WorldWideScience

Sample records for andean uplift ocean

  1. Andean Uplift in the Context of Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Louise; Poulsen, Chris; Ehlers, Todd; Insel, Nadja

    2010-05-01

    between all simulations. However, the presence of the Andes deflects low-level winds, switching the moisture source for Andean precipitation from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean. Surface temperatures in the Andes decrease by up to 26⁰C in response to an increase in elevation from 5% to 100% of modern Andean elevation. This is greater than expected for a 5⁰C/km tropical lapse rate alone, indicating that additional cooling mechanisms are acting on the plateau when the topography is raised. The magnitude of temperature change due to surface uplift is not dependent on CO2 level. The global average temperature of the 4x CO2 simulation is ~6⁰C warmer than the 1x CO2 case. In South America, the location of temperature increase due to elevated CO2 is dependent on the elevation of the Andes, with CO2 concentration having a reduced affect on Andean temperatures at higher elevations. Both Andean elevation and global climate therefore determine South American surface temperatures but Andean elevation is a stronger control on precipitation and low-level wind patterns.

  2. Andean uplift promotes lowland speciation through vicariance and dispersal in Dendrocincla woodcreepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jason T; Price, Momoko

    2011-11-01

    Andean uplift contributed importantly to the build-up of high Neotropical diversity. Final uplift of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia separated once-contiguous lowland faunas east and west of the Andes between 5 and 3.5 million years ago (Ma hereafter). We used DNA sequences from several moderate- to fast-evolving mitochondrial and two slow-evolving nuclear genes to generate a well-supported phylogeny of Dendrocincla woodcreepers, a genus with multiple species endemic to lowland regions both east and west of the Andes. A time-calibrated phylogeny and dispersal-vicariance analysis indicated that uplift of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia resulted in the initial vicariant separation of a widespread lowland form east and west of the Andes at c. 3.6 Ma. This was followed by two separate east-to-west dispersal events over or around the completed Andes, each producing a genetically distinct lineage. Our analysis suggests that Andean uplift promoted the build-up of biodiversity in lowland Neotropical faunas both through vicariance-based speciation during uplift and through dispersal-based speciation following uplift. In contrast to the multiple colonizations of the trans-Andean region by Dendrocincla, the Atlantic Forest was colonized from the Amazon only once, followed by in situ diversification.

  3. How do subduction processes contribute to forearc Andean uplift? Insights from numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinod, J.; Regard, V.; Letourmy, Y.; Henry, H.; Hassani, R.; Baratchart, S.; Carretier, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present numerical models to study how changes in the process of subduction may explain the observed Quaternary uplift of the Andean forearc region. Indeed, most segments of the South American Pacific coasts between 16 and 32° S have been uplifting since the Lower Pleistocene, following a period of stability of the forearc region. Models confirm that local uplift is expected to occur above ridges, this phenomenon being predominant in central Peru where the Nazca Ridge is subducting. We investigate the effects of slab pull, interplate friction and convergence velocity on the vertical displacements of the overriding plate. We propose that the global tendency to coastal uplift is accompanying the deceleration of the Nazca-South America convergence that occurred in the Pleistocene. In contrast, forearc subsidence may accompany increasing convergence velocities, as suggested by the subsidence history of the South America active margin.

  4. Andean uplift and Neogene climate change in the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, J. A.; Currie, B. S.; Jordan, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Today the Andean Cordillera and Altiplano provide a major obstacle to atmospheric circulation over South America. The Altiplano Plateau prevents moist air masses from the Amazon Basin from reaching the Atacama Desert, causing the Atacama to be one of the driest places on Earth. Although Neogene sedimentary records from the western flank of the Andes should record the dramatic shift to hyperaridity that resulted from the growth of the Altiplano Plateau, the climatic implications of many sedimentary sequences have been difficult to decipher. The causes of the difficulties are complex, such as the relative influences of tectonics and active volcanism versus climate, and the roles of local as well as regional precipitation on groundwater and on the deposition of paludal sediments in basin centers. Over the last few years our research group has focused on using paleosols and the isotopic composition of palustrine carbonates in the Calama Basin (22°S) to try to identify a local precipitation signal and determine the onset of extreme hyperaridity as a consequence of the growth of the Altiplano. We have determined the soil morphological characteristics, salt chemistry, and mass independent fractionation anomalies (Δ17O values) in dated paleosols to reconstruct a Middle Miocene climatic transition from semi-aridity to extreme hyperaridity in the Atacama Desert. Paleosols along the southeastern margin of the Calama Basin change from calcic Vertisols with root traces, slickensides, and gleyed horizons to an extremely mature salic Gypsisol with pedogenic nitrate. We interpret this transition, which occurred between 19 and 13 Ma, to represent a change in precipitation from >200 mm/yr to Calama Basin also show a marked change during this time period. δ13C values of palustrine carbonates increase from -7 to +7? VPDB and δ18O values increases from -7 to +1? VPDB over the late to Middle Miocene time. This major trend towards more positive values is likely the result of several

  5. Cenozoic stratigraphic development in the north Chilean forearc: Implications for basin development and uplift history of the Central Andean margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Adrian J.; Evenstar, Laura

    2010-11-01

    with volcanic activity limited to the periodic eruption of extensive ignimbrite sheets. Alluvial fan, fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation dominated within the endorheic basins from ˜ 8 to 3 Ma. After development of a regional unconformity at 3 Ma a change to isolated evaporite sub-basins took place in the Central Depression with small lacustrine basins developed along the flank of the Western Cordillera. The scale and grain size recorded in the sedimentary systems indicates that a substantial source area was located in the present day area of the Western Cordillera by 30 Ma and that this has persisted to the present day. This area also shed material eastwards into the Altiplano. The presence of such a topographic feature by 30 Ma suggests that a significant proportion of Andean uplift had occurred prior to the Late Miocene. This important uplift phase should be incorporated into any model of Andean uplift. The evidence from the basin-fill succession suggests that sediments accumulated in a basin developed in front of a broad monocline between 38 and 19 Ma and that a transition to a thrust-bounded foreland style basin took place after the development of the unconformity at 19 Ma.

  6. Late Eocene to Early Miocene Andean uplift inferred from detrital zircon fission track and U-Pb dating of Cenozoic forearc sediments (15-18°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decou, A.; von Eynatten, H.; Dunkl, I.; Frei, D.; Wörner, G.

    2013-08-01

    Timing, amount, and mechanisms of uplift in the Central Andes have been a matter of debate in the last decade. Our study is based on the Cenozoic Moquegua Group deposited in the forearc basin between the Western Cordillera and the Coastal Cordillera in southern Peru from ˜50 to ˜4 Ma. The Moquegua Group consists mainly of mud-flat to fluvial siliciclastic sediments with upsection increasing grain size and volcanic intercalations. Detrital zircon U-Pb dating and fission track thermochronology allow us to refine previous sediment provenance models and to constrain the timing of Late Eocene to Early Miocene Andean uplift. Uplift-related provenance and facies changes started around 35 Ma and thus predate major voluminous ignimbrite eruptions that started at ˜25 by up to 10 Ma. Therefore magmatic addition to the crust cannot be an important driving factor for crustal thickening and uplift at Late Eocene to Early Oligocene time. Changes in subduction regime and the subducting plate geometry are suggested to control the formation of significant relief in the area of the future Western Cordillera which acts as an efficient large-scale drainage divide between Altiplano and forearc from at least 15.5 to 19°S already at ˜35 Ma. The model integrates the coincidence of (i) onset of provenance change no later than 35 Ma, (ii) drastic decrease in convergence rates at ˜40, (iii) a flat-subduction period at around ˜40 to ˜30 Ma leading to strong interplate coupling, and (iv) strong decrease in volcanic activity between 45 and 30 Ma.

  7. Deep intrusions, lateral magma transport and related uplift at ocean island volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klügel, Andreas; Longpré, Marc-Antoine; García-Cañada, Laura; Stix, John

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic intraplate volcanoes grow by accumulation of erupted material as well as by coeval or discrete magmatic intrusions. Dykes and other intrusive bodies within volcanic edifices are comparatively well studied, but intrusive processes deep beneath the volcanoes remain elusive. Although there is geological evidence for deep magmatic intrusions contributing to volcano growth through uplift, this has rarely been demonstrated by real-time monitoring. Here we use geophysical and petrological data from El Hierro, Canary Islands, to show that intrusions from the mantle and subhorizontal transport of magma within the oceanic crust result in rapid endogenous island growth. Seismicity and ground deformation associated with a submarine eruption in 2011-2012 reveal deep subhorizontal intrusive sheets (sills), which have caused island-scale uplift of tens of centimetres. The pre-eruptive intrusions migrated 15-20 km laterally within the lower oceanic crust, opening pathways that were subsequently used by the erupted magmas to ascend from the mantle to the surface. During six post-eruptive episodes between 2012 and 2014, further sill intrusions into the lower crust and upper mantle have caused magma to migrate up to 20 km laterally, resulting in magma accumulation exceeding that of the pre-eruptive phase. A comparison of geobarometric data for the 2011-2012 El Hierro eruption with data for other Atlantic intraplate volcanoes shows similar bimodal pressure distributions, suggesting that eruptive phases are commonly accompanied by deep intrusions of sills and lateral magma transport. These processes add significant material to the oceanic crust, cause uplift, and are thus fundamentally important for the growth and evolution of volcanic islands. We suggest that the development of such a magma accumulation zone in the lower oceanic crust begins early during volcano evolution, and is a consequence of increasing size and complexity of the mantle reservoir system, and potentially

  8. Munroa argentina, a Grass of the South American Transition Zone, Survived the Andean Uplift, Aridification and Glaciations of the Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarilla, Leonardo D.; Anton, Ana M.; Chiapella, Jorge O.; Manifesto, María M.; Angulo, Diego F.; Sosa, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The South American Transition Zone (SATZ) is a biogeographic area in which not only orogeny (Andes uplift) and climate events (aridification) since the mid-Miocene, but also Quaternary glaciation cycles had an important impact on the evolutionary history of the local flora. To study this effect, we selected Munroa argentina, an annual grass distributed in the biogeographic provinces of Puna, Prepuna and Monte. We collected 152 individuals from 20 localities throughout the species’ range, ran genetic and demographic analyses, and applied ecological niche modeling. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses based on cpDNA and AFLP data identified three phylogroups that correspond to the previously identified subregions within the SATZ. Molecular dating suggests that M. argentina has inhabited the SATZ since approximately 3.4 (4.2–1.2) Ma and paleomodels predict suitable climate in these areas during the Interglacial period and the Last Glacial Maximum. We conclude that the current distribution of M. argentina resulted from the fragmentation of its once continuous range and that climate oscillations promoted ecological differences that favored isolation by creating habitat discontinuity. PMID:26110533

  9. Numerical simulation of installation process and uplift resistance for an integrated suction foundation in deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Yang, Shu-geng; Yu, Shu-ming

    2016-03-01

    A concept design, named integrated suction foundation, is proposed for a tension leg platform (TLP) in deep ocean. The most important improvement in comparing with the traditional one is that a pressure-resistant storage module is designed. It utilizes the high hydrostatic pressure in deep ocean to drive water into the module to generate negative pressure for bucket suction. This work aims to further approve the feasibility of the concept design in the aspect of penetration installation and the uplift force in-place. Seepage is generated during suction penetration, and can have both positive and negative effects on penetration process. To study the effect of seepage on the penetration process of the integrated suction foundation, finite element analysis (FEA) is carried out in this work. In particular, an improved methodology to calculate the penetration resistance is proposed for the integrated suction foundation with respect to the reduction factor of penetration resistance. The maximum allowable negative pressure during suction penetration is calculated with the critical hydraulic gradient method through FEA. The simulation results of the penetration process show that the integrated suction foundation can be installed safely. Moreover, the uplift resistance of the integrated suction foundation is calculated and the feasibility of the integrated suction foundation working on-site is verified. In all, the analysis in this work further approves the feasibility of the integrated suction foundation for TLPs in deep ocean applications.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Installation Process and Uplift Resistance for An Integrated Suction Foundation in Deep Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李英; 杨树耕; 于书铭

    2016-01-01

    A concept design, named integrated suction foundation, is proposed for a tension leg platform (TLP) in deep ocean. The most important improvement in comparing with the traditional one is that a pressure-resistant storage module is designed. It utilizes the high hydrostatic pressure in deep ocean to drive water into the module to generate negative pressure for bucket suction. This work aims to further approve the feasibility of the concept design in the aspect of penetration installation and the uplift force in-place. Seepage is generated during suction penetration, and can have both positive and negative effects on penetration process. To study the effect of seepage on the penetration process of the integrated suction foundation, finite element analysis (FEA) is carried out in this work. In particular, an improved methodology to calculate the penetration resistance is proposed for the integrated suction foundation with respect to the reduction factor of penetration resistance. The maximum allowable negative pressure during suction penetration is calculated with the critical hydraulic gradient method through FEA. The simulation results of the penetration process show that the integrated suction foundation can be installed safely. Moreover, the uplift resistance of the integrated suction foundation is calculated and the feasibility of the integrated suction foundation working on-site is verified. In all, the analysis in this work further approves the feasibility of the integrated suction foundation for TLPs in deep ocean applications.

  11. Paleomagnetic study of Cambrian Ordovician rocks in the Eastern Precordillera of Argentina: some constraints on the Andean uplift of this block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalini, A. E.; Bordonaro, O.; Berquo, T. S.

    2000-11-01

    A paleomagnetic study on several carbonatic units (limestones to dolomites) of the Argentine Precordillera, spanning the Middle Cambrian to Arenig, is reported. Sampling was done at 23 sites (140 samples) in five localities of the Eastern Precordillera of San Juan province: Zonda (1), Juan Pobre (2) and La Flecha (3) creeks, Loma Redonda (4) and Cerro Pedernal de los Berros (5). Standard AF and thermal demagnetization indicated two different magnetic behaviors. Samples from localities 1 and 2 showed a single, post-tectonic magnetic component attributed to a Recent viscous or chemical remagnetization. Samples from localities 3 to 5 showed two magnetic components: a low unblocking temperature (350°C) magnetization coincident with that found at the previous localities and a high temperature one (up to 500°C). This second component was also found to be post-folding (post-Devonian?) and its in situ mean direction is Dec: 277.1°, Inc: 69.4, α95: 9.3°, N=10. This is not consistent with any expected direction for the study area between Carboniferous and Recent times. It is therefore inferred that the rocks carrying it underwent substantial tectonic rotation since its recording. Comparison with the magnetization carried by similar Early Ordovician limestones in the Central Precordillera and the San Rafael Block, and assigned to a Permian remagnetizing event, suggests that the same process affected the carbonatic rocks in the Eastern Precordillera and, therefore, the age of the component is likely Permian. Restoration of the in situ mean direction to the expected direction for a Permian remagnetization can be obtained by a 40° ccw rotation around an axis plunging 30° to N30°E. This is compatible with uplifting of the Eastern Precordillera as a series of quasi-rigid blocks along a major E dipping N to NE backthrust during the Andean orogeny.

  12. Geochemical and thermochronological signals in Tertiary to Recent sediments from the Western Andes (15-19°S): proxies for sediment provenance and Andean uplift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decou, A.; Mamani, M.; von Eynatten, H.; Wörner, G.

    2009-04-01

    During the Cenozoic the landscape at the western margin of South America changed dramatically due to the tectonic evolution of the Andes (Isacks 1988, J Geophysical Res 93) and significant variations in climate (Gregory-Wodzicki 2000, GSA Bulletin 112). At present day the climate in the western Central Andes (N-Chile, S-Peru) is arid (rainfall average is less than 100-200 mm/y) Climate has changed significantly through time, for example, sediments on the Altiplano and the eastern Central Andes indicate a period of increased precipitation at around 7-8 Ma (Gaupp et al. 1999, PPP 151; Uba et al. 2007, Geology 35). The uplift of the Andes started some 30-25 My ago (Isacks, 1988,). Siliciclastic sedimentation along the western flank of the Central Andes started at 55 Ma and lasted until recent time (Moquegua Group, Roperch et al. 2006, Tectonics 25). This implies that a river system with sediment deposition was already developed before the Andean uplift which occurred during deposition of the Moquegua Group. The Moquegua group is composed of four units: Moquegua A (55-45Ma), Moquegua B (45-30Ma), Moquegua C (30-15?Ma) and Moquegua D (15?-0Ma) (Roperch et al. 2006). The sedimentary basin of Moquegua has a complex internal structure and is composed of different subbasins. We focus in this study respectively, from north to south, on the Cuno Cuno section (cut by the Rio Ocoña), the Majes section (cut by the Rio Majes) and the Moquegua section (cut by the Rio Moquegua). Several facies and compositional changes of Moquegua Group sediments, both along orogenic strike and through time, are already described; however, it lacks a detailed provenance study to constrain the tectonic and climatic controls on sediment generation, dispersal, and accumulation. To do so sandstones from all Moquegua units from the three different sections have been sampled. Because it is crucial to know all the potential source rocks in some detail, the Proterozoic-Paleozoic basement, the Jurassic

  13. Effects of Caribbean oceanic plateau shallow subduction on topographic uplift and exhumation of the northwestern Maracaibo block, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J.; Mann, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Maracaibo block in the northwestern South America is a triangular lithotectonic terrane bounded on its western edge by the Santa Marta-Bucaramanga left-lateral strike-slip fault and the Oca-Ancon right-lateral strike-slip fault on its northern edge. These faults bound two isolated Andean ranges within the Maracaibo block: the Sierra de Santa Marta massif (SSM) in the east whose highest point is 5700 m ASL, and the Serrania del Perija (SP) to the west, whose highest point is 3600 m ASL. The two ranges are separated by an elongate, NNE-trending sedimentary basin, the Cesar-Rancheria basin (CRB). Previous thermochronological studies in the region have shown three discrete exhumation pulses from Paleocene to Miocene that are attributed to various collisional and strike events along the Caribbean margin. However the tectonic origin of the late Neogene deformation that produced the isolated, high topography of the SSM and SP has remained unclear. To establish patterns of recent uplift and associate them with a specific tectonic mechanism affecting the area, we integrated the following results: 1) analysis of stream profiles using channel normalized steepness indices and identification of slope-break knickpoints as indicators of rock uplift; 2) integration of observations from geological maps; 3) interpretation of 2D onland seismic profiles; 4) analysis of published thermochronological data; and 5) analysis of 1D/2D basin model based on well subsidence analysis from the CRB. Our results from the extraction of 550 long stream profiles from different watersheds for the SSM and SP reveal: 1) undisturbed profiles at western flank of the northern SP characterized by a few vertical-step knickpoints associated with lithology changes; in contrast the eastern flank of the northern SP shows slope-break knickpoints and changes in steepness indices increasing by a factor of ~2, all indicative of active fault control affecting this area; 2) disturbed profiles in the elevated

  14. Biostratigraphic evidence for dramatic Holocene uplift of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Ridge, SE Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, P.; Le Roux, J. P.; Lara, L. E.; Orozco, G.; Astudillo, V.

    2015-03-01

    Hotspot oceanic islands typically experience subsidence due to several processes related to migration of the oceanic plate away from the mantle plume and surface flexural loading. However, many other processes can interrupt subsidence, some of which may be associated with catastrophic events. A study of the biostratigraphy and sedimentology of Holocene deposits on Robinson Crusoe Island (RCI) on the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR) indicated that dramatic uplift has occurred since 8000 years BP, at a rate of about 8.5mm yr-1. This is evidenced by supratidal flats with tepee structures and sand layers containing marine gastropods (mostly Nerita sp.) that are now exposed ca. 70 m a.s.l. The active hotspot is located 280 km further west and the last volcanic activity on RCI occurred at ca. 800 000 years BP. Long-term subsidence is evidenced by deep submerged marine abrasion terraces at RCI. As no direct evidence was found for the existence of a compensating bulge generated by the present hotspot upon which RCI would be situated, it must be concluded that subsidence in the wake of the mantle plume beneath the migrating plate was interrupted by very rapid uplift, but on a scale that did not fully compensate for the previous subsidence. This can be attributed to large-scale landslides followed by isostatic rebound, although this is only vaguely reflected in the low-resolution bathymetry of the area. To determine if this mechanism produced the uplift, a detailed bathymetric survey of the area will be required. If such a survey confirms this hypothesis, it may have implications for the short-term dynamics of vertical variations of oceanic edifices and their related effects on ecosystems and human population.

  15. Mountain building at ocean-continent margins - linking mass flux, mechanics, and earthquakes at the Andean margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncken, O.

    2015-12-01

    Deformation at convergent plate boundaries involves various styles of mass flux and of backarc shortening. For the Andes, patterns appear obvious. Long-term mass flux style - i.e. accretionary versus erosive - shows a distinct relationship with forearc as well as backarc deformation mode. Neogene surface deformation exhibits tectonically uplifting areas along the coast driven by interseismically active reverse faulting. Moreover, seismic-cycle vertical displacement is not coincident with long-term vertical motion that probably is superseded by slow basal underplating (southern Chile) or tectonic erosion (northern Chile). Reconstruction clearly indicates that the Central Andean trench has always been underfilled with less than 500 m of sediment. In southern Chile, our data illustrate a similar trend during most of the Cenozoic with a shift around some 6-7 Ma to substantial sediment influx from glaciation of the Patagonian part of the Andean Cordillera. As a consequence, backarc shortening stopped at this latitude, while shortening velocity in the Central Andes was still accelerating. Using latitudinal evolution and variations of shortening rate, orogenic strain accumulation and deformation partitioning in the Andes can be shown to be dominated by distinct factors. The Altiplano-Puna plateaux are characterized by a complete cycle of initial lateral spreading of deformation followed by subsequent localization and acceleration of bulk shortening rate. Estimates of strength evolution based on force balance calculations and critical wedge analysis suggest significant backarc weakening driving this change. Lithosphere-scale failure from strain weakening beyond a critical strain threshold (c. 20%) and fault coalescence with formation of a weak detachment in shales (μeff < 0.1) played a key role in the evolution of the Central Andes. Strain-related lithosphere weakening dominated over the impact of external forcing mechanisms, such as variations of plate convergence

  16. The intersection of climate, tectonic uplift, and regional groundwater flow in the central Andean Plateau: Insight from the accumulation of the massive evaporite deposit in the Salar de Atacama, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutt, D. F.; Hynek, S. A.; Corenthal, L.; Munk, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Salar de Atacama (SdA), a large endorheic basin adjacent to the Central Andes in the hyperarid Atacama Desert, has accumulated over 1800 km3 of evaporites and a lithium-rich brine since the late Miocene. Focused groundwater discharge in endorheic basins, such as those in the Chilean Altiplano, provide opportunities to investigate mechanisms for closing hydrologic budgets in arid regions. We demonstrate that modern evapotranspiration is 5 to 21 times greater than modern recharge from precipitation in the topographic watershed. Multiple lines of evidence including an adapted chloride mass balance method applied to remotely sensed precipitation estimates and sodium mass balance calculations support this conclusion. We contend that the missing water needed to close the extreme hydrologic imbalance of SdA is sourced from recharge on the orogenic plateau in an area over 4 times larger than the topographic watershed, augmented by transient draining of stored groundwater. Groundwater recharged during wetter periods in the late Pleistocene is still actively draining and discharging from storage without corresponding recharge into the system. Geologic evidence from the volume of evaporites deposited in the basin suggests that the SdA has been receiving significant amounts of fresh inflow waters over at least 7 Ma despite the region being hyperarid over the same time frame. Our conceptualization of the depositional model for evaporite accumulation necessitates the water table being at or close to the land surface. Subsidence associated with basin development has accommodated significant accumulation of these deposits thereby requiring the sustenance of fresh inflow waters during uplift of the Andean plateau. Sustained groundwater discharge to the basin requires long residence times, deep water tables and strong gradients in landscape and climate enabled by an uplifting plateau. The application of steady state assumptions to the modern hydrologic system are unsupported by

  17. From ocean depths to mountain tops: uplift of the Troodos Massif (Cyprus) constrained by (U-Th)/He thermochronology and geomorphic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morag, N.; Haviv, I.; Katzir, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Troodos Massif of Cyprus, rising to nearly 2000 meters above sea level, encompasses one of the world's classic ophiolites. Following its formation at a seafloor spreading center in Late Cretaceous times, this slice of the NeoTethyan oceanic lithosphere was uplifted and eventually exposed on mountain tops during the Neogene. The final uplift and exhumation of the Troodos was previously assigned to Pleistocene age by observations in the circum-Troodos sedimentary strata. However, quantitative thermochronological and geomorphological data from the Massif itself were not available. Here we use apatite (U-Th)/He low-temperature thermochronology complemented by zircon (U-Th)/He and apatite fission track data, and combined with geomorphic analysis to constrain the exhumation and uplift history of the Troodos ophiolite. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages vary with depth from ~ 22 Ma at the top of the Gabbro sequence to ~ 6 Ma at the bottom of the sequence. The deepest sample from a Gabbro pegmatitic dyke intruding the ultramafic sequence yielded an age of ~ 3 Ma. Thermal modeling of apatite (U-Th)/He and fission track data delineates Plio - Pleistocene initiation of rapid uplift and exhumation of the Troodos ophiolite. The estimated cumulative exhumation since its initiation is 2-3 km. No evidence was found for significant uplift of the central Troodos area prior to that time. The geomorphic analysis delineates a bull's-eye zone at the center of the Troodos Massif, where local relief and channel steepness index are highest. The boundaries of this zone roughly correspond with the Mt. Olympus mantle outcrop and suggest recent, differential uplift of this zone relative to its surroundings. The most likely mechanism, which could drive such a focused bull's-eye uplift pattern is hydration of ultramafic rocks (serpentinization) leading to a decrease in rock density and subsequent diapiric uplift of the serpentinized lithospheric mantle.

  18. Phylogenetic insights into Andean plant diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLuebert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Andean orogeny is considered as one of the most important events for the developmentof current plant diversity in South America. We compare available phylogenetic studies anddivergence time estimates for plant lineages that may have diversified in response to Andeanorogeny. The influence of the Andes on plant diversification is separated into four major groups:The Andes as source of new high-elevation habitats, as a vicariant barrier, as a North-Southcorridor and as generator of new environmental conditions outside the Andes. Biogeographicalrelationships between the Andes and other regions are also considered. Divergence timeestimates indicate that high-elevation lineages originated and diversified during or after the majorphases of Andean uplift (Mid-Miocene to Pliocene, although there are some exceptions. Asexpected, Andean mid-elevation lineages tend to be older than high-elevation groups. Mostclades with disjunct distribution on both sides of the Andes diverged during Andean uplift.Inner-Andean clades also tend to have divergence time during or after Andean uplift. This isinterpreted as evidence of vicariance. Dispersal along the Andes has been shown to occur ineither direction, mostly dated after the Andean uplift. Divergence time estimates of plant groupsoutside the Andes encompass a wider range of ages, indicating that the Andes may not benecessarily the cause of these diversifications. The Andes are biogeographically related to allneighbouring areas, especially Central America, with floristic interchanges in both directionssince Early Miocene times. Direct biogeographical relationships between the Andes and otherdisjunct regions have also been shown in phylogenetic studies, especially with the easternBrazilian highlands and North America. The history of the Andean flora is complex and plantdiversification has been driven by a variety of processes, including environmental change,adaptation, and biotic interactions

  19. Sahara dust, ocean spray, volcanoes, biomass burning: pathways of nutrients into Andean rainforests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fabian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Regular rain and fogwater sampling in the Podocarpus National Park, on the humid eastern slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes, along an altitude profile between 1960 and 3180 m, has been carried out since 2002. The samples, accumulated over about 1-week intervals, were analysed for pH, conductivity and major ions (K+, Na+, NH4+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl, SO42−, NO3, PO43−.

    About 35% of the weekly samples had very low ion contents, with pH mostly above 5 and conductivity below 10 μS/cm. 10-days back trajectories (FLEXTRA showed that respective air masses originated in pristine continental areas, with little or no obvious pollution sources.

    About 65%, however, were significantly loaded with cations and anions, with pH as low as 3.5 to 4.0 and conductivity up to 50 μS/cm. The corresponding back trajectories clearly showed that air masses had passed over areas of intense biomass burning, active volcanoes, and the ocean, with episodic Sahara and/or Namib desert dust interference.

    Enhanced SO42− and NO3+ were identified, by combining satellite-based fire pixel observations with back trajectories, as predominantly resulting from biomass burning. Analyses of oxygen isotopes 16O, 17O, and 18O in nitrate show that nitrate in the samples is indeed a product of atmospheric conversion of precursors. Some SO42−, about 10% of the total input, could be identified to originate from active volcanoes, whose plumes were encountered by about 10% of all trajectories.

    Enhanced Na+, K+, and Cl were found to originate from ocean spray sources. They were associated with winds providing Atlantic air masses to the receptor site within less than 5 days. Episodes of

  20. Uplifting Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Andy; Boyle, Alan

    2015-01-01

    To find out how organizations turn failure into success, Andrew Hargreaves and his colleagues studied more than 15 business, sports, and education organizations. They found that the secret to these organizations' success came down to just two words: uplifting leadership. Uplifting leadership, write Hargreaves and Boyle in this article, raises the…

  1. From ocean depths to mountain tops: Uplift of the Troodos ophiolite (Cyprus) constrained by low-temperature thermochronology and geomorphic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morag, Navot; Haviv, Itai; Katzir, Yaron

    2016-03-01

    The timing and mode of uplift of the Troodos ophiolite are constrained by low-temperature thermochronology combined with geomorphic analysis. Zircon (U-Th)/He and apatite fission track cooling ages in the Troodos plutonic sequence are all Cretaceous (83-106 Ma) and within error of published zircon U-Pb crystallization ages. This indicates early cooling of the oceanic crust and termination of spreading axis magmatism at ~90 Ma. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages decrease with reconstructed crustal depths from ~40 Ma near the top of the sheeted-dike complex to ~4 Ma within the mantle sequence. A prominent inflection point in the age versus depth curve defines the bottom of the exhumed helium partial retention zone and records the onset of rapid exhumation of the main Troodos massif at 6 ± 2 Ma. Inverse thermal modeling supports this conclusion, indicating that the timing of uplift is earlier than previously estimated. The boundaries of the mantle sequence exposed in the core of the Troodos structure closely overlap the boundaries of a concentric zone delineated by high local relief and higher channel steepness indices, indicating differential exhumation and uplift of this area relative to its surroundings. This zone also overlaps with a prominent negative Bouguer gravity anomaly. The timing and pattern of the Troodos ophiolite uplift suggest that it is driven by serpentinite diapirism, possibly triggered by Miocene reactivation of subduction along the Cyprean Arc. The worldwide ubiquity of suprasubduction zone ophiolites may thus reflect the importance of extensive serpentinization at the overthrusting mantle wedge in obduction processes.

  2. Gravimetric structure for the abyssal mantle massif of Saint Peter and Saint Paul peridotite ridge, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean, and its relation to active uplift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KENJI F. MOTOKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents gravimetric and morphologic analyses based on the satellite-derived data set of EGM2008 and TOPEX for the area of the oceanic mantle massif of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul peridotite ridge, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The free-air anomaly indicates that the present plate boundary is not situated along the longitudinal graben which cuts peridotite ridge, but about 20 km to the north of it. The high Bouguer anomaly of the peridotite ridge suggests that it is constituted mainly by unserpentinised ultramafic rocks. The absence of isostatic compensation and low-degree serpentinisation of the ultramafic rocks indicate that the peridotite ridge is sustained mainly by active tectonic uplift. The unparallel relation between the transform fault and the relative plate motion generates near north-south compression and the consequent tectonic uplift. In this sense, the peridotite massif is a pressure ridge due to the strike-slip displacement of the Saint Paul Transform Fault.

  3. Biostratigraphic evidence of dramatic Holocene uplift of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Ridge, SE Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sepúlveda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the biostratigraphy and sedimentology of Holocene deposits on Robinson Crusoe Island (RCI on the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR indicates that a~dramatic but localized uplift occurred since 8000 BP, at a rate of about 8.5 mm yr−1. In fact, supratidal flats and sand layers with marine gastropods (mostly Nerita sp. are now exposed ca. 70 m a.s.l., and covered by transitional dunes. The last volcanic activity on RCI occurred at ca. 0.8 Ma (active hotspot located 280 km further west and there is no sign of a compensating bulge that explains this uplift, isobaths of the sea floor instead suggesting general subsidence. However, modeling indicates that large-scale landslides followed by isostatic rebound are a viable explanation, partially reflected in the low-resolution bathymetry of the area.

  4. Biostratigraphic evidence of dramatic Holocene uplift of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Ridge, SE Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, P.; Le Roux, J. P.; Lara, L. E.; Orozco, G.; Astudillo, V.

    2014-09-01

    A study of the biostratigraphy and sedimentology of Holocene deposits on Robinson Crusoe Island (RCI) on the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR) indicates that a~dramatic but localized uplift occurred since 8000 BP, at a rate of about 8.5 mm yr-1. In fact, supratidal flats and sand layers with marine gastropods (mostly Nerita sp.) are now exposed ca. 70 m a.s.l., and covered by transitional dunes. The last volcanic activity on RCI occurred at ca. 0.8 Ma (active hotspot located 280 km further west) and there is no sign of a compensating bulge that explains this uplift, isobaths of the sea floor instead suggesting general subsidence. However, modeling indicates that large-scale landslides followed by isostatic rebound are a viable explanation, partially reflected in the low-resolution bathymetry of the area.

  5. Birds of Two Oceans? Trans-Andean and Divergent Migration of Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens from the Peruvian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Davenport

    Full Text Available Seasonal flooding compels some birds that breed in aquatic habitats in Amazonia to undertake annual migrations, yet we know little about how the complex landscape of the Amazon region is used seasonally by these species. The possibility of trans-Andes migration for Amazonian breeding birds has largely been discounted given the high geographic barrier posed by the Andean Cordillera and the desert habitat along much of the Pacific Coast. Here we demonstrate a trans-Andes route for Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger cinerascens breeding on the Manu River (in the lowlands of Manu National Park, Perú, as well as divergent movement patterns both regionally and across the continent. Of eight skimmers tracked with satellite telemetry, three provided data on their outbound migrations, with two crossing the high Peruvian Andes to the Pacific. A third traveled over 1800 km to the southeast before transmissions ended in eastern Paraguay. One of the two trans-Andean migrants demonstrated a full round-trip migration back to its tagging location after traveling down the Pacific Coast from latitude 9° South to latitude 37° S, spending the austral summer in the Gulf of Arauco, Chile. This is the first documentation of a trans-Andes migration observed for any bird breeding in lowland Amazonia. To our knowledge, this research also documents the first example of a tropical-breeding waterbird migrating out of the tropics to spend the non-breeding season in the temperate summer, this being the reverse pattern with respect to seasonality for austral migrants in general.

  6. Andean waterways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    , social, and cultural concerns. Set in the highland town of Recuay in Ancash, the book traces the ways in which water affects political and ecological relations as glaciers recede. By looking at the shared waterways of four villages located in the foothills of Cordillera Blanca, it addresses pertinent......Andean Waterways explores the politics of natural resource use in the Peruvian Andes in the context of climate change and neoliberal expansion. It does so through careful ethnographic analysis of the constitution of waterways, illustrating how water becomes entangled in a variety of political...

  7. Phylogeny and biogeography of exindusiate Andean Polystichum (Dryopteridaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Monique A; Barrington, David S

    2014-02-01

    Uplift of the tropical Andes had a significant impact on the diversification of South American flora and fauna. Recent biogeographic inquiries have established patterns of Andean divergence, but investigations on ferns are scant. The fern genus Polystichum Roth (Dryopteridaceae) combines widespread geographic and elevational distribution with a large number of species to form an ideal system for investigation of the origin and diversification patterns of a fern lineage in the tropical Andes. The relationships among 42 Polystichum species, including taxa from all major biogeographic regions, were analyzed with 2591 aligned nucleotides from four plastid markers using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. The resulting phylogeny was then used to estimate divergence times and reconstruct both ancestral areas and ancestral elevations. Tropical Andean South American polystichums that lack an indusium (sori exindusiate) were confirmed to form a monophyletic group. This exindusiate Andean Polystichum clade diverged from a middle-elevation forest lineage now rich in species endemic to Mexico during the middle Miocene (13.12 million years ago). The majority of diversification that followed took place in the montane regions of the central Andes with radiations to the northern Andes, southeastern Brazil, and alpine regions. The monophyletic exindusiate Andean Polystichum lineage diverged from a Mexican lineage in the middle Miocene and diversified in the central Andes before dispersing northward. This south-to-north dispersal pattern, documented for many other Andean lineages, corresponds with episodes of uplift in the tropical Andes.

  8. Where and When did High Andean Relief Emerge?: Insights From Molecular Phylogenies of Andean Biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, T.; Picard, D.; Plantard, O.

    2006-05-01

    Emergence of mountains along the Andean margin created new ecosystems and thus triggered a variety of adaptive biotic radiations, to the point that the Andes are to-day one of the world's major biodiversity hotspots. The rising Andes came to serve as a rain barrier: cloud forests developed along their eastern side due to orographic concentration of the westward-moving Amazonian moisture, and environments became drier in the west, with highland steppes extending above ~2-3 km. Relevant biologic data concerning Andean taxa adapted to these environments might therefore shed some light on the issue of Andean orogeny and surface uplift. Phylogeography (the analysis of phylogenetic trees in terms of biogeographic distributions) and phylochronology (the use of phylogenetic trees as molecular clocks) can be employed to reconstruct syn- orogenic radiations and estimate their timing, respectively. We use published molecular phylogenies that inform on the evolution of a variety of Andean animal and plant taxa, and therefore provide indirect means to assess and approximately date the acquisition of altitude. Phylogeographic analyses of 6 phylogenetic trees concerning unrelated Andean biota coincide in having their basal clades established in areas within the Central Andean Orocline (CAO), 5 of them clearly pointing to southern Peru and/or western Bolivia as the region of origin of the corresponding high-Andean taxa. A histogram of 9 phylochronologic estimates, based on trees concerning unrelated taxa (independently constructed and calibrated), suggests that the 2.0-2.5 km critical altitude was acquired during the 23-17 Ma or 26-16 Ma intervals (depending on the threshold used), confirming some geomorphic and geologic estimates (but conflicting with others). Although more data are needed, these results suggest that it was within the CAO and approximately during the early Miocene that the Andes acquired altitudes sufficient to trigger radiations of cold-adapted taxa, i.e. >~2 km

  9. Tectonomagmatic Associations on the Central Andean Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, S. L.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Central Andes is characterized by a strong association between plate convergence, mountain building and plateau formation, and magmatism. Plateau uplift by crustal shortening and thickening in the lower crust is broadly coincident with large scale silicic magmatism defined by the Neogene Central Andean ignimbrite province. Of particular interest here are the spatiotemporal correlations between silicic magmatism and tectonic evolution of the Altiplano-Puna plateau. Although magmatism is driven by the subduction-related flux from mantle to crust, the shift to "crustal" magmatism as indicated by elevated crustal isotopic indices after ~10Ma suggests a link between crustal thickening, plateau formation and silicic magmatism. In particular, elevated geotherms associated with crustal thickening and enhanced mantle flux associated with lithospheric delamination may have played a role in thermally preparing the Central Andean crust for enhanced silicic magma production during the extensive Neogene ignimbrite flare-up. Emplacement of these magmas in the upper crust throughout the Neogene may have fuelled a period of significant interaction between magmatism and tectonism on the plateau. With particular reference to the 21° to 24°S segment of the Central Andes, spatial and structural coincidence of calderas of the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex with the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapata-El Toro fault zone suggests significant tectonomagmatic interaction. Location of calderas suggest that these regional faults focused magma intrusion and storage, while spatially and temporally correlated eruption pulses connote a tectonic control. Indeed, current thermomechanical models of magma chamber development and eruption triggering promote a role for external triggering of "perched" upper crustal magma chambers. This might have been achieved by melt-enhanced deformation, or alternatively, significant uplift (~1km) associated with the development of large

  10. Issues in IIA Uplifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallosh, Renata; Soroush, Masoud

    2006-12-12

    Moduli stabilization in the type IIA massive string theory so far was achieved only in the AdS vacua. The uplifting to dS vacua has not been performed as yet: neither the analogs of type IIB anti-D3 brane at the tip of the conifold, nor the appropriate D-terms have been identified. The hope was recently expressed that the F-term uplifting may work. We investigate this possibility in the context of a simplified version of the type IIA model developed in hep-th/0505160 and find that the F-term does not uplift the AdS vacua to dS vacua with positive CC. Thus it remains a challenging task to find phenomenologically acceptable vacua in the type IIA string theory.

  11. Qochas on Andean highlands

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    On the Andean highlands, the "qochas" are lakes or ponds of natural or artificial origin. An ancient agricultural technique is based on their use. Linked together by a network of canals, qochas form a system of water and soil management, alternately used for crops or pasture. The concave structure of qochas controls the strong evaporation produced by solar radiation and wind blowing. Qochas can be observed in the satellite imagery of Google Maps.

  12. Sulfur geochemistry and microbial sulfate reduction during low-temperature alteration of uplifted lower oceanic crust: Insights from ODP Hole 735B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Susan E.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide petrography plus whole rock contents and isotope ratios of sulfur were measured in a 1.5 km section of oceanic gabbros in order to understand the geochemistry of sulfur cycling during low-temperature seawater alteration of the lower oceanic crust, and to test whether microbial effects may be present. Most samples have low SO4/ΣS values (≤ 0.15), have retained igneous globules of pyrrhotite ± chalcopyrite ± pentlandite, and host secondary aggregates of pyrrhotite and pyrite laths in smectite ± iron-oxyhydroxide ± magnetite ± calcite pseudomorphs of olivine and clinopyroxene. Compared to fresh gabbro containing 100–1800 ppm sulfur our data indicate an overall addition of sulfide to the lower crust. Selection of samples altered only at temperatures ≤ 110 °C constrains microbial sulfate reduction as the only viable mechanism for the observed sulfide addition, which may have been enabled by the production of H2 from oxidation of associated olivine and pyroxene. The wide range in δ34Ssulfide values (− 1.5 to + 16.3‰) and variable additions of sulfide are explained by variable εsulfate-sulfide under open system pathways, with a possible progression into closed system pathways. Some samples underwent oxidation related to seawater penetration along permeable fault horizons and have lost sulfur, have high SO4/ΣS (≥ 0.46) and variable δ34Ssulfide (0.7 to 16.9‰). Negative δ34Ssulfate–δ34Ssulfide values for the majority of samples indicate kinetic isotope fractionation during oxidation of sulfide minerals. Depth trends in sulfide–sulfur contents and sulfide mineral assemblages indicate a late-stage downward penetration of seawater into the lower 1 km of Hole 735B. Our results show that under appropriate temperature conditions, a subsurface biosphere can persist in the lower oceanic crust and alter its geochemistry.

  13. Andean subduction orogeny: feedbacks between tectonics, relief evolution and global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacassin, Robin; Armijo, Rolando; Coudurier-Curveur, Aurélie; Carrizo, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Andean subduction margin, largest tectonic relief on the Earth (13 km vertically from the trench to the Altiplano) has a stepped morphology, which results of the evolution over the past 50 Myr of two parallel flat-ramp thrust systems, at the - previously unidentified - West Andean Thrust (WAT), and at the subduction interface. The evolution of those thrusts appears concomitant with increasing aridity in the Atacama Desert, which keeps a large-scale record of interplaying tectonics and Cenozoic climate change. The coastal morphology is dominated by the Atacama Bench, a giant uplifted terrace at 1-2km asl. Geomorphic and climatic data, numerical experiments of drainage formation are consistent with the development of a flat Atacama morphology close to sea level, interrupted at ≤10 Ma by tectonic uplift prevailing to the present. This suggests recent trench-ward relief growth by incorporation of the coastal Atacama Bench to the Andes reliefs. Thrust splay structures and other complexities above the subduction interface may explain this relief growth, as well as the distribution of asperities under the oceanward forearc, and the down-dip segmentation of coupling and seismicity on the megathrust. Combining those results with geological knowledge at the scale of the whole Central Andes, we show that the Andean orogeny results from protracted processes of bivergent crustal shortening in a wide region squeezed between the rigid Marginal Block and the S America Plate. The overall growth curve of Andean orogeny over the past 50 Myr appears synchronous with the onset of the "ramp-shaped" temperature decrease since the Early Eocene climatic optimum. Andean growth and global cooling may have operated under the same forcing mechanism at plate-scale, involving viscous flow in the mantle. But Andean growth appears modulated by climatic feedbacks causative of stepwise reductions of erosive power over the Andean margin. The first of such events is coeval with Late Eocene

  14. Andean region study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    New opportunities for climate change mitigation arising from a higher energy integration among Andean Pact nations were analysed within the framework of the UNEP/GEF Project. Apart from the search for regional mitigation actions, the study was mainly aimed at detecting methodological problems which arise when passing from a strictly national view to the co-ordination of regional actions to deal with climate change. In accordance with the available resources and data, and in view of the mainly methodological nature of the project, it was decided to analyse the opportunities to delve into the energy integration of the Region as regards electricity and natural gas industries and their eventual impact on the emission of greenhouse gases. Although possibilities of setting up electricity and natural gas markets are real, their impacts on GHG emission from the energy system would not prove substantially higher than those which the nations could achieve through the use of their own energy resources, in view that the Andean systems are competitive rather than complementary. More in-depth studies and detail information will be required - unavailable for the present study - to be able to properly evaluate all benefits associated with higher energy integration. Nevertheless, the supply of natural gas to Ecuador seems to be the alternative with the highest impact on GHG emission. If we were to analyse the supply and final consumption of energy jointly, we would most certainly detect additional mitigation options resulting from higher co-operation and co-ordination in the energy field. (EHS)

  15. Foreland sedimentary record of Andean mountain building during advancing and retreating subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Brian K.

    2016-04-01

    As in many ocean-continent (Andean-type) convergent margins, the South American foreland has long-lived (>50-100 Myr) sedimentary records spanning not only protracted crustal shortening, but also periods of neutral to extensional stress conditions. A regional synthesis of Andean basin histories is complemented by new results from the Mesozoic Neuquén basin system and succeeding Cenozoic foreland system of west-central Argentina (34-36°S) showing (1) a Late Cretaceous shift from backarc extension to retroarc contraction and (2) an anomalous mid-Cenozoic (~40-20 Ma) phase of sustained nondeposition. New detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological results from Jurassic through Neogene clastic deposits constrain exhumation of the evolving Andean magmatic arc, retroarc thrust belt, foreland basement uplifts, and distal eastern craton. Abrupt changes in sediment provenance and distal-to-proximal depositional conditions can be reconciled with a complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic history of extension, post-extensional thermal subsidence, punctuated tectonic inversion involving thick- and thin-skinned shortening, alternating phases of erosion and rapid accumulation, and overlapping igneous activity. U-Pb age distributions define the depositional ages of several Cenozoic stratigraphic units and reveal a major late middle Eocene-earliest Miocene (~40-20 Ma) hiatus in the Malargüe foreland basin. This boundary marks an abrupt shift in depositional conditions and sediment sources, from Paleocene-middle Eocene distal fluviolacustrine deposition of sediments from far western volcanic sources (Andean magmatic arc) and subordinate eastern cratonic basement (Permian-Triassic Choiyoi igneous complex) to Miocene-Quaternary proximal fluvial and alluvial-fan deposition of sediments recycled from emerging western sources (Malargüe fold-thrust belt) of Mesozoic basin fill originally derived from basement and magmatic arc sources. Neogene eastward advance of the fold-thrust belt involved thick

  16. Sediment budget in the Ucayali River basin, an Andean tributary of the Amazon River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Santini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation of mountain ranges results from complex coupling between lithospheric deformation, mechanisms linked to subduction and surface processes: weathering, erosion, and climate. Today, erosion of the eastern Andean cordillera and sub-Andean foothills supplies over 99% of the sediment load passing through the Amazon Basin. Denudation rates in the upper Ucayali basin are rapid, favoured by a marked seasonality in this region and extreme precipitation cells above sedimentary strata, uplifted during Neogene times by a still active sub-Andean tectonic thrust. Around 40% of those sediments are trapped in the Ucayali retro-foreland basin system. Recent advances in remote sensing for Amazonian large rivers now allow us to complete the ground hydrological data. In this work, we propose a first estimation of the erosion and sedimentation budget of the Ucayali River catchment, based on spatial and conventional HYBAM Observatory network.

  17. Neogene climate change and uplift in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Jason A.; Currie, Brian S.; Michalski, Greg; Cowan, Angela M.

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between Andean uplift and extreme desiccation of the west coast of South America is important for understanding the interplay between climate and tectonics in the Central Andes, yet it is poorly understood. Here we use soil morphological characteristics, salt chemistry, and mass independent fractionation anomalies (Δ17O values) in dated paleosols to reconstruct a middle Miocene climatic transition from semiaridity to extreme hyperaridity in the Atacama Desert. Paleosols along the southeastern margin of the Calama Basin change from calcic Vertisols with root traces, slickensides, and gleyed horizons to an extremely mature salic Gypsisol with pedogenic nitrate. We interpret this transition, which occurred between 19 and 13 Ma, to represent a change in precipitation from >200 mm/yr to 2 km; the uplift blocked moisture from the South American summer monsoon from entering the Atacama. The mid-Miocene Gypsisol with pedogenic nitrate is located at elevations between 2900 and 3400 m in the Calama Basin, significantly higher than modern nitrate soils, which occur below ˜2500 m. Modern and Quaternary soils in this elevation zone contain soil carbonate and lack pedogenic gypsum and nitrate. We infer that >900 m of local surface uplift over the past 10 m.y. displaced these nitrate paleosols relative to modern nitrate soils and caused a return to wetter conditions in the Calama Basin by decreasing local air temperatures and creating an orographic barrier to Pacific air masses.

  18. [Health in Andean regional integration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo, Carlos A

    2007-01-01

    Despite their shared history, the Andean countries are socially and politically diverse, with heterogeneous health realities and complex integration processes. General developments such as the Latin American Free Trade Association and Latin American Integration Association have existed for decades, along with others of a regional scope, like the Andean Community of Nations, Caribbean Community, and Central American Common Market. The health field has a specific instrument in the Andean Region called the Hipólito Unánue Agreement, created in 1971. Integration processes have concentrated on economic aspects, based on preferential customs agreements that have led to an important long-term increase in trade. Less progress has been made in the field of health in terms of sharing national experiences, knowledge, and capabilities. Analysis of experiences in health has shown that integration depends on the countries' respective strengths and to a major extent on national political processes.

  19. Influence of late Cenozoic mountain building on ocean geochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymo, Maureen E.; Ruddiman, William F.; Froelich, Philip N.

    1988-07-01

    In a steady-state ocean, input fluxes of dissolved salts to the sea must be balanced in mass and isotopic value by output fluxes. For the elements strontium, calcium, and carbon, rivers provide the primary input, whereas marine biogenic sedimentation dominates removal. Dissolved fluxes in rivers are related to rates of continental weathering, which in turn are strongly dependent on rates of uplift. The largest dissolved fluxes today arise in the Himalayan and Andean mountain ranges and the Tibetan Plateau. During the past 5 m.y., uplift rates in these areas have increased significantly; this suggests that weathering rates and river fluxes may have increased also. The oceanic records of carbonate sedimentation, level of the calcite compensation depth, and δ13C and δ87Sr in biogenic sediments are consistent with a global increase in river fluxes since the late Miocene. The cooling of global climate over the past few million years may be linked to a decrease in atmospheric CO2 driven by enhanced continental weathering in these tectonically active regions.

  20. Sr isotopic composition of gypsic paleosols as a proxy for Neogene forearc uplift in the South America - Nazca plate system at latitudes 19 to 22° S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, N. J.; Jordan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of uplift of a continental surface relative to sea level is challenging. The study area comprises the forearc associated with the South America - Nazca plate margin in northern Chile. The Coastal Cordillera (CdlC) is a mountain range 800 to 2300 m in elevation that ends abruptly to the west at the Pacific Ocean, terminated at a 400 m to 1700 m high scarp. The CdlC is formed mainly of Jurassic - Early Cretaceous igneous rocks, the remnants of a Mesozoic magmatic arc. To the east, the Central Depression (CD) is a forearc basin filled with Cenozoic sediments derived from the arc to the east. Arid to hyperarid climate conditions dominated throughout the Neogene. Profiles from rivers draining the CD and cutting through the CdlC are strongly suggestive that at least 1 km of relative surface uplift occurred since 10 Ma. Paleogeographic reconstructions of continental deposits, marine terraces and tilted originally horizontal depositional surfaces in the CdlC constrain surface uplift histories. However, we seek quantitative information about the magnitude as well as ages of uplift, so that numerical models of forearc geodynamics can be tested against uplift history. We are testing a new paleoaltimetry proxy based on the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of gypsum-rich paleosols. Published studies show that modern pedogenic gypsum in the study area is derived from two sources of distinguishable Sr isotopic values; salts precipitate from aerosols in persistent winter marine fogs and dust comes from the weathering of Andean rocks. It has been shown for modern soils that a transect from the coast to the Andes reveals a progressive decline in 87Sr/86Sr, corresponding to the mixing of marine aerosols and weathered dust. Below 1.5 km altitude, the marine signal diminishes as altitude rises. The low mass difference between 87Sr and 86Sr leads to little fractionation by environmental processes, which is ideal for studying the primary marine vs. Andean signal. Because the Neogene strata

  1. Andean Mountain Building Did not Preclude Dispersal of Lowland Epiphytic Orchids in the Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Gottschling, Marc; Chomicki, Guillaume; Condamine, Fabien L; Klitgård, Bente B; Pansarin, Emerson; Gerlach, Günter

    2017-07-07

    The Andean uplift is one of the major orographic events in the New World and has impacted considerably the diversification of numerous Neotropical lineages. Despite its importance for biogeography, the specific role of mountain ranges as a dispersal barrier between South and Central American lowland plant lineages is still poorly understood. The swan orchids (Cycnoches) comprise ca 34 epiphytic species distributed in lowland and pre-montane forests of Central and South America. Here, we study the historical biogeography of Cycnoches to better understand the impact of the Andean uplift on the diversification of Neotropical lowland plant lineages. Using novel molecular sequences (five nuclear and plastid regions) and twelve biogeographic models, we infer that the most recent common ancestor of Cycnoches originated in Amazonia ca 5 Mya. The first colonization of Central America occurred from a direct migration event from Amazonia, and multiple bidirectional trans-Andean migrations between Amazonia and Central America took place subsequently. Notably, these rare biological exchanges occurred well after major mountain building periods. The Andes have limited plant migration, yet it has seldom allowed episodic gene exchange of lowland epiphyte lineages such as orchids with great potential for effortless dispersal because of the very light, anemochorous seeds.

  2. The abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Laura P; Condamine, Fabien L; Antonelli, Alexandre; Mulch, Andreas; Davis, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    The tropical Andes of South America, the world's richest biodiversity hotspot, are home to many rapid radiations. While geological, climatic, and ecological processes collectively explain such radiations, their relative contributions are seldom examined within a single clade. We explore the contribution of these factors by applying a series of diversification models that incorporate mountain building, climate change, and trait evolution to the first dated phylogeny of Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae). Our framework is novel for its direct incorporation of geological data on Andean uplift into a macroevolutionary model. We show that speciation and extinction are differentially influenced by abiotic factors: speciation rates rose concurrently with Andean elevation, while extinction rates decreased during global cooling. Pollination syndrome and fruit type, both biotic traits known to facilitate mutualisms, played an additional role in driving diversification. These abiotic and biotic factors resulted in one of the fastest radiations reported to date: the centropogonids, whose 550 species arose in the last 5 million yr. Our study represents a significant advance in our understanding of plant evolution in Andean cloud forests. It further highlights the power of combining phylogenetic and Earth science models to explore the interplay of geology, climate, and ecology in generating the world's biodiversity.

  3. Dispersal, isolation and diversification with continued gene flow in an Andean tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby Pennington, R; Lavin, Matt

    2017-07-01

    The Andes are the world's longest mountain chain, and the tropical Andes are the world's richest biodiversity hot spot. The origin of the tropical Andean cordillera is relatively recent because the elevation of the mountains was relatively low (400-2500 m palaeoelevations) only 10 MYA with final uplift being rapid. These final phases of the Andean orogeny are thought to have had a fundamental role in shaping processes of biotic diversification and biogeography, with these effects reaching far from the mountains themselves by changing the course of rivers and deposition of mineral-rich Andean sediments across the massive Amazon basin. In a recent issue of Molecular Ecology, Oswald, Overcast, Mauck, Andersen, and Smith (2017) investigate the biogeography and diversification of bird species in the Andes of Peru and Ecuador. Their study is novel in its focus on tropical dry forests (Figure 1) rather than more mesic biomes such as rain forests, cloud forests and paramos, which tend to be the focus of science and conservation in the Andean hot spot. It is also able to draw powerful conclusions via the first deployment of genomic approaches to a biogeographic question in the threatened dry forests of the New World. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Episodic swell growth inferred from variable uplift of the Cape Verde hotspot islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, R.; Helffrich, G.; Cosca, M.; Vance, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Schmidt, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    On the Beagle voyage, Charles Darwin first noted the creation and subsidence of ocean islands, establishing in geology's infancy that island freeboard changes with time. Hotspot ocean islands have an obvious mechanism for freeboard change through the growth of the bathymetric anomaly, or swell, on which the islands rest. Models for swell development indicate that flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions, as well as spreading of melt residue from the hotspot, can all contribute to island uplift. Here we test various models for swell development using the uplift histories for the islands of the Cape Verde hotspot, derived from isotopic dating of marine terraces and subaerial to submarine lava-flow morphologies. The island uplift histories, in conjunction with inter-island spacing, uplift rate and timing differences, rule out flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions. We also find that uplift cannot be reconciled with models that advocate the spreading of melt residue in swell development unless swell growth is episodic. Instead, we infer from the uplift histories that two processes have acted to raise the islands during the past 6 Myr. During an initial phase, mantle processes acted to build the swell. Subsequently, magmatic intrusions at the island edifice caused 350 m of local uplift at the scale of individual islands. Finally, swell-wide uplift contributed a further 100 m of surface rise.

  5. Chagas disease in Andean countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhl

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Andean Countries' Initiative (ACI for controlling Chagas disease was officially created in 1997 within the framework of the Hipolito Unanue Agreement (UNANUE between the Ministries of Health of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its objective was to interrupt transmission via vector and transfusion in the region, taking into account that there are 12.5 million people at risk in the four Andean countries forming the initiative in the area and around 3 million people are infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. The progress of control activities for the vector species present in the Andean sub-region, for different reasons, has been slow and control interventions have still not been installed in all geographical areas occupied by the target species. This has been partly due to lack of knowledge about these vector populations' biological characteristics, and consequent uncertainty about which are the appropriate control measures and strategies to be implemented in the region. The main vector species present important similarities in Venezuela and Colombia and in Ecuador and Northern Peru and they can be approached in a similar way throughout the whole regions, basing approaches on and adapting them to the current strategies being developed in Venezuela during the 1960s which have been progressively adopted in the Southern Cone and Central-American region. Additional measures are needed for keeping endemic areas free from Rhodnius prolixus silvatic populations, widely spread in the Orinoco region in Colombia and Venezuela. Regarding aetiological treatment, it is worth mentioning that (with the exception of Colombia none of the other countries forming the ACI have registered medicaments available for treating infected young people. There are no suitable follow-up programmes in the sub-region or for treating cases of congenital Chagas disease. An integral and integrated programme encompassing all the aspects including transmission by transfusion which

  6. Emergence and evolution of Santa Maria Island (Azores)—The conundrum of uplifted islands revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Ricardo; Helffrich, George; Madeira, Jose; Cosca, Michael A.; Thomas, Christine; Quartau, Rui; Hipolito, Ana; Rovere, Alessio; Hearty, Paul; Avila, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The growth and decay of ocean-island volcanoes are intrinsically linked to vertical movements. While the causes for subsidence are better understood, uplift mechanisms remain enigmatic. Santa Maria Island in the Azores Archipelago is an ocean-island volcano resting on top of young lithosphere, barely 480 km away from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Like most other Azorean islands, Santa Maria should be experiencing subsidence. Yet, several features indicate an uplift trend instead. In this paper, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of Santa Maria with respect to the timing and magnitude of its vertical movements, using detailed field work and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Our investigations revealed a complex evolutionary history spanning ∼6 m.y., with subsidence up to ca. 3.5 Ma followed by uplift extending to the present day. The fact that an island located in young lithosphere experienced a pronounced uplift trend is remarkable and raises important questions concerning possible uplift mechanisms. Localized uplift in response to the tectonic regime affecting the southeastern tip of the Azores Plateau is unlikely, since the area is under transtension. Our analysis shows that the only viable mechanism able to explain the uplift is crustal thickening by basal intrusions, suggesting that intrusive processes play a significant role even on islands standing on young lithosphere, such as in the Azores.

  7. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  8. Administrative Law in the Andean Community of Nations

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Rodríguez, Jorge Enrique

    2013-01-01

    One of the contemporary tendencies of Administrative Law is the recognition of its existence beyond the borders of a State. Under such premise, this paper aims to demonstrate that in the Andean Community of Nations sufficient elements to consider the existence of an Andean administrative Law. In the Andean statutes and rules, it is possible to identify an administrative function, as well as an administrative organization inside the Andean Integration System; and a system of Andean administrat...

