihem

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the frequency of childhood cancer in the Center of Tunisia during 1993-2006. The different types of cancer were grouped according to the International Classification for Cancer in Children. The general and specific frequencies by age and by sex were analyzed. A total of 727 new cases of childhood cancer were registered, with a male to-female sex ratio of 1.7/1. Leukemias had the highest frequency (27%) and, of these, lymphoid leukemias were the most prevalent (73.5%). Thereafter, in descending order of frequency, were lymphomas (25.7%), tumors of the central nervous system (CNS, 9.2%), neuroblastomas (7.7%), sarcomas (6.9%), carcinomas (6.3%), bone tumors (5.8%), nephroblastomas (5.5%), and germinal cell tumors (2.6%). The highest frequency of cancer was found at age 10-14 years (34.9%). Leukemias were the most frequent in age groups 1-4 and 5-9 years, whereas, neuroblastomas and lymphomas were the most frequent at age under one year and 10-14 years, respectively. Of those cases of solid tumors, 55.8% were diagnosed as having advanced stages of the disease. Leukemias, lymphomas, and CNS tumors were the principal cancers in the Center of Tunisia. A childhood cancer registry with high-resolution data collection is advocated for in-depth analysis of pediatric malignancies.

  7. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  8. Schemata, Cognitive Structure, and Advance Organizers: A Reply to Anderson, Spiro, and Anderson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, David P.

    1980-01-01

    Anderson, Spiro, and Anderson (EJ 189 658) assert that the author's assimilation theory of meaningful learning and retention is "hopelessly vague." Documented examination of these assertions indicates that they are unspecified, unsubstantiated, undocumented, and based on indisputable misrepresentation of published material and on logical…

  9. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  10. Identification of a Novel Cancer Biomarker | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    During cancer development, cells accumulate a variety of mutations which alter their normal components and activities. One potential change is in the carbohydrate or sugar polymers which decorate proteins predominately found on the cell surface. The accessibility of these residues makes them ideal targets for the development of diagnostics or therapeutics.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use at a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qianlai; Asher, Gary N

    2017-03-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among cancer patients, but the majority of CAM studies do not specify the time periods in relation to cancer diagnoses. We sought to define CAM use by cancer patients and investigate factors that might influence changes in CAM use in relation to cancer diagnoses. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer between 2010 and 2012 at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Questionnaires were sent to 1794 patients. Phone calls were made to nonrespondents. Log binomial/Poisson regressions were used to investigate the association between cancer-related changes in CAM use and conversations about CAM use with oncology providers. We received 603 (33.6 %) completed questionnaires. The mean age (SD) was 64 (11) years; 62% were female; 79% were white; and 98% were non-Hispanic. Respondents reported the following cancer types: breast (47%), prostate (27%), colorectal (14%), lung (11%). Eighty-nine percent reported lifetime CAM use. Eighty-five percent reported CAM use during or after initial cancer treatment, with category-specific use as follows: mind-body medicine 39%, dietary supplements 73%, body-based therapies 30%, and energy medicine 49%. During treatment CAM use decreased for all categories except energy medicine. After treatment CAM use returned to pretreatment levels for most CAMs except chiropractic. Initiation of CAM use after cancer diagnosis was positively associated with a patient having a conversation about CAM use with their oncology provider, mainly driven by patient-initiated conversations. Consistent with previous studies, CAM use was common among our study population. Conversations about CAM use with oncology providers appeared to influence cessation of mind-body medicine use after cancer diagnosis.

  12. Lipid Biomarkers Identified for Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive cancer of the liver with poor prognosis and growing incidence in developed countries. Pathology and genetic profiles of HCC are heterogeneous, suggesting that it can begin growing in different cell types. Although human tumors such as HCC have been profiled in-depth by genomics-based studies, not much is known about their overall metabolite modifications and how these changes can form a network that leads to aggressive disease and poor outcome.

  13. Random nanolasing in the Anderson localized regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jin; Garcia, P. D.; Ek, Sara

    2014-01-01

    multiple scattering. The applicability of random lasers has been limited due to multidirectional emission, lack of tunability, and strong mode competition with chaotic fluctuations due to a weak mode confinement. The regime of Anderson localization of light has been proposed for obtaining stable multimode...... random lasing, and initial work concerned macroscopic one-dimensional layered media. Here, we demonstrate on-chip random nanolasers where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder. The strong confinement achieved by Anderson localization reduces the spatial overlap between lasing modes...

  14. Electron Microscopist/Structural Biologist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives. The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for Cancer Research (CCR). The dedicated units provide electron microscopy, protein characterization, protein expression, optical microscopy and genetics. These research efforts are an integral part of CCR at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). CRTP scientists also work collaboratively with intramural NCI investigators to provide research technologies and expertise. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES - THIS POSITION IS CONTINGENT UPON FUNDING APPROVAL Develop technologies for application on emerging electron microscopy platforms. Operate and optimize performance of TEM microscopes, specifically Titan Krios and Talos Artctica for high-resolution data collection in single particle studies as well as cryo-electron tomography. Assist with maintenance for the Titan Krios and the Talos Arctica as well as associated instruments. Interact closely with and transfer newly developed technical capabilities to CCR Center for Molecular Microscopy (CMM) and CCR collaborators.

  15. Eliminating cancer stem cells: an interview with CCR’s Steven Hou | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Hou, Ph.D., senior investigator in the Basic Research Laboratory at the Center for Cancer Research describes his latest research that has uncovered potential ways to eliminate cancer stem cells and may offer hope to patients with reoccurring tumors.  Learn more...

  16. Wnt Inactivation for Liver Cancer Therapy | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common and third most deadly type of cancer in the world. The majority of cases occur in Asia and Africa, resulting in most cases being diagnosed only at advanced stages of the disease when drug resistance is high. HCC typically follows damage to the liver such as cirrhosis, making radiation and chemotherapy a more challenging prospect. Surgery is also not a very viable option because less than one in four carcinomas can be completely removed. The limitations in these treatment modalities create the need for alternative therapeutic approaches.

  17. Cancer Clinical Trials at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Cancer Clinical Trials at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center ... they are eligible for a clinical trial . NCI Clinical Trials at the NIH Clinical Center Cancer research at ...

  18. Anderson localization in bipartite lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrizio, Michele; Castellani, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    We study the localization properties of a disordered tight-binding Hamiltonian on a generic bipartite lattice close to the band center. By means of a fermionic replica trick method, we derive the effective non-linear σ-model describing the diffusive modes, which we analyse by using the Wilson-Polyakov renormalization group. In addition to the standard parameters which define the non-linear σ-model, namely, the conductance and the external frequency, a new parameter enters, which may be related to the fluctuations of the staggered density of states. We find that, when both the regular hopping and the disorder only couple one sublattice to the other, the quantum corrections to the Kubo conductivity vanish at the band center, thus implying the existence of delocalized states. In two dimensions, the RG equations predict that the conductance flows to a finite value, while both the density of states and the staggered density of states fluctuations diverge. In three dimensions, we find that, sufficiently close to the band center, all states are extended, independently of the disorder strength. We also discuss the role of various symmetry breaking terms, as a regular hopping between same sublattices, or an on-site disorder

  19. Anderson localization in bipartite lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrizio, M.; Castellani, C.

    2000-04-01

    We study the localization properties of a disordered tight-binding Hamiltonian on a generic bipartite lattice close to the band center. By means of a fermionic replica trick method, we derive the effective non-linear σ-model describing the diffusive modes, which we analyse by using the Wilson-Polyakov renormalization group. In addition to the standard parameters which define the non-linear σ-model, namely the conductance and the external frequency, a new parameter enters, which may be related to the fluctuations of the staggered density of states. We find that, when both the regular hopping and the disorder only couple one sublattice to the other, the quantum corrections to the Kubo conductivity vanish at the band center, thus implying the existence of delocalized states. In two dimensions, the RG equations predict that the conductance flows to a finite value, while both the density of states and the staggered density of states fluctuations diverge. In three dimensions, we find that, sufficiently close to the band center, all states are extended, independently of the disorder strength. We also discuss the role of various symmetry breaking terms, as a regular hopping between same sublattices, or an on-site disorder. (author)

  20. cDNA Clones with Rare and Recurrent Mutations Found in Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at UT- MD Anderson Cancer Center has developed High-Throughput Mutagenesis and Molecular Barcoding (HiTMMoB)1,2 pipeline to construct mutant alleles open reading frame expression clones that are either recurrent or rare in cancers. These barcoded genes can be used for context-specific functional validation, detection of novel biomarkers (pathway activation) and targets (drug sensitivity).

  1. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers

  2. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers.

  3. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  4. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Anota, Amélie; Dick, Julia; Kuboth, Violetta; Lareyre, Olivier; De Pauw, Antoine; Cano, Alejandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Schmutzler, Rita; Dolbeault, Sylvie; Kop, Jean-Luc

    2018-02-12

    With advances in breast cancer (BC) gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83%) in France and 180 (97%) in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively), returned the 'Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer' questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the "living with cancer" and "children-related issues" domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = -0.05), higher anxiety (b = 0.78), and having children (b = 1.51), but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  5. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists.

  6. Anderson introduces a new biomass baler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' amour, L.; Lavoie, F. [Anderson Group Co., Chesterville, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Canadian-based Anderson Group Company has developed an innovative round baler for harvesting a large variety of woody biomass. The baler was initially developed in 2005 in collaboration with the University Laval and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The third generation BIOBALER{sup TM} is currently built, engineered and commercialized by Anderson. It can produce up to 40 bales/hr in short rotations woody crops such as willow and hybrid poplar. The unit can harvest brushes up to 125 mm in diameter. A standard tractor can pull the BIOBALER in fallow or abandoned land, under power transmission lines, and between planted trees. The patented BIOBALER includes a mulcher head attachment, a choice of long or short swivel tongue, a fixed chamber and an undercarriage frame.

  7. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  8. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Senior Laboratory Animal Technician will be responsible for: Daily tasks associated with the care, breeding and treatment of research animals for experimental purposes Management of rodent breeding colonies consisting of multiple, genetically complex strains and associated record keeping and database management Colony management procedures including: tail clipping, animal identification, weaning Data entry consistent with complex colony management Collection of routine diagnostic samples Coordinating shipment of live animals and specimens Performing rodent experimental procedures including basic necropsy and blood collection Observation and recording of physical signs of animal health Knowledge of safe working practices using chemical carcinogen and biological hazards Work schedule may include weekend and holiday hours This position is in support of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

  9. Effect of coulomb interaction on Anderson localization; Effet de l'interaction coulombienne sur la localisation d'Anderson dans des systemes de basses dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waintal, X

    1999-09-10

    We study the quantum mechanics of interacting particles in a disordered system, and in particular, what happens to Anderson localisation when interaction is taken into account. In the first part,one looks at the excited states of two particles in one dimension. For this model, it has been shown (Shepelyansky 1994) that a local repulsive interaction can partially destroy Anderson localisation. Here, we show that this model has similarities with the three-dimensional Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition. In particular, the maximum of rigidity obtained in the spectral statistics correspond to some intermediary statistics that cannot be described by random matrix theory neither by a Poisson statistics. The wave functions show a multifractal behaviour and the spreading of the center of mass of a wave packet is logarithmic in time. The second part deals with the ground state of a finite density of spinless fermions in two dimensions. After the scaling theory of localisation, it was commonly accepted that there was no metal in two dimensions. This idea has been challenged by the observation of a metal-insulator transition in low density electron gas (Kravchenko et al. 1994). We propose a scenario in which a metallic phase occurs between the Anderson insulator and the pinned Wigner crystal. This intermediate phase is characterized by an alignment of the local currents flowing in the system. (author)

  10. Statistical Analysis of Research Data | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in cancer biology have resulted in the need for increased statistical analysis of research data. The Statistical Analysis of Research Data (SARD) course will be held on April 5-6, 2018 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the National Institutes of Health's Natcher Conference Center, Balcony C on the Bethesda Campus. SARD is designed to provide an overview on the general principles of statistical analysis of research data.  The first day will feature univariate data analysis, including descriptive statistics, probability distributions, one- and two-sample inferential statistics.

  11. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-11-14

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe.

  12. Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    1Department of Veterinary Sciences Science Park and 2Department of Gyneco- logic Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston...breeding colony at the Department of Veterinary Sciences , (Bastrop, Tex.) due to their viral status, reproductive history, or social incompatibili...the Department of Veterinary Sciences campus, an approved facility of the Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Labo- ratory Animal

  13. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  14. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Brédart

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With advances in breast cancer (BC gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83% in France and 180 (97% in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively, returned the ‘Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer’ questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the “living with cancer” and “children-related issues” domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = −0.05, higher anxiety (b = 0.78, and having children (b = 1.51, but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  15. Interactive computer-based programs for a cancer learning center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besa, E C; Nieman, L Z; Joseph, R R

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of a computer-based instruction (CBI) program that was integrated into a multidisciplinary cancer curriculum at the Medical College of Pennsylvania. Instruction took place in a cancer learning center. Modules contained literature, posters, slide sets, videocassette films, and "see, touch, and feel" models to teach and practice breast, testicular, rectal, laryngeal, and colonoscopic examinations. The CBI (programmed on HyperCard) contained tutorials divided into three levels of learning objectives: level one, epidemiology and prevention; level two, diagnosis and staging; and level three, management and prognosis. Simulated cases and test items were developed for each level. To evaluate students' perceptions of the program and provide them with feedback about their performances, the authors designed a questionnaire, held a focus group, and developed a built-in tracking system for the CBI. Results showed that the program was well received, the students answered the test items correctly, and the students wanted more time to study cancer. A description of some of the problems encountered with technology and equipment is provided for faculty who may be interested in designing and implementing similar CBI programs.

  16. Translational Partnership Development Lead | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) is a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc on behalf of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The staff of FNLCR support the NCI’s mission in the fight against cancer and HIV/AIDS. Currently we are seeking a Translational Partnership Development Lead (TPDL) who will work closely with the Office of Translational Resources (OTR) within the Office of the Director (OD) of NCI’s Center for Cancer Research (CCR) to facilitate the successful translation of CCR’s basic and preclinical research advances into new therapeutics and diagnostics. The TPDL with be strategically aligned within FNLCR’s Partnership Development Office (PDO), to maximally leverage the critical mass of expertise available within the PDO. CCR comprises the basic and clinical components of the NCI’s Intramural Research Program (IRP) and consists of ~230 basic and clinical Investigators located at either the NIH main campus in Bethesda or the NCI-Frederick campus. CCR Investigators are focused primarily on cancer and HIV/AIDS, with special emphasis on the most challenging and important high-risk/high-reward problems driving the fields. (See https://ccr.cancer.gov for a full delineation of CCR Investigators and their research activities.) The process of developing research findings into new clinical applications is high risk, complex, variable, and requires multiple areas of expertise seldom available within the confines of a single Investigator’s laboratory. To accelerate this process, OTR serves as a unifying force within CCR for all aspects of translational activities required to achieve success and maintain timely progress. A key aspect of OTR’s function is to develop and strengthen essential communications and collaborations within NIH, with extramural partners and with industry to bring together experts in chemistry, human subjects research

  17. Price-Anderson Act and nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.D.; Long, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    The nuclear incident at Three Mile Island has served to intensify debate about elimination of the federal limit on liability of utilities (and others) for operation of private nuclear reactions and about elimination of possible federal indemnification of utilities (or others) for claims paid in nuclear incidents. Not all those who debate these issues appear to be fully informed about the present nuclear liability and insurance system. This paper provides a brief description of the Price-Anderson Act, as amended, and of the operation of the nuclear insurance pools. It also includes a comment on the recent federal district court award against the Kerr-McGee Corporation

  18. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; van Harten, Willem H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations.

  19. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G.; Brown, Allen C.; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A.; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution. PMID:28781723

  20. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G; Brown, Allen C; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-06-14

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution.

  1. Developing a comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: the Moffitt Cancer Center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Fradley

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio- oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution.

  2. University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center opportunities for improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Tara M; Waldinger, Marcy; Silver, Samuel M

    2014-02-01

    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC) Opportunities for Improvement project involved a detailed patient-level medical record review, feedback to medical providers and clinical leadership, and discussion of potential predictors of discordant or delayed care. The medical record review revealed that reasons for discordant or delayed care were well documented by clinical providers, and medical comorbidity was the most common predisposing factor. Another common theme was the difficulty in obtaining treatment records for patients who received a portion of their care outside UMCCC. The project provided a valuable opportunity to examine established processes of care and data collection and consider how the newly implemented electronic health record might support future efforts aimed at improving efficiency and communication among providers.

  3. Manufacturing/Cell Therapy Specialist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and blood diseases and

  4. PARP inhibitors may affect normal cells in patients with a BRCA mutation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARP inhibition has been approved for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer with BRAC1 and BRAC2 mutations and is being studied in the treatment advanced breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer.  A new study by Center for Cancer Research scientists in the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program and the Laboratory of Genome Integrity, raises concerns that when cancer patients with a BRCA mutation are treated with PARP inhibitors their normal cells may also be affected.  

  5. Molecular Profiles for Lung Cancer Pathogenesis and Detection in U.S. Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. 5School of Dentistry , The University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, USA...hybridization mixes, DMSO and nuclease-free water were heat denatured at 99oC for 5 minutes, cooled to 45oC for 5 minutes, and finally centrifuged at

  6. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  7. Anderson Exploration Ltd. 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Anderson Exploration's undeveloped land inventory in the western provinces decreased 7% to 3,183,000 net acres largely due to lease expiries and drilling activity. The undeveloped land base is located 63% in Alberta, 19% in British Columbia, 17% in Saskatchewan, and 1% in Manitoba. During 1998, Anderson Exploration participated in drilling 446 wells for oil and gas vs. 669 for 1997. The average working interest in the wells was 63% vs. 64% in 1997. In 1998, the company spent $109 million on the construction of field gathering systems and production facilities vs. $123 million in 1997. In 1998, the company's gas sales increased to 555 million cubic feet per day from 549 million cubic feet per day in 1997. Crude oil sales averaged 29,808 barrels per day in 1998, an increase of 9% over the 1997 production. In 1998, the company replaced 148% of production with proven reserve additions, net of revisions, by spending 163% of cash flow from operations on capital spending. After a volatile year in 1 997, natural gas prices stabilized somewhat in 1998. A modest price increase was experienced in 1997. The company's average plant gate natural gas price increased modestly in 1998 to $1.94 per thousand cubic feet, marking the 3rd consecutive price increase. The company owns an average interest of 10.4% in two straddle plants at Empress, Alberta. The company operates and is a 50% owner of Federated Pipe Lines Ltd. The company is committed to protecting the health and safety of all employees and the public, as well as preserving the quality of the environment

  8. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Although most patients with stage II-III rectal cancer at queried National Cancer Institute–designated cancer centers between 2005 and 2011 received 3-dimensional CRT, significant and increasing numbers received IMRT. IMRT utilization is highly variable among institutions and not uniform among sociodemographic groups but may be more consistently embraced in specific clinical settings. Given this trend, comparative-effectiveness research is needed to evaluate the benefits of IMRT for rectal cancer.

  9. Research Summaries: The 11th Biennial Rivkin Center Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Deborah K

    2017-11-01

    In September 2016, the 11th biennial ovarian cancer research symposium was presented by the Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer and the American Association for Cancer Research. The 2016 symposium focused on 4 broad areas of research: Mechanisms of Initiation and Progression of Ovarian Cancer, Tumor Microenvironment and Models of Ovarian Cancer, Detection and Prevention of Ovarian Cancer, and Novel Therapeutics for Ovarian Cancer. The presentations and abstracts from each of these areas are reviewed in this supplement to the International Journal of Gynecologic Oncology.

  10. Quality of life among breast cancer patients undergoing treatment in national cancer centers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Sajani; Shrestha, Deepak Sundar; Taechaboonsermsk, Pimsurang; Siri, Sukhontha; Suparp, Jarueyporn

    2014-01-01

    To study the quality of life and to identify associated factors among breast cancer patients undergoing treatment in national cancer centers in Nepal. One hundred breast cancer patients were selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer EORTC-QLQ-C30 and EORTC-QLQ-BR23 were used to assess quality of life and modified Medical Outcome Study -Social Support survey(mMOS-SS) was used to assess social support. Only multi-item scales of EORTC C30 and BR23 were analyzed for relationships. Independent sample T-tests and ANOVA were applied to analyze differences in mean scores. The score of global health status/quality of life (GHS/GQoL) was marginally above average (mean=52.8). The worst performed scales in C-30 were emotional and social function while best performed scales were physical and role function. In BR-23, most of the patients fell into the problematic group regarding sexual function and enjoyment. Almost 90% had financial difficulties. Symptom scales did not demonstrate many problems. Older individuals, patients with stage I breast cancer and thosewith good social support were found to have good GHS/GQoL. Of all the influencing factors, social support was established to have strong statistical associations with most of the functional scales: GHS/GQoL (0.003), emotional function (system.

  11. Delay in seeking specialized care for oral cancers: experience from a tertiary cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, P; Nair, S; Chaturvedi, P; Nair, D; Agarwal, J P; D'Cruz, A K

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oral cancers are a challenge for treatment, as they require complex procedures for excision and reconstruction. Despite being occurring at a visible site and can be detected easily, many patients present in advanced stages with large tumors. Timely intervention is important in improving survival and quality of life in these patients. The aim of the present study was to find out the causes of delay in seeking specialist care in advanced oral cancer patients. A prospective questionnaire based study was done on 201 consecutive advanced oral squamous cancer patients who underwent surgery at our hospital. All patients had either cancer of gingivobuccal complex (GBC) or tongue and had tumors of size more than 4 cm (T3/T4) and were treatment naοve at presentation. Even though most patients observed abnormal lesions in their mouth, majority delayed the decision to visit a physician early. A significant percentage of patients (50%) also reported a delayed diagnosis by the primary care physician before being referred to a tertiary care center for definitive treatment. The average total duration from symptoms to treatment was 7 months. The main reasons of this delay in receiving treatment were due to patients themselves (primary delay) or due to time taken by the primary physician to diagnose the condition (secondary delay). Oral self-examination can be helpful in detecting oral cancers early.

  12. Controlling Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Fernández, David; Smolka, Stephan; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    In most experiments on Anderson localization so far, only completely random systems without any long-range correlation between the scattering sites have been used, meaning that the Anderson localized modes cannot be controlled. Strongly confined modes were recently observed in the slow-light regime...... of a disordered photonic crystal waveguide and attributed to Anderson localization. We have tested this hypothesis by measuring the light localization length, ξloc, in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide and checked explicitly the criterion of one dimensional Anderson localization that ξloc is shorter than...... the waveguide length LS. Our measurements demonstrate for the first time the close relation between light localization and density of states, which can be used ultimately for controlling Anderson localized modes....

  13. Physician Assistant/Sr. Nurse Practitioner | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  14. Head and Neck Sarcomas: A Comprehensive Cancer Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, Mohamedtaki A.; Galloway, Thomas J.; Lango, Miriam; Ridge, John A.; von Mehren, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Head/neck sarcomas are rare, accounting for about 1% of head/neck malignancies and 5% of sarcomas. Outcomes have historically been worse in this group, due to anatomic constraints leading to difficulty in completely excising tumors, with high rates of local recurrence. We retrospectively analyzed cases of head/neck soft tissue sarcomas (STS) and osteogenic sarcomas managed in a multi-disciplinary setting at Fox Chase Cancer Center from 1999–2009 to describe clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, outcomes, and prognostic factors for disease control and survival. Thirty patients with STS and seven patients with osteogenic sarcoma were identified. Most STS were high grade (23) and almost all were localized at presentation (28). Common histologies were synovial cell (6), rhabdomyosarcoma (5), angiosarcoma (4), liposarcoma (4) and leiomyosarcoma (3). The type of primary therapy and disease outcomes were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The HR and 95% CI for Cox model and median DFS/OS analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated. PMID:24202325

  15. Treatment outcomes in stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer in a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Shaun; Persad, Kamleish; Qiao, Xian; Guarino, Michael; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Treatment outcomes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients diagnosed at stage IIIA have been analyzed in many studies, which generally involve patients younger and healthier than the average patient with this disease. To analyze demographics and treatment outcomes in patients with stage IIIA NSCLC at a community cancer center. We reviewed charts of 226 patients diagnosed with stage IIIA NSCLC from January 2003 to December 2008 treated at our community cancer center. Results Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Study design was retrospective and some medical records were not available. However, this population is likely representative of patients treated in similar settings. In our population, advanced age and male gender were associated with lower median survival. Responses to concurrent and sequential chemoradiation seemed to differ based on age group, which may be useful as a prognostic guideline for similar populations. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  16. An audit of cytoreductive surgeries in ovarian cancer from a rural based cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessai, S B; Patil, V M; Chakraborty, S; Babu, S; Bhattacharjee, A; Nayanar, S; Vikram, S; Balasubramanian, S

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancers are frequently seen at an advanced stage in our center. This audit was planned to see the morbidity and efficacy of different types of cytoreductive surgeries (radical vs. ultra-radical) done in such patients. This was a retrospective analysis of all ovarian cancer patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery at our center from January 2009 to August 2013. The case records of these patients were reviewed and the demographic, disease-related and treatment-related data were extracted. Fifty-fivepatients were identified. Ten (18.2%) patients underwent primary cytoreduction while 45 patients had (81.8%) interval cytoreduction. The resections achieved were optimal in 50 patients (90.9%) and suboptimal in five patients (9.1%). The postoperative median blood loss was 400 (350-600) mL. The median time interval for surgery was 4.0 h (3-5 h). The type of resection achieved (optimal vs. suboptimal) was the only factor affecting the progression free survival (PFS) (Hazard ratio = 0.08 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.3). There was no significant difference in postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing the ultra-radical surgery as compared to those who underwent radical surgery. Optimal cytoreduction may improve PFS in advanced ovarian cancer patients and needs to be done even if it mandates an ultra-radical surgery.

  17. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker | "Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)" will be presented by Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, Chair of the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Date: 2/20/2018; Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm; Location: NCI Shady Grove Campus, Conference Room Seminar 110 Terrace Level East.

  18. PROSPECT (Profiling of Resistance Patterns & Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in Evaluation of Cancers of the Thorax and Therapeutic Target Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.; 2. Instituto de Tecnologia ...States of America, 2 Instituto de Tecnologia Quı́mica e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, 3 Department of Thoracic/Head and

  19. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  20. Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

  1. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    questionnaire to assess their prostate cancer health seeking behavior. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, Dietary risk factors, Lycopene, Genetic ... predisposition , African-Americans, Cancer research training, Quality of life, Community outreach, Recruiting study participants, Cell line inhibition...Institute (NCI) state cancer profiles, the mortality rate is almost three times that of CA men (73.9 per 100,000 AA / 25.6 per 100,000 C). Genetic and

  2. Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  3. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  4. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements

  5. CGH and OCC Announce a New, Two-Year Funding Opportunity for NCI-designated Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH and OCC announce a new funding opportunity available from CGH for cancer prevention and control (CPC) researchers at NCI-designated cancer centers: Administrative Supplements to Promote Cancer Prevention and Control Research in Low and Middle Income Countries.

  6. Mott transitions in the periodic Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, David E; Galpin, Martin R; Mannouch, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The periodic Anderson model (PAM) is studied within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory, with particular emphasis on the interaction-driven Mott transition it contains, and on resultant Mott insulators of both Mott–Hubbard and charge-transfer type. The form of the PAM phase diagram is first deduced on general grounds using two exact results, over the full range of model parameters and including metallic, Mott, Kondo and band insulator phases. The effective low-energy model which describes the PAM in the vicinity of a Mott transition is then shown to be a one-band Hubbard model, with effective hoppings that are not in general solely nearest neighbour, but decay exponentially with distance. This mapping is shown to have a range of implications for the physics of the problem, from phase boundaries to single-particle dynamics; all of which are confirmed and supplemented by NRG calculations. Finally we consider the locally degenerate, non-Fermi liquid Mott insulator, to describe which requires a two-self-energy description. This is shown to yield a number of exact results for the associated local moment, charge, and interaction-renormalised levels, together with a generalisation of Luttinger’s theorem to the Mott insulator. (paper)

  7. Robotic surgery: changing the surgical approach for endometrial cancer in a referral cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiretti, Michele; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Bocciolone, Luca; Landoni, Fabio; Colombo, Nicoletta; Minig, Lucas; Sanguineti, Fabio; Maggioni, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    To study the effect of robotic surgery on the surgical approach to endometrial cancer in a gynecologic oncology center over a short time. Prospective analysis of patients with early-stage endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgery. Teaching hospital. Eighty patients who underwent robotic surgery. Between November 2006 and October 2008, 80 consecutive patients with an initial diagnosis of endometrial cancer consented to undergo robotic surgery at the European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. We collected all patient data for demographics, operating time, estimated blood loss, histologic findings, lymph node count, analgesic-free postoperative day, length of stay, and intraoperative and early postoperative complications. Mean (SD) patient age was 58.3 (11.5) years (95% confidence interval [CI], 55.7-60.9). Body mass index was 25.2 (6.1) kg/m(2) (95% CI, 23.6-26.7). In 3 patients (3.7%), conversion to conventional laparotomy was required. Mean operative time was 181.1 (63.1) minutes (95% CI, 166.7-195.5). Mean docking time was 4.5 (1.1) minutes (95% CI, 2.2-2.7). Mean hospital stay was 2.5 (1.1) days (95% CI, 2.2-2.7), and 93% of patients were analgesic-free on postoperative day 2. Over a relatively short time using the da Vinci surgical system, we observed a substantial change in our surgical activity. For endometrial cancer, open surgical procedures decreased from 78% to 35%. Moreover, our preliminary data confirm that surgical robotic staging for early-stage endometrial cancer is feasible and safe. Age, obesity, and previous surgery do not seem to be contraindications.

  8. Liver disease stage determines whether the immune response stifles or stimulates tumor growth | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at the Center for Cancer Research and colleagues from three cancer research centers in Germany have discovered a mechanism whereby precancerous liver cells, found in individuals with chronic liver disease, can prevent neighboring cells from becoming cancerous but can also speed the growth of cells that have already become cancerous.  Learn more...

  9. Study shows aspirin reduces the risk and recurrence of prostate cancer in African-American men | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    African-American men who take a daily dose of aspirin experience a significantly lower risk of developing advanced prostate cancer – the aggressive and deadly form of the disease – than African-American men who do not regularly use aspirin, according to a study from the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis. Learn more...

  10. Sociodemographic parameters of Esophageal Cancer in northwest India: A regional cancer center experience of 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite various advances in the treatment of Esophageal Cancer (EC, being one of the least responsive tumors to cancer therapy, the overall prognosis remains poor. Therefore, it is significant to understand various sociodemographic factors associated with EC to find out various schemes for primary prevention of the disease. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of medical records of the EC patients registered in the regional cancer center of northwest India from January 2003 to December 2012. The site of the disease and the histology were also recorded in addition to the various sociodemographic parameters. Results: Out of 55,742 patients registered in our hospital; 3,667 were diagnosed to have EC. Male:female ratio was 1.15:1. The mean age was 54.6 ± 11.74 years; 66.15% of the patients were illiterate and 48.6% belonged to the low socioeconomic status. Smoking and alcohol consumption were identified as risk factors in 48 and 25.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The etiology in majority of the patients is linked to tobacco and alcohol, thus, modification of life style with limiting the use of addictions may be an effective strategy in the prevention of this dreaded and mostly incurable disease.

  11. Prevalence of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; Karnakis, Theodora; del Giglio, Auro; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of abnormal glomerular filtration rate in elderly patients with solid tumors. Methods A retrospective study with patients aged >65 years diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011 in a cancer center. The following data were collected: sex, age, serum creatinine at the time of diagnosis and type of tumor. Renal function was calculated using abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulae and then staged in accordance with the clinical practice guidelines published by the Working Group of the National Kidney Foundation. Results A total of 666 patients were included and 60% were male. The median age was 74.2 years (range: 65 to 99 years). The most prevalent diagnosis in the study population were colorectal (24%), prostate (20%), breast (16%) and lung cancer (16%). The prevalence of elevated serum creatinine (>1.0mg/dL) was 30%. However, when patients were assessed using abbreviated MDRD formulae, 66% had abnormal renal function, stratified as follows: 45% with stage 2, 18% with stage 3, 3% with stage 4 and 0.3% with stage 5. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this was the first study to estimate the frequency of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in Brazil. The prevalence of abnormal renal function among our cohort was high. As suspected, the absolute creatinine level does underestimate renal function impairment and should not be used as predictor of chemotherapy metabolism, excretion and consequent toxicity. PMID:25295449

  12. Undergraduate cancer training program for underrepresented students: findings from a minority institution/cancer center partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Gloria D; O'Connell, Mary A; Anderson, Jennifer; Löest, Helena; Ogaz, Dana; Thompson, Beti

    2010-03-01

    Students from racially/ethnically diverse backgrounds are underrepresented in graduate programs in biomedical disciplines. One goal of the Minority Institution/Cancer Center partnership between New Mexico State University (NMSU) and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) is to expand the number of underrepresented students who are trained in cancer research. As part of the collaboration, a summer internship program has been organized at the FHCRC. The program runs for 9 weeks and involves mentored research, research seminars, coffee breaks, social activities, and a final poster session. This study examined the graduate school attendance rates of past interns, explored interns' perceptions of the training program, and identified ways to improve the program. Thirty undergraduate students enrolled at NMSU participated in the internship program from 2002 to 2007 and telephone interviews were conducted on 22 (73%) of them. One-third of the students were currently in graduate school (32%); the remaining were either working (36%), still in undergraduate school (27%), or unemployed and not in school (5%). Students rated highly the following aspects of the program: mentored research, informal time spent with mentors, and research seminars. Students also reported the following activities would further enhance the program: instruction on writing a personal statement for graduate school and tips in choosing an advisor. Students also desired instruction on taking the GRE/MCAT, receiving advice on selecting a graduate or professional school, and receiving advice on where to apply. These findings can inform the design of internship programs aimed at increasing rates of graduate school attendance among underrepresented students.

  13. Cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Anderson-localized regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapienza, Luca; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally measure, by means of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, a 15-fold enhancement of the spontaneous emission decay rate of single semiconductor quantum dots coupled to disorder-induced Anderson-localized modes with efficiencies reaching 94%....

  14. Martin Anderson valis "Joonase lähetamise" / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2000-01-01

    M. Anderson kommenteeris ameerika muusikaajakirjas "Fanfare" viit talle kõige enam mõju avaldanud heliplaati, sh. R. Tobiase oratooriumi "Joonase lähetamine" CD-plaati (BIS). M. Andersoni huvist eesti muusika vastu

  15. Controlling Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Fernández, David; Smolka, Stephan; Stobbe, Søren

    structures [1,2]. Originally proposed for electrons by P. W. Anderson [3], only completely random systems without any long-range correlation between the scattering sites have been used so far, meaning that the Anderson-localized modes cannot be controlled. In disordered photonic crystals, these modes...... are predicted to appear at frequencies in or near a band gap [4] providing a possible way to control Anderson-localized modes. We have tested this hypothesis by measuring the light localization length, ξ, in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) as a function of the dispersive slowdown factor of light...... of the waveguide. Our measurements demonstrate for the first time the close relation between light localization and density of states [5], which can be used ultimately for controlling the extension and spectral position of Anderson-localized modes....

  16. Probing the statistical properties of Anderson localization with quantum emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup; Sapienza, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Wave propagation in disordered media can be strongly modified by multiple scattering and wave interference. Ultimately, the so-called Anderson-localized regime is reached when the waves become strongly confined in space. So far, Anderson localization of light has been probed in transmission...... experiments by measuring the intensity of an external light source after propagation through a disordered medium. However, discriminating between Anderson localization and losses in these experiments remains a major challenge. In this paper, we present an alternative approach where we use quantum emitters...... embedded in disordered photonic crystal waveguides as light sources. Anderson-localized modes are efficiently excited and the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra allows us to explore their statistical properties, for example the localization length and average loss length. With increasing the amount...

  17. Fox Chase Network: Fox Chase Cancer Center's community hospital affiliation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higman, S A; McKay, F J; Engstrom, P F; O'Grady, M A; Young, R C

    2000-01-01

    Fox Chase Cancer Center developed a format for affiliation with community providers in 1986. Fox Chase Network was formed to establish hospital-based community cancer centers to increase access to patients involved in clinical research. Under this program, the Fox Chase Network now contributes 500 patients per year to prevention and clinical research studies. As relationships with community providers form, patient referrals have increased at Fox Chase Cancer Center and for each Fox Chase Network member. A dedicated staff is required to operate the central office on a day-to-day basis as well as at each affiliate. We have found this to be a critical element in each program's success. New challenges in the cancer business-increasing volumes with declining revenue-have caused us to reconfigure the services offered to affiliates, while maintaining true to our mission: to reduce the burden of human cancer.

  18. Fox Chase Cancer Center's Genitourinary Division: a national resource for research, innovation and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzo, Robert G; Horwitz, Eric M; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2016-04-01

    Founded in 1904, Fox Chase Cancer Center remains committed to its mission. It is one of 41 centers in the country designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute, is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, holds the magnet designation for nursing excellence, is one of the first to establish a family cancer risk assessment program, and has achieved national distinction because of the scientific discoveries made there that have advanced clinical care. Two of its researchers have won Nobel prizes. The Genitourinary Division is nationally recognized and viewed as one of the top driving forces behind the growth of Fox Chase due to its commitment to initiating and participating in clinical trials, its prolific contributions to peer-reviewed publications and presentations at scientific meetings, its innovations in therapies and treatment strategies, and its commitment to bringing cutting-edge therapies to patients.

  19. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches

    OpenAIRE

    Micklitz, T.; Müller, C. A.; Altland, A.

    2013-01-01

    Signatures of strong Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Anderson localization leads to a formation of a coherence peak in the \\emph{forward} scattering direction (as opposed to the common weak localization backscattering peak). We present a microscopic, and fully time...

  20. Controlling Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Garcia, Pedro D.; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We prove Anderson localization in the slow-light regime of a photonic crystal waveguide by measuring the ensemble-averaged localization length which is controlled by the dispersion of the disordered photonic crystal waveguide.......We prove Anderson localization in the slow-light regime of a photonic crystal waveguide by measuring the ensemble-averaged localization length which is controlled by the dispersion of the disordered photonic crystal waveguide....

  1. A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette Linnet; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2016-01-01

    , depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence. METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical......PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of a person-centered intervention consisting of two to four nurse-led conversations using guided self-determination tailored to gynecologic cancer (GSD-GYN-C) on gynecological cancer survivors' quality of life (QOL), impact of cancer, distress, anxiety...

  2. Chromosomal Translocations: Chicken or Egg? | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many tumor cells have abnormal chromosomes. Some of these abnormalities are caused by chromosomal translocations, which occur when two chromosomes break and incorrectly rejoin, resulting in an exchange of genetic material. Translocations can activate oncogenes, silence tumor suppressor genes, or result in the creation of completely new fusion gene products. While there is little doubt that chromosomal translocations can contribute to cancer, there is an active "chicken and the egg" discussion about the role translocations and other chromosomal abnormalities play—do they actually cause cancer or merely occur because of other changes within the cancer cell.  

  3. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B are rare genetic diseases, which lead to the development of medullary thyroid cancer, usually in childhood. Surgery is the only standard treatment.

  4. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    2006. [18] L. A. Brinton, J. R. Daling, J. M. Liff, et al., “ Oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk among younger women,” Journal of the National...perceived social support reported fewer anxiety and depressive symptoms [63]. These results also revealed a positive relationship between breast cancer...64], along with other more general measures of psychological well-being, including depression and anxiety. Future studies incorporating these

  5. Possible new treatment for Kaposi sarcoma | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaborative effort by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Celgene Corporation, a global biopharmaceutical company, has yielded a possible new treatment for Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a cancer caused by a human gammaherpesvirus. The drug, called pomalidomide, is highly effective against KS and has fewer side effects compared with chemotherapy, suggesting that it may be a useful alternative to traditional therapies. Read more...

  6. Symptomatic improvement reported after receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Blazek-O'Neill, Betsy; Kopar, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate patient-perceived benefits from receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center. During a 6-month period, adults at a university hospital receiving Reiki through volunteer services were invited to complete a survey asking about perceived changes after Reiki. Changes in pain, mood, distress, sleep, and appetite were rated on a 5-point scale from no benefit to great benefit. Surveys were distributed after completing treatment and were returned in postage-paid envelops. A total of 145 surveys were completed (34.5% response rate), with 47 participants seen in the cancer infusion center and 98 in other areas of the hospital. Reiki was rated as a positive experience by 94% at the cancer center and 93% of others, with 92% at the cancer center and 86% of others interested in receiving additional Reiki sessions. Symptomatic improvement was similar for people at the cancer center and others, respectively, with much to great improvement for 89% and 86% for relaxation, 75% and 75% for anxiety/worry, 81% and 78% for improved mood, 43% and 35% for improved sleep, 45% and 49% for reduced pain, 38% and 43% for reduced isolation/loneliness, 75% and 63% for improved attitude, and 30% and 30% for improved appetite. Response was unaffected by previous exposure to Reiki, massage, or other touch therapy. Reiki results in a broad range of symptomatic benefits, including improvements in common cancer-related symptoms.

  7. Tumor Biology and Immunology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor Biology and Immunology The Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium is collaborating with National Center for Advanced Translational Sciences to complete whole exome sequencing on canine meningioma samples. Results will be published and made publicly available.