  9. Andean settlers rush for Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-vega, J

    1990-01-01

    Governments of Andean countries (Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela) have encouraged migration to the Amazon Basin, which has contributed to its destruction. Population pressure, landlessness, and poverty are the inducements to migrate. Efforts to populate the Amazon forest were begun as early as 1964 in Peru without international notice. By 1980, logging was allowed in Peru, and Brazil considered colonization of the Amazon essential to national sovereignty. By 1986, outside of Lima, Peru, a development project originally funded by the World Bank, the InterAmerican Development Bank, and the US, resulted in conflicts between settlers and Indians, in loggers indiscriminately cutting, and in farmers using slash and burn techniques to clear forests. Elsewhere the Peruvian Amazon, in San Ignacio, the population was growing by 5.5%/year. The jungle road that had been started but never completed, Carretera Marginal, destroyed 5 million hectares of primary forest, and much of the 600,000 hectares of arable land gained by the road suffered from inappropriate farming practices which caused massive erosion and laterization of the soils. Food crop production declined, and production of coca for cocaine increased. Coca crops are controlled by the Shining Path guerrillas, who are trying to overthrow the Peruvian government. Devastation of Ecuador around Lago Agrio continues. In Colombia, east of Bogota, forests have disappeared and hills have eroded and silted up rivers and dams. The Andean piedmont in Bolivia has also been devastated by loggers and by slash and burn farming. Southeastern Bolivian forests have been cleared for soya bean cultivation on poor soils. Social and economic crises propel people into the remaining forests. The solution is to ease foreign debt, transfer appropriate technology at affordable prices, refuse to finance destructive development, and help to educate and train scientific researchers. Family planning services are also urgently needed

  10. Cenozoic Uplift, Erosion and Dynamic Support of Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Simon; White, Nicky

    2016-04-01

    The physiography of Madagascar is characterised by high-elevation but low-relief topography; 42% of the landscape is above 500 m in elevation. Eocene (marine) nummulitic (marine) limestones at elevations of ˜400 m above sea level and newly dated, emergent 125 ka coral reefs suggest that Madagascar has experienced differential vertical motions during Cenozoic times. Malagasy rivers are often deeply incised and contain steepened reaches, implying that they have responded to changes in regional uplift rate. However, low temperature thermochronology and 10Be derived erosion rates suggest that both Cenozoic and Recent average denudation rates have been low. Extensive laterite-capped, low-relief surfaces also suggest that there have been long periods of tectonic quiescence. In contrast, the modern landscape is characterised by erosional gullies (i.e. lavaka), with very high local erosion rates. To bridge the gap between this disparate evidence, we inverted 2566 longitudinal river profiles using a damped non-negative, least-squares linear inversion to determine the history of regional uplift. We used a simplified version of the stream power erosional law. River profiles were extracted from the 3 arc-second Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model. Calibration of the stream power erosional law is based upon Cenozoic limestones and new radiometrically dated marine terraces. The residual misfit between observed and calculated river profiles is small. Results suggest that Malagasy topography grew diachronously by 1-2 km over the last 15-20 Ma. Calculated uplift and denudation are consistent with independent observations. Thus drainage networks contain coherent signals that record regional uplift. The resultant waves of incision are the principal trigger for modern erosional processes. Admittance calculations, the history of basaltic volcanism and nearby oceanic residual age-depth measurements all suggest that as much as 0.8 - 1.1 km of Cenozoic uplift

  11. An Andean tectonic cycle:From crustal thickening to extension in a thin crust (34º-37ºSL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor A. Ramos; Vanesa D. Litvak; Andrés Folguera; Mauro Spagnuolo

    2014-01-01

    Several orogenic cycles of mountain building and subsequent collapse associated with periods of shal-lowing and steepening of subduction zones have been recognized in recent years in the Andes. Most of them are characterized by widespread crustal delamination expressed by large calderas and rhyolitic flare-up produced by the injection of hot asthenosphere in the subduction wedge. These processes are related to the increase of the subduction angle during trench roll-back. The Payenia paleoflat-slab, in the southern Central Andes of Argentina and Chile (34º~37º S) recorded a complete cycle from crustal thickening and mountain uplift to extensional collapse and normal faulting, which are related to changes in the subduction geometry. The early stages are associated with magmatic expansion and migration, subsequent deformation and broken foreland. New ages and geochemical data show the middle to late Miocene expansion and migration of arc volcanism towards the foreland region was associated with important deformation in the Andean foothills. However, the main difference of this orogenic cycle with the previously described cycles is that the steepening of the oceanic subducted slab is linked to basaltic flooding of large areas in the retroarc under an extensional setting. Crustal delamination is concentrated only in a narrow central belt along the cordilleran axis. The striking differences between the two types of cycles are interpreted to be related to the crustal thickness when steepening the subducting slab. The crustal thickness of the Altiplano is over 60e80 km, whereas Payenia is less than 42 km in the axial part, and near 30 km in the retroarc foothills. The final extensional regime associated with the slab steepening favors the basaltic flooding of more than 8400 km3 in an area larger than 40,000 km2, through 800 central vents and large fissures. These characteristics are unique in the entire present-day Andes.

  12. Plio-Pleistocene paleo-erosion rates as a recorder of orographic barrier uplift in the NW-Argentine Andes (Humahuaca Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Heiko; Schildgen, Taylor; Wittmann, Hella

    2017-04-01

    As an integral part of the Eastern Cordillera, the intermontane Humahuaca Basin in the NW Argentine Andes is located in transition between the arid and internally drained Puna Plateau to the west and the humid broken foreland to the east. In combination with moisture-bearing air masses sourced in the Atlantic Ocean and the Amazon Basin, the present-day topographic gradient of the eastern Andean margin comprises an efficient orographic barrier that results in a strong precipitation gradient, with rainfall of more than 2,000 mm/a along the eastern flanks and Mio-Pliocene by the growth of fault-bounded mountain ranges. This led to an increase in accommodation space and enabled the trapping of largely fluvial, late Miocene to Quaternary basin filling units. Subsequently, the basin was uplifted and internally deformed. Fossil records, sedimentologic evidence, and stable-isotopes (δD from volcanic glass) moreover imply that the re-routing of the fluvial network, an initial increase in precipitation, and, as the windward ranges attained threshold elevations to incoming moisture, reduced moisture availability by ca. 3 Ma, were all a consequence of the Mio-Pliocene uplift. In this study, we present first results of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide-derived paleo-erosion rates from quartz-bearing fluvial sands and gravels of known stratigraphic age. In most cases, the age control is based on previously published U-Pb zircon data of intercalated volcanic ash deposits, but also utilizes new OSL and AMS14C ages. A reassessment of the sediment-accumulation history of the basin highlights important changes of the depositional system, apparently associated with the transformation from a humid foreland to a fluvially restricted and semi-arid intermontane basin. Similarly, our terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide-derived data indicate an order-of-magnitude decrease in erosion rates at ca. 3 Ma, which suggests a causal link between the onset of uplift-induced semi-arid conditions and

  13. Varying mechanical coupling along the Andean margin: Implications for trench curvature, shortening and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaffaldano, G.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Corbi, F.; Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Bunge, H.-P.

    2012-03-01

    Convergent margins often exhibit spatial and temporal correlations between trench curvature, overriding plate shortening and topography uplift that provide insights into the dynamics of subduction. The Andean system, where the Nazca plate plunges beneath continental South America, is commonly regarded as the archetype of this class of tectonics systems. There is distinctive evidence that the degree of mechanical coupling between converging plates, i.e. the amount of resistive force mutually transmitted in the direction opposite to their motions, may be at the present-day significantly higher along the central Andean margin compared to the northern and southern limbs. However quantitative estimates of such resistance are still missing and would be desirable. Here we present laboratory models of subduction performed to investigate quantitatively how strong lateral coupling variations need to be to result in trench curvature, tectonic shortening and distribution of topography comparable to estimates from the Andean margin. The analogue of a two-layers Newtonian lithosphere/upper mantle system is established in a silicone putty/glucose syrup tank-model where lateral coupling variations along the interface between subducting and overriding plates are pre-imposed. Despite the simplicity of our setup, we estimate that coupling in the central margin as large as 20% of the driving force is sufficient to significantly inhibit the ability of the experimental overriding plate to slide above the subducting one. As a consequence, the central margin deforms and shortens more than elsewhere while the trench remains stationary, as opposed to the advancing lateral limbs. This causes the margin to evolve into a peculiar shape similar to the present-day trench of the Andean system.

  14. Magmatic evidence for Neogene lithospheric evolution of the central Andean ``flat-slab'' between 30°S and 32°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, S. M.; Abbruzzi, J. M.

    1996-06-01

    Geochemical data from Andean Miocene magmas erupted through the now volcanically-inactive "flat-slab" between 30°S to 32°S, coupled with geological and geophysical data, illuminate details on magmatic and continental lithospheric evolution over a progressively shallowing subduction zone. Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic and trace-element data show that Main Cordilleran, Precordilleran and Pampean magmas were contaminated in both the mantle and crust, and that the nature of the contaminants varied in time and space, reflecting tectonic events. Contaminants included both "enriched" (high LIL-element, high Sr and Pb, and low Nd isotopic ratios) and "depleted" (low LILE-element, low Sr and Pb, and high Nd isotopic ratios) types. In the western region, Main Cordilleran earlier Miocene lavas had contaminants with less "enriched" signatures than later Miocene lavas. Progressive "enrichment" is attributed to: (a) increasing amounts of sediment and tectonically eroded crust being subducted into the mantle wedge; and (b) contamination in a thickening Main Cordilleran lower crust whose composition was progressively "enriched". This "enrichment" occurred through addition of upper crust by an intracrustal mixing process driven by a propagating wedge tip associated with westward wedging, heating and deformation of crust from beneath the shortening Precordillera thrust belt to the east. Further east, magmas erupted through back-arc crust have more "depleted" signatures. Those erupted in the central part through the evolving Precordilleran thrust belt were contaminated by an older, thinner Grenville (˜ 1100 Ma) basement whose "depleted" signature is unique among Central Andean terranes. Late Miocene Pocho lavas erupted further east in conjunction with uplift of the Sierras Pampeanas show "enrichment" through time. Arguably, these magmas could contain a component mechanically removed from the base of the thinning continental lithosphere to the west, and progressively incorporated into the

  15. Two new Cystoderma species from high Andean Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saar, I.; Læssøe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Two new agaric species, Cystoderma andinum and C. papallactae are described from high Andean Ecuador.......ABSTRACT: Two new agaric species, Cystoderma andinum and C. papallactae are described from high Andean Ecuador....

  16. Three-dimensional density model of the Nazca plate and the Andean continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassara, AndréS.; GöTze, Hans-Jürgen; Schmidt, Sabine; Hackney, Ron

    2006-09-01

    We forward modeled the Bouguer anomaly in a region encompassing the Pacific Ocean (85°W) and the Andean margin (60°W) between northern Peru (5°S) and Patagonia (45°S). The three-dimensional density model that reproduces the gravity field is a continental-scale representation of density structure to 410 km depth that characterizes the mantle and crust of the oceanic Nazca plate, subducted slab and continental margin with a minimum number of bodies. We predefined the density of each body after studying the dependency of density on composition of crustal and mantle materials and pressure-temperature conditions appropriate for the Andean setting. A database of independent geophysical information constrains the geometry of the top of the subducted slab, locally the Moho of the oceanic and continental crusts and, indirectly, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary underneath the continental plate. Other boundaries, notably the intracrustal density discontinuity separating upper from lower crust below the continent, were not constrained and their geometry is the result of fitting the observed and calculated Bouguer anomaly during forward modeling. This contribution presents the model to the Andean geoscientific community and contains some tools, like a sensitivity analysis, that helps potential users of the model to interpret its results. We describe and discuss some of these results in order to illustrate the application of the model to the study of a wide range of phenomena (e.g., modification of oceanic plate structure by hot spots, shape of the subducted slab, thermal structure of the continental lithosphere, compensation mechanism and formation of orogenic relieve, causes of Andean segmentation).

  17. Abrupt uplift of Tibetan Plateau at the end of early Pleistocene and Australasian impact event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shoumai; LIU Yongjiang; GE Xiaohong

    2009-01-01

    The latest sharp uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent mountains occurred at the end of the early Pleistocene. The uplift of the Plateau resulted from Late Mesozoic- -Cenozoic compressional structure due to the subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Asian continent. This event definitively effected the formation of basin-mountain relief, Cenozoic basin deformation, large scale aridity and desertification of western China. The Australasian meteorites impact event happened ca. 0.8 Ma ago, located in the triangle area of the Indian Ocean ridge (20°S/67°E). The impact may have resulted in an acceleration of speeding of the Indian Ocean ridge pushing the Indian Plate to subduct rapidly northward. Thus, the impact event can give reasonable explanation for the dynamic background of the latest rapid uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the continental deformation of western China and even of the Middle Asia.

  18. U/Pb ages on detrital zircons in the southern central Andes Neogene foreland (36°-37°S): Constraints on Andean exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, Lucía; Bottesi, Germán; Naipauer, Maximiliano; Folguera, Andrés; Ramos, Victor A.

    2011-12-01

    U/Pb dating on detrital zircons was performed in the Pampa de Carrizalito depocenter of the Late Miocene foreland basin associated with the Southern Central Andes orogenic front. This reveals Andean and pre-Andean components in magmatic derived zircons inhomogeneously distributed through the sequence. Andean, Grenville, Pampean, Famatinian and Gondwanic components reveal a complex source distribution from either the Main Andes, Coastal Cordillera and basement foreland areas. These are discussed showing different patterns in the context of the Andean orogenic cycle. Cretaceous and Jurassic components that are partly related to Mesozoic batholiths, developed at the western slope of the Andes at these latitudes, have a very contrasting behavior through the sequence: While Jurassic grains are represented from base to top, Cretaceous ones dilute upwardly. This is explained through the progressive uplift of the Southern Central Andes that could have created a barrier to Cretaceous and Jurassic detritus, while the older ones could have had either an alternative source area represented by the inverted rift system of the Huincul Ridge in the foreland area and the Cordillera del Viento in the hinterland area or the reworking of Jurassic sedimentary sequences of the Neuquén basin. Finally, a progressive enrichment in pre-Andean components to the top of the sequence is interpreted as related to the development of a broken foreland and the consequent rapid expansion of the orogenic front at the time of development of a slab shallowing setting in the region as shown by previous works.

  19. Accidental inflation from Kaehler uplifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Westphal, Alexander; Wieck, Clemens [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Jing, Shenglin [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Canadian Inst. for Theoretical Astrophysics; Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics

    2013-09-15

    We analyze the possibility of realizing inflation with a subsequent dS vacuum in the Kaehler uplifting scenario. The inclusion of several quantum corrections to the 4d effective action evades previous no-go theorems and allows for construction of simple and successful models of string inflation. The predictions of several benchmark models are in accord with current observations, i.e., a red spectral index, negligible non-gaussianity, and spectral distortions similar to the simplest models of inflation. A particularly interesting subclass of models are ''left-rolling'' ones, where the overall volume of the compactified dimensions shrinks during inflation. We call this phenomenon ''inflation by deflation'' (IBD), where deflation refers to the internal manifold. This subclass has the appealing features of being insensitive to initial conditions, avoiding the overshooting problem, and allowing for observable running {alpha}<{proportional_to}0.012 and enhanced tensor-to-scalar ratio r{proportional_to}10{sup -5}. The latter results differ significantly from many string inflation models.

  20. Administrative Law in the Andean Community of Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Santos Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the contemporary tendencies of Administrative Law is the recognition of its existence beyond the borders of a State. Under such premise, this paper aims to demonstrate that in the Andean Community of Nations sufficient elements to consider the existence of an Andean administrative Law. In the Andean statutes and rules, it is possible to identify an administrative function, as well as an administrative organization inside the Andean Integration System; and a system of Andean administrative rules and an administrative justice system.

  1. Deformation and incision of the western margin of the Central Andean Plateau, S. Peru and N. Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildgen, T.

    2012-12-01

    The western margin of the Central Andean Plateau in southern Peru and northern Chile hosts a rich geologic and geomorphic record of crustal deformation and river incision that developed during a period of regional plateau uplift. Significant growth of topography likely occurred in the western Central Andes starting at ca. 30 Ma, when the regionally extensive silts and sandstones of the Moquegua and Azapa Group sediments gave way to coarse sandstones and conglomerates. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology, 3D thermal modeling, and infilling volcanic flows show that a subsequent major phase of canyon incision started in the middle reaches of Ocoña Canyon (southern Peru) between 11 and 8 Ma, with ca. 2-km of incision occurring between ca. 11 and 5 Ma. Surface uplift coeval with this incision has been documented in northern Chile, where rotated forearc basin deposits reveal 1 to 2 km of differential uplift between the Coastal Cordillera and the plateau margin that started after 11 to 10 Ma. In contrast with the 11 to 8 Ma onset of incision in the middle reaches of Ocoña Canyon, the currently 1-km-high coastal/piedmont region appears not to have been affected by incision until after 5 Ma, as documented by the 50-km-wide alluvial and colluvial plain that remained occupied by rivers until at least 5 Ma. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology pointing to a final 1-km of incision in the middle reaches of Ocoña Canyon after ca. 5 Ma is supported by apatite 4He/3He thermochonometry, which documents the passage of a km-scale knickpoint through the same region between ca. 7 and 4 Ma. Although river incision provides only a minimum time constraint for the start of surface uplift, the broadly coincident start of incision with the rotation of forearc basin deposits in northern Chile implies a close temporal coupling between the start of surface uplift and the onset of incision in Ocoña Canyon. Furthermore, the delayed incision of the coastal/piedmont region until after 5 Ma shows

  2. Gulf Coast Basins and Uplifts [gcstructsg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide generalized outlines of major basins and uplifts in the Gulf Coast region modified after Plate 2, Principal structural features, Gulf of Mexico...

  3. Evolving Regional Security in the Andean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-19

    security forces or judicial systems reduces the effectiveness of regional cooperation. Past efforts to achieve consensus among the Andean states have...Trimestre 2001. Nuñez, Joseph. Una Arquitectura para la Seguridad del Siglo XXI par alas Américas: Cooperación Multilateral, Paz y Poder Flexible

  4. Andean region: measles on the way out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In August 1996, health officials, program managers, epidemiologists, laboratory representatives, UNICEF, Rotary International, and Pan American Health Organization staff attended the VII Andean EPI Meeting in Quito, Ecuador, to review the progress of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). All Andean countries have conducted catch-up measles vaccination campaigns targeting children 9 months to 15 years old. These campaigns achieved 90% vaccine coverage and a strong reduction in measles incidence (only 7 confirmed cases in 1996). Follow-up campaigns were conducted during 1995-1996 in Colombia, Peru, and Chile. They were expected in Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela during 1997-1999. The Andean countries implemented a national surveillance system for measles in 1995. Meeting representatives made eight recommendations regarding measles. For example, health officials should reach and maintain routine vaccination coverage greater than 95% for children 12-23 months old in each municipality. Laboratory representatives proposed recommendations on uniform criteria for measles diagnosis. The last indigenous wild poliovirus in the Americas was isolated in 1991. Imported wild poliovirus remains a concern. The Andean countries are expanding surveillance of neonatal tetanus activities. Since 1989 the frequency of neonatal tetanus has been falling in the Andean region, especially in Bolivia and Peru. The impact of migration on the control of neonatal tetanus should be a higher priority. Participants repeated the need for systematic use and continuous monitoring of EPI indicators (e.g., vaccination coverage). Three countries plan on analyzing surveys on missed opportunities for vaccination in 1996. Three countries presented progress reports on hepatitis B vaccination and surveillance. Participants issued recommendations on quality control of vaccines. The responsibility for quality control lies with the manufacturers and the government. Vaccines for invasive diseases (e

  5. Miocene tectonism and the separation of cis- and trans-Andean river basins: Evidence from Neotropical fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, James S.; Lovejoy, Nathan R.; Crampton, William G. R.

    2006-03-01

    The fish fauna of trans-Andean river basins in northwestern South America is ancient and diverse, including 14% (558 of 4,085) of all Neotropical teleost species and representing 88% of the orders and 79% of the families. The evolutionary histories of these lineages provide many examples to test models of the tectonic uplift that isolated the trans-Andean basins. We report the results of two newly compiled data sets of phylogenetic and biogeographic information on the freshwater fishes of the region: (1) species-level phylogenies for 26 Neotropical freshwater teleost taxa, with a minimum of 37 cis-/trans-Andean clades and (2) species distributions for 641 genera of Neotropical freshwater teleosts, with a minimum of 140 cis-/trans-Andean clades. Although it provides only about one-quarter the total number of cis-/trans-Andean clades, species phylogeny preserves a more accurate record of the temporal sequence of basin isolation. Phylogenies using gene sequences also may provide estimates on the timing of lineage divergences. However, the great majority (70%) of available species phylogenies for Neotropical freshwater teleosts employ comparative morphology alone, partly because species-level sampling for most taxa requires collections over large spatial (10 3-10 4 km) scales, and collections of whole specimens for morphological study are readily available for many taxa from natural history museums. Fish species phylogenies are partially concordant with patterns of drainage basin isolation generated from geological data on the Miocene of northwestern South America, which associate the initial rise of the Eastern Cordillera (˜1 2 Ma) with the hydrological isolation of the Magdalena and Pacific Slope regions and the rise of the Merida Andes (˜8 Ma) with the isolation of the modern Maracaibo and Orinoco basins. Although some phylogenies unite taxa from the Maracaibo and cis-Andean Orinoco, a more common set of area relationships occurs between clades exclusive to the

  6. Temporal patterns of diversification in Andean Eois, a species-rich clade of moths (Lepidoptera, Geometridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberger, P; Fiedler, K

    2011-04-01

    The timing of the origin of present day Neotropical animal diversity is still a matter of debate. For a long time, a preponderance of glacial (i.e. Pleistocene) radiations has been proposed. However, recent data from molecular clock studies indicate a preglacial origin for most of the examined taxa. We performed a fossil-calibrated molecular dating analysis of the genus Eois, which is a major component of one of the world's most diverse assemblages of herbivorous insects. We found that diversification of Eois took place in the Miocene following a pattern best explained by density-dependent diversification. A strong slowdown of diversification towards the present was detected. Diversification of Eois does overlap with increased Andean uplift and diversification of the most commonly used host plant genus Piper. These findings match the patterns found for the majority of Neotropical tetrapods and for three other unrelated, ecologically different lepidopteran genera.

  7. GPS Imaging of Sierra Nevada Uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent improvements in the scope and precision of GPS networks across California and Nevada have allowed for uplift of the Sierra Nevada to be observed directly. Much of the signal, in the range of 1 to 2 mm/yr, has been attributed to lithospheric scale rebound following massive groundwater withdrawal in the San Joaquin Valley in southern California, exacerbated by drought since 2011. However, natural tectonic deformation associated with long term uplift of the range may also contribute to the observed signal. We have developed new algorithms that enhance the signal of Sierra Nevada uplift and improve our ability to interpret and separate natural tectonic signals from anthropogenic contributions. We apply our new Median Interannual Difference Adjusted for Skewness (MIDAS) algorithm to the vertical times series and a inverse distance-weighted median spatial filtering and Delaunay-based interpolation to despeckle the rate map. The resulting spatially continuous vertical rate field is insensitive to outliers and steps in the GPS time series, and omits isolated features attributable to unstable stations or unrepresentative rates. The resulting vertical rate field for California and Nevada exhibits regionally coherent signals from the earthquake cycle including interseismic strain accumulation in Cascadia, postseismic relaxation of the mantle from recent large earthquakes in central Nevada and southern California, groundwater loading changes, and tectonic uplift of the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges. Uplift of the Sierra Nevada extends from the Garlock Fault in the south to an indefinite boundary in the north near the latitude of Mt. Lassen to the eastern Sierra Nevada range front in Owen's Valley. The rates transition to near zero in the southern Walker Lane. The eastern boundary of uplift coincides with the highest strain rates in the western Great Basin, suggesting higher normal fault slip rates and a component of tectonic uplift of the Sierra Nevada.

  8. An Andean radiation: polyploidy in the tree genus Polylepis (Rosaceae, Sanguisorbeae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Lebuhn, A N; Fuchs, J; Hertel, D; Hirsch, H; Toivonen, J; Kessler, M

    2010-11-01

    The Andean tree genus Polylepis (Rosaceae) is notorious for the high morphological plasticity of its species and the difficulty in their circumscription. The evolutionary mechanisms that have driven diversification of the genus are still poorly understood, with factors as diverse as ecological specialisation, reticulate evolution, polyploidisation and apomixis being proposed to contribute. In the present study, chromosome counts, flow cytometry and stomata guard cell size measurements were employed to document for the first time the presence of polyploidy in the genus and to infer ploidy levels for most species. Inferred ploidy levels show a clear progression from diploidy in cloud forest species to polyploidy (tetra- to octoploidy) in the morphologically and ecologically specialised incana group, indicating that polyploidisation may have played a major role in speciation processes and the colonisation of novel habitats during the Andean uplift. At least two species of Polylepis comprise populations with varying degrees of ploidy. More extensive studies are needed to obtain a better understanding of the prevalence and effects of intraspecific polyploidy in the genus.

  9. An Andean tectonic cycle: From crustal thickening to extension in a thin crust (34°–37°SL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. Ramos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several orogenic cycles of mountain building and subsequent collapse associated with periods of shallowing and steepening of subduction zones have been recognized in recent years in the Andes. Most of them are characterized by widespread crustal delamination expressed by large calderas and rhyolitic flare-up produced by the injection of hot asthenosphere in the subduction wedge. These processes are related to the increase of the subduction angle during trench roll-back. The Payenia paleoflat-slab, in the southern Central Andes of Argentina and Chile (34°–37°S recorded a complete cycle from crustal thickening and mountain uplift to extensional collapse and normal faulting, which are related to changes in the subduction geometry. The early stages are associated with magmatic expansion and migration, subsequent deformation and broken foreland. New ages and geochemical data show the middle to late Miocene expansion and migration of arc volcanism towards the foreland region was associated with important deformation in the Andean foothills. However, the main difference of this orogenic cycle with the previously described cycles is that the steepening of the oceanic subducted slab is linked to basaltic flooding of large areas in the retroarc under an extensional setting. Crustal delamination is concentrated only in a narrow central belt along the cordilleran axis. The striking differences between the two types of cycles are interpreted to be related to the crustal thickness when steepening the subducting slab. The crustal thickness of the Altiplano is over 60–80 km, whereas Payenia is less than 42 km in the axial part, and near 30 km in the retroarc foothills. The final extensional regime associated with the slab steepening favors the basaltic flooding of more than 8400 km3 in an area larger than 40,000 km2, through 800 central vents and large fissures. These characteristics are unique in the entire present-day Andes.

  10. Displacement and deformation analysis for uplift piles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    On the assumptions that the shear resistance increases linearly with increasing shear displacement between the uplift pile and surrounding soil,that the axis force is distributed as parabola along the pile length,that elastic distortion occurs when the pile is loaded,that the displacement of pile is in accord with that of the soil,and that the uplift pile failure is regarded as the soil failure,arational calculation method was proposed for calculating the deformation,ultimate displacement and shear resistance of piles.The distributions of frictional resistance and the shear displacement along the pile length were obtained with the method.The comparisons were made between the measurement results and the present results.The present theoretical results agree well with the measurement results,with the average difference being less than 12% before failure.The comparisons show that the proposed method is reasonable for uplift design and engineering construction of piles.

  11. Fluvial dissection, isostatic uplift, and geomorphological evolution of volcanic islands (Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Inmaculada; Silva, Pablo G.; Martín-Betancor, Moises; Pérez-Torrado, Francisco José; Guillou, Hervé; Scaillet, S.

    2008-11-01

    drier Southern sectors, the maximum values are under 0.015 mm/yr. Mean uplift rates obtained in this study are within the range of those inferred from stratigraphical markers, as is the case for horizons of raised Pliocene pillow-lavas (c.a. 4 Ma) uplifted between 46 and 143 m (0.014-0.024 mm/yr). The estimation of the bulk uplift promoted by fluvial unloading is of + 143 m for the entire island, and of + 71 m for the wet NE sector. These data explain 73% to 99% of the maximum uplift recorded by the raised Pliocene sea-level markers. This reflects that erosional unloading is a critical control factor in the uplift of the oceanic island, but is not capable of explaining the full recorded uplift in Gran Canaria. Additional sources of uplift, such as gravitational unloading, lithospheric flexure induced by adjacent islands, and/or volcanic underplating, are required. The theoretical onset of lithospheric bulging beneath Gran Canaria, as exerted by Tenerife, promoted a broad westwards tilting of the former from 3.8-3.5 Ma ago. This overall tilting accelerated fluvial incision, erosional unloading, and, therefore, the sustained differential uplift on the Eastern slope of the island over its last erosional stage. Considering mean uplift rates for the East and West sectors, Eastern values (0.024 mm/yr) are double than those in the West (0.011 mm/yr), supporting the role of lithospheric flexure of adjacent islands as an additional source of uplift. Complex feedback between fluvial unloading, differential uplift, orographic effect, lithospheric flexure, and volcanic underplating, seems to control the geomorphological development of hot-spot volcanic islands, after the gravitational collapse of stratovolcanos during their rejuvenation stage.

  12. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  13. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  14. Andean evolution of the Aluminé fold and thrust belt, Northern Patagonian Andes (38°30‧-40°30‧S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2012-10-01

    The Aluminé fold and thrust belt between 38°30' and 40°30'S is the result of two periods of progression of deformation toward the foreland. The chronology of deformation and its relationship with magmatism through time show spatially and temporally separated magmatic events closely linked to distinct deformational stages. Data presented here confirms a Late Cretaceous mountain-building phase that coexisted in space and time with an eastward arc-migration. During this stage, a belt of deformation expanded through the foreland where it produced the Southern Neuquen Precordillera. This eastern independent mountain grew separately from the main Andean axis through a combination of inversion of the old rift systems and interaction with a pre-Andean belt which acted as a foreland obstacle. On the basis of tectonostratigraphic controls we define the last Andean contractional phase between the Late Miocene and the Pliocene. This event induced the reactivation of both sectors of the fold and thrust belt with minor propagation toward the foreland, leading to the uplift of the Patagonian Andes and reshaping the Southern Neuquén Precordillera. Both intervals of shortening are separated by a period of localized extension that resulted in the development of the Collón Cura basin within this Andean segment. Here, large thicknesses of volcanosedimentary sequences accumulated contemporaneously with the extensional activity between the earliest Oligocene and the Early Miocene.

  15. F-Theory Uplifts and GUTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Grimm, Thomas W.; /Bonn U.; Jurke, Benjamin; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Weigand, Timo; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    We study the F-theory uplift of Type IIB orientifold models on compact Calabi-Yau threefolds containing divisors which are del Pezzo surfaces. We consider two examples defined via del Pezzo transitions of the quintic. The first model has an orientifold projection leading to two disjoint O7-planes and the second involution acts via an exchange of two del Pezzo surfaces. The two uplifted fourfolds are generically singular with minimal gauge enhancements over a divisor and, respectively, a curve in the non-Fano base. We study possible further degenerations of the elliptic fiber leading to F-theory GUT models based on subgroups of E{sub 8}.

  16. Uplifting non-compact gauged supergravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, Walter H.; Dall’Agata, Gianguido [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”,Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Padova Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-02-02

    We provide the M-theory uplift of de Sitter vacua of SO(5,3) and SO(4,4) gaugings of maximal supergravity in 4 dimensions. We find new non-compact backgrounds that are squashed hyperboloids with non-trivial flux for the 3-form potential. The uplift requires a new non-linear ansatz for the 11-dimensional metric and for the 3-form potential that reduces to the known one leading to the 7-sphere solution in the case of the SO(8) gauging.

  17. Juruá Orogeny: Brazil and Andean Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Vicente Caputo

    Full Text Available Seismic data from Petrobras (Brazilian state-owned petroleum company show wide deformation and many reverse faults throughout the Solimões and Acre basins of northern Brazil. This deformation was observed for the first time in the Juruá River in 1976 in the Solimões Basin, and it increases toward Acre and Subandean basins from Argentine and Chile to Colombia and Venezuela. Structural inversions, block uplifts, and asymmetrical folds are attributed to compression and shearing stresses along this wide area. The severe diastrophism seen in the Juruá River area is of Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian age. It probably coincided with the final separation between Laurasia and Gondwana continents and the initial opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean. In Peru and neighboring countries, the same Late Jurassic orogeny is also present. It occurs in the form of widespread regional uplifts, structural inversions, tilting, faults and asymmetrical folds beneath a pronounced regional parallel or angular unconformity of latest Jurassic age, marking a first-order sequence boundary above the Upper Jurassic Sarayaquillo Formation and equivalent formations, as well as above older formations. The depositional hiatus at the upper part of the Jurassic System is attributed to reorganization of stress fields that resulted in basin inversions, followed by widespread peneplanation. The uppermost Jurassic or lower Cretaceous beds, deposited above this regional unconformity, were not affected by this tectonism in Brazilian and Subandean basins. The stratigraphy of Peruvian Subandean sedimentary basins is similar to that of the Acre Basin.

  18. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tilling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA, which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions" recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene.

    The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru. The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km3 in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia killed about 25 000 people – the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent

  19. Evidence for the development of the Andean rain shadow from a Neogene isotopic record in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Jason A.; Currie, Brian S.; Shullenberger, Eric D.; Dunagan, Stan P.; Jordan, Teresa E.; Blanco, Nicolás; Tomlinson, Andrew J.; Rowe, Harry D.; Houston, John

    2010-04-01

    Varying ages from Triassic to Pliocene have been proposed for the onset of hyperaridity in the Atacama Desert. The exact timing for the initiation of hyperaridity is critical for determining potential causes, which range from regional effects of global cooling to Andean uplift above elevations conducive to extreme rain shadows. Analysis of the stable isotopic composition of lower Miocene-Quaternary (21-0.015 Ma) palustrine and lacustrine carbonates in the Calama Basin reveals extreme changes in their oxygen and carbon isotopic composition during the Miocene. Limestone δ18O values increased by ˜ 5‰ from middle to late Miocene, ranging from - 5.5‰ at 12 Ma to - 1‰ at ˜ 6 Ma. Carbon isotopic values increase by 9‰ over the Neogene, from average values of - 3‰ at 21 Ma to + 3‰ at 12 Ma, and reaching a maximum of + 6‰ at 5 Ma. The increase in oxygen isotopic values occurred over a time span in which the catchment area of the basin experienced significant uplift, causing the δ18O value of precipitation to become more negative. We attribute the shift towards higher δ18O values to enhanced evaporative enrichment both of soil water or snow prior to infiltration, and within shallow lakes or wetlands prior to carbonate precipitation. The large increase in δ13C values was likely caused by a transition from a vegetated landscape influenced primarily by soil-respired CO 2 to a landscape largely devoid of vegetation and influenced by atmospheric and volcanic CO 2. Isotopic values of palustrine carbonates therefore indicate that hyperaridity commenced in the Calama Basin during the middle to late Miocene, in agreement with other paleoclimatic records from the basin. The cause for the onset of this climate change is thought to be due to the development of a strong Andean rain shadow associated with the uplift of the Andes to mean elevations > 2 km.

  20. Detrital Zircon Provenance Record of Pre-Andean to Modern Tectonics in the Northern Andes: Examples from Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S. W. M.; Jackson, L. J.; Horton, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb age distributions from modern rivers and Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin fill in the northern Andes provide insights into pre-Andean, Andean, and active uplift and exhumation of distinctive sediment source regions. Diagnostic age signatures enable straightforward discrimination of competing sediment sources within the Andean magmatic arc (Western Cordillera-Central Cordillera), retroarc fold-thrust belt (Eastern Cordillera-Subandean Zone), and Amazonian craton (composed of several basement provinces). More complex, however, are the mid/late Cenozoic provenance records generated by recycling of basin fill originally deposited during early/mid Mesozoic extension, late Mesozoic thermal subsidence, and early Cenozoic shortening. Although subject to time-transgressive trends, regionally significant provenance patterns in Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia reveal: (1) Triassic-Jurassic growth of extensional subbasins fed by local block uplifts (with commonly unimodal 300­-150 Ma age peaks); (2) Cretaceous deposition in an extensive postrift setting fed by principally cratonic sources (with common 1800-900 Ma ages); and (3) Cenozoic growth of a broad flexural basin fed initially fed by magmatic-arc rocks (100-0 Ma), then later dominance by thrust-belt sedimentary rocks with progressively greater degrees of basin recycling (yielding diverse and variable age populations from the aforementioned source regions). U-Pb results from modern rivers and smaller subbasins prove useful in evaluating source-to-sink relationships, downstream mixing relationships, hinterland-foreland basin connectivity, paleodrainage integration, and tectonic/paleotopographic reconstructions. Most but not all of the elevated intermontane basins in the modern hinterland of the northern Andes contain provenance records consistent with genesis in a broader foreland basin developed at low elevation. Downstream variations within modern axial rivers and Cenozoic axial basins inform predictive models of

  1. Active basement uplift of Sierra Pie de Palo (Northwestern Argentina): Rates and inception from10Be cosmogenic nuclide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siame, Lionel L.; Sébrier, Michel; Bellier, Olivier; Bourlès, Didier; Costa, Carlos; Ahumada, Emilio A.; Gardini, Carlos E.; Cisneros, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Quaternary tectonic and denudation rates are investigated for an actively growing basement anticline: the Sierra Pie de Palo range, which belongs to the Andean foreland of Northwestern Argentina (28°S-33°S). In this study, a detailed morphometric analysis of the topography is combined with in situ-produced cosmogenic10Be concentrations measured in (1) surface boulders abandoned on alluvial terraces affected by fault activity (along the north bounding fault) and growth of the basement fold (along the southeastern border), (2) bedrock outcrops corresponding to an exhumed and folded, regional erosion surface, and (3) fluvial sediments sampled at the outlets of several watersheds. Along the eastern and northern borders of the range, incision and uplift rates have been estimated at approximately 0.5 and 1 mm/yr when integrated on Holocene and Pleistocene time scales, in close agreement with both long-term (structural and basin evolution data) and short-term (GPS-derived velocity field) analyses. Cosmogenic-derived denudation and uplift rates combined with geomorphic characteristics of watersheds and river channels allows estimating the onset of the uplift at 4-6 Ma, followed by a more recent period of topographic rejuvenation at roughly 1-2 Ma, probably synchronous with steepening of the eastern and northern flanks of the anticline.

  2. Differential uplift between Beihuaiyang and Dabie orogenic belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨坤光; 马昌前; 许长海; 杨巍然

    2000-01-01

    Isotope dating, hornblende geobarometer, fission-track analysis and fluid inclusion homogeneous temperature analysis have been applied to Caledonian, Variscan and Yenshan plutons in Bei Huaiyang (BHY) and Dabie erogenic belt (DOB), and the emplaced depths and ages of these plutons have been obtained in order to obtain differential uplift time and uplift heights between BHY and DOB since late Paleozoic era. BHY had experienced three stages of uplift (C1-C2, T-J2, J3-K1) and its total uplift height is about 10 km, but, DOB had only experienced two stages of uplift (T-J2, J3-K1) and its maximum uplift height is more than 15 km. BHY uplift occurred mainly before the mid-Jurassic (about 150 Ma), but DOB uplift took place after the mid-Jurassic (about 150 Ma).

  3. Differential uplift between Beihuaiyang and Dabie orogenic belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Isotope dating,hornblende geobarometer,fission-track analysis and fluid inclusion homogeneous temperature analysis have been applied to Caledonian,Variscan and Yenshan plutons in Bei Huaiyang (BHY) and Dabie orogenic belt (DOB),and the emplaced depths and ages of these plutons have been obtained in order to obtain differential uplift time and uplift heights between BHY and DOB since late Paleozoic era.BHY had experienced three stages of uplift (C1-C2,T-J2,J3-K1) and its total uplift height is about 10 km,but,DOB had only experienced two stages of uplift (T-J2,J3-K1) and its maximum uplift height is more than 15 km.BHY uplift occurred mainly before the mid-Jurassic (about 150 Ma),but DOB uplift took place after the mid-Jurassic (about 150 Ma).

  4. Marking behavior of Andean bears in an Ecuadorian cloud forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipczyková, Eva; Heitkonig, Ignas; Castellanos, Armando; Hantson, Wouter; Steyaert, Sam M.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Very little is known about marking behavior of the endangered Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus). Here, we present a first detailed description of Andean bear marking behavior obtained using camera traps. From November 2012 to April 2013, we inspected 16 bear trails in the Napo province of eastern

  5. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Damien; Sempere, Thierry; Plantard, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes, biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida, a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures and thus thrives above 2.0-2.5 km in these tropical highlands. The Peruvian populations of this species exhibit a clear evolutionary pattern with deeper, more ancient lineages occurring in Andean southern Peru and shallower, younger lineages occurring progressively northwards. Genetically diverging G. pallida populations thus progressively colonized highland areas as these were expanding northwards, demonstrating that altitude in the Peruvian Andes was acquired longitudinally from south to north, i.e. in the direction of decreasing orogenic volume. This phylogeographic structure is recognized in other, independent highland biotaxa, and point to the Central Andean Orocline (CAO) as the region where high altitudes first emerged. Moreover, molecular clocks relative to Andean taxa, including the potato-tomato group, consistently estimate that altitudes high enough to induce biotic radiation were first acquired in the Early Miocene. After calibration by geological and biological tie-points and intervals, the phylogeny of G. pallida is used as a molecular clock, which estimates that the 2.0-2.5 km threshold elevation range was reached in the Early Miocene in southernmost Peru, in the Middle and Late Miocene in the Abancay segment (NW southern Peru), and from the latest Miocene in central and northern Peru. Although uncertainties attached to phylochronologic ages are significantly larger than those derived from geochronological methods, these results are fairly consistent with coeval

  6. Oroclinal Bending and Mountain Uplift in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpodozis, C.; Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.

    2007-05-01

    The large paleomagnetic database now available for the Central Andes permits a good understanding of the overall spatial and temporal variations of rotations. Mesozoic to Early Paleogene rocks along the forearc of northern Chile (23°-28°S) record significant clockwise rotations (>25°) [Arriagada et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001923]. Along the forearc of southern Peru, counterclockwise rotations recorded within flat lying red-beds (Moquegua Formation) increase from about -30° at 17.5°S to - 45° at15.5°S and decrease through time from the late Eocene to the late Oligocene-early Miocene [Roperch et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001882]. Recently published thermo-chronological studies show evidence for strong exhumation within Bolivian Eastern Cordillera and the Puna plateau starting in the Eocene while structural studies indicate that the majority of crustal shortening in the Eastern Cordillera occurred during the Eocene-Oligocene, although the final stages of deformation may have continued through the Early Miocene. Rotations in the Peruvian and north Chilean forearc thus occurred at the same time than deformation and exhumation/uplift within the Eastern Cordillera. In contrast Neogene forearc rocks in southern Peru and northern Chile do not show evidences of rotation but low magnitude (10°) counterclockwise rotations are usually found in mid to late Miocene rocks from the northern Altiplano. These Neogene rotations are concomitant with shortening in the Sub-Andean zone and sinistral strike-slip faulting along the eastern edge of the northern Altiplano. We interpret the rotation pattern along the southern Peru and north Chile forearc as a result of strong late Eocene- late Oligocene oroclinal bending of the Central Andes associated with shortening gradients along the Eastern Cordillera associated both with the Abancay deflection and the Arica bend. The amount and spatial distribution of pre-Neogene shortening needed to account for

  7. F-term uplifted racetrack inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Badziak, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that two classes of racetrack inflation models, saddle point and inflection point ones, can be constructed in a fully supersymmetric framework with the matter field F-term as a source of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking and uplifting. Two models of F-term SUSY breaking are considered: the Polonyi model and the quantum corrected O'Raifeartaigh model. In the former case, both classes of racetrack inflation models differ significantly from the corresponding models with non-SUSY uplifting. The main difference is a quite strong dominance of the inflaton by the matter field. In addition, fine-tuning of the parameters is relaxed as compared to the original racetrack models. In the case of the racetrack inflation models coupled to the O'Raifeartaigh model, the matter field is approximately decoupled from the inflationary dynamics.

  8. Cenozoic foreland basin evolution during Andean shortening in the Malargüe region of western Argentina (35°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, S. G.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.

    2015-12-01

    Cenozoic clastic deposits in western Argentina provide key opportunities to evaluate the timing and duration of Andean deformation and uplift. We studied the Malargüe segment of the Andean foreland basin at 35°S to better understand latest Cretaceous to Pliocene deformation and eastward propagation of Andean retroarc shortening. Our multi-technique approach included logging of a well-exposed ~1500m Paleocene-Miocene stratigraphic succession, paleocurrent measurements, conglomerate clast counts, and detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological analyses of basin fill exposed in the Sosneado region along the Rio Atuel. The Pircala and Coihueco Formations define the lowermost ~180 m of the section and are represented by fine to medium sandstones, siltstones, claystones and marls interpreted as distal fluvial floodplain and localized lacustrine deposits. Pircala paleocurrents show a major reversal from west- to east-directed flow. These finer deposits of the lower succession are separated from the overlying coarser-grained ~800 m thick Agua de la Piedra Formation by a conspicuous unconformity that spans up to roughly 20 Myr. The Agua de la Piedra Formation is composed of upward-coarsening amalgamated beds of massive medium to coarse sandstones and lenticular conglomerates interpreted as a prograding proximal fluvial to alluvial fan system. Conglomerate clast counts show initial dominance by Mesozoic detritus from the pre-Andean Neuquen basin system, with a progressive upsection increase in Cenozoic volcanic detritus from the Andean magmatic arc. Collectively, the paleocurrents, clast compositions, sedimentary facies associations, and emerging U-Pb results suggest a long-term shift, commencing in the Paleocene, from eastern cratonic sources to magmatic-arc and thrust-belt sources during a systematic eastward propagation of deformation, with a pronounced phase of Miocene magmatism and shortening that incorporated the proximal foreland basin into the advancing thrust belt.

  9. D-term Uplifted Racetrack Inflation.

    OpenAIRE

    Brax, P.; Davis, A. C.; Davis, S.C.; Jeannerot, R.; Postma, M.

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that racetrack inflation can be implemented in a moduli stabilisation scenario with a supersymmetric uplifting D-term. The resulting model is completely described by an effective supergravity theory, in contrast to the original racetrack models. We study the inflationary dynamics and show that the gaugino condensates vary during inflation. The resulting spectral index is n_s = 0.95 as in the original racetrack inflation model. Hence extra fields do not appear to alter the predicti...

  10. Uplift and submarine formation of some Melanesian porphyry copper deposits: Stable isotope evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivas, A.R.; O'Neil, J.R.; Katchan, G.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope analyses of sericites and kaolinites from four young porphyry copper deposits (Ok Tedi (1.2 Ma) and Yandera (6.5 Ma), Papua New Guinea; Koloula (1.5 Ma), Solomon Islands; and Waisoi (ocean water. For Ok Tedi, the non-magmatic component was a meteoric water with an isotopic composition different from that of the present meteoric water in the region. The isotopic signature of the former meteoric water is consistent with a surface elevation of 200 m a.s.l. or less at the time of mineralization. The deposit was later exposed and supergene kaolinitization commenced at approximately 1200 m a.s.l. Uplift and erosion has continued to the present at which time the elevation of the exposed deposit is 1800 m a.s.l. This rate of uplift is consistent with that known from other geological evidence. If the rate of uplift were approximately constant during the last 1.2 Ma, the age of supergene enrichment can be dated at approximately 0.4 Ma B.P. Similarly, influx of meteoric water at Yandera occurred when the ground surface above the deposit was at an elevation of approximately 600 m a.s.l. The deposit's present elevation is 1600 m a.s.l. In this case a total uplift of approximately 2.2 km is indicated, with removal of 1.2 km of overburden by erosion. ?? 1984.

  11. Rapid uplift in Laguna del Maule volcanic field of the Andean Southern Volcanic zone (Chile) 2007-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Kurt L.; Le Mével, Hélène; Tabrez Ali, S.; Córdova, Loreto; Andersen, Nathan L.; DeMets, Charles; Singer, Bradley S.

    2014-02-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is an exceptional example of postglacial rhyolitic volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. By interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired between 2007 and 2012, we measure exceptionally rapid deformation. The maximum vertical velocity exceeds 280 mm yr-1. Although the rate of deformation was negligible from 2003 January to 2004 February, it accelerated some time before 2007 January. Statistical testing rejects, with 95 per cent confidence, four hypotheses of artefacts caused by tropospheric gradients, ionospheric effects, orbital errors or topographic relief, respectively. The high rate of deformation is confirmed by daily estimates of position during several months in 2012, as measured by analysis of signals transmitted by the Global Positioning System (GPS) and received on the ground at three stations around the reservoir forming the LdM. The fastest-moving GPS station (MAU2) has a velocity vector of [-180 ± 4, 46 ± 2, 280 ± 4] mm yr-1 for the northward, eastward and upward components, respectively, with respect to the stable interior of the South America Plate. The observed deformation cannot be explained by changes in the gravitational load caused by variations in the water level in the reservoir. For the most recent observation time interval, spanning 44 d in early 2012, the model that best fits the InSAR observations involves an inflating sill at a depth of 5.2 ± 0.3 km, with length 9.0 ± 0.3 km, width 5.3 ± 0.4 km, dip 20 ± 3° from horizontal and strike 14 ± 5° clockwise from north, assuming a rectangular dislocation in a half-space with uniform elastic properties. During this time interval, the estimated rate of tensile opening is 1.1 ± 0.04 m yr-1, such that the rate of volume increase in the modelled sill is 51 ± 5 million m3 yr-1 or 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 s-1. From 2004 January to 2012 April the total increase in volume was at least 0.15 km3 over the 5.2-yr interval observed by InSAR. The inflating region includes most of the 16-km-by-14-km ring of rhyolitic domes and coulees. The similarity of high-silica rhyolite compositions on opposite sides of the ring and the concentration of rhyolitic eruptions since ˜20 ka suggest that processes within a large silicic magma chamber are responsible for the current deformation.

  12. A 17-My-old whale constrains onset of uplift and climate change in east Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichura, Henry; Jacobs, Louis L.; Lin, Andrew; Polcyn, Michael J.; Manthi, Fredrick K.; Winkler, Dale A.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Clemens, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Timing and magnitude of surface uplift are key to understanding the impact of crustal deformation and topographic growth on atmospheric circulation, environmental conditions, and surface processes. Uplift of the East African Plateau is linked to mantle processes, but paleoaltimetry data are too scarce to constrain plateau evolution and subsequent vertical motions associated with rifting. Here, we assess the paleotopographic implications of a beaked whale fossil (Ziphiidae) from the Turkana region of Kenya found 740 km inland from the present-day coastline of the Indian Ocean at an elevation of 620 m. The specimen is ∼17 My old and represents the oldest derived beaked whale known, consistent with molecular estimates of the emergence of modern strap-toothed whales (Mesoplodon). The whale traveled from the Indian Ocean inland along an eastward-directed drainage system controlled by the Cretaceous Anza Graben and was stranded slightly above sea level. Surface uplift from near sea level coincides with paleoclimatic change from a humid environment to highly variable and much drier conditions, which altered biotic communities and drove evolution in east Africa, including that of primates.

  13. The Andean Geotrail (2): An educational project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Sassier, C.; Vial, M.; Thiberge, P.

    2009-12-01

    The role of Geosciences in our society is of primary importance. Its implications for humanity relate to major challenges such as climate change, managing energy resources, natural hazard mitigation, and water scarcity. Despite these issues being familiar to specialists, this is in general not the case for the public. In a world, where the impact of human activity is beginning to be seen on the environment, knowledge of the Earth and its history is paramount to make informed decisions that will influence our future. The necessity to educate the global population and raise awareness of Geosciences has led UNESCO to designate 2009 the International Year of the Planet Earth. In the framework of the UNESCO International Year of Planet Earth, we performed an educational project in collaboration with primary, secondary and high schools in France and Norway. Geosciences are not usually studied in schools, but this project allowed more than 600 pupils (from 17 schools) aged 8 to 18 years old to share the geological discoveries of our popular science adventure The Andean Geotrail (see Sassier et al., this session). The main educational goal was to promote Geosciences by illustrating in the field what geology is. Our natural laboratory was the spectacular Andean Cordillera. The secondary goal was to promote careers in geology and highlight their variety by allowing the pupils to meet geologists through portraits of geologists. The teachers of the partner schools used our project as a dynamic complement to their theoretical lessons. To set up this partnership, we obtained the support of the pedagogic supervisors of the French Ministry of National Education. The pedagogical project consisted of three steps: (1) Before the expedition (Oct.-Nov. 2008), we visited the pupils of each partner school to present the project, establish personal contact and engage the pupils in our adventure. (2) During The Andean Geotrail itself (Nov. 2008-Aug. 2009), we continuously documented our

  14. D-term Uplifted Racetrack Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Stephen C; Jeannerot, Rachel; Postma, Marieke

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that racetrack inflation can be implemented in a moduli stabilisation scenario with a supersymmetric uplifting D-term. The resulting model is completely described by an effective supergravity theory, in contrast to the original racetrack models. We study the inflationary dynamics and show that the gaugino condensates vary during inflation. The resulting spectral index is n_s = 0.95 as in the original racetrack inflation model. Hence extra fields do not appear to alter the predictions of the model. An equivalent, simplified model with just a single field is presented.

  15. De Sitter Uplift with Dynamical Susy Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Retolaza, Ander

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of D-brane realizations of Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking (DSB) gauge sectors as sources of uplift in compactifications with moduli stabilization onto de Sitter vacua. This construction is fairly different from the introduction of anti D-branes, yet allows for tunably small contributions to the vacuum energy via their embedding into warped throats. The idea is explicitly exemplified by the embedding of the 1-family $SU(5)$ DSB model in a local warped throat with fluxes, which we discuss in detail in terms of orientifolds of dimer diagrams.

  16. De Sitter uplift with Dynamical Susy Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retolaza, Ander; Uranga, Angel

    2016-04-01

    We propose the use of D-brane realizations of Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking (DSB) gauge sectors as sources of uplift in compactifications with moduli stabilization onto de Sitter vacua. This construction is fairly different from the introduction of anti D-branes, yet allows for tunably small contributions to the vacuum energy via their embedding into warped throats. The idea is explicitly exemplified by the embedding of the 1-family SU(5) DSB model in a local warped throat with fluxes, which we discuss in detail in terms of orientifolds of dimer diagrams.

  17. Soil organic matter dynamics at the paramo and puna highlands in the Andean mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles Muñoz, M.; Faz, Ángel; Mermut, Ahmet R.; Zornoza, Raúl

    2014-05-01

    Mountains and uplands represent the most diverse and fragile ecosystems in the world, cover about 20% of the terrestrial surface and are distributed across all continents and major ecoregions. The Andean Plateau is the main mountain range of the American continent and one of the largest in the world with more than 7,500 km. The soil organic matter is a corner stone in the fertility management of the Andean agriculture as well as in the erosion control. However, its role is still much unknown in these ecosystems. Moreover, the influence of current global climatic change on soil organic C reservoirs and dynamics is still not clearly understood. The aim of this work was to review the soil C dynamics and the implication of the soil organic matter in the fertility management, erosion control, conservation of biodiversity and global climate change to improve the knowledge on the mountain Andean highlands. Climate, landscape, soil C pools, biomass and management were studied. In general, the Andean climate is affected by three main factors: ocean currents, winds and orography characterized by an abrupt topography. The entire Andean belt is segmented into the Northern, Central and Southern Andes. Northern Andes are called paramo and are characterized by humid climate while Central and Southern Andes dryer zones are called puna. Most of the region is tectonically and volcanically active. Sedimentary rocks predominated in the paramo while sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic ones prevailed in the puna. The most common soils were Andosols, Regosols, Umbrisols and Histosols. The cold and wet climate and the low atmospheric pressure favored organic matter accumulation in the soil. The accumulation of organic matter is further enhanced by the formation of organomineral complexes strongly resistant to the microbial breakdown mainly in the paramo. High organic C contents were observed in the paramo (10%) oppositely to the low contents found in the dryer puna (1%). The C/N ratio

  18. The new Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Farid; Forero-Romero, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    The Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD) is a new effort in South America to serve several goals in astronomical development. Six countries (Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Perú and Venezuela) will work together, representing a common language block in the Andean region and focusing on develop strategies to strengthen the professional research, education and popularization of astronomy. Our current Working Structure comprises a ROAD Coordinator and Coordinators per Task Force, as well as Organizing Committees, Collaborators and Volunteers.The participating institutions of this new ROAD have been involved in many projects involving each of the current OAD’s Task Forces: research, schools and children and public, exploring educational activities/material to be shared among the Andean countries, standardizing the knowledge and creating inspirational experiences. We expect to generate many efforts in order to bring a more homogeneous activity in each Andean country, taking into account the special role of Chile in global astronomy, due to its great conditions for astronomy and the involvement of many professional observatories, universities and astronomy institutions.Our current (and upcoming) most relevant activities includes: Andean Schools on Astronomy, Andean Graduate Program and Massive Open Online Courses (TF1); Virtual Training Sessions and Teaching material for the visually impaired students; Annual TF2 meeting to gather all the collaborators (TF2); Development for planetariums and Communicating Astronomy with the Public (TF3). The Andean region, in the other hand, will also be involved in at least two important events: the CAP Meeting in May 2016 and the XV LARIM in October 2016 (both in Colombia); and Chile will bid to host the XXXI IAU GA in 2021, with the aim of show the great advances in astronomical development from the Andean region and South America.

  19. Morphometric assessment of uplifting coral reef sequences, Sumba Island, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexer, Maëlle; Authemayou, Christine; Schildgen, Taylor; Hantoro, Wayhoe; Molliex, Stephane; Delcaillau, Bernard; Pedoja, Kevin; Husson, Laurent; Regard, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Rates and patterns of vertical ground motions constitute a basic framework for understanding the kinematics of the deforming lithosphere. Calibrating morphometric indices with landscape maturity and tectonic deformation requires comparisons with regions of known uplift history. The ability to derive uplift histories from marine or reefal terrace analysis in coastal zones therefore makes such settings ideal for testing morpho-tectonic analysis techniques. To explore the relationships between uplift rates and landscape morphology, we studied a 300-km-long coastal stretch affected by slow to moderate uplift rates, varying laterally from ≈0.02 to ≈0.6 mm/yr. We exploited the systematic spatial variation in rock uplift rates recorded in well-dated sequences of coral reef terraces of Sumba Island to assess the manner and degree to which the eight morphometric indices selected for this study can be correlated with tectonic forcing. The uniform equatorial climate and lithology (most of the bedrock is composed of Quaternary reefal limestones) across the study area allow us to evaluate which morphometric indices best reflect the spatial variations in Pleistocene coastal uplift rates. Morphometric indices extracted from digital elevation models include residual relief, incision, stream length index, ksn, hypsometric integral, drainage area, mean relief, and shape factor. We calculated and extracted these indices at three scales: across the whole island, from grouped sequences of coral reef terraces undergoing comparable uplift rates and individual catchments draining mainly the coral reef zones located in the northern part of Sumba Island. We find that SL, hypsometric integral, mean relief and shape factor of catchments positively correlate with uplift rates, whereas incision, residual relief, and ksn do not. Interestingly enough, we find that only the areas that are uplifting at a rate faster than 0.3 mm/yr can yield the extreme values for these indices, implying in turn

  20. The Andean Geotrail (1): A scientific adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassier, C.; Galland, O.; Raufaste, C.; Mair, K.

    2009-12-01

    The role of Geosciences in our society is of primary importance. Its implications for humanity relate to major challenges such as climate change, managing energy resources, natural hazard mitigation, and water scarcity. Despite these issues being familiar to specialists, this is in general not the case for the public. In a world, where the impact of human activity is beginning to be seen on the environment, knowledge of the Earth and its history is paramount to make informed decisions that will influence our future. The necessity to educate the global population and raise awareness of Geosciences has led UNESCO to designate 2009 the International Year of the Planet Earth. In this context and with the label of the UNESCO, we organized and performed a popular science adventure that was followed in real time by both school children and many adults around the world. The Andean Geotrail consisted of a cycling expedition through a spectacular geological environment, the Andean Cordillera. During the nine month expedition, we cycled 8000 km and walked 400 km from Ushuaia in the Southern tip of Argentina to Nazca in Peru to encounter a rich variety of geological environments: active volcanoes, earthquakes, mineral and hydrocarbon deposits, and fantastic geological scenery. All this makes the Andes a great pedagogical natural laboratory. During the expedition, we visited spectacular geological localities that illustrate key Earth Science phenomena (such as mines and hydrocarbon deposits, erupting volcanoes and seismogenically active areas, and national parks) and discovered their implications for the local people. Along the way, we interviewed local geologists and scientists who helped us understand the geology of their areas. We gathered our own observations with those of the local specialists and published essays, articles and photographs on our website and blog (www.georouteandine.fr/English, http://georouteandine.blogspot.com). Seventeen schools in France and Norway

  1. Postseismic uplift of the Andes following the 2010 Maule earthquake: Implications for mantle rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoyang; Moreno, Marcos; Bedford, Jonathan; Rosenau, Matthias; Heidbach, Oliver; Melnick, Daniel; Oncken, Onno

    2017-02-01

    Postseismic surface deformation associated with great subduction earthquakes is controlled by asthenosphere rheology, frictional properties of the fault, and structural complexity. Here by modeling GPS displacements in the 6 years following the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake in Chile, we investigate the impact of heterogeneous viscosity distribution in the South American subcontinental asthenosphere on the 3-D postseismic deformation pattern. The observed postseismic deformation is characterized by flexure of the South America plate with peak uplift in the Andean mountain range and subsidence in the hinterland. We find that, at the time scale of observation, over 2 orders of magnitude gradual increase in asthenosphere viscosity from the arc area toward the cratonic hinterland is needed to jointly explain horizontal and vertical displacements. Our findings present an efficient method to estimate spatial variations of viscosity, which clearly improves the fitting to the vertical signal of deformation. Lateral changes in asthenosphere viscosity can be correlated with the thermomechanical transition from weak subvolcanic arc mantle to strong subcratonic mantle, thus suggesting a stationary heterogeneous viscosity structure. However, we cannot rule out a transient viscosity structure (e.g., power law rheology) with the short time span of observation.

  2. East Central Uplift Belt of Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Mosuowandong ( Z3 ) and Dongdaohaizi (Z4) are two bidding blocks located in the east part of central uplift Belt, the hinterland of Junggar Basin. Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. It totally covers an area of 8 100km2. Topographically, the two blocks are quite gentle with elevation of 380-400 m on average. The north part is desert and the south area is good for farming. There are three ephemeral streams flowing across the desert from south to north. The ground water is buried at the depth ranging from 6 to 8 m. It belongs to continental climate with the annually averaged precipitation of 80 mm. The traffic is rather convenient in the south part of both blocks. There are several sand-paved roads and two asphalt roads connected with the highway from Karamay to Urumqi City.

  3. Pleistocene climatic cycling and diversification of the Andean treefrog, Hypsiboas andinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscinski, Daria; Handford, Paul; Tubaro, Pablo L; Sharp, Sarah; Lougheed, Stephen C

    2008-04-01

    Our understanding of the causes of diversification of Neotropical organisms lags behind that of Northern Hemisphere biota, especially for montane and temperate regions of southern South America. We investigated the mitochondrial DNA genealogical patterns in 262 individuals of the frog Hypsiboas andinus from 26 sites across the eastern ranges of the Andes Mountains in Argentina and Bolivia. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate at least three distinct lineages: one representing H. andinus from Northwestern Argentina and southern Bolivia, at least one H. andinus lineage from northern Bolivia, and one clade containing both H. andinus (from the southern portion of the species range) and its putative sister taxon Hypsiboas riojanus. Hypsiboas andinus samples from northern Bolivia are well differentiated and may represent distinct species. The northern Argentine H. andinus lineage and southern H. andinus/H. riojanus lineage likely diverged between 2 and 6 million years ago; their current sympatry may be the result of secondary contact due to range expansion after isolation during Andean uplift or may reflect cryptic species. Within the geographically extensive northern H. andinus clade, we found significant geographical structuring consistent with historical fragmentation and subsequent range expansion. The timing of this fragmentation and range expansion coincide with the Pleistocene, a time of extensive climatic cycling and vegetational shifts. Average divergence among clades is lower than those found for other Neotropical taxa, highlighting the potential importance of recent climatic history in diversification in the southern Andes.

  4. Andean tectonics: Implications for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Current knowledge and theories of large scale Andean tectonics as they relate to site planning for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program's proposed high precision geodetic measurements of relative motions between the Nazca and South American plates are summarized. The Nazca Plate and its eastern margin, the Peru-Chile Trench, is considered a prototype plate marked by rapid motion, strong seismicity and well defined boundaries. Tectonic activity across the Andes results from the Nazca Plate subducting under the South American plate in a series of discrete platelets with different widths and dip angles. This in turn, is reflected in the tectonic complexity of the Andes which are a multitutde of orogenic belts superimposed on each other since the Precambrian. Sites for Crustal Dynamics Program measurements are being located to investigate both interplate and extraplate motions. Observing operations have already been initiated at Arequipa, Peru and Easter Island, Santiago and Cerro Tololo, Chile. Sites under consideration include Iquique, Chile; Oruro and Santa Cruz, Bolivia; Cuzco, Lima, Huancayo and Bayovar, Peru; and Quito and the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Based on scientific considerations, Santa Cruz, Huancayo (or Lima), Quito and the Galapagos Islands should be replaced by Isla San Felix, Chile; Brazilia or Petrolina, Brazil; and Guayaquil, Ecuador. If resources permit, additional important sites would be Buenaventura and Villavicencio or Puerto La Concordia, Colombia; and Mendoza and Cordoba, Argentina.

  5. Andean tectonics: Implications for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1984-09-01

    Current knowledge and theories of large scale Andean tectonics as they relate to site planning for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program's proposed high precision geodetic measurements of relative motions between the Nazca and South American plates are summarized. The Nazca Plate and its eastern margin, the Peru-Chile Trench, is considered a prototype plate marked by rapid motion, strong seismicity and well defined boundaries. Tectonic activity across the Andes results from the Nazca Plate subducting under the South American plate in a series of discrete platelets with different widths and dip angles. This in turn, is reflected in the tectonic complexity of the Andes which are a multitutde of orogenic belts superimposed on each other since the Precambrian. Sites for Crustal Dynamics Program measurements are being located to investigate both interplate and extraplate motions. Observing operations have already been initiated at Arequipa, Peru and Easter Island, Santiago and Cerro Tololo, Chile. Sites under consideration include Iquique, Chile; Oruro and Santa Cruz, Bolivia; Cuzco, Lima, Huancayo and Bayovar, Peru; and Quito and the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Based on scientific considerations, Santa Cruz, Huancayo (or Lima), Quito and the Galapagos Islands should be replaced by Isla San Felix, Chile; Brazilia or Petrolina, Brazil; and Guayaquil, Ecuador. If resources permit, additional important sites would be Buenaventura and Villavicencio or Puerto La Concordia, Colombia; and Mendoza and Cordoba, Argentina.

  6. A geodynamic model of Andean mountain building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, Wouter P.

    2017-04-01

    The Andes mountain range in South America is the longest in the world and is unique in that it has formed at a subduction zone and not at a continent-continent collision zone. The mountain range has formed due to overriding plate shortening since the Late Cretaceous, and its origin and the driving mechanism(s) responsible for its formation remain a topic of intense debate. Here I present a buoyancy-driven geodynamic model of South American-style subduction, mantle flow and overriding plate deformation, illustrating how subduction-induced mantle flow drives overriding plate deformation. The model reproduces several first-order characteristics of the Andes, including major crustal thickening (up to double the initial crustal thickness) and hundreds of km of east-west shortening in the Central Andes, as well as a slab geometry that is comparable to that of the Nazca slab below the Central Andes. Ultimately, the geodynamic model shows that subduction-induced mantle flow is responsible for Andean-style mountain building.

  7. Handbook for Uplift-Resisting Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-01

    Technical Safety pin in in-line/out-of-line detonator Report R-284-7: Structures in deep ocean; engi-neerii-gmanual for undervater construction, chap...Automatic-firing mode: for deep ocean use, by J. E. Smith. Port Hueneme,CA, Ju 1966. Safety pin in detonator slide Hydrostatic-pressure actuation of...Hydrostatic-pressure actuation of valve in firing mechanism Safety pin on hydrostatic pressure valve drag cone Shorting and grounding of electrical leads

  8. Tectonomagmatic setting and provenance of the Santa Marta Schists, northern Colombia: Insights on the growth and approach of Cretaceous Caribbean oceanic terranes to the South American continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Bustamante, C.; García-Casco, A.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Saldarriaga, M.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    Metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks accreted to the northern South American continental margin are major vestiges of the Caribbean oceanic plate evolution and its interactions with the continent. Selected whole rock geochemistry, Nd-Sr isotopes and detrital zircon geochronology were obtained in metabasic and metasedimentary rocks from the Santa Marta and San Lorenzo Schists in northernmost Colombia. Trace element patterns are characterized by primitive island arc and MORB signatures. Similarly initial 87Sr/ 86Sr-ɛ Nd isotopic relations correlate with oceanic arcs and MORB reservoirs, suggesting that the protoliths were formed within a back-arc setting or at the transition between the inta-oceanic arc and the Caribbean oceanic crust. Trace element trends from associated metasedimentary rocks show that the provenance was controlled by a volcanic arc and a sialic continental domain, whereas detrital U/Pb zircons from the Santa Marta Schists and adjacent southeastern metamorphic units show Late Cretaceous and older Mesozoic, Late Paleozoic and Mesoproterozoic sources. Comparison with continental inland basins suggests that this arc-basin is allocthonous to its current position, and was still active by ca. 82 Ma. The geological features are comparable to other arc remnants found in northeastern Colombia and the Netherland Antilles. The geochemical and U/Pb detrital signatures from the metasedimentary rocks suggest that this tectonic domain was already in proximity to the continental margin, in a configuration similar to the modern Antilles or the Kermadec arc in the Pacific. The older continental detritus were derived from the ongoing Andean uplift feeding the intra-oceanic tectonic environment. Cross-cutting relations with granitoids and metamorphic ages suggest that metamorphism was completed by ca. 65 Ma.

  9. Accelerating Uplift Rate and Non-uniform Inheritance: Cosmogenic Be10 Depth Profiles from the Montecito Anticline, Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, W.; Schoenbohm, L.; Brooks, B.; Costa, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Andean orogenic front between 31° S and 33° S marks the transition between west-vergent thick- skinned faulting in the Sierras Pampeanas, and east vergent thin-skinned faulting in the Precordillera. This area has experienced several devastating earthquakes in the last century, and geodetic studies indicate that this area has a long-term shortening rate of ~5mm/yr. One of the growing anticlines in this region that partially accommodates this shortening is the Montecito anticline, a fault propagation fold above a blind thrust fault. Uplifted and deformed fluvial terraces formed along the axis of this anticline were dated using Be10 cosmogenic depth profiles. In 3 of the 5 dated terraces the horizon sampled directly above the strath had a higher nuclide concentration than the other samples in the profile, which suggests that the assumption of constant inheritance with depth is violated. One possible explanation for the cosmogenic profile irregularity is that catastrophic flooding events mobilize sediment from storage locations which are not normally tapped, such as hillslopes or alluvial fan surfaces. This sediment, which has an abnormally high inheritance value due to its increased time in storage, is deposited on the strath of the newly formed terrace, thus leading to higher Be10 values at the base of the profile. After discarding the abnormally high bottom value in each profile the terrace ages are found to be ~6.5 ka, ~4.1 ka, ~1.9 ka. Given their height above the river the uplift rate is 0.63-0.68 mm/yr for the period between 6.5 ka and 1.9 ka. However, surprising preliminary data indicates that the uplift rate of the Montecito Anticline has increased 4-fold since 1.9 ka. This could reflect stochastic variations in slip rate or interactions with other regional faults, and suggests a greater seismic threat in this earthquake prone region.

  10. Large along-strike variations in the onset of Subandean exhumation: Implications for Central Andean orogenic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lease, Richard O.; Ehlers, Todd A.; Enkelmann, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Plate tectonics drives mountain building in general, but the space-time pattern and style of deformation is influenced by how climate, geodynamics, and basement structure modify the orogenic wedge. Growth of the Subandean thrust belt, which lies at the boundary between the arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau and its humid, low-elevation eastern foreland, figures prominently into debates of orogenic wedge evolution. We integrate new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometer data with previously published apatite fission-track data from samples collected along four Subandean structural cross-sections in Bolivia between 15° and 20°S. We interpret cooling ages vs. structural depth to indicate the onset of Subandean exhumation and signify the forward propagation of deformation. We find that Subandean growth is diachronous south (11 ± 3 Ma) vs. north (6 ± 2 Ma) of the Bolivian orocline and that Subandean exhumation magnitudes vary by more than a factor of two. Similar north-south contrasts are present in foreland deposition, hinterland erosion, and paleoclimate; these observations both corroborate diachronous orogenic growth and illuminate potential propagation mechanisms. Of particular interest is an abrupt shift to cooler, more arid conditions in the Altiplano hinterland that is diachronous in southern Bolivia (16-13 Ma) vs. northern Bolivia (10-7 Ma) and precedes the timing of Subandean propagation in each region. Others have interpreted the paleoclimate shift to reflect either rapid surface uplift due to lithosphere removal or an abrupt change in climate dynamics once orographic threshold elevations were exceeded. These mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and both would drive forward propagation of the orogenic wedge by augmenting the hinterland backstop, either through surface uplift or spatially variable erosion. In summary, we suggest that diachronous Subandean exhumation was driven by piecemeal hinterland uplift, orography, and the outward

  11. On the Nature of Cross-Linguistic Transfer: A Case Study of Andean Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntendam, Antje G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on cross-linguistic transfer in Andean Spanish word order. In Andean Spanish the object appears in preverbal position more frequently than in non-Andean Spanish, which has been attributed to an influence from Quechua (a Subject-Object-Verb language). The high frequency of preverbal objects could be…

  12. On the Nature of Cross-Linguistic Transfer: A Case Study of Andean Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntendam, Antje G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on cross-linguistic transfer in Andean Spanish word order. In Andean Spanish the object appears in preverbal position more frequently than in non-Andean Spanish, which has been attributed to an influence from Quechua (a Subject-Object-Verb language). The high frequency of preverbal objects could be…

  13. Accidental inflation from Kähler uplifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Westphal, Alexander; Wieck, Clemens [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Theory Group, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Jing, Shenglin, E-mail: ido.bendayan@desy.de, E-mail: shenglin.jing@utoronto.ca, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de, E-mail: clemens.wieck@desy.de [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St.George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    We analyze the possibility of realizing inflation with a subsequent dS vacuum in the Käahler uplifting scenario. The inclusion of several quantum corrections to the 4d effective action evades previous no-go theorems and allows for construction of simple and successful models of string inflation. The predictions of several benchmark models are in accord with current observations, i.e., a red spectral index, negligible non-gaussianity, and spectral distortions similar to the simplest models of inflation. A particularly interesting subclass of models are ''left-rolling'' ones, where the overall volume of the compactified dimensions shrinks during inflation. We call this phenomenon ''inflation by deflation'' (IBD), where deflation refers to the internal manifold. This subclass has the appealing features of being insensitive to initial conditions, avoiding the overshooting problem, and allowing for observable running α ∼ 0.012 and enhanced tensor-to-scalar ratio r ∼ 10{sup −5}. The latter results differ significantly from many string inflation models.

  14. Evidence for latest Pleistocene to Holocene uplift at the southern margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau (CAP), southern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Domenico; Öǧretmen, Nazik; Cipollari, Paola; Gliozzi, Elsa; Radeff, Giuditta; Yıldırım, Cengiz; Baykara, Oruc M.; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-04-01

    Along the Mediterranean coastal area of southern Anatolia, markers of ancient sea-level have been reported west of Alanya and east of the Göksu delta. In both areas, bioconstructed fossil rims, consisting mainly of calcareous algae, are situated 0.5 m above the live counterpart. The fossil rim to the west of Alanya has been dated between 2690 to 1545 yrs BP, evidencing late Holocene rock uplift at the CAP southern margin. More recently, based on beachrocks along the coastal area from Incekum to the south of Adana, authors showed that the shoreline was raised around 0.5 m after 19 BC-200 AD. Based on new field observations along the coast between Aydı ncı k and Ayaş (Mersin, southern Turkey), together with AMS 14C dating and high-resolution U-Th chronology, a more complex uplift history can be suggested. Along the coast of Yeşilovacı k, we observed up to seven uplifted marine notches, from 0.5 m to 6.10 m above sea level. Some of them show relationships with a travertine crust that yielded U-Th ages of 2727 ± 1559 years and 5236 ± 2255 years. In the same area, a calcareous algae fossil trottoir related to a marine notch 5.40 m above sea level yielded an AMS 14C 2σ age of 32700 to 31645 years cal BP. Considering that the global ocean was 60 m below the present sea level at 32 ka, the Yeşilovacı k coastal area has been uplifted at 2 mm/yr. Moving to the east, in a small embayment at Eǧribük, two distinct well cemented beach deposits containing Murex brandaris, Cerithium vulgatum, and Columbella rustica have been uplifted at 0.3 m and 0.7 m above the present sea level. Although it is difficult to reconstruct the paleodepth of those beach deposits, AMS 14C 2σ ages of 5575 to 5445 years cal BP and 2130 to 1965 years cal BP show late Holocene uplift. In the Narlı kuyu area, up to seven different uplifted markers of sea level were observed between 0.8 and 7.2 m above the present sea level. In addition, near Ayaş new insights for late Holocene uplift are

  15. The new Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Farid; Forero-Romero, Jaime

    2016-10-01

    The Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD) is a new effort in South America to serve several goals in astronomical development. The six countries in the Andean ROAD (Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela) represent a common language block in the region. They work together to develop strategies to strengthen the professional research, education and popularization of astronomy. Our current Working Structure comprises a ROAD Coordinator and one Coordinators in each Task Force. Here we describe the main points of the ROAD's current action plan.

  16. Uplifting of the Jiamusi Block in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NE China: evidence from basin provenance and geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjiang; Wen, Quanbo; Han, Guoqing; Li, Wei

    2010-05-01

    The main part of Jiamusi Block, named as Huanan-Uplift, is located in the northeastern Heilongjiang, China. The Huanan-Uplift is surrounded by many relatively small Mesozoic-Cenozoic basins, e.g. Sanjiang Basin, Hulin Basin, Boli Basin, Jixi Basin, Shuangyashan Basin and Shuanghua Basin. However previous research works were mainly focused on stratigraphy and palaeontology of the basins, therefore, the coupling relation between the uplift and the surrounding basins have not been clear. Based on the field investigations, conglomerate provenance studies of the Houshigou Formation in Boli Basin, geochronology of the Huanan-Uplift basement, we have been studied the relationships between Huanan-Uplift and the surrounding basins. The regional stratigraphic correlations indicates that the isolated basins in the area experienced the same evolution during the period of the Chengzihe and the Muling Formations (the Early Cretaceous). The paleogeography reconstructions suggest that the area had been a large-scale basin as a whole during the Early Cretaceous. The Huanan-Uplift did not exist. The paleocurrent directions, sandstone and conglomerate provenance analyses show that the Huanan-Uplift started to be the source area of the surrounding basins during the period of Houshigou Formation (early Late Cretaceous), therefore, it suggests that the Jiamusi Block commenced uplift in the early Late Cretaceous. The granitic gneisses in Huanan-Uplift give 494-415 Ma monazite U-Th-total Pb ages, 262-259 Ma biotite and 246-241 Ma K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages. The cooling rates of 1-2 ℃/Ma from 500-260 Ma and 10-11 ℃/Ma from 260-240 Ma have been calculated based on the ages. This suggests that the Jiamusi Block had a rapid exhumation during late Permian, which should be related to the closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean between the Siberian and North China continents. It is concluded that during the late Paleozoic the Jiamusi Block was stable with a very slow uplifting. With the closure of

  17. Postmodern Anthropology: Reflections from Andean Ethnohistory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villarías-Robles, Juan J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The postmodern perspective, which began its influence on studies of Prehispanic Peru in the 1980s, has resulted —as chief positive effect— in reflection and debate concerning the written sources for apprehending such cultural otherness, the so-called “Chronicles of the West Indies”: a perspective accompanied by new editions of these texts. The author of the present article expresses his own reflection on such change in theory and method. He argues that, with regard to self-reflectivity on its epistemological foundations, the new perspective is not entirely original in the long history of Andean ethnohistory; in effect, this approach is almost as old as the field itself. What is indeed original is the cognitive relativism that surfaced in some extreme forms of the discussion. It was an unfortunate development, however: when not denying, as a matter of principle, the very possibility of understanding that cultural otherness, arguments masked actual interpretations or explanations of its features that were protected, ipso facto, from a rigorous process of validation.

    La perspectiva posmoderna, que empezó a ser influyente en los estudios del Perú prehispánico en la década de 1980, ha tenido como principal efecto positivo la reflexión y el debate sobre las fuentes originales de conocimiento de esa alteridad cultural, las llamadas genéricamente “Crónicas de Indias”: una perspectiva acompañada de nuevas ediciones de tales textos. El autor del presente artículo hace aquí su propia reflexión sobre este cambio teórico y metodológico. Plantea que, en lo que tiene de discusión sobre sus bases epistemológicas, no es del todo original en la larga historia de la etnohistoria peruanista. Es, de hecho, casi tan antiguo como ella. Lo que sí ha sido original es el relativismo cognitivo que ha acompañado a algunas expresiones extremas de la discusión. Pero fue ésta una novedad desafortunada: cuando no negaba por principio la

  18. A Late Quaternary shortening rate for the frontal thrust of the Andean Precordillera north of Mendoza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Kuhlmann, J.; Hetzel, R.; Mingorance, F.; Ramos, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Although large historical earthquakes occurred in the Andean back-arc region between 28° and 34°S - for instance Mendoza was destroyed by an earthquake of magnitude MS = 7.0 in 1861 - the slip rates of active faults remain unknown. We report a slip rate for the 50-km-long Las Penas thrust, which constitutes the frontal thrust of the Precordillera. In its southern part, a well preserved fluvial terrace along La Escondida Creek (Costa et al., 2000) is displaced vertically by 10.6 ± 0.7 m as documented by several fault scarp profiles. Apart from radiocarbon dating of plant remnants, three different approaches for 10Be exposure dating have been applied to constrain the age of the terrace. Amalgamated sandstone pebbles (corrected for an inherited 10Be component using similar pebbles from the active creek) and a depth profile obtained from four sand samples yield 10Be exposure ages of 12.2 ± 1.5 and 11.3 ± 2.0 kyr, respectively. Both ages are in excellent agreement with the 14C age of 12.61 ± 0.20 cal kyr BP. In contrast, 10Be ages of five sandstone boulders vary significantly and exceed the age of the terrace by 10 to 70 kyr, which demonstrates that the widely used assumption of a negligible inherited component is not valid here. The age of the river terrace combined with the vertical fault offset yields an uplift rate of ~0.8 mm/yr for the Las Penas thrust. Combined with the fault dip of 25°, we determine a Late Quaternary horizontal shortening rate of ~1.8 mm/yr, which is about 40% of the GPS derived shortening rate of 4.5 ± 1.7 mm/yr in the back-arc region of the Andes (Brooks et al., 2003). References Brooks, B.A., Bevis, M., Smalley, R., Kendrick, E., Manceda, R., Lauria, E., Maturana, R. & Araujo, M. (2003): Crustal motion in the Southern Andes (26° - 36°S): Do the Andes behave like a microplate? Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 4 (10), pp. 14, 1085, doi 10.1029/2003GC000505. Costa, C.H., Gardini, C.E., Diederix, H., Cortés, J.M. (2000): The Andean orogenic

  19. Uplift Pressure of Waves on A Horizontal Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周益人; 陈国平; 黄海龙; 王登婷

    2003-01-01

    Uplift pressures of waves acting on horizontal plates are the important basis for design of maritime hollow-trussed structures. In this paper, an experimental study on the uplift pressures of waves on a horizontal plate is conducted by use of a series of model tests. Detailed analysis has been given to the formation mechanism of uplift pressures of waves. It is considered that the impact pressure intensity is mainly affected by geometrical factors (tangential angle of waves), dynamic factors (wave height, wave velocity, etc.) and air cushion. Based on the test results, an equation for calculation of the maximum uplift pressure intensity of waves on a plate is presented. A large quantity of test data shows good agreement of the present equation with the test results.

  20. Zonation of uplifted pleistocene coral reefs on barbados, west indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesolella, K J

    1967-05-05

    The coral species composition of uplifted Pleistocene reefs on Barbados is very similar to Recent West Indian reefs. Acropora palmata, Acropora cervicornis, and Montastrea annularis are qtuantitatively the most important of the coral species.

  1. Andean grasslands are as productive as tropical cloud forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Girardin, C.; Doughty, C.E.; Cahuana, N.; Arenas, C.E.; Oliver, V.; Huaraca Huasco, W.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We aim to assess net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon cycling in Andean tropical alpine grasslands (puna) and compare it with NPP of tropical montane cloud forests. We ask the following questions: (1) how do NPP and soil respiration of grasslands vary over the seasonal cycle? (2) how do burning

  2. The astronomy of Andean myth: The history of a cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, William F.

    It is shown that Andean myth, on one level, represents a technical language recording astronomical observations of precession and, at the same time, an historical record of simultaneous social and celestial transformations. Topographic and architectural terms of Andean myth are interpreted as a metaphor for the organization of and locations on the celestial sphere. Via ethoastronomical date, mythical animals are identified as stars and placed on the celestial sphere according to their topographical location. Tested in the planetarium, these arrays generate cluster of dates - 200 B.C. and 650 A.D. Analysis of the names of Wiraqocha and Manco Capac indicates they represent Saturn and Jupiter and that their mythical meeting represents their conjunction in 650 A.D. The astronomy of Andean myth is then used as an historical tool to examine how the Andean priest-astronomers recorded the simultaneous creation of the avllu and of this distinctive astronomical system about 200 B.C. The idea that the agricultural avllu, with its double descent system stressing the importance of paternity, represents a transformation of society from an earlier matrilineal/horticultural era is examined in light of the sexual imagery employed in myth. Wiraqocha's androgyny and the division of the celestial sphere into male (ecliptic) and female (celestial equator = earth) are interpreted as cosmological validations of the new social structure.

  3. Andean shrublands of Moquegua, South Peru: Prepuna plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montesinos, D.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Sykora, K.V.

    2012-01-01

    A syntaxonomic overview of shrubland vegetation in the southern Andean regions of Peru is presented. For each plant community, information is given on physiognomy, floristic diversity, ecology and geographical distribution. The shrub vegetation on the slopes of the upper Tambo river valley includes

  4. Inflammatory aspects of type 2 diabetes in the Andean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y. Baldeón Rojas (Lucy)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis deals with the immune inflammatory aspects of obesity, the metabolic syndrome (MetS), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Andean region, more precisely in Quito, Ecuador. To understand the research questions a short introduction in the immun

  5. Truncations driven by constraints: consistency and conditions for correct upliftings

    CERN Document Server

    Pons, J M; Pons, Josep M.; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism of truncations driven by the imposition of constraints. We show how the consistency of such truncations is controlled, and give general theorems that establish conditions for the correct uplifting of solutions. We show in some particular examples how one can get correct upliftings from 7d supergravities to 10d type IIB supergravity, even in cases when the truncation is not initially consistent by its own.

  6. Control of paleoshorelines by trench forebulge uplift, Loyalty Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, William R.

    2013-07-01

    Unlike most tropical Pacific islands, which lie along island arcs or hotspot chains, the Loyalty Islands between New Caledonia and Vanuatu owe their existence and morphology to the uplift of pre-existing atolls on the flexural forebulge of the New Hebrides Trench. The configuration and topography of each island is a function of distance from the crest of the uplifted forebulge. Both Maré and Lifou are fully emergent paleoatolls upon which ancient barrier reefs form highstanding annular ridges that enclose interior plateaus representing paleolagoon floors, whereas the partially emergent Ouvea paleoatoll rim flanks a drowned remnant lagoon. Emergent paleoshoreline features exposed by island uplift include paleoreef flats constructed as ancient fringing reefs built to past low tide levels and emergent tidal notches incised at past high tide levels. Present paleoshoreline elevations record uplift rates of the islands since last-interglacial and mid-Holocene highstands in global and regional sea levels, respectively, and paleoreef stratigraphy reflects net Quaternary island emergence. The empirical uplift rates vary in harmony with theoretical uplift rates inferred from the different positions of the islands in transit across the trench forebulge at the trench subduction rate. The Loyalty Islands provide a case study of island environments controlled primarily by neotectonics.

  7. Dynamic Paleogeography of the Jurassic Andean Basin: pattern of regression and general considerations on main features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-C. Vicente

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Following examination of the evolution of the Jurassic Andean retroarc basin at a global scale for the Central Andes, this paper analyses the pattern of the regressive process, and discusses some general features concerning Andean Jurassic Paleogeography. The early Upper Jurassic regression obeys to an exactly reverse pattern as the one evidenced for the Lower Jurassic transgressive process. Sectors with late transgressions become those with early regressions while those with early transgressions show later regressions. This fact may indicate that the Norte Chico Isthmus (29°S to 30°30'S was a precociously emerged zone from the Bajocian. This carries again a split up between the Tarapacá and Aconcagua-Neuquén basins until their complete drying up in the Late Oxfordian following their restricted circulation. This evaporitic late stage presents great analogy with the Mediterranean «Messinian crisis» and gives evidence of a general tectonic and magmatic control on the straits. The local transgressions observed on the cratonic margin of the central part of these shrinking basins were due to shifting of water masses resulting from the regressive process on the northern and southern margins. Comparison between the main stages of transgression and regression allows some quantification concerning velocities of displacement of coastlines, specifically lengthwise. The permanence of paleogeographic and structural features over the time argues for an indisputable tectonic heritage. In the dynamic framework of this typical barred retroarc basin where arc magmatic activity has contributed considerably to variation on sediment supply and changing bathymetry of the seaways connecting with the Pacific Ocean, evidence for an assumed global eustatic cycle remains questionable or very subordinated.

  8. SPECIES RICHNESS AND INDICES OF ABUNDANCE OF MEDIUM-SIZED MAMMALS IN ANDEAN FOREST AND REFORESTATIONS WITH ANDEAN ALDER: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁNCHEZ FRANCISCO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the species richness and two indices of abundance of medium-sizedmammals in areas with Andean forest and Andean alder (Alnus acuminatareforestations in a reserve at the Central Andes of Colombia. Since reforested areashave a less complex habitat structure and lower plant diversity than native forests, wepredicted that they have lower richness of mammals than areas with Andean forest.We obtained the indices of abundance from direct contacts in transects and from theuse of track stations. Our results suggest that, indeed, areas with Andean forest hada higher richness of mammals than reforestations, but this pattern may be modifiedby anthropogenic factors. We found no differences between the indices of abundanceof the squirrel, Sciurus granatensis, in the two forest types. In contrast, the coatiswere recorded more frequently in the reforestations than in areas with Andean forestat the reserve.

  9. Colorado Plateau magmatism and uplift by warming of heterogeneous lithosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mousumi; Jordan, Thomas H; Pederson, Joel

    2009-06-18

    The forces that drove rock uplift of the low-relief, high-elevation, tectonically stable Colorado Plateau are the subject of long-standing debate. While the adjacent Basin and Range province and Rio Grande rift province underwent Cenozoic shortening followed by extension, the plateau experienced approximately 2 km of rock uplift without significant internal deformation. Here we propose that warming of the thicker, more iron-depleted Colorado Plateau lithosphere over 35-40 Myr following mid-Cenozoic removal of the Farallon plate from beneath North America is the primary mechanism driving rock uplift. In our model, conductive re-equilibration not only explains the rock uplift of the plateau, but also provides a robust geodynamic interpretation of observed contrasts between the Colorado Plateau margins and the plateau interior. In particular, the model matches the encroachment of Cenozoic magmatism from the margins towards the plateau interior at rates of 3-6 km Myr(-1) and is consistent with lower seismic velocities and more negative Bouguer gravity at the margins than in the plateau interior. We suggest that warming of heterogeneous lithosphere is a powerful mechanism for driving epeirogenic rock uplift of the Colorado Plateau and may be of general importance in plate-interior settings.

  10. Pronounced central uplift identified in the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana, using multichannel seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Christopher A.; Karp, Tobias; Brooks, Keely M.; Milkereit, Bernd; Amoako, Philip Y. O.; Arko, Justice A.

    2002-10-01

    The Lake Bosumtwi impact structure is the youngest and best-preserved complex terrestrial impact crater and serves as an important reference site for the study of cratering processes. Because the impacting body struck continental crystalline target rocks and not a submerged sedimentary platform, no significant backwash processes have modified the crater morphology. Not only may Bosumtwi contain the best-preserved central uplift structure on Earth, but it is the most accessible relatively large, young crater in the solar system generated in a large gravity field. There is a well-established link between the Lake Bosumtwi impact structure and the Ivory Coast tektite field, and the lacustrine sediments within the crater contain a unique 1 m.y. record of paleoclimate in the continental tropics south of the Sahel. Eight profiles of marine-type multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data were acquired from the 8-km-diameter, ˜75-m-deep lake that fills much of the crater. These were augmented by wide-angle seismic data acquired with ocean-bottom hydrophones. MCS data reveal a well-defined central uplift near the northwest-central part of the lake and a maximum postimpact lacustrine sediment thickness of ˜310 m. The central uplift structure has a diameter of 1.9 km and a maximum height of 130 m above the annular moat inside the crater. An intermediate velocity layer (3200 m/s) beneath the lacustrine sediment is interpreted as fallback breccia or a breccia-melt horizon. The measured apparent depth of the crater (da) is 500 m, implying a slightly higher aspect ratio for the structure than predicted from published empirical relationships. The Bosumtwi structure is a small complex crater that deviates slightly from trends predicted from classical scaling laws, perhaps because of the effects of a large gravity field.

  11. Shortening Record in the Central Andean Plateau of Southern Peru: Basement Inversion, Thin-skinned Thrusting, and Geomorphic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, N.; Horton, B. K.; McQuarrie, N.; Stübner, K.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the inherited structural architecture along western South America influence the timing, magnitude, and style of Andean deformation and topographic evolution. New results from mapping, balanced cross-section construction, apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronology, and geomorphology spanning the Altiplano, Eastern Cordillera and Subandean zone of southern Peru define the role of Triassic rift inversion on Cenozoic deformation style, thrust belt kinematics, exhumation timing, and spatial variation of canyon incision. A minimum of 130 km (38%) shortening along a 200 km transect accommodated by thin- and thick-skinned structures involved selective reactivation of Triassic normal faults that fed slip to shallower detachments of thin-skinned fold-thrust systems. Map relationships define unique structural domains defined by inherited normal faults. In the Eastern Cordillera, new zircon (U-Th)/He results from a Triassic pluton reveal Oligocene-Miocene (~26-18 Ma) cooling, consistent with previously reported exhumation from ~40 km along strike to the NW. However, rapid ~15 Ma cooling revealed by new apatite (U-Th)/He data is ~11 Myr older than equivalent rocks in a similar structural setting ~40 km to the NW. This suggests a potential middle Miocene shift from synchronous to diachronous exhumation along strike. Modern fluvial profiles constructed along the Eastern Cordillera show a reduction in knickpoint elevations from SE to NW, suggesting more youthful uplift toward the NW, comparable to the spatial trend in apatite (U-Th)/He ages. The deformation front reached the Subandean zone by ~15 Ma, after the majority of reported deformation in the Eastern Cordillera and Altiplano. These variations in exhumation over such distances are consistent with multiple potential scenarios: a northward propagating wave of uplift, spatial variations in climatically driven incision, interactions with mantle dynamics, or complex structural geometries.

  12. Ongoing drought-induced uplift in the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, Adrian Antal; Agnew, Duncan Carr; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The western United States has been experiencing severe drought since 2013. The solid earth response to the accompanying loss of surface and near-surface water mass should be a broad region of uplift. We use seasonally adjusted time series from continuously operating global positioning system stations to measure this uplift, which we invert to estimate mass loss. The median uplift is 5 millimeters (mm), with values up to 15 mm in California’s mountains. The associated pattern of mass loss, ranging up to 50 centimeters (cm) of water equivalent, is consistent with observed decreases in precipitation and streamflow. We estimate the total deficit to be ~240 gigatons, equivalent to a 10-cm layer of water over the entire region, or the annual mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  13. Technical analysis of four archaeological andean painted textiles

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This project investigates the materials and manufacturing techniques used to create four archaeological Andean painted textiles in the collection of the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution. The textiles are attributed to Peru but have minimal provenience. Building on previous work by other scholars on similar archaeological textiles, the materials and manufacturing techniques are identified and characterized by observation, documentation, and scientific analysis. S...

  14. Mechanisms of Tectonic Uplift in the Santa Cruz Mountains, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdottir, M. H.; Hilley, G. E.; Rood, D. H.; Finkel, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    GPS velocity measurements in the San Francisco Bay Area limit transpression across the region to San Andreas Fault (SAF) undergoes a local change in orientation by approximately 8-10 degrees. While active seismicity and surface velocities suggest that the restraining bend accommodates the geodetically observed contraction in this area, low temperature thermochronology, uplifted marine terraces, and uplifted Pliocene marine units indicate that contraction and uplift may be more uniformly distributed than can be explained exclusively by the restraining bend. Thus, it is unclear to what degree the geologic strain accommodated throughout this region results from plate-normal contraction versus restraining-bend tectonics. To determine the relative roles of these two factors, we measured cosmogenic radionuclide erosion rates from four basins flanking the southwestern SCM, whose topography results from deformation associated with the SAF. The southernmost basin is seated within the heart of the SCM restraining bend, while basins farther north are located progressively farther away from the bend. Thus, if restraining-bend tectonics dominate the deformation of the area, we expect rapid erosion rates to be focused in these areas, while more uniform rock uplift and erosion rates may be indicative of regional transpression. Erosion rates from basins within the restraining bend are about 0.53 mm/yr, twice as high as those north of the bend (0.24 - 0.31 mm/yr). The clear spatial association of high erosion rates with the restraining bend suggests that at least half of the observed uplift and erosion may result from restraining-bend deformation. Accordingly, relatively uniform erosion rates north of the bend may result from either rock uplift that is driven by isostatic unloading of the upper crust or limited regional transpression.

  15. Predicting Polylepis distribution: vulnerable and increasingly important Andean woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Zutta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polylepis woodlands are a vital resource for preserving biodiversity and hydrological functions, which will be altered by climate change and challenge the sustainability of local human communities. However, these highaltitude Andean ecosystems are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to anthropogenic pressure including fragmentation, deforestation and the increase in livestock. Predicting the distribution of native woodlands has become increasingly important to counteract the negative effects of climate change through reforestation and conservation. The objective of this study was to develop and analyze the distribution models of two species that form extensive woodlands along the Andes, namely Polylepis sericea and P. weberbaueri. This study utilized the program Maxent, climate and remotely sensed environmental layers at 1 km resolution. The predicted distribution model for P. sericea indicated that the species could be located in a variety of habitats along the Andean Cordillera, while P. weberbaueri was restricted to the high elevations of southern Peru and Bolivia. For both species, elevation and temperature metrics were the most significant factors for predicted distribution. Further model refinement of Polylepis and other Andean species using increasingly available satellite data demonstrate the potential to help define areas of diversity and improve conservation strategies for the Andes.

  16. State dilemmas in applying the Previous Consultation Law in the Andean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Barrio de Mendoza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Peruvian government enacted a new law granting consultation rights to indigenous peoples as a mechanism to enhance social inclusion in the country. The law generated debates about the criteria to identify indigenous population in the Andean region. Why does this law have problems granting consultation rights to Andean people? This paper aims to answer the question by reviewing historically the different Andean identities and analyzing the current international debate on indigenity. Our main argument is that the government intrying to apply the law is structuring a restrictive model that is hardlyable to grasp the complexity and dynamism of Andean identities.

  17. Alpine glacial topography and the rate of rock column uplift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Vivi Kathrine; Egholm, D.L.; Nielsen, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the influence of alpine glacial erosion on the morphology and relief distribution of mountain regions associated with varying rock column uplift rates. We take a global approach and analyse the surface area distribution of all mountain regions affected by glacial....... On the basis of this decay, the analysed mountain regions fall within three distinct groupsprimarily reflecting variations in average values of rock columnuplift rates.Mountain ranges affected by rapid rock column uplift display high above-snowline relief and large decay lengths, whereas inactive orogens have...

  18. Evidence for Holocenic uplift at Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Fedele, Lorenzo; Grifa, Celestino; Morra, Vincenzo; Berg, Ria; Varone, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    Detailed stratigraphical, archaeological, micropalaeontological, archaeometrical and petrochemical analyses of samples from trenches and boreholes at insula of Casti Amanti, in Pompeii, allowed a faithful reconstruction of the recent environmental evolution of the site. The present data clearly indicate the alternation of both subaerial and shallow marine conditions during Holocene times. Taking into account the relative local sea level variations, a ~ 30 m ground uplift event in the last 6 kyr (with an average vertical uplift rate of ~ 5 mm/yr) was inferred for the first time.

  19. Lithospheric evolution of the Andean fold thrust belt, Bolivia, and the origin of the central Andean plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Nadine; Horton, Brian K.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan; DeCelles, Peter G.

    2005-04-01

    We combine geological and geophysical data to develop a generalized model for the lithospheric evolution of the central Andean plateau between 18° and 20° S from Late Cretaceous to present. By integrating geophysical results of upper mantle structure, crustal thickness, and composition with recently published structural, stratigraphic, and thermochronologic data, we emphasize the importance of both the crust and upper mantle in the evolution of the central Andean plateau. Four key steps in the evolution of the Andean plateau are as follows. 1) Initiation of mountain building by ˜70 Ma suggested by the associated foreland basin depositional history. 2) Eastward jump of a narrow, early fold-thrust belt at 40 Ma through the eastward propagation of a 200-400-km-long basement thrust sheet. 3) Continued shortening within the Eastern Cordillera from 40 to 15 Ma, which thickened the crust and mantle and established the eastern boundary of the modern central Andean plateau. Removal of excess mantle through lithospheric delamination at the Eastern Cordillera-Altiplano boundary during the early Miocene appears necessary to accommodate underthrusting of the Brazilian shield. Replacement of mantle lithosphere by hot asthenosphere may have provided the heat source for a pulse of mafic volcanism in the Eastern Cordillera and Altiplano at 24-23 Ma, and further volcanism recorded by 12-7 Ma crustal ignimbrites. 4) After ˜20 Ma, deformation waned in the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean zone and began to be transferred into the Subandean zone. Long-term rates of shortening in the fold-thrust belt indicate that the average shortening rate has remained fairly constant (˜8-10 mm/year) through time with possible slowing (˜5-7 mm/year) in the last 15-20 myr. We suggest that Cenozoic deformation within the mantle lithosphere has been focused at the Eastern Cordillera-Altiplano boundary where the mantle most likely continues to be removed through piecemeal delamination.

  20. Tectonic Constraints on the Transformation of Paleozoic Framework of Uplift and Depression in the Ordos Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingfei; DENG Jun; HUANG Dinghua; YANG Liqiang; GAO Bangfei; XU Hao; JIANG Shaoqing

    2006-01-01

    During the Paleozoic, the Ordos area in the western North China Plate was located at the intersecting position of microplates and controlled by their interaction. The structural framework in the Ordos area, which underwent transformations in the Ordovician, the Carboniferous and the Permian respectively, was dominated by the alternation of uplift and depression. The transformations of structural framework are utilized as the clues to investigate the microplates' interacting type and its response in the Ordos area. According to the regional structural evolution, the Ordos area is simplified into an isopachous, isotropic and elastic shell model, and under proposed various boundary conditions,three series of numerical simulations corresponding to the three structural transformations are carried out to determine the detailed tectonic constraints. Numerical simulations reveal that the structure of the uplift and depression, which is similar to the actual pattern, develops only under one special boundary condition in each of the three series, indicating that the structural framework responds to the unique tectonic background. The simulation results show that in the Early Paleozoic, the L-shaped paleouplift formed nearby the southwestern corner of the Ordos area because the intensity of the compressions in the southern and western boundaries resulting from the ocean-continent collisions was similar. In the Late Paleozoic, it evolved into continent-continent (or arc-continent) interaction in the southern and northern boundaries; in the preliminary stage of the interaction, since the interface between the North China Plate and the plates on the south and north was narrow, the relative acting force was little and the regional western boundary immobile, and the structural framework in the basin was characterized by the N-S trending slender-waist-shaped uplift; as the interface between the plates expanded gradually, the extrusive force in the southern and northern boundaries

  1. Adaptation and convergent evolution within the Jamesonia-Eriosorus complex in high-elevation biodiverse Andean hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Thomas, Gavin H

    2014-01-01

    The recent uplift of the tropical Andes (since the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene) provided extensive ecological opportunity for evolutionary radiations. We test for phylogenetic and morphological evidence of adaptive radiation and convergent evolution to novel habitats (exposed, high-altitude páramo habitats) in the Andean fern genera Jamesonia and Eriosorus. We construct time-calibrated phylogenies for the Jamesonia-Eriosorus clade. We then use recent phylogenetic comparative methods to test for evolutionary transitions among habitats, associations between habitat and leaf morphology, and ecologically driven variation in the rate of morphological evolution. Páramo species (Jamesonia) display morphological adaptations consistent with convergent evolution in response to the demands of a highly exposed environment but these adaptations are associated with microhabitat use rather than the páramo per se. Species that are associated with exposed microhabitats (including Jamesonia and Eriorsorus) are characterized by many but short pinnae per frond whereas species occupying sheltered microhabitats (primarily Eriosorus) have few but long pinnae per frond. Pinnae length declines more rapidly with altitude in sheltered species. Rates of speciation are significantly higher among páramo than non-páramo lineages supporting the hypothesis of adaptation and divergence in the unique Páramo biodiversity hotspot.

  2. The Under-side of the Andes: Using Receiver Functions to Map the North Central Andean Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project is an interdisciplinary project to investigate connections between lithospheric removal, crustal shortening and surface uplift in the northern Bolivia and southern Peru region of the South American Andean orogen. The central Andes are defined by six major tectonomorphic provinces; the forearc, the volcanically active Western Cordillera (WC, ~6 km elevation), the internally drained Altiplano (~4 km elevation), an inactive fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Cordillera (EC, ~6 km elevation), a lower elevation active fold and thrust belt in the Subandean (SA) zone and the Beni, a foreland basin. Forty seismic stations installed for the CAUGHT project were deployed between 13° and 18° S latitude, covering the transition zone where the Altiplano region pinches out in southern Peru, in an effort to better constrain the changing character of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Geologic studies across the northern Bolivian portion of the eastern Andean margin (15-17° S) have documented a total of 275 km of upper crustal shortening (McQuarrie et al, Tectonics, v27, 2008), which may be associated with crustal thickening and/or the removal of lithospheric material as a thickened lithosphere root becomes unstable. For this receiver function (converted wave) study, we have little coverage in the forearc and foreland, ~75 km spacing in most of the array, and a relatively dense ~20 km spaced profile along the Charaña-La Paz-Yucumo transect, the eastern portion of which is nearly coincident with the balanced cross-section of McQuarrie et al. (2008). Using the first year of available data, more than 1200 receiver functions have been calculated using an iterative deconvolution method, and stacked using the common conversion point (CCP) method, along profiles parallel to and nearly coincident to those used for the geologic shortening estimates. We identified arrivals for the Moho and generated a 3D map of

  3. Modeling of the Uplift Response of Buried Pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choobbasti, Asskar Janalizadeh; Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Firouzianbandpey, Sarah;

    2009-01-01

    Over the years, researchers have tried to understand the complex behavior of buried pipelines subjected to ground ruptures due to landslides, earthquakes, faults and uplift forces in shallow trenches. In an attempt to understand this complex behavior, an experimental investigation program has been...

  4. Deep mantle forces and the uplift of the Colorado Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moucha, R; Forte, A M; Rowley, D B; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2009-06-23

    Since the advent of plate tectonics, it has been speculated that the northern extension of the East Pacific Rise, specifically its mantle source, has been over-ridden by the North American Plate in the last 30 Myrs. Consequently, it has also been postulated that the opening of the Gulf of California, the extension in the Basin and Range province, and the uplift of the Colorado Plateau are the resulting continental expressions of the over-ridden mantle source of the East Pacific Rise. However, only qualitative models based solely on surface observations and heuristic, simplified conceptions of mantle convection have been used in support or against this hypothesis. We introduce a quantitative model of mantle convection that reconstructs the detailed motion of a warm mantle upwelling over the last 30 Myrs and its relative advance towards the interior of the southwestern USA. The onset and evolution of the crustal uplift in the central Basin and Range province and the Colorado Plateau is determined by tracking the topographic swell due to this mantle upwelling through time. We show that (1) the extension and magmatism in the central Basin and Range province between 25 and 10 Ma coincides with the reconstructed past position of this focused upwelling, and (2) the southwestern portion of the Colorado Plateau experienced significant uplift between 10 Ma and 5 Ma that progressed towards the northeastern portion of the plateau. These uplift estimates are consistent with a young, ca. 6 Ma, Grand Canyon model and the recent commencement of mafic magmatism.

  5. The tectonic uplift of the Hua Shan in the Cenozoic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Six granite samples were collected from sixdifference elevation locations at the Hua Shah in a mainridge of the Qinling Mountain. Apatite and zircon separatedfrom these six samples were dated by the fission track tech-nique. An assessment of the Cenozoic uplift or exhumationrate was obtained from the altitude difference of samplingsamples dated by fission track, and from the difference offission track dates of both apatite and zircon for a sample.The preliminary results suggest that the beginning of upliftof the Hua Shan was as early as 68.2 MaBP and the upliftrates for different periods are 0.02-0.19 mm/a (from theelevation difference) or 0.12-0.16 mm/a (from two mineralfission track dates). The average uplift rate is 0.12 mm/a(from the elevation difference) or 0.14 mm/a (from two min-eral fission track dates). The uplift of the Hua Shan mightaccelerate since (17.8+2.0) MaBP, and the average uplift rateis about 0.19 mm/a.

  6. New Borehole Strain System Detects Uplift at Campi Flegrei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Amoruso, Antonella; Crescentini, Luca; Romano, Pierdomenico; De Cesare, Walter; Martini, Marcello; Scarpato, Giovanni; Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn I.

    2007-05-01

    Campi Flegrei and Mount Vesuvius are active Italian volcanoes though presently in a quiescent stage. The last eruption of Mount Vesuvius occurred during the spring of 1944. Campi Flegrei last erupted in 1538 but experienced a subsidence trend from the early 1900s to 1970, which was followed by episodes of ground uplift accompanied by seismic swarms.

  7. Uplift and seismicity driven by groundwater depletion in central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Colin B; Audet, Pascal; Hammond, William C; Bürgmann, Roland; Johanson, Ingrid A; Blewitt, Geoffrey

    2014-05-22

    Groundwater use in California's San Joaquin Valley exceeds replenishment of the aquifer, leading to substantial diminution of this resource and rapid subsidence of the valley floor. The volume of groundwater lost over the past century and a half also represents a substantial reduction in mass and a large-scale unburdening of the lithosphere, with significant but unexplored potential impacts on crustal deformation and seismicity. Here we use vertical global positioning system measurements to show that a broad zone of rock uplift of up to 1-3 mm per year surrounds the southern San Joaquin Valley. The observed uplift matches well with predicted flexure from a simple elastic model of current rates of water-storage loss, most of which is caused by groundwater depletion. The height of the adjacent central Coast Ranges and the Sierra Nevada is strongly seasonal and peaks during the dry late summer and autumn, out of phase with uplift of the valley floor during wetter months. Our results suggest that long-term and late-summer flexural uplift of the Coast Ranges reduce the effective normal stress resolved on the San Andreas Fault. This process brings the fault closer to failure, thereby providing a viable mechanism for observed seasonality in microseismicity at Parkfield and potentially affecting long-term seismicity rates for fault systems adjacent to the valley. We also infer that the observed contemporary uplift of the southern Sierra Nevada previously attributed to tectonic or mantle-derived forces is partly a consequence of human-caused groundwater depletion.

  8. Earthquakes, Uplift, and Landscape Evolution in the NW Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, F.; Mahmood, S.; Gloaguen, R.

    2009-05-01

    The terrain between Main Mantle Thrust to Salt Range Thrust in the NW Himalayas has been characterized by surface and subsurface features with variable tectonic activity. These features show relatively variable tectonic activity, existence of blind faults and basement faulting. In the present study, we use seismological and remote sensing analysis backed by field observations to investigate the relationship between earthquakes, uplift, and landscape evolution. We use nonlinear analysis to understand the earthquake dynamics in relation to surface faults and blind faults. The fractal analysis of the seismicity in three subsurface features of the area is used to characterize the roughness of the faults' surface. We find a high fault surface roughness in the Indus Kohistan Seismic Zone (IKSZ). It is concluded that the area is in the process of being uplifted and landscape is evolving. This evolution is further investigated using a set of geomorphological analyses consisting of extracting a drainage network from digital elevation models (DEM). The extracted streams are analysed using to calculate geomorphic indices and relative uplift rates. These analyses were applied on Indus, Swat, Kabul, Kunhar, Kishanganga, Poonch, Jehlum, Swan and Kurram, Kabul Rivers and their associate tributaries. The analyses provide us with the spatial variation of relative uplift based upon specific streams. We found that the Hazara Kashmir Syntaxis and Nanga Parbat Haramosh Massif are subject to a relatively high uplift. It is observed that the neotectonic activities are linearizing the drainage network from meandering pattern. We analyse the complete drainage texture using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. The analysis of the fractal dimension (D) employing box counting methods is calculated with a moving window approach and the lower values of D demonstrate the effect of neotectonic activity. The locations with lower but similar D values are further differentiated using

  9. Shaping the Rwenzoris: balancing uplift, erosion, and glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Hinderer, Matthias; Romanov, Douchko

    2016-09-01

    The Rwenzori Mountains in Africa represent an extremely uplifted basement fault block at the eastern edge of the western branch of the East African Rift system, a large-scale rift system controlled by extensional stresses. The rugged alpine topography reaches an altitude of up to 5109 m, and the highest parts are ice-covered. Glacial landforms and moraines proof repeated more extensive glaciations during the last glacial cycles. In order to elucidate magnitudes and the varying role of erosional processes in shaping the relief of the Rwenzori Mountains over the past 2 mill. years, we performed numerical simulations with the landscape evolution programme ULTIMA THULE. It is controlled by a climate driver with temperature as a master variable as well as changing precipitation and evapotranspiration over time. The morphological processes considered are fluvial erosion, hillslope diffusion, and glacial abrasion, and the latter controlled by the simulated glaciation of the landscape. We provide three sets of model runs: the first one starting from the present-day topography and running for approx. 800 ka, the second one extending the modelling period to 2 Ma, and the third one starting from a peneplain and evolving for 2 Ma. Our results provide constraints on the temperature history of the Rwenzori Mountains, the interplay of morphological degradation and tectonic uplift, and a time frame for the formation of the mountain chain from a peneplain to the present relief. The modelled landscape evolves from a peneplain 2 Ma ago to a Rwenzori-type mountain range, when the fairly strong average rock uplift of 1-2 mm year-1 is compensated by a strong fluvial erosion component. The rock uplift rate is needed to obtain elevations above the equilibrium line altitude around 500 ka BP and results in surface uplift over time. Around that time, a periodic ice cap appears in the models, and glacial abrasion then limits the height of the Rwenzori Mountains to its present elevation.

  10. Modelo para la variación del volumen orogénico andino y acortamientos en el sector 20°-46°S Model for Andean orogenic volume variation and shortening in the 20°-46°S sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Pose

    2005-12-01

    orogenic volume along the southern Central Andes and northern Patagonian Andes (20°-46°S decreases linearly, from north to south. At 38°S, we have separated two segments with different rates of variation in the Andean volume. The northern sector (20°-38°S shows a steeper linear law than the southern sector. Even though the Andean volume varies together with the decrease from north to south of the subducted oceanic slab age, latitude 38°S coincides with a sudden change related to this late parameter. This observation has led us to propose a linkage between subducted parameters and variation of Andean volume, which contrasts with other hypotheses that assume that climate, is the principal cause for the variations in the observed orogenic volume. We also present two empiric equations to calculate the orogenic volume at determined latitude, beyond the area of influence of two anomalies centered around 27°S and 33°S respectively. Those sectors are considered to be influenced by other factors related to isostatic rebounds, superposed to shortening. Additionally, we discuss a law for the latitudinal variation of the orogenic shortening away from the location of the mentioned anomalies.

  11. Mantle plume related dynamic uplift and plate kinematics: The NE Atlantic case with global implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogseid, Jakob; Khabbaz Ghazian, Reza; Lunt, Ian

    2014-05-01

    At present a pronounced residual depth anomaly (RDA), centred on Iceland, is characterizing the bathymetry of the NE Atlantic region. For the oceanic lithosphere this anomaly represents a 2500 m elevation difference compared to 'normal' oceanic lithosphere. The observed depth anomaly has since Cochran and Talwani (1978) been ascribed to a 200 -300 km thick moderate thermal anomaly beneath the oceanic lithosphere, the existence of which today has been proven by a sizable low velocity zone on seismic tomography data. The sub-lithosphere low velocities are, however, not limited to the oceanic domain, but also underlie the adjacent continental lithosphere, thus causing a similar magnitude anomalous elevation of the continental shelves and landmasses. The thermal anomaly is presumed to relate to the arrival of the Iceland mantle plume demonstrated by excess Paleocene and Early Eocene magmatism and the formation of the North Atlantic Volcanic Province (NAVP), and subsequent volcanic margin formation. The present width of the RDA compares with the size of the regions that experienced excess magmatism during rifting and breakup, which implies that the sub-lithospheric thermally anomalous body was emplaced in Paleocene time, but still resides in the area. This presentation aims to describe the temporal and spatial development of uplift based on combining plate kinematic modeling with models of lithospheric and plume body thickness development through Late Cretaceous-Paleocene extension, and subsequent seafloor spreading. The model prediction of uplift compares well with descriptions of erosional episodes and depositional sequences off Greenland, in the Northern North Sea, off mid-Norway and in the SW Barents Sea, and represents a mechanism that explains the present elevation of East Greenland as well as western Norway. In a global perspective the close correlation between Large Igneous Provinces (LIP's), the arrival of known mantle plumes and formation of volcanic margins

  12. Metals and altitude drive genetic diversity of chironomids in Andean streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loayza-Muro, R.A.; de Baat, M.; Palomino, E.J.; Kuperus, P.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.; Breeuwer, H.

    2014-01-01

    1. Andean streams cover steep altitude gradients and locally leach metal-rich bedrock, creating highly selective habitat conditions. Chironomids are among the few dominant insect taxa present under the harshest conditions in Andean high altitude streams, but it remains unclear whether their dominanc

  13. Genetics and mapping of a new anthracnose resistance Locus in Andean common bean Paloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean cultivar Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican and Andean races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the fungal pathogen that causes the destructive anthracnose disease of common bean. Remarkably, Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican races 2047 and 3481, which are among the most virulent races ...

  14. Andean terraced hills (a use of satellite imagery)

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is in stimulating the use of satellite imagery, in particular the free service of Google Maps, to investigate the distribution of the agricultural technique of terraced hills in Andean countries, near Titicaca Lake. In fact, satellite maps can give a clear view of the overall surface modified by human work, being then a precious help for on-site archaeological researches and for historical analysis. Satellite imagery is also able to give the distribution of burial and worship places. The paper discusses some examples near the Titicaca Lake.

  15. Integration, migration and sustainable development in the Andean group of nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R; Kratochwil, H

    1993-04-01

    This paper, which was presented at the 1993 meeting of the International Organization for Migration, summarizes past and recent progress in Andean integration and migration arrangements. Changes in the strategy of the Andean group of nations (GAN) have occurred in the adjustment to prevailing conditions at the subregional and international level. GAN includes Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. The Andean Pact originated with the signing of the Cartegena Agreement in 1969. Members approved the Andean Strategic Design in 1989, which loosened up trade integration and the movement of capital, services, and persons across shared borders. The Strategic Design also addressed issues resulting from economic and social integration. A statement of migratory patterns among GAN, Andean integration during 1969-89, and the goals and operation of the Andean Strategic Design and integration are discussed in some detail. The Galapagos Declaration and the La Paz Statement of 1990 are also described. The present situation with Andean integration is based on the following meetings of Andean nations: the First Meeting of Migration Officials of the Andean Group of Nations in March 1991, the Second Meeting of Migration Officials in September 1991, and bilateral agreements between Andean nations. Seven basic conclusions are drawn: 1) the strategy is an institutional, deliberate, programmed process; 2) integration within GAN is the culmination of a joint, coordinated directive of achievement of sustainable development in the subregion which aims to reduce the economic gaps between the North and the South, to lessen the impact of protected markets of the North and their migration barriers, and to improve the possibility of development of technologically sophisticated human capital; 3) subregional policies are more sensitive to short-term change in domestic politics; 4) integration and migration can be sustained better with deliberate planning; 5) implementation is dependent on

  16. Receiver functions and crustal structure of the northwestern Andean region, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Esteban; Monsalve, Gaspar; Vargas, Carlos Alberto

    2015-04-01

    We used the receiver function technique to deduce crustal thickness beneath the northwestern Andean system, using data from the permanent seismic network of Colombia, combined with some of the IRIS and CTBTO stations in Colombia and Ecuador. The estimation of crustal thickness was made using the primary P to s conversion and crustal reverberations. The bulk crustal VP/VS ratio was constrained using a crustal thickness versus VP/VS stacking method, in addition to estimations using a time to depth conversion technique based on results of a modified Wadati diagram analysis. We observed a wide range of crustal thicknesses, including values around 17 km beneath the Malpelo Island on the Pacific Ocean, 20 to 30 km at the coastal Pacific and Caribbean plains of Colombia, 25 to 40 km beneath the eastern plains and foothills, 35 km beneath the Western Cordillera, 45 km at the Magdalena River intermountain valley, 52 to 58 km under the northern Central Cordillera, and reaching almost 60 km beneath some of the volcanoes of the Southern Cordilleran system of Colombia; crustal thickness can be slightly greater than 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera. The values of VP/VS are particularly high for some of the stations on the volcanic centers, reaching values above 1.79, probably related to the addition of mafic materials to the lower crust, and in the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera near Bogota, where we speculate about the possibility of crustal seismic anisotropy associated with shear zones.

  17. SENP1, but not fetal hemoglobin, differentiates Andean highlanders with chronic mountain sickness from healthy individuals among Andean highlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Matthew M; Callacondo, David; Rojas-Camayo, Jose; Quesada-Olarte, Jose; Wang, Xunde; Uchida, Naoya; Maric, Irina; Remaley, Alan T; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Villafuerte, Francisco C; Tisdale, John F

    2016-06-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) results from chronic hypoxia. It is unclear why certain highlanders develop CMS. We hypothesized that modest increases in fetal hemoglobin (HbF) are associated with lower CMS severity. In this cross-sectional study, we found that HbF levels were normal (median = 0.4%) in all 153 adult Andean natives in Cerro de Pasco, Peru. Compared with healthy adults, the borderline elevated hemoglobin group frequently had symptoms (headaches, tinnitus, cyanosis, dilatation of veins) of CMS. Although the mean hemoglobin level differed between the healthy (17.1 g/dL) and CMS (22.3 g/dL) groups, mean plasma erythropoietin (EPO) levels were similar (healthy, 17.7 mIU/mL; CMS, 12.02 mIU/mL). Sanger sequencing determined that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in endothelial PAS domain 1 (EPAS1) and egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1), associated with lower hemoglobin in Tibetans, were not identified in Andeans. Sanger sequencing of sentrin-specific protease 1 (SENP1) and acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family, member D (ANP32D), in healthy and CMS individuals revealed that non-G/G genotypes were associated with higher CMS scores. No JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in CMS individuals. Thus, HbF and other classic erythropoietic parameters did not differ between healthy and CMS individuals. However, the non-G/G genotypes of SENP1 appeared to differentiate individuals with CMS from healthy Andean highlanders.