  8. Advancing Prostate Cancer Research by Providing Summer Research Opportunities for HBCU Students at the Cancer Center at UTHSCSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    NCI-designated cancer center and participate in state-of-the-art prostate cancer research in many focus areas including biomarkers , genetics, tumor...vortioxetine, which has beneficial effects on cognitive impairment in depression . The drug was given in the diet, and controls received standard diet... biomarkers for metastatic disease. The goal of this project was to identify likely markers that could be used to develop clinical assays to help predict

  9. Finding the Right Care | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trained as a registered nurse and with a doctoral degree in public health, Jane D. is no stranger to the U.S. health care system. But, when she found herself facing a diagnosis of anal cancer in 2013, she felt adrift.

  10. NCI RNA Biology 2017 symposium recap | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent discovery of new classes of RNAs and the demonstration that alterations in RNA metabolism underlie numerous human cancers have resulted in enormous interest among CCR investigators in RNA biology. In order to share the latest research in this exciting field, the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology held its second international symposium April 23-24, 2017, in Natcher Auditorium. Learn more...

  11. Pediatric Oncology Branch - Support Services | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Support Services As part of the comprehensive care provided at the NCI Pediatric Oncology Branch, we provide a wide range of services to address the social, psychological, emotional, and practical facets of pediatric cancer and to support patients and families while they are enrolled in clinical research protocols.

  12. The Art of Interpreting Epigenetic Activity | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even though all the cells of the human body share a common genomic blueprint, epigenetic activity such as DNA methylation, introduces molecular diversity that results in functionally and biologically different cellular constituents. In cancers, this ability of epigenetic activity to introduce molecular diversity is emerging as a powerful classifier of biological aggressiveness.

  13. Anomalous resonance of the symmetric single-impurity Anderson model in the presence of pairing fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guang-Ming Zhang; Lu Yu

    1998-10-01

    We consider the symmetric single-impurity Anderson model in the presence of pairing fluctuations. In the isotropic limit, the degrees of freedom of the local impurity are separated into hybridizing and non-hybridizing modes. The self-energy for the hybridizing modes can be obtained exactly, leading to two subbands centered at ±U/2. For the non-hybridizing modes, the second order perturbation yields a singular resonance of the marginal Fermi liquid form. By multiplicative renormalization, the self-energy is derived exactly, showing the resonance is pinned at the Fermi level, while its strength is weakened by renormalization. (author)

  14. What Are Cancer Centers Advertising to the Public? A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B.; Donohue, Julie M.; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Background Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, the content of these advertisements has not been analyzed. Objective To characterize the informational and emotional content of cancer center advertisements. Design Systematic analysis of all cancer center advertisements in top U.S. consumer magazines (N=269) and television networks (N=44) in 2012. Measurements Using a standardized codebook, we assessed (1) types of clinical services promoted; (2) information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, and costs; (3) use of emotional advertising appeals; and (4) use of patient testimonials. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti. Kappa values ranged from 0.77 to 1.0. Results A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%; padvertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%; padvertisements mentioned insurance coverage or costs (5%). Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), most often evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and evoking fear (30%). Nearly half of advertisements included patient testimonials, usually focused on survival or cure. Testimonials rarely included disclaimers (15%) and never described the results a typical patient might expect. Limitations Internet advertisements were not included. Conclusions Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy using emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, or costs. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. PMID:24863081

  15. Prevalence of Complementary Medicine Use in Patients With Cancer: A Turkish Comprehensive Cancer Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suayib Yalcin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has been popular among patients with cancer for several decades. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of CAM use and to identify the factors affecting CAM use in a large patient cohort seen at a comprehensive cancer center in Turkey. Patients and Methods: An investigator-designed survey was completed by volunteer patients who visited the outpatient clinic in the medical oncology department. CAM use encompassed pharmacologic agents including vitamins, dietary supplements, and herbal products or nonpharmacologic methods like prayer, meditation, hypnosis, massage, or acupuncture. Results: Of 1,499 patients who answered the survey, 1,433 (96% used nonpharmacologic CAM and 60 (4% used pharmacologic CAM (pCAM. The most frequent types of CAM used were prayer (n = 1,433 followed by herbal products (n = 42. pCAM use was not significantly associated with age (P = .63, sex (P = .15, diagnosis (P = .15, or income level (P = .09. However, it was significantly associated with the level of education (P = .0067 and employment status (P < .001. Patients with higher education levels used more pCAM products (P = .025. Among 60 pCAM users, six patients (10% used pCAM for more than 2 years and 22 (36% did not consult their physicians about their pCAM use. Only nine patients (15% reported unpleasant adverse effects related to pCAM. Conclusion: Although CAM use was high among our patients, prevalence of pCAM use was lower than expected. Patients with higher education levels tended to use more pCAM.

  16. Fasting glucose and risk of colorectal cancer in the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeree; Cho, Sooyoung; Woo, Hyeongtaek; Park, Sue K; Shin, Hai-Rim; Chang, Soung-Hoon; Yoo, Keun-Young; Shin, Aesun

    2017-01-01

    Previous cohort studies have demonstrated a positive association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, there are few comparisons between DM groups categorized by fasting glucose level. This study examined associations between diabetes as defined by fasting glucose level and self-reported history of DM and CRC risk among Korean adults. Data from the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort between 1993 and 2005 were analyzed. The study population comprised 14,570 participants aged 20 years or older. Participants were followed until December 31, 2012 (median follow-up: 11.9 years). Among participants with high fasting glucose (≥126mg/dL), the risk of developing CRC was significantly higher (HR: 1.51 [1.02-2.25]) than among participants with low fasting glucose (fasting glucose and history of DM were considered together, the risk of CRC among participants with both high fasting glucose and history of DM was 54% (HR: 1.54 [0.97-2.43]), and the risk of CRC among participants with high fasting glucose and no history of DM was 50% (HR: 1.50 [0.73-3.05]). When the first 5 years of follow-up were excluded, among participants with high fasting glucose, the risk of developing CRC was significantly higher (HR: 1.61 [1.02-2.56]) than among participants with low fasting glucose. Risk of CRC was also significantly higher among participants with high fasting glucose and no history of DM (HR: 1.69 [1.01-2.84]). High fasting glucose and self-reported history of DM were associated with increased risk of CRC in this Korean population.

  17. Microenvironment Influences Interaction of Signaling Molecules | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor progression depends not only on events that occur within cancer cells but also on the interaction of cancer cells with their environment, which can regulate tumor growth and metastasis and modulate the formation of new blood vessels to nourish the tumor. All cells communicate with other cells around them, including endothelial cells (the cells that make up blood vessels). They also interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM), a network of sugars and proteins that supports cells. Communication between neighboring cells and molecules often occurs through interaction among and between molecules on the cell surface and molecules of the ECM. Defining these interactions should facilitate the development of novel approaches to limit tumor progression.

  18. Modern Soft Tissue Pathology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book comprehensively covers modern soft tissue pathology and includes both tumors and non-neoplastic entities. Soft tissues make up a large bulk of the human body, and they are susceptible to a wide range of diseases. Many soft-tissue tumors are biologically very aggressive, and the chance of them metastasizing to vital organs is quite high. In recent years, the outlook for soft-tissue cancers has brightened dramatically due to the increased accuracy of the pathologist's tools.

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of KSHV in 1994 was a historical landmark in tumor virology and human cancer research. KSHV's subsequent identification as a cause of Kaposi sarcoma and its association with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease soon attracted the attention of hundreds of research laboratories and motivated thousands of virologists and oncologists to switch their research directions. To date, PubMed has collected nearly 5000 papers on KSHV from numerous journal publications throughout the world.

  20. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. Key Roles/Responsibilities The Senior Laboratory Animal Technician will be responsible for: Daily tasks associated with the care, breeding and treatment of research animals for experimental purposes Management of rodent breeding colonies consisting of multiple, genetically complex strains and associated record keeping and database management Colony management procedures including: tail clipping, animal identification, weaning Data entry consistent with complex colony management Collection of routine diagnostic samples Coordinating shipment of live animals and specimens Performing rodent experimental procedures including basic necropsy and blood collection Observation and recording of physical signs of animal health Knowledge of safe working practices using chemical carcinogen and biological hazards Work schedule may include weekend and holiday hours

  1. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

    2014-03-21

    Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments.

  2. WORRIES OF THE CANCER PATIENTS: THE EXPERIENCE OF THE EDUCATION CENTER OF THE INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE CANCEROLOGIA

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras-Cruz Ana Cecilia; Castro-Camargo Gladys Juliette; Puerto-Jiménez Devi Nereira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: to know the characteristics and worries of the cancer patients allows imparting an adequate attention to their needs in order to answer the experience of living with cancer. Objective: to identify the main worries of the cancer patients expressed to contact the center. Methods: selection for one year of cancer patients who attended to the education center for the patients and their families of the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INC). Field diaries were ...

  3. The benefits of cancer screening in kidney transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taigo; Kakuta, Yoichi; Abe, Toyofumi; Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Takahara, Shiro; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-02-01

    The frequency of malignancy is increasing in kidney transplant recipients. Posttransplant malignancy (PTM) is a major cause of long-term graft survival inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the frequency and prognosis of PTM at our center and examined the efficacy of cancer screening. Between 1972 and 2013, 750 patients were followed-up at our center. Annual physical examinations and screenings were performed to detect PTM. We investigated the detail of two distinctive cancer groups: screening-detected cancers and symptom-detected cancers. Seventy-seven PTM were identified during the follow-up period. The mean age at the initial PTM detection was 43.6 ± 12.8 years. The mean interval from transplantation to cancer diagnosis was 134.5 ± 11.3 months. Among the 77 patients, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) was the most common cancer (19.5%, 15/77), followed by renal cell carcinoma (15.6%, 12/77). Of the cancer cases, 46.8% (36/77) were detected via screening. The most frequently screening-detected cancer was renal cell carcinoma of the native kidney and breast cancer (22.2%, 8/36). However, it was difficult to detect PTLD, urothelial carcinoma, and colorectal cancer via screening. Interestingly, Cox proportional regression analyses revealed nonscreened recipients to be a significant prognostic factor for PTM (P kidney transplant recipients. These findings support the provision of long-term appropriate screening for kidney transplant recipients. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cancer Center Clinic and Research Team Perceptions of Identity and Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Torsten; Lee, Simon J Craddock; Garcia, Sandra; Gill, Mary; Duncan, Tobi; Williams, Erin L; Gerber, David E

    2017-12-01

    Conduct of cancer clinical trials requires coordination and cooperation among research and clinic teams. Diffusion of and confusion about responsibility may occur if team members' perceptions of roles and objectives do not align. These factors are critical to the success of cancer centers but are poorly studied. We developed a survey adapting components of the Adapted Team Climate Inventory, Measure of Team Identification, and Measure of In-Group Bias. Surveys were administered to research and clinic staff at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t tests, and analyses of variance. Responses were received from 105 staff (clinic, n = 55; research, n = 50; 61% response rate). Compared with clinic staff, research staff identified more strongly with their own group ( P teams, we also identified key differences, including perceptions of goal clarity and sharing, understanding and alignment with cancer center goals, and importance of outcomes. Future studies should examine how variation in perceptions and group dynamics between clinic and research teams may impact function and processes of cancer care.

  5. Mutant HABP2 Causes Non-Medullary Thyroid Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that lies at the base of the throat in front of the windpipe. A member of the endocrine system, the thyroid secretes hormones to regulate heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and metabolism. Cancer of the thyroid is the most common endocrine cancer and the eighth most common cancer in the U.S. An estimated 63,450 Americans will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer this year. The vast majority is of follicular cell origin, and the remaining cancer originates from parafollicular cells, so called medullary thyroid cancer.

  6. The Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence: past accomplishments and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Rudy L; Sunnarborg, Susan; DeSimone, Joseph; Haroon, Zishan

    2011-01-01

    The Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (C-CCNE) is funded by the National Cancer Institute and is based at the University of North Carolina. The C-CCNE features interactions between physical and biological scientists in a series of projects and cores that work together to quickly harness innovations in nanotechnology for the early diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Two key focus areas of the C-CCNE are, first, the selective delivery of drugs and imaging agents utilizing advanced nanoparticle technology, and second, novel approaches to imaging and radiotherapy utilizing carbon nanotube-based x-ray sources.

  7. Documented quality of care in certified colorectal cancer centers in Germany: German Cancer Society benchmarking report for 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselmann, S; Winter, A; Ferencz, J; Seufferlein, T; Post, S

    2014-04-01

    In order to improve the quality of treatment for cancer patients the German Cancer Society (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft) implemented a certification system for oncological care institutions. The certified colorectal cancer centers present the structures, processes and results of their network in the framework of an auditing procedure. The current benchmarking report by the certified centers reflects the centers' reference results over a period of 3 years. The figures included in the benchmarking report reflect the areas of interdisciplinary collaboration, guideline-compliant treatment, and expertise of the main treatment partners. High percentages were shown for indicators reflecting pretreatment and postoperative case presentations in multidisciplinary team meetings (91.8 % or 98.1 %), psycho-oncologic care (54.8 %) as well as social service counseling (77.1 %). Good quality of the TME rectal specimen and adequate lymph-node retrieval (12 lymph nodes at least) was achieved by 93 % or 96.6 % of the centers. Adjuvant chemotherapy (colon, Union for International Cancer Control [UICC] stage III) or neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (rectum, UICC stages II and III) received 73.7 % or 80 % of relevant patients. Quotas of anastomotic leakage in the colon or rectum were 4.4 % or 7.6 %, whereas postoperative mortality amounted to 2.6 %. The present analysis of the results, together with the centers' statements and the auditors' reports, shows that most of the targets for indicator figures are being better met over the course of time. In addition, however, there is a clear potential for improvement and the centers are verifiably addressing this. A transparent presentation of the quality of care and reflection on and discussion of the results among the treatment partners in the certified network and with the auditors during the certification process may contribute to constant quality improvement in oncological care.

  8. Vaccines 2.0 | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1974, Jay A. Berzofsky, M.D., Ph.D., now Chief of CCR’s Vaccine Branch, came to NIH to study protein folding. His curious mind and collaborative spirit quickly led him into the intertwined fields of immunology and vaccine development. With close to 500 publications to his name, Berzofsky has pioneered the characterization of B- and T-cell epitopes and their modification to make vaccines directed against cancer and chronic infectious diseases. He has also characterized and taken advantage of the cellular and molecular regulators of immune responses in order to enhance tumor immunity and vaccine efficacy. In the last several years, he has translated many of these strategies into promising clinical trials. From the microcosm of his laboratory, he brings the same spirit of cross-fertilizing, bench-to-bedside research to leading the Vaccine Branch as a whole.

  9. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loonen, Jacqueline J; Blijlevens, Nicole Ma; Prins, Judith; Dona, Desiree Js; Den Hartogh, Jaap; Senden, Theo; van Dulmen-Den Broeder, Eline; van der Velden, Koos; Hermens, Rosella Pmg

    2018-01-16

    Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the "Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model", that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  10. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  11. Quantum criticality of quasi one-dimensional topological Anderson insulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altland, A.; Bagrets, D.; Fritz, L.; Kamenev, A.; Schmiedt, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytic theory of quantum criticality in the quasi one-dimensional topological Anderson insulators of class AIII and BDI. We describe the systems in terms of two parameters (g,χ) representing localization and topological properties, respectively. Surfaces of half-integer valued χ

  12. Spectra of Anderson type models with decaying randomness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    There have been but few models in higher dimensional random operators of the Anderson model type in which presence ... The models we consider in this paper are related to the discrete Laplacian ( u)(n) = ∑. |i|=1 u(n + i) on l2( ν). .... identically distributed real valued random variables with distribution µ. The operator H0.

  13. Coordination of lanthanide cation to an Anderson type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 5. Coordination of lanthanide cation to an Anderson type polyoxometalate anion ... and spectroscopy. Vaddypally Shivaiah Tanmay Chatterjee Samar K Das. Special issue on Chemical Crystallography Volume 126 Issue 5 September 2014 pp 1525-1533 ...

  14. Interplay of Anderson localization and strong interaction in disordered systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henseler, Peter

    2010-01-15

    We study the interplay of disorder localization and strong local interactions within the Anderson-Hubbard model. Taking into account local Mott-Hubbard physics and static screening of the disorder potential, the system is mapped onto an effective single-particle Anderson model, which is studied within the self-consistent theory of electron localization. For fermions, we find rich nonmonotonic behavior of the localization length {xi}, particularly in two-dimensional systems, including an interaction-induced exponential enhancement of {xi} for small and intermediate disorders and a strong reduction of {xi} due to hopping suppression by strong interactions. In three dimensions, we identify for half filling a Mott-Hubbard-assisted Anderson localized phase existing between the metallic and the Mott-Hubbard-gapped phases. For small U there is re-entrant behavior from the Anderson localized phase to the metallic phase. For bosons, the unrestricted particle occupation number per lattice site yields a monotonic enhancement of {xi} as a function of decreasing interaction, which we assume to persist until the superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate phase is entered. Besides, we study cold atomic gases expanding, by a diffusion process, in a weak random potential. We show that the density-density correlation function of the expanding gas is strongly affected by disorder and we estimate the typical size of a speckle spot, i.e., a region of enhanced or depleted density. Both a Fermi gas and a Bose-Einstein condensate (in a mean-field approach) are considered. (orig.)

  15. Interpolation solution of the single-impurity Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzemsky, A.L.

    1990-10-01

    The dynamical properties of the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM) is studied using a novel Irreducible Green's Function method (IGF). The new solution for one-particle GF interpolating between the strong and weak correlation limits is obtained. The unified concept of relevant mean-field renormalizations is indispensable for strong correlation limit. (author). 21 refs

  16. Eigenfunction statistics for Anderson model with Hölder continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    continuous (0 < α ≤ 1) single site distribution. In localized regime, we study the distri- bution of eigenfunctions in space and energy simultaneously. In a certain scaling limit, we prove limit points are Poisson. Keywords. Anderson model; Hölder continuous measure; Poisson statistics. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification ...

  17. Controlling Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Fernández, David; Smolka, Stephan; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    are predicted to appear at frequencies in or near a band gap [4] providing a possible way to control Anderson-localized modes. We have tested this hypothesis by measuring the light localization length, ξ, in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) as a function of the dispersive slowdown factor of light...

  18. Interplay of Anderson localization and strong interaction in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henseler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We study the interplay of disorder localization and strong local interactions within the Anderson-Hubbard model. Taking into account local Mott-Hubbard physics and static screening of the disorder potential, the system is mapped onto an effective single-particle Anderson model, which is studied within the self-consistent theory of electron localization. For fermions, we find rich nonmonotonic behavior of the localization length ξ, particularly in two-dimensional systems, including an interaction-induced exponential enhancement of ξ for small and intermediate disorders and a strong reduction of ξ due to hopping suppression by strong interactions. In three dimensions, we identify for half filling a Mott-Hubbard-assisted Anderson localized phase existing between the metallic and the Mott-Hubbard-gapped phases. For small U there is re-entrant behavior from the Anderson localized phase to the metallic phase. For bosons, the unrestricted particle occupation number per lattice site yields a monotonic enhancement of ξ as a function of decreasing interaction, which we assume to persist until the superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate phase is entered. Besides, we study cold atomic gases expanding, by a diffusion process, in a weak random potential. We show that the density-density correlation function of the expanding gas is strongly affected by disorder and we estimate the typical size of a speckle spot, i.e., a region of enhanced or depleted density. Both a Fermi gas and a Bose-Einstein condensate (in a mean-field approach) are considered. (orig.)

  19. What are cancer centers advertising to the public?: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Donohue, Julie M; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2014-06-17

    Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, analyses of the content of these advertisements are lacking. To characterize the informational and emotional content of direct-to-consumer cancer center advertisements. Content analysis. Top U.S. consumer magazines (n = 269) and television networks (n = 44) in 2012. Types of clinical services promoted; information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, costs, and insurance availability; use of emotional advertising appeals; and use of patient testimonials were assessed. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti, and κ values ranged from 0.77 to 1.00. A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%). Benefits of advertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%) but were rarely quantified (2%). Few advertisements mentioned coverage or costs (5%), and none mentioned specific insurance plans. Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and inducing fear (30%). Nearly one half of advertisements included patient testimonials, which were usually focused on survival, rarely included disclaimers (15%), and never described the results that a typical patient may expect. Internet advertisements were not included. Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy with emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, costs, or insurance availability. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. National Institutes of Health.

  20. Strategic planning for the TotalCare Cancer Center at Los Alamitos Medical Center with data analysis of caseloads before and after opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Kelli K

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of the new TotalCare Cancer Center at Los Alamitos Medical Center during its first 6 months of operation. This study evaluates the short-term impact that the center has had on patient caseload in the areas of infusion and radiation oncology. Two 6-month time blocks were evaluated using the cancer registry database. Cases were reviewed to determine the number of patients that received chemotherapy and radiation therapy at Los Alamitos Medical Center prior to and directly after the initiation of the TotalCare Cancer Center to determine if the initial goals laid out by the administration were met. The same number of patients received chemotherapy at the hospital prior to and directly after the center was opened and few patients received radiation therapy in the first 6 months after the center was opened. The TotalCare Cancer Center did not appear to have the desired impact on caseload as was desired by the administration within the first 6 months of operation. However, overall caseload did increase over that time period, concluding that there may be a lag in overall affect of the new center.

  1. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  2. Quantum-classical correspondence in multimensional nonlinear systems: Anderson localization and "superdiffusive" solitons

    KAUST Repository

    Brambila, Danilo

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically studied Anderson localization in a 2D+1 nonlinear kicked rotor model. The system shows a very rich dynamical behavior, where the Anderson localization is suppressed and soliton wave-particles undergo a superdiffusive motion.

  3. Prevalence of Anderson-Fabry disease in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the European Anderson-Fabry Disease survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elliott, Perry; Baker, Robert; Pasquale, Ferdinando; Quarta, Giovanni; Ebrahim, Hatim; Mehta, Atul B.; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Anastasakis, Aristides; Autore, Camillo; Musumeci, Maria Beatrice; Frenneaux, Michael; Gimeno, Juan; Tiina, Heliö; Kuusisto, Johanna; Aalto-Setäla, Katriina; McKeown, Pascal; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Fernandez, Xusto; Pacileo, Giuseppe; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Rapezzi, Claudio; Biagini, Elena; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Christiaans, Imke; Zachara, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) in patients presenting with unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of AFD in a large, consecutive cohort of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using rapid

  4. Vaginal Radical Trachelectomy for early stage cervical cancer. Results of the Danish National Single Center Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, L; Høgdall, C; Loft, A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present and evaluate an unselected national single center strategy with fertility preserving trachelectomy in cervical cancer. In 2003 nationwide single-center referral of women for trachelectomies was agreed upon between all Danish departments performing cervical cancer surgery...... with the purpose of increasing volume, to increase surgical safety and facilitate follow-up. METHODS: Prospective data were recorded in the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database of all Vaginal Radical Trachelectomies (VRT) performed in Denmark between 2002 and 2013. Oncologic, fertility and obstetrical outcomes...... of 120 unselected consecutive VRTs were assessed. To obtain complete follow-up about fertility treatment, pregnancy and obstetric outcome the women filled out an electronic questionnaire. Median follow-up: 55.7 months. RESULTS: 85.8% of the patients had stage IB1 disease, 68.3% squamous cell carcinomas...

  5. 78 FR 39670 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health.... SUMMARY: On May 2, 2013, the Administrator of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program received a petition (Petition 002) requesting the addition of prostate cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health...

  6. Use of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program screening and accrual log to address cancer clinical trial accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Germain, Diane; Denicoff, Andrea M; Dimond, Eileen P; Carrigan, Angela; Enos, Rebecca A; Gonzalez, Maria M; Wilkinson, Kathy; Mathiason, Michelle A; Duggan, Brenda; Einolf, Shaun; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Bryant, Donna M; Thompson, Michael A; Grubbs, Stephen S; Go, Ronald S

    2014-03-01

    Screening logs have the potential to help oncology clinical trial programs at the site level, as well as trial leaders, address enrollment in real time. Such an approach could be especially helpful in improving representation of racial/ethnic minority and other underrepresented populations in clinical trials. The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) developed a screening log. Log data collected from March 2009 through May 2012 were analyzed for number of patients screened versus enrolled, including for demographic subgroups; screening methods; and enrollment barriers, including reasons for ineligibility and provider and patient reasons for declining to offer or participate in a trial. User feedback was obtained to better understand perceptions of log utility. Of 4,483 patients screened, 18.4% enrolled onto NCCCP log trials. Reasons for nonenrollment were ineligibility (51.6%), patient declined (25.8%), physician declined (15.6%), urgent need for treatment (6.6%), and trial suspension (0.4%). Major reasons for patients declining were no desire to participate in trials (43.2%) and preference for standard of care (39%). Major reasons for physicians declining to offer trials were preference for standard of care (53%) and concerns about tolerability (29.3%). Enrollment rates onto log trials did not differ between white and black (P = .15) or between Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients (P = .73). Other races had lower enrollment rates than whites and blacks. Sites valued the ready access to log data on enrollment barriers, with some sites changing practices to address those barriers. Use of screening logs to document enrollment barriers at the local level can facilitate development of strategies to enhance clinical trial accrual.

  7. New immunotherapy approach leads to remission in patients with the most common type of childhood cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), the most common type of childhood cancer. B-ALL is characterized by an overproduction of immature white blood cells called lymphoblasts. In a trial led by Center for Cancer Research investigators, around 70 to 90 percent of patients whose B-ALL has relapsed or developed resistance to chemotherapy entered remission after CAR T-cell therapy targeting CD19. Read more…

  8. Second-Opinion Review of Breast Imaging at a Cancer Center: Is It Worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Kristen; D'Alessio, Donna; Keating, Delia M; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Second-opinion review of breast imaging studies can be a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether reinterpretation of studies obtained at institutions outside a cancer center influences clinical management, specifically by revealing additional cancer and preventing unnecessary biopsy. A review was conducted of breast imaging studies of 200 patients who underwent ultrasound and MRI at community facilities and had the images submitted for second opinions at a cancer center between January and April 2014. Each case was evaluated for concordance between the original report and the second-opinion interpretation. Second-opinion review resulting in the recommendation and performance of new biopsies was further subdivided into benign, high-risk, and malignant categories based on the histopathologic results obtained at the cancer center. Second-opinion review of the 200 cases showed a change in interpretation in 55 cases (28%; 95% CI, 21-34%). Overall, 26 recommendations (13%; 95% CI, 9-18%) led to a major change in management. Twenty new biopsies were performed, yielding 10 malignancies (5%; 95% CI, 2-9%) and four high-risk lesions (2%; 95% CI, 1-5%). Surgical management was changed to mastectomy for 6 of 10 patients (60%) with new sites of biopsy-proven malignancy. Eight biopsies were averted (4%; 95% CI, 2-8%) on the basis of benign interpretation of the imaging findings, and no disease was found at 1-year follow-up evaluation. Reinterpretation of studies obtained outside a cancer center resulted in a change in interpretation in more than one-fourth of submitted studies. Additional cancer was detected in 5% of patients, and biopsy was averted for 4%. The practice of second-opinion review influences clinical management and adds value to patient care.

  9. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium... Assistance on March 18, 2010, applicable to workers of Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson... have occurred involving workers in support of the Anderson, South Carolina location of Plastic Omnium...

  10. BMI1 and H-RAS Cooperate to Drive Breast Cancer Metastasis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    There have been significant improvements in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages of the disease. However, even when patients are identified early, there is a 30 percent chance of recurrence after apparently successful treatment of the initial tumor. The major cause of death for breast cancer patients is metastasis of the tumor to other organs but, unfortunately, the mechanisms of metastatic progression and cancer recurrence are poorly understood.

  11. Obesity-Linked Mouse Models of Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy Stauffer, Ph.D., and colleagues working with Robert  Wiltrout, Ph.D., in CCR’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, along with collaborators in the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, have developed a novel mouse model that demonstrates how fat-producing phenotypes can influence the development of hepatic cancer.   The team recently reported their findings in Cancer Research.

  12. Five National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers' data collection on racial/ethnic minority participation in therapeutic trials: a current view and opportunities for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Ernest T; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Ford, Jean G; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Brahmer, Julie R; Chen, Moon S; Jones, Lovell A; Hurd, Thelma C; Rogers, Lisa M; Nguyen, Lynne H; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Fouad, Mona; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2014-04-01

    To ensure that National Institutes of Health-funded research is relevant to the population's needs, specific emphasis on proportional representation of minority/sex groups into National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers' clinical research programs is reported to the NCI. EMPaCT investigators at 5 regionally diverse comprehensive cancer centers compared data reported to the NCI for their most recent Cancer Center Support Grant competitive renewal to assess and compare the centers' catchment area designations, data definitions, data elements, collection processes, reporting, and performance regarding proportional representation of race/ethnicity and sex subsets. Cancer centers' catchment area definitions differed widely in terms of their cancer patient versus general population specificity, levels of specificity, and geographic coverage. Racial/ethnic categories were similar, yet were defined differently, across institutions. Patients' socioeconomic status and insurance status were inconsistently captured across the 5 centers. Catchment area definitions and the collection of patient-level demographic factors varied widely across the 5 comprehensive cancer centers. This challenged the assessment of success by cancer centers in accruing representative populations into the cancer research enterprise. Accrual of minorities was less than desired for at least 1 racial/ethnic subcategory at 4 of the 5 centers. Institutions should clearly and consistently declare their primary catchment area and the rationale and should report how race/ethnicity and sex are defined, determined, collected, and reported. More standardized, frequent, consistent collection, reporting, and review of these data are recommended, as is a commitment to collecting socioeconomic data, given that socioeconomic status is a primary driver of cancer disparities in the United States. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  13. Health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours in women who applied to cancer early detection center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting women in Turkey. The early detection methods for breast cancer have been associated with health belief variables. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine women's health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours. Methods: This study was designed as descriptive and cross-sectional survey and was performed on 344 women who applied the Nigde Cancer Early Diagnosis, Screening and Education Center between May and October 2009. The data were collected using a questionnaire which consists of socio-demographic characteristics and breast cancer risk factors and Health Belief Model Scale. Data analysis was performed using frequency and Mann-Whitney U Test. All values of p0.05. According to study results, the rate of regular BSE performance rate for women was found low. Therefore, KETEM was planned to the training programs related to breast cancer screening methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(3.000: 265-271

  14. Modulating Cancer Risk: The Gut Takes Control | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer risk is influenced by a number of factors, including exposure to chemicals in food and drugs and other molecules in the environment. Some of these chemicals may increase risk of developing cancer, while others, including many chemicals in vegetables, may confer protection.

  15. Clinical trial tests new schedule of radiation therapy for recurring prostate cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to find the most compressed schedule of radiation that prostate cancer patients can tolerate without strong side effects, Deborah Citrin, M.D., of the Radiation Oncology Branch wants to see if giving higher doses of radiation over 2–4 weeks can be as effective at killing cancer cells. Read more… 

  16. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia among patients of a comprehensive cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixin Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Most clinical studies of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia have not included cancer patients who have high risk of thromboembolism, frequent exposure to heparin, and many potential causes of thrombocytopenia other than heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. To estimate the incidence and prevalence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in cancer patients, we identified cases based on diagnostic codes, anti-heparin antibody testing, and clinical characteristics (4T score at a comprehensive cancer center between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2011. We estimated that the prevalence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia to be 0.02% among all cancer patients and 0.24% among cancer patients exposed to heparin. The annual incidence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia was 0.57 cases per 1000 cancer patients exposed to heparin. Of the 40 cancer patients with the International Classification of Diseases (Ninth Revision; ICD-9 code for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, positive anti-heparin antibody, and 4T score ≥4, 5 (12.5% died of related thromboembolic or hemorrhagic complications. In a multivariate logistic regression model, male gender was a significant (p = 0.035 factor, and non-hematological malignancy was a significant (p = 0.017 factor associated with anti-heparin antibody positivity. Future studies may further examine the risk factors associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in larger cohorts.

  17. Psycho-oncology: structure and profiles of European centers treating patients with gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenburg, Annette; Amant, Frederic; Aerts, Leen; Pascal, Astrid; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Kesic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    Psycho-oncological counseling should be an integrated part of modern cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the structures and interests of psycho-oncology services within European Society of Gynecological Oncology (ESGO) centers. In 2010, a survey, which consisted of 15 questions regarding organization of psycho-oncological services and interests in training and research, was sent to all ESGO-accredited centers (n = 41). The response rate was 65.8% (27 centers). 96.3% (n = 26) of the surveys came from universities, and 3.7% (n = 1) came from nonacademic institutions. Most of the institutions (92.6%, n = 25) offer psycho-oncological care, mainly by psychologists (64%, n = 16) or psycho-oncologists (48%, n = 12). Fifty-two percent of patients are evaluated for sexual dysfunction as sequelae of their disease or treatment-related adverse effects. Fifty-two percent (n = 14) of institutions offer psychological support for cancer care providers. Eighty-five percent (n = 23) of all centers are interested in psycho-oncological training, and the preferred teaching tools are educational workshops (87%). The main issues of interest are sexual problems in patients with cancer, communication and interpersonal skills, responses of patients and their families, anxiety and adjustment disorders, and palliative care. Eighty-five percent (n = 17) of the 20 institutions look for research in the field of psycho-oncology, and 55% (n = 11) of those are already involved in some kind of research. Although psycho-oncological care is provided in most of the consulted ESGO accredited centers, almost 50% of women lack information about sexual problems. The results of the survey show the need for and interest in psycho-oncology training and research, including sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, psychological support should be offered to all cancer care providers.

  18. Studying Online Behavior: Comment on Anderson et al. 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As social scientists increasingly employ data from online sources, it is important that we acknowledge both the advantages an limitations of this research. The latter have received comparatively little public attention. In this comment, I argue that a recent article by Anderson and colleagues: 1 inadequately describes the study sample; 2 inadequately describes how the website operates; and 3 inadequately develops the paper’s central measures — such that it is difficult to evaluate the generalizability, veracity, and importance of their claims and impossible to replicate their findings. These limitations are not unique to the Anderson et al. article; rather, they point to a set of concerns that all researchers in this growing and important line of study need to address if our work is to have enduring impact.

  19. Wegner Estimate and Anderson Localization for Random Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdős, László; Hasler, David

    2012-01-01

    We consider a two dimensional magnetic Schrödinger operator with a spatially stationary random magnetic field. We assume that the magnetic field has a positive lower bound and that it has Fourier modes on arbitrarily short scales. We prove the Wegner estimate at arbitrary energy, i.e. we show that the averaged density of states is finite throughout the whole spectrum. We also prove Anderson localization at the bottom of the spectrum.

  20. Experimental Test of Universality of the Anderson Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Matthias; Clément, Jean-François; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude; Delande, Dominique

    2012-03-01

    We experimentally test the universality of the Anderson three dimensional metal-insulator transition, using a quasiperiodic atomic kicked rotor. Nine sets of parameters controlling the microscopic details have been tested. Our observation indicates that the transition is of second order, with a critical exponent independent of the microscopic details; the average value 1.63±0.05 agrees very well with the numerically predicted value ν=1.58.

  1. Dynamic greedy algorithms for the Edwards-Anderson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Stefan; Janke, Wolfhard

    2017-11-01

    To provide a novel tool for the investigation of the energy landscape of the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model we introduce an algorithm that allows an efficient execution of a greedy optimization based on data from a previously performed optimization for a similar configuration. As an application we show how the technique can be used to perform higher-order greedy optimizations and simulated annealing searches with improved performance.

  2. Effect of Anderson magnetic impurities on superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Rashid, R.I.M.A.

    1983-06-01

    A model which consists of a BCS Hamiltonian and a periodic Anderson Hamiltonian for a lattice of magnetic ions is studied using the Green functions equation of motion method. It is found that the Cooper pairing on the site-localized magnetic electrons with antiferromagnetic coupling is capable of destroying superconductivity at a lower critical temperature and thus predicting a reentrant behaviour of the superconducting transition temperature. (author)

  3. Nuclear liability and the Price--Anderson Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The Price-Anderson Act is viewed as meeting public needs in a unique and responsible way, reflecting the far-sightedness of those involved in the early development of nuclear power who saw the importance of building safety into each step of the program. An extension of the Act is advised as a first step in recognizing that many potential and real disasters (e.g., dam breaks, floods, etc.) are man-made rather than ''Acts of God''. Rather than abolish the Price-Anderson Act because it is unique, the case is made for extending it to cover these other situations. Provisions of the Act are examined in terms of the role of negligence in nuclear accidents, and the conclusion is reached that public concern for reactor safety should not be affected. Limited assets on the part of insurers and insurance pools have made government involvement important but not a real subsidy because of high premiums. Premiums in the new amendment are paid retroactively when there is an accident, which relieves the problem of anticipating what premiums may be needed in the future. This limits government liability and, combined with the waiver of defenses against liability, offers better protection for the public. Recommendations for allowing tort law to operate above the $560 million Price-Anderson limits are criticized, and a counter proposal is made for reassessing the figure at an appropriate limit and extending insurance to competitive industries

  4. Time of Anderson-Fabry Disease Detection and Cardiovascular Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Selthofer-Relatic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited disease, which manifests in a different manner depending on gender and genotype. Making a working diagnosis of Anderson-Fabry disease is difficult because of several reasons: (a that it is a multiorgan disease with wide variety of phenotypes, (b different timelines of presentation, (c gender differences, and (d possible coexistence with other comorbidities. Late-onset/cardiac type of presentation with minimal involvement of other organs can additionally make diagnosis difficult. Aim. To describe different cardiac manifestations at different time points in the course of the disease: (1 72-year-old female (echocardiography detection, heterozygote, significant left and mild right ventricular hypertrophy; (2 62-year-old male (echocardiography detection, hemizygote, left ventricular hypertrophy, implanted cardiac pacemaker, a performed percutaneous coronary intervention after myocardial infarction, degenerative medium degree aortic valve stenosis; (3 45-year-old female (asymptomatic/family screening, heterozygote, thickened mitral papillary muscle, mild left ventricular hypertrophy, first degree diastolic dysfunction; and (4 75-year-old female (symptomatic/family screening, heterozygote, cardiomyopathy with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction after heart surgery (mitral valve annuloplasty and plastic repair of the tricuspid valve. Conclusion. All patients have Anderson-Fabry disease but with different clinical presentations depending on the gender, the type of mutation, and the time of detection. All these features can make the patients’ profiles unique and delay the time of detection.

  5. On the Anderson localization conjecture in Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Constanze; Busse, Kyle; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In 1958, Anderson suggested that sufficiently large impurities in a semi-conductor could lead to spatial localization of electrons. This idea unfolded into the field of Anderson Localization, one of the most fascinating phenomena in solid-state physics as it plays a major role in the conductive properties of imperfectly ordered materials. The Anderson Localization Conjecture claims that random disorder of any strength causes localization of electrons in the medium. The problem has proven to be highly non-trivial. Over the years the community has argued whether spatial localization occurs in 2D for small impurities. From a mathematical standpoint, the conjecture is still considered an open question. In 2013, Liaw challenged the commonly held assumption that localization holds in 2D by introducing a new mathematically more rigorous method to test for extended states, and applying it to the discrete random Schrödinger operator. One of the advantages of the underlying method is its versatility. It can be applied to any ordered system such as colloids, crystals, and atomic lattices. In a cross-disciplinary effort we merge this method with a numerical code used to simulate 2D physics systems, in preparation for experimentally testing the theory against complex plasma crystals.

  6. [Colorectal cancer screening: survey of endoscopy center's physicians in Lazio region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, A; Valle, S; Giorgi Rossi, P; Grassi, A; Borgia, P; Guasticchi, G

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to describe the characteristics of digestive endoscopy centers and the physicians that work there, with particular attention to their attitudes and practices in colorectal cancer screening. A questionnaire was sent to all 80 digestive endoscopy centers in the Lazio region, identified by the annual census of Italian Society of Digestive Endoscopy (Società Italiana di Endoscopia Digestiva, SIED). Seventy-one centers (89%), returned the questionnaire. Screening activity on average represents 14% of the centers' colonoscopy workload. Colonoscopy was considered to be a "very effective" screening test by 96% of physicians, the faecal occult blood test "very effective" by 20%, and flexosigmoidoscopy "very effective" by 11%. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of physicians reported recommending any test for screening: 80% colonoscopy, 61% faecal occult blood test, 14% double contrast barium enema and 11% flexosigmoidoscopy. Despite the fact that almost all physicians reported recommending screening, the centres are only marginally involved in screening practice. Endoscopy centers' physicians tend to have an aggressive strategy for colorectal cancer prevention and exclusive trust in colonoscopy; an attitude more consistent with a clinical-diagnostic approach than with real mass screening of a healthy population.