  18. A review about the mechanisms associated with active deformation, regional uplift and subsidence in southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folguera, Andrés; Gianni, Guido; Sagripanti, Lucía; Rojas Vera, Emilio; Novara, Iván; Colavitto, Bruno; Alvarez, Orlando; Orts, Darío; Tobal, Jonathan; Giménez, Mario; Introcaso, Antonio; Ruiz, Francisco; Martínez, Patricia; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    A broad range of processes acted simultaneously during the Quaternary producing relief in the Andes and adjacent foreland, from the Chilean coast, where the Pacific Ocean floor is being subducted beneath South American, to the Brazilian and the Argentinean Atlantic platform area. This picture shows to be complex and responds to a variety of processes. The Geoid exemplifies this spectrum of uplift mechanisms, since it reflects an important change at 35°S along the Andes and the foreland that could be indicating the presence of dynamic forces modeling the topography with varying intensity through the subduction margin. On the other hand, mountains uplifted in the Atlantic margin, along a vast sector of the Brazilian Atlantic coast and inland regions seem to be created at the area where the passive margin has been hyper-extended and consequently mechanically debilitated and the forearc region shifts eastwardly at a similar rate than the westward advancing continent. Therefore the forearc at the Arica latitudes can be considered as relatively stationary and dynamically sustained by a perpendicular-to-the-margin asthenospheric flow that inhibits trench roll back, determining a highly active orogenic setting at the eastern Andes in the Subandean region. To the south, the Pampean flat subduction zone creates particular conditions for deformation and rapid propagation of the orogenic front producing a high-amplitude orogen. In the southern Central and Patagonian Andes, mountain (orogenic) building processes are attenuated, becoming dominant other mechanisms of exhumation such as the i) impact of mantle plumes originated in the 660 km mantle transition, ii) the ice-masse retreat from the Andes after the Pleistocene producing an isostatic rebound, iii) the dynamic topography associated with the opening of an asthenospheric window during the subduction of the Chile ridge and slab tearing processes, iv) the subduction of oceanic swells linked to transform zones and v) the

  19. HYDRODYNAMIC UPLIFT FORCE AND STABILITY OF ARCIFORM LUNGE POOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Compared with general trapeziform plunge pools, an arciform plunge pool has its advantages, e.g. Less excavate quantity, higher stability, etc. In this paper, the hy-drodynamic pressure distribution on the soleplate of the arci-form plunge pool is measured under a relatively dangerous condition of operation. The result is helpful to the design of the arciform plunge pool. The result also shows that the difference between the maximum and the minimum pressures on the upward surface of the soleplate may cause an additional uplift force on the soleplate under certain condition and should be taken into consideration in the uplift force calculation of the soleplate. The scour experiment verifies the higher stability of the arciform plunge pool.

  20. Revisiting constraints on uplifts to de Sitter vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Bizet, Nana Cabo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the issue of uplifting the potential to de Sitter (dS) vacua in type IIB flux compactifications of Kachru, Kallosh, Linde and Trivedi (KKLT). We shed light on some tension between two constraints on dS vacua in type IIB string theory. One is the well-known and much-discussed constraint which leads to the no-go theorem that can in principle be evaded. The other follows from 4-dimensional Einstein's equations, which has, however, been much less discussed in connection with the former constraint. In addition to the challenges previously posed, it is suggested that the uplifting scenarios, in particular, obstruct the evasion of the no-go theorem more strongly than one might have assumed.

  1. Harmonic Structure Predicts the Enjoyment of Uplifting Trance Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agres, Kat; Herremans, Dorien; Bigo, Louis; Conklin, Darrell

    2017-01-01

    An empirical investigation of how local harmonic structures (e.g., chord progressions) contribute to the experience and enjoyment of uplifting trance (UT) music is presented. The connection between rhythmic and percussive elements and resulting trance-like states has been highlighted by musicologists, but no research, to our knowledge, has explored whether repeated harmonic elements influence affective responses in listeners of trance music. Two alternative hypotheses are discussed, the first highlighting the direct relationship between repetition/complexity and enjoyment, and the second based on the theoretical inverted-U relationship described by the Wundt curve. We investigate the connection between harmonic structure and subjective enjoyment through interdisciplinary behavioral and computational methods: First we discuss an experiment in which listeners provided enjoyment ratings for computer-generated UT anthems with varying levels of harmonic repetition and complexity. The anthems were generated using a statistical model trained on a corpus of 100 uplifting trance anthems created for this purpose, and harmonic structure was constrained by imposing particular repetition structures (semiotic patterns defining the order of chords in the sequence) on a professional UT music production template. Second, the relationship between harmonic structure and enjoyment is further explored using two computational approaches, one based on average Information Content, and another that measures average tonal tension between chords. The results of the listening experiment indicate that harmonic repetition does in fact contribute to the enjoyment of uplifting trance music. More compelling evidence was found for the second hypothesis discussed above, however some maximally repetitive structures were also preferred. Both computational models provide evidence for a Wundt-type relationship between complexity and enjoyment. By systematically manipulating the structure of chord

  2. Andean rural children's views of the environment: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurial, Mahia

    Andean rural children's drawings and narratives about their crops and the immediate biological environment are rich tools to understand local views of the environment. Children's drawings and narratives were collected and linked to interviews as well as participant observation gathered from parents, leaders and teachers. The research sites are the community of Willca and the school of Mayu. Fieldwork was completed in 1998. In the conceptual framework I distinguish between two dissimilar knowledges, school knowledge and local knowledge. These knowledges produce two dissimilar views of the environment. I further analyze relationships of knowledge and power and argue that school knowledge overpowers local knowledge. Concomitantly, I studied set of ideas associated with two knowledges aforementioned: superacion (surpass) and regeneration (Apffel-Marglin 1995). Although these ideas coexist in peoples' minds they are not linked or effectively connected. In order to link local knowledge and school knowledge together, I propose the integration of environmental studies and art education to enhance a local sense of place (Blandy et. al 1993) in Andean and other schools. This will contribute to grassroots educational policy.

  3. Climate change forces new ecological states in tropical Andean lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    Full Text Available Air temperatures in the tropical Andes have risen at an accelerated rate relative to the global average over recent decades. However, the effects of climate change on Andean lakes, which are vital to sustaining regional biodiversity and serve as an important water resource to local populations, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that recent climate changes have forced alpine lakes of the equatorial Andes towards new ecological and physical states, in close synchrony to the rapid shrinkage of glaciers regionally. Using dated sediment cores from three lakes in the southern Sierra of Ecuador, we record abrupt increases in the planktonic thalassiosiroid diatom Discostella stelligera from trace abundances to dominance within the phytoplankton. This unprecedented shift occurs against the backdrop of rising temperatures, changing atmospheric pressure fields, and declining wind speeds. Ecological restructuring in these lakes is linked to warming and/or enhanced water column stratification. In contrast to seasonally ice-covered Arctic and temperate alpine counterparts, aquatic production has not increased universally with warming, and has even declined in some lakes, possibly because enhanced thermal stability impedes the re-circulation of hypolimnetic nutrients to surface waters. Our results demonstrate that these lakes have already passed important ecological thresholds, with potentially far-reaching consequences for Andean water resources.

  4. Directionality Evidence in High Andean Forest Early Successional Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Eduardo Lequerica Támara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary growth forests have increased their extension in the last decades, and have been suggested as potential conservation reservoirs. The objective of this study was to evaluate diversity and vegetation composition in pastures and forests at (Granada, Cundinamarca, Colombia to assess if successional processes show evidence of directionality, we placed six plots by 0.1-ha in the forest edges, one towards the forest and other to the abandoned paddocks in three locations. We determined the average vegetation structure, diversity, and floristic composition for each plot. We found that diversity is significantly higher in forest plots than in paddock plots (at early succession stage in high Andean cloud ecosystems. The successional stage of each one of the study sites was characterized using non-metric multidimensional scaling. This analysis shows that vegetation tends to group in function of age groups more that it does by geographic location of the plots, suggesting succession is a directional process. Seedling recruitment was not significantly different between forest edge and forest interior. An inverse relation was found between floristic and geographic distances, reflecting the fact that matrix discontinuity is a limiting factor for seed dispersal, thus it is a barrier for high Andean cloud forest succession.

  5. Uplift and Subsidence Associated with the Great Aceh-Andaman Earthquake of 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The magnitude 9.2 Indian Ocean earthquake of December 26, 2004, produced broad regions of uplift and subsidence. In order to define the lateral extent and the downdip limit of rupture, scientists from Caltech, Pasadena, Calif.; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.; the U.S. Geological Survey, Pasadena, Calif.; and the Research Center for Geotechnology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Bandung, Indonesia; first needed to define the pivot line separating those regions. Interpretation of satellite imagery and a tidal model were one of the key tools used to do this. These pre-Sumatra earthquake (a) and post-Sumatra earthquake (b) images of North Sentinel Island in the Indian Ocean, acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft, show emergence of the coral reef surrounding the island following the earthquake. The tide was 30 plus or minus 14 centimeters lower in the pre-earthquake image (acquired November 21, 2000) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 20, 2005), requiring a minimum of 30 centimeters of uplift at this locality. Observations from an Indian Coast Guard helicopter on the northwest coast of the island suggest that the actual uplift is on the order of 1 to 2 meters at this site. In figures (c) and (d), pre-earthquake and post-earthquake ASTER images of a small island off the northwest coast of Rutland Island, 38 kilometers east of North Sentinel Island, show submergence of the coral reef surrounding the island. The tide was higher in the pre-earthquake image (acquired January 1, 2004) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 4, 2005), requiring subsidence at this locality. The pivot line must run between North Sentinel and Rutland islands. Note that the scale for the North Sentinel Island images differs from that for the Rutland Island images. The tidal model used for this study was

  6. Segmentation of Sub-Andean Retro-Arc Foreland Basins in Western South America%南美西部次安第斯弧后前陆盆地分段特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    琚亮; 张光亚; 温志新; 汪伟光

    2011-01-01

    Sub-Andean retro-arc foreland basins in the western margin of South America are important petroleum accumulation and produc-tion zones,and develop in three different tectonic settings: evolvement of Caribbean plate superimposed Andean-type foreland compressive deformation in the north;Sub-Andean foreland basins were in long-term the Gondwana continental marginal setting,subsequently subducted by oceanic plate and thrusted by Andean orogenesis in the middle;the shapes and evolvement of basins in Patagonia were more influenced by Gondwana breakup and opening of Atlantic in the south.Based on the evolvements and petroleum characteristics,the sub-Andean retro-arc foreland basins in the western margin of South America could be divided into 6 segments.%发育在南美西缘的次安第斯弧后前陆盆地群为南美重要的油气产区,其形成于3个大的构造背景之下:北部为加勒比板块演化叠加安第斯前陆挤压;中部的次安第斯前陆盆地长期处于冈瓦纳古陆的大陆边缘环境,之后受到大洋板块的俯冲和安第斯山脉的隆升和冲断;南部巴塔哥尼亚各盆地的形成演化更多地受到冈瓦纳古陆裂解和大西洋形成的影响。综合安第斯山脉的形成演化以及各盆地的构造演化和石油地质特征,将其划分成6段。

  7. An Outbreak of Bartonella bacilliformis in an Endemic Andean Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Sanchez Clemente

    Full Text Available Bartonellosis affects small Andean communities in Peru, Colombia and Ecuador. Research in this area has been limited.Retrospective review of 191 cases of bartonellosis managed in Caraz District Hospital, Peru, during the last outbreak (2003.The majority of cases (65% were 14 years old and younger. There was a peak in acute cases after the rainy season; chronic cases presented more constantly throughout the year. The sensitivity of blood smear against blood culture in acute disease was 25%. The most commonly used treatment for chronic disease was rifampicin; chloramphenicol was used to treat most acute cases. Complications arose in 6.8% and there were no deaths.Diagnostic and treatment algorithms for acute and chronic bartonellosis have been developed without a strong evidence base. Preparation of ready-to-go operational research protocols for future outbreaks would strengthen the evidence base for diagnostic and treatment strategies and enhance opportunities for control.

  8. A new minute Andean Pristimantis (Anura: Strabomantidae from Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César L. Barrio-Amorós

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Pristimantis is described from the Venezuelan Andes. The new species is the smallest in its genus known in Venezuela and belongs to the Pristimantis unistrigatus Group. It differs from the rest of Venezuelan Andean congeners in body size (mean male SVL < 21.3 mm, female SVL < 26.3 mm, expanded discs on fingers and toes, absence of dorsolateral folds, and a distinctivecall consisting in 2–5 cricket-like short notes. The new species inhabits the southwestern part of the Cordillera de Mérida in Venezuela and the Venezuelan side of the Cordillera Oriental deColombia, and could be present on the Colombian portion of the cordillera as well.

  9. Spatial random downscaling of rainfall signals in Andean heterogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas, A.; Duffaut Espinosa, L. A.; Yarlequé, C.; Carbajal, M.; Heidinger, H.; Carvalho, L.; Jones, C.; Quiroz, R.

    2015-07-01

    Remotely sensed data are often used as proxies for indirect precipitation measures over data-scarce and complex-terrain areas such as the Peruvian Andes. Although this information might be appropriate for some research requirements, the extent at which local sites could be related to such information is very limited because of the resolution of the available satellite data. Downscaling techniques are used to bridge the gap between what climate modelers (global and regional) are able to provide and what decision-makers require (local). Precipitation downscaling improves the poor local representation of satellite data and helps end-users acquire more accurate estimates of water availability. Thus, a multifractal downscaling technique complemented by a heterogeneity filter was applied to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) 3B42 gridded data (spatial resolution ~ 28 km) from the Peruvian Andean high plateau or Altiplano to generate downscaled rainfall fields that are relevant at an agricultural scale (spatial resolution ~ 1 km).

  10. Climate Change Impacts in a Colombian Andean Tropical Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, O. L.; Vélez, J. J.; Londoño, A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and climate variability have a large impact on water resources. Developing regions have less capacity to prepare for, respond to, and recover from climate-related hazards and effects, and then, populations may be disproportionately affected. In Colombia, the geographical location and the marked irregularity in the terrain, give as a result, a complex climate. These factors have contributed to the water supply of the territory. Unfortunately, the visualization of abundant and inexhaustible water resources created a great disregard for them. Besides, the water supply is not distributed uniformly across the country, and then there is water-deficit in some areas as Andean Region, where the largest population and the main development centers are located. In recent decades, water conflicts have emerged locally and regionally, which have generated a crisis in the allocation mechanisms and have improved the understanding of the water situation in Colombia. The Second National Communication to CCMNU alerts on possible future consequences of climate change and the need for regional studies for understanding climate change impacts on the fragile ecosystems of high mountains as paramos and fog forest, which are water production regulators. Colombian water resources are greatly affected by changes in rainfall patterns influenced by El Niño and La Niña. The recent disasters in the 2010-2011 rainy seasons have caught the attention of not only the authorities but from the scientific community to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating and responding to climate variability and climate change. Whereas sound water management is built upon long-term, the country is undertaking a pilot exercise for the integrated management of water resources, five Basins are selected, among them, is the Chinchiná River Basin; this Andean tropical Basin is located on the western slopes at the central range in the Andes between 4°48 and 5°12 N

  11. Forward modeling of δ18O in Andean ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, J. V.; Vuille, M.; Hardy, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Tropical ice core archives are among the best dated and highest resolution from the tropics, but a thorough understanding of processes that shape their isotope signature as well as the simulation of observed variability remain incomplete. To address this, we develop a tropical Andean ice core isotope forward model from in situ hydrologic observations and satellite water vapor isotope measurements. A control simulation of snow δ18O captures the mean and seasonal trend but underestimates the observed intraseasonal variability. The simulation of observed variability is improved by including amount effects associated with South American cold air incursions, linking synoptic-scale disturbances and monsoon dynamics to tropical ice core δ18O. The forward model was calibrated with and run under present-day conditions but can also be driven with past climate forcings to reconstruct paleomonsoon variability. The model is transferable and may be used to render a (paleo)climatic context at other ice core locations.

  12. A new Andean species of Philodryas (Dipsadidae, Xenodontinae) from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaher, Hussam; Arredondo, Juan C; Valencia, Jorge H; Arbeláez, Ernesto; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Altamirano-Benavides, Marco

    2014-04-04

    We describe a new species of Philodryas from the highlands of southern Ecuador. The new species is distinguished from all known species of Philodryas by a unique combination of coloration, scalation, and hemipenial characters. The new species resembles Philodryas simonsii in color pattern. However, they differ notoriously by their hemipenial morphology. The three other trans-Andean members of the genus (Philodryas simonsii, Philodryas chamissonis, and Philodryas tachymenoides), along with the new species, compose a probably monophyletic group that may be characterized by the presence of ungrooved postdiastemal teeth in the maxilla. Unlike most species of the genus Philodryas, the new species shows a restricted distribution, being apparently endemic to a small region of high-altitude (3150-4450m) grasslands in the southern Andes of Ecuador.

  13. Terreneuvian stratigraphy and faunas from the Anabar Uplift, Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Kouchinsky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Assemblages of mineralized skeletal fossils are described from limestone rocks of the lower Cambrian Nemakit-Daldyn, Medvezhya, Kugda-Yuryakh, Manykay, and lower Emyaksin formations exposed on the western and eastern flanks of the Anabar Uplift of the northern Siberian Platform. The skeletal fossil assemblages consist mainly of anabaritids, molluscs, and hyoliths, and also contain other taxa such as Blastulospongia, Chancelloria, Fomitchella, Hyolithellus, Platysolenites, Protohertzina, and Tianzhushanella. The first tianzhushanellids from Siberia, including Tianzhushanella tolli sp. nov., are described. The morphological variation of Protohertzina anabarica and Anabarites trisulcatus from their type locality is documented. Prominent longitudinal keels in the anabaritid Selindeochrea tripartita are demonstrated. Among the earliest molluscs from the Nemakit-Daldyn Formation, Purella and Yunnanopleura are interpreted as shelly parts of the same species. Fibrous microstructure of the outer layer and a wrinkled inner layer of mineralised cuticle in the organophosphatic sclerites of Fomitchella are reported. A siliceous composition of the globular fossil Blastulospongia is reported herein and a possible protistan affinity similar to Platysolenites is discussed. New carbon isotope data facilitate correlation both across the Anabar Uplift and with the Terreneuvian Series of the IUGS chronostratigraphical scheme for the Cambrian System. The base of Cambrian Stage 2 is provisionally placed herein within the Fortunian‒Cambrian Stage 2 transitional interval bracketed by the lowest appearance of Watsonella crosbyi and by a slightly higher horizon at the peak of carbon isotope excursion Iʹ from western flank of the Anabar Uplift. Correlation across the Siberian Platform of the fossiliferous Medvezhya and lower Emyaksin formations showing δ13Ccarb excursion Iʹ with the upper Sukharikha Formation containing excursion 5p and upper Ust’-Yudoma Formation

  14. Using the Nordic Geodetic Observing System for land uplift studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordman, M.; Poutanen, M.; Kairus, A.; Virtanen, J.

    2014-07-01

    Geodetic observing systems have been planned and developed during the last decade. An ideal observing system consists of a network of geodetic observing stations with several techniques at the same site, publicly accessible databases, and as a product delivers data time series, combination of techniques or some other results obtained from the data sets. Globally, there is the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), and there are ongoing attempts to create also regional observing systems. In this paper we introduce one regional system, the Nordic Geodetic Observing System (NGOS) hosted by the Nordic Geodetic Commission (NKG). Data availability and accessibility are one of the major issues today. We discuss in general data-related topics, and introduce a pilot database project of NGOS. As a demonstration of the use of such a database, we apply it for postglacial rebound studies in the Fennoscandian area. We compare land uplift values from three techniques, GNSS, tide gauges and absolute gravity, with the Nordic Geodetic Commission NKG2005LU land uplift model for Fennoscandia. The purpose is to evaluate the data obtained from different techniques and different sources and get the most reliable values for the uplift using publicly available data. The primary aim of observing systems will be to produce data and other products needed by multidisciplinary projects, such as Upper Mantle Dynamics and Quaternary Climate in Cratonic Areas (DynaQlim) or the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), but their needs may currently exceed the scope of an existing observing system. We discuss what requirements the projects pose to observing systems and their development. To make comparisons between different studies possible and reliable, the researcher should document what they have in detail, either in appendixes, supplementary material or some other available format.

  15. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünwald Niklaus J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum, all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a and one mitochondrial (Cox1 region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Results Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. Conclusions The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  16. [Elaboration and evaluation of infant food based on Andean crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo-Carrasco, R; Hoyos, N L

    1993-06-01

    The Andes mountain range of South America is one of the most important centres for crop domestication, potato, corn, and lesser known grains such as quinua, cañihua, kiwicha and tarwi are indigenous of these highlands. These Andean grains have adapted perfectly to the climatic and geographical conditions present, whereas other grains have not been able to survive. In addition to their hardiness, they also have a high nutritional value. Bearing in mind on one hand, the high nutritional value of these indegenous products, and on the other hand the high rate of child malnutrition prevalent in the population, it was considered important to look for new variations in their processing which would facilitate their consumption by the poor working classes, especially the children. Accordingly three different flour mixtures were developed based on these Andean grains, the mixtures were then subjected to bromatological and biological analysis. The three new flour mixtures were: Quinua-Cañihua-Broad Bean (Q-C-B), Quinua-Kiwicha-Bean (Q-K-B) and Kiwicha-Rice (K-R). The protein content of these mixtures varied between 11.35-15.46 g/100g, the mixture K-R having the lowest protein level and the Q-C-B having the highest. The Q-K-B mixture had the highest chemical score, PER and NPU value. This PER value of 2.59 was higher than the value of casein which was 2.50. In addition this mixture had a chemical score of 0.94 and a NPU value of 59.38. The Q-C-B mixture had a chemical score of 0.88 and its PER, NPU and Digestibility values were 2.36, 47.24 and 79.2 respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Central Andean crustal structure from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jamie; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Wagner, Lara; Minaya, Estela; Tavera, Hernado

    2016-07-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (15°-27°S) is a high plateau in excess of 3 km elevation, associated with thickened crust along the western edge of the South America plate, in the convergent margin between the subducting Nazca plate and the Brazilian craton. We have calculated receiver functions using seismic data from a recent portable deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-21°S) region and combined them with waveforms from 38 other stations in the region to investigate crustal thickness and crust and mantle structures. Results from the receiver functions provide a more detailed map of crustal thickness than previously existed, and highlight mid-crustal features that match well with prior studies. The active volcanic arc and Altiplano have thick crust with Moho depths increasing from the central Altiplano (65 km) to the northern Altiplano (75 km). The Eastern Cordillera shows large along strike variations in crustal thickness. Along a densely sampled SW-NE profile through the Bolivian orocline there is a small region of thin crust beneath the high peaks of the Cordillera Real where the average elevations are near 4 km, and the Moho depth varies from 55 to 60 km, implying the crust is undercompensated by 5 km. In comparison, a broader region of high elevations in the Eastern Cordillera to the southeast near 20°S has a deeper Moho at 65-70 km and appears close to isostatic equilibrium at the Moho. Assuming the modern-day pattern of high precipitation on the flanks of the Andean plateau has existed since the late Miocene, we suggest that climate induced exhumation can explain some of the variations in present day crustal structure across the Bolivian orocline. We also suggest that south of the orocline at 20°S, the thicker and isostatically compensated crust is due to the absence of erosional exhumation and the occurrence of lithospheric delamination.

  18. Depositional and provenance record of the Paleogene transition from foreland to hinterland basin evolution during Andean orogenesis, northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Christopher J.; Horton, Brian K.; Caballero, Victor; Mora, Andrés; Parra, Mauricio; Sierra, Jair

    2011-10-01

    The Central Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera of the northern Andes form the topographic flanks of the north-trending Magdalena Valley Basin. Constraining the growth of these ranges and intervening basin has implications for Andean shortening and the transformation from a foreland to hinterland basin configuration. We present sedimentological, paleocurrent, and sandstone petrographic results from Cenozoic type localities to provide insights into the tectonic history of the northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin of Colombia. In the Nuevo Mundo Syncline, the mid-Paleocene transition from marine to nonmarine deposystems of the Lisama Formation corresponds with a paleocurrent shift from northward to eastward transport. These changes match detrital geochronological evidence for a contemporaneous shift from cratonic (Amazonian) to orogenic (Andean) provenance, suggesting initial shortening-related uplift of the Central Cordillera and foreland basin generation in the Magdalena Valley by mid-Paleocene time. Subsequent establishment of a meandering fluvial system is recorded in lower-middle Eocene strata of the lower La Paz Formation. Eastward paleocurrents in mid-Paleocene through uppermost Eocene fluvial deposits indicate a continuous influence of western sediment source areas. However, at the upper middle Eocene (˜40 Ma) boundary between the lower and upper La Paz Formation, sandstone compositions show a drastic decrease in lithic content, particularly lithic volcanic fragments. This change is accompanied by a facies shift from mixed channel and overbank facies to thick, amalgamated braided fluvial deposits of possible fluvial megafans, reflecting changes in both the composition and proximity of western sediment sources. We attribute these modifications to the growing influence of exhumed La Cira-Infantas paleohighs in the axial Magdalena Valley, features presently buried beneath upper Eocene-Quaternary basin fill along the western flank of the Nuevo Mundo Syncline. In

  19. Regional polyphase deformation of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas (Argentina Andean foreland): strengths and weaknesses of paleostress inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traforti, Anna; Zampieri, Dario; Massironi, Matteo; Viola, Giulio; Alvarado, Patricia; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern Sierras Pampeanas of central Argentina are composed of a series of basement-cored ranges, located in the Andean foreland c. 600 km east of the Andean Cordillera. Although uplift of the ranges is partly attributed to the regional Neogene evolution (Ramos et al. 2002), many questions remain as to the timing and style of deformation. In fact, the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas show compelling evidence of a long lasting brittle history (spanning the Early Carboniferous to Present time), characterised by several deformation events reflecting different tectonic regimes. Each deformation phase resulted in further strain increments accommodated by reactivation of inherited structures and rheological anisotropies (Martino 2003). In the framework of such a polyphase brittle tectonic evolution affecting highly anisotropic basement rocks, the application of paleostress inversion methods, though powerful, suffers from some shortcomings, such as the likely heterogeneous character of fault slip datasets and the possible reactivation of even highly misoriented structures, and thus requires careful analysis. The challenge is to gather sufficient fault-slip data, to develop a proper understanding of the regional evolution. This is done by the identification of internally consistent fault and fracture subsets (associated to distinct stress states on the basis of their geometric and kinematic compatibility) in order to generate a chronologically-constrained evolutionary conceptual model. Based on large fault-slip datasets collected in the Sierras de Cordoba (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas), reduced stress tensors have been generated and interpreted as part of an evolutionary model by considering the obtained results against: (i) existing K-Ar illite ages of fault gouges in the study area (Bense et al. 2013), (ii) the nature and orientation of pre-existing anisotropies and (iii) the present-day stress field due to the convergence of the Nazca and South America plates (main shortening

  20. Formal Law and Local Water Control in the Andean Region: A Fiercely Contested Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de H.; Boelens, R.A.; Bustamente, R.R.

    2006-01-01

    Water access and control rights of peasant and indigenous communities in Andean countries are threatened. Vertical state law and intervention practices, as well as new privatization policies generally ignore, discriminate or undermine local normative frameworks. Recognition of diverse local rights

  1. CONDESAN: Better Knowledge, Better Decisions—Supporting Sustainable Andean Mountains Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miguel Saravia; Christian Devenish; Bert De Bièvre; Manuel Peralvo

    2013-01-01

    The Consortium for the Sustainable Development of the Andean Ecoregion (CONDESAN) was established in February 1993 after a series of consultations among different regional stakeholders working on sustainable development...

  2. Trechisibus apukhapiensis sp. n. (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Trechinae) from southeastern Andean mountains of Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruiz-Tapiador, Ildefonso; Delgado, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    A new species of ground beetle, Trechisibus (Trechisibiodes) apukhapiensis sp. n. from the Andean Mountains of southeastern Peru is described based on specimens collected in the Apu Khapia Mountain, 4 462 m...

  3. Genetic, Cytogenetic and Morphological Trends in the Evolution of the Rhodnius (Triatominae: Rhodniini) Trans-Andean Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián; Panzera, Francisco; Jaramillo-O, Nicolás; Pérez, Ruben; Fernández, Rosina; Vallejo, Gustavo; Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, Jose E.; Triana, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodnius Pacific group is composed of three species: Rhodnius pallescens, R. colombiensis and R. ecuadoriensis, which are considered important vectors of trypanosomes (Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli) infecting humans. This group is considered as a recent trans-Andean lineage derived from the widespread distributed sister taxa R. pictipes during the later uplift of northern Andes mountain range. The widest spread species R. pallescens may be a complex of two divergent lineages with different chromosomal attributes and a particular biogeographical distribution across Central America and Colombia with several southern populations in Colombia occupying the same sylvatic habitat as its sister species R. colombiensis. Although the taxonomy of Rhodnius Pacific group has been well studied, the unresolved phylogenetic and systematic issues are the target of this paper. Here we explore the molecular phylogeography of this species group analyzing two mitochondrial (ND4 and cyt b) and one nuclear (D2 region of ribosomal 28S gene) gene sequences. The molecular analyses suggest an early divergence of the species R. ecuadoriensis and R. colombiensis, followed by a recent expansion of R. pallescens lineages. The phylogenetic relationship between sympatric R. pallescens Colombian lineage and R. colombiensis was further explored using wing morphometry, DNA genome size measurements, and by analyzing chromosomal behavior of hybrids progeny obtained from experimental crosses. Our results suggest that the diversification of the two R. pallescens lineages was mainly influenced by biogeographical events such as (i) the emergence of the Panama Isthmus, while the origin and divergence of R. colombiensis was associated with (ii) the development of particular genetic and chromosomal features that act as isolation mechanisms from its sister species R. pallescens (Colombian lineage). These findings provide new insights into the evolution of the Rhodnius Pacific group and the underlying

  4. Genetic, cytogenetic and morphological trends in the evolution of the Rhodnius (Triatominae: Rhodniini trans-Andean group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Díaz

    Full Text Available The Rhodnius Pacific group is composed of three species: Rhodnius pallescens, R. colombiensis and R. ecuadoriensis, which are considered important vectors of trypanosomes (Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli infecting humans. This group is considered as a recent trans-Andean lineage derived from the widespread distributed sister taxa R. pictipes during the later uplift of northern Andes mountain range. The widest spread species R. pallescens may be a complex of two divergent lineages with different chromosomal attributes and a particular biogeographical distribution across Central America and Colombia with several southern populations in Colombia occupying the same sylvatic habitat as its sister species R. colombiensis. Although the taxonomy of Rhodnius Pacific group has been well studied, the unresolved phylogenetic and systematic issues are the target of this paper. Here we explore the molecular phylogeography of this species group analyzing two mitochondrial (ND4 and cyt b and one nuclear (D2 region of ribosomal 28S gene gene sequences. The molecular analyses suggest an early divergence of the species R. ecuadoriensis and R. colombiensis, followed by a recent expansion of R. pallescens lineages. The phylogenetic relationship between sympatric R. pallescens Colombian lineage and R. colombiensis was further explored using wing morphometry, DNA genome size measurements, and by analyzing chromosomal behavior of hybrids progeny obtained from experimental crosses. Our results suggest that the diversification of the two R. pallescens lineages was mainly influenced by biogeographical events such as (i the emergence of the Panama Isthmus, while the origin and divergence of R. colombiensis was associated with (ii the development of particular genetic and chromosomal features that act as isolation mechanisms from its sister species R. pallescens (Colombian lineage. These findings provide new insights into the evolution of the Rhodnius Pacific group and the

  5. Constraints on the uplift mechanism of northern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haijian; Fu, Bihong; Shi, Pilong; Ma, Yuanxu; Li, Haibing

    2016-11-01

    Enhanced latest Oligocene to present uplift of northern Tibet is manifest in a variety of geological records. However, the main controversy is how the crust came to be thickened. Theories seeking to explain the growth of northern Tibet include removal of the mantle lithosphere beneath Tibet and the cessation of fast motion on major strike-slip faults. To address this issue, we conducted a detailed paleomagnetic study in the central Kumkol basin, south of the Altyn Tagh fault (ATF). Combined with our previous study from the Janggalsay area, north of the ATF, magnetic declination data suggest fast strike-slip motion for the left-lateral ATF between 22 and 15 Ma. However, the fast motion along the ATF terminated between 15 and Tibet at ∼15 Ma. Our results argue in support of a Mid-Miocene transition in tectonic regime from extrusion to distributed shortening in northern Tibet and emphasize the role of the ATF in governing widespread and simultaneous uplift of northern Tibet.

  6. Uplift, thermal unrest and magma intrusion at Yellowstone caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Charles W; Thatcher, Wayne; Dzurisin, Daniel; Svarc, Jerry

    2006-03-02

    The Yellowstone caldera, in the western United States, formed approximately 640,000 years ago when an explosive eruption ejected approximately 1,000 km3 of material. It is the youngest of a series of large calderas that formed during sequential cataclysmic eruptions that began approximately 16 million years ago in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. The Yellowstone caldera was largely buried by rhyolite lava flows during eruptions that occurred from approximately 150,000 to approximately 70,000 years ago. Since the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift/subsidence episodes with movements of approximately 70 cm historically to several metres since the Pleistocene epoch, and intense hydrothermal activity. Here we present observations of a new mode of surface deformation in Yellowstone, based on radar interferometry observations from the European Space Agency ERS-2 satellite. We infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement of molten basalt into and out of the Yellowstone volcanic system.

  7. East Antarctic rifting triggers uplift of the Gamburtsev Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Finn, Carol A; Jordan, Tom A; Bell, Robin E; Anderson, Lester M; Damaske, Detlef

    2011-11-16

    The Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains are the least understood tectonic feature on Earth, because they are completely hidden beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Their high elevation and youthful Alpine topography, combined with their location on the East Antarctic craton, creates a paradox that has puzzled researchers since the mountains were discovered in 1958. The preservation of Alpine topography in the Gamburtsevs may reflect extremely low long-term erosion rates beneath the ice sheet, but the mountains' origin remains problematic. Here we present the first comprehensive view of the crustal architecture and uplift mechanisms for the Gamburtsevs, derived from radar, gravity and magnetic data. The geophysical data define a 2,500-km-long rift system in East Antarctica surrounding the Gamburtsevs, and a thick crustal root beneath the range. We propose that the root formed during the Proterozoic assembly of interior East Antarctica (possibly about 1 Gyr ago), was preserved as in some old orogens and was rejuvenated during much later Permian (roughly 250 Myr ago) and Cretaceous (roughly 100 Myr ago) rifting. Much like East Africa, the interior of East Antarctica is a mosaic of Precambrian provinces affected by rifting processes. Our models show that the combination of rift-flank uplift, root buoyancy and the isostatic response to fluvial and glacial erosion explains the high elevation and relief of the Gamburtsevs. The evolution of the Gamburtsevs demonstrates that rifting and preserved orogenic roots can produce broad regions of high topography in continental interiors without significantly modifying the underlying Precambrian lithosphere.

  8. The Colorado front range: anatomy of a Laramide uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Karl; Bryant, Bruce; Reed, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Along a transect across the Front Range from Denver to the Blue River valley near Dillon, the trip explores the geologic framework and Laramide (Late Cretaceous to early Eocene) uplift history of this basement-cored mountain range. Specific items for discussion at various stops are (1) the sedimentary and structural record along the upturned eastern margin of the range, which contains several discontinuous, east-directed reverse faults; (2) the western structural margin of the range, which contains a minimum of 9 km of thrust overhang and is significantly different in structural style from the eastern margin; (3) mid- to late-Tertiary modifications to the western margin of the range from extensional faulting along the northern Rio Grande rift trend; (4) the thermal and uplift history of the range as revealed by apatite fission track analysis; (5) the Proterozoic basement of the range, including the significance of northeast-trending shear zones; and (6) the geologic setting of the Colorado mineral belt, formed during Laramide and mid-Tertiary igneous activity.

  9. Partitioning of oblique convergence in the Northern Andes subduction zone: Migration history and the present-day boundary of the North Andean Sliver in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Nocquet, J. M.; Jaillard, E.; Mothes, P.; Jarrín, P.; Segovia, M.; Rolandone, F.; Cisneros, D.

    2016-05-01

    Along the Ecuadorian margin, oblique subduction induces deformation of the overriding continental plate. For the last 15 Ma, both exhumation and tectonic history of Ecuador suggest that the northeastward motion of the North Andean Sliver (NAS) was accompanied by an eastward migration of its eastern boundary and successive progressively narrowing restraining bends. Here we present geologic data, earthquake epicenters, focal mechanisms, GPS results, and a revised active fault map consistent with this new kinematic model. All data sets concur to demonstrate that active continental deformation is presently localized along a single major fault system, connecting fault segments from the Gulf of Guayaquil to the eastern Andean Cordillera. Although secondary faults are recognized within the Cordillera, they accommodate a negligible fraction of relative motion compared to the main fault system. The eastern limit is then concentrated rather than distributed as first proposed, marking a sharp boundary between the NAS, the Inca sliver, and the Subandean domain overthrusting the South American craton. The NAS limit follows a northeast striking right-lateral transpressional strike-slip system from the Gulf of Guayaquil (Isla Puná) to the Andean Cordillera and with the north-south striking transpressive faults along the eastern Andes. Eastward migration of the restraining belt since the Pliocene, abandonment of the sutures and reactivation of north-south striking ancient fault zones lead to the final development of a major tectonic boundary south and east of the NAS, favoring its extrusion as a continental sliver, accommodating the oblique convergence of the Nazca oceanic plate toward South America.

  10. The uplifting process of the Bogda Mountain during the Cenozoic and its tectonic implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZongXiu; LI Tao; ZHANG Jin; LIU YongQing; MA ZongJin

    2008-01-01

    Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China The Tianshan Mountains have undergone its initial orogeny, extension adjusting and re-orogeny since the Late Paleozoic. The re-orogeny and uplifting process of the orogeny in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are two of most important events in the geological evolution of Euro-Asian continent, which resulted in the formation of the present range-and-basin pattern in topography of the Tianshan Mountains and its adjacent areas. Thermochronology results by the method of fission-track dating of apatite suggest three obvious uplifting stages of the Bogad Mountain Chain re-orogeny during the Cenozoic, i.e. 5.6-19 Ma, 20-30 Ma, and 42-47 Ma. The strongest uplifting stage of the mountain is the second one at 20-30 Ma, when the mountain uplifted as a whole, and the beginning of re-orogeny was no less than 65Ma. Furthermore, our studies also show that the uplifting types of the mountain are variable in the different time periods, including uplifting of mountain as a whole and differential uplifting. The apparently diversified uplifting processes of the mountain chain are characterized by the migration (or transformation) of the uplifting direction of the mountain from west to east and from north to south, and the main process of mountain extending is from north to south.

  11. Fission track evidence for the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic uplift of Mt. Bogda, Xinjiang, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Chuanbo; MEI Lianfu; PENG Lei; ZHANG Shiwan; LIU Lin; TANG Jiguang

    2006-01-01

    Fission-track dating evidence from 5apatite samples and 4 zircon samples, and modeled time-temperature thermal history indicate that since Late Jurassic-Cretaceous (150 -106 Ma), the uplift process of Mt. Bogda can be divided into four stages of thermal evolution: 150 - 106, 75 -65, 44 -24and 13 -9 Ma. Before 44- 24 Ma, the cooling rate and uplifting rate of the southern and northern segments of Mt. Bogda are almost the same, showing that the uplifting of Mt. Bogda is an overall process.Since 44 - 24 Ma, the uplifting of the southern and northern segments of Mt. Bogda has shown differences. During 42 - 11 Ma, the northern segment of Mt. Bogda was at a steady stage, with the cooling rate being 0.03℃/Ma and the uplifting rate being 0. 001 mm/a. From 11 Ma to the present, the northern segment of Mt. Bogda was at a rapid cooling and uplifting stage, with the cooling rate being 5.72℃/Ma and the uplifting rate being 0.19 mm/a. However, the southern segment of Mt. Bogda has been at a rapid cooling and uplifting stage since 26 Ma, with the cooling rate being 1.24℃/Ma and the uplifting rate being 0.041 mm/a during 26 -9 Ma; 4.88℃/Ma and 0. 163 mm/a from 9 Ma till now.

  12. Basic Types and Structural Characteristics of Uplifts: An Overview of Sedimentary Basins in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Dengfa; LI Desheng; WU Xiaozhi; WEN Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The uplift is a positive structural unit of the crust. It is an important window for continental dynamics owing to its abundant structural phenomena, such as fault, fold, unconformity and denudation of strata. Meanwhile, it is the very place to store important minerals like oil, natural gas, coal and uranium. Giant and large-scale oil and gas fields in China, such as the Daqing Oilfield, Lunnan-Tahe Oilfield, Penglai 19-3 Oilfield, Puguang Gas Field and Jingbian Gas Field, are developed mainly on uplifts. Therefore, it is the main target both for oil and gas exploration and for geological study. The uplift can be either a basement uplift, or one developed only in the sedimentary cover. Extension, compression and wrench or their combined forces may give rise to uplifts. The development process of uplifting, such as formation, development, dwindling and destruction, can be taken as the uplifting cycle. The uplifts on the giant Precambrian cratons are large in scale with less extensive structural deformation. The uplifts on the medium- and small-sized cratons or neo-cratons are formed in various shapes with strong structural deformation and complicated geological structure. Owing to changes in the geodynamic environment, uplift experiences a multi-stage or multi-cycle development process. Its geological structure is characterized in superposition of multi-structural layers. Based on the basement properties, mechanical stratigraphy and development sequence, uplifts can be divided into three basic types--the succession, superposition and destruction ones. The succession type is subdivided into the maintaining type and the lasting type. The superposition type can he subdivided into the composite anticlinal type, the buried-hill draped type, the faulted uplift type and the migration type according to the different scales and superimposed styles of uplifts in different cycles. The destruction type is subdivided into the tilting type and the negative inverted type. The

  13. Tectonic Affinity, T-t Path and Uplift Trajectory of Eclogites from Northern Dabie Mountains, Central-Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Petrologic geochemistry and isotopic chronology of the eclogites suggest that most of the eclogites in northern Dabie Mountains produced from the Triassic Yangtze subducted continental crust (lower crust and formed during the deep subduction) and the metamorphosed mafic-untramafic belt with eclogite, marble and meta-peridotite blocks around the Mozitan-Xiaotian fault zone may represent the meta-tectonic melange produced during the active subduction of an ancient oceanic slab and subsequent collision between the Yangtze and North China continental plates. The cooling history of the eclogites from ~900 ℃ to 300 ℃ can be subdivided into three stages: one isothermal stage and two rapid cooling stages. The initial stage between (230±6) and 210 Ma was a near-isothermal or temperature rise process corresponding to the retrograded metamorphism of granulite-facies with a rapid uplift of 4 nun/a, then two fast cooling stages occurred with cooling rate of ~10 ℃/Ma during 210 Ma to (172±3) Ma and ~4 ℃/Ma during (172±3) Ma to 130 Ma. After the peak metamorphism of eclogite-facies, their initial isothermal stage with slower uplift rate and cooling rate and high-T overprinting of granulite-facies metamorphism is the major difference between the eciogites in northern Dabie Mountains from those in southern Dabie Mountains. This may be one of the most important reasons to preserve few evidences of earlier ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism.

  14. The 17 Ma old Turkana beaked whale fossil: new paleoaltimetry constraints for uplift and environmental change in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichura, Henry; Jacobs, Louis L.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Lin, Andrew; Polcyn, Michael J.; Manthi, Fredrick K.; Winkler, Dale A.; Matthew, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Timing and magnitude of vertical motions of the Earth's crust is key to evaluate the impact of tectonic processes on changes in atmospheric circulation patterns, rainfall, and environmental conditions. The East African Plateau (EAP) is a major topographic feature that fundamentally impacts the patterns of the Indian-African Monsoon and the eastward transport of air masses from the Congo Basin. Uplift of the EAP in Kenya has been linked to mantle processes, but due to the lack of reliable palaeoaltimetric data it has been challenging to unambiguously constrain plateau evolution, vertical motions associated with late Cenozoic rifting of the East African Rift System, and ensuing environmental change. We explored the fossil remains of a beaked whale (Ziphiidae) from the Turkana region in the northern Kenya Rift, 700 km inland from the present-day coastline of the Indian Ocean. The whale fossil, preserved near sea level, was discovered at an elevation of 620 m and thus constrains the uplift of the northeastern flanks of the EAP. The Kenyan ziphiid was discovered in fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the extensional Oligo-Miocene Lokichar basin (Mead, 1975) along with terrestrial mammals and freshwater molluscs below a basalt dated at 17.1 ± 1.0 Ma (Boschetto et al., 1992). The unifying characteristics of riverine occurrences of modern marine mammals include sufficient discharge in low-gradient rivers to maintain pathways deep enough to facilitate migration, and the absence of shallow bedrock, rapids, and waterfalls. The most likely route, which may have had these characteristics is a fluvial corridor controlled by protracted thermal subsidence of the Cretaceous Anza Rift, which once linked extensional processes in Central and East Africa with the continental margin of northeastern Africa. The fossil locality and analogies with present-day occurrences of marine mammals in terrestrial realms suggest that the ziphiid stranded slightly above sea level. In combination with

  15. No Moho uplift below the Baikal Rift Zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer; Thybo, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The late Cenozoic Baikal Rift Zone (BRZ) in southern Siberia is composed of several individual topographic depressions and half grabens with the deep Lake Baikal at its center. We have modeled the seismic velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle along a 360 km long profile of the Baikal...... Explosion Seismic Transects (BEST) project across the rift zone in the southern part of Lake Baikal. The seismic velocity structure along the profile is determined by tomographic inversion of first arrival times and 2-D ray tracing of first arrivals and reflections. The velocity model shows a gently...... deepening Moho from the Siberian Platform (41 km depth) into the Sayan-Baikal Fold Belt (46 km depth). We can exclude the presence of any Moho uplift around the ~10 km deep sedimentary graben structure of southern Lake Baikal. The lower crust includes a distinct 50-80 km wide high-velocity anomaly (7...

  16. Finite temperature behaviour of the ISS-uplifted KKLT model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papineau, C.

    2008-02-15

    We study the static phase structure of the ISS-KKLT model for moduli stabilisation and uplifting to a zero cosmological constant. Since the supersymmetry breaking sector and the moduli sector are only gravitationally coupled, we expect negligible quantum effects of the modulus upon the ISS sector, and the other way around. Under this assumption, we show that the ISS fields end up in the metastable vacua. The reason is not only that it is thermally favoured (second order phase transition) compared to the phase transition towards the supersymmetric vacua, but rather that the metastable vacua form before the supersymmetric ones. This nice feature is exclusively due to the presence of the KKLT sector. We also show that supergravity effects are negligible around the origin of the field space. Finally, we turn to the modulus sector and show that there is no destabilisation effect coming from the ISS sector. (orig.)

  17. Mountain uplift and the threshold for sustained Northern Hemisphere Glaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Foster

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Miocene (~24 to ~5 million years ago was a period of relative global warmth (e.g. Zachos et al. 2001 characterised by the glaciation of Antarctica only. Paradoxically, the majority of available proxy data suggest that during the Miocene pCO2 was similar, or even lower, than the pre-industrial levels (280 ppmv; Pagani et al., 1999; Pearson and Palmer, 2000; Kürschner et al., 1996, 2008 and at times probably crossed the modelled threshold value required for sustained glaciation in the Northern Hemisphere (DeConto et al., 2008. Records of ice rafted debris and the oxygen isotope composition of benthic foraminifera suggest that at several times over the last 25 million years substantial amounts of continental ice did build up in the Northern Hemisphere but none of these led to sustained glaciation. In this contribution we review evidence that suggests that in the Miocene the North American Cordillera was, at least in parts, considerably lower than today. We present new GCM simulations that imply that Late Miocene uplift of the North American Cordillera would have resulted in significant cooling of Northern North American Continent. Offline ice sheet modelling, driven by these GCM outputs, suggests that with a reduced topography inception of the Cordilleran ice sheet is prohibited, and there is a small, but potentially significant, reduction in the amount of ice grown on Baffin Island. This suggests uplift of the North American Cordillera in the Late Miocene may have played an important role in priming the climate for the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation in the Late Pliocene.

  18. Mechanisms of O2 transport in Andean dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchero, N; Cruz, J; Bustinza, J

    1975-04-01

    Using previously inserted catheters, 11 dogs native to high altitude (7.5-23 kg bwt) were studied standing and unsedated in Cerro de Pasco, Peru at 4350 meters. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), O2 and CO2 contents, PO2, PCO2 and pH were measured in simultaneously obtained arterial and mixed venous blood samples. Blood pressures were measured in the pulmonary artery and the left ventricle and cardiac output (Q) was determined by dye dilution. Moderately higher values for Hb and Hct were found in these dogs. Hb-O2 affinity was no different than that found in sea level dogs: the P50 in the Andean dogs was 31.6 mm Hg at 38 degrees C and pH of 7.4. Because of the low barometric pressure at 4350 m (458 mmHg) the partial pressures of oxygen in inspired and in alveolar air were lower than at sea level: 84.3 and 56.4 mm Hg, respectively. PAO2 and PVO2, were 55.5 and 32.9 mm Hg while the SAO2 and SVO2 were 79.5 and 50.7%, respectively. Marked hyperventilation was observed (PACO2, 25.6 mm Hg) however, pH was normal. Cardiac output was normal (average 162 plus or minus 39 ml/min/kg). Moderate pulmonary arterial hypertension was observed in the presence of normal left ventricular end diastolic pressure suggesting increased pulmonary vascular resistance.

  19. Cerebral vasoreactivity in Andeans and headache at sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenzeller, O; Passino, C; Roach, R; Gamboa, J; Gamboa, A; Bernardi, L; Bonfichi, M; Malcovati, L

    2004-04-15

    Headache is common in Cerro de Pasco (CP), Peru (altitude 4338 m) and was present in all patients with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) in CP reported here. Forty-seven percent of inhabitants report headache. Twenty-four percent of men have migraine with aura, with an average of 65 attacks a year. We assessed vasoreactivity of the cerebral vessels to CO2 by rebreathing and to NO by the administration of isosorbite dinitrate (IDN), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in natives of CP, some of whom suffered from CMS. We repeated the measurements in Lima (altitude 150 m) in the same subjects within 24 h of arrival. Vasodilatation in the middle cerebral artery supply territory in response to CO2 and NO, both physiologic vasodilators, is defective in Andean natives at altitude and in the same subjects at sea level. Incapacitating migraine can occur with impaired cerebral vasoreactivity to physiologic vasodilators. We propose that susceptibility to migraine might depend in part on gene expression with consequent alterations of endothelial function.

  20. Changing Hydrology in Glacier-fed High Altitude Andean Peatbogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayback, D. A.; Yager, K.; Baraer, M.; Mohr, K. I.; Argollo, J.; Wigmore, O.; Meneses, R. I.; Mark, B. G.

    2012-12-01

    Montane peatbogs in the glacierized Andean highlands of Peru and Bolivia provide critical forage for camelids (llama and alpaca) in regionally extensive pastoral agriculture systems. During the long dry season, these wetlands often provide the only available green forage. A key question for the future of these peatbog systems, and the livelihoods they support, is the impact of climate change and glacier recession on their hydrology, and thus forage production. We have already documented substantial regional glacier recession, of, on average, approximately 30% of surface area over the past two decades. As glaciers begin to retreat under climate change, there is initially a period of increased meltwater outflow, culminating in a period of "peak water", and followed by a continual decline in outflows. Based on previous work, we know that some glaciers in the region have already passed peak water conditions, and are now declining. To better understand the impacts of these processes on peatbog hydrology and productivity, we have begun collecting a variety of surface data at several study sites in both Bolivia and Peru. These include precipitation, stream flow, water levels, water chemistry and isotope analyses, and peatbog biodiversity and biomass. These measurements will be used in conjunction with a regional model driven by satellite data to predict likely future impacts. We will present the results from these initial surface measurements, and an overview of satellite datasets to be used in the regional model.

  1. Can footwall unloading explain late Cenozoic uplift of the Sierra Nevada crest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G.A.; Parsons, T.

    2009-01-01

    Globally, normal-fault displacement bends and warps rift flanks upwards, as adjoining basins drop downwards. Perhaps the most evident manifestations are the flanks of the East African Rift, which cuts across the otherwise minimally deformed continent. Flank uplift was explained by Vening Meinesz (1950, Institut Royal Colonial Belge, Bulletin des Seances, v. 21, p. 539-552), who recognized that isostasy should cause uplift of a normal-faulted footwall and subsidence of its hanging wall. Uplift occurs because slip on a dipping normal fault creates a broader root of less-dense material beneath the footwall, and a narrowed one beneath the hanging wall. In this paper, we investigate the potential influence of this process on the latest stages of Sierra Nevada uplift. Through theoretical calculations and 3D finite element modelling, we find that cumulative slip of about 4km on range-front faults would have produced about 1.3km peak isostatic uplift at the ridge crest. Numerical models suggest that the zone of uplift is narrow, with the width controlled by bending resistance of the seismogenic crust. We conclude that footwall unloading cannot account for the entire elevation of the Sierran crest above sea level, but if range-front faulting initiated in an already elevated plateau like the adjacent Basin and Range Province, then a hybrid model of pre-existing regional uplift and localized footwall unloading can account for the older and newer uplift phases suggested by the geologic record.

  2. GPS Imaging of vertical land motion in California and Nevada: Implications for Sierra Nevada uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, William C.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Kreemer, Corné

    2016-10-01

    We introduce Global Positioning System (GPS) Imaging, a new technique for robust estimation of the vertical velocity field of the Earth's surface, and apply it to the Sierra Nevada Mountain range in the western United States. Starting with vertical position time series from Global Positioning System (GPS) stations, we first estimate vertical velocities using the MIDAS robust trend estimator, which is insensitive to undocumented steps, outliers, seasonality, and heteroscedasticity. Using the Delaunay triangulation of station locations, we then apply a weighted median spatial filter to remove velocity outliers and enhance signals common to multiple stations. Finally, we interpolate the data using weighted median estimation on a grid. The resulting velocity field is temporally and spatially robust and edges in the field remain sharp. Results from data spanning 5-20 years show that the Sierra Nevada is the most rapid and extensive uplift feature in the western United States, rising up to 2 mm/yr along most of the range. The uplift is juxtaposed against domains of subsidence attributable to groundwater withdrawal in California's Central Valley. The uplift boundary is consistently stationary, although uplift is faster over the 2011-2016 period of drought. Uplift patterns are consistent with groundwater extraction and concomitant elastic bedrock uplift, plus slower background tectonic uplift. A discontinuity in the velocity field across the southeastern edge of the Sierra Nevada reveals a contrast in lithospheric strength, suggesting a relationship between late Cenozoic uplift of the southern Sierra Nevada and evolution of the southern Walker Lane.

  3. Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Van dam, Tonie; Hamilton, Gordon S.

    2007-01-01

    , calculated from sequential digital elevation models, contributes about 16 mm of the observed uplift, with an additional 5 mm from volume loss of Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier. The remaining uplift signal is attributed to significant melt-induced ice volume loss from the ice sheet margin along the southeast coast...

  4. The Prediction Model of Dam Uplift Pressure Based on Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Su, Huaizhi; Hu, Jiang

    2017-09-01

    The prediction of the dam uplift pressure is of great significance in the dam safety monitoring. Based on the comprehensive consideration of various factors, 18 parameters are selected as the main factors affecting the prediction of uplift pressure, use the actual monitoring data of uplift pressure as the evaluation factors for the prediction model, based on the random forest algorithm and support vector machine to build the dam uplift pressure prediction model to predict the uplift pressure of the dam, and the predict performance of the two models were compared and analyzed. At the same time, based on the established random forest prediction model, the significance of each factor is analyzed, and the importance of each factor of the prediction model is calculated by the importance function. Results showed that: (1) RF prediction model can quickly and accurately predict the uplift pressure value according to the influence factors, the average prediction accuracy is above 96%, compared with the support vector machine (SVM) model, random forest model has better robustness, better prediction precision and faster convergence speed, and the random forest model is more robust to missing data and unbalanced data. (2) The effect of water level on uplift pressure is the largest, and the influence of rainfall on the uplift pressure is the smallest compared with other factors.

  5. Ratings uplifts and bank characteristics in the Eurozone 2002-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores which characteristics define banks that are too-big-to-fail in the Eurozone over the period 2002-2011. These banks are identified through ratings uplift data from Moody’s. Higher ratings uplifts are associated with higher degrees of interest income and lower degrees of commission

  6. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON TOTAL UPLIFT FORCES OF WAVES ON HORIZONTAL PLATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yi-ren; CHEN Guo-ping; WANG Deng-ting

    2004-01-01

    The total uplift forces of waves acting on hori zontal plates are the important basis for the design of maritime hollow-trussed structures. In this paper, an experimental study on the total uplift forces of waves on horizontal plates was conducted by a series of model tests. The results show that the maximum total uplift forces do not necessarily occur with the maximum impact pressure intensity synchronously.On the basis of the test results, formation mechanism of the total uplift forces of waves as well as its influencing factors were analyzed in detail, and an equation for calculation of the maximum total uplift forces of waves on plates was put forward. Lots of test data shows the present equation is in good agreement with the test results.

  7. Assessment of terrain slope influence in SWAT modeling of Andean watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, C.; Pérez-Foguet, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrological processes in the Andean Region are difficult to model. Large range of altitudes involved (from over 4000 meters above sea level, masl, to zero) indicates the high variability of rainfall, temperature and other climate variables. Strong runoff and extreme events as landslides and floods are the consequence of high slopes of terrain, especially in the upper part of the basins. Strong seasonality of rain and complex ecosystems (vulnerable to climate changes and anthropogenic activities) helps these processes. Present study focuses in a particular watershed from Peruvian Andes, the Jequetepeque River. The distributed watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is applied to model run-off and sediments transport through the basin with data from 1997 to 2006. Specifically, the study focuses in the assessment of the influence of considering terrain slope variation in the definition of Hydrographical Response Units within SWAT. The Jequetepeque watershed (4 372.5 km2) is located in the north part of Peru. River flows east to west, to the Pacific Ocean. Annual average precipitation ranges from 0 to 1100 mm and altitude from 0 to 4188 masl. The "Gallito Ciego" reservoir (400 masl) separates upper-middle part from lower part of the watershed. It stores water for supplying the people from the big cities on the coast and for extensive agriculture uses. Upper-middle part of the watershed covers 3564.8 km2. It ranges from 400 to 4188 masl in no more that 80 km, with slopes up to 20%. Main activities are agricultural and livestock and mining and about 80% of the population are rural. Annual mean temperature drops from 25.4 °C at the reservoir to less than 4 °C in the upper part. Also the highest rainfall variability is found in the upper-middle part of the watershed. Erosion produced by extreme events like 1997/98 "el Niño" Phenomenon is silting the reservoir faster than expected. Moreover, anthropogenic activities like agriculture and

  8. Estimating detection and density of the Andean cat in the high Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppucci, Juan; Gardner, Beth; Lucherini, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Andean cat (Leopardus jacobita) is one of the most endangered, yet least known, felids. Although the Andean cat is considered at risk of extinction, rigorous quantitative population studies are lacking. Because physical observations of the Andean cat are difficult to make in the wild, we used a camera-trapping array to photo-capture individuals. The survey was conducted in northwestern Argentina at an elevation of approximately 4,200 m during October–December 2006 and April–June 2007. In each year we deployed 22 pairs of camera traps, which were strategically placed. To estimate detection probability and density we applied models for spatial capture–recapture using a Bayesian framework. Estimated densities were 0.07 and 0.12 individual/km2 for 2006 and 2007, respectively. Mean baseline detection probability was estimated at 0.07. By comparison, densities of the Pampas cat (Leopardus colocolo), another poorly known felid that shares its habitat with the Andean cat, were estimated at 0.74–0.79 individual/km2 in the same study area for 2006 and 2007, and its detection probability was estimated at 0.02. Despite having greater detectability, the Andean cat is rarer in the study region than the Pampas cat. Properly accounting for the detection probability is important in making reliable estimates of density, a key parameter in conservation and management decisions for any species.

  9. Late Quaternary delta evolution on an uplifted coastal area (Wadi Haida Sultanate of Oman, Arabian Peninsula)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quraishi, K. Al; Balushi, N. Al; Roepert, A.; Rupprechter, M.; Hoffmann, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is situated in the Northeastern part of the Arabian Peninsula. The coastal morphology allows delineating areas of subsidence and uplift. The study area is located on the eastern shoreline facing the Indian Ocean. The coast is characterized by 6-7 wave cut terraces which are situated up to 400 m above present sea level. Whereas the higher - and therefore older - terraces are mainly erosional, the lower ones are depositional in style. We aim at quantifying the differential land movement along the coast (Rupprechter et al. 2012, Hoffmann et al. 2012 ). The study presented here aims at revealing the processes that resulted in the formation of the depositional terraces. Relevant processes are: (a) ongoing land uplift; (b) sea-level oscillations; (c) faulting. Historic evidence gave rise to the speculation of recent earthquake activity: the city of Qalhat, situated 7 km south of the study site was probably destroyed by an earthquake at the end of the 15th century (Musson 2009). The delta under investigation here formed at the mouth of the 15 km long Wadi Haida that drains the adjacent Selma Plateau (up to 2000 m high). The apex is situated 1.6 km from the present shoreline and the delta is some 2 km across. The delta sediments make up the lowermost terrace and are exposed along a cliff section. In the central part the cliff is 12 m high and cliff heights are lower to the North and South, reflecting the convex shape of the delta. The Quaternary delta deposits were deposited on top of an Eocene limestone. This formation is only observed in the northern part of the study area. In the southern part the formation is located below beach level, due to normal faulting. The lowermost unit related to the delta formation is a mudstone with in-situ coral reefs. The maximum thickness observed is 3 m. The coral reefs are capped by a 1.5 m thick layer of unconsolidated gravel. The sorting is very poor, individual boulders are up to 70 cm in diameter and angular

  10. Brain blood flow in Andean and Himalayan high-altitude populations: evidence of different traits for the same environmental constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F.A. Jansen; B. Basnyat

    2011-01-01

    Humans have populated the Tibetan plateau much longer than the Andean Altiplano. It is thought that the difference in length of occupation of these altitudes has led to different responses to the stress of hypoxia. As such, Andean populations have higher hematocrit levels than Himalayans. In contras

  11. Exploring the potential of an Andean fruit: an interdisciplinary study on the cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.) value chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivares Tenorio, Mary Luz

    2017-01-01

    Cape gooseberry is a fruit cultivated in Andean countries. Currently it is available some international markets, besides the domestic Andean market. Colombia is the major producer and export country at the moment. The value chain of cape gooseberry faces several barriers of technological and governa

  12. Ice cap melting and low‐viscosity crustal root explain the narrow geodetic uplift of the Western Alps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chéry, J; Genti, M; Vernant, P

    2016-01-01

    ...) the isostatic response to denudation responsible for only a fraction of the observed uplift and (2) the rebound induced by the Wurmian ice cap melting which predicts a broader uplifting region than the one evidenced by geodetic observations...

  13. Transference of some microsatellite molecular markers from Fabaceae family to Andean Lupin (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Chirinos-Arias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze transferibility of 15 microsatellite primers from Fabaceae family to Lupinus mutabilis Sweet "andean lupine" chosen to present transferability between species and genera, by its high rate of polymorphic content (PIC and high degree of observed and expected heterozygosity. DNA was extracted of 300 andean lupines plants, PCR conditions were standardized by gradients of master mix components. Primers for screening were run on 3% agarose gel with some samples. Finally population was amplified and run on 6% polyacrylamide gel for its highest resolution. Only 6.67% of primers were amplified, but they were monomorphic, so they cannot be used for molecular characterization. We proposed eight microsatellite primers for andean lupin wich should be probed in laboratory conditions.

  14. How widely is the Andean type of continental margin represented in the Archean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Application of the principle of uniformitarianism to the Archean was discussed in a search for evidence of Archean-type continental margins in Archean rocks. The author cautioned that Archean rocks represent only 2 percent of the current exposure of the continents, half of which is in the North American Superior Province. Care must be taken in interpreting the global tectonic significance of relatively small exposures of Archean rocks, such as South India. Andean margins were characterized by their elongate shape, magmatic associations, and isotopic signatures. Although the compositional evidence alone will always be ambiguous, it was suggested that supporting structural evidence may aid in the identification of Archean Andean margins. Andean margin remains have been recognized in the Superior Province of Canada by these criteria, and the author suggested that the Closepet granite of South India may represent another example.

  15. Paired Magmatic-Metallogenic Belts in Myanmar - an Andean Analogue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Nicholas; Robb, Laurence; Searle, Michael; Morley, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    contrasting minerals endowment. The Mogok-Mandalay-Mergui (MMM) Belt hosts crustal-melt S-type granites with significant tin-tungsten mineralization, and contains the historically major tungsten deposit of Mawchi. The Wuntho-Popa Arc comprises I-type granites and granodiorites with porphyry-type copper-gold and epithermal gold mineralization, and includes the world-class Monywa copper mine. Recent U-Pb radiometric age dating has shown the potential for the two belts to be both active from the Late Cretaceous to Eocene. The spatial juxtaposition of these two sub-parallel belts, the implication of contemporary magmatism, and their distinct but consistent metallogenic endowment bears strong similarities to the metallogenic belts of the South American Cordillera. Here we investigate whether they together represent the magmatic and metallogenic expression of an Andean-type setting in Myanmar during the subduction of Neo-Tethys. In this analogue the Wuntho-Popa Arc represents a proximal I-type magmatic belt sited immediately above the eastwards-verging Neo-Tethys subduction zone. Exhibiting porphyry-type copper-gold and epithermal gold mineralization, this would therefore be the Myanmar equivalent of the Andean coastal copper belts. Conversely, the parallel MMM Belt, comprised of more distal crustal-melt S-type tin granites, would have an analogue in the Bolivian tin belt.

  16. Diverging Responses of Tropical Andean Biomes under Future Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%–17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for

  17. [Structural recovering in Andean successional forests from Porce (Antioquia, Colombia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Adriana P; del Valle, Jorge I; Jaramillo, Sandra L; Orrego, Sergio A

    2010-03-01

    Places subjected to natural or human disturbance can recover forest through an ecological process called secondary succession. Tropical succession is affected by factors such as disturbances, distance from original forest, surface configuration and local climate. These factors determine the composition of species and the time trend of the succession itself. We studied succession in soils used for cattle ranching over various decades in the Porce Region of Colombia (Andean Colombian forests). A set of twenty five permanent plots was measured, including nine plots (20 x 50 m) in primary forests and sixteen (20 x 25 m) in secondary forests. All trees with diameter > or =1.0 cm were measured. We analyzed stem density, basal area, above-ground biomass and species richness, in a successional process of ca. 43 years, and in primary forests. The secondary forests' age was estimated in previous studies, using radiocarbon dating, aerial photographs and a high-resolution satellite image analysis (7 to >43 years). In total, 1,143 and 1,766 stems were measured in primary and secondary forests, respectively. Basal area (5.7 to 85.4 m2 ha(-1)), above-ground biomass (19.1 to 1,011.5 t ha(-1)) and species richness (4 to 69) directly increased with site age, while steam density decreased (3,180 to 590). Diametric distributions were "J-inverted" for primary forests and even-aged size-class structures for secondary forests. Three species of palms were abundant and exclusive in old secondary forests and primary forests: Oenocarpus mapora, Euterpe precatoria and Oenocarpus bataua. These palms happened in cohorts after forest disturbances. Secondary forest structure was 40% in more than 43 years of forest succession and indicate that many factors are interacting and affecting the forests succession in the area (e.g. agriculture, cattle ranching, mining, etc.).

  18. Diverging responses of tropical Andean biomes under future climate conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Tovar

    Full Text Available Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%-17.4%, there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar

  19. Diverging responses of tropical Andean biomes under future climate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%-17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for other

  20. Regional uplift associated with continental large igneous provinces: The roles of mantle plumes and the lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, A.D.; Jones, S.M.; Morgan, L.A.; Pierce, K.L.; Widdowson, M.; Xu, Y.G.

    2007-01-01

    The timing and duration of surface uplift associated with large igneous provinces provide important constraints on mantle convection processes. Here we review geological indicators of surface uplift associated with five continent-based magmatic provinces: Emeishan Traps (260??million years ago: Ma), Siberian Traps (251??Ma), Deccan Traps (65??Ma), North Atlantic (Phase 1, 61??Ma and Phase 2, 55??Ma), and Yellowstone (16??Ma to recent). All five magmatic provinces were associated with surface uplift. Surface uplift can be measured directly from sedimentary indicators of sea-level in the North Atlantic and from geomorpholocial indicators of relative uplift and tilting in Yellowstone. In the other provinces, surface uplift is inferred from the record of erosion. In the Deccan, North Atlantic and Emeishan provinces, transient uplift that results from variations in thermal structure of the lithosphere and underlying mantle can be distinguished from permanent uplift that results from the extraction and emplacement of magma. Transient surface uplift is more useful in constraining mantle convection since models of melt generation and emplacement are not required for its interpretation. Observations of the spatial and temporal relationships between surface uplift, rifting and magmatism are also important in constraining models of LIP formation. Onset of surface uplift preceded magmatism in all five of the provinces. Biostratigraphic constraints on timing of uplift and erosion are best for the North Atlantic and Emeishan Provinces, where the time interval between significant uplift and first magmatism is less than 1??million years and 2.5??million years respectively. Rifting post-dates the earliest magmatism in the case of the North Atlantic Phase 1 and possibly in the case of Siberia. The relative age of onset of offshore rifting is not well constrained for the Deccan and the importance of rifting in controlling magmatism is disputed in the Emeishan and Yellowstone

  1. Chromosome identification in the Andean common bean accession G19833 (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Altrock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of all chromosomes of the Andean G19833 bean genotype was carried out by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Eleven single-copy genomic sequences, one for each chromosome, two BACs containing subtelomeric and pericentromeric repeats and the 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA were used as probes. Comparison to the Mesoamerican accession BAT93 showed little divergence, except for additional 45S rDNA sites in four chromosome pairs. Altogether, the results indicated a relative karyotypic stability during the evolution of the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools of P. vulgaris.

  2. Diversity and ecological ranges of plant species from dry inter-Andean valleys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Catalina

    of Ecuadorian dry inter-Andean valleys vegetation, including information related to the physical settings as well as to the vegetation and flora of the valleys. 2) This chapter unveils the influence of disturbance, water availability and low temperature in shaping species composition and occurrence. We found...... found on steep slopes and in ravines. These areas of original dry valley vegetation preserve many wild relatives of cultivated plants on the one hand and old lineages of other wild plant groups. Dry inter-Andean valleys (DIAVs) in Ecuador therefore makeup a biodiversity hot spot for both plants...

  3. Regional cenozoic uplift and subsidence events in the southeastern North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordt, H.

    1995-12-31

    The Paleocene topography of the Fennoscandian Shield is indicated by outbuilding towards the Central Trough and the Ringkoebing-Fyn High. From Eocene until Pliocene time three events of relative vertical movements are indicated by changes in outbuilding directions and reflection termination patterns in the central North Sea. The firs event of uplift was in the Eocene and resulted in relative uplift of the Mid North Sea High and contemporary subsidence east of it, indicated by a change in outbuilding from north to west. A second event of uplift is indicated to the north of the study area at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary by renewed southward outbuilding in the Norwegian-Danish Basin. In Miocene until Early Pliocene time a relatively stationary, almost east-west striking, basin margin was probably located to the north along the Tornquist Zone as indicated by the continued outbuilding towards the Ringkoebing-Fyn High. A third event of relative uplift is indicated east of the study area by changes in the Pliocene outbuilding pattern. After the first event of uplift it appears that the deepest parts of the Eocene North Sea Basin was located more easterly than the deepest part are today. Apparently the two latest uplift events north and east of the study area were related to movements of, or along the Tornquist Zone or to regional uplift of the Fennoscandian Shield finally resulting in the present-day configuration of the North Sea. (au) 11 refs.

  4. Do hassles and uplifts change with age? Longitudinal findings from the VA normative aging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldwin, Carolyn M; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Igarashi, Heidi; Spiro, Avron

    2014-03-01

    To examine emotion regulation in later life, we contrasted the modified hedonic treadmill theory with developmental theories, using hassles and uplifts to assess emotion regulation in context. The sample was 1,315 men from the VA Normative Aging Study aged 53 to 85 years, who completed 3,894 observations between 1989 and 2004. We computed 3 scores for both hassles and uplifts: intensity (ratings reflecting appraisal processes), exposure (count), and summary (total) scores. Growth curves over age showed marked differences in trajectory patterns for intensity and exposure scores. Although exposure to hassles and uplifts decreased in later life, intensity scores increased. Group-based modeling showed individual differences in patterns of hassles and uplifts intensity and exposure, with relative stability in uplifts intensity, normative nonlinear changes in hassles intensity, and complex patterns of individual differences in exposure for both hassles and uplifts. Analyses with the summary scores showed that emotion regulation in later life is a function of both developmental change and contextual exposure, with different patterns emerging for hassles and uplifts. Thus, support was found for both hedonic treadmill and developmental change theories, reflecting different aspects of emotion regulation in late life.

  5. The uplift history of the Arabian Plateau as inferred from geomorphologic analysis of its northwestern edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Oded; Zilberman, Ezra; Feinstein, Shimon; Calvo, Ran; Gvirtzman, Zohar

    2016-03-01

    The Arabian Plateau (AP) is an Oligocene sub-horizontal regional planation surface, extending throughout the western half of the Arabian Peninsula. Its present elevation of about 1 km required a prominent uplift since the Late Eocene. In order to reconstruct the uplift history, we documented abundant abrasive and fluvial terraces that were left along and across the raised Judea Mountains (JM), which comprised the NW edge of the AP. Using the ages of those terraces and the differences in height between them, we found that the JM was uplifted in three major phases: a few hundred meters during the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene, ~ 500 m during the Early Miocene-early Middle Miocene, and ~ 350 m during the Late Pliocene. The two earliest uplift phases predate the formation of the Dead-Sea Transform (DST), which today separates the JM from the AP, meaning that these two phases affected the continuous rigid lithosphere extending southeastwards to the AP interiors. Moreover, restoration of the paleogeography predating the lateral offset along the DST eliminates the main height differences across it and suggests that the DST does not play a major role in the vertical position of its bordering plates, but rather forms a relatively narrow deformation strip within the AP. Those two early phases of uplift can be corroborated by previous thermochronology studies, which exhibit similar ages around the Red Sea but may reflect the uplift age of the entire region. The present sub-horizontal morphology of the AP is in contrast to the presumed original northeastward drainage and may suggest a subsequent long-wave moderate tilting to the SW. Three possible mechanisms were suggested for the uplift of the AP: a long wavelength flexure of the Arabian plate during early stages of the uplift, and lithospheric thinning or dynamic topography during later stages of the uplift.

  6. Daily hassles and uplifts: a diary study on understanding relationship quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totenhagen, Casey J; Serido, Joyce; Curran, Melissa A; Butler, Emily A

    2012-10-01

    In this investigation, we use the Conservation of Resources (CoR) theory as a guide to examine how both uplifts and hassles are associated with positive (e.g., satisfaction, commitment) and negative (ambivalence, conflict) relational quality on a daily basis. In previous studies of hassles and uplifts, the focus has been primarily on negative outcomes at the individual level (e.g., affect). Here, we build on this previous research in examining both positive and negative events (i.e., uplifts and hassles) in associations with positive and negative relational qualities. Further, we focus on examining social and nonsocial events that are external to the relationship (i.e., do not involve the romantic partner) and how they are linked with relational qualities. Finally, we examine which patterns are confined to the same day and which carry over to subsequent days (i.e., lagged effects). Contrary to previous literature, we find that both social and nonsocial hassles are largely unrelated to relationship quality after accounting for the effects of social and nonsocial uplifts. In contrast, nonsocial uplifts bolster positive feelings about the relationship on that day. Results also show that hassles and uplifts may work together to explain relational commitment. Finally, we find that nonsocial uplifts experienced on one day are associated with trend-level declines in next day positive feelings about the relationship. Our findings suggest that preserving relationship quality through daily experiences is best achieved by equipping couples to recognize the benefits of uplifts to the relationship, especially uplifts that are nonsocial, in tandem with managing hassles.

  7. Centrifuge Testing and Seismic Response Analysis for Uplift Behavior of Spread Foundation Structures on Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Suzuki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The uplift behavior of structures subjected to severe seismic motion has not been clarified. This paper presents experimental and analytical studies conducted for clarifying this problem of spread foundation structures on rock. First, centrifugal loading tests are conducted to determine the uplift behavior of these structures, and the uplift behavior of these structures is confirmed. Then, simulation analyses are performed using a three-dimensional FE model and the accuracy of these analyses is confirmed. A comparison between test and analyses results clarified the important analytical conditions required for maintaining analysis precision and the limit of analysis precision.

  8. Sequence-modified primers for the differential RT-PCR detection of Andean potato latent and Andean potato mild mosaic viruses in quarantine tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Renate; Ziebell, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    To enable the differential PCR detection of Andean potato latent virus (APLV) and Andean potato mild mosaic virus (APMMV) strains, sense primers were designed that correspond to regions directly upstream of the coat protein genes. Their differentiating power was increased by A->C or T->C replacements in their 3'-terminal parts. Together with the broad-specificity antisense primer EM3, primer AL-a-mod3C detected all APLV strains tested, but none of the APMMV strains. Primer AM-a-mod4C yielded PCR products with all APMMV preparations, but also with some APLV preparations. Sequence analysis revealed that this was not due to a lack of primer specificity, but to the sensitive detection of contaminating APMMV in some of our APLV preparations.

  9. Seismo-stratigraphic evolution of the northern Austral Basin and its possible relation to the Andean tectonics, onshore Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Victoria; Anka, Zahie; Pagan, Facundo; Kohler, Guillermina; Cagnolatti, Marcelo; di Primio, Rolando; Rodriguez, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    , coupled with important basin subsidence at Andes foothills. An E-W transpressive deformation occurred during late Oligocene and Miocene, initiated by significant changes of plate motion between Nazca and South American plate, driving the Quechua phase of the Andean uplift. Hence, enhanced sedimentation from the rising Andes was renewed since a late Miocene unconformity.

  10. Linkage between the second uplifting of the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibetan) Plateau and the initiation of the Asian monsoon system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施雅风; 汤懋苍; 马玉贞

    1999-01-01

    During the period from 25 to 17 Ma BP, when the second plateau uplifting, i.e. the second phase of the Himalaya movement, occurred, the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau reached an altitude high enough to change the situation of the general circulation. Such an effect of the plateau on the atmospheric circulation was accompanied by the warming of the tropical ocean, the enhancement of the cross equatorial current, the enlargement of the marginal sea basins in the cast-southeastern Asia, the westward extending of the Asian continent and the regression of the Paratethys Sea. As a result, the thermal difference was enlarged, and the air currents were enhanced between continents and oceans; finally the Asian monsoon system, mainly the summer monsoon, was initiated. The former planet wind system was then substituted by the monsoon system, and this caused the important environmental changes, such as the large shrinkage of the dry steppe in Central Asia, and the extension of the humid forest zone in East Asia. Those chan

  11. Assessment of satellite rainfall products over the Andean plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satgé, Frédéric; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Gosset, Marielle; Molina, Jorge; Hernan Yuque Lima, Wilson; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro; Timouk, Franck; Garnier, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Nine satellite rainfall estimations (SREs) were evaluated for the first time over the South American Andean plateau watershed by comparison with rain gauge data acquired between 2005 and 2007. The comparisons were carried out at the annual, monthly and daily time steps. All SREs reproduce the salient pattern of the annual rain field, with a marked north-south gradient and a lighter east-west gradient. However, the intensity of the gradient differs among SREs: it is well marked in the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 (TMPA-3B42), Precipitation Estimation from remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN) and Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) products, and it is smoothed out in the Climate prediction center MORPHing (CMORPH) products. Another interesting difference among products is the contrast in rainfall amounts between the water surfaces (Lake Titicaca) and the surrounding land. Some products (TMPA-3B42, PERSIANN and GSMaP) show a contradictory rainfall deficit over Lake Titicaca, which may be due to the emissivity contrast between the lake and the surrounding lands and warm rain cloud processes. An analysis differentiating coastal Lake Titicaca from inland pixels confirmed this trend. The raw or Real Time (RT) products have strong biases over the study region. These biases are strongly positive for PERSIANN (above 90%), moderately positive for TMPA-3B42 (28%), strongly negative for CMORPH (- 42%) and moderately negative for GSMaP (- 18%). The biases are associated with a deformation of the rain rate frequency distribution: GSMaP underestimates the proportion of rainfall events for all rain rates; CMORPH overestimates the proportion of rain rates below 2 mm day- 1; and the other products tend to overestimate the proportion of moderate to high rain rates. These biases are greatly reduced by the gauge adjustment in the TMPA-3B42, PERSIANN and CMORPH products, whereas a

  12. Allantoplacental ultrastructure of an Andean population of Mabuya (Squamata, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia; De Pérez, Gloria; Carreño-Escobar, J Fernando

    2006-10-01

    Mabuya species are highly matrotrophic viviparous lizards with Type IV epitheliochorial allantoplacenta. The allantoplacenta of an Andean population of this genus, currently assigned to Mabuya sp., possesses specializations related to histotrophic nutrition at the embryonic hemisphere (placentome, paraplacentome, and chorionic areolas), while at the abembryonic hemisphere it has a mixed function: histotrophic transfer (absorptive plaques) and hemotrophic nutrition (gas exchange in respiratory segments). These placental specializations were studied using high-resolution light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and were compared with those found in other squamate reptiles and eutherian mammals. Cytological features of the placentome suggest that this is an important region for nutritional provision; the paraplacentome also shows characteristics for nutrient transfer, especially lipids. Chorionic areolas allow the absorption of glandular products, as well as uterine and chorionic cellular debris produced by lysis of some cells of both epithelia during areola formation. In the absorptive plaques both uterine and chorionic epithelia are firmly attached and their cellular apices exhibit electron-dense granules that could be related to autocrine and paracrine functions. The short interhemal distance found in the respiratory segments confirms their role in gas exchange. A common feature of all regional specializations in the Mabuya sp. allantoplacenta is the presence of lipids in the interacting chorionic and uterine epithelia, suggesting that lipids are transferred throughout the entire embryonic chamber; placental transfer of lipids may be the principal fetal energy and lipid source in this species. In spite of this feature, each one of the specialized areas of the allantoplacenta has different features suggesting particular functions in the transfer of nutrients (as ions, lipids, proteins, amino acids, sugar, water, and gases), and in the possible

  13. Characterization of Two Microbial Isolates from Andean Lakes in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demergasso, C.; Blamey, J.; Escudero, L.; Chong, G.; Casamayor, E. O.; Cabrol, N. A.; Grin, E. A.; Hock, A.; Kiss, A.; Borics, G.

    2004-01-01

    We are currently investigating the biological population present in the highest and least explored perennial lakes on earth in the Bolivian and Chilean Andes, including several volcanic crater lakes of more than 6000 m elevation, in combination of microbiological and molecular biological methods. Our samples were collected in saline lakes of the Laguna Blanca Laguna Verde area in the Bolivian Altiplano and in the Licancabur volcano crater (27 deg. 47 min S/67 deg. 47 min. W) in the ongoing project studying high altitude lakes. The main goal of the project is to look for analogies with Martian paleolakes. These Bolivian lakes can be described as Andean lakes following the classification of Chong. We have attempted to isolate pure cultures and phylogenetically characterize prokaryotes that grew under laboratory conditions. Sediment samples taken from the Licancabur crater lake (LC), Laguna Verde (LV), and Laguna Blanca (LB) were analyzed and cultured using enriched liquid media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. All cultures were incubated at room temperature (15 to 20 C) and under light exposure. For the reported isolates, 36 hours incubation were necessary for reaching optimal optical densities to consider them viable cultures. Ten serial dilutions starting from 1% inoculum were required to obtain a suitable enriched cell culture to transfer into solid media. Cultures on solid medium were necessary to verify the formation of colonies in order to isolate pure cultures. Different solid media were prepared using several combinations of both trace minerals and carbohydrates sources in order to fit their nutrient requirements. The microorganisms formed individual colonies on solid media enriched with tryptone, yeast extract and sodium chloride. Cells morphology was studied by optical and electronic microscopy. Rodshape morphologies were observed in most cases. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from 50 ml late-exponential phase culture by using the CTAB

  14. Multiple uplift phases inferred from the Southwest African Atlantic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Cacace, Mauro; Dressel, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The South Atlantic basins offshore Namibia and South Africa stored more than 10 km thick sedimentary successions that are separated by major unconformities into several sequences. These sedimentary units rest on a thinned continental crust of a magmatic passive margin. Using a 3D forward modelling approach considering flexural compensation of a rheologically differentiated lithosphere in response to sedimentary loading after stretching on one hand and the thermal feed-back between cooling of the stretched lithosphere and insulating sediments on the other hand we derive quantitative estimates on how vertical movements have influenced the margin after stretching. The approach combines the consideration of observations on sediment configuration as well as on crustal thickness (ß-factor) with the process of lithosphere thinning and subsequent thermal re-equilibration. These estimates are conservative estimates as they are based on the preserved sediments only whereas eroded sediments are not considered. Nevertheless, the approach considers thermo-mechanical coupling in 3D and both initial conditions as well as sedimentary history are constrained by observations. Specific effects include the delayed thermal re-equilibration of the thinned lithosphere due to deposition of insulating sediments and the related thermal feedback on lithosphere rheology and therefore on the flexural response to sediment loading. Our results indicate that in addition to predominantly continuous subsidence also phases of uplift have affected the southwestern African margin during the syn-rift and post-rift evolution. The spatio-temporal variation of vertical movements is controlled by the amount of initial thinning of the lithosphere, the variation of rheological characteristics (lithology and temperature) but also by the distribution of sediment supply (loading and thermal insulation).

  15. Paleobiology of the Mesoproterozoic Billyakh Group, Anabar Uplift, northern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, V. N.; Knoll, A. H.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Silicified peritidal carbonates of the Mesoproterozoic Kotuikan and Yusmastakh Formations, Anabar Uplift, northeastern Siberia, contain exceptionally well-preserved microfossils. The assemblage is dominated by ellipsoidal akinetes of nostocalean cyanobacteria (Archaeoellipsoides) and problematic spheroidal unicells (Myxococcoides); both are allochthonous and presumably planktonic. The assemblage also includes distinctive mat-forming scytonematacean and entophysalidacean cyanobacteria, diverse short trichomes interpreted as cyanobacterial hormogonia or germinated akinetes, rare longer trichomes, and several types of colonial unicells. Although many taxa in the Kotuikan-Yusmastakh assemblage are long-ranging prokaryotes, the overall character of the assemblage is distinctly Mesoproterozoic, with its major features shared by broadly coeval floras from Canada, China, India, and elsewhere in Siberia. Microfossils also occur in middle to inner shelf shales of the Ust'-Il'ya and lower Kotuikan Formations. Leiosphaerid acritarchs (up to several hundred microns in diameter) characterize this facies. As in other Mesoproterozoic acritarch assemblages, acanthomorphic and other complex forms that typify Neoproterozoic assemblages are absent. The combination in Billyakh assemblages of exceptional preservation and low eukaryotic diversity supports the hypothesis that nucleated organisms diversified markedly near the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic boundary. The assemblages also demonstrate the antiquity of cyanobacteria capable of cell differentiation and suggest the importance of both changing peritidal substrates and evolving eukaryotes in determining stratigraphic patterns of Proterozoic prokaryotes. The permineralized assemblage contains 33 species belonging to 17 genera. Ten new species or new combinations are proposed: Archaeoellipsoides costatus n. sp., A. elongatus n. comb., A. dolichos n. comb., A. minor n. nom., A. crassus n. comb., A. major n. comb., A. bactroformis n

  16. Shock metamorphism of Bosumtwi impact crater rocks, shock attenuation, and uplift formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Koeberl, Christian; Ivanov, Boris A; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2008-12-12

    Shock wave attenuation rate and formation of central uplifts are not precisely constrained for moderately sized complex impact structures. The distribution of shock metamorphism in drilled basement rocks from the 10.5-kilometer-diameter Bosumtwi crater, and results of numerical modeling of inelastic rock deformation and modification processes during uplift, constrained with petrographic data, allowed reconstruction of the pre-impact position of the drilled rocks and revealed a shock attenuation by approximately 5 gigapascals in the uppermost 200 meters of the central uplift. The proportion of shocked quartz grains and the average number of planar deformation feature sets per grain provide a sensitive indication of minor changes in shock pressure. The results further imply that for moderately sized craters the rise of the central uplift is dominated by brittle failure.

  17. Uplifting behavior of shallow buried pipe in liquefiable soil by dynamic centrifuge test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Liu, Jingwen; Lin, Peng; Ling, Daosheng

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines are widely applied in the so-called lifeline engineerings. It shows according to seismic surveys that the damage from soil liquefaction to underground pipelines was the most serious, whose failures were mainly in the form of pipeline uplifting. In the present study, dynamic centrifuge model tests were conducted to study the uplifting behaviors of shallow-buried pipeline subjected to seismic vibration in liquefied sites. The uplifting mechanism was discussed through the responses of the pore water pressure and earth pressure around the pipeline. Additionally, the analysis of force, which the pipeline was subjected to before and during vibration, was introduced and proved to be reasonable by the comparison of the measured and the calculated results. The uplifting behavior of pipe is the combination effects of multiple forces, and is highly dependent on the excess pore pressure.

  18. Uplifting Behavior of Shallow Buried Pipe in Liquefiable Soil by Dynamic Centrifuge Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Underground pipelines are widely applied in the so-called lifeline engineerings. It shows according to seismic surveys that the damage from soil liquefaction to underground pipelines was the most serious, whose failures were mainly in the form of pipeline uplifting. In the present study, dynamic centrifuge model tests were conducted to study the uplifting behaviors of shallow-buried pipeline subjected to seismic vibration in liquefied sites. The uplifting mechanism was discussed through the responses of the pore water pressure and earth pressure around the pipeline. Additionally, the analysis of force, which the pipeline was subjected to before and during vibration, was introduced and proved to be reasonable by the comparison of the measured and the calculated results. The uplifting behavior of pipe is the combination effects of multiple forces, and is highly dependent on the excess pore pressure.

  19. Segmented Coastal Uplift Along an Erosional Subduction Margin, Northern Hikurangi Fore Arc, North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. S.; Litchfield, N. J.; Berryman, K. R.; Clark, K.; Cochran, U. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Hikurangi subduction margin along North Island, New Zealand accommodates oblique convergence of the Pacific plate westward beneath the Australian plate at 45 mm/yr. Along the southern margin, frontal accretion and pronounced forearc uplift occur inboard of the subducting Hikurangi plateau. In the north, subduction erosion and segmented uplift occur inboard of subducting seamounts along the plateau flank. Prior workers have established a robust foundation for coastal terrace studies along the northern Hikurangi margin (e.g., Berryman et al., 1989; Ota et al., 1992; Berryman, 1993; Wilson et al., 2006, 2007; Clark et al., 2010; Litchfield et al, 2007, 2010). New field observations presented here provide additional constraints on terrace uplift along this erosional subduction margin. Along Raukumara Peninsula (north of Poverty Bay), multiple Holocene to late Pleistocene marine and fluvial terraces occur at varying elevations, recording differential uplift across six coastal segments from Gisborne to East Cape (Ota et al., 1992; Wilson et al., 2007). In this study, two to three late Pleistocene terraces were observed on rocky headlands within the first segment (Gisborne to Whangara) at elevations of 80-185 m above msl. Preliminary correlation with OIS 5a-e sea level high stands (80-125 ka) indicates net uplift at 1.2-1.5 m/ky. Uplifted Holocene wavecut platforms occur in steps along the seaward edge of these terraces, consistent with coseismic uplift. At Makorori Point, an uplifted bench occurs along the modern seacliff at 2.3 m above the cliff base. A fossil gastropod shell from paleo-beach gravels on the platform inner edge yielded a calibrated radiocarbon age of 1680 ×110 ybp. At Turihaua Point, a ≥1 m thick deposit of Holocene beach sands overlies an uplifted wavecut platform at ≥1.5 m above mean sea level. Carbonate-cemented beachrock at the base of the sand deposit yields a calibrated radiocarbon age of 2990 ×70 ybp. At Mahia Peninsula (between Poverty

  20. De Sitter Vacua from a D-term Generated Racetrack Uplift

    CERN Document Server

    Rummel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We propose an uplift mechanism using a structure of multi-K\\"ahler moduli dependence in the F-term potential of type IIB string theory compactifications. This mechanism requires a D-term condition that fixes one modulus to be proportional to another modulus, resulting in a trivial D-term potential. De Sitter minima are realized along with an enhancement of the volume in the Large Volume Scenario and no additional suppression of the uplift term such as warping is required. We further show the possibility to realize the uplift mechanism in the presence of more K\\"ahler moduli such that we expect the uplift mechanism to work in many other compactifications.

  1. 78 FR 21002 - Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA), as Amended: Request for Public Comments Regarding Beneficiary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... entered into a bilateral free trade agreement. Colombia was no longer an eligible beneficiary country under the ATPA as of May 15, 2012, when the U.S.-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement entered into force... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Andean...

  2. Institutional reform in the Andean irrigation sector: enabling policies for strengthening local rights and water management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, L.; Ooijevaar, M.; Boelens, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, local and indigenous water rights and rules in the Andean region have been largely neglected and discriminated against. The process of undermining local communities' water access and control rights continues up to today and not only is it headed by powerful local, national and

  3. Persistence of chironomids in metal polluted Andean high altitude streams: does melanin play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loayza Muro, R.A.; Marticorena-Ruíz, J.K.; Palomino, E.J.; Merritt, C.; de Baat, M.L.; van Gemert, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    In high altitude Andean streams an intense solar radiation and coinciding metal pollution allow the persistence of only a few specialized taxa, including chironomids. The aim of the present study was therefore to determine the mechanisms underlying the persistence of chironomids under these multiple

  4. Persistence of chironomids in metal polluted Andean high altitude streams: does melanin play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loayza Muro, R.A.; Marticorena-Ruíz, J.K.; Palomino, E.J.; Merritt, C.; de Baat, M.L.; van Gemert, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    In high altitude Andean streams an intense solar radiation and coinciding metal pollution allow the persistence of only a few specialized taxa, including chironomids. The aim of the present study was therefore to determine the mechanisms underlying the persistence of chironomids under these multiple

  5. Association mapping analysis of the response to Macrophomina phaseolina in the Andean Diversity Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel was evaluated for response to inoculation with charcoal rot in a field trial in Isabela, Puerto Rico in 2012. The trial was inoculated with backpack sprayers at flowering and a visual evaluation was conducted three weeks later. There was a broad range of response, with abo...

  6. Marcos Zapata's "Last Supper": a feast of European religion and Andean culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendt, Christina

    2010-01-01

    In Marcos Zapata's 1753 painting of the Last Supper in Cuzco, Peru, Christian symbolism is filtered through Andean cultural tradition. Zapata was a late member of the Cuzco School of Painting, a group comprised of few European immigrants and handfuls of mestizo and Indian artists. The painters in Cuzco learned mostly from prints of European paintings, and their style tends to blend local culture into the traditional painting of their conquistadors. Imagery was the most successful tool used by the Spaniards in their quest to Christianize the Andean population. By teaching locals to paint Christian subjects, they were able to infuse Christianity into Andean traditions. Zapata's rendering of the Last Supper utilizes this cultural blending while staying true to the Christian symbolism within the subject. Instead of the traditional lamb, Zapata's Last Supper features a platter of cuy, or guinea pig, an Andean delicacy stocked with protein as well as cultural significance. Cuy was traditionally a sacrificial animal at Inca agricultural festivals and in this way it offers poignant parallel to the lamb, as a traditional Christian sacrificial animal.

  7. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA main

  8. Taxonomic and functional assignment of cloned sequences from high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montaña, José Salvador; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Angel, Tatiana; Hernández, Mónica; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Total metagenomic DNA was isolated from high Andean forest soil and subjected to taxonomical and functional composition analyses by means of clone library generation and sequencing. The obtained yield of 1.7 μg of DNA/g of soil was used to construct a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clon

  9. Functional trait state diversity of Andean forests in Venezuela changes with altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, J.F.; Cuello, N.L.

    2012-01-01

    Question It is presumed that environmental stress is more pronounced at higher altitudes in Andean forests due to lower rates of temperature-constrained processes of growth, nutrient uptake and decomposition. Because community assembly theory predicts a low variation in viable traits under

  10. The Rise and Fall of Andean Empires: El Nino History Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on El Nino and the methods for investigating ancient climate record. Traces the rise and fall of the Andean empires focusing on the climatic forces that each empire (Tiwanaku, Wari, Moche, and Inca) endured. States that modern societies should learn from the experiences of these ancient civilizations. (CMK)

  11. The electronic procurement in the framework of the Andean Community. State of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William David Hernández Martínez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is structured as a brief survey of the academic and policy approach on the unification or harmonization of regulations about electronic commerce, specifically relating the electronic contracts, in Latin America, with special emphasis on the Andean Community of Nations as a proposed work on the development of modern trends of international trade law.

  12. Forests of the tropical eastern Andean flank during the middle Pleistocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cárdenas, M.L.; Gosling, W.D.; Pennington, R.T.; Poole, I.; Sherlock, S.C.; Mothes, P.

    2014-01-01

    Inter-bedded volcanic and organic sediments from Erazo (Ecuador) indicate the presence of four different forest assemblages on the eastern Andean flank during the middle Pleistocene. Radiometric dates (40Ar-39Ar) obtained from the volcanic ash indicate that deposition occurred between 620,000 and 19

  13. Formal Law and Local Water Control in the Andean Region: A Fiercely Contested Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de H.; Boelens, R.A.; Bustamente, R.R.

    2006-01-01

    Water access and control rights of peasant and indigenous communities in Andean countries are threatened. Vertical state law and intervention practices, as well as new privatization policies generally ignore, discriminate or undermine local normative frameworks. Recognition of diverse local rights a

  14. Institutional reform in the Andean irrigation sector: enabling policies for strengthening local rights and water management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, L.; Ooijevaar, M.; Boelens, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, local and indigenous water rights and rules in the Andean region have been largely neglected and discriminated against. The process of undermining local communities' water access and control rights continues up to today and not only is it headed by powerful local, national and interna

  15. 77 FR 24555 - Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA), as Amended: Request for Public Comments Regarding Beneficiary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES...., provides trade benefits for eligible Andean countries. The original Act allowed only Bolivia, Ecuador... Bolivia no longer satisfies the eligibility criteria related to counternarcotics and suspended...

  16. 75 FR 19669 - Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA), as Amended: Request for Public Comments Regarding Beneficiary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES... eligible Andean countries. In Proclamation 7616 of October 31, 2002, the President designated Bolivia... President determined that Bolivia no longer satisfies the eligibility criteria related to...

  17. The Rise and Fall of Andean Empires: El Nino History Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on El Nino and the methods for investigating ancient climate record. Traces the rise and fall of the Andean empires focusing on the climatic forces that each empire (Tiwanaku, Wari, Moche, and Inca) endured. States that modern societies should learn from the experiences of these ancient civilizations. (CMK)

  18. Genome-wide association study of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans ...

  19. Simulation of gas hydrate dissociation caused by repeated tectonic uplift events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shusaku; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Nagakubo, Sadao

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrate dissociation by tectonic uplift is often used to explain geologic and geophysical phenomena, such as hydrate accumulation probably caused by hydrate recycling and the occurrence of double bottom-simulating reflectors in tectonically active areas. However, little is known of gas hydrate dissociation resulting from tectonic uplift. This study investigates gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments caused by repeated tectonic uplift events using a numerical model incorporating the latent heat of gas hydrate dissociation. The simulations showed that tectonic uplift causes upward movement of some depth interval of hydrate-bearing sediment immediately above the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS) to the gas hydrate instability zone because the sediment initially maintains its temperature: in that interval, gas hydrate dissociates while absorbing heat; consequently, the temperature of the interval decreases to that of the hydrate stability boundary at that depth. Until the next uplift event, endothermic gas hydrate dissociation proceeds at the BGHS using heat mainly supplied from the sediment around the BGHS, lowering the temperature of that sediment. The cumulative effects of these two endothermic gas hydrate dissociations caused by repeated uplift events lower the sediment temperature around the BGHS, suggesting that in a marine area in which sediment with a highly concentrated hydrate-bearing layer just above the BGHS has been frequently uplifted, the endothermic gas hydrate dissociation produces a gradual decrease in thermal gradient from the seafloor to the BGHS. Sensitivity analysis for model parameters showed that water depth, amount of uplift, gas hydrate saturation, and basal heat flow strongly influence the gas hydrate dissociation rate and sediment temperature around the BGHS.

  20. Response of glacial landscapes to spatial variations in rock uplift rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Simon H.; Whipple, Kelin X.

    2007-06-01

    The response of glaciated landscapes to rapid rock uplift, driven by tectonic convergence, is an important, often neglected, aspect of proposed interactions between plate tectonic processes and climate change. Rivers typically respond to more rapid rock uplift in part through increasing channel gradients. In contrast, the "glacial buzzsaw" hypothesis suggests that glaciers can erode as quickly as the fastest rock uplift rates (6-10 mm/yr) without any increase in mean elevations. However, it has not been established how this is achieved. We examined moving window maps, swath and longitudinal profiles, hillslope relief, and hypsometry for glacierized and formerly glacierized basins in areas of spatially variable rock uplift rate in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, and around Nanga Parbat, Pakistan, to determine whether glaciers have a specific response to rapid rock uplift. The response of these glaciated landscapes to rapid rock uplift (6-10 mm/yr) comprises (1) modest steepening of the longitudinal profiles in smaller glaciated basins, (2) maintenance of shallow downvalley slopes in larger glaciated basins (>˜30 km2, Southern Alps; >˜100 km2, Nanga Parbat), (3) development of tall headwalls, and (4) steepening of the basin as a whole, dominated by hillslope lengthening. Around Nanga Parbat, headwalls several kilometers high constitute >50% of the basin relief. At rapid rock uplift rates, although glaciers can incise the valley floor swiftly, they cannot prevent headwalls from reaching exceptional heights. The associated increase in mean distance between cirque heads (i.e., a decrease in drainage density) causes regional mean elevation to rise with increasing rock uplift rate. However, this is much less than the changes in elevation expected in unglaciated ranges.

  1. Structural pattern in central uplifts of cryptoexplosion structures as typified by Sierra Madera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilshire, H.G.; Howard, K.A.

    1968-01-01

    The pattern of deformation in central uplifts of Sierra Madera and other well-known cryptoexplosion structures indicates that inward as well as upward movement of strata formed the uplifts. This kind of movement is incompatible with structures not of impact origin with which they have been compared. The structural style of cryptoexplosion structures, together with features that suggest shock deformation, supports the belief that they are the eroded roots of impact craters.

  2. Erosion-driven uplift in the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains of East Antarctica.

    OpenAIRE

    Paxman, G. J. G.; Watts, A. B.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T.A.; R. E. Bell; Jamieson, S.S.R.; Finn, C A

    1999-01-01

    The relative roles of climate and tectonics in mountain building have been widely debated. Central to this debate is the process of flexural uplift in response to valley incision. Here we quantify this process in the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, a paradoxical tectonic feature in cratonic East Antarctica. Previous studies indicate that rifting and strike-slip tectonics may have provided a key trigger for the initial uplift of the Gamburtsevs, but the contribution of more recent valley inci...

  3. Test of the uplift of Tibetan Plateau by FG5 absolute gravimeter at Lhasa station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The uplift of the Tibetan Plateau has been monitored by the FG5 absolute gravimeter, whose observing accuracy is as high as 2×10-8 m/s2. The analysis of the gravity observation results at the Lhasa station in 1999 and 1993 shows that the gravity value has decreased by 12×10-8 m/s2, and it is confirmed that the Lhasa region is uplifting at a rate of 10 mm/a.

  4. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  5. Canyon incision, volcanic fill, and re-incision rates in southwest Peru: proxies for quantifying uplift in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gunnell, Yanni; de La Rupelle, Aude

    2010-05-01

    Using zircon and apatite fission tracks and apatite (U-Th)/He to constrain 26 rock cooling histories of Cretaceous diorites and 40Ar-39Ar to date 45 Neogene ignimbrites and lavas, we have estimated incision and topographic uplift rates of the Western Cordillera in southwest Peru. Rock cooling patterns confirm that continental denudation declined rapidly during the early Cenozoic. Topographic paleoelevations provided by 24.5 Ma forearc marine sediments now occurring at 1.8 km a.s.l. indicate that the Andean orogenic plateau did not begin to rise before Miocene time. A suite of marker horizons consisting of Huaylillas ignimbrite (14.3-12.7 Ma) on the plateau, and of Sencca ignimbrite (3.8 Ma) and Barroso lavas (2.27 Ma) near the Rio Cotahuasi and Rio Ocoña valley floors, respectively, have helped to bracket accelerated uplift between 13 Ma and 3.8-2.27 Ma. In-canyon (U-Th)/He bedrock cooling ages decrease upstream from ~13 Ma to 2-4 Ma, implying that uplift-driven valley incision began after 14 Ma and that downcutting was neither steady nor uniform along the 209 km-long canyon system. Whereas ~9 Ma Caraveli ignimbrites filled broad, shallow valleys, V-shaped downcutting occurred after 9-6 Ma. Argon-dated in-canyon lava flows and ignimbrites reveal three pulses of bedrock incision: 8.8-5.8 Ma, 5.8-3.6 Ma, 3.6-1.36 Ma, followed by post-1.36 Ma re-incision into unconsolidated valley fill. Accordingly, ample variations belie the 14 Myr-averaged incision rate of 170 m Myr-1: 130-190 m Myr-1 between 13 and 9 Ma, rising to 250-400 m/Myr-1 between 9 and 3.8 Ma and to >1000 m Myr-1 of reincision after 1.36 Ma. Rapid bedrock incision ended before 3.76 Ma in the upper, and before 2.27 Ma in the lower canyon reaches. The 3.76 to 1.36 Ma pyroclastic and mass-flow deposits filled the valley to ~75% and ~60% of its height in its upper and lower reaches, respectively. Post-1.36 Ma re-incision removed 75% of these deposits, thus exhuming most of the bedrock paleocanyon. The upper

  6. The Yulong Mountains Structural Culmination: Tectonic and Geomorphic Controls on Localized Uplift Rates and Exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki-Gizbert, C.; Wang, Y.; Burchfiel, B. C.; Chen, L.

    2005-12-01

    The active tectonics of the Eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau are characterised by left-lateral faults accommodating clockwise rotation of crustal fragments and normal faults accommodating generally east-west directed extension in the wake of the northward propagating eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Within the corridor of transtensional deformation that extends from Dali to Zhongdian, the Jinsha (Yangzi) river interacts with a closed circuit of normal and transtensional faults and results in localised high mean and maximum elevations, anomalously high rock uplift rates and the exposure of deep structural levels and metamorphic rocks in the core of fault-bounded antiformal dome. Flexural uplift of the footwalls of the bounding normal faults due to tectonic and erosional unroofing can plausibly explain the high elevations in the core of the range. However, geomorphic indicators of high uplift rates do not unequivocally coincide with the distribution of uplift and subsidence predicted by such a model. Nor does such a model yield any insight into the role of extreme fluvial incision in either accommodating or driving anomalously high uplift rates (and thus total exhumation). Moreover, unlike the association of antiformal culminations with transverse rivers reported in many compressional belts (Simpson 2004 and references therein), localised erosional unloading ought to relieve vertical stresses driving extensional faulting. Alternatively, we envisage a model somewhat analogous to the reactive diapirs well known from salt tectonics: both tectonic extension and geomorphic unloading weaken and thin the brittle upper crust and accommodate localized, anomalously high rock uplift rates.

  7. Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador: Geographic Distribution, Population Size and Extinction Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveda-Rodríguez, Adrián; Vargas, Félix Hernán; Kohn, Sebastián; Zapata-Ríos, Galo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador is classified as Critically Endangered. Before 2015, standardized and systematic estimates of geographic distribution, population size and structure were not available for this species, hampering the assessment of its current status and hindering the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. In this study, we performed the first quantitative assessment of geographic distribution, population size and population viability of Andean Condor in Ecuador. We used a methodological approach that included an ecological niche model to study geographic distribution, a simultaneous survey of 70 roosting sites to estimate population size and a population viability analysis (PVA) for the next 100 years. Geographic distribution in the form of extent of occurrence was 49 725 km2. During a two-day census, 93 Andean Condors were recorded and a population of 94 to 102 individuals was estimated. In this population, adult-to-immature ratio was 1:0.5. In the modeled PVA scenarios, the probability of extinction, mean time to extinction and minimum population size varied from zero to 100%, 63 years and 193 individuals, respectively. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to the conservation of Andean Condor populations in Ecuador. Population size reduction in scenarios that included habitat loss began within the first 15 years of this threat. Population reinforcement had no effects on the recovery of Andean Condor populations given the current status of the species in Ecuador. The population size estimate presented in this study is the lower than those reported previously in other countries where the species occur. The inferences derived from the population viability analysis have implications for Condor management in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to redirect efforts from captive breeding and population reinforcement to habitat conservation. PMID:26986004

  8. Shifts in leaf litter breakdown along a forest-pasture-urban gradient in Andean streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos; Rausche, Sirkka; Cueva, Augusta; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Espinosa, Carlos; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-07-01

    Tropical montane ecosystems of the Andes are critically threatened by a rapid land-use change which can potentially affect stream variables, aquatic communities, and ecosystem processes such as leaf litter breakdown. However, these effects have not been sufficiently investigated in the Andean region and at high altitude locations in general. Here, we studied the influence of land use (forest-pasture-urban) on stream physico-chemical variables (e.g., water temperature, nutrient concentration, and pH), aquatic communities (macroinvertebrates and aquatic fungi) and leaf litter breakdown rates in Andean streams (southern Ecuador), and how variation in those stream physico-chemical variables affect macroinvertebrates and fungi related to leaf litter breakdown. We found that pH, water temperature, and nutrient concentration increased along the land-use gradient. Macroinvertebrate communities were significantly different between land uses. Shredder richness and abundance were lower in pasture than forest sites and totally absent in urban sites, and fungal richness and biomass were higher in forest sites than in pasture and urban sites. Leaf litter breakdown rates became slower as riparian land use changed from natural to anthropogenically disturbed conditions and were largely determined by pH, water temperature, phosphate concentration, fungal activity, and single species of leaf-shredding invertebrates. Our findings provide evidence that leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams is sensitive to riparian land-use change, with urban streams being the most affected. In addition, this study highlights the role of fungal biomass and shredder species (Phylloicus; Trichoptera and Anchytarsus; Coleoptera) on leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams and the contribution of aquatic fungi in supporting this ecosystem process when shredders are absent or present low abundance in streams affected by urbanization. Finally, we summarize important implications in terms of managing of

  9. Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador: Geographic Distribution, Population Size and Extinction Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveda-Rodríguez, Adrián; Vargas, Félix Hernán; Kohn, Sebastián; Zapata-Ríos, Galo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador is classified as Critically Endangered. Before 2015, standardized and systematic estimates of geographic distribution, population size and structure were not available for this species, hampering the assessment of its current status and hindering the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. In this study, we performed the first quantitative assessment of geographic distribution, population size and population viability of Andean Condor in Ecuador. We used a methodological approach that included an ecological niche model to study geographic distribution, a simultaneous survey of 70 roosting sites to estimate population size and a population viability analysis (PVA) for the next 100 years. Geographic distribution in the form of extent of occurrence was 49 725 km2. During a two-day census, 93 Andean Condors were recorded and a population of 94 to 102 individuals was estimated. In this population, adult-to-immature ratio was 1:0.5. In the modeled PVA scenarios, the probability of extinction, mean time to extinction and minimum population size varied from zero to 100%, 63 years and 193 individuals, respectively. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to the conservation of Andean Condor populations in Ecuador. Population size reduction in scenarios that included habitat loss began within the first 15 years of this threat. Population reinforcement had no effects on the recovery of Andean Condor populations given the current status of the species in Ecuador. The population size estimate presented in this study is the lower than those reported previously in other countries where the species occur. The inferences derived from the population viability analysis have implications for Condor management in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to redirect efforts from captive breeding and population reinforcement to habitat conservation.

  10. Reconciling Local and Global Agendas in Sustainable Development: Participatory Research with Indigenous Andean Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert E. Rhoades; Virginia Nazarea

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses participatory research in the Andes and presents a case study in Cotacachi, Ecuador, where sustainability scientists and indigenous people seek common ground in their respective but drastically different research and social agendas. Participatory research based on Andean experiences pre-dated and inspired much of the later international movement in agriculture, health, and conservation. Andean communities have a long history in demanding that outsiders address the needs of the community as a condition for carrying out scientific or applied activities. What an Andean community, however, sees as relevant may or may not practiced throughout much of the world. In fact,overzealous participatory researchers are just as bothersome as their predecessors bearing long questionnaires. More important to Andean people is an equitable relationship with researchers and developers in which exchanges of value are made. A research is drawn. In the case of the SANREM project in Cotacachi, Ecuador, scientists carried out enriching research activities of interest to local people as a way to generate social capital for conducting basic research which does not have an obvious, immediate local benefit. The requested research did not have a conventional participatory methodology but provided valuable products (educational opportunity,germplasm, community visualization tools, and information) to the indigenous community in exchange for time and resources to conduct research on more basic natural resource questions. We argue that in the Andean context the key to reconciling the needs of scientists and of local needs is seeking new forms of equitable collaboration which reach beyond the present and now somewhat tired discourse of ‘participation'.

  11. Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus in Ecuador: Geographic Distribution, Population Size and Extinction Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Naveda-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus in Ecuador is classified as Critically Endangered. Before 2015, standardized and systematic estimates of geographic distribution, population size and structure were not available for this species, hampering the assessment of its current status and hindering the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. In this study, we performed the first quantitative assessment of geographic distribution, population size and population viability of Andean Condor in Ecuador. We used a methodological approach that included an ecological niche model to study geographic distribution, a simultaneous survey of 70 roosting sites to estimate population size and a population viability analysis (PVA for the next 100 years. Geographic distribution in the form of extent of occurrence was 49 725 km2. During a two-day census, 93 Andean Condors were recorded and a population of 94 to 102 individuals was estimated. In this population, adult-to-immature ratio was 1:0.5. In the modeled PVA scenarios, the probability of extinction, mean time to extinction and minimum population size varied from zero to 100%, 63 years and 193 individuals, respectively. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to the conservation of Andean Condor populations in Ecuador. Population size reduction in scenarios that included habitat loss began within the first 15 years of this threat. Population reinforcement had no effects on the recovery of Andean Condor populations given the current status of the species in Ecuador. The population size estimate presented in this study is the lower than those reported previously in other countries where the species occur. The inferences derived from the population viability analysis have implications for Condor management in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to redirect efforts from captive breeding and population reinforcement to habitat conservation.

  12. Chronic hypoxia in Andeans; are there lessons for neurology at sea level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenzeller, Otto; Minko, Tamara; Qualls, Clifford; Pozharov, Vitaly; Gamboa, Jorge; Gamboa, Alfredo; Pakunlu, Rafica I

    2006-08-15

    Hypoxia is implicated in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We posited that changes in gene expression induced by ambient hypoxia at altitude may be neuroprotective to natives of these regions. We studied 30 men. Twenty natives of Cerro de Pasco (CP), altitude 4,338 m were examined in CP; then transported within 6 h to Lima (150 m-sea level) and examined 1 h after arrival. They were assessed by a Chronic Mountain Sickness-score (CMS-sc) in CP, 10 were normal Andeans and 10 had chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a sudden inexplicable loss of adaptation to their native environment. RNA was extracted from venous blood white cells. The Andeans were compared to 10 normal US men living at 1500 m using RT-PCR. We focused on the cyto-neuro-protective genes, Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), heme-oxygenase-1 (HMOX 1), heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70), heat shock protein-90 (HSP-90), and the neuroprotective enzyme, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 1 (Nnmat 1). CMS patients had significantly higher levels of gene expression (HMOX-1, HSP-70, ATM) than Andean controls in CP. HSP-90 and Nmnat 1, however, were higher in Andean controls in all locations. Significant reductions of all gene products, within an hour of arriving in normoxia in Lima, were found. In Andean controls, the gene products in Lima fell to levels approaching US controls. Correlation and regression methods showed men with high expression of all gene products had an average CMS-sc=19.8; those with low expression a normal score (9.4, P=0.02). ATM expression was related to age (P<0.001). The natural experiment that unfolds in the mountainous regions of the world provides opportunities to study neuroprotection in intact humans.

  13. Identifying signatures of natural selection in Tibetan and Andean populations using dense genome scan data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Bigham

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude hypoxia (reduced inspired oxygen tension due to decreased barometric pressure exerts severe physiological stress on the human body. Two high-altitude regions where humans have lived for millennia are the Andean Altiplano and the Tibetan Plateau. Populations living in these regions exhibit unique circulatory, respiratory, and hematological adaptations to life at high altitude. Although these responses have been well characterized physiologically, their underlying genetic basis remains unknown. We performed a genome scan to identify genes showing evidence of adaptation to hypoxia. We looked across each chromosome to identify genomic regions with previously unknown function with respect to altitude phenotypes. In addition, groups of genes functioning in oxygen metabolism and sensing were examined to test the hypothesis that particular pathways have been involved in genetic adaptation to altitude. Applying four population genetic statistics commonly used for detecting signatures of natural selection, we identified selection-nominated candidate genes and gene regions in these two populations (Andeans and Tibetans separately. The Tibetan and Andean patterns of genetic adaptation are largely distinct from one another, with both populations showing evidence of positive natural selection in different genes or gene regions. Interestingly, one gene previously known to be important in cellular oxygen sensing, EGLN1 (also known as PHD2, shows evidence of positive selection in both Tibetans and Andeans. However, the pattern of variation for this gene differs between the two populations. Our results indicate that several key HIF-regulatory and targeted genes are responsible for adaptation to high altitude in Andeans and Tibetans, and several different chromosomal regions are implicated in the putative response to selection. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaption and provide a basis for future genotype/phenotype association

  14. Onset of uplift and environmental change in East Africa: paleoaltimetry constraints from a 17 Ma beaked whale fossil from northern Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichura, H.; Jacobs, L. L.; Strecker, M. R.; Lin, A. S.; Polcyn, M. J.; Manthi, F. K.; Winkler, D. A.; Clemens, M.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and magnitude of vertical crustal motions is key to understanding the impact of tectonic uplift on changes in atmospheric circulation, rainfall, and environmental conditions. Uplift of the East African Plateau (EAP) of Kenya has been linked to mantle processes, but paleoaltimetry data are still too scarce to unambiguously constrain plateau evolution and subsequent vertical motions associated with late Cenozoic rifting. Here we assess the fossil remains of a beaked whale (Ziphiidae) from the Turkana region of Kenya, 700 km inland from the present-day coastline of the Indian Ocean. The whale fossil was found at an elevation of 650 m and helps constraining the uplift of the northeastern flanks of the EAP. The Kenyan ziphiid was discovered in fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the extensional Oligo-Miocene Lokichar basin (Mead, 1975) along with terrestrial mammals and freshwater mollusks below a basalt dated at 17.1 ± 1.0 Ma (Boschetto et al., 1992). The unifying characteristics of riverine occurrences of modern marine mammals include sufficient discharge in low-gradient rivers to maintain pathways deep enough to facilitate migration, and the absence of shallow bedrock, rapids and waterfalls. The most likely route, which may have had these characteristics is a fluvial corridor controlled by thermal subsidence of the Cretaceous Anza Rift, which once linked extensional processes in Central and East Africa with the continental margin. The fossil locality and analogies with present-day occurrences of marine mammals in terrestrial realms suggest that the ziphiid stranded slightly above sea level. In combination with 13.5. Ma phonolite flows that utilized eastward-directed drainages away from the EAP the fossil find thus provides the older of only two empirical paleoelevation points that constrain the onset of uplift of the EAP to the interval between approximately 17 and 13 Ma. Topographic uplift of the EAP induced paleoclimatic change from a low

  15. Active landsliding and landscape denudation in response to transient tectonic uplift, Northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G. L.; Roering, J. J.; Miller, S. R.; Kirby, E.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Californian Coast ranges present a unique area to study landscape response to transient tectonic uplift. Studies have shown that an increase in uplift may be balanced by the rate of landsliding in settings of steady uplift. However, the landsliding response to transient tectonic uplift remains to be elucidated. The Californian Coast ranges are shaped by the northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ), which geodynamic modeling suggests produces a transient double-humped uplift field. A major research question is whether we can detect a signature of this transient tectonic uplift in landslide activity and document how the channel network communicates this signal to hillslopes. Using air photos and Worldview imagery, we manually mapped more than 2000 earthflows and debris slides in the Eel and surrounding catchments that span the ~400 km-long region. The velocities of active earthflows were estimated by visually tracking features between images spanning 1993 to 2013. We mapped channel steepness from 10m NED DEMs in Topotoolbox 2 and developed a new tool to automatically define knickpoints along the channel network. Earthflows occur almost exclusively in a band of Franciscan mélange oriented along the MTJ transect whilst debris slides are more evenly distributed by lithology. Both earthflows and debris slides are clustered in the Eel catchment around the proposed uplift peaks and are largely absent outside of these zones. Within these areas of high landslide densities, we observe peaks in active earthflows adjacent to peaks in dormant earthflows to the south, suggesting that the signature of earthflow activity remains for a period of time once the uplift peak has passed. Landslide density, mean landslide area, and earthflow velocity all increase rapidly above threshold values of channel steepness and local relief. In the Eel catchment, where the zone of rapid uplift is commencing, landslides, particularly earth flows, are concentrated

  16. Relationship model of sediment grain size and Tibetan Plateau uplift in middle-west parts of Qilian Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅开道; 李吉均; 高军平; 方小敏

    2001-01-01

    By observing, measuring the fluvial sediment grain size of mid-western segment of the Qilianshan Range and studying the correlation between the grain size and uplift of the plateau, we model the correlation. These models are applied to the Laojunmiao section and the process curve of the uplift of the northern Tibetan Plateau against age from 8.35 Ma is illustrated here. The process curve shows that the northern Tibetan Plateau surface has uplifted from the mean altitude of 900-3700 m since 8.35 MaBP. From 8.35 to 3.1 MaBP, the Tibetan Plateau uplifted slowly, uplifted amplitude is small, the total range is 420 m. From 3.1 MaBP up to now, the Tibetan Plateau uplifted tempestuously, showing that the uplift accelerated obviously later. It uplifted totally 2400 m. About 0.9 Ma ago, the northern Tibetan Plateau surface had uplifted to over 3000 m a.s.l., showing that the Tibetan Plateau surface had reached the cryosphere; and the mountain peaks had uplifted to more than 4000 m altitude, suggesting that there

  17. Cenozoic back-arc magmatism of the southern extra-Andean Patagonia (44° 30' - 52° S: A review of geochemical data and geodynamic interpretations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Orazio

    2004-12-01

    framework of the space-time evolution of the magmatism and in the wider frame of the Cenozoic history of the Pacific margin of southern South America. The slab window openings associated with the collision between oceanic spreading ridges and the Chile Trench are the preferred geodynamic interpretation of the southern Patagonia magmatism. However, the occurrence of many volcanic formations whose age and location are not entirely compatible with the slab window model suggests that other geodynamic processes inducing mantle melting could have been active during Cenozoic time in the extra Andean Patagonia.