  7. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A pilot study into the therapeutic effects of music therapy at a cancer help center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S J; Harbuz, M S; Hucklebridge, F; Bunt, L

    2001-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, music therapy has been a regular feature of the residential program at the internationally renowned Bristol Cancer Help Centre, United Kingdom. Music therapy complements other therapeutic interventions available to residents at the center. To compare the therapeutic effects of listening to music in a relaxed state with the active involvement of music improvisation (the playing of tuned and untuned percussion instruments) in a music therapy group setting and to investigate the potential influence of music therapy on positive emotions and the immune system of cancer patients. A quantitative pre-posttest, psychological/physiological measures, and qualitative focus group design. A cancer help center that offers a fully integrated range of complementary therapies, psychological support, spiritual healing, and nutritional and self-help techniques addressing the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs of cancer patients and their supporters. Twenty-nine cancer patients, aged 21 to 68 years. Group music therapy interventions of listening to recorded/live music in a relaxed state and improvisation. Increased well-being and relaxation and less tension during the listening experience. Increased well-being and energy and less tension during improvisation. Increased levels of salivary immunoglobulin A and decreased levels of cortisol in both experiences. Psychological data showed increased well-being and relaxation as well as altered energy levels in both interventions. Physiological data showed increased salivary immunoglobulin A in the listening experience and a decrease in cortisol levels in both interventions over a 2-day period. Preliminary evidence of a link between positive emotions and the immune system of cancer patients was found. These findings, which link listening to music in a relaxed state and improvisation to alterations in psychological and physiological parameters, may provide a better understanding of the effectiveness of music

  9. De novo cancers following liver transplantation: a single center experience in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songfeng Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: De novo cancers are a growing problem that has become one of the leading causes of late mortality after liver transplantation. The incidences and risk factors varied among literatures and fewer concerned the Eastern population. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and clinical features of de novo cancers after liver transplantation in a single Chinese center. METHODS: 569 patients who received liver transplantation and survived for more than 3 months in a single Chinese center were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 18 de novo cancers were diagnosed in 17 recipients (13 male and 4 female after a mean of 41 ± 26 months, with an overall incidence of 3.2%, which was lower than that in Western people. Of these, 8 (3.32% cases were from 241 recipients with malignant liver diseases before transplant, while 10 (3.05% cases were from 328 recipients with benign diseases. The incidence rates were comparable, p = 0.86. Furthermore, 2 cases developed in 1 year, 5 cases in 3 years and 11 cases over 3 years. The most frequent cancers developed after liver transplantation were similar to those in the general Chinese population but had much higher incidence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Liver transplant recipients were at increased risk for developing de novo cancers. The incidence rates and pattern of de novo cancers in Chinese population are different from Western people due to racial and social factors. Pre-transplant malignant condition had no relationship to de novo cancer. Exact risk factors need further studies.

  10. Inflammation and Cancer: Two Pieces of the Same Puzzle? | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic inflammation, in Crohn’s disease for example, is a known risk factor for malignant transformation, however the role inflammation plays in cancer initiation is poorly understood. STAT2, an important protein that regulates gene activation, is known to be stimulated by immune factors that inhibit cell growth. STAT2 also has reduced expression in the immune cells of patients with Crohn’s disease, which suggested to Ana Gamero, Ph.D., a former NCI Scholar of the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, CCR, and now Assistant Professor at Temple University in collaboration with Nancy Colburn, Ph.D. of the Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and her colleagues, that STAT2 may be a key protein in regulating inflammation-induced cancer progression. The results of their studies were recently published in a Cancer Prevention Research article.

  11. [Development of Holistic Cancer Treatment Centering Cancer Patients - From the Standpoint of Hypoxia and Hedgehog Signaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hideya; Ogino, Toshitatsu; Morisaki, Takashi; Katano, Mitsuo

    2017-11-01

    Recently, hypoxia that is one of cancer microenvironments, takes much attention. Because circumstance that we usually perform experiment is 20% O2 condition, it is likely that different signaling pathways may be activated in vivo cancer. We focused Hedgehog(Hh)signaling as one of activated pathways under hypoxia. It has been shown that Hh signaling is activated under hypoxia, followed by inducing malignant phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. Therefore, Hh signaling inhibitor should elicit anti-tumor effect. However, if we consider "whole-person therapy" we should confirm how Hh signaling affects the function of immune cells. In the present study, we describe hypoxia/Hh signaling/functions of cancer cells and immune cells focusing our previous results.

  12. Is There a Proximal Migration of Colon Cancers? An Experience from Regional Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouda YG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancers stands 3rd in males and 2nd in females in order of frequency of most common cancers worldwide and in developed countries. And is 4th common in males and 5th common in females in developing countries. Colonic tumors located at the caecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, and splenic flexure were defined as right sided colon cancer and tumors located at the descending colon, sigmoid, rectosigmoid and rectum were defined as left sided colorectal cancer. The difference in percentage deviation is statistically not significant and present study concludes that there is no actual migration of colon cancers towards right side. In the present study there is higher proportion of males being affected with Right colon cancers group which is significant and doesn’t go in accordance with the literature published, where females are more affected. Since this is institutional based study there is further need for studies based on population. As the mean age at presentation was very earlier than in the developed countries, the thrust is in us to have an effective screening programs.

  13. Radiotherapy of locally advanced laryngeal cancer: the Gliwice Center of Oncology experience, 1990-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucha-Malecka, A.; Skladowski, K.; Wygoda, A.; Sasiadek, W.; Tarnawski, R.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of radiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer T3 - T4, and to establish the prognostic value of the size and the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations and of emergency tracheostomy. 296 patients with advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx were radically treated with radiotherapy alone in Center of Oncology in Gliwice between the years 1990 and 1996. There were 221 cases of supraglottic cancer (75%) and 75 of glottic cancer (25%). The stages were as follows: supraglottic cancer: T3 - 113 (51%), T4 - 108 (49%), glottic cancer: T3 - 69 (92%), T4 - 6 (8%). Positive neck nodes were found in 100 patients with supraglottic cancer (45%), and only in 11 patients with glottic cancer (15%). In cases of extra laryngeaI invasion (T4) the pyriform recess was involved in 33%, the base of tongue and valleculae glosso-epiglotticae in 30%, the hypopharyngeal wall in 9% of cases, while a massive involvement of the larynx, the pyriform recess and the base of the tongue was found in 6% of patients. Cartilage involvement was suspected in 22% of patients. Thirty six patients (12%) underwent emergency tracheostomy. Generally, the 3-year local control rate (LC) and disease free survival rate (DSF) were 46% and 41%, respectively. The probability of LC was similar in both supraglottic and glottic cancer: 44% and 47.5% respectively. The presence of involved neck nodes significantly decreased LC and DFS rates in both groups (about 20%). For stage T4 laryngeal cancer the LC rate was correlated with the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations. Best prognosis was connected with the suspicion of cartilage infiltration - 56% of 3-year LC rate. The worst results were noted in cases of massive infiltrations spreading from larynx through the hypopharynx - 13.5% of 3-year LC rate. Emergency tracheostomy before radiotherapy was very significantly linked to poorer treatment results. The 3-year LC rate in

  14. The Effects of Yoga, Massage, and Reiki on Patient Well-Being at a Cancer Resource Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Mark S; Velde, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Cancer resource centers offer patients a variety of therapeutic services. However, patients with cancer and cancer healthcare practitioners may not fully understand the specific objectives and benefits of each service. This research offers guidance to cancer healthcare practitioners on how they can best direct patients to partake in specific integrative therapies, depending on their expressed needs. This article investigates the effects of yoga, massage, and Reiki services administered in a cancer resource center on patients' sense of personal well-being. The results show how program directors at a cancer resource center can customize therapies to meet the needs of patients' well-being. The experimental design measured whether engaging in yoga, massage, or Reiki services affects the self-perceived well-being of 150 patients at a cancer resource center at two times. All three services helped decrease stress and anxiety, improve mood, and enhance cancer center patrons' perceived overall health and quality of life in a similar manner. Reiki reduced the pain of patients with cancer to a greater extent than either massage or yoga.

  15. Evaluation of a Dedicated Tobacco Cessation Support Service for Thoracic Cancer Center Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Katharine A; Reid, Mary E; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Giovino, Gary A; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Warren, Graham W; Mahoney, Martin C; Hyland, Andrew J

    2017-12-22

    Cancer patients' continued tobacco use results in poorer therapeutic outcomes including decreased quality of life and survival. To assess reach and impact of a free, opt-out, telephone-based tobacco cessation program for thoracic cancer center patients. Observational study. Comprehensive Cancer Center in Western New York. Current or recent (within past 30 days) tobacco-using thoracic cancer center patients referred to a tobacco cessation support service between October 2010 and October 2012 at a Comprehensive Cancer Center (n = 942/1313 referrals were eligible for cessation support). A free, opt-out, telephone-based cessation service that was implemented as standard of care. Cessation specialists had patient-guided conversations that assessed readiness to quit; methods used in the past provided cessation strategies and worked to set up a quit date. There was an average of 35.9 days between referral and first contact. Program reach (referral and participation rates) and impact (as self-reported cessation outcomes measured twice after referral). Of 942 patients, 730 (77.5%) referred to and called by a tobacco cessation service participated in at least 1 cessation support call, of which 440 of 730 (60.3%) were called for follow-up and 89.5% (394/440) participated. In total, 20.2% (69/342) of current smokers at referral reported at least 7-day abstinence at follow-up. Among current smokers at referral and first contact, being married (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-4.18) and having a lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score (OR = 4.05; 95% CI, 1.58-10.39) were associated with quitting at follow-up, after controlling for demographic, clinical, and health behavior characteristics. Our results demonstrate that 78% of thoracic cancer center patients, if contacted, participated at least once in this cessation support service; for current smokers at referral and first contact, being married and having a lower ECOG

  16. Prognostic Factors and Treatment Outcomes of Parotid Gland Cancer: A 10-Year Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae Won; Hong, Hyun Jun; Ban, Myung Jin; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Won Shik; Koh, Yoon Woo; Choi, Eun Chang

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the treatment outcomes of parotid gland cancer at a single center over a 10-year period and to evaluate the prognostic significance of maximum standardized uptake value. Retrospective case series with chart review. Academic care center. Ninety-eight patients with primary parotid gland cancer who were surgically treated at Yonsei University Head & Neck Cancer Clinic between January 1999 and December 2008 were analyzed. Patient data were collected retrospectively from medical charts. The investigators analyzed the association of clinicopathological factors and maximum standardized uptake value on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan with disease-specific survival. Mean patient age was 49.7 years. Mean follow-up was 48.8 months. Thirty-three, 40, 30, and 23 patients had stage I, II, III, and IVA disease, respectively. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common histologic type (34.7%), followed by acinic cell carcinoma (27.6%). Eighteen patients (18.4%) experienced recurrences (mean recurrence gap, 20.6 months; range, 2-87 months). Five- and 10-year disease-specific survival rates were 93.6% and 81.8%, respectively. In the univariate analysis, pathologic T stage, pathologic lymph node status, resection margin, external parenchymal extension, and maximum standardized uptake value were significantly associated with disease-specific survival. Pathologic lymph node status and maximum standardized uptake value were independent prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis. Our single-center experience with parotid gland cancer treatment is consistent with the literature. Cervical lymph node metastasis and high maximum standardized uptake value are associated with poor survival in parotid gland cancer. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  17. Evaluating Disability Insurance Assistance as a Specific Intervention by Physiatrists at a Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jack B; Osborn, Melissa P; Silver, Julie K; Konzen, Benedict S; Ngo-Huang, An; Yadav, Rajesh; Bruera, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Because of their expertise, physiatrists provide disability insurance assistance for cancer survivors. In this brief report, we perform a descriptive retrospective analysis of all new (354) outpatient physiatry consultations from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013, at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center. Disability and/or work accommodations were brought up at some point with the physiatrist during the duration of their care for 131 (37%) of 354 patients. More than 90% of the discussions took place during the first visit. Of those patients who had a documented disability/employment discussion, 58 (44.3%) of 131 patients were originally referred for disability assistance specifically, and 58 (44.3%) of 131 also had disability insurance paperwork completed by the physiatrist. Outcomes of initial physiatry disability insurance assistance were 45 (77.6%) of 58 approved/renewed, 5 (8.6%) of 58 denied, and 8 (13.8%) of 58 unknown/died during the disability application process. The median form size was 33 (SD, 25.95) items. This study is the first of its kind and provides an initial look at work-related discussions and support with disability insurance paperwork as a specific intervention provided by physiatrists at a cancer center. The results are compelling and demonstrate that physiatrists frequently provide these interventions. These interventions take considerable time and effort but are generally successful.

  18. Inpatient infectious disease consultations requested by surgeons at a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Ichiro; Kurai, Hanako

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the value of infectious disease specialist consultations for surgeons at comprehensive cancer centers. A total of 151 cancer surgery inpatients were retrospectively assessed during a 12-month period. We focused on the characteristics of the infectious disease consultations from surgical departments: the referring surgical divisions, the referral phases, and the reasons for the infectious disease consultations. Three-quarters of all consultation requests were made after the day of surgery. Approximately, 60 % of these requests were made within 30 days after surgery for cancer. The reasons for the infectious disease consultations could be classified into three categories: diagnosis and management (54 %), management of established infections (44 %), and surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (3 %). The most requested reason for consultations was the diagnosis and management of fever or elevated inflammatory markers of unknown etiology. Among the management of established infections, the antimicrobial management of surgical site infections was most frequently requested. Many surgeons would prefer infectious disease specialists to assume a more direct role in the care of difficult or perplexing cases (such as fevers of unknown origin) while also maintaining a traditional relationship in which the consultant recommends antimicrobial agents during a perioperative period. Particularly at cancer centers where oncology specialists account for a significant proportion of the providers, the knowledge and skill of infectious disease physicians are valued.

  19. Adolescent and young adult oncology patients: Disparities in access to specialized cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Elysia; Keegan, Theresa; Johnston, Emily E; Haile, Robert; Sanders, Lee; Saynina, Olga; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2017-07-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) ages 15 to 39 years with cancer continue to experience disparate survival outcomes compared with their younger and older counterparts. This may be caused in part by differential access to specialized cancer centers (SCCs), because treatment at SCCs has been associated with improved overall survival. The authors examined social and clinical factors associated with AYA use of SCCs (defined as Children's Oncology Group-designated or National Cancer Institute-designated centers). A retrospective, population-based analysis was performed on all hospital admissions of AYA oncology patients in California during 1991 through 2014 (n = 127,250) using the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database. Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined the contribution of social and clinical factors on always receiving care from an SCC (vs sometimes or never). Results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Over the past 20 years, the percentage of patients always receiving inpatient care at an SCC increased over time (from 27% in 1991 to 43% in 2014). In multivariable regression analyses, AYA patients were less likely to always receive care from an SCC if they had public insurance (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.62-0.66), were uninsured (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.46-0.56), were Hispanic (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85-0.91), lived > 5 miles from an SCC, or had a diagnosis other than leukemia and central nervous system tumors. Receiving care at an SCC was influenced by insurance, race/ethnicity, geography, and tumor type. Identifying the barriers associated with decreased SCC use is an important first step toward improving outcomes in AYA oncology patients. Cancer 2017;123:2516-23. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Hepatic Stellate Cells Alter Liver Immune Environment to Promote Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer, accounting for up to 90 percent of cases, and is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide according to the World Health Organization’s 2014 World Cancer Report. Even when caught early, HCC often recurs, either from intra-liver metastases or new primary tumors, and recurrence is the leading cause of death for patients with HCC. The liver microenvironment is an important contributor to HCC initiation and progression and also likely plays a role in tumor recurrence. Xin Wei Wang, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, and his colleagues wondered whether activated hepatic stellate cells (A-HSCs), stromal cells in the liver known to participate in repair following injury and in the development of fibrosis, contribute directly to HCC recurrence.

  1. Genetic Variation Linked to Lung Cancer Survival in White Smokers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR investigators have discovered evidence that links lung cancer survival with genetic variations (called single nucleotide polymorphisms) in the MBL2 gene, a key player in innate immunity. The variations in the gene, which codes for a protein called the mannose-binding lectin, occur in its promoter region, where the RNA polymerase molecule binds to start transcription, and in the first exon that is responsible for the correct structure of MBL. The findings appear in the September 19, 2007, issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  2. An oasis in the hospital: the perceived benefits of a cancer support center in a hospital setting offering complementary therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anne M; Bulsara, Caroline E; Joske, David J L; Petterson, Anna S; Nowak, Anna K; Bennett, Kellie S

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of persons attending a cancer support center, providing emotional support to cancer patients through self-selected complementary therapies offered free of charge through qualified volunteer therapists. A grounded theory methodology was used. Sources of data were 16 semistructured interviews with persons attending the center. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was conducted using the constant comparative method. The overarching theme that emerged in this study was the benefits attributed to attendance at the cancer support center. The center was described as an "oasis" in the hospital, and three aspects relating to this were identified: (a) facilitating comfort, (b) increasing personal control, and (c) helping make sense of the cancer experience. A drop-in center offering complementary therapies appeared to enable coping with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer by facilitating comfort and increasing perceptions of personal control. The center also helped some participants to make sense of their experience with cancer. This research has provided a unique insight into the ongoing emotional needs of cancer patients, and directions for further development and research into the provision of holistic care for patients within a hospital setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Oncologists' perspectives on concurrent palliative care in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Ahles, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand oncology clinicians' perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. This was a qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: (1) treating the whole patient, (2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, (3) “some patients just want to fight,” and (4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists' views on the complementary role of palliative care: (1) “refer early and often,” (2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals “hospice”; “Heme patients are different,” (3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, (4) palliative care “shares the load,” and (5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care.

  4. Survival of a cohort of women with cervical cancer diagnosed in a Brazilian cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Calazan do Carmo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess overall survival of women with cervical cancer and describe prognostic factors associated. METHODS: A total of 3,341 cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed at the Brazilian Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil, between 1999 and 2004 were selected. Clinical and pathological characteristics and follow-up data were collected. There were performed a survival analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and a multivariate analysis through Cox model. RESULTS: Of all cases analyzed, 68.3% had locally advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. The 5-year overall survival was 48%. After multivariate analysis, tumor staging at diagnosis was the single variable significantly associated with prognosis (p<0.001. There was seen a dose-response relationship between mortality and clinical staging, ranging from 27.8 to 749.6 per 1,000 cases-year in women stage I and IV, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that early detection through prevention programs is crucial to increase cervical cancer survival.

  5. Cancer Center Website Rankings in the USA: Expanding Benchmarks and Standards for Effective Public Outreach and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Timothy R; Walker, Daniel M; Ford, Eric W

    2017-06-01

    The 68 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive and cancer centers have been tasked with leading the campaign in the fight against cancer, as well as providing education and outreach to the public. Therefore, it is important for these organizations to have an effective online presence to disseminate information and engage patients. The purpose of this study was to assess both the functionality and usability of cancer centers' websites. The 68 center web domains were evaluated using two separate but complementary approaches. First, a webcrawler was used to score each website on five dimensions: accessibility, content, marketing, technology, and usability. Rankings on each dimension and an average ranking were calculated for all 68 centers. Second, a three-reader system was used to determine a list of all functionalities present on the websites. Both webcrawler scores and functionality prevalence were compared across center type. No differences were observed in webcrawler scores between comprehensive and cancer centers. Mean scores on all dimensions ranged between 5.47 and 7.09. For the functionality assessment, 64 unique functions were determined and categorized into 12 domains, with the average center possessing less than 50 % of the functions. This census assessment of NCI centers' websites suggests the need for improvement to capitalize on new dissemination platforms available online. Progress in development of this technology can help achieve the goals of public education and outreach to a broad audience. This paper presents performance guidelines evaluated against best-demonstrated practice to facilitate social media use improvement.

  6. Barriers to colorectal cancer screening in community health centers: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fletcher Robert H

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer screening rates are low among disadvantaged patients; few studies have explored barriers to screening in community health centers. The purpose of this study was to describe barriers to/facilitators of colorectal cancer screening among diverse patients served by community health centers. Methods We identified twenty-three outpatients who were eligible for colorectal cancer screening and their 10 primary care physicians. Using in-depth semi-structured interviews, we asked patients to describe factors influencing their screening decisions. For each unscreened patient, we asked his or her physician to describe barriers to screening. We conducted patient interviews in English (n = 8, Spanish (n = 2, Portuguese (n = 5, Portuguese Creole (n = 1, and Haitian Creole (n = 7. We audiotaped and transcribed the interviews, and then identified major themes in the interviews. Results Four themes emerged: 1 Unscreened patients cited lack of trust in doctors as a barrier to screening whereas few physicians identified this barrier; 2 Unscreened patients identified lack of symptoms as the reason they had not been screened; 3 A doctor's recommendation, or lack thereof, significantly influenced patients' decisions to be screened; 4 Patients, but not their physicians, cited fatalistic views about cancer as a barrier. Conversely, physicians identified competing priorities, such as psychosocial stressors or comorbid medical illness, as barriers to screening. In this culturally diverse group of patients seen at community health centers, similar barriers to screening were reported by patients of different backgrounds, but physicians perceived other factors as more important. Conclusion Further study of these barriers is warranted.

  7. Dying in cancer centers: do the circumstances allow for a dignified death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jors, Karin; Adami, Sandra; Xander, Carola; Meffert, Cornelia; Gaertner, Jan; Bardenheuer, Hubert; Buchheidt, Dieter; Mayer-Steinacker, Regine; Viehrig, Marén; George, Wolfang; Becker, Gerhild

    2014-10-15

    Prior research has shown that hospitals are often ill-prepared to provide care for dying patients. This study assessed whether the circumstances for dying on cancer center wards allow for a dignified death. In this cross-sectional study, the authors surveyed physicians and nurses in 16 hospitals belonging to 10 cancer centers in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany. A revised questionnaire from a previous study was used, addressing the following topics regarding end-of-life care: structural conditions (ie, rooms, staff), education/training, working environment, family/caregivers, medical treatment, communication with patients, and dignified death. In total, 1131 surveys (response rate = 50%) were returned. Half of the participants indicated that they rarely have enough time to care for dying patients, and 55% found the rooms available for dying patients unsatisfactory. Only 19% of respondents felt that they had been well-prepared to care for the dying (physicians = 6%). Palliative care staff reported much better conditions for the dying than staff from other wards (95% of palliative care staff indicated that patients die in dignity on their ward). Generally, physicians perceived the circumstances much more positively than nurses, especially regarding communication and life-prolonging measures. Overall, 57% of respondents believed that patients could die with dignity on their ward. Only about half of the respondents perceived that a dignified death is possible on their ward. We recommend that cancer centers invest more in staffing, adequate rooms for dying patients, training in end-of-life care, advance-care planning standards, and the early integration of specialist palliative care services. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  8. A variational study of superconducting correlations within periodic Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, Piyush; Panwar, Sunil; Singh, Ishwar

    2005-01-01

    In this work we present the study of heavy fermion (HF) systems represented by the extended periodic Anderson model (PAM). A term, which contains the superconducting correlations, has been included in the conventional PAM. The study has been carried out at finite U. We have used the variational method. The variational wavefunction contains two variational parameters A kσ and B kσ . We have found that both the variational parameters are mutually dependent. We have studied ground state as well as finite temperature properties. We have found that T c increases, as J increases

  9. Remembering Joan (Jan) Mary Anderson (1932-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wah Soon; Horton, Peter; Barrett, Martin; Osmond, Charles Barry

    2016-08-01

    Joan Mary Anderson, known to most people as Jan, was born on May 12, 1932 in Dunedin, New Zealand. She died on August 28, 2015 in Canberra, Australia. To celebrate her life, we present here a brief biography, some comments on her discoveries in photosynthesis during a career spanning more than half a century, and reminiscences from family and friends. We remember this wonderful person who had an unflagging curiosity, creative ability to think laterally, enthusiasm, passion, generosity and love of color and culture.

  10. Signatures of Anderson localization excited by an optical frequency comb

    KAUST Repository

    Gentilini, S.

    2010-01-25

    We investigate Anderson localization of light as occurring in ultrashort excitations. A theory based on time dependent coupled-mode equations predicts universal features in the spectrum of the transmitted pulse. In particular, the process of strong localization of light is shown to correspond to the formation of peaks in both the amplitude and in the group delay of the transmitted pulse. Parallel ab initio simulations made with finite-difference time-domain codes and molecular dynamics confirm theoretical predictions, while showing that there exists an optimal degree of disorder for the strong localization. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  11. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1996 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This first annual report on DOE's Price Anderson Amendments Act enforcement program covers the activities, accomplishments, and planning for calendar year 1996. It also includes the infrastructure development activities of 1995. It encompasses the activities of the headquarters' Office of Enforcement in the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and Investigation and the coordinators and technical advisors in DOE's Field and Program Offices and other EH Offices. This report includes an overview of the enforcement program; noncompliances, investigations, and enforcement actions; summary of significant enforcement actions; examples where enforcement action was deferred; and changes and improvements to the program

  12. Unbinding slave spins in the Anderson impurity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerci, Daniele; Fabrizio, Michele

    2017-11-01

    We show that a generic single-orbital Anderson impurity model, lacking, for instance, any kind of particle-hole symmetry, can be exactly mapped without any constraint onto a resonant level model coupled to two Ising variables, which reduce to one if the hybridization is particle-hole symmetric. The mean-field solution of this model is found to be stable to unphysical spontaneous magnetization of the impurity, unlike the saddle-point solution in the standard slave-boson representation. Remarkably, the mean-field estimate of the Wilson ratio approaches the exact value RW=2 in the Kondo regime.

  13. An integrated methodology for process improvement and delivery system visualization at a multidisciplinary cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singprasong, Rachanee; Eldabi, Tillal

    2013-01-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer centers require an integrated, collaborative, and stream-lined workflow in order to provide high quality of patient care. Due to the complex nature of cancer care and continuing changes to treatment techniques and technologies, it is a constant struggle for centers to obtain a systemic and holistic view of treatment workflow for improving the delivery systems. Project management techniques, Responsibility matrix and a swim-lane activity diagram representing sequence of activities can be combined for data collection, presentation, and evaluation of the patient care. This paper presents this integrated methodology using multidisciplinary meetings and walking the route approach for data collection, integrated responsibility matrix and swim-lane activity diagram with activity time for data representation and 5-why and gap analysis approach for data analysis. This enables collection of right detail of information in a shorter time frame by identifying process flaws and deficiencies while being independent of the nature of the patient's disease or treatment techniques. A case study of a multidisciplinary regional cancer centre is used to illustrate effectiveness of the proposed methodology and demonstrates that the methodology is simple to understand, allowing for minimal training of staff and rapid implementation. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  14. Experimental drug STA-8666 causes complete tumor regression in animal models of pediatric sarcomas | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    New studies from scientists in the NCI Center for Cancer Research’s (CCR) Pediatric Oncology Branch suggest that an experimental drug called STA-8666 could be an effective treatment for the childhood cancers Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. In mouse models of these diseases, STA-8666 eliminated tumors and prolonged survival beyond that of animals treated with a related drug, irinotecan. Read more…

  15. Identifying Molecular Culprits of Cervical Cancer Progression | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is found in 99.7% of invasive cervical carcinomas, providing strong evidence that the virus is a causative agent in the development of this disease. However, most women who become infected with HPV do not develop invasive cervical lesions, indicating that additional exogenous or genetic factors may determine whether HPV preclinical lesions will progress to cancer. Identification of these factors would be facilitated by a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular changes that accompany progression to malignancy. In addition, knowledge of which women are at greatest risk for disease progression would be a significant clinical advancement in the management of patients with premalignant cervical lesions.

  16. Evolution in breast cancer suspicion and extent of surgery at a radio-oncology center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez L, Veronica; Carvajal C, Claudia; Gallardo M, Manuel; Russo N, Moies

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Breast cancer diagnosis and treatment ad evolved over the past quarter century. From self-examination to mammography as main suspicion tool and from radical to conservative surgery plus radiotherapy as prefered treatment. The aim of this review was to assess the evolution of presentation and local management of breast cancer at a Chilean radio-oncology center. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 1.204 breast cancer patients who received postoperative irradiation on two four-years periods.The first period included 223 patients and coincides with the introduction of mammography and conservative surgery. The second included 981 patients managed according to current guidelines. The variables analyzed were type of clinical suspicion, time between clinical suspicion and diagnosis confirmation, type of surgery, histology and tumor size. Data were obtained from medical records and analyzed using STATA 2. Results: In the second period mammographic suspicion reached 39.88%. Time between clinical suspicion and histological diagnosis was reduced to 50%, the proportion of tumors larger than 2 cm was reduced from 61 to 45%, the proportion of DCIS was tripled from 6 to 18%, use of conservative surgery as an absolute increase of 28%. All of these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The introduction of mammography and conservative management allowed early diagnosis of breast cancer in the analyzed population

  17. La importancia de Comunidades imaginadas y de Benedict Anderson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Calhoun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El remarcable libro Comunidades imaginadas de Benedict Anderson reconfiguró el estudio de las naciones y el nacionalismo. Sorprendentemente original, rompió con el excesivo énfasis que hasta el momento se ponía en el continente europeo y con los argumentos falsamente polarizados sobre si las naciones existían desde siempre o eran meros epifenómenos de los estados modernos. Comunidades imaginadas dirige la atención a la dinámica de la imaginación organizada social y culturalmente como proceso que se encuentra en el corazón de la cultura política, la comprensión de uno mismo y la solidaridad, idea que, como innovación de primer orden en la comprensión de los ‘imaginarios sociales’, tuvo una influencia que va más allá del estudio del nacionalismo. Sin embargo, el enfoque de Anderson conservó el incapié en las condiciones materiales que configuran la cultura y en las instituciones que facilitan su reproducción, desde periódicos y novelas a censos, mapas y museos.

  18. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  19. Permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization in magnetophotonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, R., E-mail: r.abdi@bonabu.ac.ir [Department of Laser and Optical Engineering, University of Bonab, 5551761167 Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namdar, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, 5166614766 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This theoretical study was carried out to investigate the permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization of light in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals. It was shown that the disorder create the resonant transmittance modes associated with enhanced Faraday rotations inside the photonic band gap. The average localization length of the right- and left-handed circular polarizations (RCP and LCP), the total transmittance together with the ensemble average of the RCP and LCP phases, and the Faraday rotation of the structure were also investigated. For this purpose, the off-diagonal elements of the permittivity tensor were varied for various wavelengths of incident light. The obtained results revealed the nonreciprocal property of circular eigen modes. This study can potentially open up a new aspect for utilizing the disorder magnetophotonic structures in nonreciprocal systems such as isolators and circulators. - Highlights: • We theoretically investigated the permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization of light in magnetophotonic crystals. • The disorder considered in the diagonal elements of the permittivity tensor of magneto-optical layers. • The disorder create the resonant transmittance modes associated with enhanced Faraday rotations in the photonic band gap. • The average localization length of the circular polarizations and the ensemble average of their phases were investigated. • The obtained results revealed the nonreciprocal property of circular eigen modes.

  20. Price-Anderson Act - the third decade. Report to Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltzman, J.

    1983-12-01

    Subsection 170p. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, requires that the Commission submit to the Congress by August 1, 1983, a detailed report on the need for continuation or modification of Section 170 of the Act, the Price-Anderson provisions. The report is divided into four sections with detailed subject reports appended to the main report. Sections I through III include an examination of issues that the Commission was required by statute to study (i.e., condition of the nuclear industry, state of knowledge of nuclear safety, and availability of private insurance), and discussion of other issues of interest and importance to the Congress and to the public. The subjects covered are as follows: (1) overview of the Price-Anderson system; (2) the state of knowledge of nuclear safety; (3) availability of private insurance; (4) conditions of the nuclear industry; (5) causality and proof of damages; (6) limitation of liability and subsidy; and (7) a proposal that would provide for removal of the limitation of liability but with limited annual liability payments. Section IV of the report contains conclusions and recommendations. Section V contains a bibliography

  1. Large Population-Based Study Reveals Disparities in Myeloma Precursor Disease | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a cancer of plasma cells, which are antibody-producing white blood cells. Patients with MM have a characteristic excess of monoclonal antibodies, so called M proteins, in their serum, urine, or both and plasma cell infiltration into their bone marrow at multiple sites. African Americans are more than twice as likely as whites to develop MM, but the reason for this higher prevalence is not entirely clear. Since MM is nearly always preceded by the premalignant condition monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), Ola Landgren, M.D., Ph.D., a Senior Investigator in CCR’s Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, and colleagues from NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, the Mayo Clinic, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), wanted to determine whether there were also disparities in MGUS prevalence or in biomarkers associated with a high risk of MGUS progression to MM.

  2. Repair Mechanism of UV-damaged DNA in Xeroderma Pigmentosum | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, inherited disorder characterized by extreme skin sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. XP is caused by mutations in genes involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) of damaged DNA. Normal cells are usually able to fix this damage before it leads to problems; however, the DNA damage is not repaired normally in patients with XP. As more abnormalities form in DNA, cells malfunction and eventually become cancerous or die. XP patients have more than a 10,000-fold increased risk of developing skin cancer. Kenneth Kraemer, M.D., in CCR’s Dermatology Branch, has been studying XP patients at the Clinical Center for more than 40 years.

  3. Design of a Municipal Yard Waste Composting Facility for Anderson County, South Carolina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klapmeyer, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... Large-scale composting is a proven method by which Anderson County can demonstrate sound environmental stewardship while drastically reducing the volume of waste entering county landfills, thereby...

  4. Preliminary results of SIB-IMRT in head and neck cancers: Report from a regional cancer center in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Santam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Intensity-modulated radiotherapy using simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT is an attractive method for the treatment of head and neck cancers with sparing of the salivary function. Aims : To assess the feasibility, toxicity, and tumor control using SIB-IMRT in locally advanced head and neck cancers in the Indian setting. Settings and Design : The study was conducted in a regional cancer center in northern India. A review of the treatment result of the first 20 patients is presented. Methods and Materials : SIB-IMRT was planned for 20 patients-14 patients were treated with the SIB-72 schedule delivering a dose of 72 Gy, 66 Gy, and 57 Gy to the PTV GTV , PTV CTV1 , and PTV CTV2 in 33 fractions. Six patients were treated with the SIB-66 schedule delivering 66 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy to the above-mentioned volumes in 30 fractions. Patients were monitored for toxicity using the CTCAE v 3.0 criteria. Descriptive analysis of toxicity and actuarial estimates of the loco-regional control and survival are presented. Results : Grade III mucositis was seen in 65% patients. None of the patients had Grade III dermatitis. The projected 2-year overall survival was 95%. Conclusion : SIB-IMRT schedules evaluated were found to be safe and effective and are being subjected to further prospective studies.

  5. Locoregional Prostate Cancer Treatment Pattern Variation in Independent Cancer Centers: Policy Effect, Patient Preference, or Physician Incentive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Camarata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance, Epidemiologic, and End Results (SEER registry data abstracted from a priority 2 or higher reporting source from 2006 to 2008 were used to compare treatment patterns in 45–64-year old men diagnosed with locoregional prostate cancer (LRPC across states with or without radiation therapy-directed certificate of need (CON laws and across independent cancer centers (ICCs compared to large multi-specialty groups (LMSGs. Adjusted treatment percentages for the five most common LRPC treatments (surgery, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT, combination brachytherapy with EBRT, brachytherapy, and observation were compared using cross-sectional logistic regression between CON-unregulated and -regulated states and between LMSGs and ICCs. LRPC EBRT rates were no different across CON regions, but are increased in ICCs compared to LMSGs (37.00% vs. 13.23%, P < 0.001. Variation in LRPC treatment patterns by reporting source merits further scrutiny under the Affordable Care Act of 2010, considering the intent of incentivized accountable care organizations (ACOs established by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA and the implications of early descriptions of these new healthcare provider organizations on prostate cancer treatment patterns.

  6. Clinical features and overall survival among elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; del Giglio, Auro; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha; Karnakis, Theodora; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the epidemiological profile and overall survival of a large population of elderly individuals diagnosed with solid tumors in a tertiary hospital. Methods This retrospective study included patients aged >65 years, diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011, at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. The medical records were reviewed to obtain information about clinical variables and overall survival. Results A total of 806 patients were identified, and 58.4% were male. Mean age was 74 years (65 to 99 years). The most common types were prostate (22%), colorectal (21%), breast (19%), and lung cancer (13%), followed by bladder (8%), pancreas (6%), and other types (11%). The majority of patients were diagnosed at early stage disease. After a median follow-up of 27 months (15 to 45 months), 29% of the patients (234/806) died, predominantly in the group older than 70 years. For the entire cohort, the median 2-year survival rate was 71%. Median overall survival was not reached within the study period. In a multivariate analysis, age (HR: 1.35; 95%CI: 1.25-1.45; p<0.001) and disease stage (HR: 1.93; 95%CI: 1.75-2.14; p<0.001) were independent negative predictors of poor survival. Conclusion The most prevalent tumors were prostate, colorectal, breast, and lung cancer, with the larger proportion diagnosed at initial stages, reflecting the great number of patients alive at last follow-up. PMID:26676269

  7. The Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of the National Cancer Institute - its resources to assist patients with bone marrow failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the bone marrow transplantation center of the brazilian National Cancer Institute, which is responsible for the cancer control in Brazil. The document also describes the resources available in the Institute for assisting patients presenting bone marrow failures. The Center provides for allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplants, peripheral stem cell transplants, umbilical cord collections and transplants, and a small experience with unrelated bone marrow transplants. The Center receives patient from all over the country and provides very sophisticated medical care at no direct cost to the patients

  8. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  9. The Cost analysis of cervical cancer screening services provided by Damavand health center in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Chouhdari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, the health sector in many countries is facing with severe resource constraints; hence it is absolutely necessary that cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness assessment have a major role in design of health services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-benefit and effectiveness of cervical cancer screening service (Pap smear test done by the health centers in Damavand County in 2013.  Methods: This is a descriptive study with cross-sectional method. All data was extracted from existing documents in Damavand health network.Cost of service screening for doing Pap smear test (manpower costs of performing the service, the cost of transferring samples, water, electricity, telephone and gas was estimated in all health centers then results, were compared with the incomes of this service.  Results: Screening program coverage was 22.3%, 6.9% and 6.05% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 respectively. All costs and incomes of units performing Pap smear screening test were calculated. Entire costs and incomes of this service during 2013 were respectively 303,009,000 and 11,640,000 RLS equal $12,227 and $496.73. Therefore, the cost-benefit ratio of this screening test was approximately 0.040.  Conclusion: The costs of units performing cervical cancer screening test in Damavand Health Center were much more than this benefit and because of a none-positive Pap smear test in spite of high cost, performing this test in Damavand health centers was not cost effective.

  10. A real-time audit of radiation therapy in a regional cancer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brundage, Michael D.; Dixon, Peter F.; Mackillop, William J.; Shelley, Wendy E.; Hayter, Charles; Paszat, Lawrence F.; Youssef, Youssef M.; Robins, Jean M.; McNamee, Anne; Cornell, Annette

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To report the development, structure, and implementation of a real-time clinical radiotherapy audit of the practice of radiation oncology in a regional cancer center. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy treatment plans were audited by a real-time peer-review process over an 8-year period (1989-1996). The overall goal of the audit was to establish a process for quality assurance (QA) of radiotherapy planning and prescription for individual patients. A parallel process was developed to audit the implementation of intervention-specific radiotherapy treatment policies. Results: A total of 3052 treatment plans were audited. Of these, 124 (4.1%) were not approved by the audit due to apparent errors in radiation planning. The majority of the nonapproved plans (79%) were modified prior to initiating treatment; the audit provided important clinical feedback about individual patient care in these instances. Most of the remaining nonapproved plans were deviations from normal practice due to patient-specific considerations. A further 110 (3.6% of all audited plans) were not approved by the audit due to deviations from radiotherapy treatment policy. A minority of these plans (22%) were modified prior to initiating treatment and the remainder provided important feedback for continuous quality improvement of treatment policies. Conclusion: A real-time audit of radiotherapy practice in a regional cancer center setting proved feasible and provided important direct and indirect patient benefits

  11. Quality of working life of nurses in a tertiary cancer center in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhirani Nagammal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Nurses are the largest segment of professionals working in the healthcare industry, and a satisfactory quality of working life will empower them to provide the highest quality care to their patients. Aim To assess the quality of working life among nurses in a tertiary cancer care center in Qatar concerning the following variables; control at work, employee engagement, general well-being, home-work interface, job/career satisfaction, stress at work, and working conditions. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to assess the QoWL among 146 Staff Nurses working in different units of a tertiary cancer center in Qatar. A Quality of Work life Scale, a seven-point Likert’s scale was used, were nurses self-reported their QoWL. Results The mean age of the study participants were 36.48 years ± 6.74, and mean total years of clinical experience in nursing and clinical experience at the center was 14.16 years and 7.65 years respectively. The majority (69.9% of the nurses who participated in the study were working in inpatient units. Around fifty-four percentage were graduate nurses. A vast majority (89.7% of the respondents were married and among them, 84.2% of nurses lived with their family. Nurses’ perception of the factors associated with QoWL including control and stress at work were found average, and others such as employee engagement, general well-being, homework interface, job/career satisfaction, working condition, and overall quality of work life were considered good. There was no statistically significant difference in the QoWL scores and participants’ characteristics (P>0.05. Conclusion The overall QoWL was found to be good for the Oncology Nurses working at a cancer center in Qatar. However, Nurses reported having varying degrees of stress at work. Nurses require highly specialized clinical competencies to accurately determine patients' states and predict and cope with difficulties that may occur during

  12. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy for anal canal epidermoid cancer in our center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Kunihiko; Sahara, Rikisaburo; Yamana, Tetsuro; Okamoto, Kinya; Takahashi, Tomoko; Furukawa, Satomi; Okada, Daisuke; Kaneko, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Atsuo

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of radiotherapy (RT) and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for anal canal epidermoid cancer were evaluated. Twenty-four patients with anal canal epidermoid cancer were treated in our center between 1988 and 2006, consisting of 13 patients treated by RT and 11 by CRT. In these patients, the efficacy and safety of RT and CRT were evaluated in terms of adverse events, 5-year local control rates, 5-year disease-free survival rates, and 5-year survival rates. No grade 3 or higher adverse events were noted in patients receiving RT. In contrast, anorexia, diarrhea, neutropenia, and anemia were observed in 33.3%, 10%, 33.3%, and 10%, respectively, of the patients receiving CRT. The anal preserving rate, 5-year local control rate, 5-year disease-free survival rate, and 5-year survival rate were 66.7%, 73%, 77.5%, and 88.4%, respectively. RT and CRT for anal canal epidermoid cancer should be first-line treatments because of their safety and efficacy. (author)

  13. Psychometric evaluation and design of patient-centered communication measures for cancer care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Bryce B; Thissen, David M; Bann, Carla M; Mack, Nicole; Treiman, Katherine; Sanoff, Hanna K; Roach, Nancy; Magnus, Brooke E; He, Jason; Wagner, Laura K; Moultrie, Rebecca; Jackson, Kathryn D; Mann, Courtney; McCormack, Lauren A

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of questions that assess patient perceptions of patient-provider communication and design measures of patient-centered communication (PCC). Participants (adults with colon or rectal cancer living in North Carolina) completed a survey at 2 to 3 months post-diagnosis. The survey included 87 questions in six PCC Functions: Exchanging Information, Fostering Health Relationships, Making Decisions, Responding to Emotions, Enabling Patient Self-Management, and Managing Uncertainty. For each Function we conducted factor analyses, item response theory modeling, and tests for differential item functioning, and assessed reliability and construct validity. Participants included 501 respondents; 46% had a high school education or less. Reliability within each Function ranged from 0.90 to 0.96. The PCC-Ca-36 (36-question survey; reliability=0.94) and PCC-Ca-6 (6-question survey; reliability=0.92) measures differentiated between individuals with poor and good health (i.e., known-groups validity) and were highly correlated with the HINTS communication scale (i.e., convergent validity). This study provides theory-grounded PCC measures found to be reliable and valid in colorectal cancer patients in North Carolina. Future work should evaluate measure validity over time and in other cancer populations. The PCC-Ca-36 and PCC-Ca-6 measures may be used for surveillance, intervention research, and quality improvement initiatives. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Geographic disparities amongst patients with gynecologic malignancies at an urban NCI-designated cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Sarah M; Fleming, Saroj A; Amrane, Selma; Schluterman, Nicholas; Terplan, Mishka

    2015-06-01

    Women with gynecologic malignancies require specialized care. We hypothesize that a geographic disparity exists amongst patients with gynecologic malignancies and that longer distance and time traveled negatively impact completion of adjuvant therapy. Patients with incident gynecologic malignancies at a single, urban NCI-designated cancer center were identified. Distances from the patient's home to the treating facility were calculated in miles and minutes. Demographic variables were evaluated for their impact on treatment outcomes using Chi-squared, ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis analyses. One hundred and fifty consecutive patients were identified. The median distance traveled to the hospital was 16.9miles with a median travel time of 28min. The distance and time traveled were significantly different between insurance groups, with the uninsured traveling the furthest for care by distance (p=0.04) and time (p=0.03). Race, tumor site, medical comorbidities and median income at zip code were not associated with travel distance or time to the hospital. The majority of patients (87%) completed recommended initial treatment. Treatment completion was related to distance traveled with those patients living at the distance extremes (50miles) least likely to complete care (p<0.01). The presence of medical comorbidities (p<0.01) but not insurance status was correlated to treatment completion. Geographic disparities exist in women with gynecologic malignancies receiving treatment at an NCI-designated cancer center. Approaches to decreasing these disparities may include improved support for cancer patients needing assistance with travel and additional social work and psychosocial support to patients with medical co-morbidities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of drug interactions in patients treated with antidepressants at a tertiary care cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Lincy Subha; Zhuang, Amy; Hung, Frank; Feng, Chun; Arbuckle, Rebecca; Fisch, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated potential drug interactions in patients treated with antidepressants at a tertiary care cancer center to determine if it affects resource utilization. We identified a cohort of patients with continuous care at the study institution by tagging patients who received at least three prescriptions for antidepressants within a continuous 6-month period. Data collected included demographics, cancer type and comorbidities, resource utilization (hospital and emergency room visits), and potential major drug interactions. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were utilized in the analysis. The study population, which included 297 patients, was 70% female and 71% Caucasian; the mean age was 53 years (SD, 12 years), with a mean follow-up period (duration of therapy) of 403 days. Overall, 145 (49%) of the patients had a drug combination that could result in a potential major drug interaction with antidepressants. There were 118 (40%) patients with a potential major drug interaction that could lead to serotonin syndrome symptoms and 59 (20%) patients with a potential major drug interaction with anticoagulants. Potential major drug interactions were associated with an increased number of hospital and ER visits (odds ratio [OR], 2.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-4.03). This finding was consistent for the two subanalysis groups as well, serotonin syndrome-inducing drugs (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.33-3.92) and anticoagulants (OR, 3.66; 95% CI, 1.85-7.22). Potential drug interactions are frequent in patients receiving antidepressants in a tertiary care cancer center and are associated with an increase in resource utilization.