  18. Coral Paleo-Uplift History Overlying a Very Shallow AD 2007 Megathrust Rupture of the Western Solomons Forearc: Deficit of Interseismic Subsidence Results in Net Long-Term Uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Lavier, L. L.; Frohlich, C.; Shen, C.; WU, C.; Sun, H.; Papabatu, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    The processes of forearc deformation and their relation to the megathrust earthquake cycle provide critical insights regarding longer-term arc tectonic evolution and the earthquake cycle itself. At the Western Solomon Islands arc, Ranongga and other islands sit over the seismogenic megathrust as close as 4 km from the trench where the Australian plate converges at ~80-100 mm/yr. Coral reefs fringe the coasts and record the relative sea level changes accompanying both long-term tectonic uplift and the shorter-term earthquake cycle. The AD 2007 Mw 8.1 megathrust rupture zone dips from 1-2 km to ~25 km deep beneath islands and caused uplift that we measured at coasts along a profile normal to the arc trend. Vertical components of the 2007 displacement show the expected fairly smooth uplift profile typical of elastic strain release. In contrast, along the same profile the amounts of longer-term net uplift of the mid-Holocene (~6 ka) coral shoreline are more variable. Likewise, the elevations of individual coral paleo-shorelines recording a series of individual uplifts (as young as 600 yr old with ~2.25 m uplift) also indicate variable amounts of uplift along the profile when compared to the 2007 coseismic uplift. For 50 -100 yr before 2007, all sites along the same profile subsided at rates on the order of 1-3 cm/yr, all of which equaled or exceeded the upward growth rates of corals. However, the amounts of pre-2007 subsidence are highly variable along the profile and do not conform well to the smoother profile of the 2007 displacements. Where total uplift since the mid-Holocene is smaller, pre-2007 subsidence and 2007 uplift may be relatively large. Where total uplift since the mid-Holocene is larger, 2007 coseismic uplift may be large while pre-2007 subsidence is relatively small. Therefore, the differences in longer-term uplift rates appear tied to variable subsidence during the interseismic period rather than being primarily a coseismic phenomenon. Furthermore

  19. Molecular phylogeography of the Andean alpine plant, Gunnera magellanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M.; Fujii, N.; Ito, M.; Asakawa, T.; Nishida, H.; Suyama, C.; Ueda, K.

    2015-12-01

    that the populations of G. magellanica that were distributed along the Andes have been divided into the two local populations of the northern and southern Andes during the uplift of the Andes.

  20. Ocean technology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Peshwe, V.B.

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Voices_Oceans_1996_113.pdf.txt stream_source_info Voices_Oceans_1996_113.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  1. Oceanic archipelagos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantis, Kostas A.; Whittaker, Robert James; Fernández-Palacios, José María;

    2016-01-01

    Since the contributions of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, oceanic archipelagos have played a central role in the development of biogeography. However, despite the critical influence of oceanic islands on ecological and evolutionary theory, our focus has remained limited to either the i...

  2. Ocean acidification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gattuso, J.P; Hansson, L

    2011-01-01

    The fate of much of the CO 2 we produce will be to enter the ocean. In a sense, we are fortunate that ocean water is endowed with the capacity to absorb far more CO 2 per litre than were it salt free...

  3. Observations and modeling of post-midnight uplifts near the magnetic equator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Nicolls

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We report here on post-midnight uplifts near the magnetic equator. We present observational evidence from digital ionosondes in Brazil, a digisonde in Peru, and other measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory that show that these uplifts occur fairly regularly in the post-midnight period, raising the ionosphere by tens of kilometers in the most mild events and by over a hundred kilometers in the most severe events. We show that in general the uplifts are not the result of a zonal electric field reversal, and demonstrate instead that the uplifts occur as the ionospheric response to a decreasing westward electric field in conjunction with sufficient recombination and plasma flux. The decreasing westward electric field may be caused by a change in the wind system related to the midnight pressure bulge, which is associated with the midnight temperature maximum. In order to agree with observations from Jicamarca and Palmas, Brazil, it is shown that there must exist sufficient horizontal plasma flux associated with the pressure bulge. In addition, we show that the uplifts may be correlated with a secondary maximum in the spread-F occurrence rate in the post-midnight period. The uplifts are strongly seasonally dependent, presumably according to the seasonal dependence of the midnight pressure bulge, which leads to the necessary small westward field in the post-midnight period during certain seasons. We also discuss the enhancement of the uplifts associated with increased geomagnetic activity, which may be related to disturbance dynamo winds. Finally, we show that it is possible using simple numerical techniques to estimate the horizontal plasma flux and the vertical drift velocity from electron density measurements in the post-midnight period.

  4. Crustal reflection structure in the uplifting zone of Songliao Basin and disconnecting Moho interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Baojun; TANG; Jianren; LI; Qinxue; WANG; Jianmin; S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to obtain the fine structure of Songliao Basin, four nearly vertical reflection profiles were acquired and then processed so as to get the poststack migration sections with two-way travel of 15s. In this paper, we study the reflection characteristics in the southeastern and northeastern uplifting zones of Songliao Basin, discovering that the structure within the uplifting zones has the following features: (i) The sedimentary thickness decreases from west to east and increases from north to south. (ii) In the northeastern and southeastern uplifting zones, the crustal reflection image varies remarkably along east-west or south-north direction. (iii) In the northeastern uplifting zone, the two-way travel time of Moho interface ranges within 9.6-11.0 s (the depth range of 30-34 km). (iv) In the southeastern uplift, the two-way travel time of Moho interface ranges within 9.7-10.4 s (the depth range of 30-32 km). The poststack migration sections manifest the peculiar phenomenon of the disconnecting Moho reflection phases in Songliao Basin with two-way travel time difference of 0.1-0.5 s (2 km or so). In the vicinity of disconnecting zone, there are several shear faults, which are wide within the uplifting zone and become narrow at the intersection of two uplifting zones. It can be inferred that these reflection images and peculiar reflections from Moho interface are attributed to the coupling of the following dynamic factors: multi-phase weak collision of Heilongjiang micro-continents, westward underthrusting of Pacific plate and so on.

  5. Crustal‐scale structural architecture in central Chile based on seismicity and surface geology: Implications for Andean mountain building

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farías, Marcelo; Comte, Diana; Charrier, Reynaldo; Martinod, Joseph; David, Claire; Tassara, Andrés; Tapia, Felipe; Fock, Andrés

    2010-01-01

    .... This structure plays a fundamental role in the Andean orogenesis because most of the shortening has been accommodated by structures rooted in it and allows the distribution of crustal thickening...

  6. Phenotypic, Molecular, and Pathological Characterization of Colletotrichum acutatum Associated with Andean Lupine and Tamarillo in the Ecuadorian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falconi, C.; Visser, R.G.F.; Heusden, van A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracnose is a serious problem of both Andean lupine and tamarillo in Ecuador. Morphological features, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, and host specificity were used to characterize Colletotrichum isolates from lupine and tamarillo. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization,

  7. Crustal wedging triggering recent deformation in the Andean thrust front between 31°S and 33°S: Sierras Pampeanas-Precordillera interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    VergéS, J.; Ramos, V. A.; Meigs, A.; Cristallini, E.; Bettini, F. H.; CortéS, J. M.

    2007-03-01

    We document a new model of crustal structure of the Andean front in Argentina where numerous historic earthquakes destroyed the cities of Mendoza in 1861 (Ms = ˜7) and San Juan in 1944 (Mw = 7.0). The Cerro Salinas anticline is formed above the west directed Cerro Salinas thrust. An east facing monocline with an amplitude of about 2 km folds the Cerro Salinas thrust and overlying Neogene succession. This monocline is formed above a blind crustal thrust in the basement. Its dip of 14° west is inferred from fold geometry. This thick-skinned east directed blind thrust and the thin-skinned west directed Cerro Salinas thrust define a tectonic wedge; the wedge tip occurs at a depth of 5.4 km. Growth of the monocline after ˜8.5 Ma is revealed on multichannel seismic (MSC) profile 31017 (Repsol-YPF). Rates of Cerro Salinas thrust displacement are of the order of 1 mm/yr, whereas vertical uplift of ˜0.45 mm/yr results from the combined displacement on the Cerro Salinas thrust and growth of east facing monocline. The lateral extent of the east directed crustal blind ramp corresponds with the along-strike extent of the Eastern Precordillera. When combined with the low displacement rate, a long earthquake recurrence interval is implied. Smaller magnitude earthquakes, however, indicate that segments of the blind thrust ramps ruptured in historic events. If all the segments of the blind thrust ruptured together the fault area is ˜7000 km2 and could produce a Mw ˜ 7.7 earthquake. The crustal wedge model provides new constraints on the origin and potential size of earthquakes that threaten the densely populated region.

  8. Greenhouse gas balance in the conversion from extensive pasture to other agricultural systems in Andean region of Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Amanda Silva [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of agricultural sector is to reduce emissions and increase food production, taking into account environmental aspects. In Andean zone of Colombia, there is a growing need to develop GHG (greenhouse gas) mitigation techniques associated to milk production. This work focuses on the GHG emissions and potential sinks associated to milk production scenarios in the Andean zone of Colombia. The scenarios considered were: conventional agriculture of Pennisetum clandestinum in rotation w...

  9. Can Andean medicine coexist with biomedical healthcare? A comparison of two rural communities in Peru and Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Mathez-Stiefel, Sarah-Lan; Vandebroek, Ina; Rist, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that indigenous medical systems remain strong in developing countries because biomedicine is physically inaccessible or financially not affordable. This paper compares the health-seeking behavior of households from rural Andean communities at a Peruvian and a Bolivian study site. The main research question was whether the increased presence of biomedicine led to a displacement of Andean indigenous medical practices or to coexistence of the two healing tra...

  10. Can Andean medicine coexist with biomedical healthcare? A comparison of two rural communities in Peru and Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Mathez-Stiefel Sarah-Lan; Vandebroek Ina; Rist Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background It is commonly assumed that indigenous medical systems remain strong in developing countries because biomedicine is physically inaccessible or financially not affordable. This paper compares the health-seeking behavior of households from rural Andean communities at a Peruvian and a Bolivian study site. The main research question was whether the increased presence of biomedicine led to a displacement of Andean indigenous medical practices or to coexistence of the two healin...

  11. A case of rapid rock riverbed incision in a coseismic uplift reach and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Wan; Pan, Yii-Wen; Liao, Jyh-Jong

    2013-02-01

    During the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (Mw = 7.6) in Taiwan, the coseismic displacement induced fault scarps and a pop-up structure in the Taan River. The fault scarps across the river experienced maximum vertical slip of 10 m, which disturbed the dynamic equilibrium of the fluvial system. As a result, rapid incision in the weak bedrock, with a maximum depth of 20 m, was activated within a decade after its armor layer was removed. This case provides an excellent opportunity for closely tracking and recording the progressive evolution of river morphology that is subjected to coseismic uplift. Based on multistaged orthophotographs and digital elevation model (DEM) data, the process of morphology evolution in the uplift reach was divided into four consecutive stages. Plucking is the dominant mechanism of bedrock erosion associated with channel incision and knickpoint migration. The astonishingly high rate of knickpoint retreat (KPR), as rapid as a few hundred meters per year, may be responsible for the rapid incision in the main channel. The reasons for the high rate of KPR are discussed in depth. The total length of the river affected by the coseismic uplift is 5 km: 1 km in the uplift reach and 4 km in the downstream reach. The downstream reach was affected by a reduction in sediment supply and increase in stream power. The KPR cut through the uplift reach within roughly a decade; further significant flooding in the future will mainly cause widening instead of deepening of the channel.

  12. Tectonic uplift, threshold hillslopes, and denudation rates in a developing mountain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, S.A.; Phillips, W.M.; Summerfield, M.A.; Fifield, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Studies across a broad range of drainage basins have established a positive correlation between mean slope gradient and denudation rates. It has been suggested, however, that this relationship breaks down for catchments where slopes are at their threshold angle of stability because, in such cases, denudation is controlled by the rate of tectonic uplift through the rate of channel incision and frequency of slope failure. This mechanism is evaluated for the San Bernardino Mountains, California, a nascent range that incorporates both threshold hill-slopes and remnants of pre-uplift topography. Concentrations of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in alluvial sediments are used to quantify catchment-wide denudation rates and show a broadly linear relationship with mean slope gradient up to ???30??: above this value denudation rates vary substantially for similar mean slope gradients. We propose that this decoupling in the slope gradient-denudation rate relationship marks the emergence of threshold topography and coincides with the transition from transport-limited to detachment-limited denudation. The survival in the San Bernardino Mountains of surfaces formed prior to uplift provides information on the topographic evolution of the range, in particular the transition from slope-gradient-dependent rates of denudation to a regime where denudation rates are controlled by rates of tectonic uplift. This type of transition may represent a general model for the denudational response to orogenic uplift and topographic evolution during the early stages of mountain building. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  13. GPS measurements of crustal uplift near Jakobshavn Isbræ due to glacial ice mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Liu, Lin; Wahr, John;

    2010-01-01

    Isbræ. All stations experienced uplift, but the uplift rate at Kangia North, only 5 km from the glacier front, was about 10 mm yr−1 larger than the rate at Ilulissat, located only ∼45 km further away. This suggests that most of the uplift is due to the unloading of the Earth’s surface as Jakobshavn...... thins and loses mass. Our estimate of Jakobshavn’s contribution to uplift rates at Kangia North and Ilulissat are 14.6 ± 1.7 mm yr−1 and 4.9 ± 1.1 mm yr−1, respectively. The observed rates are consistent with a glacier thinning model based on repeat altimeter surveys from NASA’s Airborne Topographic...... Mapper (ATM), which shows that Jakobshavn lost mass at an average rate of 22 ± 2 km3 yr−1 between 2006 and 2009. At Kangia North and Ilulissat, the predicted uplift rates computed using thinning estimates from the ATM laser altimetry are 12.1 ± 0.9 mm yr−1 and 3.2 ± 0.3 mm yr−1, respectively...

  14. Insights on the Quaternary Tectonic Evolution of the SE Indonesia Arc-Continent Collision from the Study of Uplifted Coral Terraces on Sumba Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, F.; Rigaud, S.; Chiang, H. W.; Djamil, Y. S.; Herdiyanti, T.; Johnny, J.; Ildefonso, S.; Meilano, I.; Bijaksana, S.; Abidin, H. Z.; Tapponnier, P.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sumba Island is uniquely positioned within the Sunda-Banda forearc, at the transition between oceanic subduction and arc-continent collision. There, the convergence between the Sunda and Australian plates is accommodated along at least three major structures: the megathrust, the Savu backthrust located south of Sumba and the Flores backthrust located north of the volcanic arc. The incipient collision in the vicinity of Sumba is responsible for coastal vertical movements. Quaternary reefal deposits form spectacular uplifted flights of terraces, which directly overlie Mid Miocene - Early Pliocene deep carbonate and volcaniclastic rocks at elevations exceeding 500m. Although aerial fossil reefs extensively rim the northern and eastern coasts of Sumba, studies have been limited to Cape Laundi where an uplift rate of 0.2-0.5 m/kyr is estimated for the last 400 kyr, partly on the basis of alpha-spectrometric U/Th dating. At the island scale, the relief morphology and the hydrographic network point to a N-S asymmetry, indicating a general tilt toward the north. A subducting seafloor asperity and south-dipping normal faults have been postulated to generate this asymmetry. However as the pattern and kinematics of the deformation remain partially determined, structures and processes capable of driving such deformation and accommodating the nascent collision may be undisclosed. New topographic data coupled with field observations and coral mass-spectrometric U/Th dating allow investigating the morphology, stratigraphy and age of the fossil reef terraces at the island scale. Tectonic structures disrupting the topography are identified and their activities are relatively dated with respect to fossil reef terraces. The deformation pattern of Sumba is characterized, especially in Cape Laundi where the uplift rate is re-evaluated. Through a multi-disciplinary study, we intend to reconstruct the tectonic evolution of Sumba island and, at a larger scale, of the collision in SE

  15. Detrital zircon provenance constraints on the initial uplift and denudation of the Chinese western Tianshan after the assembly of the southwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yigui; Zhao, Guochun; Sun, Min; Eizenhöfer, Paul R.; Hou, Wenzhu; Zhang, Xiaoran; Liu, Dongxing; Wang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic data of detrital zircons from late Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata along the southern flank of the Chinese western Tianshan enable to identify provenance changes and reconstruct early stage uplift and denudation history of the Tianshan range. Detrital zircons from Permian and Early-Middle Triassic siliciclastic rocks show two prominent age populations at 500-390 Ma and 310-260 Ma, and subordinate Precambrian ages at ~ 2.5 Ga, 2.0-1.7 Ga, 1.2-0.9 Ga and 900-600 Ma, with rare ages between 390 and 310 Ma. These characteristics and zircon εHf(t) data consistently suggest a sediment source predominantly from the Tarim Craton, rather than the Central Tianshan-Yili Block. In contrast, Late Triassic to Cretaceous strata additionally contain abundant 390-310 Ma and 260-220 Ma detrital zircons, implying multiple source regions from the Central Tianshan-Yili Block, Tarim Craton, and Western Kunlun Orogen. A significant switch of sedimentary provenances occurred in the mid-Triassic and is consistent with contemporaneous change of paleocurrent directions and the onset of intense tectonothermal events in the broad region of the Chinese western Tianshan and Kyrgyz Tianshan. These data collectively indicate that the significant surface uplift and denudation of the Tianshan range were probably initiated in the mid-Triassic (~ 240 Ma) after the assembly of the southwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. This uplifting event represents an intracontinental orogeny most likely in response to the collision between the Qiangtang Block and southern Eurasia, following the closure of the western part of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean.

  16. Investigating the Uplift of Southern Africa Using Coupled Thermo-mechanical and Surface Processes Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucher, R.; Huismans, R. S.; Brown, R. W.; Robin, C.

    2014-12-01

    The topography of southern and eastern Africa (referred to as the African Superswell by Nyblade and Robinson, 1994) is anomalously high (> 900m) relative to central and west Africa, and also to other continents. The southern tip of Africa is surrounded by passive margins and mid ocean ridges as a result of continental rifting (early Jurassic in the east, late Jurassic in the west) and Gondwana break up. Recent studies have also identified the Earth's largest low seismic velocity anomaly in the mid-lower mantle beneath southern Africa and catalysed interest in the role the interactions between surface and deep processes play in generating large scale topography. Understanding how the relief evolved since rifting onset is fundamental to advancing knowledge about the coupling between deep tectonics and dynamic topography. Such a large scale topographic feature may also have important impact on atmosphere circulation and precipitations patterns. The complexity of such a system requires an integrated approach looking at interactions between tectonics and surface processes on a range of spatial and temporal scales. We use high-resolution numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM) to investigate the factors controlling the style of deformation. The experiments consist in simple extension models involving lithosphere with variable thickness (normal-like lithosphere to thick cratonic-like lithosphere) and explore the effects of rheological and compositional variability of the layer components of the crust and the lithosphere. Tomography and geochemistry evidences suggest a possible counterflow in the lower lithosphere in parts of the African western margins. We discuss the effect of a gravitationally driven lithospheric counterflow of depleted lower lithosphere (compositionally less dense than sublithospheric mantle) on the rift geometry and the effect of the isostatic responses in terms

  17. Provenance of the Miocene Alto Tunuyán Basin (33°40‧S, Argentina) and its implications for the evolution of the Andean Range: Insights from petrography and U-Pb LA-ICPMS zircon ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Hernán; Pinto, Luisa; Tunik, Maisa; Giambiagi, Laura; Deckart, Katja

    2016-10-01

    The Alto Tunuyán Foreland Basin in western Argentina is located immediately south of the flat-slab segment of the Central Andes and its evolution is directly related to the propagation of structures to the east. Petrographic and geochronologic studies have been performed to determine the provenance of syntectonic sediments in the basin in order to establish their relationship to the Andean orogenic activity. The analysed detrital and igneous zircons in contrast with previous data, allow us to restrict the basin age between ca. 15 and 6 Ma. Sandstones record two main contributions, one from andesitic volcanic rocks and the other from an acidic igneous source, the first probably corresponding to Miocene volcanic rocks from the Principal Cordillera (Farellones Formation) and the second to Permo-Triassic, acidic, igneous rocks from the Frontal Cordillera (Choiyoi Magmatic Province, CMP). Two secondary sources have been recorded, sedimentary and metamorphic; the first one is represented by Mesozoic rocks in the Principal Cordillera and the second by the Proterozoic/early Carboniferous Guarguaráz Complex (GC) in the Frontal Cordillera, respectively. Sandstones from the lower basin deposits (15-11 Ma) register supply pulses from the Farellones Formation reflecting the unroofing of the Principal Cordillera by uplift pulses during the middle Miocene. Sandstones from the upper basin deposits (ca. 11-9 Ma) record an increase in material derived from the CMP, reflecting important uplift of the Frontal Cordillera. A thick, ca. 9 Ma old ignimbrite within the basin indicates an eruption in the Frontal Cordillera. Detrital zircons from the CMP have been detected also in the lower basin deposits, suggesting either recycling of Mesozoic deposits containing CMP zircons or an early paleorelief of the Frontal Cordillera. The good correlation between the age of the detrital zircons of the CMP and the GC in the lower basin deposits supports recycling of Mesozoic sedimentary deposits.

  18. Diversity patterns, environmental drivers and changes in vegetation composition in dry inter-Andean valleys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Catalina; Girardello, Marco; Barfod, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aims We studied diversity, patterns of endemism and turnover of vegetation composition in dry inter-Andean valleys (DIAVs) where little is known about the influence of the abiotic drivers controlling plant species composition and occurrences, and the life forms that contribute most to α- and β......, suggesting low migration rates due to local barriers. We identified seven species distribution patterns that gave rise to high β-diversity in the dry inter-Andean valleys. The β-diversity of trees was the lowest. Herbs had the highest β-diversity, which increased steadily with geographic distance. Our...... results further highlight the influence of disturbance, water availability and low temperature on plant species composition and occurrence. We also found significant, contrasting patterns in responses to environmental drivers, when analyzing our data separately by life form. Our results show...

  19. Organochlorine compounds in soils and sediments of the mountain Andean Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghini, Francesca; Grimalt, Joan O; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Barra, Ricardo; García, Carlos J Torres; Focardi, Silvano

    2005-07-01

    Semi-volatile organochlorine compounds (OC) were analyzed in remote Andean soils and lake sediments. The sampling sites covered a wide latitudinal gradient from 18 degrees S to 46 degrees S along Chile and an altitudinal gradient (10-4500 m). The concentrations were in the order of background levels, involving absence of major pollution sources in the high mountain areas. Significant correlations were found between log-transformed concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, alpha- and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane in soils and total organic content (TOC). In addition, TOC-normalized concentrations of the most volatile OC showed a significant linear dependence with air temperature. This good agreement points to temperature as a significant factor for the retention of long range transported OC in remote ecosystems such as the Andean mountains, although other variables should not be totally excluded. The highest concentrations of OCs were achieved in the sites located at highest altitude and lowest temperature of the dataset.

  20. Anomalous transient uplift observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear test site using satellite radar interferometry time-series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, P.; Buckley, S. M.; Yang, D.; Carle, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    Anomalous uplift is observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear test site using ERS satellite SAR data. Using an InSAR time-series analysis method, we show that an increase in absolute uplift with time is observed between 1997 and 1999. The signal is collocated with past underground nuclear tests. Due to the collocation in space with past underground tests we postulate a nuclear test-related hydrothermal source for the uplift signal. A possible mechanism is presented that can account for the observed transient uplift and is consistent with documented thermal regimes associated with underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site).

  1. Numerical investigation of underground drain radius, depth and location on uplift pressure reduction (Case study: Tabriz diversion dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Salmasi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Water penetration from beneath of built structures on permeable soils causes uplift force along the contact of structure with foundation. This uplift force reduces hydraulic structure stability. Typically, these instabilities occur due to under-pressure development (uplift force, gradual inner degradation of foundation material (piping or sand boil phenomenon. Thus, it seems necessary to calculate the pressure applied to the contact surface of the dam. One method for preventing piping phenomenon, reduction in exit gradient as well as decrease of uplift force beneath diversion dams includes implementation of weep hole. This study aims to study the effect of radius, depth and location of pipe drains under stilling basin upon how much uplift force decreases. The benefit of this study in agricultural field for soil and water engineers is to have a safe design of lined canals, weirs or diversion dams. To do this, numerical simulation of Tabriz diversion dam with Geo-Studio software was carried out. Results showed that application of drain pipe under the structure reduced uplift force respect to without drain under the structure. Increasing of drain radius; caused reduction of uplift pressure more but increased of seepage flow slightly. Installation of drain in upper part of stilling basin had a tendency to decrease uplift pressure more. Existence of drain near the stilling basin bottom caused in more reducing of uplift pressure than of installation of it in deeper depth

  2. Large Differences in Bacterial Community Composition among Three Nearby Extreme Waterbodies of the High Andean Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Pablo; Acosta, Eduardo; Dorador, Cristina; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    The high Andean plateau or Altiplano contains different waterbodies that are subjected to extreme fluctuations in abiotic conditions on a daily and an annual scale. The bacterial diversity and community composition of those shallow waterbodies is largely unexplored, particularly, of the ponds embedded within the peatland landscape (i.e., Bofedales). Here we compare the small-scale spatial variability (Altiplano peatland ponds represent a hitherto unknown source of microbial diversity.

  3. Antihypertensive and antioxidant activity of atomized andean purple corn (Zea mayz L) hydroalcoholic extract in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo, Jorge; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Químico farmaceútico.; Raez, Ernesto; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Médico patólogo.; Rodríguez, Miguel; Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Odontólogo.; Chumpitaz, Víctor; Facultad Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Odontólogo.; Burga, Jonny; Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Odontólogo.; De la Cruz, Walter; Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Médico.; Valencia, José; Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Químico Farmacéutico.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the antihypertensive and antioxidant activity of the atomized hydroalcoholic extract of Zea mays L. (Andean purple corn) in rats with induced hypertension. Material and methods. We used five groups of six Holtzmann rats each, one without hypertension (negative control) and four with hypertension induced by L-NAME: positive control and three groups for the doses of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively. The treatment was carried out orally once a day for 25 days. Th...

  4. Invertebrate metacommunity structure and dynamics in an andean glacial stream network facing climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andino, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    theory as a conceptual framework to better understand how river network structure influences the spatial organization of aquatic communities in glacierized catchments. At 51 stream sites in an Andean glacierized catchment (Ecuador), we sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, measured physico...... community variation. Overland spatial variables based on geographical and altitudinal distances significantly affected community variation. Watercourse spatial variables based on glaciality distances had a unique significant effect on community variation. Within alpine catchment, glacial meltwater affects...

  5. Coca: The History and Medical Significance of an Ancient Andean Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sue Biondich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coca leaf products are an integral part of the lives of the Andean peoples from both a cultural and traditional medicine perspective. Coca is also the whole plant from which cocaine is derived. Coca products are thought to be a panacea for health troubles in regions of South America. This review will examine the toxicology of whole coca and will also look at medicinal applications of this plant, past, present, and future.

  6. Oxyoppia mustaciata n. sp. from andean forests of northwestern patagonia and key to oxyoppiinae from Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Kun, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; During a three-year survey of oribatid mites in soil and leaf litter of Andean North patagonian forests, specimens belonging to the genus Oxyoppia were collected. Even though the specimens could be recognized by the use of previous descriptions and existing keys as being close to Oxyoppia (Oxyoppiella) suramericana, morphological analyses suggest enough differences to propose a new species Oxyoppia mustaciata n. sp. A new identification key to species of Oxyoppiinae fr...

  7. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1 There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2 There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3 Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  8. The active southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau: uplift of mantle origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.; McCarthy, J.

    1995-01-01

    During Cenozoic time, the Colorado Plateau was raised about 2km above sea level. The most-recent and best-documented uplift of the plateau (~1km) has been concentrated at its southwest margin between 6 and 1 Ma, whereas the eastern Colorado Plateau may have been at high elevations since Eocene time. To better understand the recent tectonic activity at the southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau, we compile detailed crustal thickness and density information from seismic and gravity data for a region that includes northwest Arizona and the southern tip of Nevada. This information is used to isolate the mantle contribution to uplift. We speculate that uplift may result from subduction-related thinning of the continental lithosphere. -from Authors

  9. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of multi-base seismically isolated structures with uplift potential I: formulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panos C. Tsopelas; Panayiotis C. Roussis; Michael C. Constantinou

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of modern seismically isolated structures requires the analysis of the structural system and the isolation system in its entirety and the ability to capture potential discontinuous phenomena such as isolator uplift and their effects on the superstructures and the isolation hardware. In this paper, an analytical model is developed and a computational algorithm is formulated to analyze complex seismically isolated superstructures even when undergoing highly-nonlinear phenomena such as uplift. The computational model has the capability of modeling various types of isolation devices with strong nonlinearities, analyzing multiple superstructures (up to five separate superstructures) on multiple bases (up to five bases), and capturing the effects of lateral loads on bearing axial forces, including bearing uplift. The model developed herein has been utilized to form the software platform 3D-BASIS-ME-MB, which provides the practicing engineering community with a versatile tool for analysis and design of complex structures with modem isolation systems.

  10. Neogene uplift of south Western Australia as constrained by river profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Flament, Nicolas; Butterworth, Nathaniel; Müller, R Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The relative tectonic quiescence of the Australian continent during the Cenozoicmakes it an excellent natural laboratory to study recent large-scale variations insurface topography and the processes influencing these changes. A part of this landscape is a fluvial network that is sensitive to variations in landscape horizontaland vertical motions. The notion that a river acts as a "tape recorder" for vertical perturbations (Pritchard et al., 2009) suggests that one can deduce changes in spatial and temporal characteristics of uplift via the analysis of river "channel-parallel", or longitudinal, profiles. Here we analysed 21 longitudinal river profiles, around the Australian continent. Steady-state concave upward profiles in northeast Australia indicate an absence of recent uplift. In contrast, pronounced convex upward undulations and major knickpoints within longitudinal profiles of rivers in southwest Australia suggest recent landscape uplift. This requires an explanation given the lackof recent, large-scale ...

  11. Uplift and subsidence reveal a nonpersistent megathrust rupture boundary (Sitkinak Island, Alaska)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Richard W.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Nelson, Alan R.; Dura, Tina; Kemp, Andrew C.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Corbett, D. Reide; Angster, Stephen J.; Bradley, Lee-Ann

    2014-01-01

    We report stratigraphic evidence of land-level change and tsunami inundation along the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust during prehistoric and historical earthquakes west of Kodiak Island. On Sitkinak Island, cores and tidal outcrops fringing a lagoon reveal five sharp lithologic contacts that record coseismic land-level change. Radiocarbon dates, 137Cs profiles, CT scans, and microfossil assemblages are consistent with rapid uplift ca. 290-0, 520-300, and 1050-790 cal yr BP, and subsidence in AD 1964 and ca. 640-510 cal yr BP. Radiocarbon, 137Cs, and 210Pb ages bracketing a sand bed traced 1.5 km inland and evidence for sudden uplift are consistent with Russian accounts of an earthquake and tsunami in AD 1788. The mixed uplift and subsidence record suggests that Sitkinak Island sits above a non-persistent boundary near the southwestern limit of the AD 1964 Mw 9.2 megathrust rupture.

  12. A numerical modelling study on the processes of uplift and planation of the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董文杰; 汤懋苍

    1997-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has experienced a number of processes of uplift and planation alternately since about 45 Ma B. P. when it began to raise. A differential equation model for describing the Plateau altitude variation with time is formulated on the basis of previous field studies and a theoretical hypothesis: if palaeomagnetic polarity is positive, the convective activity in the earth is strong; orogenic movement is violent; and the raising velocity of the Plateau is high and vice versa . The analytical solution of the equation is obtained. The altitude variation from the beginning of the Plateau uplift to present is computed through using the geomagnetic polarity reversals timing series and interstellar atomic hydrogen concentration data. A comparison between the model results and the field studies indicates that the former is quite similar to the latter. The model results are able to basically reproduce the alternating processes of uplift and planation of the plate geological history. In the present m

  13. Surface uplift in the Central Andes driven by growth of the Altiplano Puna Magma Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jonathan P.; Ward, Kevin M.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.; Finnegan, Noah J.

    2016-10-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (APMB) in the Central Andes is the largest imaged magma reservoir on Earth, and is located within the second highest orogenic plateau on Earth, the Altiplano-Puna. Although the APMB is a first-order geologic feature similar to the Sierra Nevada batholith, its role in the surface uplift history of the Central Andes remains uncertain. Here we show that a long-wavelength topographic dome overlies the seismically measured extent of the APMB, and gravity data suggest that the uplift is isostatically compensated. Isostatic modelling of the magmatic contribution to dome growth yields melt volumes comparable to those estimated from tomography, and suggests that the APMB growth rate exceeds the peak Cretaceous magmatic flare-up in the Sierran batholith. Our analysis reveals that magmatic addition may provide a contribution to surface uplift on par with lithospheric removal, and illustrates that surface topography may help constrain the magnitude of pluton-scale melt production.

  14. New constraints on Holocene uplift rates for the Baudo Mountain Range, northwestern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan L.; Shen, Zhixiong; Mauz, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    A beach deposit on the southern end of the Baudo Mountain Range, at an elevation of ˜2.0 m above the backshore of the modern beach, was dated at ˜2870 years using optically stimulated luminescence dating. The calculated average uplift rate necessary to raise this deposit is 0.7 mm/yr. This rate combines the long-term regional deformation associated with the subduction of the Nazca Plate under the South American Plate and the collision of the Choco Block microplate against the South American continent, as well as uplift from local faults. We propose that rapid emergence probably as several pulses, each involving decimeter scale coseismic uplift, is likely to have occurred to elevate the beach above the intertidal zone and offset destructive wave erosion.

  15. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F; Hamilton, D P; McKinnon, W B; Schenk, P M; Binzel, R P; Bierson, C J; Beyer, R A; Moore, J M; Stern, S A; Weaver, H A; Olkin, C B; Young, L A; Smith, K E

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto's tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin's present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  16. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Hamilton, D. P.; McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Bierson, C. J.; Beyer, R. A.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Spencer, J. R.; Beyer, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Buie, M.; Buratti, B.; Cheng, A.; Cruikshank, D.; Ore, C. Dalle; Earle, A.; Gladstone, R.; Grundy, W.; Howard, A. D.; Lauer, T.; Linscott, I.; Nimmo, F.; Parker, J.; Porter, S.; Reitsema, H.; Reuter, D.; Roberts, J. H.; Robbins, S.; Schenk, P. M.; Showalter, M.; Singer, K.; Strobel, D.; Summers, M.; Tyler, L.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Banks, M.; Barnouin, O.; Bray, V.; Carcich, B.; Chaikin, A.; Chavez, C.; Conrad, C.; Hamilton, D. P.; Howett, C.; Hofgartner, J.; Kammer, J.; Lisse, C.; Marcotte, A.; Parker, A.; Retherford, K.; Saina, M.; Runyon, K.; Schindhelm, E.; Stansberry, J.; Steffl, A.; Stryk, T.; Throop, H.; Tsang, C.; Verbiscer, A.; Winters, H.; Zangari, A.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto’s tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin’s present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  17. Oceanic archipelagos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantis, Kostas A.; Whittaker, Robert James; Fernández-Palacios, José María

    2016-01-01

    Since the contributions of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, oceanic archipelagos have played a central role in the development of biogeography. However, despite the critical influence of oceanic islands on ecological and evolutionary theory, our focus has remained limited to either...... the island-level of specific archipelagos or single archipelagos. Recently, it was proposed that oceanic archipelagos qualify as biotic provinces, with diversity primarily reflecting a balance between speciation and extinction, with colonization having a minor role. Here we focus on major attributes...... of the archipelagic geological dynamics that can affect diversity at both the island and the archipelagic level. We also reaffirm that oceanic archipelagos are appropriate spatiotemporal units to frame analyses in order to understand large scale patterns of biodiversity....

  18. Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocean and coastal acidification is an emerging issue caused by increasing amounts of carbon dioxide being absorbed by seawater. Changing seawater chemistry impacts marine life, ecosystem services, and humans. Learn what EPA is doing and what you can do.

  19. Ocean Color

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellite-derived Ocean Color Data sets from historical and currently operational NASA and International Satellite missions including the NASA Coastal Zone Color...

  20. Introduction and Establishment of Pissodes castaneus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Andean Patagonia of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, V A; Gomez, C A; La Manna, L; Roux, G; Lanteri, A A; Vallejos, N C; Marvaldi, A E

    2016-02-01

    The pine weevils that occur in plantations of Pinus spp. in Andean Patagonia of Argentina belong to the species Pissodes castaneus (De Geer), a Eurasian endemic species, according to the identification based on molecular and morphological characters. Sequences of the mitochondrial Cytochrome oxidase subunit I and nuclear genes (28 S rDNA and ITS2) were obtained for individuals of 13 afforestations, covering the entire distribution area of the established populations in the Andean Patagonia of Argentina. Sequence comparison with representative species of the genus (European, North American, and Chinese species) shows that Patagonian specimens are conspecific to those of P. castaneus sequenced from Europe. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that all terminals from Patagonia form a monophyletic unit without evident subclades, eliminating the possibility of existence of more than one species of Pissodes Germar in this area, including cryptic ones. Moreover, the very low genetic divergence between the Patagonian populations suggests that it is plausible that P. castaneus was introduced into Patagonia from just one location. Mitochondrial DNA analysis shows that Patagonian terminals group together with a French haplotype and are clearly separated from other P. castaneus individuals represented in our sample, and reveal that established populations in Andean Patagonia originated via a limited introduction.

  1. Endemic epigean Tenebrionids (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) from the Andean Region: exploring the patagonian-diversification hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Rodolfo; Flores, Gustavo E

    2015-08-26

    Tenebrionidae is a diverse insect family of Coleoptera that shows high levels of endemicity in epigean species. For the Andean region, which is divided into three subregions: Central Chilean, Subantarctic and Patagonian, it has been hypothesized that epigean tenebrionids have diversified in the Patagonian subregion and subsequently, they dispersed to Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions. In this work, based on information obtained from museum collections and scientific studies, we presented the first list of endemic epigean tenebrionids from the Andean region with their taxonomic arrangement and geographic distribution. Moreover, we used these data to explore the veracity of the Patagonian-diversification hypothesis. A total of 416 species grouped into six subfamilies, 17 tribes and 41 genera were identified as endemic to the Andean region. Considering the spatial distribution it was observed that subfamilies, tribes, genera and species were unequally distributed across subregions. Results did not support the Patagonian-diversification hypothesis; to the contrary, they were more concordant with processes of isolation among subregions that have promoted speciation by interrupting gene flow among populations, resulting in endemism because species can not expand their range sizes. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings to be considered in biodiversity conservation, because endemic species, by their high extinction risk, are primary targets in conservation strategies.

  2. Agronomic performance and stability of andean common bean lines with white grains in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Santos Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of genotype by environment interaction in Andean common bean lines with white grains, in Central Southern Brazil, to identify lines with high agronomic performance, stability and adaptability, aiming to meet domestic demand and to increase the Brazilian participation in the foreign market of common bean. Nineteen trials with twelve Andean lines were conducted in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in Central Southern Brazil. Grain yield and other agronomic traits were evaluated. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and of adaptability/stability using Annicchiarico and modified AMMI methods. Significant differences were found between lines for all traits evaluated. Genotype by environment interaction was important for lines with Andean origin and white seed. The utilization of weighted mean of absolute scores and yield with the AMMI results enabled the identification of the most stable and adapted lines. Lines Poroto Alubia, CNFB 16211, Ouro Branco and WAF 160 were stable and adapted, using both methods. CNFB 16211 line presented high agronomic performance, stability and adaptability and therefore this line may be a new cultivar. USWA 70 and WAF 75 lines presented grain size similar to that required by the foreign market and superior to the Brazilian cultivars, besides favorable agronomic traits, and thus these lines may be indicated as new cultivars.

  3. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Peruvian Andean hispanics: the PREVENCION study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Zea-Diaz, Humberto; Morey-Vargas, Oscar L; Bolaños-Salazar, Juan F; Muñoz-Atahualpa, Edgar; Postigo-MacDowall, Mauricio; Corrales-Medina, Fernando; Valdivia-Ascuña, Zoila; Cuba-Bustinza, Carolina; Paredes-Díaz, Sheyla; Villalobos-Tapia, Paola; Chirinos-Pacheco, Julio; Goldberg, Ronald B; Chirinos, Julio A

    2007-11-01

    Data regarding the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MTS) in Andean populations are limited. We evaluated the prevalence of MTS according to American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute criteria among 1878 subjects in the PREVENCION study in Peru. In women, the most common component was low HDL cholesterol (60.9%) followed by abdominal obesity (36.9%). In men, the most common component was elevated triglycerides (52.0%) followed by low HDL cholesterol (32.5%), whereas the prevalence of abdominal obesity was 14%. Abnormal fasting glucose was the least common component in men (5.4%) and women (5.0%). The prevalence of MTS was significantly higher in women compared to men (23.2% versus 14.3%) and increased steeply with age, particularly in women (por=30kg/m2) instead of waist circumference as a component of the MTS lead to equivalent prevalence estimates of MTS in men but significantly underestimated the prevalence in women. The MTS is highly prevalent among Peruvian Andeans, particularly in older women. The pattern of MTS components in this Andean population is characterized by a high prevalence of dyslipidemia and a relatively low prevalence of elevated fasting glucose. Further studies are required to characterize genetic and environmental determinants of these patterns.

  4. The TF1 Radio Astronomy Working Group in the Andean ROAD: goals and challenges for 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro Molano, G.

    2017-07-01

    Since the creation of the Andean Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) of the International Astronomical Union, one of the main goals has been to foster a scientific culture of radio astronomy in countries of the central and northern Andes (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Perú, and Venezuela). For this reason, Andean ROAD Task Force 1 (Research and Education in Universities) created the Radio Astronomy Working Group to set a path along which collaborative endeavors can grow and yield scientific results. The first official meeting of the Working Group took place in Bogotá, Colombia during the 2nd Astronomá en los Andes Workshop (2015) where scientists actively developing projects in radio astronomy set goals for the near future, such as improving mobility for researchers and students, developing collaborations in related areas such as engineering and data science, and building transnational collaborations aiming at developing VLBI across the countries of the Andean ROAD and beyond. In this poster, I present current projects and associated research groups (ROAS - Perú, SiAMo - Colombia, Alfa-Orion UTP - Colombia, RAIG - Chile) and discuss goalposts and current challenges in the development of transnational radioastronomical projects. As a case study, I present the development and early astronomical results of the privately funded UECCI 4m Radio Telescope for 21 cm line observations in Bogotá, Colombia.

  5. Estimating Aboveground Biomass and Carbon Stocks in Periurban Andean Secondary Forests Using Very High Resolution Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Clerici

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Periurban forests are key to offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions, but they are under constant threat from urbanization. In particular, secondary Neotropical forest types in Andean periurban areas have a high potential to store carbon, but are currently poorly characterized. To address this lack of information, we developed a method to estimate periurban aboveground biomass (AGB—a proxy for multiple ecosystem services—of secondary Andean forests near Bogotá, Colombia, based on very high resolution (VHR GeoEye-1, Pleiades-1A imagery and field-measured plot data. Specifically, we tested a series of different pre-processing workflows to derive six vegetation indices that were regressed against in situ estimates of AGB. Overall, the coupling of linear models and the Ratio Vegetation Index produced the most satisfactory results. Atmospheric and topographic correction proved to be key in improving model fit, especially in high aerosol and rugged terrain such as the Andes. Methods and findings provide baseline AGB and carbon stock information for little studied periurban Andean secondary forests. The methodological approach can also be used for integrating limited forest monitoring plot AGB data with very high resolution imagery for cost-effective modelling of ecosystem service provision from forests, monitoring reforestation and forest cover change, and for carbon offset assessments.

  6. Transplanting the European Court of Justice: The Experience of the Andean Tribunal of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Saldías

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although there is an extensive literature on domestic legal transplants, far less is known about the transplantation of supranational judicial bodies. The Andean Tribunal of Justice (ATJ is one of eleven copies of the European Court of Justice (ECJ, and the third most active international court. This article considers the origins and evolution of the ATJ as a transplanted judicial institution. It first reviews the literatures on legal transplants, neofunctionalist theory, and the spread of European ideas and institutions, explaining how the intersection of these literatures informs the study of supranational judicial transplants. The article next explains why the Andean Pact's member states decided to add a court to their regional integration initiative, why they adapted the European Community model, and how the ECJ's existence has shaped the evolution of Andean legal doctrine and the political space within which the ATJ operates. We conclude by analyzing how the ATJ's experience informs the challenges of supranational transplants and theories of supranational legal integration more generally. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1948405

  7. [Diversity and dynamics of a high sub-Andean forest from Northern Andes, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Jesús Oswaldo Velásquez; Maniguaje, Nancy Lorena; Duque, Alvaro Javier

    2012-06-01

    The sub-Andean forests are characterized by a high biodiversity, but little is known about their natural dynamics. In order to generate new information, this study assessed two permanent plots of one hectare each, in the Northern Andean area of the Western Cordillera, Colombia. Methodology included the evaluation of diversity patterns, above ground biomass (AGB) dynamics, and mortality and recruitment rates. Besides, we used the Fisher's Alpha index to calculate species diversity. Forest dynamics and AGB were evaluated in both plots by means of three censuses carried out within a nine years period. In total, we found 1 664 individuals with diameter at breast height (DBH)> or =10cm belonging to 222 species, 113 genera and 60 families. Mean species richness was of 156 species/ha and a mean Fisher's Alpha index of 56.2/ha. The mortality rate was 0.88% and recruitment was 1.16%, which did not allow to lay any external effect of global warming or climate change on individual forest dynamics. However, the mean AGB was 243.44+/-9.82t/ha, with an annual average increase of 2.9t/ha, a higher value than the one reported in other studies of high sub-Andean forests, which suggests that equilibrium in terms of the AGB have not yet been reached. Besides, according to field observations, a recovery process, from a disturbance that occurred in the past, might be on his way.

  8. Organochlorine compounds in soils and sediments of the mountain Andean Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghini, Francesca [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Via Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena (Italy); Grimalt, Joan O. [Department of Environmental Chemistry (ICER-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: jgoqam@cid.csic.es; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C. [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Carlos III, s/n, 45071 Toledo (Spain); Barra, Ricardo [Aquatic Systems Research Unit, EULA - Chile Environmental Sciences Centre, University of Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Garcia, Carlos J. Torres [Izan-a Atmospheric Observatory, National Institute of Meteorology, La Marina 20, 38071 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Focardi, Silvano [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Via Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena (Italy)

    2005-07-15

    Semi-volatile organochlorine compounds (OC) were analyzed in remote Andean soils and lake sediments. The sampling sites covered a wide latitudinal gradient from 18 deg. S to 46 deg. S along Chile and an altitudinal gradient (10-4500 m). The concentrations were in the order of background levels, involving absence of major pollution sources in the high mountain areas. Significant correlations were found between log-transformed concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, {alpha}- and {gamma}-hexachlorocyclohexane in soils and total organic content (TOC). In addition, TOC-normalized concentrations of the most volatile OC showed a significant linear dependence with air temperature. This good agreement points to temperature as a significant factor for the retention of long range transported OC in remote ecosystems such as the Andean mountains, although other variables should not be totally excluded. The highest concentrations of OCs were achieved in the sites located at highest altitude and lowest temperature of the dataset. - Distribution of persistent organochlorine compounds in the Andean Mountain lakes is influenced by temperature.

  9. A regional perspective on the diversity and conservation of tropical Andean fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth P; Maldonado-Ocampo, Javier A

    2011-02-01

    The tropical Andes harbor an extraordinarily varied concentration of species in a landscape under increasing pressure from human activities. Conservation of the region's native plants and animals has received considerable international attention, but the focus has been on terrestrial biota. The conservation of freshwater fauna, particularly the conservation of fishes, has not been emphasized. Tropical Andean fishes are among the most understudied vertebrates in the world. We estimate that between 400 and 600 fish species inhabit the diverse aquatic environments in the region. Nearly 40% of these species are endemic. Tropical Andean fishes are vulnerable to ongoing environmental changes related to deforestation, water withdrawals, water pollution, species introductions, and hydropower development. Additionally, their distributions and population dynamics may be affected by hydrologic alterations and warmer water temperatures associated with projected climate change. Presently, at least three species are considered extinct, some populations are endangered, and some species are likely to decline or disappear. The long-term persistence of tropical Andean fishes will depend on greater consideration of freshwater systems in regional conservation initiatives.

  10. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of the Andean clade and the placement of new Colombian blueberries (Ericaceae, Vaccinieae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pedraza-Penalosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The blueberry tribe Vaccinieae (Ericaceae is particularly diverse in South America and underwent extensive radiation in Colombia where many endemics occur. Recent fieldwork in Colombia has resulted in valuable additions to the phylogeny and as well in the discovery of morphologically noteworthy new species that need to be phylogenetically placed before being named. This is particularly important, as the monophyly of many of the studied genera have not been confirmed. In order to advance our understanding of the relationships within neotropical Vaccinieae and advice the taxonomy of the new blueberry relatives, here we present the most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for the Andean clade. Anthopterus, Demosthenesia, and Pellegrinia are among the putative Andean genera recovered as monophyletic, while other eight Andean genera were not. The analyses also showed that genera that have been traditionally widely defined are non-monophyletic and could be further split into more discrete groups. Four newly discovered Colombian Vaccinieae are placed in the monophyletic Satyria s.s. and the Psammisia I clade. Although these new species are endemic to the Colombian Western Cordillera and Chocó biogeographic region and three are not known outside of Las Orquídeas National Park, they do not form sister pairs.

  11. Uplift of Symmetrical Anchor Plates by Using Grid-Fixed Reinforced Reinforcement in Cohesionless Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamed Niroumand; Khairul Anuar Kassim

    2014-01-01

    Uplift response of symmetrical anchor plates with and without grid fixed reinforced (GFR) reinforcement was evaluated in model tests and numerical simulations by Plaxis. Many variations of reinforcement layers were used to reinforce the sandy soil over symmetrical anchor plates. In the current research, different factors such as relative density of sand, embedment ratios, and various GFR parameters including size, number of layers, and the proximity of the layer to the symmetrical anchor plate were investigated in a scale model. The failure mechanism and the associated rupture surface were observed and evaluated. GFR, a tied up system made of fiber reinforcement polymer (FRP) strips and end balls, was connected to the geosynthetic material and anchored into the soil. Test results showed that using GFR reinforcement significantly improved the uplift capacity of anchor plates. It was found that the inclusion of one layer of GFR, which rested directly on the top of the anchor plate, was more effective in enhancing the anchor capacity itself than other methods. It was found that by including GFR the uplift response was improved by 29%. Multi layers of GFR proved more effective in enhancing the uplift capacity than a single GFR reinforcement. This is due to the additional anchorage provided by the GFR at each level of reinforcement. In general, the results show that the uplift capacity of symmetrical anchor plates in loose and dense sand can be significantly increased by the inclusion of GFR. It was also observed that the inclusion of GFR reduced the requirement for a large L/D ratio to achieve the required uplift capacity. The laboratory and numerical analysis results are found to be in agreement in terms of breakout factor and failure mechanism pattern.

  12. Ice cap melting and low viscosity crustal root explain narrow geodetic uplift of the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chery, Jean; Genti, Manon; Vernant, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    More than 10 years of geodetic measurements demonstrate an uplift rate of 1-3 mm/yr of the high topography region of the Western Alps. By contrast, no significant horizontal motion has been detected. Three uplift mechanisms have been proposed so far: (1) the isostatic response to denudation. However this process is responsible for only a fraction of the observed uplift and (2) the rebound induced by the Wurmian ice cap melting. This process leads to a broader uplifting region than the one evidenced by geodetic observations. (3) a deep source motion associated with slab motion or some deep isostatic unbalance. Using a numerical model accounting for crustal and mantle rheology of the Alps and its foreland, we model the response to Wurmian ice cap melting. We show that a crustal viscosity contrast between the foreland and the central part of the Alps, the later being weaker with a viscosity of 1021 Pa.s, is needed to produce a narrow uplift. The vertical rates are enhanced if the strong uppermost mantle beneath the Moho is interrupted across the Alps, therefore allowing a weak vertical rheological anomaly thanks to the continuity between the low viscosity parts of the crust and mantle. References: Champagnac, J.-D., F. Schlunegger, K. Norton, F. von Blanckenburg, L. M. Abbühl, and M. Schwab (2009), Erosion-driven uplift of the modern Central Alps, Tectonophysics, 474(1-2), 236-249. Vernant, P., F. Hivert, J. Chéry, P. Steer, R. Cattin, and A. Rigo (2013), Erosion-induced isostatic rebound triggers extension in low convergent mountain ranges, geology, 41(4), 467-470.

  13. Distribution of Lutzomyia ayacuchensis, the vector of Andean-type cutaneous leishmaniasis, at different altitudes on the Andean slope of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Eduardo A; Kato, Hirotomo; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Distribution of the vector species is a major risk factor for the endemicity of leishmaniasis. In the present study, the vertical distribution of Lutzomyia (Lu.) ayacuchensis, the vector of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the Ecuadorian Andes, was surveyed at different altitudes (300-2500m above sea level) of the Andean slope. The vector species Lu. ayacuchensis was identified at an altitude of 650m and a higher areas, and higher distribution ratio of the species was observed at higher altitudes. In addition, high ratios of L. (L.) mexicana infection were detected in higher areas, but none in lower populations of sand flies. Since an association between sand fly populations and vector competence is suggested in Lu. ayacuchensis, haplotype analysis was performed on the species from different altitudes of the study areas; however, no apparent difference was observed among populations. These results suggested that Lu. ayacuchensis in Andean slope areas of Ecuador has the potential to transmit L. (L.) mexicana and spread leishmaniasis in these areas.

  14. The role of uplift and erosion in the persistence of saline groundwater in the shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, R. M.; McCoy, K. J.; Voss, C. I.; Sanford, W. E.; Winston, R. B.

    2017-04-01

    In many regions of the world, the shallow (top 1 km of a sedimentary foreland basin dominated by aquitards, where the rate of uplift and erosion (20 m Ma-1) balances that of meteoric flushing. Paleozoic age saline groundwater and brine persist at shallow depths that might otherwise have contained potable water. Similar hydrogeologic conditions, and uplift and erosion rates, likely exist in many other regions of the world, where a moving landscape has probably never been considered as an important contributor to groundwater quality.

  15. The flux-scaling scenario. De Sitter uplift and axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Damian, Cesar; Herschmann, Daniela; Sun, Rui [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Muenchen (Germany); Font, Anamaria [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Non-geometric flux-scaling vacua provide promising starting points to realize axion monodromy inflation via the F-term scalar potential. We show that these vacua can be uplifted to Minkowski and de Sitter by adding an D3-brane or a D-term containing geometric and non-geometric fluxes. These uplifted non-supersymmetric models are analyzed with respect to their potential to realize axion monodromy inflation self-consistently. Admitting rational values of the fluxes, we construct examples with the required hierarchy of mass scales. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Coastal uplift and mortality of intertidal organisms caused by the september 1985 Mexico earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, P; Klinger, T

    1986-09-05

    Coastal uplift associated with the great Mexican earthquake of 19 September 1985 and its principal aftershock produced widespread mortality of intertidal organisms along the coast of the states of Michoacán and Guerrero, Mexico. Measurements of the vertical extent of mortality at ten sites provided estimates of the magnitude of the vertical component of deformation along the coast. Within the affected area, uplift ranged from about 12 centimeters to about 1 meter, and no subsidence was observed. The observations are consistent with models of the tectonic deformation that results from buried slip on a shallow-dipping underthrust fault.

  17. Captivity Shapes the Gut Microbiota of Andean Bears: Insights into Health Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Borbón-García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Andean bear is an endemic species of the tropical Andes who has an almost exclusively plant-based diet. Since herbivorous mammals do not carry enzymes for fiber degradation, the establishment of symbiosis with cellulolytic microorganisms in their gastrointestinal (GI tract is necessary to help them fulfill their nutritional needs. Furthermore, as described for other mammals, a stable, diverse, and balanced gut microbial composition is an indicator of a healthy status of the host; under disturbances this balance can be lost, leading to potential diseases of the host. The goal of this study was to describe the gut microbiota of wild and captive Andean bears and determine how habitat status influences the composition and diversity of the gut symbiotic community. Fecal samples from wild (n = 28 and captive (n = 8 Andean bears were collected in “Reserva Pantano de Martos” and “Fundación Bioandina”, Colombia. Composition and diversity analyses were performed using amplicons from the V4 region of the 16S rDNA gene sequenced using the Ion PGM platform. PICRUSt algorithm was applied to predict the gene content of the gut microbiome of wild and captive Andean bears. A total of 5,411 and 838 OTUs were identified for wild and captive bears, respectively. Captive bears contained a lower number of bacterial phyla (n = 7 compared to wild individuals (n = 9. Proteobacteria (59.03% and Firmicutes (14.03% were the phyla that contributed the most to differences between wild and captive bears (overall dissimilarity = 87.72%. At family level, Enterobacteriaceae drove the main differences between the two groups (13.7%. PICRUSt metagenomics predictions suggested a similar pattern of relative abundance of gene families associated with the metabolism of carbohydrates across samples in wild individuals, despite the taxonomic differences of their gut microbiota. Captivity alters the availability and diversity of food resources, which likely reduces microbiota

  18. Geomechanical modeling of surface uplift around well KB-502 at the in Salah CO2 storage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.; Orlic, B.; Meer, L.G.H. van der; Geel, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Injection of CO2 in the InSalah field has caused uplift of the surface, as observed by satellite geodetic techniques (InSAR). Around one of the wells, KB-502, the uplift shows anomalous behaviour: a two-lobe pattern develops in the direction of the preferred fracture orientation. This indicates the

  19. Geomechanical modeling of surface uplift around well KB-502 at the in Salah CO2 storage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.; Orlic, B.; Meer, L.G.H. van der; Geel, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Injection of CO2 in the InSalah field has caused uplift of the surface, as observed by satellite geodetic techniques (InSAR). Around one of the wells, KB-502, the uplift shows anomalous behaviour: a two-lobe pattern develops in the direction of the preferred fracture orientation. This indicates the

  20. Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  1. Surface Response to Regional Uplift of Madagascar Reveals Short Wavelength Dynamic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, S.; White, N.

    2016-12-01

    The physiography of Madagascar is characterized by high elevation but low relief topography with 42% of the landscape at an elevation grgeater than 500 m. Eocene marine limestones crop out at an elevation of 400 m, extensive low relief erosion surfaces capped by laterites occur at elevations of up to 2 km, and longitudinal river profiles are disequilibrated. Together, these observations suggest that Madagascar underwent regional uplift in Neogene times. Inverse modeling of drainage networks suggests that regional uplift is diachronous and has occurred on wavelengths of 1000 km. The existence of deeply incised river channels together with low-temperature thermochronologic measurements (i.e. AFT, AHe) implies that erosion occurred in response to regional Neogene uplift. Admittance analysis of long wavelength free-air gravity and topography shows that admittance, Z = 45 ± 5 mGal/km. The history of Neogene volcanism and a lack of significant tectonic shortening both suggest that uplift is dynamically supported. Here we present a suite of U-Th dates of emergent coral reef deposits from northern Madagascar, whose margins are sometimes considered `stable'. Elevation of these coeval coral reefs decreases from 7.2 m at the northern tip of Madagascar to sea level 100 km to the south. The existence of a spatial gradient suggests that differential vertical motions occurred during Late Quaternary times. These results raise significant questions about the reliability both of emergent coral reefs as global sea-level markers and the length-scale of variations in dynamic topography.

  2. Advancement Staff and Alumni Advocates: Cultivating LGBTQ Alumni by Promoting Individual and Community Uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Jason C.; Drezner, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a constructivist case-study analysis, we explore philanthropy toward higher education among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) alumni, examining the role of advancement staff and alumni advocates in engaging LGBTQ alumni to promote individual and community uplift. Data come from focus groups with 37 advancement staff and…

  3. Cenozoic episodic uplift and kinematic evolution between the Pamir and Southwestern Tien Shan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongliang; Li, Haibing; Sun, Zhiming; Cao, Yong; Wang, Leizhen; Pan, Jiawei; Han, Liang; Ye, Xiaozhou

    2017-08-01

    The Pamir Salient and Southwestern Tien Shan belong to two different systems, which collided due to the continuous northward drift of the Indian Plate during the Cenozoic, resulting in a shortening of 300 km. The uplift history and kinematic evolution of the Pamir-Southwestern Tien Shan remain unclear. In this study, we chose the 2025 m-thick Pakabulake formation in the East Wuqia section, at the southern-most margin of the Southwestern Tien Shan system, to obtain a high-resolution magnetostratigraphic record spanning 16.61 Ma to 9.78 Ma. Based on its high sedimentation rate, stable ca. E-W paleocurrents and stable magnetic susceptibility values, the nearby Southwestern Tien Shan was inferred to have undergone stable uplift during this period of sedimentation. Combining our results with the previous low-temperature thermochronology, magnetostratigraphy and re-calculated block rotations, we conclude that four episodic uplift events occurred in the Pamir-Southwestern Tien Shan during the Cenozoic, at times of 50-40 Ma, 35-16 Ma, 11-7 Ma and < 5 Ma, and that the first episodic uplift only occurred in the Pamir Salient. In addition, the Pamir Salient underwent a tectonic transformation from entire- to a half-oroclinal bending rotation during the Miocene, caused by activity along the Karakorum Fault and Kashgar-Yecheng Transfer System.

  4. VIBRATING-UPLIFT ROCKING MOTION OF CAISSON BREAKWATERS UNDER VARIOUS BREAKING WAVE IMPACT FORCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuan-zhan; ZHOU Zhi-rong; YANG Hai-dong

    2005-01-01

    Overturning is one of principal failure types of caisson breakwaters and is an essential content of stability examination in caisson breakwater design. The mass-springdashpot model of caisson-foundation system is used to simulate the vibrating-uplift rocking motion of caisson under various types of breaking wave impact forces, i.e., single peak impact force, double peak impact force, and shock-damping oscillation impact force. The effects of various breaking wave types and the uplift rocking motion on dynamic response behaviors of caisson breakwaters are investigated. It is shown that the dynamic responses of a caisson are significantly different under different types of breaking wave impact forces even when the amplitudes of impact forces are equal. Though the rotation of a caisson is larger due to the uplift rocking motion, the displacement, the sliding force and the overturning moment of the caisson are significantly reduced. It provides the theoretical base for the design idea that the uplift rocking motion of caisson is allowed in design.

  5. Rapid bedrock uplift in the Antarctic Peninsula explained by viscoelastic response to recent ice unloading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nield, Grace A.; Barletta, Valentina Roberta; Bordoni, Andrea;

    2014-01-01

    Since 1995 several ice shelves in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula have collapsed and triggered ice-mass unloading, invoking a solid Earth response that has been recorded at continuous GPS (cGPS) stations. A previous attempt to model the observation of rapid uplift following the 2002 breakup of L...

  6. Advancement Staff and Alumni Advocates: Cultivating LGBTQ Alumni by Promoting Individual and Community Uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Jason C.; Drezner, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a constructivist case-study analysis, we explore philanthropy toward higher education among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) alumni, examining the role of advancement staff and alumni advocates in engaging LGBTQ alumni to promote individual and community uplift. Data come from focus groups with 37 advancement staff and…

  7. Use of GRACE data to detect the present land uplift rate in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei Joud, Mehdi S.; Sjöberg, Lars E.; Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2017-05-01

    After more than 13 yr of GRACE monthly data, the determined secular trend of gravity field variation can be used to study the regions of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Here we focus on Fennoscandia where long-term terrestrial and high-quality GPS data are available, and we study the monthly GRACE data from three analysis centres. We present a new approximate formula to convert the secular trend of the GRACE gravity change to the land uplift rate without making assumptions of the ice load history. The question is whether the GRACE-derived land uplift rate by our method is related to GIA. A suitable post-processing method for the GRACE data is selected based on weighted RMS differences with the GPS data. The study reveals that none of the assumed periodic changes of the GRACE gravity field is significant in the estimation of the secular trend, and they can, therefore, be neglected. Finally, the GRACE-derived land uplift rates are obtained using the selected post-processing method, and they are compared with GPS land uplift rate data. The GPS stations with significant differences were marked using a statistical significance test. The smallest rms difference (1.0 mm a-1) was obtained by using GRACE data from the University of Texas.

  8. Tectono-thermal Evolution in the Bachu Uplift,Tarim Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Nansheng; JIANG Guang; MEI Qinghua; WANG Shengjun

    2010-01-01

    The thermal evolution of source rocks in the Paleozoic has long been a problem to petroleum exploration in the Bachu uplift,Tarim basin,since the thermal history in the Paleozoic could not be rebuilt objectively due to lack of effective thermal indicators in the Lower Paleozoic successions.The apatite and zircon(U-Th)/He thermochronometry can be used as a new kind of technique to study the thermal history and tectonic uplift of sedimentary basins.Based on the measured apatite and zircon(U-Th)/He ages,apatite fission track data and equivalence vitrinite reflectance(%EVRo),the tectonothermal histories in 5 wells of the Bachu uplift were modeled.The modeling results show that there was relatively high gradient at the Early Paleozoic in the Bachu uplift and it decreased gradually during the entire Paleozoic: 33-35℃/km in the CambrianOrdovician,32-33℃/km in the Silurian-Devonian,30-32℃/km at the end of Carboniferous and 27.5-31℃/km at the end of Permian.Therefore,the thermal history can be modeled by combining multiple thermal indicators of AFT,(U-Th)/He ages and EVRo data.Especially,this provides a new method to rebuild the thermal history for the Low Paleozoic carbonate successions in the Tarim Basin.

  9. Rapid regional surface uplift of the northern Altiplano plateau revealed by multiproxy paleoclimate reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Nandini; Garzione, Carmala N.; Jaramillo, Carlos; Shanahan, Timothy; Carlotto, Victor; Pullen, Alex; Moreno, Federico; Anderson, Veronica; Moreno, Enrique; Eiler, John

    2016-08-01

    The central Altiplano is inferred to have experienced ∼ 2.5 ± 1km surface uplift between ∼10 and 6 Ma, while the southern Altiplano experienced a similar magnitude of surface uplift that began earlier, between ∼16 and 9 Ma. To properly constrain the along strike timing of the Altiplano plateau surface uplift, it is necessary to know how and when the northernmost part of the Altiplano plateau evolved. We reconstruct the paleoclimate and infer the corresponding paleoelevation from the Miocene-Pliocene deposits of the Descanso-Yauri basin (14-15°S) in the northernmost part of the Altiplano plateau using 4 different proxies, including carbonate clumped isotope composition (i.e., Δ47 values), carbonate δ18Oc, leaf wax δDwax and pollen assemblages from paleosol, lacustrine and palustrine carbonates and organic-rich sediments. The isotopic signatures reflect past climate conditions of mean annual air temperature (Δ47) and meteoric water isotope values (δ18Oc, δDwax). Our results show that the northernmost plateau remained at low elevation (0.9 ± 0.8 to 2.1 ± 0.9km) until late Miocene time (∼9 Ma) characterized by ∼15 °C warmer than modern temperature (mean annual air temperature of 23 ± 4 °C, 2σ), low elevation vegetation and precipitation signature with reconstructed □ δ18Omw (VSMOW) of - 8.3 ± 2.0 ‰ (2 σ) from carbonate (δ18Oc) and - 8.6 ± 1.8 ‰ (2 σ) from leaf wax (δDwax). Modern elevations of 4 km were not reached until 5.4 ± 1.0Ma, as indicated by a negative shift in δDwax (VSMOW) from - 143.4 ± 12.8 ‰ (2 σ) to - 209.2 ± 21.1 ‰ (2 σ) between 9.1 ± 0.7 and 5.4 ± 1.0Ma. The timing of surface uplift of the northernmost Altiplano is consistent with the evidence for late Miocene surface uplift of the central Altiplano (16-19°S) between 10 and 6 Ma, and indicates that regional scale uplift in the northern-central plateau significantly postdates the onset of surface uplift in the southern Altiplano (19-22°S) between ∼16

  10. Seismic Cycle Deformation and Net Coastal Uplift at San Juanillo, Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, A. J.; Marshall, J.; Morrish, S.; Ritzinger, B.; Wellington, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica lies ~60 km inboard of the Middle America Trench where the Cocos Plate subducts under the Caribbean Plate at ~9 cm/yr. This outer fore arc peninsula overlies the seismogenic zone along a mature seismic gap, with an estimated recurrence interval of ~50 yr for large megathrust earthquakes. The last major event (M 7.7, 1950) resulted in 1.0-1.5 m of coseismic uplift along the peninsula's central coast. Since then, gradual coastal subsidence has been observed as the plate interface accumulates interseismic strain. While elastic seismic-cycle deformation produces short-term shoreline fluctuations on the Nicoya Peninsula, net tectonic uplift throughout the Quaternary results in long-term coastal emergence and the formation of marine terraces. At San Juanillo, north of Punta Guiones, emergent carbonate beachrock horizons mark former Holocene shorelines with calibrated radiocarbon ages of 0.9-1.8 ka. The position of these deposits on the upper beach face is consistent with net uplift at ~0.5 m/k.y. Tidal erosion and the undermining of beachrock and adjacent cliffs may reflect coastal inundation associated with the current phase of elastic interseismic subsidence. Inland of the beach, two uplifted marine terraces mark former late Quaternary shorelines with inner edge elevations of ~30 m and ~55 m above mean sea level. The ages of these surfaces are estimated at 80 ka and 125 ka respectively, based on correlation with OSL dated terraces ~80 km to the south and the timing of late Pleistocene sea level high stands (Oxygen Isotope Stages 5a-5e). Long-term net uplift at San Juanillo therefore occurs at a rate of 0.3-0.5 m/k.y. This is the highest uplift rate recorded among seven marine terrace study sites along the Nicoya coast, with the exception of the peninsula's southern tip (Cabo Blanco) where accelerated uplift occurs in response to seamount subduction. Since the 1950 Nicoya earthquake, Costa Rica's population and tourism industry have

  11. Oceans Past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Based on research for the History of Marine Animal Populations project, Oceans Past examines the complex relationship our forebears had with the sea and the animals that inhabit it. It presents eleven studies ranging from fisheries and invasive species to offshore technology and the study of marine...... environmental history, bringing together the perspectives of historians and marine scientists to enhance understanding of ocean management of the past, present and future. In doing so, it also highlights the influence that changes in marine ecosystems have upon the politics, welfare and culture of human...

  12. Dynamic model of vibrating-sliding-uplift rocking coupled motion and dynamic design method of caisson breakwaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yuanzhan; HUA; Leina; DONG; Shaowei

    2004-01-01

    Vibrating, sliding and uplift rocking are three elementary motion types of caisson breakwaters. The dynamic model and the numerical simulation method of vibrating-sliding-uplift rocking coupled motion of caisson breakwaters are developed. The histories of displacement, rotation, sliding force and overturning moment of a caisson breakwater under the excitation of breaking wave impact are calculated for the motion models of vibrating, vibrating-sliding, vibrating-uplift rocking and vibrating-sliding-uplift rocking. The effects of various motion models on the stability of caisson breakwaters are investigated. The feasibility of the dynamic design idea that the sliding motion and the uplift rocking motion of caisson breakwaters are allowed under the excitation of breaking wave impact is discussed.

  13. The Dras arc Complex: lithofacies and reconstruction of a Late Cretaceous oceanic volcanic arc in the Indus Suture Zone, Ladakh Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alastair; Degnan, Paul

    1994-08-01

    are thought to reflect relative sea-level changes, of tectono-magmatic and/or global eustatic origin. The oceanic Dras arc Complex formed within Neotethys in the mid-Late Cretaceous above an assumed northward-dipping subduction zone. Around 79 Ma (Campanian), the oceanic arc underwent collisional deformation, possibly related to accretion to the Trans-Himalaya (Ladakh Block) and/or the southern margin of Eurasia, to form an Andean-type active continental margin. The Suru unit in the west (Dras 1 Sub-unit) was deformed, then overlain by the mainly acidic Dras 2 Sub-unit. However, there is no direct evidence that the Nindam Formation in the east was deformed until the Early Eocene when final collision of India and Eurasia took place, with southward thrusting of the Dras arc Complex. This was followed by partial erosion during deposition of the "Indus molasse", and then back-thrusting and folding related to uplift of the High Himalayas in the later Tertiary.

  14. Modeling ground surface uplift during CO2 sequestration: the case of In Salah, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Finsterle, Stefan; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2016-04-01

    Observable ground deformation, common in storage projects, carries useful information on processes occurring at the injection depth. The Krechba gas field at In Salah (Algeria) is one of the best known sites for studying ground surface deformation during geological storage. Being the first industrial-scale on-shore CO2 demonstration project, the site is well known for satellite-based ground-deformation monitoring data of remarkable quality. In this work, we carry out coupled fluid flow and geomechanical simulations to understand the uplift at three different CO2 injection wells (KB-501, KB-502, KB-503). Previous numerical studies focused on the KB-502 injection well, where a double-lobe uplift pattern has been observed in the ground-deformation data. The observed uplift patterns at KB-501 and KB-503 are different, but also indicate the influence of deep fracture zone mechanical responses. The current study improves the previous modeling approach by introducing an injection reservoir and a fracture zone, both responding to a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. In addition, we model a stress-dependent permeability and bulk modulus, according to a dual continuum model. Mechanical and hydraulic properties were determined through inverse modeling by matching the simulated spatial and temporal evolution of uplift to the corresponding InSAR observations as well as by matching simulated and measured pressures. The numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with observed spatial and temporal variation of ground surface uplift, as well as with measured pressures. The estimated values for the parameterized mechanical and hydraulic properties are in good agreement with previous numerical results, although with uncertainty.

  15. Impact of rock uplift on rates of late Cenozoic Rocky Mountain river incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimaki, Catherine A.; Anderson, Robert S.; Safran, Elizabeth B.

    2007-09-01

    The high relief of the modern Rocky Mountain landscape formed in the late Cenozoic by downcutting of a fluvial network that links a series of easily eroded sedimentary basins across relatively resistant crystalline cores of adjacent ranges. Using a numerical model of fluvial erosion and the flexural isostatic response to the associated unloading, we first calculate the expected pattern and pace of incision caused by rock uplift related to migration of the Yellowstone hot spot and to growth of the northern portion of the Rio Grande rift. Calculated incision rates are <60 m/Myr, and total depth of erosion of sedimentary basins is <300 m, well below the long-term incision rates and amounts of erosion interpreted from the geologic record. Broad-scale tilting of the region toward the east, accomplished by a gradient in rock uplift of ˜1 km along the north-south axis of the central Rockies, declining to zero 1000 km to the east, can account for the additional erosion needed to match observations. In each modeling scenario, stream incision is nonsteady, with rock uplift outpacing erosion for <1 Myr in perimeter basins and 1-5 Myr in interior basins. Three factors dominate the spatial and temporal pattern of regional landscape evolution: (1) the time since uplift began, (2) the uplift pattern, and (3) the distribution of relatively resistant bedrock within the region. Our results suggest that the spatial variability in late Cenozoic exhumation can be explained by a long-lived transience in the stream network response to these various late Cenozoic geophysical events.

  16. Rock-type control on erosion-induced uplift, eastern Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2009-02-01

    There is growing evidence that Quaternary rock uplift in parts of the European Alps is a consequence of climate- and erosion-driven isostatic rebound. Contemporary rates of rock uplift U in the Swiss Alps show two distinctive dome-like peak regions that attain ~ 1.6 mm yr - 1 . We focus on the Alpenrhein catchment and its surroundings, where one of these peak regions spatially coincides with widely exposed Cretaceous Bündner schist and lower Tertiary flysch. Field assessments and analyses of hillslope gradient distributions quantitatively demonstrate the low rock-mass strength and high erodibility of these rocks. This is reflected in mean postglacial catchment erosion rates D ~ 4 mm yr - 1 , as opposed to 0.7 mm yr - 1 in more resistant crystalline rocks. Though largely inferred from landslide- and debris-flow prone tributary catchments export, from the region. We further find that the steepness of bedrock rivers, the density of large landslides, and D correlate with the highest values of U. Our observations highlight the possibility that erosion of mechanically weak Bündner schist and flysch enhanced by large landslides may have contributed to regional crustal unloading, and concomitant rock uplift. Irrespective of whether this is betraying a coupling between long-term uplift and erosion modulated by rock type, our findings indicate that long-term (10 3 to 10 4 yr) geomorphic signals contained in bedrock-river steepness, spatial density of large landslides, and postglacial erosion rates strikingly correlate with regional gradients of historic (10 1 yr) rock uplift rates.

  17. Variation in deformational mechanisms in the Banda Arc: Uplift and tectonic implications of Kisar, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, J. R.; Harris, R. A.; Chiang, H.; Prasetyadi, C.; Shen, C.

    2009-12-01

    Kisar island is an enigmatic feature which reveals anomalous mountain building processes in the forearc basin of the Banda arc-continent collision. The roughly circular uplift rises 3 km from the basin floor to the surface and is surrounded by uplifted coral terraces. The island is near a retrowedge thrust imaged by seismic reflection. Yet, the location, shape, and structures of the island suggest an origin more complex than simple thrusting, such as diapiric activity (i.e. an emergent gneiss dome). Kisar exposes low-grade metasediments with scattered mafic bodies and is similar to the Aileu Fm. on neighboring Timor. Detrital zircon analysis reveals an affinity to Australia’s northern continental margin. The geochemistry of mafic bodies indicates a rift environment, likely related to the breakup of Gondwana. Geothermobarometry and geochronologic data from the Aileu Complex shows the rocks were subducted to a depth of 35 km and have a long-term rock uplift rate calculated at 3-5 mm/yr. However, U-Th series age analyses of uplifted coral terraces on Kisar yield a short-term surface uplift rate of 0.15-0.8 mm/yr. In addition, several loose coral heads found at 10-20m elevation on the south, east, and west coasts yield ages of ~100 years and are likely tsunami deposits from undocumented seismic activity on the Timor trough. These are the first age data from a 400 km stretch of islands between Timor and Tanimbar where the young orogen displays varied deformational mechanisms along strike. Simplified map of southern Banda Arc with Kisar noted.

  18. Hydrocarbon Accumulation and Distribution Characteristics of the Silurian in the Tazhong Uplift of Tarim Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    LÜ, Xiuxiang; BAI, Zhongkai; ZHAO, Fengyun

    Hydrocarbon accumulation of the Silurian in the Tazhong uplift of Tarim basin is characterized by "two sources and three stages". "Two sources" means that the hydrocarbons are derived from two source rocks of the Cambrian and Middle-Upper Ordovician. "Three stages" means that asphalt and movable oil undergoes three hydrocarbon accumulation stages, i.e., Late Caledonian, Late Hercynian, and Yanshanian-Himalayan. The formation of asphalt resulted from the destruction of the hydrocarbons accumulated and migrated in the early stages. The present movable oil, mostly derived from Middle-Upper Ordovician source rock, resulted from the hydrocarbons accumulated in the late stage. There are three types of reservoirs, i.e., anticline structural, stratigraphic lithological, and lava shield reservoirs in the Tazhong uplift. Hydrocarbon accumulation of the Silurian in the Tazhong uplift is controlled by the three factors. (1) The background of uplift structure. Around the ancient uplift, the compounding of many types makes up the composite hydrocarbon accumulation areas. (2) Effective cover. The show of oil gas including asphalt, heavy crude oil, and normal oil is quite active in the Silurian. Asphalt and heavy crude oil are distributed under the red mudstone member and movable oil is distributed under the gray mudstone member. (3) High quality reservoir bed. Sandstone is distributed widely in the Tazhong area. Reservoir pore space can be divided into three types: a) secondary origin-primary origin pore space; b) primary origin-secondary origin pore space, and c) micropore space. Porosity is 3.3-17.4%, and permeability is (0.1-667.97) × 10 -3 μm 2.

  19. Controls on the location of arc volcanoes: an Andean study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Erin; Allen, Mark B.; McCaffrey, Kenneth J. W.; Macpherson, Colin G.; Davidson, Jon P.; Saville, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Depth corrected data of earthquake hypocentres from South America are used to generate new models of depth to the subducting Nazca slab. This new slab model shows a general correlation between the 100 km depth to the slab, the western edge of the Altiplano-Puna Plateau (defined by the 3500 m elevation contour) and the frontal volcanic arc. Across the entire Altiplano-Puna Plateau, volcanic centres are found to be either at or above the 3500 m critical elevation contour, which also defines the cut off for seismogenic thrusting. Normal faults are only found above this critical elevation contour, suggesting that there may be a change in the stress regime associated with high elevations in the plateau. The Salar de Atacama basin (23-24oS) defines a major break in topography on the west side of the Puna Plateau. Here, the volcanism deviates around the eastern edge of the basin, approximately 80 km inland from the general trend of the arc, remaining above the 3500 m elevation contour. The volcanoes bordering the Salar de Atacama have a depth to slab approximately 30 km deeper than those in the adjacent arc segment 200 km to the north of the basin. Across this distance there is no significant difference in subduction parameters such as the slab dip, subduction rate and age of the oceanic plate entering the trench. It is likely, therefore, that melt forms at the same depth in both locations, as the factors affecting the melt source are constant. However, in the case of the Salar de Atacama region, magma is diverted to the east due to preferential emplacement under the higher elevations of the plateau. We suggest that although mantle and subduction processes have a primary control on the location of arc volcanoes, shaping the general trend of the arc, they cannot explain anomalies from the trend. Such anomalies, such as the arc deviation around the Atacama basin, can be explained by the influence of structures and stress regime within the overriding plate.

  20. 'Andean-centred' genera in the short-branch clade of Annonaceae: testing biogeographical hypotheses using phylogeny reconstruction and molecular dating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirie, M.D.; Chatrou, L.W.; Mols, J.B.; Erkens, R.H.J.; Oosterhof, J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim We test biogeographical hypotheses regarding the origin of Andean-centred plant groups by reconstructing phylogeny in the short-branch clade (SBC) of Annonaceae, and estimating the timing of diversifications in four apparently Andean-centred genera: Cremastosperma R.E.Fr., Klarobelia Chatrou, Ma

  1. Constraints on the origin and evolution of magmas in the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, Quaternary Andean Back-arc of Western Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernando, I.R.; Aragón, E.; Frei, R.; González, P.D.; Spakman, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field (Pleistocene–Holocene) is located in the Andean back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone, western Argentina, and is contemporaneous with the Andean volcanic arc at the same latitude. It includes two polygenetic, mostly trachytic volcanoes: Payún Matrú (with a summit cald

  2. Evolution and variability of the Asian monsoon and its potential linkage with uplift of the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Ryuji; Zheng, Hongbo; Clift, Peter D.

    2016-12-01

    Uplift of the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau (HTP) and its linkage with the evolution of the Asian monsoon has been regarded as a typical example of a tectonic-climate linkage. Although this linkage remains unproven because of insufficient data, our understanding has greatly advanced in the past decade. It is thus timely to summarize our knowledge of the uplift history of the HTP, the results of relevant climate simulations, and spatiotemporal changes in the Indian and East Asian monsoons since the late Eocene. Three major pulses of the HTP uplift have become evident: (1) uplift of the southern and central Tibetan Plateau (TP) at ca. 40-35 Ma, (2) uplift of the northern TP at ca. 25-20 Ma, and (3) uplift of the northeastern to eastern TP at ca. 15-10 Ma. Modeling predictions suggest that (i) uplift of the southern and central TP should have intensified the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and the Somali Jet at 40-35 Ma; (ii) uplift of the northern TP should have intensified the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM), as well as the desertification of inland Asia at 25-20 Ma; and (iii) uplift of the northeastern and eastern TP should have further intensified the EASM and EAWM at 15-10 Ma. We tested these predictions by comparing them with paleoclimate data for the time intervals of interest. There are insufficient paleoclimate data to test whether the ISM and Somali Jet intensified with the uplift of the southern and central TP at 40-35 Ma, but it is possible that such uplift enhanced erosion and weathering that drew down atmospheric CO2 and resulted in global cooling. There is good evidence that the EASM and EAWM intensified, and desertification started in inland Asia at 25-20 Ma in association with the uplift of the northern TP. The impact of the uplift of the northeastern and eastern TP on the Asian monsoon at 15-10 Ma is difficult to evaluate because that interval was also a time of global cooling and Antarctic glaciation that might also

  3. Deforestation and benthic indicators: how much vegetation cover is needed to sustain healthy Andean streams?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Iñiguez-Armijos

    Full Text Available Deforestation in the tropical Andes is affecting ecological conditions of streams, and determination of how much forest should be retained is a pressing task for conservation, restoration and management strategies. We calculated and analyzed eight benthic metrics (structural, compositional and water quality indices and a physical-chemical composite index with gradients of vegetation cover to assess the effects of deforestation on macroinvertebrate communities and water quality of 23 streams in southern Ecuadorian Andes. Using a geographical information system (GIS, we quantified vegetation cover at three spatial scales: the entire catchment, the riparian buffer of 30 m width extending the entire stream length, and the local scale defined for a stream reach of 100 m in length and similar buffer width. Macroinvertebrate and water quality metrics had the strongest relationships with vegetation cover at catchment and riparian scales, while vegetation cover did not show any association with the macroinvertebrate metrics at local scale. At catchment scale, the water quality metrics indicate that ecological condition of Andean streams is good when vegetation cover is over 70%. Further, macroinvertebrate community assemblages were more diverse and related in catchments largely covered by native vegetation (>70%. Our results suggest that retaining an important quantity of native vegetation cover within the catchments and a linkage between headwater and riparian forests help to maintain and improve stream biodiversity and water quality in Andean streams affected by deforestation. This research proposes that a strong regulation focused to the management of riparian buffers can be successful when decision making is addressed to conservation/restoration of Andean catchments.

  4. Prevalence and patterns of hypertension in Peruvian Andean Hispanics: the PREVENCION study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Zea-Diaz, Humberto; Morey-Vargas, Oscar L; Bolaños-Salazar, Juan F; Postigo-Macdowall, Mauricio; Paredes-Díaz, Sheyla; Corrales-Medina, Fernando; Valdivia-Ascuña, Zoila; Cuba-Bustinza, Carolina; Villalobos-Tapia, Paola; Muñoz-Atahualpa, Edgar; Chirinos-Pacheco, Julio; Raij, Leopoldo; Chirinos, Julio A

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is emerging as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. Population-based data regarding the prevalence of hypertension and hypertension subtypes in Andean Hispanic populations are scarce. The authors performed a population-based study that included 1878 Peruvian Andean adults to determine: (1) the prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension and (2) the relative frequency of hypertension subtypes (systolic vs. diastolic). The prevalence of hypertension was 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.0%-17.4%), did not differ by gender, and increased steeply with age, particularly in women. Awareness, treatment, and control rates were 47.9%, 39.5%, and 14%, respectively. Diastolic blood pressure increased until age 50 years and reached a plateau thereafter, whereas mean arterial pressure continued to increase with age even after age 50 years. Furthermore, in sharp contrast with the United States population, the predominant type of hypertension was systodiastolic (41.7%; 95% CI, 35.1%-48.5%). Isolated systolic hypertension accounted for only 29.3% of cases (95% CI, 23.9%-35.4%) and was responsible for a minority of cases in all age groups before age 70 years. Hypertension subtypes in this Andean population seem to differ significantly from those present in the United States population, with a much larger proportion of systodiastolic and diastolic hypertension even with advanced age. These differences result from interactions between hemodynamic and structural factors, and further studies aimed at characterizing their genetic and environmental determinants and implications in end-organ damage and prognosis in this population may contribute to understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  5. The potential impact of new Andean dams on Amazon fluvial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Bruce R; Melack, John M; Dunne, Thomas; Barthem, Ronaldo B; Goulding, Michael; Paiva, Rodrigo C D; Sorribas, Mino V; Silva, Urbano L; Weisser, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Increased energy demand has led to plans for building many new dams in the western Amazon, mostly in the Andean region. Historical data and mechanistic scenarios are used to examine potential impacts above and below six of the largest dams planned for the region, including reductions in downstream sediment and nutrient supplies, changes in downstream flood pulse, changes in upstream and downstream fish yields, reservoir siltation, greenhouse gas emissions and mercury contamination. Together, these six dams are predicted to reduce the supply of sediments, phosphorus and nitrogen from the Andean region by 69, 67 and 57% and to the entire Amazon basin by 64, 51 and 23%, respectively. These large reductions in sediment and nutrient supplies will have major impacts on channel geomorphology, floodplain fertility and aquatic productivity. These effects will be greatest near the dams and extend to the lowland floodplains. Attenuation of the downstream flood pulse is expected to alter the survival, phenology and growth of floodplain vegetation and reduce fish yields below the dams. Reservoir filling times due to siltation are predicted to vary from 106-6240 years, affecting the storage performance of some dams. Total CO2 equivalent carbon emission from 4 Andean dams was expected to average 10 Tg y-1 during the first 30 years of operation, resulting in a MegaWatt weighted Carbon Emission Factor of 0.139 tons C MWhr-1. Mercury contamination in fish and local human populations is expected to increase both above and below the dams creating significant health risks. Reservoir fish yields will compensate some downstream losses, but increased mercury contamination could offset these benefits.

  6. Genetic control of the seed coat colour of Middle American and Andean bean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possobom, Micheli Thaise Della Flora; Ribeiro, Nerinéia Dalfollo; Zemolin, Allan Emanoel Mezzomo; Arns, Fernanda Daltrozo

    2015-02-01

    Seed coat colour of bean seeds is decisive for acceptance of a cultivar. The objectives of this research were to determine whether there is maternal effect for "L", a* and b* colour parameters in Middle American and Andean bean seeds; to obtain estimates of heritability and gain with selection for "L", a* and b* values; and select recombinants with the seed coat colour required by the market demand. Thus, controlled crossings were carried out between the Middle American lines CNFP 10104 and CHC 01-175, and between the Andean lines Cal 96 and Hooter, for obtaining F1, F1 reciprocal, F2 and F2 reciprocal generations for each hybrid combination. Parents and generations were evaluated in two field experiments (2012 normal rainy and 2013 dry seasons) in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Seed coat colour was quantified with a portable colorimeter. Genetic variability for "L" (luminosity), chromaticity a* (green to red shade), and chromaticity b* (blue to yellow shade) values was observed in seeds with F2 seed coat of Middle American and Andean beans. "L", a* and b* values in bean seeds presented maternal effects. High broad-sense heritability are observed for luminosity (h(2)b: 76.66-95.07%), chromaticity a* (h(2)b: 73.08-89.31%), and chromaticity b* (h(2)b: 88.63-92.50%) values in bean seeds. From the crossings, it was possible to select bean seeds in early generation for the black group, and for carioca and cranberry types (dark or clear background) which present the colour required by the market demand.

  7. Identifying positive selection candidate loci for high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigham Abigail W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-altitude environments (>2,500 m provide scientists with a natural laboratory to study the physiological and genetic effects of low ambient oxygen tension on human populations. One approach to understanding how life at high altitude has affected human metabolism is to survey genome-wide datasets for signatures of natural selection. In this work, we report on a study to identify selection-nominated candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in one highland group, Andeans from the South American Altiplano. We analysed dense microarray genotype data using four test statistics that detect departures from neutrality. Using a candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism-based approach, we identified genes exhibiting preliminary evidence of recent genetic adaptation in this population. These included genes that are part of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF pathway, a biochemical pathway involved in oxygen homeostasis, as well as three other genomic regions previously not known to be associated with high-altitude phenotypes. In addition to identifying selection-nominated candidate genes, we also tested whether the HIF pathway shows evidence of natural selection. Our results indicate that the genes of this biochemical pathway as a group show no evidence of having evolved in response to hypoxia in Andeans. Results from particular HIF-targeted genes, however, suggest that genes in this pathway could play a role in Andean adaptation to high altitude, even if the pathway as a whole does not show higher relative rates of evolution. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaptation and provide a basis for genotype/phenotype association studies that are necessary to confirm the role of putative natural selection candidate genes and gene regions in adaptation to altitude.

  8. Deforestation and benthic indicators: how much vegetation cover is needed to sustain healthy Andean streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos; Leiva, Adrián; Frede, Hans-Georg; Hampel, Henrietta; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Deforestation in the tropical Andes is affecting ecological conditions of streams, and determination of how much forest should be retained is a pressing task for conservation, restoration and management strategies. We calculated and analyzed eight benthic metrics (structural, compositional and water quality indices) and a physical-chemical composite index with gradients of vegetation cover to assess the effects of deforestation on macroinvertebrate communities and water quality of 23 streams in southern Ecuadorian Andes. Using a geographical information system (GIS), we quantified vegetation cover at three spatial scales: the entire catchment, the riparian buffer of 30 m width extending the entire stream length, and the local scale defined for a stream reach of 100 m in length and similar buffer width. Macroinvertebrate and water quality metrics had the strongest relationships with vegetation cover at catchment and riparian scales, while vegetation cover did not show any association with the macroinvertebrate metrics at local scale. At catchment scale, the water quality metrics indicate that ecological condition of Andean streams is good when vegetation cover is over 70%. Further, macroinvertebrate community assemblages were more diverse and related in catchments largely covered by native vegetation (>70%). Our results suggest that retaining an important quantity of native vegetation cover within the catchments and a linkage between headwater and riparian forests help to maintain and improve stream biodiversity and water quality in Andean streams affected by deforestation. This research proposes that a strong regulation focused to the management of riparian buffers can be successful when decision making is addressed to conservation/restoration of Andean catchments.

  9. Analysis of the drought resilience of Andosols on southern Ecuadorian Andean páramos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Iñiguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neotropical Andean grasslands above 3500 m a.s.l. known as "páramo" offer remarkable ecological services for the Andean region. Most important is the water supply – of excellent quality – to many cities and villages established in the lowlands of the inter-Andean valleys and to the coast. However, the páramo ecosystem is under constant and increased threat by human activities and climate change. In this paper we study the resilience of its soils for drought periods during the period 2007–2013. In addition, field measurements and hydrological conceptual modelling at the catchment-scale are comparing two contrasting catchments in the southern Ecuadorian Andes. Both were intensively monitored during two and a half years (2010–2012 in order to analyse the temporal variability of the soil moisture storage. A typical catchment on the páramo at 3500 m a.s.l. was compared to a lower grassland one at 2600 m a.s.l. The main aim was to estimate the resilience capacity of the soils during a drought period and the recovery during a subsequent wet period. Local soil water content measurements in the top soil (first 30 cm through TDR were used as a proxy for the catchment's average soil moisture storage. The local measurements were compared to the average soil water storage as estimated by the probabilistic soil moisture (PDM model. This conceptual hydrological model with 5 parameters was calibrated and validated for both catchments. The study reveals the extraordinary resilience capacity of this type of shallow organic soils during the droughts in 2009 and 2010. During these droughts, the soil water content dropped from a normal value of about 0.80 to ~ 0.60 cm3 cm−3, while the recovery time was only two to three months.

  10. Single origin and subsequent diversification of central Andean endemic Umbilicaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestmark, Geir; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Kauff, Frank; Fraker, Emily; Molnar, Katalin; Lutzoni, François

    2011-01-01

    We studied an Andean endemic group of species of the lichen-forming fungal genus Umbilicaria from the subalpine and low-alpine zone, with their biogeographic center in Bolivia and Peru. A number of species and varieties have been described from this element, but apparent instability in several morphological traits has made it difficult to precisely delimit taxa. Based on DNA sequences of nuclear ITS, LSU and mitochondrial SSU from extensive collections from Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, we present here a molecular phylogenetic analysis of this Andean endemic element within genus Umbilicaria. All analyses (MP, ML and Bayesian) support a single origin for the element and a division into two major groups characterized by different apothecium types: the Umbilicaria dichroa group and U. calvescens group. Taxa U. krempelhuberi, U. peruviana and U. subcalvescens are nested withinn U. calvescens and are treated as conspecific with the latter species. The endemic element shares a most recent common ancestor with the Umbilicaria vellea group, which has a worldwide distribution and contains several asexually reproducing (sorediate) species. Independent reversals to sexual reproduction might explain the evolution of two types of apothecia in this monophyletic endemic lineage. A number of cosmopolitan, mostly high-alpine, species of Umbilicaria also present in the central Andes are related only remotely to the endemic element and do not exhibit speciation into endemics. Because the An-dean element dominates the Umbilicaria habitats of the low- and subalpine zones we propose that the founder colonized the Andes at a time when the mountains had not yet reached their current elevation while the high-alpine species arrived more recently.

  11. [Decriminalizing traditional Andean medicine: an interview with Walter Álvarez Quispe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Walter Álvarez; Loza, Carmen Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Walter Álvarez Quispe, a Kallawaya healer and biomedical practitioner specializing in general surgery and gynecology, presents the struggle of traditional and alternative healers to get their Andean medical systems depenalized between 1960 and 1990. Bolivia was the first country in Latin America and the Caribbean to decriminalize traditional medicine before the proposals of the International Conference on Primary Health Care (Alma-Ata, 1978). The data provided by the interviewee show that the successes achieved, mainly by the Kallawayas, stem from their own independent initiative. These victories are not the result of official policies of interculturality in healthcare, although the successes achieved tend to be ascribed to them.

  12. Physics in the Andean Countries: A Perspective from Condensed Matter, Novel Materials and Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, P.

    2009-05-01

    We will discuss the current state of R&D in the fields of condensed matter, novel materials, and nanotechnology in the Andean nations. We will initially consider Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) to then visualize individual developments, as well as those for the region as a whole in these fields of knowledge in each of the nations constituting the Andean Region (Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Venezuela, Peru, and Colombia). Based on Science & Technology watch exercises in the countries involved, along with the Iberian American and Inter-American Science & Technology Network of Indicators (Red de indicadores de Ciencia y Tecnolog'ia (RICYT) iberoamericana e interamericana)1, we will reveal statistical data that will shed light on the development in the fields mentioned. As will be noted, total R&D investment in Latin American and Caribbean countries remained constant since 1997. In spite of having reached a general increase in publications without international collaboration in LAC nations, the countries with greatest research productivity in Latin America (Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, and Chile) have strengthened their international collaboration with the United States, France, Germany, and Italy through close links associated with the formation processes of their researchers. Academic and research integration is evaluated through joint authorship of scientific articles, evidencing close collaboration in fields of research. This principle has been used in the creation of cooperation networks among participating nations. As far as networks of research on condensed matter, novel materials, and nanotechnology, the Andean nations have not consolidated a regional network allowing permanent and effective cooperation in research and technological development; as would be expected, given their idiomatic and cultural similarities, their historical background, and geographical proximity, which have been integrating factors in other research areas or socio-economic aspects. This

  13. Plasma soluble erythropoietin receptor is decreased during sleep in Andean highlanders with Chronic Mountain Sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Villafuerte, Francisco C.; Corante, Noemí; Anza-Ramírez, Cecilia; Figueroa-Mujíca, Rómulo; Vizcardo-Galindo, Gustavo; Mercado, Andy; Macarlupú, José Luis; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Excessive erythrocytosis (EE) is the main sign of Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a highly prevalent syndrome in Andean highlanders. Low pulse O2 saturation (SpO2) during sleep and serum androgens have been suggested to contribute to EE in CMS patients. However, whether these factors have a significant impact on the erythropoietin (Epo) system leading to EE is still unclear. We have recently shown that morning soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR), an endogenous Epo antagonist, is decreased in CMS pa...

  14. Role of carbon and climate in forming the Páramo, an Andean evolutionary hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    According to a number of genetic diversification measures the Páramo grasslands of the high equatorial Andes show the greatest rates of speciation on the planet. This is probably driven by contrasting ranges of the ecosystem between glacial and interglacial periods of the Pleistocene. During the warm interglacial periods the treeline is high in the Andes restricting the Páramos to the highest regions of the Andean mountain chain, while in the cool glacial periods the Páramo areas expand and probably coalesce, bringing isolated populations into contact with each other. The origin of the Páramo ecosystem is placed close to the end of the Pliocene and has been related to the finale of regional Andean mountain building. However, this formation date is also coincident with the global cooling at the end of the Pliocene, as Northern Hemisphere glaciation and the bipolar Pleistocene ice ages begin. Furthermore, it is estimated that atmospheric CO2 concentrations dropped from the 400 ppmv typical of the Pliocene to values more typical of the Pleistocene at around this time. Global climate model simulations, coupled with a high resolution biome model, give us the opportunity to test these competing hypotheses for the formation of the Páramo ecosystem. A series of HadCM3 climate model simulations are presented here varying the height of the highest altitude Andes and the global climate from its pre-industrial state to the Pliocene. The climate are topographic changes are varied both independently and together. These climatologies are then used to drive a high-resolution biome model, BIOME4, and simulate the impact on Andean vegetation. These models seem to reproduce the observed changes in high altitude grassland biomes during the Pliocene. The climate and biome modelling presented here show that the climate changes associated with the Plio-Pleistocene boundary are the primary cause of the initial formation of this unique and important ecosystem. Although the reduction

  15. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A Is Associated with Chronic Mountain Sickness in the Andean Population

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Jose R.; Alvarez, Giancarlo; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Ju Preciado, Hugo F.; Macarlupu, Jose-Luis; Rivera-Ch, Maria; Rodriguez, Jorge; Favier, Judith; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Espinoza, Jose R., Giancarlo Alvarez, Fabiola León-Velarde, Hugo F. Ju Preciado, Jose-Luis Macarlupu, Maria Rivera-Ch, Jorge Rodriguez, Judith Favier, Anne-Paule Gimenez-Roqueplo, and Jean-Paul Richalet. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A is associated with chronic mountain sickness in Andean population. High Alt Med Biol. 15:146–154, 2014.—A study of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) with a candidate gene—vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA)—was carried out in a Peruvian population l...

  16. The genus Phyllophaga Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the Colombian Andean Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Luis Fernando; Wolff, Martha

    2013-01-01

    The number of species in the genus Phyllophaga Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in Colombia is updated to 33. This group represents one of the most common components of the "white grubs" complex, known to damage important agricultural crops, especially in the Colombian Andean Mountains. A commented taxonomic history of the genus is provided, including five new records for the country (P. schizorhina, P. onoreana, P. densata, P. guanacasteca, and P. gigantea) and Phyllophaga tesorito is described as a new species. A key to the identification of male specimens of 30 species is included with a catalogue illustrating their key structures. Finally, aspects related to their ecological importance, geographic distribution, and phenology are discussed.

  17. Contribution to Andean flora from Oyón District , Lima, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Kahn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the inventory of vascular plants of high mountains (altitudes of 4000-4810 m from northeast Oyon district, Lima, Peru is presented. Specimens were collected during March to May 2014 and 2015 and September to November 2015. 47 families, 112 genera and 181 species are reported, of which 94 were the first record for Lima region. For each species are given collector names, collect number and elevation. New local botanical inventories are needed for better evaluating the diversity, species distribution patterns and endemism in the high Andean vegetation.

  18. Submergence and Uplift Associated to Paleoearthquakes in the Northern Sunda Subduction System: Implications for Future Earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, D. R.; McHugh, C. M.; Mortlock, R. A.; Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Akhter, S. H.; Mustaque, S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies documented that the northern part of the Sunda subduction zone ruptured several times in the past 1500 years including one in 1762. To better understand megathrust surface ruptures and the hazards associated to them, we surveyed the SE coast of Bangladesh along the Teknaf peninsula and the Saint Martin anticline by dating coral microatolls of Porites lutea species by the U-Th dating method. Porites luteagrows a few centimeters below the low tide level creating a 5-12 mm thick skeletal band per year, which makes them a good indicator of relative sea level change that might be caused during tectonic submergence and uplift. U-Th ages were obtained from coral slabs and their growth bands interpreted from x-rays. The corals and marine terraces uplift were measured with high precision RTK GPS and modeled with high resolution DEM. The coral microatolls along the St. Martin anticline were dated to be ~ 250, 800 and 1300 years old. Since storm and other climatic phenomenon cannot cause uplift, we interpret that 2.5 m uplift was caused by 1762 earthquake that killed the coral microatolls. The coral slabs show three growth interruptions, where skeletal growth bands continued to grow onlapping the older growth bands. These growth onlaps could be the result of smaller uplift events after 1762 that did not result in coral mortality. The subsidence history extracted from vertical growth of the slabs suggests that the island is submerging at a rate of 11 mm/year. Corals growing 250 m from the dead coral colony post date the 1762 earthquake. Today living Porites lutea can be found 2.5 m below the dead coral heads and 9 cm above the spring low tide. The elevation of marine terraces (T1, T2 and T3) along the Teknaf coast is 2.5 m, 5-7 m and 11-13 m above sea level, respectively. A shell bed on top of T1 was dated at 1763 (dated by C14). This and the other two terraces could have been uplifted during the three earthquakes dated from coral microatolls. Considering the

  19. Complex Drainage Response To Migrating Tectonic Uplift: Example From The Northern California Coast Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, J.; Furlong, K. P.

    Migration of the Mendocino triple junction in northern California produces rapid and dramatic changes in the processes and patterns of crustal deformation. In response to this tectonism, the river systems of the northern California Coast Ranges have devel- oped a complex drainage history and pattern. The tectonic response to this migrating triple junction is described by the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor model (MCC), which predicts a spatially and temporally varying pattern of crustal deformation and up- lift. We use a combination of geomorphic and geophysical observations, coupled with landscape evolution modeling to develop the links between the geomorphic observa- tions in the Coast Ranges and the uplift/subsidence pattern predicted by the MCC. In contrast to many previous landscape evolution studies that find that streams typically cut through or are diverted around growing structures, in the northern California Coast Ranges drainage reversal and stream capture appear to be the response to tectonism. Our landscape evolution modeling shows that the uplift predicted by the MCC pro- duces: (1) a topographic gradient that switches from trending northwest to southeast, causing streams that at first flow to the northwest to reverse and drain to the south- east, (2) drainage divides that migrate in concert with the triple junction, and (3) river evolution that will result in fish hooked drainage patterns, all characteristics similar to those observed in the Northern California Coast Ranges. The uplift/subsidence pat- tern in the northern Coast Ranges is further complicated by the interaction of a second tectonic driver - the Pioneer fragment. The Pioneer fragment migrates with the Pacific (south of the triple junction) and creates a mini-slab window, adjacent to the coast, to produce a superimposed secondary uplift/subsidence pattern. The effects of this Pioneer related uplift are recorded by the Eel River. Key to the complex evolution of river systems in northern

  20. Well-being, social capital and international migration. The case of the Latin American and Andean Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Leal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to introduce the concept of Latin American and Andean Spain. In order to do this the author collects data about the massive migration between Latin America and the Andean region to Spain. Then, two theoretical perspectives are proposed as an explanation of this phenomenon: push and pull theory, linked to the concept of well-being, and social capital theory associated with the concept of migration network. In third place, it is analyzed some evidence from Colombia that supports the theoretical framework. Finally, contemporary return migration dynamics from Spain are discussed

  1. Observations of mesoscale and boundary-layer scale circulations affecting dust transport and uplift over the Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Marsham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the Saharan boundary layer, made during the GERBILS field campaign, show that mesoscale land surface temperature variations (which were related to albedo variations induced mesoscale circulations. With weak winds along the aircraft track, land surface temperature anomalies with scales of greater than 10 km are shown to significantly affect boundary-layer temperatures and winds. Such anomalies are expected to affect the vertical mixing of the dusty and weakly stratified Saharan Residual Layer (SRL. Mesoscale variations in winds are also shown to affect dust loadings in the boundary layer.

    Using the aircraft observations and data from the COSMO model, a region of local dust uplift, with strong along-track winds, was identified in one low-level flight. Large eddy model (LEM simulations based on this location showed linearly organised boundary-layer convection. Calculating dust uplift rates from the LEM wind field showed that the boundary-layer convection increased uplift by approximately 30%, compared with the uplift rate calculated neglecting the convection. The modelled effects of boundary-layer convection on uplift are shown to be larger when the boundary-layer wind is decreased, and most significant when the mean wind is below the threshold for dust uplift and the boundary-layer convection leads to uplift which would not otherwise occur.

    Both the coupling of albedo features to the atmosphere on the mesoscale, and the enhancement of dust uplift by boundary-layer convection are unrepresented in many climate models, but may have significant impacts on the vertical transport and uplift of desert dust. Mesoscale effects in particular tend to be difficult to parametrise.

  2. Shape and amount of the Quaternary uplift of the western Rhenish shield and the Ardennes (western Europe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, A.; Hallot, E.

    2009-09-01

    A good evaluation of the Quaternary uplift of the Rhenish shield is a key element for the understanding of the Cenozoic geodynamics of the western European platform in front of the alpine arc. Previous maps of the massif uplift relied on fluvial incision data since the time of the rivers' Younger Main Terrace to infer a maximum post-0.73 Ma uplift of ~ 290 m in the SE Eifel. Here, we propose a new interpretation of the incision data of the intra-massif streams, where anomalies in the terrace profiles would result from knickpoint retreat in the tributaries of the main rivers rather than from tectonic deformation. We also use additional geomorphological data referring to (1) deformed Tertiary planation surfaces, (2) the history of stream piracy that severely affected the Meuse basin in the last 1 Ma, and (3) incision data outside the Rhenish shield. A new map of the post-0.73 Ma uplift of the Rhenish shield is drawn on the basis of this enlarged dataset. It reduces the maximum amount of tectonic uplift in the SE Eifel to ~ 140 m and modifies the general shape of the uplift, namely straightening its E-W profile. It is also suggested that an uplift wave migrated across the massif, starting from its southern margin in the early Pleistocene and currently showing the highest intensity of uplift in the northern Ardennes and Eifel. These features seem to favour an uplift mechanism chiefly related to lithospheric folding and minimize the impact on the topography of a more local Eifel plume.

  3. Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-05-15

    Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

  4. Miocene orographic uplift forces rapid hydrological change in the southern central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Sachse, Dirk; Mulch, Andreas; Pingel, Heiko; Tofelde, Stefanie; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-10-01

    Rainfall in the central Andes associated with the South American Monsoon and the South American Low-Level Jet results from orographic effects on atmospheric circulation exerted by the Andean Plateau and the Eastern Cordillera. However, despite its importance for South American climate, no reliable records exist that allow decoding the evolution of thresholds and interactions between Andean topography and atmospheric circulation, especially regarding the onset of humid conditions in the inherently dry southern central Andes. Here, we employ multi-proxy isotope data of lipid biomarkers, pedogenic carbonates and volcanic glass from the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina and present the first long-term evapotranspiration record. We find that regional eco-hydrology and vegetation changes are associated with initiation of moisture transport via the South American Low-Level Jet at 7.6 Ma, and subsequent lateral growth of the orogen at 6.5 Ma. Our results highlight that topographically induced changes in atmospheric circulation patterns, not global climate change, were responsible for late Miocene environmental change in this part of the southern hemisphere. This suggests that mountain building over time fundamentally controlled habitat evolution along the central Andes.

  5. Sombrero uplift above the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body: evidence of a ballooning mid-crustal diapir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, Yuri; Pearse, Jill

    2012-10-12

    The Altiplano-Puna ultralow-velocity zone in the central Andes, South America, is the largest active magma body in Earth's continental crust. Space geodetic observations reported an uplift in the Altiplano-Puna proper at a rate of ~10 mm/year; however, the nature of the inferred inflation source has been uncertain. We present data showing that the uplift has persisted at a nearly constant rate over the past two decades, and is surrounded by a broad zone of subsidence. We show that the ongoing uplift and peripheral subsidence may result from a large mid-crustal diapir fed by partial melt from the Altiplano-Puna Magma Body.

  6. Age estimates and uplift rates for Late Pleistocene marine terraces: Southern Oregon portion of the Cascadia Forearc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Miller, Gifford H.; Kennedy, George L.; Whelan, Joseph F.; McInelly, Galan W.

    1990-05-01

    Marine terraces are prominent landforms along the southern Oregon coast, which forms part of the forearc region of the Cascadia subduction zone. Interest in the Cascadia subduction zone has increased because recent investigations have suggested that slip along plates at certain types of convergent margins is characteristically accompanied by large earthquakes. In addition, other investigations have suggested that convergent margins can be broadly classified by the magnitude of their uplift rates. With these hypotheses in mind, we generated new uranium series, amino acid, and stable isotope data for southern Oregon marine terrace fossils. These data, along with terrace elevations and two alternative estimates of sea level at the time of terrace formation, allow us to determine terrace ages and uplift rates. Uranium series analysis of fossil coral yields an age of 83±5 ka for the Whisky Run terrace at Coquille Point in Bandon, Oregon. A combination of amino acid and oxygen isotope data suggest ages of about 80 and 105 ka for the lowest two terraces at Cape Blanco. These ages indicate uplift rates of 0.45-1.05 and 0.81-1.49 m/kyr for Coquille Point and Cape Blanco, respectively. Late Quaternary uplift rates of marine terraces yield information about deformation in the overriding plate, but it is unclear if such data vary systematically with convergent margin type. In order to assess the utility of the southern Oregon uplift rates for predicting the behavior of the Cascadia subduction zone, we compared late Quaternary uplift rates derived from terrace data from subduction zones around the world. On the basis of this comparison the southern Oregon rates of vertical deformation are not unusually high or low. Furthermore, late Quaternary uplift rates show little relationship to the type of convergent margin. These observations suggest that local structures may play a large role in uplift rate variability. In addition, while the type of convergent margin may place an

  7. The Western Solomons Forearc: Independent Inner and Outer Forearc Paleo-Uplift Histories and Relationship to Megathrust Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Lavier, L. L.; Papabatu, A. K.; Toba, T.; Shen, C. C.; Cai, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Solomons forearc has undergone repeated uplifts that probably were coseismic and similar to that during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 megathrust rupture that raised the outer forearc as much as 2.5 m. A parallel swath of the inner forearc subsided ~0.5 m during the 2007 event. The Western Solomons is ideal for crustal motion measurements because both the outer forearc above the seismogenic zone and the inner forearc are occupied by reef-fringed islands enabling land-based measurements of vertical displacements. U-series and 14C dating of uplifted corals and microatolls has provided the ages for a number of paleo-uplift events that we infer to have been coseismic. While the outer forearc has uplifted rapidly in late Holocene time at rates from ~1 to 8 mm/yr, the inner forearc has risen at only 0 - 1.1 mm/yr. It is notable that the inner and outer forearcs are separated by an arc-parallel boundary along which there is little or no net uplift. However, although both the inner and outer forearcs have late Quaternary histories of relatively rapid net uplift, they appear to have quite different uplift histories. The outer forearc has uplifted several times over the past 1000 years by as much as several meters in each event. Although the inner forearc subsided during the 2007 event and should subside during all events that ruptured the seismogenic zone beneath the outer forearc, it also has undergone abrupt late Holocene uplifts that do not correspond to those of the outer forearc. But the most surprising difference between the inner and outer forearcs is that 8-9 ka corals in growth position and emerged solution notches were found in a number of inner forearc sites adjacent to corals of the ~6 ka mid-Holocene high sea level that was a little higher than present sea level. Because sea level at 8-9 ka was 10-20 m lower than present in this region, 10-20 m of uplift is required between 8-9 ka and 6 ka during one or more tectonic events. Some of the 9 ka corals have

  8. Tectonic and erosion-driven uplift in the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom; Watts, Tony; Bell, Robin; Jamieson, Stewart; Finn, Carol; Damaske, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms leading to intraplate mountain building remains a significant challenge in Earth Sciences compared to ranges formed along plate margins. The most enigmatic intraplate mountain range on Earth is the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) located in the middle of the Precambrian East Antarctic Craton. During the International Polar Year, the AGAP project acquired 120,000 line km of new airborne geophysical data (Bell et al., 2011, Science) and seismological observations (Hansen et al., 2010, EPSL) across central East Antarctica. Models derived from these datasets provide new geophysical perspectives on crustal architecture and possible uplift mechanisms for the enigmatic GSM (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature). The geophysical data define a 2,500-km-long Paleozoic to Mesozoic rift system in East Antarctica surrounding the GSM. A thick high-density lower crustal root is partially preserved beneath the range and has been interpreted as formed during the Proterozoic assembly of East Antarctica. Rifting could have triggered phase/density changes at deep crustal levels, perhaps restoring some of the latent root buoyancy, as well as causing rift-flank uplift. Permian rifting is well-established in the adjacent Lambert Rift, and was followed by Cretaceous strike-slip faulting and transtension associated with Gondwana break-up; this phase may have provided a more recent tectonic trigger for the initial uplift of the modern GSM. The Cretaceous rift-flank uplift model for the Gamburtsevs is appealing because it relates the initiation of intraplate mountain-building to large-scale geodynamic processes that led to the separation of Greater India from East Antarctica. It is also consistent with several geological and geophysical interpretations within the Lambert Rift. However, recent detrital thermochrology results from Oligocene-Quaternary sediments in Prydz Bay (Tochlin et al., 2012, G3) argue against the requirement for major Cretaceous rift

  9. Consistent and inconsistent truncations. General results and the issue of the correct uplifting of solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Pons, J M; Pons, Josep M.; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We clarify the existence of two different types of truncations of the field content in a theory, the consistency of each type being achieved by different means. A proof is given of the conditions to have a consistent truncation in the case of dimensional reductions induced by independent Killing vectors. We explain in what sense the tracelessness condition found by Scherk and Scharwz is not only a necessary condition but also a {\\it sufficient} one for a consistent truncation. The reduction of the gauge group is fully performed showing the existence of a sector of rigid symmetries. We show that truncations originated by the introduction of constraints will in general be inconsistent, but this fact does not prevent the possibility of correct upliftings of solutions in some cases. The presence of constraints has dynamical consequences that turn out to play a fundamental role in the correctness of the uplifting procedure.

  10. Seismic image of the Ivanhoe Lake Fault Zone in the Kapuskasing Uplift of the Canadian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianjun; Mereu, Robert F.; Percival, John A.

    1992-02-01

    The Kapuskasing uplift, located in the central Canadian shield, represents an oblique exposure of the Archean middle to lower crust. The Ivanhoe Lake fault zone, believed to be the basal thrust carrying the high-grade rocks of the Kapuskasing zone over the low-grade Abitibi greenstone belt, holds the key to understanding the nature and evolution of the Kapuskasing uplift. Despite numerous geological and geophysical studies, including LITHOPROBE deep seismic reflection profiles, and because of very limited bedrock exposure in the area, the shallow structure of the Ivanhoe Lake fault zone remains obscure. Here we present results obtained by reprocessing data from a LITHOPROBE seismic reflection profile across the fault zone. For the first time, the Ivanhoe Lake fault zone is clearly imaged on the seismic section as a series of west-dipping reflectors with an average dip of 20°, which can be traced to the surface. The results support the conclusion that fault zones form good reflectors.

  11. Simulation and modal analysis of the uplift device of a sugarcane harvester using virtual prototype technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ying-chun; LI Shang-ping

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the uplift device of a sugarcane harvester was built up in Pro/Engineer. Simulation and evaluation of its motional and dynamic performance were performed with the automatic dynamic analysis of mechanical system (ADAMS). ANSYS program was applied to the structural analysis of the model. A finite element analytic model was built up with the bottom-up methodology and was meshed. The default Block Lanczos method was used to work out the native frequency. The results indicate that the five lower modes-the transpotaion wheel, the left holding device, the right holding device, the left cutter disk, and the right cutter disk- and displacement of vibratory type only slightly affect the process of sugarcane harvester and harvesting quality. So it is advisable that the optimization of the static intensity other than the dynamic stiffness of uplift device be executed.

  12. The High Arctic Large Igneous Province Mantle Plume caused uplift of Arctic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Jennifer; Ernst, Richard; Hadlari, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The Sverdrup Basin is an east-west-trending extensional sedimentary basin underlying the northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The tectonic history of the basin began with Carboniferous-Early Permian rifting followed by thermal subsidence with minor tectonism. Tectonic activity rejuvenated in the Hauterivian-Aptian by renewed rifting and extension. Strata were deformed by diapiric structures that developed during episodic flow of Carboniferous evaporites during the Mesozoic and the basin contains igneous components associated with the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). HALIP was a widespread event emplaced in multiple pulses spanning ca. 180 to 80 Ma, with igneous rocks on Svalbard, Franz Josef Island, New Siberian Islands, and also in the Sverdrup Basin on Ellef Ringnes, Axel Heiberg, and Ellesmere islands. Broadly contemporaneous igneous activity across this broad Arctic region along with a reconstructed giant radiating dyke swarm suggests that HALIP is a manifestation of large mantle plume activity probably centred near the Alpha Ridge. Significant surface uplift associated with the rise of a mantle plume is predicted to start ~10-20 my prior to the generation of flood basalt magmatism and to vary in shape and size subsequently throughout the LIP event (1,2,3) Initial uplift is due to dynamical support associated with the top of the ascending plume reaching a depth of about 1000 km, and with continued ascent the uplift topography broadens. Additional effects (erosion of the ductile lithosphere and thermal expansion caused by longer-term heating of the mechanical lithosphere) also affect the shape of the uplift. Topographic uplift can be between 1 to 4 km depending on various factors and may be followed by subsidence as the plume head decays or become permanent due to magmatic underplating. In the High Arctic, field and geochronological data from HALIP relevant to the timing of uplift, deformation, and volcanism are few. Here we present new evidence

  13. Surface uplift and time-dependent seismic hazard due to fluid-injection in eastern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzaei, M.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    US states such as Texas and Oklahoma that produce high-volumes of unconventional oil and gas, are facing a sharp increase in seismicity. Observations of the associated surface deformation and accompanying physical models that unequivocally link the seismicity and waste water injection are scarce. Here, we find that the waste water injection in eastern Texas causes uplift, detectable using radar interferometric data. Combining the uplift and injection data through a poroelastic model allows for the resolution of a complex crustal distribution of hydraulic conductivity and pore pressure. We find that the ~5 years pore pressure increase is capable of triggering the 17 May 2012, Mw 4.8 earthquake, the largest event recorded in east Texas. This study shows that surface deformation data are vital in order to constrain the spatiotemporal variations of the stress field in the vicinity of injection sites.

  14. The deep Earth origin of the Iceland plume and its effects on regional surface uplift and subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Hassan, Rakib; Flament, Nicolas; Müller, Dietmar

    2017-02-01

    The present-day seismic structure of the mantle under the North Atlantic Ocean indicates that the Iceland hotspot represents the surface expression of a deep mantle plume, which is thought to have erupted in the North Atlantic domain during the Palaeocene. The spatial and temporal evolution of the plume since its eruption is still highly debated, and little is known about its deep mantle history. Here, we use palaeogeographically constrained global mantle flow models to investigate the evolution of deep Earth flow beneath the North Atlantic since the Jurassic. The models show that over the last ˜ 100 Myr a remarkably stable pattern of convergent flow has prevailed in the lowermost mantle near the tip of the African Large Low-Shear Velocity Province (LLSVP), making it an ideal plume nucleation site. We extract model dynamic topography representative of a plume beneath the North Atlantic region since eruption at ˜ 60 Ma to present day and compare its evolution to available offshore geological and geophysical observations across the region. This comparison confirms that a widespread episode of Palaeocene transient uplift followed by early Eocene anomalous subsidence can be explained by the mantle-driven effects of a plume head ˜ 2500 km in diameter, arriving beneath central eastern Greenland during the Palaeocene. The location of the model plume eruption beneath eastern Greenland is compatible with several previous models. The predicted dynamic topography is within a few hundred metres of Palaeocene anomalous subsidence derived from well data. This is to be expected given the current limitations involved in modelling the evolution of Earth's mantle flow in 3-D, particularly its interactions with the base of a heterogeneous lithosphere as well as short-wavelength advective upper mantle flow, not captured in the presented global models.