  16. Minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer: Single center experience after 44 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the Department of Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery of the Hospital for Digestive Surgery in Belgrade, hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy (hMIE has been a standard of care for patients with resectable esophageal cancer since 2009. As a next and final step in the change management, from January 2015 we utilized total minimally invasive esophagectomy (tMIE as a standard of care. Objective. The aim of the study was to report initial experiences in hMIE (laparoscopic approach for cancer and analyze surgical technique, major morbidity and 30-day mortality. Methods. A retrospective cohort study included 44 patients who underwent elective hMIE for esophageal cancer at the Department for Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery, Hospital for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade from April 2009 to December 2014. Results. There were 16 (36% middle thoracic esophagus tumors and 28 (64% tumors of distal thoracic esophagus. Mean duration of the operation was 319 minutes (approximately five hours and 20 minutes. The average blood loss was 173.6 ml. A total of 12 (27% of patients had postoperative complications and mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 days. Mean hospital stay after surgery was 16 days. The average number of harvested lymph nodes during surgery was 31.9. The overall 30-day mortality rate within 30 days after surgery was 2%. Conclusion. As long as MIE is an oncological equivalent to open esophagectomy (OE, better relation between cost savings and potentially increased effectiveness will make MIE the preferred approach in high-volume esophageal centers that are experienced in minimally invasive procedures.

  17. The parabolic Anderson model random walk in random potential

    CERN Document Server

    König, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive survey on the research on the parabolic Anderson model – the heat equation with random potential or the random walk in random potential – of the years 1990 – 2015. The investigation of this model requires a combination of tools from probability (large deviations, extreme-value theory, e.g.) and analysis (spectral theory for the Laplace operator with potential, variational analysis, e.g.). We explain the background, the applications, the questions and the connections with other models and formulate the most relevant results on the long-time behavior of the solution, like quenched and annealed asymptotics for the total mass, intermittency, confinement and concentration properties and mass flow. Furthermore, we explain the most successful proof methods and give a list of open research problems. Proofs are not detailed, but concisely outlined and commented; the formulations of some theorems are slightly simplified for better comprehension.

  18. Compressible ferrimagnetism in the depleted periodic Anderson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, N. C.; Araújo, M. V.; Lima, J. P.; Paiva, T.; dos Santos, R. R.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2018-02-01

    Tight-binding Hamiltonians with single and multiple orbitals exhibit an intriguing array of magnetic phase transitions. In most cases the spin ordered phases are insulating, while the disordered phases may be either metallic or insulating. In this paper we report a determinant quantum Monte Carlo study of interacting electrons in a geometry which can be regarded as a two-dimensional periodic Anderson model with depleted interacting (f ) orbitals. For a single depletion, we observe an enhancement of antiferromagnetic correlations and formation of localized states. For half of the f orbitals regularly depleted, the system exhibits a ferrimagnetic ground state. We obtain a quantitative determination of the nature of magnetic order, which we discuss in the context of Tsunetsugu's theorem, and show that, although the dc conductivity indicates insulating behavior at half filling, the compressibility remains finite.

  19. Spin-liquid state in an inhomogeneous periodic Anderson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, R. C.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2018-02-01

    We studied the ground state of alkaline-earth-metal atoms confined in one-dimensional optical lattices with an effective hybridization generated by a suitable laser field. This system is modeled by the periodic Anderson model plus a quadratic confining potential, and we adopted the density-matrix renormalization group to calculate its ground state. We found a one-to-one correspondence between the local variance, the local von Neumann entropy, and the on-site spin-spin correlation. For low global densities, we observed the formation of local singlets between delocalized and localized atoms and found Kondo spin-liquid domains that can be tuned with the confining potential, the hybridization, and the local repulsion. Band insulator, metallic, phase separation, and Kondo spin-liquid regions coexist in the ground state.

  20. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV's) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG ampersand G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin). Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin)

  1. Classical diffusion, Anderson localization, and spectral statistics in billiard chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, T.; Doron, E.; Smilansky, U.

    1993-03-01

    We study spectral properties of quasi one-dimensional extended systems that show deterministic diffusion on the classical level and Anderson localization in the quantal description. Using semiclassical arguments, we relate to universal aspects of the spectral fluctuations to features of the set of classical periodic orbits, expressed in terms of probability to perform periodic motion, that are likewise universal. This allows to derive an analytical expression for the spectral form factor which reflects the diffusive nature of the corresponding classical dynamics. It defines a novel spectral universality class which covers the transition between GOE statistics in the limit of a small ratio of the system size to the localization length, corresponding to the metallic regime of disordered systems, to Poissonian level fluctuations in the opposite limit. Our semiclassical predictions are illustrated and confirmed by a numerical investigation of aperiodic chains of chaotic billiards. (authors)

  2. Unconstitutionality of Section 170 (e) of the price Anderson Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Several environmental protection groups in the State of North Carolina have recently contested the conformity with the United States Constitution of Section 170 (e) of the Atomic Energy Act (Price-Anderson Act). The court seized of the question (the United States District Court for the western district of North Carolina, Charlotte Division) held in March 1977 that this Section and the other provisions of the Atomic Energy Act concerning implementation of the $560 million limitation of liability for nuclear damage were unconstitutional and unenforceable insofar as they applied to nuclear incidents occurring inside the United States. The defendants, the former United States Atomic Energy Commission and its then Commissioners as well as the Duke Power Company (the local electricity company) will appeal this decision. The note on case law analyses the arguments retained by the court. (NEA) [fr

  3. Superconductivity in the periodic Anderson model with anisotropic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarasua, L.G.; Continentino, Mucio A.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we study superconductivity in the periodic Anderson model with both on-site and intersite hybridization, including the interband Coulomb repulsion. We show that the presence of the intersite hybridization together with the on-site hybridization significantly affects the superconducting properties of the system. The symmetry of the hybridization has a strong influence in the symmetry of the superconducting order parameter of the ground state. The interband Coulomb repulsion may increase or decrease the superconducting critical temperature at small values of this interaction, while is detrimental to superconductivity for strong values. We show that the present model can give rise to positive or negative values of dT c /dP, depending on the values of the system parameters

  4. X-slave boson approach to the periodic Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, R.; Figueira, M.S.; Foglio, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    The periodic anderson model (PAM) in the limit U=∞, can be studied by employing the Hubbard X operators to project out the unwanted states. In a previous work, we have studied the cumulant expansion of this Hamiltonian employing the hybridization as a perturbation, but probability conservation of the local states (completeness) is not usually satisfied when partial expansions like the 'chain approximation (CHA)' are employed. To consider this problem, we use a technique similar to the one employed by Coleman to treat the same problem with slave-bosons in the mean-field approximation. Assuming a particular renormalization for hybridization, we obtain a description that avoids an unwanted phase transition that appears in the mean-field slave-boson method at intermediate temperatures

  5. Quality of Life in Oncological Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Validity and Reliability of the Dutch Version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Deglutition Handicap Index

    OpenAIRE

    Speyer, Ren?e; Heijnen, Bas J.; Baijens, Laura W.; Vrijenhoef, Femke H.; Otters, Elsemieke F.; Roodenburg, Nel; Bogaardt, Hans C.

    2011-01-01

    Quality of life is an important outcome measurement in objectifying the current health status or therapy effects in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) have been determined for oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. At Maastricht University Medical Center, 76 consecutive patients were selected and asked to fill in three questio...

  6. All-solid-state cavity QED using Anderson-localized modes in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter; Sapienza, Luca; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup

    2010-01-01

    We employ Anderson-localized modes in deliberately disordered photonic crystal waveguides to confine light and enhance the interaction with matter. A 15-fold enhancement of the decay rate of a single quantum dot is observed meaning that 94% of the emitted single photons are coupled to an Anderson...

  7. Mott Transition of Cerium Compound CeCu2Si2 in the Anderson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Exact-Diagonalization (ED) technique is applied to the Single Site Impurity Anderson Model (SIAM) and the Periodic Anderson Model (PAM) to elucidate the nature of the ground-state energy and the phase diagram of the two models. The results obtained show a smooth phase transition from an antiferromagnetic ...

  8. PS1-22: A Systematic Review of Web-Based Cancer Prognostic Calculators: Can They Support Patient-Centered Communication with Cancer Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Borsika; Gaglio, Bridget; Sanders, Tristan; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Bull, Sheana; Marcus, Alfred; Dearing, James

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Information about cancer prognosis is a main topic of interest for cancer patients and clinicians alike. Prognostic information can help with decisions about treatment, lessen patients’ uncertainty and empower them to participate in the decision making process. Calculating and communicating cancer prognostic information can be challenging due to the high complexity and probabilistic nature of the information. Furthermore, prognostic information is further complicated by the potential interplay between cancer and other comorbid medical conditions. The purpose of this presentation is to present findings from a systematic review of web-based interactive prognostic calculators and assess how they might support patient-centered communication of prognostic information with cancer patients. Methods A systematic review of web-based cancer prognostic calculators was conducted using web search engines, peer-reviewed manuscripts, and expert input. Calculators had to be interactive, focus on cancer, available in English, and provide information about probabilities of survival/mortality, recurrence, spread, or clinical response to treatment. Eligible calculators were reviewed and abstracted for content, format, and functions of patient-centered communication and findings were summarized in a tabular format for comparison. The abstraction guide was pilot tested by all abstractors and was refined using a consensus approach. Results A total of 22 eligible web-based cancer prognostic tools including 95 individual calculators for 88 distinct cancer sites were identified and abstracted. Thirteen of the tools recommended patients as potential direct users; all other tools were designed for clinicians. Outcomes presented will include: 1) general description of calculators, including cancer type, designated users, types of data elements used in prognosis prediction, and validation, 2) calculator interface data entry features, and graphic output, 3) interpretation of

  9. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauser, Steven B; Johnson, Maureen R; O'Brien, Donna M; Beveridge, Joy M; Fennell, Mary L; Kaluzny, Arnold D

    2009-09-26

    In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align) to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  10. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  11. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Christoph P.; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase.

  12. PWA90 Workshop : Marking the Scientific Accomplishments of Philip W. Anderson

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, PIers; Kotliar, Gabi; Ong, Phuan; Stein, Daniel L; Yu, Clare; PWA90 : a lifetime of emergence

    2016-01-01

    In a remarkable career spanning more than six decades, Philip W Anderson has made many fundamental contributions to physics. As codified in his oft-quoted phrase "More is Different", Anderson has been the most forceful and persuasive proponent of the radical, but now ubiquitous, viewpoint of emergent phenomena: truly fundamental concepts that can and do emerge from studies of Nature at each layer of complexity or energy scale. Anderson's ideas have also extended deeply into other areas of physics, including the Anderson–Higgs mechanism and the dynamics of pulsars. PWA90: A Lifetime of Emergence is a volume of original scientific essays and personal reminiscences of Philip W Anderson by experts in the field, that were presented as part of "PWA90: Emergent Frontiers of Condensed Matter" meeting held at Princeton in December 2013 to highlight Anderson's contributions to physics.

  13. Predictors of pathologic complete response after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Cheol [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Young Ki; Baek, Sung Gyu [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To identify possible predictors of pathologic complete response (pCR) of rectal cancer after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We conducted a retrospective review of 53 patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CCRT followed by radical surgery at a single center between January 2007 and December 2012. The median radiotherapy dose to the pelvis was 54.0 Gy (range, 45.0 to 63.0 Gy). Five-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy was administered via continuous infusion with leucovorin. The pCR rate was 20.8%. The downstaging rate was 66%. In univariate analyses, poor and undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.020) and an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (p = 0.040) were significantly associated with pCR, while female gender (p = 0.070), initial carcinoembryonic antigen concentration of <5.0 ng/dL (p = 0.100), and clinical stage T2 (p = 0.100) were marginally significant factors. In multivariate analysis, an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (odds ratio, 0.139; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.877; p = 0.036) was significantly associated with pCR, while stage T2 (odds ratio, 5.363; 95% confidence interval, 0.963 to 29.877; p = 0.055) was a marginally significant risk factor. We suggest that the interval from finishing CCRT to surgery is a predictor of pCR after preoperative CCRT in patients with rectal cancer. Stage T2 cancer may also be an important predictive factor. We hope to perform a robust study by collecting data during treatment to obtain more advanced results.

  14. Breast Conserving Surgery and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Sezer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients with locally advanced breast cancer may undergo breast conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of the study is to evaluate the results of locally advanced breast cancer patients who underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection and sentinel lymph node biopsy in a single center. Material and Methods: 12 patients with locally advanced breast cancer stage IIIA/IIIB were included in the study between 2002-2009. The patients were given anthracycline-based regimen before surgery. Patients underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection, and sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by radiotherapy. Results: There were five patients in stage IIIA, six in stage IIIB, and one in stage IIIC. Patients had received 3-6 regimen of FAC/FEC. Eight had partial and four had complete response. Five positive axilla were detected. The median value of the lymph nodes was 12 (n:8-19. Five patients underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy. The biopsy has failed in one patient and the median value of dissected sentinel node was 3.5 (n:3-4. Locoregional recurrence was not observed in any patients. The mean follow-up of the patients was 29.8 months and median time was 16 (n:2-80 months.Of the 12 patients 10 are alive and 2 were deceased. Conclusion: In selected locally advanced patients, breast conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy may be applied by a multidisciplinary approach, and excellent success may be achieved in those patients as in early breast cancer patients.

  15. Colorectal Cancer in India: An Audit from a Tertiary Center in a Low Prevalence Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prachi S; Saklani, Avanish; Gambhire, Pravir; Mehta, Shaesta; Engineer, Reena; De'Souza, Ashwin; Chopra, Supriya; Bal, Munita

    2017-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common cancer worldwide with a low reported incidence in India. There is significant geographical variation in the incidence rates, and the presentation may also vary. There are few studies evaluating the clinical profile of CRC in Indian patients. We analyzed a prospective database maintained at the Tata Memorial Hospital, a referral cancer center in Mumbai, of consecutive patients with CRC between August 2013 and August 2014. We captured details regarding the demography, symptoms, pathology, stage, and treatment plan. The aim was to assess the demographic and clinical details of patients with CRC in India and compare it with those of the reported literature. Eight hundred new patients with CRC were seen in the colorectal clinic in one year. The mean age was 47.2 years. Sixty-five percent were males. Patients were symptomatic for an average period of 4 months prior to presentation. The commonest symptoms were rectal bleeding (57%), pain (44%), and altered bowel habits (26%). Thirteen percent of the patients had signet ring tumors. The median CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) level was 5.8 ng/mL. Most patients had localized or locally advanced disease. Twenty-eight percent of the patients had metastatic disease with liver being the commonest site of metastases (14%) followed by peritoneum and lung. More than half of the patients received treatment with a curative intent. Colorectal cancer in India differs from that described in the Western countries. We had more young patients, higher proportion of signet ring carcinomas, and more patients presenting with an advanced stage. Inadequate access to healthcare and socioeconomic factors may play a role in some of these differences.

  16. Phase Diagrams of Three-Dimensional Anderson and Quantum Percolation Models Using Deep Three-Dimensional Convolutional Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Tomohiro; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2017-11-01

    The three-dimensional Anderson model is a well-studied model of disordered electron systems that shows the delocalization-localization transition. As in our previous papers on two- and three-dimensional (2D, 3D) quantum phase transitions [https://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.85.123706" xlink:type="simple">J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 85, 123706 (2016), https://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.86.044708" xlink:type="simple">86, 044708 (2017)], we used an image recognition algorithm based on a multilayered convolutional neural network. However, in contrast to previous papers in which 2D image recognition was used, we applied 3D image recognition to analyze entire 3D wave functions. We show that a full phase diagram of the disorder-energy plane is obtained once the 3D convolutional neural network has been trained at the band center. We further demonstrate that the full phase diagram for 3D quantum bond and site percolations can be drawn by training the 3D Anderson model at the band center.

  17. Incidental prostate cancer: a 10-year review of a tertiary center, Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedi AR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amir-reza Abedi,1 Morteza Fallah-Karkan,2 Farzad Allameh,1 Arash Ranjbar,1 Afshin Shadmehr3 1Urology Department, Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Urology Department, Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital, Laser Application in Medical Sciences Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Urology Department, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran Objective: Incidental prostate cancer (IPCa is defined as a symptom-free cancer unexpectedly discovered upon microscopic examination of resected tissue. The aim of this study was to report the correlation between some specific clinical criteria in patients incidentally diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP or open prostatectomy (OP after clinically suspected benign prostatic hyperplasia.Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study. Data were collected from Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital database during November 2006 to October 2016. Four hundred and twenty three men suffering from symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent either TURP or OP that provided a prostate specimen were evaluated. The data analysis was performed using Pearson correlation test and independent t-test using SPSS version 20 software.Results: The mean age of subjects was 68.74±9.87 years old (45–93 years. The mean prostate specific antigen (PSA level was 21.47±13.44 ng/mL (0.6–47.1 ng/mL. Results showed that 84 patients (19.9% had PCa (40 patients who underwent TURP [12.6%] and 44 patients who underwent OP [40.7%] groups. Cut-off point of PSA for detecting IPCa was 3.8 ng/mL in our study, and this showed sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of 26.08%, 100%, 100%, and 29.79%, respectively. Twenty two patients with cancer had a positive family history for PCa; thus, a significant relationship between

  18. Qualification of National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to prequalify imaging facilities at all of the National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive and clinical cancer centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including PET. Here we review the CQIE PET/CT scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 y, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantoms, including uniform and American College of Radiology-approved phantoms, PET/CT images, and examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time periods: initial submission (T0) and 2 requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures, and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for scanners that failed. Quantitative results were compared across scanners within a given time period and across time periods for a given scanner. Results: Data from 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 56 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification; 64 scanners passed the qualification. Data from 44 (68%) of those 65 scanners were submitted for T2. From T0 to T2, the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% for T1 to 67% for T2. The most common reasons for failure were SUV outside specifications, incomplete submission, and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and American College of Radiology-approved phantom results between scanner manufacturers were similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process showed that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, for quantitative imaging-based trials, further evaluation of the relationships between the level of

  19. [Psychosocial Situation and Patient Satisfaction among Clients of Cancer Counselling Centers in Saxony].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Heide; Röder, Heiko; Frenschkowski, Sandra; Mehnert, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Outpatient psychosocial counselling (OPC) centers for those affected by cancer fulfill 2 main purposes: (a) to offer low-threshold psychological, social and legal counselling, and (b) to refer clients to other services. Here we report findings from a user-based assessment of OPC in the state of Saxony, Germany. This study was funded in part by the Saxon State Ministry of Social Affairs and Consumer Protection. We used a paper-based questionnaire to survey 213 clients of OPC in Saxony at 2 points (t1: up to one week after first contact, t2: 4 months after t1). All participants were cancer patients. The survey assessed utilization of services, depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), quality of life (SF-8) as well as clients' satisfaction with the counselling service (ZUF-8). The majority of clients (81%) were referred to the OPC from a hospital or rehabilitation center. 46% of patients only had one contact. 78% of counselling sessions treated matters of social law. Patients suffered from 13 problems on average, the most common being fatigue and exhaustion, worries, anxiety, uncertainty about the future, and pain. Half the patients (49%) reported moderate to severe anxiety and 68% showed elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Psychosocial distress did not change significantly over time (GAD-7: p=0.580, PHQ-9: p=0.101). Patients' quality of life was low overall (cut-off<50). At t2, quality of life had particularly increased in physical aspects, but overall quality of life remained lower than in the general population (all subscales: p<0.05). We identified younger age and lower income as risk factors for higher psychosocial distress and lower quality of life. Patients were very satisfied with the counselling they received, 9% reported to be dissatisfied. Our results show that psychosocial distress remains high over a longer period of time at least for some patients. This illustrates the persisting need for long-term support regarding physical, mental and social

  20. World Trade Center Health Program; amendments to list of WTC-related health conditions; cancer; revision. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-18

    On September 12, 2012, the Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) published a final rule in the Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)-Related Health Conditions (List) in the WTC Health Program regulations; an additional final rule was published on September 19, 2013 adding prostate cancer to the List. Through the process of implementing the addition of cancers to the List and integrating cancer coverage into the WTC Health Program, the Administrator has identified the need to amend the rule to remove the ICD codes and specific cancer sub-sites, clarify the definition of ``childhood cancers,'' revise the definition of ``rare cancers,'' and notify stakeholders that the Administrator is revising WTC Health Program policy related to coverage of cancers of the brain and the pancreas. No types of cancer covered by the WTC Health Program will be removed by this action; four types of cancer--malignant neoplasms of the brain, the cervix uteri, the pancreas, and the testis--are newly eligible for certification as WTC-related health conditions as a result of this action.

  1. Prognostic significance of cancer family history for patients with gastric cancer: a single center experience from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Cai, Hong; Yu, Lin; Huang, Hua; Long, Ziwen; Wang, Yanong

    2016-06-14

    Family history of cancer is a risk factor for gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the prognoses of gastric cancer patients with family history of cancer. A total of 1805 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy from 2000 to 2008 were evaluated. The clinicopathologic parameters and prognoses of gastric cancer patients with a positive family history (PFH) of cancer were compared with those with a negative family history (NFH). Of 1805 patients, 382 (21.2%) patients had a positive family history of cancer. Positive family history of cancer correlated with younger age, more frequent alcohol and tobacco use, worse differentiation, smaller tumor size, and more frequent tumor location in the lower 1/3 of the stomach. The prognoses of patients with a positive family history of cancer were better than that of patients with a negative family history. Family history of cancer independently correlated with better prognosis after curative gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients.

  2. Prevalence of Precancerous Conditions and Gastric Cancer Based upon the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea for 7 Years, Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyuk Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Gastric cancer is the second most prevalent cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Korea. The National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP has implemented esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD biennially for all Koreans starting in their 40s. This study was conducted to estimate the clinical relevance of NCSP through identifying the prevalence of gastric disease, including cancer. Materials and Methods. Data from 40,821 subjects who received the screening EGD in the single center for 7 years were retrospectively investigated. Results. The overall prevalence of nonatrophic/atrophic/metaplastic gastritis, peptic ulcer, adenoma, early gastric cancer (EGC, and advanced gastric cancer (AGC was 44.28%, 27.97%, 14.95%, 0.59%, 0.43%, 0.21%, and 0.09%, respectively. The prevalence of metaplastic gastritis, peptic ulcer, adenoma, EGC, and AGC was significantly higher in men than in women. The prevalence of preneoplastic/neoplastic disease significantly increased with age. Judged from the ratio of EGC to AGC, the proportion of EGC made up to 70% of all cancers. Conclusions. Screening endoscopy starting for people in their 40s should be strongly recommended for the elderly. Through the NCSP, the early detection of gastric cancer might contribute to the decreased mortality rate due to gastric cancer in Korea.

  3. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington: Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies (Revision)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-03-01

    This case study was prepared by participants in the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new laboratory buildings for both the public and the private sectors. Retrofits of existing laboratories are also encouraged. The energy-efficient features of the laboratories in the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center complex in Seattle, Washington, include extensive use of efficient lighting, variable-air-volume controls, variable-speed drives, motion sensors, and high-efficiency chillers and motors. With about 532,000 gross square feet, the complex is estimated to use 33% less electrical energy than most traditional research facilities consume because of its energy-efficient design and features.

  4. A Personal Reflection on the History of Radiation Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Florence C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a historical and personal narrative of the development of radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), from its founding more than 100 years ago to the present day. Methods and Materials: Historical sources include the Archives of MSKCC, publications by members of MSKCC, the author's personal records and recollections, and her communications with former colleagues, particularly Dr. Basil Hilaris, Dr. Zvi Fuks, and Dr. Beryl McCormick. Conclusions: The author, who spent 38 years at MSKCC, presents the challenges and triumphs of MSKCC's Radiation Oncology Department and details MSKCC's breakthroughs in radiation oncology. She also describes MSKCC's involvement in the founding of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

  5. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center experience of metastatic extramammary Paget disease 1998-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Padrnos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD is a rare cutaneous malignancy. The most common presentation of EMPD is the vulva followed by perianal involvement. Most cases are localized to the dermis with treatment focused on surgery, topical treatment or radiotherapy. Recurrence is frequent despite therapies utilized. Metastatic extramammary Paget disease is uncommon and, as such, standard treatment guidelines do not exist. This study sought to evaluate the treatment regimens and outcomes of patients treated at a Mayo Clinic Center from 1998-2012. Cancer registry inquiry revealed 261 patients with report advanced Paget disease during these years. Ten cases of metastatic EPMD were identified with sufficient documentation for review. This review reveals support for utilizing localized radiation therapy for bulky disease sequentially with systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and paclitaxel or irinotecan. Further studies are necessary to define the optimal treatment regimen.

  6. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland OR, Houston TX, and Galveston TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulant of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  7. Aggressive Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Increases Survival: A Scandinavian Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Watten Brudvik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined overall and disease-free survivals in a cohort of patients subjected to resection of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRLM in a 10-year period when new treatment strategies were implemented. Methods. Data from 239 consecutive patients selected for liver resection of CRLM during the period from 2002 to 2011 at a single center were used to estimate overall and disease-free survival. The results were assessed against new treatment strategies and established risk factors. Results. The 5-year cumulative overall and disease-free survivals were 46 and 24%. The overall survival was the same after reresection, independently of the number of prior resections and irrespectively of the location of the recurrent disease. The time intervals between each recurrence were similar (11 ± 1 months. Patients with high tumor load given neoadjuvant chemotherapy had comparable survival to those with less extensive disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive resection margin or resectable extrahepatic disease did not affect overall survival. Conclusion. Our data support that one still, and perhaps to an even greater extent, should seek an aggressive therapeutic strategy to achieve resectable status for recurrent hepatic and extrahepatic metastases. The data should be viewed in the context of recent advances in the understanding of cancer biology and the metastatic process.

  8. Epidemiological study of penile cancer in Pernambuco: experience of two reference centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Thiago Costa do; Arruda, Rodrigo Medeiros Barbosa; Couto, Moisés Costa do; Barros, Felipe Dubourcq

    2014-01-01

    To investigate and analyze the epidemiological profile of penile cancer in the state of Pernambuco and compare this information with other studies related to the issue. We conducted a retrospective, observational and descriptive study of all patients with penile cancer in two reference centers in Pernambuco - Brazil, from 2007 to 2012. The variables studied were: age, region from the state, socio-economic situation, previous postectomy, smoking, time from the beginning of injury to diagnosis, staging of the primary lesion, tumor differentiation, treatment performed and death due to cancer. The total number of patients was 88. The highest prevalence was seen in those aged between 66 and 75 years. About the socio-economic situation, 67% worked informally and 64.8% received up to two minimum wages. Of all patients, 57% were married and 50% illiterate. The Metropolitan Region of Recife was the one with the highest number of cases, 41%. Tobacco smoking was reported in 48.9% of cases and prior postectomy in 3.4%. Most often it was observed an average period of six months from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis. And when the lesion was diagnosed, it usually had 2 to 5 cm (64.7%), stage T2 in 50% and well differentiated in 79.6%. Partial penectomy was performed in 76.1% and total in 17%. Death was observed in 27.3%. The clinical profile and epidemiological characteristics found in this study are similar to other national and international studies related to the issue, i.e., typical of underdeveloped or developing countries.

  9. Early Access to Investigational Agents through the National Cancer Institute's Treatment Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tali M; Boron, Matthew J

    2012-12-01

    The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD), as an investigational new drug sponsor, may provide early access to investigational agents for treatment use. Until recently, the NCI had 3 protocol mechanisms for distributing investigational agents through the Treatment Referral Center (TRC), a service provided by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch (PMB) within the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program of the NCI's DCTD. The first mechanism is the Group C protocol, the second mechanism is the TRC protocol, and the third, and most common, mechanism is the Special Exception protocol. The purpose of this article is to describe and report on the activities of the TRC at the PMB since 2000 through the end of 2011. Capital Technology Information Services performed PMB data mining for all treatment protocols from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Requests to PMB were sorted in spreadsheet format by disposition, either as referred, approved, or denied, and were counted by type, either as Group C, TRC, or Special Exception. More than 60% of requests were either referred or approved between 2000 and 2011. The peak number of requests was 1664 between 2000 and 2011 and occurred in 2003. The peak was mostly a result of Special Exception requests; however, more than 400 TRC requests and 20 Group C requests were approved that year. The total number of requests dropped precipitously after 2003, and since 2008 have totaled fewer than 50 annually. All Group C and TRC protocols were completed by March 2006. The lowest number of treatment use requests occurred in 2011. Providing agents through the Special Exception mechanism is one way that promising investigational new drug agents can get to patients with life-threatening illnesses. In general, the PMB's TRC is a useful drug information resource for sites conducting clinical research in oncology, and it provides a valuable service to the oncology community.

  10. Meeting patients' health information needs in breast cancer center hospitals - a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Christoph; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Ansmann, Lena; Wesselmann, Simone; Pfaff, Holger

    2014-11-25

    Breast cancer patients are confronted with a serious diagnosis that requires them to make important decisions throughout the journey of the disease. For these decisions to be made it is critical that the patients be well informed. Previous studies have been consistent in their findings that breast cancer patients have a high need for information on a wide range of topics. This paper investigates (1) how many patients feel they have unmet information needs after initial surgery, (2) whether the proportion of patients with unmet information needs varies between hospitals where they were treated and (3) whether differences between the hospitals account for some of these variation. Data from 5,024 newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients treated in 111 breast center hospitals in Germany were analyzed and combined with data on hospital characteristics. Multilevel linear regression models were calculated taking into account hospital characteristics and adjusting for patient case mix. Younger patients, those receiving mastectomy, having statutory health insurance, not living with a partner and having a foreign native language report higher unmet information needs. The data demonstrate small between-hospital variation in unmet information needs. In hospitals that provide patient-specific information material and that offer health fairs as well as those that are non-teaching or have lower patient-volume, patients are less likely to report unmet information needs. We found differences in proportions of patients with unmet information needs between hospitals and that hospitals' structure and process-related attributes of the hospitals were associated with these differences to some extent. Hospitals may contribute to reducing the patients' information needs by means that are not necessarily resource-intensive.

  11. Interactive breast cancer segmentation based on relevance feedback: from user-centered design to evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze, A.; Kieffer, S.; Van Brussel, C.; Moncarey, R.; Grivegnée, A.; Macq, B.

    2009-02-01

    Computer systems play an important role in medical imaging industry since radiologists depend on it for visualization, interpretation, communication and archiving. In particular, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems help in lesion detection tasks. This paper presents the design and the development of an interactive segmentation tool for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The tool conception is based upon a user-centered approach in order to ensure that the application is of real benefit to radiologists. The analysis of user expectations, workflow and decision-making practices give rise to the need for an interactive reporting system based on the BIRADS, that would not only include the numerical features extracted from the segmentation of the findings in a structured manner, but also support human relevance feedback as well. This way, the numerical results from segmentation can be either validated by end-users or enhanced thanks to domain-experts subjective interpretation. Such a domain-expert centered system requires the segmentation to be sufficiently accurate and locally adapted, and the features to be carefully selected in order to best suit user's knowledge and to be of use in enhancing segmentation. Improving segmentation accuracy with relevance feedback and providing radiologists with a user-friendly interface to support image analysis are the contributions of this work. The preliminary result is first the tool conception, and second the improvement of the segmentation precision.

  12. Environmental dose level survey of radiotherapy center in large cancer hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Bin; Zhong Hailuo; Wu Dake; Li Jian; Wang Pei; Qi Guohai; Huang Renbing; Lang Jinyi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the radiation dosage around the working environment in radiotherapy centre affiliated to Sichuan cancer hospital in the western China. Methods: In 60 days, we have continuously monitored the accumulated dose that absorbed by doctors, nurses, technicians, physicists and engineers, and investigated the working environment ( 60 Co unit, accelerator, after loading unit, X-ray simulator, CT simulator, gamma knife, MRI and doctor's office) and external environment by using TLD, and compared our results to those released by relevant departments. Results: The average dosage in the working environment is 1.96 μC ·kg -1 ·month -1 , 1.61 μC ·kg -1 ·month -1 in external environment. Conclusion: In the past 25 years, the radiotherapy center constructed strictly by the criterions of environment and protection departments required, so the radiation dosage in or outside the radiotherapy center has reached the national standard, which is safe for the staff and patients. Its instatement that the radiotherapy sites constructed by the related laws well accorded with the safety standards regulated. (authors)

  13. Analysis of patterns of palliative radiotherapy in north west India: A regional cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative radiotherapy (PRT is the eventual requirement in 30-50% of all cancer patients. PRT is primarily aimed to relieve pain and prevent/treat collapse or fracture in case of bone metastasis, to reduce edema in patients with cranial metastasis, and to control distressing symptoms of rapid primary growth. An audit of PRT planned in a busy cancer center can help in the characterization of the requirements of the patients and the formulation of institutional policies. Materials and Methods: In total, 516 patients who received PRT in our regional cancer center from January 2012 to December 2012 and whose complete records were available for analysis were selected for this retrospective study. Medical records and radiotherapy files were analyzed to obtain data such as sociodemographic parameters, prescription of PRT, and follow up. Descriptive statistics were evaluated in terms of frequencies and percentages to allow comparisons. Results: Of the 516 patients, 73% patients were male; the median age of the patients receiving PRT was 62 years (range 13-83 years. About 48% ( n = 248 patients received PRT at the primary site while rest (52% were given PRT at the metastatic site. The most common indication of PRT was pain (56.8% cases, followed by cytostatic PRT (19.8% and raised ICT (12.4%. The median dose prescribed was 30 Gy (range 8-36 Gy delivered in 1-12 fractions over the duration of 1-18 days. The overall response rate was about 43% at 2 weeks of completion of PRT; the median follow-up of the patients was 154 days (range 9-256 days. The long-term symptom relief at median follow up was 8%. Conclusions: Good clinical judgment and expertise is required in prescribing correct fractionation schedule to achieve effective symptom palliation with lowest possible cost and inconvenience to the patients and relatives. Hypofractionated radiotherapy is a feasible treatment option in patients with advanced incurable disease to achieve effective

  14. Anderson transition in one-dimension using Wegner's Flow equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Quito, Victor; Pekker, David; Refael, Gil

    2015-03-01

    We study the Anderson transition in one-dimensional random single-particle Hamiltonians with long-range hoppings decaying in a power-law. Explicitly, we consider the single particle tight-binding model in the spin representation with disorder both in the fields and hoppings. It has been shown by Mirlin et. al. that this model shows an extended-to-localized transition as a function of the power-law exponent with a critical multi-fractal regime when the decay exponent is equal to one. We generalize the flow equation technique, first introduced by Wegner, to the disordered system and use it to study the model and elucidate the character of this transition. This method allows us to efficiently compute the eigenvalues and local observables. We follow, analytically and numerically, the flow of the coupling distributions for the different exponents as a function of the flow-time and look for signatures of the two distinct phases as well as a characterization of the critical point.

  15. Anderson's considerations on the flow of superfluid helium: Some offshoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoquaux, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Nearly five decades have elapsed since the seminal 1966 paper of P. W. Anderson on the flow of superfluid helium, 4He at that time. Some of his "considerations"—the role of the quantum phase as a dynamical variable, the interplay between the motion of quantized vortices and potential superflow, its incidence on dissipation in the superfluid and the appearance of critical velocities, the quest for the hydrodynamic analogs of the Josephson effects in helium—and the way they have evolved over the past half century are recounted in this review. But it is due to key advances on the experimental front that phase slippage could be harnessed in the laboratory, leading to a deeper understanding of superflow, vortex nucleation, the various intrinsic and extrinsic dissipation mechanisms in superfluids, macroscopic quantum effects, and the superfluid analog of both ac and dc Josephson effects—pivotal concepts in superfluid physics—have been performed. Some of the experiments that have shed light on the more intimate effect of quantum mechanics on the hydrodynamics of the dense heliums are surveyed, including the nucleation of quantized vortices both by Arrhenius processes and by macroscopic quantum tunneling, the setting up of vortex mills, and superfluid interferometry.

  16. Magnetic flux creep in HTSC and Anderson-Kim theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykov, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental data on flux creep in high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) were analyzed in the review paper. On the one hand, the main attention is paid to the most striking experimental results which have had a significant influence on the investigations of flux creep in HTSC. On the other hand, the analysis of theoretical studies is concentrated on the works, which explain the features of flux creep on the basis of the Anderson-Kim (AK) theory modifications, and received previously unsufficient attention. However, it turned out that the modified AK theory could explain a lot of features of flux creep in HTSC: the scaling behaviour of current-voltage curves of HTSC, the finite rate of flux creep at ultra low temperatures, the logarithmic dependence of effective pinning potential as a function of transport current and its decrease with temperature. The harmonic potential field which is used in this approach makes it possible to solve accurately the both problems: viscous vortex motion and flux creep in this field. Moreover the distribution of pinning potential and the interaction of vortices with each other are taken into account in the approach. Thus, the modification of the AK theory consists, essentially, in its detailed elaboration and approaching to real situations in superconductors

  17. What should the Price--Anderson Act accomplish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    A historical review of the Price-Anderson Act's goals is followed by recommendations for amendments to improve guarantees of public safety. Failures of the original Act are identified as its failure to cover some accident situations appropriately and to provide incentives for promoting public safety. Legislation should correct these problems and be extended to all energy areas. Legislation based on worst-case situations is not found to be meaningful in terms of increasing safety or estimating comprehensive compensation because it relies on invalidated assumptions, which are still useful in safety awareness. Legislation could take the direction of putting 1.5 percent of the reactor cost into a fund, with the vendor and licensee contributing equal parts. When an incident occurs at any reactor, another one percent is put in by every reactor plus a $1 million penalty proportioned among those responsible. The Federal government would cover amounts above the fund, which would have no limit. Compensation to public funds by the industry would be a social decision based on the social and economic impact

  18. Primary Care Provider Practices and Perceptions Regarding HPV Vaccination and Anal Cancer Screening at a Boston Community Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Kaan Z; Fontenot, Holly B; Shtasel, Derri L; Mayer, Kenneth H; Keuroghlian, Alex S

    2018-02-26

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and anal cancer screening are valuable, yet underutilized, tools in prevention of HPV-related cancers among sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations. The aim of this study was to characterize primary care providers' (PCPs) practices and perceptions pertaining to HPV vaccination and anal cancer screening. A survey assessing self-reported practice characteristics related to HPV vaccination and anal cancer screening, as well as perceived barriers to vaccination and anal cancer screening at the patient-, provider-, and system-level was distributed to PCPs at a Federally-Qualified Health Center that specializes in care for SGM populations in the greater Boston area. A total of 33 PCPs completed the survey. All PCPs strongly recommended HPV vaccination to their patients by emphasizing that the vaccine is extremely important or very important. Most PCPs told their patients that the HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer (96.9%), anal cancer (96.9%), oropharyngeal cancer (72.7%), penile cancer (57.5%), and genital warts (63.6%). There is substantial variability among providers regarding recommendations for anal cancer screening and follow-up. Most PCPs perceived that patient-level factors such as poverty, mental illness, and substance use disorders were barriers to HPV vaccination and anal cancer screening. Systems-level barriers such as lack of clinical time with each patient and lack of staffing were also described as barriers to vaccination and screening. Patient-, provider- and systems-level improvements are important to increase HPV vaccination and anal cancer screening rates.

  19. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  20. Development of a Community-Based Palliative Care Model for Advance Cancer Patients in Public Health Centers in Busan, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Nam; Choi, Soon-Ock; Shin, Seong Hoon; Ryu, Ji-Sun; Baik, Jeong-Won

    2017-07-01

    A feasible palliative care model for advance cancer patients is needed in Korea with its rapidly aging population and corresponding increase in cancer prevalence. This study describes the process involved in the development of a community-based palliative care (CBPC) model implemented originally in a Busan pilot project. The model development included steps I and II of the pilot project, identification of the service types, a survey exploring the community demand for palliative care, construction of an operational infrastructure, and the establishment of a service delivery system. Public health centers (including Busan regional cancer centers, palliative care centers, and social welfare centers) served as the regional hubs in the development of a palliative care model. The palliative care project included the provision of palliative care, establishment of a support system for the operations, improvement of personnel capacity, development of an educational and promotional program, and the establishment of an assessment system to improve quality. The operational infrastructure included a service management team, provision teams, and a support team. The Busan Metropolitan City CBPC model was based on the principles of palliative care as well as the characteristics of public health centers that implemented the community health projects. The potential use of the Busan CBPC model in Korea should be explored further through service evaluations.

  1. The presence of postmenopausal bleeding as prognostic parameter in patients with endometrial cancer: a retrospective multi-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seebacher, Veronika; Schmid, Maximilian; Polterauer, Stephan; Hefler-Frischmuth, Katrin; Leipold, Heinz; Concin, Nicole; Reinthaller, Alexander; Hefler, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus on the utility of screening procedures for the early detection of endometrial cancer. The value of transvaginal ultrasound for screening of asymptomatic endometrial cancer has been discussed controversially. This study was conducted to evaluate whether asymptomatic patients with endometrial cancer have a better prognosis than symptomatic patients with endometrial cancer diagnosed after postmenopausal bleeding. In the present multi-center study, the effect of the presence of postmenopausal bleeding on prognosis was evaluated retrospectively in 605 patients with endometrial cancer using patients' files. 543 patients (133 patients were asymptomatic, 410 patients were symptomatic) with endometrioid endometrial cancer were enrolled in all further analysis. Student's t-test, Cox regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used were appropriate. Presence/absence of a postmenopausal bleeding was not associated with tumor stage (p = 0.2) and age at diagnosis (p = 0.5). Asymptomatic patients with endometrial cancer had a significantly higher rate of well and moderate-differentiated tumors compared to symptomatic patients (p = 0.008). In univariable and multivariable survival analysis, tumor stage, tumor grade, and patients' age at diagnosis, but not presence/absence of a postmenopausal bleeding, were associated with disease free and overall survival. Asymptomatic patients with endometrial cancer have a higher rate of well differentiated tumors compared to patients with a postmenopausal bleeding prior to diagnosis. The prognosis of both groups of patients was similar

  2. 75 FR 8346 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Settlement; Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site, Leadpoint, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Settlement; Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site, Leadpoint, WA AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice; request for public comment. SUMMARY: In...

  3. Steady-State Anderson Accelerated Coupling of Lattice Boltzmann and Navier–Stokes Solvers

    KAUST Repository

    Atanasov, Atanas

    2016-10-17

    We present an Anderson acceleration-based approach to spatially couple three-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann and Navier–Stokes (LBNS) flow simulations. This allows to locally exploit the computational features of both fluid flow solver approaches to the fullest extent and yields enhanced control to match the LB and NS degrees of freedom within the LBNS overlap layer. Designed for parallel Schwarz coupling, the Anderson acceleration allows for the simultaneous execution of both Lattice Boltzmann and Navier–Stokes solver. We detail our coupling methodology, validate it, and study convergence and accuracy of the Anderson accelerated coupling, considering three steady-state scenarios: plane channel flow, flow around a sphere and channel flow across a porous structure. We find that the Anderson accelerated coupling yields a speed-up (in terms of iteration steps) of up to 40% in the considered scenarios, compared to strictly sequential Schwarz coupling.

  4. Modified Anderson orthogonality catastrophe power law in the presence of shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, Swarnali; Hentschel, Martina

    2011-01-01

    We study Anderson orthogonality catastrophe (AOC) for parabolic quantum dots and focus on the effects of degeneracies, realized through the inherent shell structure of their energy levels that can be lifted through an external magnetic field, on the Anderson overlap. We find rich and interesting behaviors as a function of the strength and position of the perturbation, the system size, and the applied magnetic field. In particular, even for weak perturbations, we observe a pronounced AOC that is related to the degeneracy of energy levels. Most importantly, the power-law decay of the Anderson overlap as a function of the number of particles is modified in comparison to the metallic case due to the rearrangement of the energy-level shell structure. We support our analytical results by numerical calculations and also study the distribution of Anderson overlaps.

  5. Anderson localization for 2D discrete Schrödinger operator with random vector potential

    CERN Document Server

    Klopp, F

    2002-01-01

    We prove the Anderson localization near the bottom of the spectrum for two dimensional discrete Schr{\\"o}dinger operators with a class of random vector potentials and no scalar potentials. Main lemmas are the Lifshitz tail and the Wegner estimate on the integrated density of states. Then, the Anderson localization, i.e., the pure point spectrum with exponentially decreasing eigenfunctions, is proved by the standard multiscale argument.

  6. Wegner estimates, Lifshitz tails, and Anderson localization for Gaussian random magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Naomasa

    2016-07-01

    The Wegner estimate for the Hamiltonian of the Anderson model for the special Gaussian random magnetic field is extended to more general magnetic fields. The Lifshitz tail upper bounds of the integrated density of states as analyzed by Nakamura are reviewed and extended so that Gaussian random magnetic fields can be treated. By these and multiscale analysis, the Anderson localization at low energies is proven.

  7. Attractive Hubbard model with disorder and the generalized Anderson theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchinskii, E. Z.; Kuleeva, N. A.; Sadovskii, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Using the generalized DMFT+Σ approach, we study the influence of disorder on single-particle properties of the normal phase and the superconducting transition temperature in the attractive Hubbard model. A wide range of attractive potentials U is studied, from the weak coupling region, where both the instability of the normal phase and superconductivity are well described by the BCS model, to the strong-coupling region, where the superconducting transition is due to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs, formed at temperatures much higher than the superconducting transition temperature. We study two typical models of the conduction band with semi-elliptic and flat densities of states, respectively appropriate for three-dimensional and two-dimensional systems. For the semi-elliptic density of states, the disorder influence on all single-particle properties (e.g., density of states) is universal for an arbitrary strength of electronic correlations and disorder and is due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band. In the case of a flat density of states, universality is absent in the general case, but still the disorder influence is mainly due to band widening, and the universal behavior is restored for large enough disorder. Using the combination of DMFT+Σ and Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink approximations, we study the disorder influence on the superconducting transition temperature T c for a range of characteristic values of U and disorder, including the BCS-BEC crossover region and the limit of strong-coupling. Disorder can either suppress T c (in the weak-coupling region) or significantly increase T c (in the strong-coupling region). However, in all cases, the generalized Anderson theorem is valid and all changes of the superconducting critical temperature are essentially due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band

  8. The Optimal Treatment Modality for Taiwan Oral Cavity Cancer Patients-Experience of a Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Ta Liao; Chien-Yu Lin; Kang-Hsing Fan; Hung-Ming Wang

    2015-01-01

    Oral cavity cancer ranks sixth in cancer incidence in Taiwan, and it is the most common malignancy diagnosed in Taiwanese men aged between 30 and 50 years. Despite recent declines in high risk habits, the incidence of oral cavity cancer in Taiwan is still increasing with more than 5000 new cases diagnosed in 2011. Currently, the main treatment modality for oral cavity cancer is surgical excision, either with or without adjuvant therapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideli...

  9. Introduction of the non-technical skills for surgeons (NOTSS) system in a Japanese cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuburaya, Akira; Soma, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Cho, Haruhiko; Miki, Tamotsu; Uramatsu, Masashi; Fujisawa, Yoshikazu; Youngson, George; Yule, Steven

    2016-12-01

    Non-technical skills rating systems, which are designed to support surgical performance, have been introduced worldwide, but not officially in Japan. We performed a pilot study to evaluate the "non-technical skills for surgeons" (NOTSS) rating system in a major Japanese cancer center. Upper gastrointestinal surgeons were selected as trainers or trainees. The trainers attended a master-class on NOTSS, which included simulated demo-videos, to promote consistency across the assessments. The trainers thereafter commenced observing the trainees and whole teams, utilizing the NOTSS and "observational teamwork assessment for surgery" (OTAS) rating systems, before and after their education. Four trainers and six trainees were involved in this study. Test scores for understanding human factors and the NOTSS system were 5.89 ± 1.69 and 8.00 ± 1.32 before and after the e-learning, respectively (mean ± SD, p = 0.010). The OTAS scores for the whole team improved significantly after the trainees' education in five out of nine stages (p < 0.05). There were no differences in the NOTSS scores before and after education, with a small improvement in the total scores for the "teamwork and communication" and "leadership" categories. These findings demonstrate that implementing the NOTSS system is feasible in Japan. Education of both surgical trainers and trainees would contribute to better team performance.

  10. RNAi Functions in Adaptive Reprogramming of the Genome | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The regulation of transcribing DNA into RNA, including the production, processing, and degradation of RNA transcripts, affects the expression and the regulation of the genome in ways that are just beginning to be unraveled. A surprising discovery in recent years is that the vast majority of the genome is transcribed to yield an abundance of RNA transcripts. Many transcripts are regulated by the exosome, a multi-protein complex that degrades RNAs, and may also be targeted, under certain conditions, by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. These RNA degrading activities can recruit factors to silence certain regions of the genome by condensing the DNA into tightly-packed heterochromatin. For some chromosomal regions, such as centromeres and telomeres, which lie at the center and ends of chromosomes, respectively, silencing must be stably enforced through each cell generation. For other regions, silencing mechanisms must be easily reversible to activate gene expression in response to changing environmental or developmental conditions. Thus, the regulation of gene silencing is key to maintaining the integrity of the genome and proper cellular expression patterns, which, when disrupted can underlie many diseases, including cancer.

  11. Hormone receptors over the last 8 years in a cancer referral center in India: What was and what is?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shet Tanuja

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to observe the trend in hormone receptors over the last 8 years in a tertiary cancer center in India. A total of 11,780 tumors analyzed for hormone receptors over the last 7 years were compared with the results of hormone receptor expression in a prior published study on 798 cases of breast cancer from the same institute. The patient′s ages ranged from 18 to 102 years, Sixty percent of the patients were in the age group of 31-50 years. Seventy percent of the tumors were grade III tumors. The percentage of hormone receptor expression in breast cancer in the last 8 years varied from 52 to 57%. The overall receptor expression in the last 8 years shifted within a 5% range, confirming that the hormone receptor expression in Indian patients with breast cancer is low. However, there was redistribution within the pattern of estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR expression among tumors showing hormone receptor expression. Breast cancers showing only PR expression reduced dramatically from 21% in the year 1999 to in the year 2006, with a parallel increase in breast cancers showing combined ER and PR positivity (from 25 to 41.8% and only ER expression (from 7.4 to 10.6%. The hormone receptor expression in breast cancers in India is and continues to be low but the high incidence of only PR-positive tumors in our population reported earlier was misrepresented.

  12. Engaging Patient Advocates and Other Stakeholders to Design Measures of Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Katherine; McCormack, Lauren; Olmsted, Murrey; Roach, Nancy; Reeve, Bryce B; Martens, Christa E; Moultrie, Rebecca R; Sanoff, Hanna

    2017-02-01

    Patient-centered communication (PCC) is an essential component of patient-centered care and contributes to patient satisfaction, health-related quality of life, and other important patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to develop and test survey questions to assess patients' experiences with PCC in cancer care. We used a conceptual model developed by the National Cancer Institute as our framework. The survey questions align with the six core functions of PCC defined in the model: Exchanging Information, Managing Uncertainty, Enabling Patient Self-Management, Fostering Healing Relationships, Making Decisions, and Responding to Emotions. The study focused on colorectal cancer patients. We conducted two rounds of cognitive interviewing to evaluate patients' ability to understand and provide valid answers to the PCC questions. Interviews were conducted in Maryland and North Carolina in 2014. We involved a patient advocacy group, Fight Colorectal Cancer, and a multidisciplinary panel of stakeholders throughout the measurement development process to ensure that the survey questions capture aspects of PCC that are important to patients and meet the needs of potential end users, including researchers, healthcare organizations, and health professionals. Patient and other stakeholder input informed revisions of draft survey questions, including changes to survey instructions, frame of reference for questions, response scales, and language. This study demonstrated the feasibility and value of engaging patients and other stakeholders in a measurement development study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) conceptual model of patient-centered outcomes research provides a useful guide for patient engagement in research. Research funders should call for meaningful roles for patients and other stakeholders in health research, including in the development of patient-centered outcomes.

  13. Cannabis use among patients at a comprehensive cancer center in a state with legalized medicinal and recreational use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergam, Steven A; Woodfield, Maresa C; Lee, Christine M; Cheng, Guang-Shing; Baker, Kelsey K; Marquis, Sara R; Fann, Jesse R

    2017-11-15

    Cannabis is purported to alleviate symptoms related to cancer treatment, although the patterns of use among cancer patients are not well known. This study was designed to determine the prevalence and methods of use among cancer patients, the perceived benefits, and the sources of information in a state with legalized cannabis. A cross-sectional, anonymous survey of adult cancer patients was performed at a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in Washington State. Random urine samples for tetrahydrocannabinol provided survey validation. Nine hundred twenty-six of 2737 eligible patients (34%) completed the survey, and the median age was 58 years (interquartile range [IQR], 46-66 years). Most had a strong interest in learning about cannabis during treatment (6 on a 1-10 scale; IQR, 3-10) and wanted information from cancer providers (677 of 911 [74%]). Previous use was common (607 of 926 [66%]); 24% (222 of 926) used cannabis in the last year, and 21% (192 of 926) used cannabis in the last month. Random urine samples found similar percentages of users who reported weekly use (27 of 193 [14%] vs 164 of 926 [18%]). Active users inhaled (153 of 220 [70%]) or consumed edibles (154 of 220 [70%]); 89 (40%) used both modalities. Cannabis was used primarily for physical (165 of 219 [75%]) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (139 of 219 [63%]). Legalization significantly increased the likelihood of use in more than half of the respondents. This study of cancer patients in a state with legalized cannabis found high rates of active use across broad subgroups, and legalization was reported to be important in patients' decision to use. Cancer patients desire but are not receiving information about cannabis use during their treatment from oncology providers. Cancer 2017;123:4488-97. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution

  14. Survey of Policies and Guidelines on Antioxidant Use for Cancer Prevention, Treatment, and Survivorship in North American Cancer Centers: What Do Institutions Perceive as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gyeongyeon; White, Jennifer; Zhong, Lihong; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-07-01

    Health care policies and guidelines that are clear and consistent with research evidence are important for maximizing clinical outcomes. To determine whether cancer centers in Canada and the United States had policies and/or guidelines about antioxidant use, and whether policies were aligned with the evidence base, we reviewed current research evidence in the field, and we undertook a survey of the policies and guidelines on antioxidant use at cancer institutions across North America. A survey of policies and guidelines on antioxidant use and the development and communication of the policies and guidelines was conducted by contacting cancer institutions in North America. We also conducted a Website search for each institution to explore any online resources. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant use were collected from 78 cancer institutions. Few cancer institutions had policies (5%) but most provided guidelines (69%). Antioxidants from diet were generally encouraged at cancer institutions, consistent with the current research evidence. In contrast, specific antioxidant supplements were generally not recommended at cancer institutions. Policies and guidelines were developed using evidence-based methods (53%), by consulting another source (35%), or through discussions/conference (26%), and communicated mainly through online resources (65%) or written handouts (42%). For cancer institutions that had no policy or guideline on antioxidants, lack of information and lack of time were the most frequently cited reasons. Policies and guidelines on antioxidants from diet were largely consistent with the research evidence. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant supplements during treatment were generally more restrictive than the research evidence might suggest, perhaps due to the specificity of results and the inability to generalize findings across antioxidants, adding to the complexity of their optimal and safe use. Improved communication of comprehensive research

  15. Young Vs Old Colorectal Cancer in Indian Subcontinent: a Tertiary Care Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharkar, Ashish B; Bhandare, Manish; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Engineer, Reena; Saklani, Avanish P

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to compare patient, tumor, treatment-related factors and survival between young (45 years) Indian colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Total 778 patients of CRC were registered at tertiary cancer center in India between 1 August 2013 and 31 July 2014. Patients were followed up for median period of 27.73 months. Data regarding patient, tumor, treatment and survival-related factors were collected. Patients were divided in young (≤45 years) and old (>45 years) age groups. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS software version 23. Young age group patients presented more commonly with poor histology, node-positive disease, and rectal site. Younger age group patients received multiple lines of neoadjuvant treatment. There was no significant overall survival difference in both groups of patients. On stratified stage-wise analysis, no significant overall survival (OS) difference was found between two groups (young vs old-1- and 3-year OS: 85.2 and 61.5% vs 81.5 and 64.5%, respectively; P  = 0.881). On univariate analysis, gender, performance status, site, stage, differentiation, TRG, CRM status, signet ring type, and CEA level were significant prognostic factors. In disease-free survival (DFS) analysis, it is found that there is statistically significant difference in DFS (young vs old: 1 and 3 years; 77.6 and 62.8% vs 85.8 and 74.1%, respectively; P value, 0.02), but when OS was analyzed for same group of patient, there was no statistical difference ( P  = 0.302). This study confirms the high incidence rates of CRC in young Indian patients. There is no OS difference between two age groups. In operated group of patients, there is higher DFS in older patients but no OS advantage at 3 years follow-up. Further long-term follow-up is required to see any OS difference.

  16. Resection of Hepatocellular Cancer ≤ 2 CM: Results from Two Western Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roayaie, Sasan; Obeidat, Khaled; Sposito, Carlo; Mariani, Luigi; Bhoori, Sherrie; Pellegrinelli, Alessandro; Labow, Daniel; Llovet, Josep M.; Schwartz, Myron; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Asian series have shown 5 year survival of ∼70% after resection of hepatocellular cancer (HCC) <2cm. Western outcomes with resection have not been as good. In addition ablation of HCC ≤ 2cm has been shown to achieve competitive results leaving the role of resection unclear in these patients. Records of patients undergoing resection at two Western centers between 1/1990 and 12/2009 were reviewed. Patients with a single HCC ≤ 2cm on pathology were included. Thirty clinical variables including demographics, liver function, tumor characteristics, nature of the surgery, and the surrounding liver were examined. An exploratory statistical analysis was conducted to determine variables associated with recurrence and survival. The study included 132 patients with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. There was 1 (<1%) 90-day mortality. There were 32 deaths with a median survival of 74.5 months and 5-year survival of 70% (63% in cirrhotics). Median time-to-recurrence was 31.6 months and 5-year recurrence rate was 68%. Presence of satellites (HR=2.46, p=0.031) and platelet count <150,000/μl (HR=2.37, p=0.026) were independently associated with survival. Presence of satellites (HR=2.79, p=0.003), cirrhosis (HR=2.3, p=0.010), and non-anatomic resection (HR=1.79, p=0.031) were independently associated with recurrence. Patients with a single HCC ≤ 2cm and platelet count ≥150,000/μl achieved median and 5-year survivals of 138 months and 81%, respectively. Conclusion Resection of HCC ≤ 2cm is safe and achieves excellent results in Western centers. Recurrence continues to be a significant problem. Presence of satellites, platelet count, anatomic resection and cirrhosis are associated with outcomes after resection even among such early tumors. Resection should continue to be considered a primary treatment modality in patients with small HCC and well preserved liver function. PMID:22576353

  17. Advancing Cancer Systems Biology: Introducing the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Martin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrative cancer biology research relies on a variety of data-driven computational modeling and simulation methods and techniques geared towards gaining new insights into the complexity of biological processes that are of critical importance for cancer research. These include the dynamics of gene-protein interaction networks, the percolation of subcellular perturbations across scales and the impact they may have on tumorigenesis in both experiments and clinics. Such innovative ‘systems’ research will greatly benefi t from enabling Information Technology that is currently under development, including an online collaborative environment, a Semantic Web based computing platform that hosts data and model repositories as well as high-performance computing access. Here, we present one of the National Cancer Institute’s recently established Integrative Cancer Biology Programs, i.e. the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT, which is charged with building a cancer modeling community, developing the aforementioned enabling technologies and fostering multi-scale cancer modeling and simulation.

  18. Perspectives on Strengthening Cancer Research and Control in Latin America Through Partnerships and Diplomacy: Experience of the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Frech

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the Pan American Health Organization, noncommunicable diseases, including cancer, are the leading causes of preventable and premature death in the Americas. Governments and health care systems in Latin America face numerous challenges as a result of increasing morbidity and mortality from cancer. Multiple international organizations have recognized the need for collaborative action on and technical support for cancer research and control in Latin America. The Center for Global Health at the US National Cancer Institute (NCI-CGH is one entity among many that are working in the region and has sought to develop a strategy for working in Latin America that draws on and expands the collaborative potential of engaged, skilled, and diverse partners. NCI-CGH has worked toward developing and implementing initiatives in collaboration with global partners that share the common objectives of building a global cancer research community and translating research results into evidence-informed policy and practice. Both objectives are complementary and synergistic and are additionally supported by an overarching strategic framework that is focused on partnerships and science diplomacy. This work highlights the overall strategy for NCI-CGH engagement in Latin America through partnerships and diplomacy, and highlights selected collaborative efforts that are aimed at improving cancer outcomes in the region.

  19. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers in hairy cell leukaemia: a SEER population analysis and the 30-year experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Justin M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hsu, Meier; Lacouture, Mario E; Postow, Michael A; Park, Jae H; Stein, Eytan M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Devlin, Sean M; Tallman, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) incidence rates after a diagnosis of hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). We assessed 267 HCL patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for melanoma and NMSC incidence rates after HCL. Incidence data from MSKCC patients demonstrated a 10-year combined melanoma and NMSC skin cancer rate of 11.3%, melanoma 4.4% and NMSC 6.9%. Molecular analysis of skin cancers from MSKCC patients revealed activating RAS mutations in 3/9 patients, including one patient with melanoma. Of 4,750 SEER patients with HCL, 55 (1.2%) had a subsequent diagnosis of melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) did not show that melanoma was more common in HCL patients versus the general population (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 0.78–2.03). Analysis of SEER HCL patients diagnosed before and after 1990 (approximately before and after purine analogue therapy was introduced) showed no evidence of an increased incidence after 1990. A better understanding of any potential association between HCL and skin cancer is highly relevant given ongoing trials using BRAF inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, for relapsed HCL, as RAS-mutant skin cancers could be paradoxically activated in these patients. PMID:26115047

  20. Non-melanoma skin cancer in renal transplant recipients: a study in a Brazilian reference center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves CP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pereira Gonçalves, Beatriz Moritz Trope, Marcia Ramos-e-Silva Sector of Dermatology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Background: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC after kidney transplantation is common and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Their incidence and risk factors in renal transplant recipients (RTRs vary depending on geographic location and there is a scarcity of literature describing the features of NMSC in Brazil. Methods: NMSC data were retrospectively reviewed in charts of RTRs at the Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital from January 2004 to December 2005, with the objectives of: 1 evaluating the occurrence of NMSC in RTRs transplanted between 2004 and 2005 at a reference center in Brazil; 2 verifying the frequency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in these patients according to sex, race, age, and tumor site; and 3 determining the time between transplantation and neoplasia. Results: We found 202 RTRs, with 165 suitable for the study. There were 19 NMSC in eleven patients (6.67%, at a mean time of 37.7 months after transplantation. The mean follow-up time was 72.7 months. The ratio of SCC:BCC was 1.1:1. White race and age ≥40 years were associated with a higher incidence of NMSC and they appeared predominantly in sun-exposed sites. Conclusion: Regular dermatological follow-up of RTRs can help to make earlier diagnoses, resulting in better quality of life and lower morbidity and mortality. Keywords: squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, Brazil 

  1. Antibody-linked drug destroys tumor cells and tumor blood vessels in many types of cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team led by Brad St. Croix, Ph.D., Senior Associate Scientist, Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, has developed an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that destroys both tumor cells and the blood vessels that nourish them. The drug significantly shrank breast tumors, colon tumors and several other types of cancer and prolonged survival. Learn more...  

  2. The utilization of websites for fundraising by NCI-designated cancer centers: Examining the capacity for dialogic communication with prospective donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Cathleen O; Dias, Ashley M

    2016-01-01

    The study employs a dialogic public relations framework to explore the utilization of the Internet for fundraising by nonprofit health care organizations-specifically, NCI-designated cancer centers. Cancer centers have been noted for effective websites and for being highly engaged in fundraising, which is characterized as relationship marketing. Results indicate all but one cancer center use websites and social media for fundraising but are limited in capacity for two-way symmetrical dialogue. Results are discussed and recommendations are made for future research.

  3. Quality assured health care in certified breast centers and improvement of the prognosis of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Matthias W; Brucker, Cosima; Hanf, Volker; Rauh, Claudia; Bani, Mayada R; Knob, Stefanie; Petsch, Sabrina; Schick, Stefan; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Lux, Michael P; Häberle, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Increasing effort has been put in the implementation and certification of breast centers in order to establish standardized, quality assured health care for breast cancer patients. The aim of this analysis was to investigate whether patients treated in certified breast centers (CBC) have a favorable prognosis as compared to patients treated outside of certified breast treatment units. The data of 3,940 patients with invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer were analyzed with regard to differences in patient and tumor characteristics and crude overall survival according to diagnosis in or outside CBC in Middle Franconia, Germany. Patient, tumor, and follow-up data were obtained from the clinical cancer registry. Patients in CBC were younger, and had lower disease stages and lower grading. Independent of the effects of these variables on overall survival, being treated at a CBC added to the prediction of overall survival. Patients treated at a CBC had a hazard ratio of 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93) in the adjusted Cox model. Independent from common prognostic factors, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer at a CBC improves the prognosis of patients. It can be hypothesized that this effect is mediated through quality assured health care provided by the certification process. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. User-centered design of quality of life reports for clinical care of patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Jason; Hartzler, Andrea; Avery, Daniel I; Shih, Cheryl; Dalkin, Bruce L; Gore, John L

    2014-05-01

    Primary treatment of localized prostate cancer can result in bothersome urinary, sexual, and bowel symptoms. Yet clinical application of health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) questionnaires is rare. We employed user-centered design to develop graphic dashboards of questionnaire responses from patients with prostate cancer to facilitate clinical integration of HRQOL measurement. We interviewed 50 prostate cancer patients and 50 providers, assessed literacy with validated instruments (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine short form, Subjective Numeracy Scale, Graphical Literacy Scale), and presented participants with prototype dashboards that display prostate cancer-specific HRQOL with graphic elements derived from patient focus groups. We assessed dashboard comprehension and preferences in table, bar, line, and pictograph formats with patient scores contextualized with HRQOL scores of similar patients serving as a comparison group. Health literacy (mean score, 6.8/7) and numeracy (mean score, 4.5/6) of patient participants was high. Patients favored the bar chart (mean rank, 1.8 [P = .12] vs line graph [P concept of a dynamic HRQOL dashboard that permits a base patient-centered report in bar chart format that can be toggled to other formats and include error bars that frame comparison group scores. Inclusion of lower literacy patients may yield different preferences. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cannabis use among patients at a comprehensive cancer center in a state with legalized medicinal and recreational use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Maresa C.; Lee, Christine M.; Cheng, Guang‐Shing; Baker, Kelsey K.; Marquis, Sara R.; Fann, Jesse R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cannabis is purported to alleviate symptoms related to cancer treatment, although the patterns of use among cancer patients are not well known. This study was designed to determine the prevalence and methods of use among cancer patients, the perceived benefits, and the sources of information in a state with legalized cannabis. METHODS A cross‐sectional, anonymous survey of adult cancer patients was performed at a National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center in Washington State. Random urine samples for tetrahydrocannabinol provided survey validation. RESULTS Nine hundred twenty‐six of 2737 eligible patients (34%) completed the survey, and the median age was 58 years (interquartile range [IQR], 46‐66 years). Most had a strong interest in learning about cannabis during treatment (6 on a 1‐10 scale; IQR, 3‐10) and wanted information from cancer providers (677 of 911 [74%]). Previous use was common (607 of 926 [66%]); 24% (222 of 926) used cannabis in the last year, and 21% (192 of 926) used cannabis in the last month. Random urine samples found similar percentages of users who reported weekly use (27 of 193 [14%] vs 164 of 926 [18%]). Active users inhaled (153 of 220 [70%]) or consumed edibles (154 of 220 [70%]); 89 (40%) used both modalities. Cannabis was used primarily for physical (165 of 219 [75%]) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (139 of 219 [63%]). Legalization significantly increased the likelihood of use in more than half of the respondents. CONCLUSIONS This study of cancer patients in a state with legalized cannabis found high rates of active use across broad subgroups, and legalization was reported to be important in patients' decision to use. Cancer patients desire but are not receiving information about cannabis use during their treatment from oncology providers. Cancer 2017;123:4488‐97. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the

  6. Cancer patients' control preferences in decision making and associations with patient-reported outcomes: a prospective study in an outpatient cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Markus; Schildmann, Jan; Trautmann, Freya; Hentschel, Leopold; Hornemann, Beate; Rentsch, Anke; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schmitt, Jochen

    2017-09-01

    "Shared decision making" has been proposed as a prerequisite of patient-centered care. However, little is known on factors, which may influence cancer patients' decision control preferences (DCP) in routine care. This study investigated possible determinants of the patients' DCP with respect to patient characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Consecutive patients presenting at a comprehensive cancer center between May 2014 and October 2014 were offered a self-administered electronic questionnaire including standardized PRO measures and patients' DCP. Results were linked with patient characteristics from the hospital information system and analyzed using cross-sectional methods. Out of 126 patients participating, 102 (81%; 65% male; mean age 62 years) completed the DCP-item. Overall, 49% (n = 50) preferred shared treatment decision responsibility, 29% (n = 30) preferred to leave the control to his/her physician, whereas 22% (n = 22) preferred to be in control of his/her treatment decision. Higher age (p = 0.035) and elevated distress levels (p = 0.038) were significantly associated with an increased willingness to leave the decision control to the physician. Further sociodemographic and PRO measures were not associated with patients' DCP. Our findings demonstrate that DCP assessment in routine cancer care is possible and provides important information to the treating oncologist. Information on DCP combined with PRO may contribute to more individualized decision making in cancer care.

  7. Validation of the memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center nomogram to predict disease-specific survival after R0 resection in a Chinese gastric cancer population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglai Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prediction of disease-specific survival (DSS for individual patient with gastric cancer after R0 resection remains a clinical concern. Since the clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric cancer vary widely between China and western countries, this study is to evaluate a nomogram from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC for predicting the probability of DSS in patients with gastric cancer from a Chinese cohort. METHODS: From 1998 to 2007, clinical data of 979 patients with gastric cancer who underwent R0 resection were retrospectively collected from Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute and used for external validation. The performance of the MSKCC nomogram in our population was assessed using concordance index (C-index and calibration plot. RESULTS: The C-index for the MSKCC predictive nomogram was 0.74 in the Chinese cohort, compared with 0.69 for American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC staging system (P<0.0001. This suggests that the discriminating value of MSKCC nomogram is superior to AJCC staging system for prognostic prediction in the Chinese population. Calibration plots showed that the actual survival of Chinese patients corresponded closely to the MSKCC nonogram-predicted survival probabilities. Moreover, MSKCC nomogram predictions demonstrated the heterogeneity of survival in stage IIA/IIB/IIIA/IIIB disease of the Chinese patients. CONCLUSION: In this study, we externally validated MSKCC nomogram for predicting the probability of 5- and 9-year DSS after R0 resection for gastric cancer in a Chinese population. The MSKCC nomogram performed well with good discrimination and calibration. The MSKCC nomogram improved individualized predictions of survival, and may assist Chinese clinicians and patients in individual follow-up scheduling, and decision making with regard to various treatment options.

  8. Trends in cancer survivors' experience of patient-centered communication: results from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Chawla, Neetu; Moser, Richard P; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Hesse, Bradford W; Arora, Neeraj K

    2016-12-01

    Two Institute of Medicine reports almost a decade apart suggest that cancer survivors often feel "lost in transition" and experience suboptimal quality of care. The six core functions of patient-centered communication: managing uncertainty, responding to emotions, making decisions, fostering healing relationships, enabling self-management, and exchanging information, represent a central aspect of survivors' care experience that has not been systematically investigated. Nationally representative data from four administrations of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) was merged with combined replicate weights using the jackknife replication method. Linear and logistic regression models were used to assess (1) characteristics of cancer survivors (N = 1794) who report suboptimal patient-centered communication and (2) whether survivors' patient-centered communication experience changed from 2007 to 2013. One third to one half of survivors report suboptimal patient-centered communication, particularly on core functions of providers helping manage uncertainty (48 %) and responding to emotions (49 %). In a fully adjusted linear regression model, survivors with more education (Wald F = 2.84, p = .04), without a usual source of care (Wald F = 11.59, p health (Wald F = 9.08, p communication. Although ratings of patient-centered communication improved over time (p trend = .04), this trend did not remain significant in fully adjusted models. Despite increased attention to survivorship, many survivors continue to report suboptimal communication with their health care providers. Survivorship communication should include managing uncertainty about future risk and address survivors' emotional needs. Efforts to improve patient-centered communication should focus on survivors without a usual source of care and in poorer health.

  9. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.*

  10. Identifying a Mechanism for Crosstalk Between the Estrogen and Glucocorticoid Receptors | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen has long been known to play important roles in the development and progression of breast cancer. Its receptor (ER), a member of the steroid receptor family, binds to estrogen response elements (EREs) in DNA and regulates gene transcription. More recently, another steroid receptor family member, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), has been implicated in breast cancer progression, and ER/GR status is an important predictor of breast cancer outcome.

  11. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence FY12-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    despite the relatively high prevalence of these genetic mutations in Ashkenazi Jews , only seven percent of breast cancers in Ashkenazi women are caused by...assessment is essential to quality genetic counseling for breast cancer. Breast cancer genetic counseling serves the goal of helping women to analyze their...risk women of active duty military age: clinically relevant molecular profiles; evaluation of genetic and military-specific exposures risk; and tumor

  12. First-in-Human Study of Interleukin-15 as Immunotherapy for Metastatic Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the hallmarks of cancer that is now more clearly recognized is tumors’ ability to avoid recognition and destruction by the immune system. A novel class of treatments, dubbed immunotherapy, attempts to overcome this aspect by stimulating the immune system to attack cancer cells. The cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2), which is approved for the treatment of renal cancer and melanoma, is the prototypic immunotherapy. Treatment with IL-2 enhances the proliferation of effector immune cells, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. Unfortunately, IL-2 also exerts immunosuppressive activity through maintenance of regulatory T cells and activation-induced cell death. The related cytokine, interleukin-15 (IL-15), displays similar immune cell stimulatory activity, but without the inhibitory effects of IL-2. These findings, suggest that IL-15 may have greater potential as an immunotherapeutic agent and is consistent with the results seen in melanoma and prostate and colon cancer mouse models.

  13. CCR study: evidence for benefit of TARP vaccine for men with early stage prostate cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a pilot clinical trial found that TARP, or T-cell receptor gamma chain alternate reading frame protein, vaccination slowed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) rise in the majority of patients with early stage prostate cancer.

  14. Immunocompetent mouse model for tracking cancer progression | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees or research collaborators to develop and commercialize transgenic mice having immunocompetent rat growth hormone-firefly Luciferase-enhanced green fluorescent protein.

  15. Risk factors for bowel dysfunction after sphincter-preserving rectal cancer surgery: a prospective study using the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center bowel function instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihn, Myong Hoon; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Duck-Woo; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Lee, Soo Young; Hong, Sa Min

    2014-08-01

    Until recently, no studies have prospectively evaluated bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer with the use of a validated bowel function scoring system. The aim of this study was to investigate possible risk factors for altered bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery. This was a prospective study. The study was conducted between January 2006 and May 2012 at the authors' institution. Patients who underwent sphincter-preserving rectal cancer surgery were recruited. Bowel function was assessed 1 day before (baseline) and at 1 year after sphincter-preserving surgery or temporary ileostomy takedown with the use of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center questionnaire. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify the factors associated with altered bowel function after surgery. Overall, 266 patients were eligible for the analysis. The tumor was located in the upper, middle, and lower rectum in 68 (25.5%), 113 (42.5%), and 85 (32.0%) patients. Intersphincteric resection and temporary ileostomy were performed in 18 (6.8%) and 129 (48.5%) patients. The mean Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center score was 64.5 ± 7.6 at 1 year after sphincter-preserving surgery or temporary ileostomy takedown. The Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center score decreased in 163/266 patients (61.3%) between baseline and 1 year after surgery. Tumor location (p = 0.01), operative method (p = 0.03), anastomotic type (p = 0.01), and temporary ileostomy (p = 0.01) were associated with altered bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery in univariate analyses. In multivariable analysis, only tumor location was independently associated with impaired bowel function after sphincter-preserving rectal cancer surgery. This study was limited by its nonrandomized design and the lack of measurement before preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We suggest that preoperative counseling should be implemented to inform patients of the risk of bowel dysfunction

  16. Nipple-centered radiate MPR images of MDCT for evaluation of breast cancer extent. Correlation with mammography and pathologic specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimatsu, Natsuko; Kunimatsu, Akira; Morooka, Miyako; Akahane, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of the extent of breast cancer lesions is important for selecting the appropriate surgical procedure or to determine the surgical margin. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of nipple-centered radiate multiplanar reconstruction (NRMPR) images using multidetector row helical computed tomography (MDCT), comparing it with conventional mammography. Our subjects were 26 breast cancer patients with a total of 29 lesions who sequentially received contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging for preoperative evaluation. We measured the maximum diameter of the breast cancer in the direction toward the nipple on NRMPR images and mammography. All data were correlated with histopathological mapping of the specimens. The tumor extent measured on NRMPR images and in pathological examinations ranged from 12.4 to 66.0 mm (average, 28.0 mm) and 10 to 70 mm (average, 27.9 mm), respectively. The correlation coefficient of the two measurements was 0.898. On mammography, two lesions were not clearly identified. The correlation coefficient of mammography and pathological measurements was 0.554. The addition of NRMPR images to mammography provides more information to evaluate breast cancer extension toward the nipple. Potentially, it provides a clue for selecting the appropriate surgical procedure or surgical resection margin for breast cancer. (author)

  17. Colorectal cancer: A case control study of dietary factors, King Faisal specialist hospital and researh center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem M Nashar

    2008-01-01

    Materials and Methods: A case-controlled study of fifty newly-admitted patients at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia diagnosed with colorectal cancer were interviewed to collect data on various dietary factors and their nutritional status. Their data were compared with a sex-matched control group aged fifty. Results: The consumption of meat high in fat, fried eggs and whole fat dairy products, and diet low in fibers 2-3 times or above per week increased the risk of colorectal cancer, while the consumption of whole wheat products, vegetables and fruits, and diet low in animal fats at the same rate per week may play a protective role against colorectal cancer in both men and women when compared to controls. Conclusions: The higher consumption of meat and fat from animal sources could increase the risk of colorectal cancer. The high consumption of whole wheat bread, fruits and vegetables with high fiber content could play a protective role against the risk of colorectal cancer in the Saudi society. Additional studies are needed in different regions of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to verify or refute these results.

  18. Classification and diagnostic prediction of cancers using gene expression profiling and artificial neural networks | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method of classifying cancers to specific diagnostic categories based on their gene expression signatures using artificial neural networks (ANNs). We trained the ANNs using the small, round blue-cell tumors (SRBCTs) as a model. These cancers belong to four distinct diagnostic categories and often present diagnostic dilemmas in clinical practice. The ANNs correctly classified all samples and identified the genes most relevant to the classification.

  19. Walking with purpose after an HPV-related head and neck cancer diagnosis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2015, Michael Becker was diagnosed with Stage IV head and neck cancer caused by a strain of the human papillomavirus, or HPV. He now advocates for education and awareness of the HPV vaccine as cancer prevention for both boys and girls. “I want to make people aware that you can avoid my situation by getting the shot.” Read more…

  20. Cancer of unknown primary: changing approaches. A multidisciplinary case presentation from the Joan Karnell cancer center of pennsylvania hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzer, David M; Warhol, Michael; Martin, Anne-Marie; Greene, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary is a common clinical syndrome, accounting for 2%-5% of cancer patients. A representative case is presented. This heterogenous group of disorders includes entities such as poorly differentiated carcinoma of unknown primary, adenocarcinoma of unknown primary, neuroendocrine carcinoma of unknown primary, squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary, poorly differentiated (not otherwise specified) cancer of unknown primary, and melanoma of unknown primary. It is crucial to identify those treatment-responsive presentations of unknown primary with the greatest potential for long-term survival. This discussion emphasizes newer approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of unknown primary cancer, including advances in pathology with immunoperoxidase and molecular genetic techniques, positron emission tomography, and published chemotherapeutic trials. With the increased sophistication of pathologic and radiologic techniques, the frequency of unknown primary cancers will likely continue to decline. Further, as newer and more targeted therapies for specific types of cancer are identified, the previously held nihilism regarding the search for and identification of the primary may become less supportable.

  1. Survey of return to work of head and neck cancer survivors: A report from a tertiary cancer center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jaiprakash; Krishnatry, Rahul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Gupta, Tejpal; Budrukkar, Ashwani; Murthy, Vedang; Deodhar, Joyita; Nair, Deepa; Nair, Sudhir; Dikshit, Rajesh; D'Cruz, Anil K

    2017-05-01

    The rates and factors associated with the return to work of head and neck cancer survivors from low- and middle-income countries, such as India, are largely unknown. We conducted a preliminary cross-sectional survey of 250 consecutive eligible head and neck cancer survivors (age work rates and sociodemographic, clinical, and quality of life (QOL; European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30-questions [EORTC-QLQ-C30] and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 Head and Neck 35-questions [EORTC-QLQ-H&N35]) correlates. In our cohort, 92.4% of the patients were employed pretreatment, 65.6% and 81.2% returned to work at 6 months posttreatment and by the time of the survey (median follow-up 19 months), respectively. Family structure (work. Head and neck cancer survivors who returned to work had better global quality of life (QOL; p = .014) and less coughing (p = .001) but more problems related to sticky saliva (p = .004). Further studies are needed to address the large unmet needs regarding identification and amelioration of barriers to return to work for head and neck cancer survivors in low- and middle-income countries, such as India. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 893-899, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Wigner-like crystallization of Anderson-localized electron systems with low electron densities

    CERN Document Server

    Slutskin, A A; Pepper, M

    2002-01-01

    We consider an electron system under conditions of strong Anderson localization, taking into account interelectron long-range Coulomb repulsion. We establish that at sufficiently low electron densities and sufficiently low temperatures the Coulomb electron interaction brings about ordering of the Anderson-localized electrons into a structure that is close to an ideal (Wigner) crystal lattice, provided the dimension of the system is > 1. This Anderson-Wigner glass (AWG) is a new macroscopic electron state that, on the one hand, is beyond the conventional Fermi glass concept, and on the other hand, qualitatively differs from the known 'plain' Wigner glass (inherent in self-localized electron systems) in that the random slight electron displacements from the ideal crystal sites essentially depend on the electron density. With increasing electron density the AWG is found to turn into the plain Wigner glass or Fermi glass, depending on the width of the random spread of the electron levels. It is shown that the res...

  3. Persistence of Anderson localization in Schrodinger operators with decaying random potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Figotin, A; Klein, A; Müller, P

    2006-01-01

    We show persistence of both Anderson and dynamical localization in Schrodinger operators with non-positive (attractive) random decaying potential. We consider an Anderson-type Schr\\"odinger operator with a non-positive ergodic random potential, and multiply the random potential by a decaying envelope function. If the envelope function decays slower than $|x|^{-2}$ at infinity, we prove that the operator has infinitely many eigenvalues below zero. For envelopes decaying as $|x|^{-\\alpha}$ at infinity, we determine the number of bound states below a given energy $E<0$, asymptotically as $\\alpha\\downarrow 0$. To show that bound states located at the bottom of the spectrum are related to the phenomenon of Anderson localization in the corresponding ergodic model, we prove: ~(a)~ these states are exponentially localized with a localization length that is uniform in the decay exponent $\\alpha$; (b)~ dynamical localization holds uniformly in $\\alpha$.

  4. Image transport through a disordered optical fibre mediated by transverse Anderson localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J; Koch, Karl W; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

    2014-02-25

    Transverse Anderson localization of light allows localized optical-beam-transport through a transversely disordered and longitudinally invariant medium. Its successful implementation in disordered optical fibres recently resulted in the propagation of localized beams of radii comparable to that of conventional optical fibres. Here we demonstrate optical image transport using transverse Anderson localization of light. The image transport quality obtained in the polymer disordered optical fibre is comparable to or better than some of the best commercially available multicore image fibres with less pixelation and higher contrast. It is argued that considerable improvement in image transport quality can be obtained in a disordered fibre made from a glass matrix with near wavelength-size randomly distributed air-holes with an air-hole fill-fraction of 50%. Our results open the way to device-level implementation of the transverse Anderson localization of light with potential applications in biological and medical imaging.

  5. John Anderson's development of (situational) realism and its bearing on psychology today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, Fiona J

    2009-10-01

    In 1927, the Scottish philosopher John Anderson arrived in Australia to take up the chair of Philosophy at the University of Sydney. By the late 1930s, the "macrostructure" of his realist system was in place. It includes a theory of process and a substantial metaphysics, one that opposes positivism, linguistic philosophy and all forms of idealism. However, beyond Australia it remains largely unknown, despite its bearing on a number of current issues in psychology and the social sciences generally. This article outlines Anderson's transition from Hegelian idealism to realism, describes aspects of his ontology and epistemology, compares some of Anderson's ideas with Dewey's pragmatism and explains their relevance to present-day psychology.

  6. Image transport through a disordered optical fibre mediated by transverse Anderson localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J.; Koch, Karl W.; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

    2014-02-01

    Transverse Anderson localization of light allows localized optical-beam-transport through a transversely disordered and longitudinally invariant medium. Its successful implementation in disordered optical fibres recently resulted in the propagation of localized beams of radii comparable to that of conventional optical fibres. Here we demonstrate optical image transport using transverse Anderson localization of light. The image transport quality obtained in the polymer disordered optical fibre is comparable to or better than some of the best commercially available multicore image fibres with less pixelation and higher contrast. It is argued that considerable improvement in image transport quality can be obtained in a disordered fibre made from a glass matrix with near wavelength-size randomly distributed air-holes with an air-hole fill-fraction of 50%. Our results open the way to device-level implementation of the transverse Anderson localization of light with potential applications in biological and medical imaging.

  7. Simultaneous resection for colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases is a safe procedure: Outcomes at a single center in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulundu, Ender; Attaallah, Wafi; Tilki, Metin; Yegen, Cumhur; Coskun, Safak; Coskun, Mumin; Erdim, Aylin; Tanrikulu, Eda; Yardimci, Samet; Gunal, Omer

    2017-05-23

    The optimal surgical strategy for treating colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases is subject to debate. The current study sought to evaluate the outcomes of simultaneous colorectal cancer and liver metastases resection in a single center. Prospectively collected data on all patients with synchronous colorectal liver metastases who underwent simultaneous resection with curative intent were analyzed retrospectively. Patient outcomes were compared depending on the primary tumor location and type of liver resection (major or minor). Between January 2005 and August 2016, 108 patients underwent simultaneous resection of primary colorectal cancer and liver metastases. The tumor was localized to the right side of the colon in 24 patients (22%), to the left side in 40 (37%), and to the rectum in 44 (41%). Perioperative mortality occurred in 3 patients (3%). Postoperative complications were noted in 32 patients (30%), and most of these complications (75%) were grade 1 to 3 according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Neither perioperative mortality nor the rate of postoperative complications after simultaneous resection differed among patients with cancer of the right side of the colon, those with cancer of the left side of the colon, and those with rectal cancer (4%, 2.5%, and 2%, respectively, p = 0.89) and (17%, 33%, and 34%, respectively; p = 0.29)]. The 5-year overall survival of the entire sample was 54% and the 3-year overall survival was 67 %. In conclusion, simultaneous resection for primary colorectal cancer and liver metastases is a safe procedure and can be performed without excess morbidity in carefully selected patients regardless of the location of the primary tumor and type of hepatectomy.

  8. Common Molecular Subtypes Among Asian Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    About the Cover:  The Thailand Initiative in Genomics and Expression Research for Liver Cancer (TIGER-LC) Consortium (depicted as a tiger) emerges from foliage, representing molecular, clinical, and epidemiological studies from teams in the United States, Thailand, and Japan, to generate a multilayered genomic and genetic liver cancer data ecosystem (represented by the tiger’s tail).

  9. Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

  10. Nasopharyngeal cancer mimicking otitic barotrauma in a resource-challenged center: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adekunle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nasopharyngeal cancer commonly manifests with cervical lymphadenopathy, recurrent epistaxis and progressive nasal obstruction. Neuro-ophthalmic and otologic manifestations can also occur. Isolated otologic presentations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare and the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer may not be foremost in the list of differentials. Case presentation We present the case of a 29-year-old Nigerian woman with bilateral conductive hearing loss and tinnitus after air travel. There were no other symptoms. The persistence of the symptoms after adequate treatment for otitic barotrauma necessitated re-evaluation, which led to a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer. Conclusion Isolated otologic manifestations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare in regions with low incidence of the disease. There is a need for it to be considered as a possible differential in patients presenting with bilateral serous otitis media.

  11. Typical-medium multiple-scattering theory for disordered systems with Anderson localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terletska, H.; Zhang, Y.; Chioncel, L.; Vollhardt, D.; Jarrell, M.

    2017-04-01

    The typical medium dynamical cluster approximation (TMDCA) is reformulated in the language of multiple scattering theory to make possible first-principles calculations of the electronic structure of substitutionally disordered alloys including the effect of Anderson localization. The TMDCA allows for a systematic inclusion of nonlocal multisite correlations and at the same time provides an order parameter, the typical density of states, for the Anderson localization transition. The relation between the dynamical cluster approximation and the multiple scattering theory is analyzed, and is illustrated for a tight-binding model.

  12. Phase diagram of the anisotropic Anderson transition with the atomic kicked rotor: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Matthias; Clément, Jean-François; Lemarié, Gabriel; Delande, Dominique; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Garreau, Jean Claude

    2013-06-01

    We realize experimentally a cold-atom system, the quasiperiodic kicked rotor, equivalent to the three-dimensional Anderson model of disordered solids where the anisotropy between the x direction and the y-z plane can be controlled by adjusting an experimentally accessible parameter. This allows us to study experimentally the disorder versus anisotropy phase diagram of the Anderson metal-insulator transition. Numerical and experimental data compare very well with each other and a theoretical analysis based on the self-consistent theory of localization correctly describes the observed behavior, illustrating the flexibility of cold-atom experiments for the study of transport phenomena in complex quantum systems.

  13. Does the cancer patient want to know? Results from a study in an Indian tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhawat Laxmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The disclosure of the diagnosis of cancer is a distressing and complex issue. Families and doctors still do not tell patients when they have cancer in the belief that the patient does not want to know and telling him would lead to fear and depression. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the information needs of Indian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 300 patients′ views was conducted with the help of an adaptation of Cassileth′s Information Needs questionnaire. Results: A majority of cancer patients exhibited a strong need for information about illness and treatment. Ninety-four percent wanted to know if their illness was cancer. Most patients also wanted to know the chance of cure (92%. Age, education, and type of treatment significantly affect information preferences. Gender did not have an effect on information needs. Conclusion: This study showed that most of the patients wanted to know about their illness, treatment, side-effects, and chances of cure.

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  15. Status of the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, M.; Rosen, L.

    1975-01-01

    A brief history and a description of the LAMPF Linac is given, followed by a discussion of the experimental areas, some selected experimental results, and some practical applications. Differential cross section data for n-p charge exchange scattering near 640 MeV are compared with data taken on other machines, and data on pion scattering are presented. The application of negative pions to the treatment of cancer is discussed

  16. Analysis of Sociodemographic parameters of patients admitted in a newly established palliative care center in a regional cancer institute of north-west India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Palliative care services are an indispensable part of a tertiary regional cancer care center. The oncologists should be made aware of the requirement of better relief of pain and other distressing symptoms to provide better quality of life to the patients suffering from advanced cancer.

  17. Practice adaptive reserve and colorectal cancer screening best practices at community health center clinics in 7 states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shin-Ping; Young, Vicki M; Coombs, Letoynia J; Williams, Rebecca S; Kegler, Michelle C; Kimura, Amanda T; Risendal, Betsy C; Friedman, Daniela B; Glenn, Beth A; Pfeiffer, Debbie J; Fernandez, Maria E

    2015-04-15

    Enhancing the capability of community health centers to implement best practices (BPs) may mitigate health disparities. This study investigated the association of practice adaptive reserve (PAR) with the implementation of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening BPs at community health center clinics in 7 states. A convenience sample of clinic staff participated in a self-administered, online survey. Eight PCMH CRC screening BPs were scored as a composite ranging from 0 to 32. The PAR composite score was scaled from 0 to 1 and then categorized into 3 levels. Multilevel analyses examined the relation between PAR and self-reported implementation of PCMH BPs. There were 296 respondents, and 59% reported 6 or more PCMH BPs at their clinics. The mean PAR score was 0.66 (standard deviation, 0.18), and the PCMH BP mean scores were significantly higher for respondents who reported higher clinic PAR categories. In comparison with the lowest PAR level, adjusted PCMH BP means were 25.0% higher at the middle PAR level (difference, 3.2; standard error, 1.3; t = 2.44; P = .015) and 63.2% higher at the highest PAR level (difference, 8.0; standard error, 1.9; t = 4.86; P clinic staff. Future research is needed to determine the PAR levels most conducive to implementing CRC screening and to develop interventions that enhance PAR in primary care settings. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  18. A research on the enhancement of research management efficiency for the division of research, Korea cancer center hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. W.; Ma, K. H.; Kim, J. R.; Lee, D. C.; Lee, J. H.

    1999-06-01

    The research activities of Korea Cancer Center Hospital have increased for the past a few years just in proportion to the increase of research budget, but the assisting manpower of the office of research management has never been increased and the indications are that the internal and external circumstances will not allow the recruitment for a fairly long time. It has, therefore, become inevitable to enhance the work efficiency of the office by analyzing the administrative research assistance system, finding out problems and inefficiency factors, and suggesting possible answers to them. The office of research management and international cooperation has conducted this research to suggest possible ways to facilitate the administrative support for the research activities of Korea Cancer Center Hospital By analyzing the change of research budget, organization of the division of research and administrative support, manpower, and the administrative research supporting system of other institutes, we suggested possible ways to enhance the work efficiency for administrative research support and developed a relative database program. The research report will serve as a data for the organization of research support division when the Radiation Medicine Research Center is established. The database program has already been used for research budget management

  19. Implementation successes and challenges in participating in a pragmatic study to improve colon cancer screening: perspectives of health center leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Gloria D; Schneider, Jennifer L; Petrik, Amanda; Rivelli, Jennifer; Taplin, Stephen; Green, Beverly B

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the challenges faced by community clinics who must address clinical priorities first when participating in pragmatic studies. We report on implementation challenges faced by the eight community health centers that participated in Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC), a large comparative effectiveness cluster-randomized trial to evaluate a direct-mail program to increase the rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We conducted interviews, at the onset of implementation and 1 year later, with center leaders to identify challenges with implementing and sustaining an electronic medical record (EMR)-driven mailed program to increase CRC screening rates. We used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to thematically analyze the content of meeting discussions and identify anticipated and experienced challenges. Common early concerns were patients' access to colonoscopy, patients' low awareness of CRC screening, time burden on clinic staff to carry out the STOP CRC program, inability to accurately identify eligible patients, and incompatibility of the program's approach with the patient population or organizational culture. Once the program was rolled out, time burden remained a primary concern and new organizational capacity and EMR issues were raised (e.g., EMR staffing resources and turnover in key leadership positions). Cited program successes were improved CRC screening processes and rates, more patients reached, reduced costs, and improved patient awareness, engagement, or satisfaction. These findings may inform any clinic considering mailed fecal testing programs and future pragmatic research efforts in community health centers.

  20. Evaluation of the stage IB designation of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Ballman, Karla V; McCall, Linda M; Yi, Min; Sahin, Aysegul A; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hansen, Nora; Gabram, Sheryl; Hurd, Thelma; Giuliano, Armando E; Hunt, Kelly K

    2015-04-01

    The seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system for breast cancer differentiates patients with T1 tumors and lymph node micrometastases (stage IB) from patients with T1 tumors and negative nodes (stage IA). This study was undertaken to determine the utility of the stage IB designation. The following two cohorts of patients with breast cancer were identified: 3,474 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1993 to 2007 and 4,590 patients from the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z0010 trial. Clinicopathologic and outcomes data were recorded, and disease was staged according to the seventh edition AJCC staging system. Recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Median follow-up times were 6.1 years and 9.0 years for the MD Anderson Cancer Center and ACOSOG cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, there were no significant differences between patients with stage IA and stage IB disease in 5- or 10-year RFS, DSS, or OS. Estrogen receptor (ER) status and grade significantly stratified patients with stage I disease with respect to RFS, DSS, and OS. Among patients with T1 breast cancer, individuals with micrometastases and those with negative nodes have similar survival outcomes. ER status and grade are better discriminants of survival than the presence of small-volume nodal metastases. In preparing the next edition of the AJCC staging system, consideration should be given to eliminating the stage IB designation and incorporating biologic factors. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Endosonographic features of rectal cancer: A single-center experience in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Frootan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Aim: The study aim was to describe an endosonographic feature of rectal cancer in Iranian patients. Settings and Design: A retrospective study in Mehrad Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case series, all patients with confirmed diagnosis of rectal cancer during 2012-2014 were included and their hospital records were reviewed. Results: Hospital records of 76 patients with rectal cancer including 44 male (57.9% and 32 females (42.1% were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 57.81 ± 14.26 years. The distal rectum was the most common location of the tumor (42 patients, 55.3% and complete luminal obstruction was observed in 11 patients (14.5%. Sphincters were free of disease in 70% of patients (53, while lymph nodes were involved in more than 70% of patients at diagnosis. Internal anal sphincter (IAS alone was the most common sphincter involved (16 patients, 21% followed by involvement of all three sphincters together (IAS and external anal sphincter and longitudinal muscle (5, 6.6%. Conclusion: The mean age at diagnosis of rectal cancer in our country is less than that of Western countries. Lower rectum is the most common location of rectal cancer in our patients and lymph node metastasis is present in more than 70% of patients at the time of diagnosis.

  2. Colorectal cancer burden and trends in a South Asian cohort: experience from a regional tertiary care center in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasinghe, P C; Ediriweera, D S; Hewavisenthi, J; Kumarage, S K; Fernando, F R; Deen, K I

    2017-10-30

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) burden is increasing in the south Asian region due to the changing socio-economic landscape and population demographics. There is a lack of robust high quality data from this region in order to evaluate the disease pattern and comparison. Using generalized linear models assuming Poisson distribution and model fitting, authors describe the variation in the landscape of CRC burden along time since 1997 at a regional tertiary care center in Sri Lanka. Analyzing 679 patients, it is observed that both colon and rectal cancers have significantly increased over time (pre 2000-61, 2000 to 2004-178, 2005 to 2009-190, 2010 to 2014-250; P < 0.05). Majority of the cancers were left sided (82%) while 77% were rectosigmoid. Over 25% of all CRC were diagnosed in patients less than 50 years and the median age at diagnosis is < 62 years. Increasing trend is seen in the stage at presentation while 33% of the rectal cancers received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Left sided preponderance, younger age at presentation and advanced stage at presentation was observed. CRC disease pattern in the South Asian population may vary from that observed in the western population which has implications on disease surveillance and treatment.

  3. Seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer in women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikawa, Takehiro; Inoue, Manami; Shimazu, Taichi; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-05-01

    Iodine is a suspected risk factor for thyroid cancer. Seaweed accounts for about 80% of Japanese people's iodine intake. We examined the association between seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer in Japanese women. Women participating in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (n=52 679; age: 40-69 years) were followed up for a mean of 14.5 years; 134 new thyroid cancer cases, including 113 papillary carcinoma cases, were identified. Seaweed consumption was assessed using a food-frequency questionnaire and divided into three categories: 2 days/week or less (reference); 3-4 days/week; and almost daily. The Cox proportional hazards model was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seaweed consumption was clearly associated with an increased risk of papillary carcinoma (HR for almost daily consumption compared with 2 days/week or less=1.71; 95% CI: 1.01-2.90; trend P=0.04). After stratification for menopausal status, an increased risk was observed in postmenopausal women (papillary carcinoma HR for almost daily consumption compared with 2 days/week or less=3.81, 95% CI: 1.67-8.68; trend Pwomen (HR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.44-1.91; trend P=0.76). This study identified a positive association between seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer (especially for papillary carcinoma) in postmenopausal women.

  4. INTEGRATION OF BEVACIZUMAB IN METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY REGIMENS IN 2 CLINICAL CENTERS IN MOSCOW AND SAINT PETERSBURG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Dobrova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate efficacy of first line chemotherapy with bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer patients and investigate the impact of different prognostic factors on treatment outcome.Methods.During 2004–2008 48 colorectal cancer patients were included (29 in Russian N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, 19 in St. Petersburg, who had unresectable distant metastases. Primary tumor was resected in 93.8 % patients. 52.1 % had rectal cancer. 87.5 % had liver metastases, 43.8 % had more than 1 organ affected. 66.7 % received chemotherapy with bevacizumab 5 mg/kg biweekly, 33.3 % received bevacizumab 7,5 mg/kg every 3 weeks. 62.5 % patients had oxaliplatin-based regimens, 35.4 % – only fluorpyrimidines, 2.1 % – chemotherapy with irinotecan.Results.Median time of bevacizumab use was 7.8 months. 60.3 % had objective response, 87.4 % had stable diseases during more than 6 months. Median progression-free survival (PFS was 11.5 months. Median overall survival (OS was 24.1 months.Conclusions.Survival and efficacy results are comparable to international experience. Combination of fluorpyrimidines with bevacizumab had comparable efficacy to combined chemotherapy regimens with no impact on quality of life. Integration of bevacizumab in combined treatment regimens reduced the impact of negative prognostic factors on PFS and OS. 

  5. Interaction between alcohol consumption and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in thyroid cancer risk: National Cancer Center cohort in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sarah; Lee, Jeonghee; Park, Yoon; Lee, Eun Kyung; Hwangbo, Yul; Ryu, Junsun; Sung, Joohon; Kim, Jeongseon

    2018-03-06

    The effect of alcohol intake on thyroid cancer is unestablished, and its interaction effects with genetic susceptibility are unclear. In this case-control study, the relationship among alcohol intake, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, and thyroid cancer risk has been evaluated. In total, 642 cases and 642 controls of Korean origin were included, and the genetic variants C677T and A1298C of the MTHFR gene were analysed. The interactions between alcohol-consumption behaviour and genetic variants were analysed with a likelihood ratio test, wherein a multiplicative interaction term was added to a logistic regression model. There was an independent association between the C677T polymorphism and thyroid cancer risk but not for drinking history. For C677T C/C homozygotes, individuals with a history of alcohol consumption showed a protective OR (95% CI) of 0.42 (0.15-1.13) when never drinkers were used as the reference. However, this protective association was not observed among individuals with a T+ allele with an OR (95% CI) of 1.27 (0.89-1.82), showing different directions for the association between genotypes with a significant interaction (P interaction  = 0.009). Based on the genetic characteristics of individuals included, an interaction between alcohol intake and MTHFR C677T may modify the risk of thyroid cancer.

  6. Gender and smoking-related risk of lung cancer. The Copenhagen Center for Prospective Population Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Osler, M; Hein, H O

    1998-01-01

    . There were 867 cases of lung cancer, 203 among women and 664 among men. Rates among female and male never-smokers were similar, although confidence intervals around rates were wide. Rate ratios (RRs) increased with number of pack-years for both men and women to a maximum of approximately 20 in inhaling...... smokers with more than 60 pack-years of tobacco exposure. RRs did not differ much between men and women: adjusted for pack-years, age, and study population, the ratio between female and male smokers' RRs of developing lung cancer was 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.3-2.1). All histologic types were......Our aim was to compare risk of lung cancer associated with smoking by gender and histologic type. A total of 30,874 subjects, 44% women, from three prospective population-based studies with initial examinations between 1964 and 1992 were followed until 1994 through the National Cancer Registry...

  7. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Breast Cancer: A Multi-Center Demonstrator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Floyd, Carey

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus has been to gather data from multiple sites in order to verify and whether the artificial neural network computer aid to the diagnosis of breast cancer can be translated between locations...

  8. Mitochondrial Enzyme Plays Critical Role in Chemotherapy-Induced Heart Damage | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective drug for treating cancers ranging from leukemia and lymphoma to solid tumors, such as breast cancer. DOX kills dividing cells in two ways: inserting between the base pairs of DNA and trapping a complex of DNA and an enzyme that cuts DNA, topoisomerase 2α, preventing DNA repair. However, DOX also causes congestive heart failure in about 30 percent of adult cancer patients and delayed onset heart failure in a significant number of pediatric cancer patients. The mechanism of this DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity is not well understood since heart muscle cells neither divide nor express Top2α, and there are currently no genetic factors that identify patients who are susceptible to cardiac damage from DOX. However, a recent study showed that mice lacking another topoisomerase, Top2β, did not experience cardiac damage after treatment with DOX.

  9. Genome sequencing of Ewing sarcoma patients reveals genetic predisposition | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The largest and most comprehensive genomic analysis of individuals with Ewing sarcoma performed to date reveals that some patients are genetically predisposed to developing the cancer.  Learn more...

  10. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  11. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  12. Loss of an iridium-192 source and therapy misadministration at Indiana Regional Cancer Center, Indiana, Pennsylvania, on November 16, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    On December 1, 1992, the Indiana Regional Cancer Center reported to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Region I that they believed a 1.37 E + 11 becquerel (3.7-curie) iridium-192 source from their Omnitron 2000 high dose rate remote brachytherapy afterloader had been found at a biohazard waste transfer station in Carnegie, Pennsylvania. After notifying the NRC, this cancer center, one of several operated by the licensee, Oncology Services Corporation, retrieved the source, and Region I dispatched an inspector and a supervisor to investigate the event. The source was first detected when it triggered radiation alarms at a waste incinerator facility in. Warren, Ohio. The licensee informed the NRC that the source wire had apparently broken during treatment of a patient on November 16, 1992, leaving the source in the patient. On the basis of the seriousness of the incident, the NRC elevated its response to an Incident Investigation. The Incident Investigation Team initiated its investigation on December 3, 1992. The investigation team concluded that the patient received a serious misadministration and died on November 21, 1992, and that over 90 individuals were exposed to radiation from November 16 to December 1, 1992. In a press release dated January 26, 1993, the Indiana County Coroner stated that the cause of death listed in the official autopsy report was ''Acute Radiational Exposure and Consequences Thereof'' An almost identical source wire failure occurred with an afterloader in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on December 7, 1992, but with minimal radiological consequences. This incident was included in the investigation. This report discusses the Omnitron 2000 high dose rate afterloader source-wire failure, the reasons why the failure was not detected by Indiana Regional Cancer Center, the potential consequences to the patient, the estimated radiological doses to workers and the public, and regulatory aspects associated with this incident

  13. Cancer risk among female agricultural workers: a multi-center case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settimi, L; Comba, P; Carrieri, P; Boffetta, P; Magnani, C; Terracini, B; Andrion, A; Bosia, S; Ciapini, C; De Santis, M; Desideri, E; Fedi, A; Luccoli, L; Maiozzi, P; Masina, A; Perazzo, P L; Axelson, O

    1999-07-01

    Cancer risk among women engaged in farming has been poorly investigated. This group of female workers is of particular interest, however, since they may experience exposure to several potential agricultural hazards. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in five Italian rural areas to examine the association between cancer and farming among women. The areas selected were located in three different regions (i.e., Piedmont, Tuscany, and Emilia-Romagna). The following cancer sites were selected for the study: stomach, colon, rectum, lung, skin melanoma, skin non-melanoma, breast, cervix and corpus uteri, ovary, bladder, kidney. Cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were also included. Altogether, 1,044 newly diagnosed cases aged 20-75 years were ascertained from hospital records from March 1990 to September 1992, and for 945 of them detailed information was collected by a standard questionnaire. The analyses of data were performed comparing each case series to a reference group drawn from among the other sites. Unconditional logistic regression models were used in the statistical analyses. Statistically significant increased risks in association with farming were estimated for skin melanoma (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-5.8) and bladder cancer (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-6.1). Lung cancer was also found increased but not at a statistically significant level (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.7-4.4). An OR lower than unity was observed for postmenopausal breast cancer (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.7). The present study suggests that women in farming might experience increased risk of cancers, not usually found in excess among male farmers, as well as a protective effect for postmenopausal breast cancer. The role of different patterns of exposure or gender specific responses should be considered in further studies.

  14. AACR Honors Louis Staudt with Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Association for Cancer Research has awarded Louis M. Staudt, Co-Chief of CCR’s Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, its Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship. The lectureship recognizes scientists whose work has had or may have a far-reaching impact on the detection, diagnosis, treatment or prevention of cancer and who embody the dedication of the princess to multinational collaborations. Learn more...  

  15. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: U01 Natural Products Screening | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project was to enlarge the chemical space probed by Project 1 (High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line Panel) by screening an expanded natural products library (~40,000) in an effort to further define vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. This new library is derived from a diverse collection of marine bacteria (prepared by Dr. John MacMillan, University of Texas Southwestern).

  16. Truncated Hormone Inhibits Breast Tumor Blood Vessel Formation, Not Tumor Growth | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hormone prolactin (PRL) plays a critical role in normal breast development by stimulating the proliferation of mammary cells, the production of milk proteins, and the formation of new mammary blood vessels. Unfortunately, the same cell and vessel growth pathways controlled by PRL in normal cells also operate in breast cancer cells, and elevated plasma PRL is a risk factor for breast cancer, especially in post-menopausal women.

  17. What a Shock: No Apoptosis without Heat Shock Protein 90α | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apoptosis, also known as programmed cell death, consists of a series of reactions designed to systematically chop up a cell and its contents. The process is used to eliminate specific cells during development or to remove old or damaged cells without harming any surrounding cells. Since cancer cells can develop mechanisms to avoid apoptosis, researchers may be able to identify new targets to combat cancer by better understanding the details of the apoptotic process.

  18. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocvirk Janja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer.

  19. Center for Research on Minority Health -- Prostate Cancer and Health Disparities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Organization for Supportive Cancer Care and the Pan American Association to develop palliative care curriculum and continuing education courses for...23, Tuesday, 5:30-6:45 p.m., - MID TERM EXAM DUE “Health Disparities in Palliative Care : from Developing Nations to Minority Communities.” – Isabel...minority caregivers. Her research interests include health disparities across the cancer continuum, cross-cultural research, palliative care (decision

  20. Researchers unmask secret to long-lasting effects of botulinum neurotoxin A in motor neurons | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team of scientists led by the Center for Cancer Research's Allan M. Weissman, M.D., and Yien Che Tsai, Ph.D., has discovered a molecular mechanism that explains the extreme toxicity of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), the most potent BoNT strain. The discovery, published June 5 in PNAS, also identifies a molecular target that the researchers hope will eventually lead to improved therapies to treat exposure and severely undermine the potential use of BoNTs as bioweapons.  Read more...  

  1. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ROPS Rebate Skin Cancer Screening Zika Virus National Farm Medicine Center The National Farm Medicine Center was established in 1981 in response to occupational health problems seen in farm patients coming to Marshfield Clinic. The center continues ...

  2. Anderson localization for a random vector potential model at high dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, F

    2005-01-01

    We prove that Anderson localization holds on the spectral edge of the Schroedinger operator with a uniformly distributed random vector potential on ${\\bf Z}^d$, if d is sufficiently large. The key ingredient is the proof of a Wegner estimate which is reduced to the problem of counting the number of paths on ${\\bf Z}^d$ with ``no loops".

  3. Financial analysis of potential retrospective premium assessments under the Price-Anderson system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1985-04-01

    Ten representative nuclear utilities have been analyzed over the period 1981 to 1983 to evaluate the effects of three levels of retrospective premiums on various financial indicators. This analysis continues and expands on earlier analyses prepared as background for deliberations by the US Congress for possible extension or modification of the Price-Anderson Act

  4. Ilu võitlus koleduse välja vastu / Rebekka Lotman ; kommenteerinud Mart Anderson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotman, Rebekka, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    Konkursside "25 kauneimat Eesti raamatut" ja "Viis kauneimat Eesti lasteraamatut" võidutööde näitus Eesti Rahvusraamatukogus. Võidutööde valikut kommenteerib žürii esimees Mart Anderson. Loetletud 2008. aasta 25 kaunimat raamatut. Nimekiri: 2008. aasta 25 kauneimat raamatut

  5. Page 1 Graded subrings of C[X, Y] 215 References {1} Anderson ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    {1} Anderson D. F. Subrings of k[X, Y] generated by monomials, Can. J. Math, Vol. XXX, No. 1 (1978). 2 : 5. 224. [2] Bourbaki N, Commutative Algebra. Hermann, Addison Wesley Publishers. L3] Gurjar R V and Shastri A R, The fundamental group at infinity of affine surfaces, Commen, Math. Heleetici 59 (1984) 459–484.

  6. E. N. Anderson: Caring for place: ecology, ideology, and emotion in traditional landscape management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Stevens Hummel

    2016-01-01

    Anderson is deeply concerned with inadequate responses to ongoing global environmental degradation. Accordingly, he offers cases of traditional societies that survived over long time periods without destroying their environments. His focus is on ways humans think about plants, animals, and landscapes because of his conviction that stories about them are what make us...

  7. Substitutional impurity in single-layer graphene: The Koster–Slater and Anderson models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, S. Yu., E-mail: sergei-davydov@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The Koster–Slater and Anderson models are used to consider substitutional impurities in free-standing single-layer graphene. The density of states of graphene is described using a model (the M model). For the nitrogen and boron impurities, the occupation numbers and the parameter η which defines the fraction of delocalized electrons of the impurity are determined. In this case, experimental data are used for both determination of the model parameters and comparison with the results of theoretical estimations. The general features of the Koster–Slater and Anderson models and the differences between the two models are discussed. Specifically, it is shown that the band contributions to the occupation numbers of a nitrogen atom in both models are comparable, whereas the local contributions are substantially different: the local contributions are decisive in the Koster–Slater model and negligible in the Anderson model. The asymptotic behavior of the wave functions of a defect is considered in the Koster–Slater model, and the electron states of impurity dimers are considered in the Anderson model.

  8. Brownian motion and parabolic Anderson model in a renormalized Poisson potential

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xia; Kulik, Alexey M.

    2012-01-01

    A method known as renormalization is proposed for constructing some more physically realistic random potentials in a Poisson cloud. The Brownian motion in the renormalized random potential and related parabolic Anderson models are modeled. With the renormalization, for example, the models consistent to Newton’s law of universal attraction can be rigorously constructed.

  9. Combining Anderson's Model in the Teaching of Art Appreciation for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Maithreyi; Basaree, Ruzaika Omar; Hanafi, Jaffri; Putih, Abu Talib

    2016-01-01

    This study utilized 33 students taking creative communication design 3 in the third year of the graphic design and multimedia program, using an Anderson's model in teaching art appreciation. The quantitative research design and procedures were employed in this study. An experimental research using the quasi-experimental design, a single-group…

  10. Parametrization of Transfer Matrix: for One-Dimensional Anderson Model with Diagonal Disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Kai; Qin Shaojing; Wang Chuilin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a new parametrization method to calculate the localization length in one-dimensional Anderson model with diagonal disorder. This method can avoid the divergence difficulty encountered in the conventional methods, and significantly save computing time as well. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. A functional integral approach without slave bosons to the Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ngoc Thuan; Nguyen Toan Thang; Coqblin, B.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hoang Anh Tuan.

    1994-06-01

    We developed the technique of the functional integral method without slave bosons for the Periodic Anderson Model (PAM) suggested by Sarker for treating the Hubbard Model. This technique allowed us to obtain an analytical expression of Green functions containing U-dependence that is omitted in the formalism with slave bosons. (author). 9 refs

  12. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA), requires the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory.... Congressional Review Act I. Background Section 604 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58, amended...

  13. Tractable approximations for probabilistic models: The adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer mean field approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opper, Manfred; Winther, Ole

    2001-01-01

    We develop an advanced mean held method for approximating averages in probabilistic data models that is based on the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) approach of disorder physics. In contrast to conventional TAP. where the knowledge of the distribution of couplings between the random variables...

  14. (dis)Ability and Music Education: Paralympian Patrick Anderson and the Experience of Disability in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Adam Patrick

    2017-01-01

    What does it mean to experience disability in music? Based on interviews with Patrick Anderson--arguably the greatest wheelchair basketball player of all time--this article presents insights into the complexities of the experience of disability in sports and music. Contrasted with music education's tendency to adhere to a medicalized model of…

  15. Quantum resonance, Anderson localisation and selective rotational excitation in periodically kicked molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Averbukh I. Sh.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that molecules kicked periodically by laser pulses currently used in molecular alignment experiments allow to observe effects of the periodically kicked quantum rotor in a real rotational system. Among these effects are Anderson localisation in angular momentum and the scaling of the quantum resonance. Based on this, we propose a new scheme for selective molecular rotational excitation.

  16. Alternative reality and art: the creative world of Walter Inglis Anderson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenhauser, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Both mental illness and creativity run in families. This observation suggests the possibility of genetic predisposition; in light of the known dynamic interrelationships among the environment, the personality, and the brain, however, it does not diminish the possibility of significant environmental influence on personal development. An examination of the biological, psychological, and social forces impacting the life of Walter Inglis Anderson (1903-1965), the South's most important artist, serves as a case in point. Anderson's upbringing, including his mother's determination that her sons become artists and her beliefs about the shamanistic role of artists in society, might have played a large part in establishing an unusual and indelible frame of reference in a family whose history insinuated the possibility of untoward outcomes. Walter Anderson's life as an artist--one who lived at times in an alternative reality--raises questions about how a different set of circumstances might have affected his mental state as well as his talent. This essay discusses some of the important relationships, events, and circumstances in Walter Anderson's life from a biopsychosocial perspective, with emphasis on psychodynamic implications of his illness and its questionable diagnosis as schizophrenia.

  17. Evaluation of the train signal and rail systems for the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Whittier Access Project was completed in 2000. One phase of the project was to convert the 2.5 mile long Anton Anderson : Memorial Tunnel (Whittier Tunnel) into the worlds only dual-use highway/railroad tunnel with one way reversible highway t...

  18. Financial analysis of potential retrospective premium assessments under the Price-Anderson system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R.S.

    1985-04-01

    Ten representative nuclear utilities have been analyzed over the period 1981 to 1983 to evaluate the effects of three levels of retrospective premiums on various financial indicators. This analysis continues and expands on earlier analyses prepared as background for deliberations by the US Congress for possible extension or modification of the Price-Anderson Act.

  19. Ginzburg-Landau expansion in strongly disordered attractive Anderson-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinskii, E. Z.; Kuleeva, N. A.; Sadovskii, M. V.

    2017-07-01

    We have studied disordering effects on the coefficients of Ginzburg-Landau expansion in powers of superconducting order parameter in the attractive Anderson-Hubbard model within the generalized DMFT+Σ approximation. We consider the wide region of attractive potentials U from the weak coupling region, where superconductivity is described by BCS model, to the strong coupling region, where the superconducting transition is related with Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs formed at temperatures essentially larger than the temperature of superconducting transition, and a wide range of disorder—from weak to strong, where the system is in the vicinity of Anderson transition. In the case of semielliptic bare density of states, disorder's influence upon the coefficients A and B of the square and the fourth power of the order parameter is universal for any value of electron correlation and is related only to the general disorder widening of the bare band (generalized Anderson theorem). Such universality is absent for the gradient term expansion coefficient C. In the usual theory of "dirty" superconductors, the C coefficient drops with the growth of disorder. In the limit of strong disorder in BCS limit, the coefficient C is very sensitive to the effects of Anderson localization, which lead to its further drop with disorder growth up to the region of the Anderson insulator. In the region of BCS-BEC crossover and in BEC limit, the coefficient C and all related physical properties are weakly dependent on disorder. In particular, this leads to relatively weak disorder dependence of both penetration depth and coherence lengths, as well as of related slope of the upper critical magnetic field at superconducting transition, in the region of very strong coupling.

  20. Chromatin Configuration Determines Cell Responses to Hormone Stimuli | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ever since selective gene expression was established as the central driver of cell behavior, researchers have been working to understand the forces that control gene transcription. Aberrant gene expression can cause or promote many diseases, including cancer, and alterations in gene expression are the goal of many therapeutic agents. Recent work has focused on the potential role of chromatin structure as a contributor to gene regulation. Chromatin can exist in a tightly packed/inaccessible or loose/accessible configuration depending on the interactions between DNA and its associated proteins. Patterns of chromatin structure can differ between cell types and can also change within cells in response to certain signals. Cancer researchers are particularly interested in the role of chromatin in gene regulation because many of the genomic regions found to be associated with cancer risk are in open chromatin structures.

  1. Identifying Regulators of the Immune Response to Dying Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytotoxic T cells are responsible for carrying out antigen-mediated immune responses against virally-infected and malignant cells. In both cases, cytotoxic T cells are stimulated by interacting with antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). Infected cells produce virus-specific antigens and pathogen associated molecular patterns, which are recognized by DCs and lead to robust T cell activation. Dead or dying uninfected cells, on the other hand, release damage associated molecular patterns, but their release does not always appear to be sufficient to induce cytotoxic T cell activity. Tim Greten, M.D., of CCR’s Medical Oncology Branch, and a group of international collaborators set out to understand how immune responses against dying cancer cells are regulated. These processes are likely to be important for improving the efficacy of cancer treatment vaccines, which induce an immune reaction against a patient’s cancer cells.

  2. Clinical importance of second-opinion interpretations by radiologists specializing in gynecologic oncology at a tertiary cancer center: magnetic resonance imaging for endometrial cancer staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Alves

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To determine whether there are substantive differences between the initial interpretations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans acquired at outside facilities and the second-opinion interpretations of radiologists specializing in gynecologic oncology at a tertiary cancer center, among patients referred for endometrial cancer staging. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, comparative analysis of 153 initial and second-opinion MRI reports for endometrial cancer staging officially submitted for review by radiologists specializing in gynecologic oncology. For each case, the relationship between the initial and second-opinion reports, regarding the suggested diagnosis and the clinically relevant MRI findings reported, was categorized as "agreement" or "disagreement". Histopathology was used in order to establish the definitive diagnosis. Results: Disagreement was found in 58 (37.9% of the 153 cases. Second-opinion interpretations reported findings that affected the preoperative cancer staging and could have led to a change in treatment in 38 cases (24.8%; that did not affect the preoperative staging but provided information that was more accurate in 8 (5.2%; and that suggested a new cancer diagnosis in 12 (7.8%. In 37 cases (24.2%, there was a potential for changes in patient care. Among the 58 cases of disagreement, a definitive (histopathological diagnosis was made in 41 (70.7%. In 31 (75.6% of those 41 cases, the second-opinion report was more accurate than was the initial report. Conclusion: Discordant interpretations of MRI examinations, which can have a substantial effect on the clinical management of patients, appear to be common.

  3. Total Gastrectomy for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer at a Single Center: Postsurgical Outcomes in 41 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Vivian E; Gholami, Sepideh; Shah, Manish A; Tang, Laura H; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Schattner, Mark; Selby, Luke V; Yoon, Sam S; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Stadler, Zsofia K; Kelsen, David; Brennan, Murray F; Coit, Daniel G

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe postoperative outcomes of total gastrectomy at our institution for patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). HDGC, which is mainly caused by germline mutations in the E-cadherin gene (CDH1), renders a lifetime risk of gastric cancer of up to 70%, prompting a recommendation for prophylactic total gastrectomy. A prospective gastric cancer database identified 41 patients with CDH1 mutation who underwent total gastrectomy during 2005 to 2015. Perioperative, histopathologic, and long-term data were collected. Of the 41 patients undergoing total gastrectomy, median age was 47 years (range 20 to 71). There were 14 men and 27 women, with 25 open operations and 16 minimally invasive operations. Median length of stay was 7 days (range 4 to 50). In total, 11 patients (27%) experienced a complication requiring intervention, and there was 1 peri-operative mortality (2.5%). Thirty-five patients (85%) demonstrated 1 or more foci of intramucosal signet ring cell gastric cancer in the examined specimen. At 16 months median follow-up, the median weight loss was 4.7 kg (15% of preoperative weight). By 6 to 12 months postoperatively, weight patterns stabilized. Overall outcome was reported to be "as expected" by 40% of patients and "better than expected" by 45%. Patient-reported outcomes were similar to those of other patients undergoing total gastrectomy. Total gastrectomy should be considered for all CDH1 mutation carriers because of the high risk of invasive diffuse-type gastric cancer and lack of reliable surveillance options. Although most patients have durable weight loss after total gastrectomy, weights stabilize at about 6 to 12 months postoperatively, and patients report outcomes as being good to better than their preoperative expectations. No patients have developed gastric cancer recurrence after resections.

  4. Somatic Cells Become Cancer’s “Starter Dough” | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) is a term that sparks animated differences of opinions among researchers in the oncology community.  Much of the disagreement comes from the difficulty involved in isolating these cells and manipulating them ex vivo. When putative CSCs are isolated from clinical samples, researchers are unable to retrospectively identify the cell type that suffered the first oncogenic hit that led to tumorigenesis. Without this ability to make a clear pre- and post-cancer comparison, researchers are unable to characterize with confidence the origin and cellular properties of human CSCs.

  5. Bridging the digital divide by increasing computer and cancer literacy: community technology centers for head-start parents and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovey, Peter; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Mowad, Linda; Moret, Marta Elisa; Edlund, Denielle; Andersen, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of two community technology centers affiliated with Head Start early childhood education programs focused especially on Latino and African American parents of children enrolled in Head Start. A 6-hour course concerned with computer and cancer literacy was presented to 120 parents and other community residents who earned a free, refurbished, Internet-ready computer after completing the program. Focus groups provided the basis for designing the structure and content of the course and modifying it during the project period. An outcomes-based assessment comparing program participants with 70 nonparticipants at baseline, immediately after the course ended, and 3 months later suggested that the program increased knowledge about computers and their use, knowledge about cancer and its prevention, and computer use including health information-seeking via the Internet. The creation of community computer technology centers requires the availability of secure space, capacity of a community partner to oversee project implementation, and resources of this partner to ensure sustainability beyond core funding.

  6. Colorectal cancer screening at US community health centers: Examination of sociodemographic disparities and association with patient-provider communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sue C; McKinley, Duane; Sripipatana, Alek; Makaroff, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are low among underserved populations. High-quality patient-physician communication potentially influences patients' willingness to undergo CRC screening. Community health centers (HCs) provide comprehensive primary health care to underserved populations. This study's objectives were to ascertain national CRC screening rates and to explore the relations between sociodemographic characteristics and patient-provider communication on the receipt of CRC screening among HC patients. Using 2014 Health Center Patient Survey data, bivariate and multivariate analyses examined the association of sociodemographic variables (sex, race/ethnicity, age, geography, preferred language, household income, insurance, and employment status) and patient-provider communication with the receipt of CRC screening. Patients between the ages of 65 and 75 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-4.64) and patients not in the labor force (aOR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.37-3.94) had higher odds of receiving CRC screening, whereas patients who were uninsured (aOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.18-0.61) and patients who were non-English-speaking (aOR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18-0.99) had lower odds. Patient-provider communication was not associated with the receipt of CRC screening. The CRC screening rate for HC patients was 57.9%, whereas the rate was 65.1% according to the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 58.2% according to the 2013 National Health Interview Survey. The high ratings of patient-provider communication, regardless of the screening status, suggest strides toward a patient-centered medical home practice transformation that will assist in a positive patient experience. Addressing the lack of insurance, making culturally and linguistically appropriate patient education materials available, and training clinicians and care teams in cultural competency are critical for increasing future CRC screening rates. Cancer 2017

  7. Development of a risk prediction model for lung cancer: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvat, Hadrien; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Shimazu, Taichi; Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Inoue, Manami; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sawada, Norie; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2018-03-01

    Although the impact of tobacco consumption on the occurrence of lung cancer is well-established, risk estimation could be improved by risk prediction models that consider various smoking habits, such as quantity, duration, and time since quitting. We constructed a risk prediction model using a population of 59 161 individuals from the Japan Public Health Center (JPHC) Study Cohort II. A parametric survival model was used to assess the impact of age, gender, and smoking-related factors (cumulative smoking intensity measured in pack-years, age at initiation, and time since cessation). Ten-year cumulative probability of lung cancer occurrence estimates were calculated with consideration of the competing risk of death from other causes. Finally, the model was externally validated using 47 501 individuals from JPHC Study Cohort I. A total of 1210 cases of lung cancer occurred during 986 408 person-years of follow-up. We found a dose-dependent effect of tobacco consumption with hazard ratios for current smokers ranging from 3.78 (2.00-7.16) for cumulative consumption ≤15 pack-years to 15.80 (9.67-25.79) for >75 pack-years. Risk decreased with time since cessation. Ten-year cumulative probability of lung cancer occurrence estimates ranged from 0.04% to 11.14% in men and 0.07% to 6.55% in women. The model showed good predictive performance regarding discrimination (cross-validated c-index = 0.793) and calibration (cross-validated χ 2 = 6.60; P-value = .58). The model still showed good discrimination in the external validation population (c-index = 0.772). In conclusion, we developed a prediction model to estimate the probability of developing lung cancer based on age, gender, and tobacco consumption. This model appears useful in encouraging high-risk individuals to quit smoking and undergo increased surveillance. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. Intraoperative Diagnosis of Anderson-Fabry Disease in Patients With Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Undergoing Surgical Myectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Franco; Iascone, Maria; Maurizi, Niccolò; Pezzoli, Laura; Binaco, Irene; Biagini, Elena; Fibbi, Maria Laura; Olivotto, Iacopo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Fruntelata, Ana; Dorobantu, Lucian; Rapezzi, Claudio; Ferrazzi, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic screening for Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy (AFC) is performed in the presence of specific clinical red flags in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) older than 25 years. However, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) has been traditionally considered an exclusion criteria for AFC. To examine a series of patients diagnosed with HCM and severe basal LVOTO undergoing myectomy in whom the diagnosis of AFC was suspected by the cardiac surgeon intraoperatively and confirmed by histological and genetic examinations. This retrospective analysis of patients undergoing surgical septal reduction strategies was conducted in 3 European tertiary referral centers for HCM from July 2013 to December 2016. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of obstructive HCM referred for surgical management of LVOTO were observed for at least 18 months after the procedure (mean [SD] follow-up, 33 [14] months). Etiology of patients with HCM who underwent surgical myectomy. From 2013, 235 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of HCM underwent septal myectomy. The cardiac surgeon suspected a storage disease in 3 patients (1.3%) while inspecting their heart samples extracted from myectomy. The mean (SD) age at diagnosis for these 3 patients was 42 (4) years; all were male. None of the 3 patients presented with extracardiac features suggestive of AFC. All patients showed asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy, with maximal left ventricular thickness in the basal septum (19-31 mm), severe basal LVOTO (70-120 mm Hg), and left atrial dilatation (44-57 mm). Only 1 patient presented with late gadolinium enhancement on cardiovascular magnetic resonance at the right ventricle insertion site. The mean (SD) age at surgical procedure was 63 (5) years. On tactile sensation, the surgeon felt a spongy consistency of the surgical samples, different from the usual stony-elastic consistency typical of classic HCM, and this prompted histological examinations. Histology

  9. Towards patient-centered colorectal cancer surgery : focus on risks, decisions and clinical auditing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Heleen Simone

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explore several aspects of both clinical decision making and quality assessment in colorectal cancer surgery. Part one focusses on benefits and risks of treatment options, preoperative information provision and Shared Decision Making (SDM); part two investigates changes

  10. Yttrium-90 radioembolization for the treatment of unresectable liver cancer: Results of a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özhan Özgür

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effects of yttrium-90 (Y-90 resin microsphere radioembolization therapy on patients with unresectable liver cancer who do not benefit from chemotherapy. Methods: Fifty-five patients underwent radioembolization therapy included in the study whose had unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer originating from the gastrointestinal tract. Three were excluded from the study after pre-evaluation angiography. Thirteen (23.6% of the remaining 52 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma and 39 (76.4% had metastatic liver cancer. Fifty-two patients underwent Y-90 radioembolization treatment. Each patient's response to the administered treatment was evaluated using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST and the overall probability of survival was displayed graphically by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: After Y-90 therapy, 47 patients were follow-up. While 57% of the patients responded to treatment as clinical benefit, the disease progressed in 43%. The median hepatic progression-free survival time of the patients was 3.4 months (95% confidence interval (ci:1.4-5.3 and the overall survival time was 11.3 months (95%, CI:8.7-14.03. Conclusion: This study emphasizes that Y-90 resin microsphere radioembolization treatment is effective in patients with unresectable liver cancer.

  11. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Concurrent Palliative Care in an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Ahles, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To understand oncology clinicians’ perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. Methods Qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Results Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: 1) treating the whole patient, 2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, 3) “some patients just want to fight”, and 4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists’ views on the complementary role of palliative care: 1) “refer early and often”, 2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals hospice; “Heme patients are different”, 3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, 4) palliative care “shares the load”, and 5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Conclusions Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care. PMID:23040412

  12. Brachyury Essential for Notochord Cell Fate, Not Proliferation or EMT | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brachyury or T gene encodes a transcription factor that is essential for body axis elongation during embryonic development. T is also highly expressed in chordomas, rare sarcomas derived from notochord cells, and a number of additional tumor types, including lung, prostate, and colon cancers

  13. Interleukin-8 and Its Role During EMT | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The switch of cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal-like phenotype, designated as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or EMT, is known to induce cell motility and invasiveness and appears to be critical for the dissemination of solid tumors and drug resistance. An understanding of the signaling events that induce tumor EMT could lead to novel ways to prevent metastasis.

  14. [Long-term results of surgical treatment of stomach cancer: clinical experience of forty years from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, You-qing; Li, Wei; Sun, Xiao-wei; Chen, Ying-bo; Xu, Li; Chen, Gong; Guan, Yuan-xiang; Li, Yuan-fang; Xu, Da-zhi; Sun, Xian-fu; Zhang, Hua-zheng; Lin, Zhen-wen

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the approaches to improve therapeutic effect of stomach cancer by analysis of the long-term results of surgical treatment of this disease. Prognostic factors of stomach cancer were analyzed by Cox multivariate regression model based on clinical data of 2561 stomach cancer cases who underwent surgical treatment from 1964 to 2004 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. Survival rates were calculated by life table method. Gastrectomy was performed for 1950 cases with resectability of 76.1%, among which there were 1192 cases of curative resection (46.5%) and 758 cases of non-curative resection (29.6%). The other 611 cases of palliative operation included bypass procedures and laparotomy. Operative mortality of all cases was 0.8% and morbidity was 5.1%. For all cases the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rate was 52.4%, 38.6% and 35.5%, respectively. The stage-specific 5-year survival rate was 86.8% (Stage I), 58.7% (Stage II), 28.4% (Stage III) and 7.6% (Stage IV), respectively. The 5-year survival after curative resection in the period of 40 years was 45.5%, and increased to 52.7% in the last two decades and 61.8% in recent decade. Stage-specific case proportion during the earlier two decades was 1.4% (Stage I), 10.6% (Stage II), 23.1% (Stage III) and 64.9% (Stage IV), respectively, and that during the recent two decades was 9.3%, 18.5%, 35.3% and 36.8%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate of cases during the earlier two decades was 18.0% and increased to 37.5% during the recent two decades. Multivariate analysis indicated that main prognostic factors of stomach cancer included TNM staging, curative resection and multidisciplinary treatment. Early detection and curative resection were the most important measures to improve therapeutic effect of stomach cancer. A surgery-predominant multidisciplinary treatment individualizing biological characteristics of tumor, staging of disease and tumor site will contribute to improvement of therapeutic effect of

  15. Tumor-Protective Mechanism Identified from Premature Aging Disease | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an extraordinarily rare genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which encodes architectural proteins of the human cell nucleus. The mutation causes the production of a mutant protein called progerin. Patients with HGPS display signs of premature aging, such as hair loss, slowed growth, weakening of bone and joint integrity, and cardiovascular disease. Most die in their mid-teens of heart disease or stroke. Intriguingly, these patients do not develop another aging-related disease, cancer, despite having dramatically elevated levels of DNA damage. Tom Misteli, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and his colleagues hypothesized that, rather than patients not living long enough to develop cancer, a resistance mechanism was operating in HGPS cells to prevent cancer formation. To begin testing this idea, the researchers transformed fibroblasts from HGPS patients or age-matched, healthy controls with telomerase, constitutively-activated HRAS, and SV40 large and small T antigens. Transformed HGPS cells displayed morphological changes and increased proliferation similar to transformed controls but formed fewer colonies in soft agar and fewer tumors when injected into mice. When the investigators examined global gene expression in the two populations of cells, they found that transformed HGPS cells failed to activate many of the genes that are induced in response to transformation in controls, including oncogenic and proliferation pathways. In addition the transformed HGPS cells were unable to undergo oncogenic de-differentiation. Importantly, the tumor resistance in HGPS cells was due to the presence of the progerin protein, which was both necessary and sufficient to protect cells from oncogenic transformation. Together these results suggested that HGPS cells resist cancer-inducing stimuli by not undergoing the genetic reprogramming necessary for tumor initiation. The scientists

  16. Science, Passion & Compassion vs. Cancer: Tania Crombet MD PhD, Director of Clinical Research. Molecular Immunology Center, Havana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gory, Conner

    2016-10-01

    Soon after the Molecular Immunology Center (CIM) was established in 1994 (a founding institution of Havana's biotechnology and pharmaceutical campus known as the scientific pole), Dr Crombet completed her master's thesis there. She joined CIM's team in 1998 and in 2004 was designated Director of Clinical Research. She has participated in the research, development and clinical trials of some of Cuba's most innovative therapies and vaccines, including CIMAvax-EGF for non-small cell lung cancer patients. In 2015, this therapy completed Phase IV clinical trials in Cuba and is now used in primary health care services throughout the country's national health system. CIM and Roswell Park Cancer Institute (Buffalo, New York) received US Department of Treasury approval in 2015 to test CIMAvax-EGF and other CIM products in the United States, opening the way for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to consider joint ground-breaking Phase I and II clinical trials in the USA. Recent regulatory changes introduced by President Barack Obama may make applying for such licenses a thing of the past-at least that is what researchers hope. In any case, the work of Dr Crombet and the teams at CIM is making headway in cancer immunotherapy, within the broader goals of the institution's mandate…the subject of our interview.

  17. Head and neck cancers associated with exposure to the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Jonathan E; McBride, Sean M; Spielsinger, Daniel; Sherman, Eric J; Wong, Richard; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Nancy Y; Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian

    2018-01-25

    Exposure at the World Trade Center (WTC) terrorist collapse site on September 11, 2001 has been associated with increased cancer risk, though observational studies have identified very few cases of head and neck cancer (HNC) in exposed individuals. Eighty seven patients were identified who presented to our institution with HNC diagnosed from 2002 to 2017 who reported WTC exposure. The annual number and proportion of WTC-exposed HNC patients has been steadily increasing since 2002, with most cancers developing >10 years following the event. Furthermore, WTC-exposed patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive OPC experienced significantly inferior outcomes compared with non-WTC exposed patients with HPV+ OPC (disease free survival 80.1% vs. 65.6% at 4 years, p = 0.04). This single institution study cannot establish evidence of exposure-mediated causation but higher recurrence rates in the WTC-exposed HPV+ OPC population suggest a treatment refractory tumor biology and possible exposure synergism with HPV-mediated oncogenesis. © 2018 UICC.

  18. Impact of Duration of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Rectal Cancer Survival: A Real World Multi-center Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar; Kumar, Aalok; Kennecke, Hagen F; Speers, Caroline H; Cheung, Winson Y

    2018-03-01

    The utility of neoadjuvant radiotherapy (nRT) for the treatment of stage II and III rectal cancer is well-established. However, the optimal duration of nRT in this setting remains controversial. Using a population-based cohort of patients with stage II and III rectal cancer (RC) treated with curative intent, our aims were to (1) examine the patterns of nRT use and (2) explore the relationship between different nRT schedules and survival in the real-world setting. This is a multi-center retrospective cohort study based on population-based data from 5 regional comprehensive cancer centers in British Columbia, Canada. We analyzed patients diagnosed with clinical stage II or III RC from 2006 to 2010 and treated with either short-course (SC) or long-course (LC) nRT prior to curative intent surgery. Logistic regression models were constructed to determine the factors associated with the course of nRT delivered to patients. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression that accounted for known prognostic factors were used to evaluate the relationship between nRT schedule and overall (OS), disease-free (DFS), local recurrence-free (LRFS), and distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS). We identified 427 patients: the median age was 65 years (range, 31 to 94 years), 67% were men, 87% had T3 or T4 tumors, and 74% had N1 or N2 disease. Among them, 241 (56%) received SC and 186 (44%) received LC. Adjusting for confounders, patients with N1 or N2 disease were more likely to undergo LC (odds ratio [OR], 5.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.51-11.22; P  .05). Appropriate preoperative selection of SC versus LC nRT for locally advanced RC based on patient and tumor characteristics was not associated with differences in survival outcomes in the real-world setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Questionnaire survey of ultrasonography at centers equipped for detailed breast cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraiwa, Misaki; Endo, Tokiko; Morita, Takako; Niwa, Tae; Oiwa, Mikinao; Nishida, Chikako

    2012-01-01

    To ascertain the current status of ultrasonography in mammographic (MG) screening at centers equipped for detailed examination and to clarify the related issues, a questionnaire was sent to 181 centers, exclusive of those providing only medical check-ups, recognized by the Central Committee for Quality Control of Mammographic Screening in 7 prefectures of Chubu District. Of the 99 centers that returned the questionnaire (response rate, 54.7%), 82 answered ''yes'' to the use of breast ultrasound in clinical practice, in which the actual state of breast ultrasonography was analyzed. Examinations were performed by doctors alone at 24 centers, doctors and non-doctors at 40, and non-doctors alone at 18. Examinations by doctors were performed in doctors' offices at 28 centers, in inspection rooms at 26 and both at 10, frequently as outpatient examinations in 51 centers (79.7%). The mean duration of examination was 9.8 min for the first examination of a symptomatic patient, 7.5 min for follow-up, 9.6 min for the first examination of an asymptomatic patient, and 7.6 min for follow-up. For non-doctors, the respective times were 16.7, 14.4, 14.7, and 14.2 min, respectively. Non-doctors performing examinations alone (87.9%) and with insufficient MG information (50.0%) took a longer time. Frequently, the image was read only by doctors (65.5%), employing static images (93.3%). Qualified specialist doctors and technologists accounted for 16.2%, and the rate of participation in training by the Japan Association of Breast and Thyroid Sonology (JABTS) was 24.7%. Based on the present questionnaire, conditions of breast ultrasonography for mild MG abnormalities still appear to be inadequate. (author)

  20. Time Spent by Breast Imaging Radiologists to Perform Value-Added Activities at an Academic Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Mesa, Fernando; Klevos, Geetika; Arheart, Kristopher; Banks, James; Yepes, Monica; Net, Jose

    2017-04-01

    Health care reform in the United States has generated a paradigm shift in the practice of radiology aimed at increasing the degree of patient-centered care. We conducted a study to quantify the amount of time breast imaging radiologists spend on value-added activities at an academic comprehensive cancer center located in Miami, Florida, and accredited by the American College of Radiology as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence. A prospective, observational study was conducted during a period of 20 consecutive workdays. Three participating breast imaging radiologists maintained a real-time log of each activity performed. A generalized linear model was used to perform a 1-way analysis of variance. An alpha level of .05 was used to determine statistical significance. The average daily time dedicated to these activities was 92.1 minutes (range, 56.4-132.2). The amount of time significantly differed among breast imaging radiologists and correlated with their assigned daily role (P value-added activities to help improve patients' experience across the continuity of their care. We propose that similar studies be conducted at other institutions to better assess the magnitude of this finding across different breast imaging care settings.

  1. Low bone mineral density may be associated with long-term risk of cancer in the middle-aged population: A retrospective observational study from a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Fu Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally understood that cancer patients are at an increased risk for osteoporosis. Additionally, recent studies have suggested a shared pathophysiological mechanism between the development of cancer and osteoporosis. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate whether low bone mineral density is associated with cancer risk. Methods: We enrolled 8780 subjects who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and cancer screening from January 1, 2008–December 31, 2012 from a cohort selected from Chang Gung Health Care Center in Taiwan. The study end point was a definite pathological diagnosis of cancer or admission for cancer treatment. Results: During a mean follow-up of 6.6 ± 1.5 years, 110 incident cases of cancer occurred. The overall incidence of cancer was significantly higher in those patients with a low BMD (1.3% than in those with a normal BMD (1.0%. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that older age, smoking, and low BMD (hazard ratio: 1.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.0–2.3 were significant independent risk factors for cancer. Conclusion: Our investigation suggested that subjects with a low BMD may have a higher long-term risk of cancer compared with subjects with a normal BMD. Keywords: Bone mineral density, Cancer

  2. Wonders & Worries: evaluation of a child centered psychosocial intervention for families who have a parent/primary caregiver with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Farya; Prezio, Elizabeth A

    2017-07-01

    Scant evidence exists to guide interventions for children who have a parent with cancer. This study evaluated the outcomes of a community based psychosocial intervention targeted to children dealing with parental or primary caregiver cancer. This curriculum provided an age-appropriate understanding of the illness, facilitated the expression of feelings, identified individual coping skills to help ease feelings related to parent's cancer, and enhanced the family's ability to communicate about the disease. Families whose children participated in the six-week curriculum-based intervention completed a questionnaire that included demographic information, a five-item assessment of changes in parenting abilities, and a nine-item assessment of changes in children's behavioral issues. The prevalence of each reported item was determined through a secondary analyses of cross-sectional data derived from a multi-year sample of these survey results. A sample of 156 families responded to the survey between 2009 and 2014. A majority of families described improvement in all five areas of parenting abilities assessed including communication skills and confidence in parenting. Amelioration of multiple children's issues was reported including improved communication skills (87%), reduced anxiety (84%), increased feeling of security at home (90%), and improved school performance (73%). The results reported here suggest that this child centered psychosocial intervention promoted positive adaptation by actively supporting families and children while a parent/primary caregiver coped with a cancer diagnosis. Future research is planned utilizing a randomized controlled study design to formally evaluate the effectiveness and preventative impact of this manualized six-week curriculum. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. COX-2 – A Novel Target for Reducing Tumor Angiogenesis and Metastasis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, by supplying a steady stream of nutrients, removing waste, and providing tumor cells access to other sites in the body. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFRs) play a key role in tumor-mediated angiogenesis, and this pathway is the target of monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that have been approved to treat patients with cancer. Unfortunately, tumors can use alternative angiogenesis mechanisms to escape VEGF pathway blockade, but these alternate pathways are not well understood. Brad St. Croix, Ph.D., of CCR’s Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, along with Lihong Xu, Ph.D., a Postdoctoral Fellow in the St. Croix laboratory, and colleagues set out to identify VEGF-independent mediators of tumor angiogenesis.

  4. Uncovering the Origin of Skin Side Effects from EGFR-Targeted Therapies | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a key regulator of cell proliferation, is often mutated or overexpressed in a variety of cancer types. EGFR-targeted therapies, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors, can effectively treat patients whose tumors depend on aberrant EGFR signaling. Within a few weeks of initiating therapy, however, patients develop a characteristic rash with leukocyte infiltration into the skin accompanied by pruritus (itching), scaling of the skin, hair loss, and even changes in skin cell differentiation. The side effects can become so severe that patients take reduced doses, which can limit efficacy, or stop treatment altogether. To understand how EGFR inhibitors cause these skin changes in the hopes of identifying a means of preventing them, Stuart Yuspa, M.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, and his colleagues examined patient samples and generated a mouse model of EGFR loss in the skin.

  5. Cracking the finger code: an interview with CCR’s Susan Mackem | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The creation of the digits in our hand—the thumb, index-middle-ring fingers and pinky—begins early in development, but little is known about the exact programming that occurs to produce the different digit types. Investigators in the Cancer and Developmental Biology Laboratory, (CDBL), provide the first genetic evidence of how the tuning of signals sets digit identity by studying the effects of dysregulation (abnormal regulation) in several mutations. Read more…

  6. Addition to our technical center arco therapy volume (VMAT) in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, J. C.; Cabrera, P.; Luis, J.; Perucha, M.; Sanchez, G.; Herrador, M.; Ortiz, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the description of the incorporation of the treatment technique radiotherapic Arcoterapia Volumetric (VMAT) in our hospital, patients with prostate cancer risk. The technological complexity of this type, which vary simultaneously the influence of radiation, the blades of the multileaf collimator (MLC) and the angular velocity of the accelerator head, determine a major challenge in designing the plan and verify the feasibility treatments.

  7. Treatment and prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer: Five yearmulti-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodabakhshi, R.; Yahyazadeh-Jabbari, Seyed H.; Gohari, Mahmod R.; Ameri, A.; Shahidi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study the response rate for common chemotherapy regimensand the progression free survival analysis in ovarian cancer in Tehran.Ninety-eight women with confirmed ovarian cancer who had surgery, followed bychemotherapy at the 3 hospitals in (Fayazbakhsh, Shohadayee Tajrish andImam-Hossain), Tehran, Iran, between 1997 and 2003 were enrolled in thisretrospective study. Data regarding age, pathologic variations, surgicalprocedures, chemotherapy regimens, response rates and time to progression ofthe disease were collected. Response rate was evaluated for 51 patients withepithelial cancer. From a total of 98 patients, there were 81 (82.6%)epithelial, 12 (12.2%) germ cell, 4 (4.1%) granulose cell tumors and one caseof lymphoma. Staging with optimal residue was performed for 18 patients.Stage III was the most common stage (44.9%). In 71.4% of patients, completeor partial response was seen, while the other patients showed stable orprogressive disease. The most important prognostic factors were the initialstage (p=0.034) and the extent of surgical procedure (p=0.045). Mediandisease free survival was 52.6 months. Although, higher response rate wasproduced by taxane-based regimen in comparison withcisplatin-cyclophosphamide regimen (78.2% versus 71.4%) but it was notstatistically significant (p=0.275). Median age (49.6 years) of our patientsis lower than expected. Besides, a large proportion of the patients arereferred in advanced stages. New chemotherapy practically has made nosignificant higher response rate. (author)

  8. CPRIT/Johnson Space Center, September, 2011 (Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey; Lane, Helen; Baker, Tracey; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    JSC researchers study carcinogenesis, cancer prevention and treatment along with epidemiological (primarily retrospective and longitudinal) studies, modeling, and interactions with the environment such as radiation, nutritional, and endocrine changes related to space flight along with behaviors such as smoking. Cancer research is a major focus for human space flight due to the exposure to space radiation which consists of particles of varying charges and energies, and secondary neutrons. The JSC laboratories collaborate with investigators from the U.S. as well as our European and Japanese partners. We use accelerator facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Loma Linda University and Los Alamos National Laboratory that generate high energy charged particles and neutrons to simulate cosmic radiation and solar particle events. The research using cultured cells and animals concentrates on damage and repair from the level of DNA to organ tissues, due to exposure to simulated space radiation exposure, that contribute to the induction of leukemia and solid tumors in most major tissues such as lung, colon, liver and breast. The goal of the research is to develop a mathematical model that can predict cancer morbidity and mortality risks with sufficient accuracy for a given space mission.

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists ...

  10. Seasonal clustering of sinopulmonary mucormycosis in patients with hematologic malignancies at a large comprehensive cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobini Sivagnanam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive Mucorales infections (IMI lead to significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. The role of season and climatic conditions in case clustering of IMI remain poorly understood. Methods Following detection of a cluster of sinopulmonary IMIs in patients with hematologic malignancies, we reviewed center-based medical records of all patients with IMIs and other invasive fungal infections (IFIs between January of 2012 and August of 2015 to assess for case clustering in relation to seasonality. Results A cluster of 7 patients were identified with sinopulmonary IMIs (Rhizopus microsporus/azygosporus, 6; Rhizomucor pusillus, 1 during a 3 month period between June and August of 2014. All patients died or were discharged to hospice. The cluster was managed with institution of standardized posaconazole prophylaxis to high-risk patients and patient use of N-95 masks when outside of protected areas on the inpatient service. Review of an earlier study period identified 11 patients with IMIs of varying species over the preceding 29 months without evidence of clustering. There were 9 total IMIs in the later study period (12 month post-initial cluster with 5 additional cases in the summer months, again suggesting seasonal clustering. Extensive environmental sampling did not reveal a source of mold. Using local climatological data abstracted from National Centers for Environmental Information the clusters appeared to be associated with high temperatures and low precipitation. Conclusions Sinopulmonary Mucorales clusters at our center had a seasonal variation which appeared to be related to temperature and precipitation. Given the significant mortality associated with IMIs, local climatic conditions may need to be considered when considering center specific fungal prevention and prophylaxis strategies for high-risk patients.

  11. On Absence of Pure Singular Spectrum of Random Perturbations and in Anderson Model at Low Disorde

    CERN Document Server

    Grinshpun, V

    2006-01-01

    Absence of singular component, with probability one, in the conductivity spectra of bounded random perturbations of multidimensional finite-difference Hamiltonians, is for the first time rigorously established under certain conditions ensuring either absence of pure point, or absence of pure absolutely continuous component in the corresponding regions of spectra. The main technical tool applied is the theory of rank-one perturbations of singular spectra. The respective new result (the non-mixing property) is applied to establish existence and bounds of the (non-empty) pure absolutely continuous component in the spectrum of the Anderson model with bounded random potential in dimension 2 at low disorder. The new (1999) result implies, via the trace-class perturbation analysis, the Anderson model with the unbounded potential to have only pure point spectrum (complete system of localized wave-functions) with probability one in arbitrary dimension. The new technics, based on the resolvent reduction formula, and ex...

  12. Photoemission in the Anderson model for rare earth compounds with floating valences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frota, H.O. da.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS) are calculated for the spin-degenerate Anderson model of valence fluctuation compounds. Based on the renormalization group technique originally introduced by Wilson to calculate the magnetic susceptibility for the Kondo model, the numerical calculation has uniform accuracy over the entire parameter space of the Anderson model; at any given photoelectron energy, a maximum error of 4% is estimated for the calculated photoemission current. The calculated spectra display two peaks associated with the two possible x-ray induced transitions between the n f = 0,1 or 2 occupations of the f-orbital: a first ionization peak corresponding to the n f = 2 → n f = 1 transition and a second ionization peak due to the n f 1 → n f = 0 transition. (author)

  13. Bacteraemia Caused by Escherichia Coli in Cancer Patients at a Specialist Center in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parveen, A.; Sultan, F.; Saleem, S.; Nazeer, S. H.; Raza, A.; Zafar, W.; Nizamuddin, S.; Mahboob, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Escherichia coli bacteraemia among cancer patients, and to assess the risk factors and outcomes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli bacteraemia. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, and comprised medical records of patients with Escherichia coli bacteraemia presenting between December 2012 and November 2013. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with the development and 30-day mortality of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli bacteraemia. Results: Out of 1603 episodes of bacteraemia, 227(35.6 percent) were caused by E.coli, of which 98(43.2 percent) were multidrug-resistant. In multivariable analysis, age less than 18 years (adjusted odds ratio 3.92; 95 percent confidence interval 1.43-10.68), presence of central venous catheter (adjusted odds ratio 2.12; 95 percent confidence interval 1.04-4.33) and exposure to piperacillin/tazobactam within 90 days prior to infection (adjusted odds ratio 2.37; 95 percent confidence interval 1.15-4.86) were identified as independent risk factors for acquisition of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli bacteraemia. The overall 30 day mortality rate was 35.2 percent (80/227). Risk factors for mortality were intensive care unit admission (adjusted odds ratio 3.95; 95 percent confidence interval 1.79-8.71) and profound neutropenia (adjusted odds ratio 4.03; 95 percent confidence interval 1.55-10.49). Conclusion: Bloodstream infections with multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli were common in cancer patients. However it was not a predictor of mortality. (author)

  14. Cancer Vaccine Composed of Oligonucleotides Conjugated to Apoptotic Tumor Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing unmethylated Cytosine-Guanine (CpG) motifs mimic the immunostimulatory activity of bacterial DNA. CpG ODN directly stimulate B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), promote the production of T Helper 1 cells (Th1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and  trigger the maturation/activation of professional antigen presenting cells. The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, seeks interested parties to co- develop methods for inducing an immune response to tumors.

  15. Stem-Like Memory T Cells Are Discovered | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    T cells are the white blood cells that are the body’s first line of attack against foreign invaders.  When designing immunotherapies to treat cancer the goal is to prolong the immune response of T cells a bit beyond what the body normally does when a bacterium or a virus is encountered.   Nicholas P. Restifo, M.D., working with Luca Gattinoni, M.D., and other colleagues in CCR’s Surgery Branch recently discovered a subset within the human T cell population that may help clinicians to do just  this.

  16. Identifying Stem-like Cells Using Mitochondrial Membrane Potential | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapies that are based on living cells promise to improve treatments for metastatic cancer and for many degenerative diseases. Lasting treatment of these maladies may require the durable persistence of cells. Long-term engraftment of cells – for months or years – and the generation of large numbers of progeny are characteristics of stem cells. Most approaches to isolate viable hematopoetic stem cells and therapeutically active T cells are based on immunophenotyping using highly multicolored flow cytometry. However, these methods do not directly measure the metabolic features of cells, which are known to be important in predicting cell fate.

  17. Histone Modification Associated with Initiation of DNA Replication | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before cells are able to divide, they must first duplicate their chromosomes accurately. DNA replication and packaging of DNA into chromosomes by histone proteins need to be coordinated by the cell to ensure proper transmission of genetic and epigenetic information to the next generation. Mammalian DNA replication begins at specific chromosomal sites, called replication origins, which are located throughout the genome. The replication origins are tightly regulated to start replication only once per cell division so that genomic stability is maintained and cancer development is prevented.

  18. [Concrete pain prevention measures regarding hospital internal transport in a cancer center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbak, Jean-Marie; Vignozzi, Annick; Bussy, Catherine; Charleux, Diane; Laplanche, Agnès; Mathivon, Delphine; Di Palma, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Iatrogenic pain is a common problem for cancer patients, including those due to hospital internal transport. An original prospective study conducted in 2006 allowed risk factor identification, and from 2007, a pluri-annual progress plan was implemented. Its actions were systematically evaluated and all phases of transportation reconsidered: preparation, patient transport to and care in medicotechnical units. Measures applied to anticipate these pains help improve the quality of hospital care. All professionals involved in the patient transportation system need to be made aware of this and not only hospital porters.

  19. Tissue Architecture and Microenvironment Sustain Hormone Signaling | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cells interact with their environments in part through protein receptors embedded in the cell membrane. Activation of a receptor by external signaling molecules sets off a complex chain of events within the cell that can result in alterations in protein structure and function and/or changes in gene expression. Proper integration of these signals is crucial for normal cell growth and development. A more complete understanding of these normal processes will help elucidate how aberrant signaling results in diseases such as cancer.  

  20. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, is Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. McNeill's research is on the elimination of cancer-related health disparities in minority populations. Her research has particular emphasis on understanding the influence of social contextual determinants of cancer in minorities, with a special focus of the role of physical activity as a key preventive behavior and obesity as a major cancer determinant. Her research takes place in minority and underserved communities such as public housing developments, black churches, community-based clinics and low-income neighborhoods-communities with excess cancer death rates. She has been continuously funded, receiving grants from various funding agencies (i.e., National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, etc.), to better understand and design innovative solutions to address obesity in racial/ethnic minority communities. Dr. McNeill is PI of several community-based studies, primarily working with African American churches. One is a called Project CHURCH, an academic-faith-based partnership established to: 1) identify underlying reasons for health disparities in cancer and cancer risk factors (e.g., screening, diet) among AAs using a cohort study (N=2400), 2) engage AAs as partners in the research process, and 3) to ultimately eliminate disparities among AAs. In 2014 Dr. McNeill furthered her partnership through the Faith, Health, and Family (FHF) Collaborative. The goals of FHF are to enhance the Project CHURCH partnership to address family obesity in African Americans, strengthen the partnership by developing a larger coalition of organizations and stakeholders to address the problem, assess church and community interest in family obesity and develop an agenda to address obesity in faith settings. To date we have 50 churches as members. Dr. McNeill is also director of the Center for Community

  1. Direct observation of Anderson localization of matter waves in a controlled disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billy, Juliette; Josse, Vincent; Zuo, Zhanchun; Bernard, Alain; Hambrecht, Ben; Lugan, Pierre; Clément, David; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

    2008-06-12

    In 1958, Anderson predicted the localization of electronic wavefunctions in disordered crystals and the resulting absence of diffusion. It is now recognized that Anderson localization is ubiquitous in wave physics because it originates from the interference between multiple scattering paths. Experimentally, localization has been reported for light waves, microwaves, sound waves and electron gases. However, there has been no direct observation of exponential spatial localization of matter waves of any type. Here we observe exponential localization of a Bose-Einstein condensate released into a one-dimensional waveguide in the presence of a controlled disorder created by laser speckle. We operate in a regime of pure Anderson localization, that is, with weak disorder-such that localization results from many quantum reflections of low amplitude-and an atomic density low enough to render interactions negligible. We directly image the atomic density profiles as a function of time, and find that weak disorder can stop the expansion and lead to the formation of a stationary, exponentially localized wavefunction-a direct signature of Anderson localization. We extract the localization length by fitting the exponential wings of the profiles, and compare it to theoretical calculations. The power spectrum of the one-dimensional speckle potentials has a high spatial frequency cutoff, causing exponential localization to occur only when the de Broglie wavelengths of the atoms in the expanding condensate are greater than an effective mobility edge corresponding to that cutoff. In the opposite case, we find that the density profiles decay algebraically, as predicted in ref. 13. The method presented here can be extended to localization of atomic quantum gases in higher dimensions, and with controlled interactions.

  2. Comment on Theory of impure superconductors: Anderson versus Abrikosov and Gor'kov''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrikosov, A.A. (Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); Gor' kov, L.P. (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States) L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1994-05-01

    A response is given to a criticism in a paper by Kim and Overhauser of an earlier work by Abrikosov and Gor'kov on superconductors with impurities. The criticism is based on a primitive misunderstanding of the nature of the attraction of electrons achieved by phonons. As it was explained by the present authors in several publications, there exists a complete equivalence of their results with the later work by Anderson.

  3. Adaptive and self-averaging Thouless-Anderson-Palmer mean-field theory for probabilistic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opper, Manfred; Winther, Ole

    2001-01-01

    We develop a generalization of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) mean-field approach of disorder physics. which makes the method applicable to the computation of approximate averages in probabilistic models for real data. In contrast to the conventional TAP approach, where the knowledge of the d...... distributions in the thermodynamic limit. On the other hand, simulations on a real data model demonstrate that the method achieves more accurate predictions as compared to conventional TAP approaches....

  4. ALONE, UNARMED, AND UNAFRAID OVER CUBA: THE STORY OF MAJOR RUDY ANDERSON

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    invasion which would include the use of US 2 Ted Shelton, “The Major Flew Into the Page of History ...President worried aloud that any type of retaliatory airstrike would spiral into a global nuclear war: “It isn’t the first step that concerns me...yes sir”12 and official SAC history and USAF accounts of the crisis gave Heyser and Anderson equal credit for taking the first photos.13

  5. Simplified parquet equations for the Anderson impurity model: comparison with numerically exact solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Vladislav; Žonda, M.; Kauch, Anna; Janiš, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 4 (2017), s. 1042-1044 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14259S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Anderson model * parquet equations * numerical renormalization group Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.469, year: 2016

  6. Building a CAR Garage: Preparing for the Delivery of Commercial CAR T Cell Products at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Karlo; Curran, Kevin J; Brentjens, Renier J; Giralt, Sergio A

    2018-03-01

    Two commercial chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies for CD19-expressing B cell malignancies, Kymriah and Yescarta, have recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The administration of CAR T cells is a complex endeavor involving cell manufacture, tracking and shipping of apheresis products, and management of novel and severe toxicities. At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, we have identified 8 essential tasks that define the CAR T cell workflow. In this review, we discuss practical aspects of CAR T cell program development, including clinical, administrative, and regulatory challenges for successful implementation. Copyright © 2018 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Observation of the Quantum-Anomalous-Hall Insulator to Anderson Insulator Quantum Phase Transition in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Li, Jian; Jain, J. K.; Liu, Chaoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Chan, Moses H. W.

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect can be considered as the quantum Hall (QH) effect without external magnetic field, which can be realized by time reversal symmetry breaking in a topologically non-trivial system, and in thin films of magnetically-doped TI. A QAH system carries spin-polarized dissipationless chiral edge transport channels without the need for external energy input, hence may have huge impact on future electronic and spintronic device applications for ultralow-power consumption. The observation of QAH effect has opened up exciting new physics and thus understanding the physical nature of this novel topological quantum state, can lead to a rapid development of this field. In this talk, we will report our recent progress about the experimental observation of a quantum phase transition from a quantum-anomalous-Hall (QAH) insulator to an Anderson insulator by tuning the chemical potential, and finally discuss the existence of scaling behavior for this quantum phase transition. Work Supported by funding from NSF (DMR-1207469), NSF (DMR-0819762) (MIT MRSEC), ONR (N00014-13-1-0301), and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF Grant DMR-1231319.

  8. Electronic structure of vitamin B12 within the framework of the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine C63H88CoN14O14P) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. Here, our purpose is to understand the many-body effects originating from the transition-metal impurity. In this approach, the cobalt 3 d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host which consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the electronic structure of the molecule. The quantum Monte Carlo technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective Haldane-Anderson model for vitamin B12. We find that new states form inside the semiconductor gap due to the on-site Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals and that these states become the highest occupied molecular orbitals. In addition, we present results on the charge distribution and spin correlations around the Co atom. We compare the results of this approach with those obtained by the density-functional theory calculations.

  9. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Carlos Jaña Neto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo-Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive; presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score index; mortality rate; and infection rate. RESULTS: 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%. Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75% and IIIB (25% predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. CONCLUSION: The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions.

  10. Investigation of Anderson lattice behavior in Yb1-xLuxAl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, E.D.; Booth, C.H.; Lawrence, J.M.; Hundley, M.F.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Riseborough, P.S.; Ebihara, T.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of magnetic susceptibility χ(T), specific heat C(T), Hall coefficient R H (T), and Yb valence ν = 2 + n f [f-occupation number n f (T) determined from Yb L 3 x-ray absorption measurements] were carried out on single crystals of Yb 1-x Lu x Al 3 . The low temperature anomalies observed in χ(T) and C(T) corresponding to an energy scale T coh ∼ 40 K in the intermediate valence, Kondo lattice compound YbAl 3 are suppressed by Lu concentrations as small as 5% suggesting these low-T anomalies are extremely sensitive to disorder and, therefore, are a true coherence effect. By comparing the temperature dependence of various physical quantities to the predictions of the Anderson Impurity Model, the slow crossover behavior observed in YbAl 3 , in which the data evolve from a low-temperature coherent, Fermi-liquid regime to a high temperature local moment regime more gradually than predicted by the Anderson Impurity Model, appears to evolve to fast crossover behavior at x ∼ 0.7 where the evolution is more rapid than predicted. These two phenomena found in Yb 1-x Lu x Al 3 , i.e., the low-T anomalies and the slow/fast crossover behavior are discussed in relation to recent theories of the Anderson lattice

  11. Adjusting a cancer mortality-prediction model for disease status-related eligibility criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmel Marek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Volunteering participants in disease studies tend to be healthier than the general population partially due to specific enrollment criteria. Using modeling to accurately predict outcomes of cohort studies enrolling volunteers requires adjusting for the bias introduced in this way. Here we propose a new method to account for the effect of a specific form of healthy volunteer bias resulting from imposing disease status-related eligibility criteria, on disease-specific mortality, by explicitly modeling the length of the time interval between the moment when the subject becomes ineligible for the study, and the outcome. Methods Using survival time data from 1190 newly diagnosed lung cancer patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center, we model the time from clinical lung cancer diagnosis to death using an exponential distribution to approximate the length of this interval for a study where lung cancer death serves as the outcome. Incorporating this interval into our previously developed lung cancer risk model, we adjust for the effect of disease status-related eligibility criteria in predicting the number of lung cancer deaths in the control arm of CARET. The effect of the adjustment using the MD Anderson-derived approximation is compared to that based on SEER data. Results Using the adjustment developed in conjunction with our existing lung cancer model, we are able to accurately predict the number of lung cancer deaths observed in the control arm of CARET. Conclusions The resulting adjustment was accurate in predicting the lower rates of disease observed in the early years while still maintaining reasonable prediction ability in the later years of the trial. This method could be used to adjust for, or predict the duration and relative effect of any possible biases related to disease-specific eligibility criteria in modeling studies of volunteer-based cohorts.

  12. Building a protocol expressway: the case of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJoynt, Terre A; Hirzallah, Muhanad A; Satele, Daniel V; Pitzen, Jason H; Alberts, Steven R; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2009-08-10

    Inconsistencies and errors resulting from nonstandard processes, together with redundancies, rework, and excess workload, lead to extended time frames for clinical trial protocol development. This results in dissatisfaction among sponsors, investigators, and staff and restricts the availability of novel treatment options for patients. A team of experts from Mayo Clinic formed, including Protocol Development Unit staff and management from the three Mayo Clinic campuses (Florida, Minnesota, and Arizona), a systems and procedures analyst, a quality office analyst, and two physician members to address the identified deficiencies. The current-state process was intensively reviewed, and improvement steps were taken to accelerate the development and approval of cancer-related clinical trials. The primary goal was to decrease the time from receipt of a new protocol through submission to an approving authority, such as the National Cancer Institute or institutional review board. Using the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) framework infused with Lean waste-reduction methodologies, areas were identified for improvement, including enhancing first-time quality and processing new studies on a first-in/first-out basis. The project was successful in improving the mean turnaround time for internally authored protocols (P Lean methodologies is an effective tool to structure the definition, planning, analysis, and implementation of significant process changes.

  13. An algorithmic approach to perineal reconstruction after cancer resection--experience from two international centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Hannah Eliza; Jessop, Zita Maria; Di Candia, Michele; Simcock, Jeremy; Durrani, Amer J; Malata, Charles M

    2013-07-01

    This paper aims to simplify the approach to reconstruction of the perineum after resection of malignancies of the anal canal, lower rectum, vulva, and vagina. The data were collected from 2 centers, namely, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom and Christchurch Hospital, University of Otago, New Zealand. All patients who underwent perineal reconstruction from 1997 to 2009 at Christchurch Hospital (13 years) and 2001 to 2009 at Addenbrooke's Hospital (9 years) were included. The diagnosis (indication), primary surgery, reconstructive surgery, complications, tumor outcomes (recurrence and survival), and follow-up were entered into a database (Microsoft Excel; Redmond, Wash). The incidence of previous radiotherapy, requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy, and length of inpatient stay were also recorded. Forty-six patients were identified for this study--13 in New Zealand and 33 in Cambridge. Indications for perineal reconstruction included resection of anal and rectal malignancies (24), vulval and vaginal malignancy (19), perineal sarcoma (1), and perineal squamous cell carcinoma arising in an enterocutaneous fistula (Table 1). The reconstructive strategies adopted included rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps (26), gluteal fold flaps (9), gracilis V-Y or advancement flaps (7) and others (4), gluteal rotation flaps (1), local flap (2), and free latissimus dorsi flaps (1). Although various surgeons performed the reconstructive surgeries at 2 different centers, the essential approach remained the same. Smaller defects were best treated by local flaps, whereas the rectus abdominis flap remained the standard option for larger defects that additionally required closure of dead space. On the basis of our 2 center experience, we propose a simple algorithm to facilitate the planning of reconstructive surgery for the perineum.

  14. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer: an update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J; Fury, Matthew G; Pfister, David G; Wong, Richard J; Shah, Jatin P; Kraus, Dennis H; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D; Gelblum, Daphna Y; Rao, Shyam D; Lee, Nancy Y

    2012-01-01

    To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia ≥Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  16. Determining the Incidence of Pain Flare Following Palliative Radiotherapy for Symptomatic Bone Metastases: Results From Three Canadian Cancer Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hird, Amanda; Chow, Edward; Zhang Liying; Wong, Rebecca; Wu, Jackson; Sinclair, Emily; Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Loblaw, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare following radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Materials and Methods: Patients with bone metastases treated with RT were eligible. Worst pain scores and analgesic consumption were collected before, daily during, and for 10 days after treatment. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in the worst pain score (0-10) compared to baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, or a 25% increase in analgesic intake with no decrease in worst pain score. Pain flare was distinguished from progression of pain by requiring the worst pain score and analgesic intake return to baseline levels after the increase/flare (within the 10-day follow-up period). Results: A total of 111 patients from three cancer centers were evaluable. There were 50 male and 61 female patients with a median age of 62 years (range, 40-89 years). The primary cancers were mainly breast, lung, and prostate. Most patients received a single 8 Gy (64%) or 20 Gy in five fractions (25%). The overall pain flare incidence was 44/111 (40%) during RT and within 10 days following the completion of RT. Patients treated with a single 8 Gy reported a pain flare incidence of 39% (27/70) and, with multiple fractions, 41% (17/41). Conclusion: More than one third of the enrolled patients experienced a pain flare. Identifying at-risk individuals and managing potential pain flares is crucial to achieve an optimal level of care.

  17. [Organisational diagnosis of a home care-coordinating unit in oncology: which choices for the comprehensive cancer center of Lyon?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Chvetzoff, Roland; Devaux, Yves; Teil, A; Chalencon, J; Lancry, L; Kante, V; Poncelas, C; Sontag, P; Tretiakoff, C; Philip, T

    2006-10-01

    Lyon comprehensive cancer center developed a home care-coordinating unit (HCCU) allowing a wide range of cancer care at home. We present the results of an organisational and strategical analysis of the unit, in relation with internal and external contexts. We describe the functioning of the unit, modelled from the daily follow-up of professionnels. Patient discharge is initiated by the oncologist at the inpatient clinic, at the day-hospital or at outpatient visit. After consent of the patient and relatives, the HCCU (nurses and medical oncologists) evaluates patient's needs, organises hospital discharge (contacts with community nurses and general practitioner, supply of medical appliances and drugs), and provides follow-up and counselling to patient and caregivers. The HCCU works in a challenging environment, with both partners and competitors. Within the hospital, it collaborates with all other units. Outside the hospital, partners are, besides patients themselves; general practitioners and community nurses home care agencies and network services, private medical appliance providers, and public health authorities. The unit might evolve towards formal home hospitalisation or community-hospital network. Collaboration of both structure closely associated with hospital could allow to provide continuous and graduated care by the same caregivers even if administrative structures change.

  18. Effectiveness of fentanyl transdermal patch (fentanyl-TTS, durogegic) for radiotherapy induced pain and cancer pain: multi-center trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fentanyl-TTS in the management of radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. Our study was open labelled prospective phase IV multi-center study, the study population included patients with more 4 numeric rating scale (NRS) score pain although managed with other analgesics or more than 6 NRS score pain without analgesics. Patients divided into two groups: patients with radiotherapy induced pain (Group A) and patients with cancer pain treated with radiotherapy (Group B). All patients received 25 ug/hr of fentanyl transdermal patch. Primary end point was pain relief: second end points were change in patient quality of life, a degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician, side effects. Between March 2005 and June 2005, 312 patients from 26 participating institutes were registered, but 249 patients completed this study. Total number of patients in each group was 185 in Group A, 64 in Group B. Mean age was 60 years and male to female ratio was 76:24. Severe pain NRS score at 2 weeks after the application of fentanyl was decreased from 7.03 to 4.01, {rho} = 0.003. There was a significant improvement in insomnia, social functioning, and quality of life. A degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician was very high. The most common reasons of patients' satisfactions was good pain control. Ninety six patients reported side effect. Nausea was the most common side effect. There was no serious side effect. Fentanyl-TTS was effective in both relieving pain with good tolerability and improving the quality of life for patients with radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. The satisfaction of the patients and doctors was good. There wa no major side effect.

  19. Effectiveness of fentanyl transdermal patch (fentanyl-TTS, durogegic) for radiotherapy induced pain and cancer pain: multi-center trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Huh, Seung Jae

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fentanyl-TTS in the management of radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. Our study was open labelled prospective phase IV multi-center study, the study population included patients with more 4 numeric rating scale (NRS) score pain although managed with other analgesics or more than 6 NRS score pain without analgesics. Patients divided into two groups: patients with radiotherapy induced pain (Group A) and patients with cancer pain treated with radiotherapy (Group B). All patients received 25 ug/hr of fentanyl transdermal patch. Primary end point was pain relief: second end points were change in patient quality of life, a degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician, side effects. Between March 2005 and June 2005, 312 patients from 26 participating institutes were registered, but 249 patients completed this study. Total number of patients in each group was 185 in Group A, 64 in Group B. Mean age was 60 years and male to female ratio was 76:24. Severe pain NRS score at 2 weeks after the application of fentanyl was decreased from 7.03 to 4.01, ρ = 0.003. There was a significant improvement in insomnia, social functioning, and quality of life. A degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician was very high. The most common reasons of patients' satisfactions was good pain control. Ninety six patients reported side effect. Nausea was the most common side effect. There was no serious side effect. Fentanyl-TTS was effective in both relieving pain with good tolerability and improving the quality of life for patients with radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. The satisfaction of the patients and doctors was good. There wa no major side effect

  20. Racial Differences in Information Needs During and After Cancer Treatment: a Nationwide, Longitudinal Survey by the University of Rochester Cancer Center National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Matthew; Peppone, Luke J; Roscoe, Joseph A; Kleckner, Ian R; Mustian, Karen M; Heckler, Charles E; Guido, Joseph J; Sborov, Mark; Bushunow, Peter; Onitilo, Adedayo; Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Before treatment, cancer patients need information about side effects and prognosis, while after treatment they need information to transition to survivorship. Research documenting these needs is limited, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. This study evaluated cancer patients' needs according to race both before and after treatment. We compared white (n = 904) to black (n = 52) patients receiving treatment at 17 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites on their cancer-related concerns and need for information before and after cancer treatment. Two-sample t test and chi-squared analyses were used to assess group differences. Compared to white patients, black patients reported significantly higher concerns about diet (44.3 vs. 25.4 %,) and exercise (40.4 vs. 19.7 %,) during the course of treatment. Compared to whites, blacks also had significantly higher concern about treatment-related issues (white vs. black mean, 25.52 vs. 31.78), self-image issues (7.03 vs. 8.60), family-related issues (10.44 vs. 12.84), and financial concerns (6.42 vs. 8.90, all p information needs regarding follow-up tests (8.17 vs. 9.44), stress management (4.12 vs. 4.89), and handling stigma after cancer treatment (4.21 vs. 4.89) [all p information needs differed by race, with black patients reporting greater information needs and concerns. In clinical practice, tailored approaches may work particularly well in addressing the needs and concerns of black patients.

  1. Facing spousal cancer during child-rearing years: The short-term effects of the Cancer-PEPSONE programme-a single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senneseth, Mette; Dyregrov, Atle; Laberg, Jon; Matthiesen, Stig B; Pereira, Mariana; Hauken, May A

    2017-10-01

    To measure the short-term effects of the Cancer-PEPSONE programme (CPP) on the partners' received and perceived social support, psychological distress, and quality of life (QOL), as well as explore the role of received social support as a mediator of the intervention effects. Open single-center randomized controlled trial, trial number 15982171(ISRCTN). Eligible participants were the partners of cancer patients who were concomitantly caring for minors (the well parents). The sample consisted of 35 participants randomly allocated to receive either intervention (n = 17) or support as usual (n = 18). At the 3-month follow-up (approximately 1 month after intervention), 24 continued to participate (intervention n = 13, control n = 11). The intervention group selected supporters to participate in CPP (N = 130). Data were obtained using validated questionnaire. The multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significant intervention effects (P = .03, η 2 p  = 0.42), with main effects on received and perceived social support. A mediational analysis suggested that CPP may have indirect effects on QOL through received social support. Even though the long-term effects are yet to be studied, CPP seems to increase social support for the well parents' short term, which in turn may improve their QOL. Given the study's low sample size, further replications in larger samples are required. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocvirk, Janja; Moltara, Maja Ebert; Mesti, Tanja; Boc, Marko; Rebersek, Martina; Volk, Neva; Benedik, Jernej; Hlebanja, Zvezdana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer. The registry of patients with mCRC was designed to prospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy as well as selection of patients in routine clinical practice. Patient baseline clinical characteristics, pre-specified bevacizumab-related adverse events, and efficacy data were collected, evaluated and compared according to the age categories. Between January 2008 and December 2010, 210 patients with mCRC (median age 63, male 61.4%) started bevacizumab-containing therapy in the 1 st line setting. Majority of the 210 patients received irinotecan-based chemotherapy (68%) as 1 st line treatment and 105 patients (50%) received bevacizumab maintenance therapy. Elderly (≥ 70 years) patients presented 22.9% of all patients and they had worse performance status (PS 1/2, 62.4%) than patients in < 70 years group (PS 1/2, 35.8%). Difference in disease control rate was mainly due to inability to assess response in elderly group (64.6% in elderly and 77.8% in < 70 years group, p = 0.066). The median progression free survival was 10.2 (95% CI, 6.7–16.2) and 11.3 (95% CI, 10.2–12.6) months in elderly and < 70 years group, respectively (p = 0.58). The median overall survival was 18.5 (95% CI, 12.4–28.9) and 27.4 (95% CI, 22.7–31.9) months for elderly and < 70 years group, respectively (p = 0.03). Three-year survival rate was 26% and 37.6% in elderly vs. < 70 years group (p = 0.03). Overall rates of bevacizumab-related adverse events were similar in both groups: proteinuria 21

  3. Change in Management Based on Pathologic Second Opinion Among Bladder Cancer Patients Presenting to a Comprehensive Cancer Center: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchey, Adam M; Manimala, Neil J; Dickinson, Shohreh; Dhillon, Jasreman; Agarwal, Gautum; Lockhart, Jorge L; Spiess, Philippe E; Sexton, Wade J; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Gilbert, Scott M; Poch, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the incidence and degree of change from a pathologic second opinion of bladder biopsies at a Comprehensive Cancer Center that were initially performed at referring community hospitals. The secondary objective was to determine the impact the potential changes would have on a patient's treatment. Dedicated genitourinary pathologists reviewed 1191 transurethral biopsies of the bladder and/or prostatic urethra from 2008 to 2013. Major and minor treatment changes were defined as altering recommendations for cystectomy, systemic chemotherapy, or primary cancer diagnosis, and alterations in intravesical regimens, respectively. There were 326/1191 patients (27.4%) with a pathologic change on second opinion: grade (62/1191, 5.2%), stage (115/1191, 9.7%), muscle in the specimen (29/1191, 2.4%), presence or absence of carcinoma in situ (34/1191, 2.9%). Outside pathology did not address the presence or absence of lymphovascular invasion in 620/759 (81.7%) of invasive cases (≥cT1), of which 35/620 (5.6%) had lymphovascular invasion. There were 212 mixed, variant, or nonurothelial histologies detected in 199/1191 (16.7%) patients, with 114/212 (53.7%) resulting in reclassification by our pathologists. Potential treatment alterations accounted for 182/1191 (15.3%) of cases, with 141/1191 (11.8%) imparting major changes. There were 82/1191 (6.8%) changes in recommendation for a radical cystectomy, 38/1191 (3.2%) had a complete change in primary tumor type, and 21/1191 (1.8%) for change in chemotherapy regimen. The amount and degree of pathologic changes and its potential impact on treatment emphasize the importance of bladder cancer patients having their histology reviewed by genitourinary-dedicated pathologists. In our cohort, 15.3% of patients could see a treatment alteration, with 11.8% being a major change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CA-125–indicated asymptomatic relapse confers survival benefit to ovarian cancer patients who underwent secondary cytoreduction surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus regarding the management of ovarian cancer patients, who have shown complete clinical response (CCR to primary therapy and have rising cancer antigen CA-125 levels but have no symptoms of recurrent disease. The present study aims to determine whether follow-up CA-125 levels can be used to identify the need for imaging studies and secondary cytoreductive surgery (CRS. Methods We identified 410 ovarian cancer patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1984 and 2011. These patients had shown CCR to primary therapy. Follow-up was conducted based on the surveillance protocol of the MD Anderson Cancer Center. We used the Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test to assess the associations between the follow-up CA-125 levels and secondary CRS and survival duration. Results The CA-125 level of 1.68 × nadir was defined as the indicator of recurrent disease (p  1.68 × nadir at relapse (55.7 and 10.4 months; p = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively. The overall and progression free survival duration of patients with asymptomatic relapse and underwent a secondary CRS was longer than that of patients with symptomatic relapse (p = 0.02 and 0.04 respectively. Conclusions The increase of serum CA-125 levels is an early warning of clinical relapse in ovarian cancer. Using CA-125 levels in guiding the treatment of patients with asymptomatic recurrent ovarian cancer, who have shown CCR to primary therapy, can facilitate optimal secondary CRS and extend the survival duration of the patients.

  5. Changes in Bacteria Induce Inflammatory Skin Diseases | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that manifests as dry skin with a relentless itch and eczema. AD is considered an allergic disease in which the skin inflammation manifests in response to chronic exposure to contact allergens. However, identification of a responsible allergen is uncommon. Meanwhile, analyses have demonstrated that the surface of the human body is colonized by large numbers of diverse bacteria. This observation has led researchers to examine the roles these bacteria play in healthy and diseased skin. In a variety of genetic and chronic inflammatory skin diseases, including in patients with AD or with cancer who receive epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, Staphylococcus aureus and Corynebacterium species are the predominant bacteria isolated from the skin. However, the cause-and-effect relationship between this microbial imbalance and skin inflammation has not been determined.

  6. Profile of malignant spinal cord compression: One year study at regional cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Results: Most of the patients were in the age group of 41–60 years and there was no gender preponderance in patients. Female breast cancer was the most common incident (15.5% malignancy followed by multiple myeloma, lung, and prostatic carcinoma. Lower dorsal spine was the most common site of compression (35% followed by lumbar (31% and mid-dorsal (26% spine. 70 (91% patients had cord compression subsequent to bone metastasis while as other patients had leptomeningeal metastasis. In 31 (40% patients, spinal cord compression was the presenting symptom. Overall, only 26 patients had motor improvement after treatment. Conclusion: Grade of power before treatment was predictive of response to treatment and overall outcome of motor or sensory functions. Neurodeficit of more than 10 days duration was associated with poor outcome in neurological function.

  7. Notable Expressions: Transcriptional Regulation from Biochemistry to Immunology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinah Singer, Ph.D., came to NCI in 1975 as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Laboratory of Biochemistry, but soon created a career for herself in the Experimental Immunology Branch. Her interest in how genes are regulated to control biological function led her to focus on major histocompatibility complex class I genes (MHC Class I)—molecules critical to immune system function—as a model system for complex regulation of ubiquitously expressed genes across cell types and molecular contexts. Using this system to study the sequence elements and factors that control transcription, her laboratory continues to uncover fundamental principles of gene regulation. In addition to her active research career, Singer has served since 1999 as Director of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, which manages a portfolio of over 2,200 grants to extramural investigators.

  8. Blocking Glycolytic Metabolism Increases Memory T Cells and Antitumor Function | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CD8+ T cells are a major component of the cellular immune response, which is necessary to control a variety of bacterial and viral infections. CD8+ T cells also play a major role in the cell-mediated antitumor immune response. After encountering antigen, naïve CD8+ T cells undergo an extensive period of proliferation and expansion, and differentiate into effector cells and distinct memory T cell subsets. Preclinical studies using adoptive transfer of purified CD8+ T cells have shown that the ability of T cells to proliferate and survive for a long time after transfer is associated with effective antitumor and antiviral responses. Understanding how the formation of long-lived memory T cell subsets is controlled may enable development of more potent immunotherapies against cancer and infectious diseases.

  9. Bioengineering/Biophysicist Post-doctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A post-doctoral fellow position is available in the Tissue Morphodynamics Unit headed by Dr. Kandice Tanner at the National Cancer Institute. The Tanner lab combines biophysical and cell biological approaches to understand the interplay between tissue architecture and metastasis. We use a combination of imaging modalities, cell biology and animal models. It is expected that as a member of this lab, one will have an opportunity to be exposed to all these areas. We value a vibrant and collaborative environment where lab members share ideas, reagents and expertise and want to work on fundamental problems in the establishment of metastatic lesions. Our lab is located in the NIH main campus in Bethesda. The research facilities at NIH are outstanding and the lab has state-of-the-art equipment such as multi-photon and confocal microscopes, FACS facilities and animal vivarium.

  10. Urinary bladder cancer risk factors in Egypt: a multi-center case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun-Ling; Amr, Sania; Saleh, Doa’a A.; Dash, Chiranjeev; Ezzat, Sameera; Mikhail, Nabiel N.; Gouda, Iman; Loay, Iman; Hifnawy, Tamer; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Khaled, Hussein; Wolpert, Beverly; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed A.; Loffredo, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated associations between tobacco exposure, history of schistosomiasis and bladder cancer risk in Egypt. Methods We analyzed data from a case-control study (1,886 newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed cases and 2,716 age-, gender-, and residence-matched, population-based controls). Using logistic regression we estimated the covariate-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of the associations. Results Among men, cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk of urothelial carcinoma (UC) (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.4, 2.2), but not squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); smoking both waterpipes and cigarettes was associated with an even greater risk for UC (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 2.1, 3.9) and a statistically significant risk for SCC (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.6). Among non-smoking men and women, to environmental tobacco smoke exposure was associated with an increased risk of UC. History of schistosomiasis was associated with increased risk of both UC (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.9) and SCC (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.0) in women and to a lesser extent (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.7 and OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.7, for UC and SCC respectively) in men. Conclusions The results suggest that schistosomiasis and tobacco smoking increase the risk of both SCC and UC. Impact This study provides new evidence for associations between bladder cancer subtypes and schistosomiasis, and suggests that smoking both cigarettes and waterpipes increases the risk for SCC and UC in Egyptian men. PMID:22147365

  11. Radiation Therapy Noncompliance and Clinical Outcomes in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce D. [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Garg, Madhur, E-mail: mgarg@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To examine associations between radiation therapy (RT) noncompliance and clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: We reviewed all patients who completed courses of external beam RT with curative intent in our department from the years 2007 to 2012 for cancers of the head and neck, breast, lung, cervix, uterus, or rectum. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments (excluding planned treatment breaks) were deemed noncompliant. Univariate, multivariable, and propensity-matched analyses were performed to examine associations between RT noncompliance and clinical outcomes. Results: Of 1227 patients, 266 (21.7%) were noncompliant. With median follow-up of 50.9 months, 108 recurrences (8.8%) and 228 deaths (18.6%) occurred. In univariate analyses, RT noncompliance was associated with increased recurrence risk (5-year cumulative incidence 16% vs 7%, P<.001), inferior recurrence-free survival (5-year actuarial rate 63% vs 79%, P<.001), and inferior overall survival (5-year actuarial rate 72% vs 83%, P<.001). In multivariable analyses that were adjusted for disease site and stage, comorbidity score, gender, ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic status (SES), RT noncompliance was associated with inferior recurrence, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates. Propensity score–matched models yielded results nearly identical to those seen in univariate analyses. Low SES was associated with RT noncompliance and was associated with inferior clinical outcomes in univariate analyses, but SES was not associated with inferior outcomes in multivariable models. Conclusion: For cancer patients being treated with curative intent, RT noncompliance is associated with inferior clinical outcomes. The magnitudes of these effects demonstrate that RT noncompliance can serve as a behavioral biomarker to identify high-risk patients who require additional interventions. Treatment compliance may mediate the associations that have been observed linking SES and

  12. Compliance and toxicity of adjuvant CMF in elderly breast cancer patients: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Maio, Ermelinda; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Morrica, Brunello; Elmo, Massimo; Di Maio, Massimo; Perrone, Francesco; Matteis, Andrea de; Gravina, Adriano; Pacilio, Carmen; Amabile, Gerardo; Labonia, Vincenzo; Landi, Gabriella; Nuzzo, Francesco; Rossi, Emanuela; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Few data are available on compliance and safety of adjuvant chemotherapy when indicated in elderly breast cancer patients; CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, fluorouracil) can be reasonably considered the most widely accepted standard of treatment. We retrospectively reviewed compliance and safety of adjuvant CMF in patients older than 60. The treatment was indicated if patients had no severe comorbidity, a high-risk of recurrence, and were younger than 75. Toxicity was coded by NCI-CTC. Toxicity and compliance were compared between two age subgroups (<65, ≥ 65) by Fisher exact test and exact Wilcoxon rank-sum test. From March 1991 to March 2002, 180 patients were identified, 100 older than 60 and younger than 65, and 80 aged 65 or older. Febrile neutropenia was more frequent among older patients (p = 0.05). Leukopenia, neutropenia, nausea, cardiac toxicity and thrombophlebitis tended to be more frequent or severe among elderlies, while mucositis tended to be more evident among younger patients, all not significantly. Almost one half (47%) of the older patients receiving concomitant radiotherapy experienced grade 3–4 haematological toxicity. Compliance was similar in the two groups, with 6 cycles administered in 86% and 79%, day-8 chemotherapy omitted at least once in 36% and 39%, dose reduction in 27% and 38%, prolonged treatment duration (≥ 29 weeks) in 10% and 11% and need of G-CSF in 9% and 18%, among younger and older patients, respectively. Our data show that, in a highly selected population of patients 65 or more years old, CMF is as feasible as in patients older than 60 and younger than 65, but with a relevant burden of toxicity. We suggest that prospective trials in elderly patients testing less toxic treatment schemes are mandatory before indicating adjuvant chemotherapy to all elderly patients with significant risk of breast cancer recurrence

  13. Compliance and toxicity of adjuvant CMF in elderly breast cancer patients: a single-center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Ermelinda; Gravina, Adriano; Pacilio, Carmen; Amabile, Gerardo; Labonia, Vincenzo; Landi, Gabriella; Nuzzo, Francesco; Rossi, Emanuela; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Morrica, Brunello; Elmo, Massimo; Di Maio, Massimo; Perrone, Francesco; de Matteis, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Background Few data are available on compliance and safety of adjuvant chemotherapy when indicated in elderly breast cancer patients; CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, fluorouracil) can be reasonably considered the most widely accepted standard of treatment. Methods We retrospectively reviewed compliance and safety of adjuvant CMF in patients older than 60. The treatment was indicated if patients had no severe comorbidity, a high-risk of recurrence, and were younger than 75. Toxicity was coded by NCI-CTC. Toxicity and compliance were compared between two age subgroups (<65, ≥ 65) by Fisher exact test and exact Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results From March 1991 to March 2002, 180 patients were identified, 100 older than 60 and younger than 65, and 80 aged 65 or older. Febrile neutropenia was more frequent among older patients (p = 0.05). Leukopenia, neutropenia, nausea, cardiac toxicity and thrombophlebitis tended to be more frequent or severe among elderlies, while mucositis tended to be more evident among younger patients, all not significantly. Almost one half (47%) of the older patients receiving concomitant radiotherapy experienced grade 3–4 haematological toxicity. Compliance was similar in the two groups, with 6 cycles administered in 86% and 79%, day-8 chemotherapy omitted at least once in 36% and 39%, dose reduction in 27% and 38%, prolonged treatment duration (≥ 29 weeks) in 10% and 11% and need of G-CSF in 9% and 18%, among younger and older patients, respectively. Conclusion Our data show that, in a highly selected population of patients 65 or more years old, CMF is as feasible as in patients older than 60 and younger than 65, but with a relevant burden of toxicity. We suggest that prospective trials in elderly patients testing less toxic treatment schemes are mandatory before indicating adjuvant chemotherapy to all elderly patients with significant risk of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:15790416

  14. Occult invasive cervical cancer after simple hysterectomy: a multi-center retrospective study of 89 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Huilan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yue; Shen, Keng; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Occult invasive cervical cancer (OICC) is sometimes incidentally found in surgical specimens after a simple hysterectomy (SH). This study was aimed at identifying a subset of patients with OICC who have a favorable prognosis. This patient group may not require adjuvant radiotherapy and other procedures. The medical records of women in whom OICC was detected after an inadvertent SH were retrospectively reviewed. The relevant data, including clinicopathological characteristics, treatment and clinical outcome were evaluated. The primary and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS), respectively. Eighty-nine patients who met the inclusion criteria were included for analysis, and the risk of OICC was found to be 1.9 %. Finding an invasive cancer in a hysterectomy specimen after a conization procedure that shows positive margins was the most common reason (41.6 %) for the performance of inadvertent SH. In the univariate analysis, a tumor width > 20 mm, deep stromal invasion, and lymph node metastasis (LNM) were adversely associated with relapse (P < 0.001, < 0.001, and = 0.001, respectively) and survival (P = 0.003, 0.004, and 0.027, respectively), although these parameters were not independently associated with patient prognoses in the multivariate analysis. In patients with a tumor width ≤ 20 mm and superficial stromal invasion in the observation subgroup, the 5-year RFS and 5-year OS were both 100 %, whereas they were 57.1 % and 66.7 %, respectively, in patients with a tumor size > 20 mm and deep stromal invasion in the radiotherapy or chemotherapy subgroup (P < 0.001, and = 0.008, respectively). Simple observation after a lymphadenectomy procedure may be feasible in OICC patients with a tumor width ≤ 20 mm, superficial stromal invasion, a negative section margin in hysterectomy specimens, and no LNM

  15. Combination chemotherapy with Regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment: A single center, retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available Regorafenib has been demonstrated as effective in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination use with chemotherapy has not been reported. We examined the efficacy and safety of adding chemotherapy to Regorafenib for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer(mCRC patients.We recruited mCRC patients at our institute who received either regorafenib monotherapy or regorafenib in combination with other chemotherapies. All patients had received chemo and target therapies and presented with disease progression before regorafenib treatment. The primary end point was overall survival.Between September1, 2015 and May 31, 2017, 100 mCRC patients at our institute received regorafenib treatment. 39 patients were excluded due to poor performance, lack of timely treatment, or inadequate clinical data. A total of 34 patients received regorafenib combined with other chemotherapies, and 27 patients received regorafenib alone. Median follow up time was 10.4 and 6.1 months, respectively. The primary end point of median OS was higher in the combination group than in the single use group (20.9m vs 10.3m, p = 0.015. The most frequent adverse events were hand-foot skin reactions(16[47.1%]vs 12[44.4%], fatigue(6[17.6%] vs 7[25.9%], gastrointestinal discomfort (7[20.6%] vs 6[22.2%], neutropenia (4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%], diarrhea(4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%], and mucositis(5[14.7%] vs 1[3.7%].The present study showed the efficacy and side effects of regorafenib combination treatment. Superiority in median OS and median PFS was noted in the combination group. The sampling difference between the study and observation groups effects justifies the comparison. Further clinical evidence of combination therapy efficacy is pending future studies.

  16. Combination chemotherapy with Regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment: A single center, retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Chen, Chou-Chen; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Chou-Pin

    2018-01-01

    Regorafenib has been demonstrated as effective in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination use with chemotherapy has not been reported. We examined the efficacy and safety of adding chemotherapy to Regorafenib for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer(mCRC) patients. We recruited mCRC patients at our institute who received either regorafenib monotherapy or regorafenib in combination with other chemotherapies. All patients had received chemo and target therapies and presented with disease progression before regorafenib treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Between September1, 2015 and May 31, 2017, 100 mCRC patients at our institute received regorafenib treatment. 39 patients were excluded due to poor performance, lack of timely treatment, or inadequate clinical data. A total of 34 patients received regorafenib combined with other chemotherapies, and 27 patients received regorafenib alone. Median follow up time was 10.4 and 6.1 months, respectively. The primary end point of median OS was higher in the combination group than in the single use group (20.9m vs 10.3m, p = 0.015). The most frequent adverse events were hand-foot skin reactions(16[47.1%]vs 12[44.4%]), fatigue(6[17.6%] vs 7[25.9%]), gastrointestinal discomfort (7[20.6%] vs 6[22.2%]), neutropenia (4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%]), diarrhea(4[11.8%] vs 1[3.7%]), and mucositis(5[14.7%] vs 1[3.7%]). The present study showed the efficacy and side effects of regorafenib combination treatment. Superiority in median OS and median PFS was noted in the combination group. The sampling difference between the study and observation groups effects justifies the comparison. Further clinical evidence of combination therapy efficacy is pending future studies.

  17. Compliance and toxicity of adjuvant CMF in elderly breast cancer patients: a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Massimo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few data are available on compliance and safety of adjuvant chemotherapy when indicated in elderly breast cancer patients; CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, fluorouracil can be reasonably considered the most widely accepted standard of treatment. Methods We retrospectively reviewed compliance and safety of adjuvant CMF in patients older than 60. The treatment was indicated if patients had no severe comorbidity, a high-risk of recurrence, and were younger than 75. Toxicity was coded by NCI-CTC. Toxicity and compliance were compared between two age subgroups ( Results From March 1991 to March 2002, 180 patients were identified, 100 older than 60 and younger than 65, and 80 aged 65 or older. Febrile neutropenia was more frequent among older patients (p = 0.05. Leukopenia, neutropenia, nausea, cardiac toxicity and thrombophlebitis tended to be more frequent or severe among elderlies, while mucositis tended to be more evident among younger patients, all not significantly. Almost one half (47% of the older patients receiving concomitant radiotherapy experienced grade 3–4 haematological toxicity. Compliance was similar in the two groups, with 6 cycles administered in 86% and 79%, day-8 chemotherapy omitted at least once in 36% and 39%, dose reduction in 27% and 38%, prolonged treatment duration (≥ 29 weeks in 10% and 11% and need of G-CSF in 9% and 18%, among younger and older patients, respectively. Conclusion Our data show that, in a highly selected population of patients 65 or more years old, CMF is as feasible as in patients older than 60 and younger than 65, but with a relevant burden of toxicity. We suggest that prospective trials in elderly patients testing less toxic treatment schemes are mandatory before indicating adjuvant chemotherapy to all elderly patients with significant risk of breast cancer recurrence.

  18. Radiation Therapy Noncompliance and Clinical Outcomes in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine associations between radiation therapy (RT) noncompliance and clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: We reviewed all patients who completed courses of external beam RT with curative intent in our department from the years 2007 to 2012 for cancers of the head and neck, breast, lung, cervix, uterus, or rectum. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments (excluding planned treatment breaks) were deemed noncompliant. Univariate, multivariable, and propensity-matched analyses were performed to examine associations between RT noncompliance and clinical outcomes. Results: Of 1227 patients, 266 (21.7%) were noncompliant. With median follow-up of 50.9 months, 108 recurrences (8.8%) and 228 deaths (18.6%) occurred. In univariate analyses, RT noncompliance was associated with increased recurrence risk (5-year cumulative incidence 16% vs 7%, P<.001), inferior recurrence-free survival (5-year actuarial rate 63% vs 79%, P<.001), and inferior overall survival (5-year actuarial rate 72% vs 83%, P<.001). In multivariable analyses that were adjusted for disease site and stage, comorbidity score, gender, ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic status (SES), RT noncompliance was associated with inferior recurrence, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates. Propensity score–matched models yielded results nearly identical to those seen in univariate analyses. Low SES was associated with RT noncompliance and was associated with inferior clinical outcomes in univariate analyses, but SES was not associated with inferior outcomes in multivariable models. Conclusion: For cancer patients being treated with curative intent, RT noncompliance is associated with inferior clinical outcomes. The magnitudes of these effects demonstrate that RT noncompliance can serve as a behavioral biomarker to identify high-risk patients who require additional interventions. Treatment compliance may mediate the associations that have been observed linking SES and

  19. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about cervical and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  20. Uterine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about uterine and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...