  15. Two Extreme Climate Events of the Last 1000 Years Recorded in Himalayan and Andean Ice Cores: Impacts on Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. G.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Davis, M. E.; Kenny, D. V.; Lin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In the last few decades numerous studies have linked pandemic influenza, cholera, malaria, and viral pneumonia, as well as droughts, famines and global crises, to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Two annually resolved ice core records, one from Dasuopu Glacier in the Himalaya and one from the Quelccaya Ice Cap in the tropical Peruvian Andes provide an opportunity to investigate these relationships on opposite sides of the Pacific Basin for the last 1000 years. The Dasuopu record provides an annual history from 1440 to 1997 CE and a decadally resolved record from 1000 to 1440 CE while the Quelccaya ice core provides annual resolution over the last 1000 years. Major ENSO events are often recorded in the oxygen isotope, insoluble dust, and chemical records from these cores. Here we investigate outbreaks of diseases, famines and global crises during two of the largest events recorded in the chemistry of these cores, particularly large peaks in the concentrations of chloride (Cl-) and fluoride (Fl-). One event is centered on 1789 to 1800 CE and the second begins abruptly in 1345 and tapers off after 1360 CE. These Cl- and F- peaks represent major droughts and reflect the abundance of continental atmospheric dust, derived in part from dried lake beds in drought stricken regions upwind of the core sites. For Dasuopu the likely sources are in India while for Quelccaya the sources would be the Andean Altiplano. Both regions are subject to drought conditions during the El Niño phase of the ENSO cycle. These two events persist longer (10 to 15 years) than today's typical ENSO events in the Pacific Ocean Basin. The 1789 to 1800 CE event was associated with a very strong El Niño event and was coincidental with the Boji Bara famine resulting from extended droughts that led to over 600,000 deaths in central India by 1792. Similarly extensive droughts are documented in Central and South America. Likewise, the 1345 to 1360 CE event, although poorly documented

  16. Andean Adakites: Products of Slab Melting, Magma Evolution in Thickened Crust and Crustal Recycling by Forearc Subduction Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, S. M.; Kay, R. W.; Goss, A.

    2009-12-01

    Adakites in the southern and central Andes show a residual garnet signature that can variously be related to local slab melting associated with subduction of hot oceanic crust at the Chile Triple Junction, widespread interaction of mafic magmas in regions of thickened crust, and episodic melting of crust removed by forearc subduction erosion, particularly at times of frontal arc migration. Among the most convincing slab-melt adakites on Earth are the late Miocene Cerro Pampa type dacitic adakites east of the Chile Triple Junction whose low 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7028-0.7033) and high Sr contents (up to 2300 ppm) are difficult to explain by any other mechanism. Elsewhere the appearance of transient extreme adakitic signatures at times of frontal arc migration can be explained by forearc subduction erosion and the evolution of magmas at deep crustal levels in a contractional regime provided the crust is thick. Transient steep adakitic-like REE patterns at times of arc migration fit with forearc crust being transported down the subduction channel, entering the tip of the asthenospheric wedge and being incorporated into the arc mantle source. Evidence for a genetic link for transient adakite signatures, arc migration and forearc subduction erosion comes from changing isotopic ratios in mafic magmas erupted before and after arc migration on the edges of the Chilean flat-slab near 27°S and 34°S (Kay et al 2005) where the arc front has migrated up to 50 km eastward in the last 8 Ma. The chemistry of these mafic magmas cannot be explained by enriched mantle or incorporation of subducted sediments or in situ crust. Sharp increases in 87Sr/86Sr ratios and transient steep REE patterns in Andean arc rocks erupted in the final stages of Cretaceous to early Tertiary magmatic cycles at 21°S to 26°S (see Haschke et al. 2002) can also be attributed to forearc subduction erosion. Forearc subduction erosion provides a better explanation for the formation of Aleutian and Central

  17. Slow and delayed deformation and uplift of the outermost subduction prism following ETS and seismogenic slip events beneath Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Earl E.; Villinger, Heinrich; Sun, Tianhaozhe

    2015-01-01

    Two ODP CORK (Ocean Drilling Program circulation obviation retrofit kit) borehole hydrologic observatory sites deployed in 2002 at the toe of the subduction prism off Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica were visited in December 2013. The five years of seafloor and formation fluid pressure data collected since the previous visit include clear signals associated with an episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event off the coast of Nicoya Peninsula in 2009, and a Mw 7.6 subduction thrust earthquake beneath the Peninsula in 2012. Formation pressure anomalies associated with the ETS event are similar to ones observed following ETS events observed previously here, as well as ones following very low frequency earthquake swarms within the Nankai accretionary prism off southwestern Japan. Positive and negative impulsive transients in the hanging wall and foot wall of the subduction thrust, respectively, suggest contractional and dilatational strain generated by local slip propagating up the thrust fault beneath the outermost prism. In the case of the 2009 event, the transients occurred roughly two weeks after the initiation of slip observed at GPS sites along the adjacent coast. At the same time, a decrease in seafloor pressure at the prism site relative to the subducting plate was observed, indicating concurrent uplift of the prism of 1.2 cm. Other events at the prism toe following ETS events closer to the coast are seen in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011. The time between the initiation of ETS slip constrained by GPS and the onset of the prism toe transients suggest up-dip “rupture” propagation along the seaward part of the subduction thrust at rates of a few km/day. In the case of the 2009 event, the slip at the prism toe (c. 11 cm), estimated from the 1.2 cm uplift and the local dip on the decollement (6°), is roughly a factor of 5 greater than the slip further landward estimated from GPS data by Dixon et al. (in press). In other cases, slip at the toe is less or unresolvable

  18. Lower Paleogene Tectonostratigraphy of Balochistan: Evidence for Time-Transgressive Late Paleocene-Early Eocene Uplift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Clyde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of lithofacies, paleoflow directions, and sandstone petrography of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene paralic and continental sediments exposed along the transpressional suture zone of the western margin of the Indian plate indicate that the process of deformation and uplift of the carbonate shelf in this area had started by late Paleocene time. This tectonic uplift and deformation is documented by: (1 an overall shallowing upward synorogenic sequence of sediments, (2 proximal conglomerate facies (consisting of lower Paleocene and Mesozoic clasts dominating in the western part of the study area and distal facies of sandstone and shale dominating in the eastern part of the study area, (3 the existence of an unconformity of late Paleocene-early Eocene age in the Quetta and Kalat regions, (4 paleocurrent directions in deltaic and fluvial deposits indicating southeastward flowing sediment dispersal paths during late Paleocene-early Eocene time, which is opposite to that found in the late Cretaceous, suggesting a reversal in the depositional slope of the Cretaceous shelf, and (5 petrographic study of sandstones indicating a collision suture/fold thrust belt provenance. This episode of uplift and deformation could be the result of India-Arabian transpression with associated ophiolite obduction or, more likely, to represent the local response to initial India-Asia contact. The unroofing pattern and uplift geometry of the western Indian shelf suggests that this tectonism first started in the southern part of the study area (Kalat-Khuzdar area during the late Paleocene-early Eocene and proceeded northward in a time-transgressive fashion.

  19. Recent uplift of the Atlantic Atlas (offshore West Morocco): Tectonic arch and submarine terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabdellouahed, M.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Rabineau, M.; Biari, Y.; Hafid, M.; Duarte, J. C.; Schnabel, M.; Baltzer, A.; Pedoja, K.; Le Roy, P.; Reichert, C.; Sahabi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Re-examination of marine geophysical data from the continental margin of West Morocco reveals a broad zone characterized by deformation, active faults and updoming offshore the High Atlas (Morocco margin), situated next to the Tafelney Plateau. Both seismic reflection and swath-bathymetric data, acquired during Mirror marine geophysical survey in 2011, indicate recent uplift of the margin including uplift of the basement. This deformation, which we propose to name the Atlantic Atlas tectonic arch, is interpreted to result largely through uplift of the basement, which originated during the Central Atlantic rifting stage - or even during phases of Hercynian deformation. This has produced a large number of closely spaced normal and reverse faults, ;piano key faults;, originating from the basement and affecting the entire sedimentary sequence, as well as the seafloor. The presence of four terraces in the Essaouira canyon system at about 3500 meters water depth and ;piano key faults; and the fact that these also affect the seafloor, indicate that the Atlantic Atlas is still active north of Agadir canyon. We propose that recent uplift is causing morphogenesis of four terraces in the Essaouira canyon system. In this paper the role of both Canary plume migration and ongoing convergence between the African and Eurasian plates in the formation of the Atlantic Atlas are discussed as possibilities to explain the presence of a tectonic arch in the region. The process of reactivation of passive margins is still not well understood. The region north of Agadir canyon represents a key area to better understand this process.

  20. Erosion-driven uplift in the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxman, G. J. G.; Watts, A. B.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.; Bell, R. E.; Jamieson, S. S. R.; Finn, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    The relative roles of climate and tectonics in mountain building have been widely debated. Central to this debate is the process of flexural uplift in response to valley incision. Here we quantify this process in the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, a paradoxical tectonic feature in cratonic East Antarctica. Previous studies indicate that rifting and strike-slip tectonics may have provided a key trigger for the initial uplift of the Gamburtsevs, but the contribution of more recent valley incision remains to be quantified. Inverse spectral (free-air admittance and Bouguer coherence) methods indicate that, unusually for continents, the coherence between free-air gravity anomalies and bedrock topography is high (>0.5) and that the elastic thickness of the lithosphere is anomalously low (erosion are quantified: dendritic fluvial incision overprinted by Alpine-style glacial erosion in the Gamburtsevs and outlet glacier-type selective linear erosion in the Lambert Rift, part of the East Antarctic Rift System. 3D flexural models indicate that valley incision has contributed ca. 500 m of peak uplift in the Gamburtsevs and up to 1.2 km in the Lambert Rift, which is consistent with the present-day elevation of Oligocene-Miocene glaciomarine sediments. Overall, we find that 17-25% of Gamburtsev peak uplift can be explained by erosional unloading. These relatively low values are typical of temperate mountain ranges, suggesting that most of the valley incision in the Gamburtsevs occurred prior to widespread glaciation at 34 Ma. The pre-incision topography of the Gamburtsevs lies at 2-2.5 km above sea-level, confirming that they were a key inception point for the development of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Tectonic and/or dynamic processes were therefore responsible for ca. 80% of the elevation of the modern Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains.

  1. A long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete from exposure dating of marine terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Alfimov, V.; Kubik, P. W.; Fassoulas, C.; Palumbo, L.

    2009-04-01

    The island of Crete in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction zone has a rugged topography with a relief exceeding 2 km. Rock uplift rates of 2-4 mm/a were estimated previously from raised Late Holocene shorelines (Lambeck, 1995) but may not be representative on longer timescales, because earthquakes with up to 9 m of coseismic uplift have recently affected Crete (Stiros, 2001). Here we use marine terraces near Kato Zakros to quantify the long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete. Our field investigations and topographic profiles document a flight of at least 15 marine bedrock terraces carved into limestone bedrock. Age constraints for the terraces were obtained by 36Cl exposure dating of bedrock samples and 10Be dating of sandstone cobbles found on some terraces. Our results suggest that the terraces T4 and T5 at elevations of 68 and 76 m, respectively, formed during sea level highstands associated with marine isotope stage 5e, i.e. ~125 ka ago. Correlating the other terraces (T1 to T11) to a sea-level curve for the Red Sea (Siddall et al., 2003) indicates an uplift rate of 0.5-0.6 mm/a during the last 400 ka; significantly lower than previous estimates based on the elevation of Late Holocene shorelines. References Lambeck, K. (1995), Late Pleistocene and Holocene sea-level change in Greece and SW Turkey - a separation of eustatic, isostatic and tectonic contributions. Geophys. J. Int. 122, 1022-1044. Siddall, M., Rohling, E.J., Almogi-Labin, A., Hemleben, C., Meischner, D., Schmelzer, I., and Smeed, D.A. (2003), Sea-level fluctuations during the last glacial cycle. Nature, 423, 853-858. Stiros, S.C. (2001), The AD 365 Crete earthquake and possible seismic clustering during the fourth to sixth centuries AD in the Eastern Mediterranean: a review of historical and archaeological data. J. Struct. Geol., 23, 545-562.

  2. 10D massive type IIA supergravities as the uplift of parabolic M2-brane torus bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Restuccia, Alvaro [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Dept. de Fisica

    2016-04-15

    We remark that the two 10D massive deformations of the N = 2 maximal type IIA supergravity (Romans and HLW supergravity) are associated to the low energy limit of the uplift to 10D of M2-brane torus bundles with parabolic monodromy linearly and non-linearly realized respectively. Romans supergravity corresponds to M2-brane compactified on a twice-punctured torus bundle. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Uncompahgre Uplift Project, Montrose Quadrangle, Colorado. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-04-01

    The quadrangle includes portions of the Colorado Plateau and southern Rocky Mountains Physiographic Provinces. The entire area of the Gunnison Uplift and parts of the Uncompahgre and Sawatch Uplifts are included. A part of the Piceance Basin and a segment of the Rio Grande Rift Valley are also included. A basement complex of Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks is exposed in the core of the Gunnison and Sawatch Uplifts in the Southern Rocky Mountains. Jurassic and Cretaceous age sedimentary rocks lie directly on the Precambrian basement in most places. They lie on Paleozoic rocks at the west edge of the Sawatch Uplift in the north-central part of the quadrangle. Triassic beds are mapped only in the canyon of the Uncompahgre River near the southwest corner of the quadrangle. A suite of Tertiary volcanics and some sedimentary rocks occupy extensive areas. Plutonic rocks of Tertiary and laramide age occupy only a small part of the quadrangle. The literature consulted included information on about 100 separate occurrences of radioactive minerals and/or anomalous radioactivity within the quadrangle. Many fracture and stratigraphically controlled forms are reported. Most of these occurrences are clustered in three areas: Cochetopa Creek, Cebolla Creek, and Marshall Pass. Important uranium production is recorded from deposits in the Cochetopa Creek and Marshall Pass areas. A total of 220 anomalies in the uranium channel meet the minimum requirements as defined in the Interpretation methods section of Volume I of this report. A few of them appear to be related to known economic deposits, and provide examples for comparison with anomalies in other parts of the quadrangle where radioactive mineral occurrences have not been reported.

  4. Cenozoic uplift on the West Greenland margin: active sedimentary basins in quiet Archean terranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jess, Scott; Stephenson, Randell; Brown, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is believed by some authors to have experienced tectonically induced uplift within the Cenozoic. Examination of evidence, onshore and offshore, has been interpreted to imply the presence of kilometre scale uplift across the margins of the Barents Sea, North Sea, Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea. Development of topography on the West Greenland margin (Baffin Bay), in particular, has been subject to much discussion and dispute. A series of low temperature thermochronological (AFT and AHe) studies onshore and interpretation of seismic architecture offshore have suggested uplift of the entire margin totalling ~3km. However, challenges to this work and recent analysis on the opposing margin (Baffin Island) have raised questions about the validity of this interpretation. The present work reviews and remodels the thermochronological data from onshore West Greenland with the aim of re-evaluating our understanding of the margin's history. New concepts within the discipline, such as effect of radiation damage on Helium diffusivity, contemporary modelling approaches and denudational mapping are all utilised to investigate alternative interpretations to this margins complex post rift evolution. In contrast to earlier studies our new approach indicates slow protracted cooling across much of the region; however, reworked sedimentary samples taken from the Cretaceous Nuussuaq Basin display periods of rapid reheating and cooling. These new models suggest the Nuussuaq Basin experienced a tectonically active Cenozoic, while the surrounding Archean basement remained quiet. Faults located within the basin appear to have been reactivated during the Palaeocene and Eocene, a period of well-documented inversion events throughout the North Atlantic, and may have resulted in subaerial kilometre scale uplift. This interpretation of the margin's evolution has wider implications for the treatment of low temperature thermochronological data and the geological history of the North

  5. The recycled orogenic sand provenance from an uplifted thrust belt, Betic Cordillera, Southern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Critelli, Salvatore; Arribas Mocoroa, José; Le Pera, Emilia; Tortosa, A; Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; Latter, Kelly K.

    2003-01-01

    The Betic Cordillera of southern Spain represents an uplifted foreland fold–thrust belt. Source rock types of the Betic Cordillera include metamorphic (mainly phyllite, schist, quartzite, and gneiss), sedimentary (siliciclastic and carbonate), volcanic (felsic to intermediate pyroclasts), and mantle-derived (peridotite, gabbro, serpentinite, and serpentine schist) rocks. The fluvial systems range that transect the Betic Cordillera are the major detrital source of sediment ...

  6. Two new trans-Andean species of Imparfinis Eigenmann & Norris, 1900 (Siluriformes: Heptapteridae from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Ortega-Lara

    Full Text Available Two new species of Imparfinis are described from the trans-Andean region of Colombia. Imparfinis timana is diagnosed by having longer anal fin base (12.4-15.5% in SL, in combination with long adipose fin (24.6-31.3% in SL, 5-6 gill rakers on the first ceratobranchial, 42-43 vertebrae and additional measurements. Imparfinis usmai is distinguished by the combination of first ray of dorsal fin longest, but not projected as a long filament, long adipose fin (21.1-27.0% in SL, maxillary barbel exceeding pelvic-fin base, 39-40 vertebrae, upper caudal-fin lobe pointed and longer than lower lobe, lower lobe rounded, 7-8 gill rakers on the first ceratobranchial, as well as additional measurements. Imparfinis timana is only known from río Guarapas, a small tributary of the upper course of the río Magdalena. Imparfinis usmai is broadly distributed in the upper basin of ríos Cauca and Magdalena, and in the lower Patía river basin. The restricted distribution of I. nemacheir to trans-Andean drainages (Atrato, Magdalena, and Lago de Maracaibo is also discussed.

  7. Diverse tulasnelloid fungi form mycorrhizas with epiphytic orchids in an Andean cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Juan Pablo; Weiss, Michael; Abele, Andrea; Garnica, Sigisfredo; Oberwinkler, Franz; Kottke, Ingrid

    2006-11-01

    The mycorrhizal state of epiphytic orchids has been controversially discussed, and the state and mycobionts of the pleurothallid orchids, occurring abundantly and with a high number of species on stems of trees in the Andean cloud forest, were unknown. Root samples of 77 adult individuals of the epiphytic orchids Stelis hallii, S. superbiens, S. concinna and Pleurothallis lilijae were collected in a tropical mountain rainforest of southern Ecuador. Ultrastructural evidence of symbiotic interaction was combined with molecular sequencing of fungi directly from the mycorrhizas and isolation of mycobionts. Ultrastructural analyses displayed vital orchid mycorrhizas formed by fungi with an imperforate parenthesome and cell wall slime bodies typical for the genus Tulasnella. Three different Tulasnella isolates were obtained in pure culture. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear rDNA sequences from coding regions of the ribosomal large subunit (nucLSU) and the 5.8S subunit, including parts of the internal transcribed spacers, obtained directly from the roots and from the fungal isolates, yielded seven distinct Tulasnella clades. Tulasnella mycobionts in Stelis concinna were restricted to two Tulasnella sequence types while the other orchids were associated with up to six Tulasnella sequence types. All Tulasnella sequences are new to science and distinct from known sequences of mycobionts of terrestrial orchids. The results indicate that tulasnelloid fungi, adapted to the conditions on tree stems, might be important for orchid growth and maintenance in the Andean cloud forest.

  8. Research Priorities for the Conservation and Sustainable Governance of Andean Forest Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah-Lan Mathez-Stiefel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The long-term survival of Andean forest landscapes (AFL and of their capacity to contribute to sustainable development in a context of global change requires integrated adaptation and mitigation responses informed by a thorough understanding of the dynamic and complex interactions between their ecological and social components. This article proposes a research agenda that can help guide AFL research efforts for the next 15 years. The agenda was developed between July 2015 and June 2016 through a series of workshops in Ecuador, Peru, and Switzerland and involved 48 researchers and development experts working on AFL from different disciplinary perspectives. Based on our review of current research and identification of pressing challenges for the conservation and sustainable governance of AFL, we propose a conceptual framework that draws on sustainability sciences and social–ecological systems research, and we identify a set of high-priority research goals and objectives organized into 3 broad categories: systems knowledge, target knowledge, and transformation knowledge. This paper is intended to be a reference for a broad array of actors engaged in policy, research, and implementation in the Andean region. We hope it will trigger collaborative research initiatives for the continued conservation and sustainable governance of AFL.

  9. Humans permanently occupied the Andean highlands by at least 7 ka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Randall; Stefanescu, Ioana C; Garcia-Putnam, Alexander; Aldenderfer, Mark S; Clementz, Mark T; Murphy, Melissa S; Llave, Carlos Viviano; Watson, James T

    2017-06-01

    High-elevation environments above 2500 metres above sea level (m.a.s.l.) were among the planet's last frontiers of human colonization. Research on the speed and tempo of this colonization process is active and holds implications for understanding rates of genetic, physiological and cultural adaptation in our species. Permanent occupation of high-elevation environments in the Andes Mountains of South America tentatively began with hunter-gatherers around 9 ka according to current archaeological estimates, though the timing is currently debated. Recent observations on the archaeological site of Soro Mik'aya Patjxa (8.0-6.5 ka), located at 3800 m.a.s.l. in the Andean Altiplano, offer an opportunity to independently test hypotheses for early permanent use of the region. This study observes low oxygen (δ(18)O) and high carbon (δ(13)C) isotope values in human bone, long travel distances to low-elevation zones, variable age and sex structure in the human population and an absence of non-local lithic materials. These independent lines of evidence converge to support a model of permanent occupation of high elevations and refute logistical and seasonal use models. The results constitute the strongest empirical support to date for permanent human occupation of the Andean highlands by hunter-gatherers before 7 ka.

  10. [Key to chironomid pupal exuviae (Diptera: Chironomidae) of tropical high Andean streams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Narcís; González-Trujillo, Juan David; Ospina-Torres, Rodulfo

    2014-12-01

    The Chironomidae is a cosmopolitan family of Nematoceran flies with more than 20,000 species described. However the diversity of genera and species of the family in the Andean region beyond the 2,000 m.a.s.l are scarcely known. We conducted faunal surveys and biomonitoring research in different streams of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru from May 2005 to October 2011. Based on specimens collections, a taxonomic key was developed to identify pupae and pupal exuviae of 46 genera of midges (Diptera, Chironomidae) collected from streams at high altitude areas on the Andean tropical mountains. We included illustrations and brief taxonomic descriptions for all genera, of which several ones have not yet been formally described; in this latter case we used the nomenclature of Roback & Coffman (1983). For two genera, Cricotopus and Genus 1, keys to the most com- mon morphospecies were provided. Results showed that in this area the chironomid assemblages are dominated by the members of the subfamily Orthocladiinae (22 genera) followed by the Chironominae (13). Six genera of Tanypodinae were identified, while only three and two genera were present from subfamilies Podonominae and Diamesinae. This key may be very useful for both studies about drift in streams, and for biomonitoring purposes.

  11. Humans permanently occupied the Andean highlands by at least 7 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Ioana C.; Garcia-Putnam, Alexander; Aldenderfer, Mark S.; Clementz, Mark T.; Murphy, Melissa S.; Llave, Carlos Viviano; Watson, James T.

    2017-01-01

    High-elevation environments above 2500 metres above sea level (m.a.s.l.) were among the planet's last frontiers of human colonization. Research on the speed and tempo of this colonization process is active and holds implications for understanding rates of genetic, physiological and cultural adaptation in our species. Permanent occupation of high-elevation environments in the Andes Mountains of South America tentatively began with hunter–gatherers around 9 ka according to current archaeological estimates, though the timing is currently debated. Recent observations on the archaeological site of Soro Mik'aya Patjxa (8.0–6.5 ka), located at 3800 m.a.s.l. in the Andean Altiplano, offer an opportunity to independently test hypotheses for early permanent use of the region. This study observes low oxygen (δ18O) and high carbon (δ13C) isotope values in human bone, long travel distances to low-elevation zones, variable age and sex structure in the human population and an absence of non-local lithic materials. These independent lines of evidence converge to support a model of permanent occupation of high elevations and refute logistical and seasonal use models. The results constitute the strongest empirical support to date for permanent human occupation of the Andean highlands by hunter–gatherers before 7 ka. PMID:28680685

  12. Composition and diversity of High Andean in the Fauna Production Reserve Chimborazo, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Caranqui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study inquire the floristic diversity of 9 sampling in four plots of 1 m² of high andean in several locations in the “Reserva de Producción de Fauna Chimborazo”. For the development of this study, we used an adaptation of the method of plots “Gloria”. With coverage (% in each of the plots, Further the diversity indices and similarity with respective analysis were obtained. The data obtained reflect a diversity that can range from medium to low, believe that this is due to anthropogenic activities that have taken place in these ecosistems. With the presence mostly Calamagrostis intermedia, it could establish that the type of vegetation is herbaceous in high andean is higher percentage; is the species that is almost always present in most types of vegetation of the RPF Chimborazo and high dominance that influences the results of low floristic diversity indices was found in the analysis. As a result the most abundant family Asteraceae is well Poaceae.

  13. A 1700-year Record of Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures and High-altitude Andean Climate Derived from the Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. G.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Davis, M. E.; Lin, P.

    2010-12-01

    Stable isotopic, aerosol, and physical stratigraphy provided by new ice-core records from the Quelccaya ice cap (5670 masl) in Peru provide annual time series of tropical climatic and environmental variations extending back to 315 AD. These records present an opportunity to extract new information about links between rising temperatures on Andean tropical glaciers and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) indicator regions and in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the eastern Pacific and western Atlantic Oceans. ENSO is a dominant force for tropical climate variability on interannual time scales. It is linked with the position of the ITCZ and the associated teleconnections affect the strength and direction of air masses and storm tracks, variations in convective activity that control flooding and drought, and modulation of tropical storm intensities. The Quelccaya ice core record may be considered as the “Rosetta Stone” for high resolution climate records extracted from tropical glaciers, relating stable isotopic variations with tropical SSTs and freezing level heights. The ice core histories from Quelccaya also provide the longer term context needed to assess the significance of the magnitude and rate of its current ice loss. The cores provide a detailed description of climate conditions in the tropical Andes during the "Little Ice Age" and "Medieval Climate Anomaly” periods. They show that the recent acceleration of ice retreat in this Andean region is not driven solely by precipitation changes and that over decadal and longer time scales stable isotopic ratios are not significantly correlated with precipitation. The well-documented accelerating ice loss on Quelccaya in the Andes, as well as that on Naimona’nyi in the Himalayas, on Kilimanjaro in eastern Africa, and on ice fields near Puncak Jaya, Papua, Indonesia point to an overarching, larger scale driver. The ongoing melting of these ice fields is consistent

  14. Uplift-driven diversification in the Hengduan Mountains, a temperate biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yaowu; Ree, Richard H

    2017-04-25

    A common hypothesis for the rich biodiversity found in mountains is uplift-driven diversification-that orogeny creates conditions favoring rapid in situ speciation of resident lineages. We tested this hypothesis in the context of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and adjoining mountain ranges, using the phylogenetic and geographic histories of multiple groups of plants to infer the tempo (rate) and mode (colonization versus in situ diversification) of biotic assembly through time and across regions. We focused on the Hengduan Mountains region, which in comparison with the QTP and Himalayas was uplifted more recently (since the late Miocene) and is smaller in area and richer in species. Time-calibrated phylogenetic analyses show that about 8 million y ago the rate of in situ diversification increased in the Hengduan Mountains, significantly exceeding that in the geologically older QTP and Himalayas. By contrast, in the QTP and Himalayas during the same period the rate of in situ diversification remained relatively flat, with colonization dominating lineage accumulation. The Hengduan Mountains flora was thus assembled disproportionately by recent in situ diversification, temporally congruent with independent estimates of orogeny. This study shows quantitative evidence for uplift-driven diversification in this region, and more generally, tests the hypothesis by comparing the rate and mode of biotic assembly jointly across time and space. It thus complements the more prevalent method of examining endemic radiations individually and could be used as a template to augment such studies in other biodiversity hotspots.

  15. Fluvial bevelling of topography controlled by lateral channel mobility and uplift rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufe, Aaron; Paola, Chris; Burbank, Douglas W.

    2016-09-01

    Valley morphologies of rivers crossing zones of active uplift range from narrow canyons to broad alluvial surfaces. They provide illuminating examples of the fundamental, but poorly understood, competition between relief creation and landscape flattening. Motivated by a field example of abandoned kilometre-wide, fluvially eroded platforms on active detachment folds in the Tian Shan foreland, we present physical experiments investigating the controls on the area of a growing fold that is reworked by antecedent rivers. These experiments reproduce the range of observed field morphologies, varying from wholesale bevelling of the uplifting fold to the formation of narrow, steep-walled canyons. A log-linear fit to a simple dimensionless parameter shows that the competition between lateral channel mobility and rock-uplift rate explains >95% of the variance in the bevelled fraction of the folds. Our data suggest that lateral bedrock erosion rates of 0.5-40 m yr-1 are required to explain the formation of extensive platforms in the Tian Shan foreland and imply that varying water and sediment fluxes can cause striking changes in the degree of landscape flattening by influencing the lateral erosion rate.

  16. Delineation of uplifting and subsiding zones in the Western Pannonian Basin using sinousity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Judit; Kovács, Gábor; Zámolyi, András.; Pál, Lénárd; Székely, Balázs

    2010-05-01

    The recent tectonic setting of the Pannonian-basin is partly caracterised by different uplift and subsident pattern. Our study area the western part of the Bakony-Hill is currently uplifting while the neighbouring Little Hungarian Plane subsides. The contact zone of this two domain can be outline only from seismic profiles and borehole data. This normal faulting represented displacement int he seismic profile, however cannot be traced up to the surface. The depth conditions can only be partly recontsructed because we use TWT data, but there is evidence that early pannonian strata are faulted. In order to trace the faulted we analysed several seismic profile. We anticipate, that there motions inply surface this placement. Slope angles are therefore are disturbed, the valley slopes are modified and the river courses are sensitive to that change and accomodate to the new setting, restoring the original channel slope. Analysing the sinousity of these river course. We can inply to the differential uplift pattern. Historic maps were used for river course velineation, The Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire (1806-1869) perfect possibility for that. This mapsheets record the pre-regulation conditions of the hidrological system, this situation is the closest to the natural unmodified state.

  17. Ground uplift related to permeability enhancement following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in the Kanto Plain, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, Kazuya; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Nishimura, Takuya; Tsuji, Takeshi; ElGharbawi, Tamer

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the post-seismic surface displacement of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake around the Kanto Plain (including the capital area of Japan), which is located approximately 400 km from the epicenter, using a global positioning system network during 2005-2015 and persistent scatterer interferometry of TerraSAR-X data from March 2011 to November 2012. Uniform uplift owing to viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip on the plain has been reported previously. In addition to the general trend, we identified areas where the surface displacement velocity was faster than the surrounding areas, as much as 7 mm/year for 3 years after the earthquake and with a velocity decay over time. Local uplift areas were 30 × 50 km2 and showed a complex spatial distribution with an irregular shape. Based on an observed groundwater level increase, we deduce that the local ground uplift was induced by a permeability enhancement and a pore pressure increase in the aquifer system, which is attributable to mainshock vibration.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Holocene uplift and palaeoseismicity on the Eliki Fault, Western Gulf of Corinth, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stewart

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon dating of elevated coastal phenomena along the emergent footwall of the Eliki Fault in the West- em Gulf of Corinth has established a chronology of tectonic emergence during Holocene times. The results confirm -6 m of coastal uplift over the last 3000 years at sites both immediately adjacent to, and more distant from, the offshore l'ault. Although revealing little or no spatial vm.iation along the fault, temporally the data de- fine two phases of enhanced tectonic activity (0-3000 year B.P. and pre- 7-8000 year B.P. separated by a 4- 5000 year period of tectonic quiescence. Well documented historical surface faulting during the most recent lclive phase testify to the contribution to net uplift played by coseismic increments, but these are considered to be superimposed on significant aseismic movements. While asesismic uplift confuses the palaeoseismic .ecord, correlation of prominent notch levels with dated raised shoreline fauna provides evidence for at least 3 surface faulting events during the past 2500 years.

  19. Fish tank as evidence for modern coastal uplift at Diu, Saurashtra Peninsula, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kázmér, Miklós; Bhatt, Nilesh; Ujay, Vishal; Prizomwala, Siddharth; Taboroši, Danko; Székely, Balázs

    2013-04-01

    India - except the Himalayas - is considered to be tectonically stable region, with an occasional intra-plate earthquake here and there. The Saurashtra Peninsula in Western India had earthquakes less than Mw 5.7 during the last fifty years. Search for evidence of preceding major seismic events is ongoing. There is a ~16th century fish tank hewn in coastal Pleistocene limestone near Diu city, Saurashtra Peninsula, western India. The 3×4 m basin is connected to the sea by an 1 m deep channel. Today the tank is inoperable: not even high spring tide can fill the basin. We suggest that the tank, the tidal platform and the whole Diu coast have been uplifted by ~0.5 m shortly after the tank was constructed by early Portuguese colonists in the 16-17th century. Coastal karst dissolution - active in the spray zone above sea level - left deep marks on carved surfaces since uplift. We suggest that uplift of Diu Island occurred in the 16-17th century, during a major seismic event, connected to active faulting offshore along the Narmada Fault.

  20. Fission track dating of the Cenozoic uplift in Mabian area, southern Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN YanFen; HAN ZhuJun; WAN JingLin

    2008-01-01

    The apparent ages of samples are obtained from fission track dating of apatite samples collected from the fault zones in Mabian area, southern Sichuan Province.In addition, thermal history is simulated from the obtained data by applying AFTSolve Program, to acquire the thermal evolution history of the samples.The result shows that tectonically the Mabian area was relatively stable between 25 and 3 Ma, compared to the inner parts and other marginal areas of the Tibetan Plateau.The studied area had little response to the rapid uplift events that occurred for several times in the Tibetan Plateau during 25-3 Ma.The latest thermal event related to the activity of the Lidian fault zone (about 8 Ma) is later than that of the Ebian fault zone (18-15 Ma ) to the west, indicating to some extent that the evolution of fault activity in the Mabian area has migrated from west to east.The latest extensive tectonic uplift occurred since about 3 Ma.As compared with the Xianshuihe fault zone, the Mabian area is closer to the eastern margin of the plateau, while the time of fast cooling event in this area is later than that in the southeast segment of the Xianshuihe fault zone (3.6-3.46 Ma).It appears to support the assumption of episodic uplift and stepwise outward extension of the eastern boundary of the Tibetan Plateau in late Cenozoic.

  1. Fission track dating of the Cenozoic uplift in Mabian area, southern Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The apparent ages of samples are obtained from fission track dating of apatite samples collected from the fault zones in Mabian area, southern Sichuan Province. In addition, thermal history is simulated from the obtained data by applying AFT Solve Program, to acquire the thermal evolution history of the samples. The result shows that tectonically the Mabian area was relatively stable between 25 and 3 Ma, compared to the inner parts and other marginal areas of the Tibetan Plateau. The studied area had little response to the rapid uplift events that occurred for several times in the Tibetan Plateau during 25-3 Ma. The latest thermal event related to the activity of the Lidian fault zone (about 8 Ma ) is later than that of the Ebian fault zone (18-15 Ma ) to the west, indicating to some extent that the evolution of fault activity in the Mabian area has migrated from west to east. The latest extensive tectonic uplift occurred since about 3 Ma. As compared with the Xianshuihe fault zone, the Mabian area is closer to the east- ern margin of the plateau, while the time of fast cooling event in this area is later than that in the southeast segment of the Xianshuihe fault zone (3.6-3.46 Ma ). It appears to support the assumption of episodic uplift and stepwise outward extension of the eastern boundary of the Tibetan Plateau in late Cenozoic.

  2. Gaussian and mean curvatures of postglacial land uplift as expanded in surface spherical harmonics, and the origin of earthquakes in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, M.

    Formula for Gaussian and mean curvatures of postglacial land uplift, as expanded in a series of surface spherical harmonics, are derived. These are then applied in investigating if postglacial land uplift is an origin of earthquakes. It is found that the postglacial land uplift of Fennoscandia probably is the origin of the earthquakes along the whole Swedish coast of the Gulf of Bothnia as well as possibly of those in northernmost Sweden, the earthquakes occurring mainly where the Gaussian curvature of land uplift is great enough. No such relationship exists for the earthquakes of southeastern Norway/southwestern Sweden, which then probably do not originate from the land uplift.

  3. Ice cap melting and low-viscosity crustal root explain the narrow geodetic uplift of the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéry, J.; Genti, M.; Vernant, P.

    2016-04-01

    More than 10 years of geodetic measurements demonstrate an uplift rate of 1-3 mm/yr of the high topography region of the Western Alps. By contrast, no significant horizontal motion has been detected. Two uplift mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the isostatic response to denudation responsible for only a fraction of the observed uplift and (2) the rebound induced by the Wurmian ice cap melting which predicts a broader uplifting region than the one evidenced by geodetic observations. Using a numerical model to fit the geodetic data, we show that a crustal viscosity contrast between the foreland and the central part of the Alps, the latter being weaker with a viscosity of 1021 Pa s, is needed. The vertical rates are enhanced if the strong uppermost mantle beneath the Moho is interrupted across the Alps, therefore allowing a weak vertical rheological anomaly over the entire lithosphere.

  4. Contextual Analysis of the Decision To Adopt a Regional Satellite System: The Case of the Andean CONDOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo; Mody, Bella

    Acknowledging the importance of communications in economic development, this paper discusses the rationale behind the decision of the Andean Pact nations of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela to develop a regional satellite communication system to be known as CONDOR. The application of contextual theorizing to the decision-making…

  5. Phenolic compound contents and antioxidant activity in plants with nutritional and/or medicinal properties form the Peruvian Andean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirinos, R.; Pedreschi Plasencia, R.P.; Rogez, H.

    2013-01-01

    Total phenolic compounds (TPC) and antioxidant activities using different assays (DPPH, ABTS and ORAC) in fruits, grains, leaves, seeds, roots and tubers from 27 different Peruvian Andean plants used in folk medicine or/and as food by the native population were evaluated in order to use these as nat

  6. Carbon storage and long-term rate of accumulation in high-altitude Andean peatlands of Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Hribljan; D.J. Cooper; J. Sueltenfuss; E.C. Wolf; K.A. Heckman; Erik Lilleskov; R.A. Chimner

    2015-01-01

    The high-altitude (4,500+ m) Andean mountain range of north-western Bolivia contains many peatlands. Despite heavy grazing pressure and potential damage from climate change, little is known about these peatlands. Our objective was to quantify carbon pools, basal ages and long-term peat accumulation rates in peatlands in two areas of the arid puna ecoregion of Bolivia:...

  7. PES, peasants and power in Andean watersheds : power relations and payment for environmental services in Colombia and Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez de Francisco, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, the market environmentalist policy model of Payment for Environmental Services (PES) has become a widely promoted and implemented conservation and development tool, around the world as well as in the Andean countries Colombia and Ecuador. For upstream peasant

  8. Response of the Andean diversity panel to root rot in a root rot nursery in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel (ADP) was evaluated under low-fertility and root rot conditions in two trials conducted in 2013 and 2015 in Isabela, Puerto Rico. About 246 ADP lines were evaluated in the root rot nursery with root rot and stem diseases caused predominantly by Fusarium solani, which cause...

  9. Vegetation composition and altitudinal distribution of Andean rain forests in El Angel and Guandera reserves, northern Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moscol Olivera, M.C.; Cleef, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Patterns of vascular plant species composition and structure of the remaining rain forest of the Andean Cordillera in northern Ecuador were studied in two reserves: Guandera and El Angel. Thirty three plots located between 3300 and 3700 in were examined along two altitudinal transects crossing the U

  10. Geodetic measurements for monitoring rapid crustal uplift in southeastern Alaska caused by the recent deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S.; Sun, W.; Sugano, T.; Kaufman, A.; Sato, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Ohta, Y.; Larsen, C.; Freymueller, J.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers at high latitudes are considered to be extremely sensitive to climate change and thus monitoring of glaciers is a clue to evaluate the future effect of global warming and the related phenomena. Ice mass changes also produce a time-variable surface load and give us useful data to investigate subsurface structure of the earth, especially to constrain the flow characteristics of the mantle. Larsen et al. [EPSL05] have extensively studied on vertical crustal movement in SE Alaska to reveal the world's fastest glacial isostatic uplifting, which can be attributed to the response associated with deglaciation. Displacement data, however, can only be used to constrain the sum of the elastic response to present-day ice melting (PDIM) and the viscoelastic one to past changes in ice. A Japan-US joint research project, ISEA (International geodetic research project in SouthEast Alaska), was initiated in 2005 to add new geodetic data and to refine the viscoelastic model derived by the previous studies. Absolute gravity data have been acquired at the five sites in the stdudy area using a Micro-g LaCoste absolute gravimeter, FG5#111. At each site data were collected over a 48~62 hour period. The long-term variation in absolute gravity at 2 stations, HNSG and BRM, where the measurements were performed in 1987 by Sasagawa et al. [JGR89] demonstrates rapid gravity decrease with rates of -4.4 micro-gal/yr, and -3.0 micro-gal/yr, respectively, and can be attributed to uplifting and mass-redstribution. ISEA supplements pre-existing continuous GPS (CGPS) stations operated by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and the UNAVCO (Plate Boundary Observatory, PBO) and improves the spatial coverage in and around Glacier Bay. The time series of the site coordinates obtained for Queen Inlet (QUIC), which locates close to a zone of maximum uplift, shows obvious uplifting, even though there are long- term gaps because of an antenna cable trouble in 2006 and power outage in 2008 causing rather

  11. Quaternary outer fore-arc deformation and uplift inboard of the Panama Triple Junction, Burica Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Kristin D.; Fisher, Donald M.; Gardner, Thomas W.; La Femina, Peter; Davidson, Daniel; Teletzke, Allison

    2011-05-01

    The Panama Triple Junction (Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean) represents the point that abruptly separates the thick and rapidly subducting Cocos plate to the northwest from the thin and obliquely subducting Nazca plate to the southeast along the Central American convergent margin. New structural and geomorphic analyses on the Burica Peninsula, an outer fore-arc peninsula located only ˜100 km inboard the Panama Triple Junction, reveal that the peninsula is dominated primarily by contractional deformation along three listric thrust faults that root in the underlying plate boundary. The geometry and spatial distribution of these thrusts indicate that this deformation occurs primarily in response to the change in crustal thickness occurring as a result of eastern migration of the flank of the Cocos Ridge coeval with migration of the Panama Triple Junction at a rate of ˜55 mm/yr to the southeast. Mapping and detailed elevation surveys reveal eight marine terraces on the peninsula with a distribution of inner edge elevations indicating that uplift is spatially uniform from north to south along strike in this area. However, terraces along the northwest part of the peninsula are offset across major thrust faults. Age control provided by 14C, OSL and soil chronosequences indicate that the terraces within the easternmost portion of the peninsula range in age from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 to Holocene, a result that indicates that this portion of the peninsula is younger than ˜60 ka. Time-averaged uplift rates calculated from marine terraces and other Quaternary marine deposits yield consistent uplift rates that range between 2.1 ± 0.1 and 7.7 ± 0.5 mm/yr for samples older than 1 ka and between 6.9 ± 1.0 and 19.3 ± 8.0 mm/yr for samples younger than 1 ka. We interpret this temporal distribution in uplift rates to suggest that the eight terraces preserved on the peninsula are produced coseismically wherein the anomalously high uplift rates calculated from the youngest samples

  12. Crustal uplift due to ice mass variability on Upernavik Isstrøm, west Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karina; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Kjær, Kurt H.; Wahr, John; Bevis, Michael; Stearns, Leigh A.; Timm, Lars H.

    2012-11-01

    We estimate the mass loss rate of Upernavik Isstrøm (UI) using surface elevation changes between a SPOT 5 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from 2008 and NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) data from 2010. To assess the validity of our mass loss estimate, we analyze GPS data between 2007 and 2011 from two continuous receivers, UPVK and SRMP which are established on bedrock and located ∼65 and ∼2 km from the front of UI, respectively. We construct along-track elevation changes on UI for several time intervals during 2005-2011, based on ATM, SPOT 5 and Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) data to assess temporal changes of UI. We estimate a mass loss rate of -6.7±4.2 Gt/yr, over an area of ∼1600 km2. The ice mass loss occurs primarily over the northern glacier of UI. This pattern is also observed ∼40 km upstream, where we observe glacier thinning at a rate of -1.6±0.3 m/yr across the northern portion of UI and -0.5±0.1 m/yr across the southern portion. GPS measurements suggest bedrock uplift rates of 7.6±0.6 mm/yr (UPVK) and 16.2±0.6 mm/yr (SRMP). The modeled ice mass loss of UI causes bedrock uplift rates of 1.3±0.6 mm/yr (UPVK) and 8.3±4.2 mm/yr (SRMP). Including additional contributions from ice mass changes outside UI and from Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), we obtain total modeled uplift rates of 4.7±0.6 mm/yr (UPVK) and 13.8±4.2 mm/yr (SRMP). The modeled uplift rates from our UI ice mass loss are substantially lower, indicating that additional mass loss is taking place outside of UI. We obtain a difference of 0.6 mm/yr between the modeled and observed relative uplift rates (SRMP relative to UPVK), suggesting that the mass loss of UI is well captured in the model. We observe elevation changes from -15 to -40 m/yr near the front during the period 2005-2011, indicating that UI undergoes large variations in thinning pattern over short time spans.

  13. River path selection in response to uplift and interaction with alluvial fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, J. L.; Paola, C.; Voller, V. R.

    2015-12-01

    River systems construct stratigraphic successions and build land by depositing and redistributing sediments as they migrate across the entire basin. This mobility arises from the intrinsic variability of a river system but can also be forced by external changes. It is particularly observable in tectonically active basins where the basement can be partly uplifted and where sediments can come from multiple sources. Theoretically, the ability of these perturbations to steer channels depends on their capacity to create lateral topographic gradients at a faster rate than the aggradation. Following these lines, we present an experimental study on the impacts of lateral tilting by tectonics and lateral alluvial fans on rivers path. The experiment was conducted in the eXperimental Earth Scape facility, also known as the Jurassic tank, where the basement tilting rate can be monitored by controlling individually gravel subsidence through 108 hexagonal cells. The basin was relatively uplifted on one side of the tank according to an anticline-shape and sediments were input through two sources: a main, axial one and a lateral, secondary one. We analyzed the differences in the topographic signature and flow occupation of rivers in response to the uplift or the lateral sediment source as well as the competition of these forcing in the late stages of the experiments. We found that both tectonic tilting and fan activity tend to decrease the basin-wide channel mobility. Indeed, the area at the convergence of the two interacting fans is a long-lasting topographic low that tends to channelize the flow while areas away from it are less visited. The position of this boundary is correlated with the relative flow contribution from both fans. This highlights the self-healing capacity of fans that are able to rapidly restore a graded shape. As opposed to fans, an uplifted area will not heal but force rivers to carve long-lasting valleys and increase the relief. When eroded, these uplifted

  14. Evolución tectónica del Frente Andino en Neuquén Tectonicevolution of the Andean front in Neuquén

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Zamora Valcarce

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La región preandina deNeuquén está conformada por una faja plegada fósil conocida como faja plegada ycorrida del Agrio. La excelente calidad de sus afloramientos, los datos desubsuelo, junto con recientes edades radimétricas y nuevos datos de trazas defisión en apatita, han permitido reconstruir con bastante precisión la historiaevolutiva de esta región. La estructuración de la región habría comenzadodurante el Cretácico Superior, documentado por la presencia de diquesbasálticos de rumbo E-O de ~100 Ma que se encuentran cortando la estructura dela zona interna. La deformación fue consecuencia de una leve horizontalizaciónde la placa subducida que habría provocada la migración del arco volcánicohacia el antepaís. Éste se habría instaurado en la región de Collipilli, endonde, recientemente se han obtenido edades de ~ 70 Ma para las FormacionesCollipilli y Cayanta. Estas unidades, se encuentran discordantes sobre lasecuencia mesozoica, marcando así el límite superior para el primer evento dedeformación. Evidencias de esta deformación en la zona externa de la fajaplegada se pueden observar en la discordancia del Grupo Neuquén sobre el GrupoBajada del Agrio (Rayoso. A su vez, los nuevos datos de trazas de fisión enapatita en el dorso de los Chihuidos, indican una serie de eventos deenfriamiento/levantamiento, el primero de ellos a los 70-50 Ma. El segundo enel Mioceno que produjo una reactivación de la deformación, evidenciada por losdepósitos sinorogénicos del Conglomerado Tralalhué y las Formaciones PuestoBurgos y Rincón Bayo. Los nuevos datos de trazas de fisión en apatita, permiteninterpretar otros dos eventos adicionales de levantamiento/enfriamiento entrelos 11 y los 6 Ma en el dorso de los Chihuidos.The Neuquén pre-Andean region is composed of a fossilfold belt known as the Agrio fold and thrust belt. The exceptional outcrops andthe subsurface data together with recent radiometric ages and new fission

  15. Analytical model of surface uplift above axisymmetric flat-lying magma intrusions: Implications for sill emplacement and geodesy

    OpenAIRE

    Galland, Olivier; Scheibert, Julien

    2013-01-01

    58 pages, 17 figures, 2 tables. Accepted in Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research; International audience; In this paper, we develop a new axisymmetric analytic model of surface uplift upon sills and laccoliths, based on the formulation of a thin bending plate lying on an elastic foundation. In contrast to most former models also based on thin bending plate formulation, our model accounts for (i) axi-symmetrical uplift, (ii) both upon and outside the intrusion. The model accounts for...

  16. Combining information preserved in fluvial topography and strath terraces to extract rock uplift rates in the Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M.; Brandon, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Longitudinal river profiles respond to changes in tectonic uplift rates through climate-modulated erosion. Therefore, rock uplift rate information should be recorded in fluvial topography and extracting this information provides crucial constraints on tectonic processes. In addition to the shape of the modern river profile, paleo-river profiles can often be mapped in the field by connecting strath terraces. These strath terraces act as markers that record complex incision histories in response to rock uplift rates that vary in space and time. We exploit an analytical linear solution to the linear version (n=1) of the stream-power equation to efficiently extract uplift histories from river networks and strath terraces. The analytical solution is based on the transient solution to the linear version (n=1) of the stream-power equation. The general solution to this problem states that the elevation of a point in a river channel is equal to the time integral of its uplift history, where integration is carried out over the time required for an uplift signal to propagate from the baselevel of the river network to the point of interest. A similar expression can be written for each strath terrace in the dataset. Through discretization of these expressions into discrete timesteps and spatial nodes, a linear system of equations can be solved using linear inverse methods. In this way, strath terraces and river profiles can be interpreted in an internally consistent framework, without the requirement that the river profile is in a steady state. We apply our approach to the Northern Apennines where strath terraces have been extensively mapped and dated. Comparison of our inferred rock uplift rate history with modern rock uplift rates enables us to distinguish short-term deformation on a buried thrust fault with long-term mountain building processes.

  17. Age estimates and uplift rates for late Pleistocene marine terraces: Southern Oregon portion of the Cascadia forearc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhs, D.R.; Whelan, J.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Kelsey, H.M.; McInelly, G.W. (Western Washington Univ., Bellingham (United States)); Miller, G.H. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)); Kennedy, G.L. (Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, CA (United States))

    1990-05-10

    Interest in the Cascadia subduction zone has increased because recent investigations have suggested that slip along plates at certain types of convergent margins is characteristically accompanied by large earthquakes. In addition, other investigations have suggested that convergent margins can be broadly classified by the magnitude of their uplift rates. The authors generated new uranium series, amino acid, and stable isotope data for southern Oregon marine terrace fossils. These data, along with terrace elevations and two alternative estimates of sea level at the time of terrace formation, allow one to determine terrace ages and uplift rates. Uranium series analysis of fossil coral yields an age of 83 {plus minus} 5 ka for the Whisky Run terrace at Coquille Point in Bandon, Oregon. A combination of amino acid and oxygen isotope data suggest ages of about 80 and 105 ka for the lowest two terraces at Cape Blanco. These ages indicate uplift rates of 0.45-1.05 and 0.81-1.49 m/kyr for Coquille Point and Cape Blanco, respectively. In order to assess the utility of the southern Oregon uplift rates for predicting the behavior of the Cascadia subduction zone, the authors compared late Quaternary uplift rates derived from terrace data from subduction zones around the world. On the basis of this comparison the southern Oregon rates of vertical deformation are not usually high or low. Furthermore, late Quaternary uplift rates show little relationship to the type of convergent margin. In the case of the southern Oregon coast, variability in uplift rate probably reflects local structures in the overriding plate, and the rate of uplift cannot be used as a simple index of the potential for great earthquakes along the southern Cascadia subduction zone.

  18. The estimation of future surface water bodies at Olkiluoto area based on statistical terrain and land uplift models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjola, J.; Turunen, J.; Lipping, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland); Ikonen, A.

    2014-03-15

    In this working report the modelling effort of future landscape development and surface water body formation at the modelling area in the vicinity of the Olkiluoto Island is presented. Estimation of the features of future surface water bodies is based on probabilistic terrain and land uplift models presented in previous working reports. The estimation is done using a GIS-based toolbox called UNTAMO. The future surface water bodies are estimated in 10 000 years' time span with 1000 years' intervals for the safety assessment of disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site. In the report a brief overview on the techniques used for probabilistic terrain modelling, land uplift modelling and hydrological modelling are presented first. The latter part of the report describes the results of the modelling effort. The main features of the future landscape - the four lakes forming in the vicinity of the Olkiluoto Island - are identified and the probabilistic model of the shoreline displacement is presented. The area and volume of the four lakes is modelled in a probabilistic manner. All the simulations have been performed for three scenarios two of which are based on 10 realizations of the probabilistic digital terrain model (DTM) and 10 realizations of the probabilistic land uplift model. These two scenarios differ from each other by the eustatic curve used in the land uplift model. The third scenario employs 50 realizations of the probabilistic DTM while a deterministic land uplift model, derived solely from the current land uplift rate, is used. The results indicate that the two scenarios based on the probabilistic land uplift model behave in a similar manner while the third model overestimates past and future land uplift rates. The main features of the landscape are nevertheless similar also for the third scenario. Prediction results for the volumes of the future lakes indicate that a couple of highly probably lake formation scenarios can be identified

  19. Atmospheric CO2 Consumption in Uplifting Mountain Ranges: New Insight From the New Zealand Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. D.; Blum, J. D.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2004-12-01

    Rates of physical erosion and chemical weathering in uplifting mountain ranges are generally higher than the rates observed in tectonically stable regions. This observation has led to the hypothesis that orogenic events lead to global cooling over geologic time scales by accelerating the rate of atmospheric CO2 drawdown from silicate weathering. However, recent studies of rivers draining the rapidly uplifting Himalaya Mountains have demonstrated that much of the chemical weathering flux is dominated by carbonate dissolution, which does not influence long-term atmospheric CO2 levels. To examine if carbonate weathering dominates in other orogenic environments, we have undertaken investigations of rivers draining the New Zealand Southern Alps, which present a largely unexplored setting for systematically examining tectonic controls on the carbon cycle. In particular, we quantified rates of physical erosion and both silicate and carbonate weathering across a gradient of variable uplift rates but constant bedrock composition. We also compared the findings to global mean values as well as to data for major world rivers in other tectonic and climatic settings. Rapid uplift in the western Southern Alps elevates mechanical erosion rates by a factor of ~13 relative to those on the tectonically stable eastern side. Similarly, the average chemical weathering rate is ~5 times higher on the western compared to eastern side of the mountain range. However, because the proportion of stream-water Ca2+ and Mg2+ from the weathering of trace hydrothermal calcite increases as the rate of mechanical erosion increases, the long-term atmospheric CO2 consumption rate on the western side is only ~2 times higher than that on the eastern side and only ~1.5 times higher than the global mean value. These data demonstrate that tectonic uplift in the New Zealand Southern Alps accelerates physical erosion and chemical weathering rates but does not greatly enhance the rate of long-term atmospheric

  20. Challenges of Holocene sea-level reconstructions in area of low uplift rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzinska, Ieva; Vassiljev, Jüri; Stivrins, Normunds

    2017-04-01

    Isolated coastal water bodies provide an excellent sedimentary archive of the evolutionary stages of the coastal regions. It is relatively easy to determine lake isolation threshold, time and contact, where marine and brackish diatoms are replaced by halophilous and subsequently by freshwater diatoms, in areas with high land uplift rates and hard bedrock. Whereas, in areas where the land uplift rate is near zero and sedimentary cover of sand, silt and/or clay exists, determination of the lake isolation threshold and time is a rather complicated task. Such an area is the coast of the Gulf of Riga, where the apparent land uplift is about 1 mm yr-1 in the northern part and near zero in the southern part of the area. The aim of the study is to improve the understanding of the nature and extent of the Holocene sea level changes in the eastern Baltic Sea region, in the area with low land uplift rate. This study marks the first attempt to reconstruct sea level changes for a wide variety of settings based on high-resolution bio-, litho-, and chronostratigraphical evidence from sediment records of isolation basins in Latvia. In total, eight lakes were studied in order to revise the relative sea level (RSL) changes at the southern coast of the Gulf of Riga based on new litho- and biostratigraphical data and radiocarbon datings. The palaeogeographical reconstruction was challenging because we had to take into account that the process of isolation was influenced by various factors, such as gradual eustatic sea level (ESL) rise, river delta infilling by sediments and long-shore sediment transport. The water level in the Baltic Sea basin until 8,500 cal BP was influenced primarily by deglaciation dynamics, whereas in the last 8,500 years, the main factor was complicated interplay between the ESL rise and the land uplift rate. According to diatom composition and radiocarbon dates, the Litorina Sea transgression was a long-lasting event (ca. 2,200 years) in the southern part of

  1. UPLIFTING TECHNOLOGY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas K Grose

    2015-01-01

      Inspired by Star Trek turbolifts, German engineering firm ThyssenKrupp says it's ready to replace cables and pulleys using maglev, or magnetic levitation technology, that enables the world's fastest...

  2. Depth anomalies in the Arabian Basin, NW Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ajay, K.K.; Chaubey, A.K.

    (swell). According to Sleep (1990), the regional domal uplift is a characteristic feature of the presence of mantle plumes. The change from vertical upwelling to horizontal flow along the base of the lithosphere induces an upward force on the plate...) Site 715. In: Backman J, Duncan RA et al. (eds) Proceedings Ocean Drilling Program, College Station, TX, pp 917–946 Sichoix L, Bonneville A, McNutt MK (1998) The seafloor swells and superswell in French Polynesia. J Geophys Res 103:27123– 27133 Sleep NH...

  3. Late Pleistocene and Holocene uplift history of Cyprus: implications for active tectonics along the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R.W.; Tsiolakis, E.; Stone, B.D.; Lord, A.; McGeehin, J.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Chirico, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate during the Neogene is complex, controversial and fundamental in understanding active plate-margin tectonics and natural hazards in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Our investigation provides new insights into the Late Pleistocene uplift history of Cyprus and the Troodos Ophiolite. We provide isotopic (14C) and radiogenic (luminescence) dates of outcropping marine sediments in eastern Cyprus that identify periods of deposition during marine isotope stages (MIS) 3, 4, 5 and 6. Past sea-levels indicated by these deposits are c. 95±25 m higher in elevation than estimates of worldwide eustatic sea-level. An uplift rate of c. 1.8 mm/year and possibly as much as c. 4.1 mm/year in the past c. 26–40 ka is indicated. Holocene marine deposits also occur at elevations higher than those expected for past SL and suggest uplift rates of c. 1.2–2.1 mm/year. MIS-3 marine deposits that crop out in southern and western Cyprus indicate uniform island-wide uplift. We propose a model of tectonic wedging at a plate-bounding restraining bend as a mechanism for Late Pleistocene to Holocene uplift of Cyprus; uplift is accommodated by deformation and seismicity along the margins of the Troodos Ophiolite and re-activation of its low-angle, basal shear zone.

  4. The niche and phylogeography of a passerine reveal the history of biological diversification between the Andean and the Atlantic forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Arias, Natalia; Dantas, Gisele P M; Arbeláez-Cortés, Enrique; Naoki, Kazuya; Gómez, Maria I; Santos, Fabricio R; Miyaki, Cristina Y; Aleixo, Alexandre; Tubaro, Pablo L; Cabanne, Gustavo S

    2017-07-01

    The Atlantic Forest is separated from the Andean tropical forest by dry and open vegetation biomes (Chaco and Cerrado). Despite this isolation, both rainforests share closely related lineages, which suggest a past connection. This connection could have been important for forest taxa evolution. In this study, we used the Saffron-billed Sparrow (Arremon flavirostris) as a model to evaluate whether the Andean and the Atlantic forests act as a refugia system, as well as to test for a history of biogeographic connection between them. In addition, we evaluated the molecular systematic of intraspecific lineages of the studied species. We modeled the current and past distribution of A. flavirostris, performed phylogeographic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) analyses to test for biogeographic scenarios. The major phylogeographic disjunction within A. flavirostris was found between the Andean and the Atlantic forests, with a divergence that occurred during the Mid-Pleistocene. Our paleodistribution models indicated a connection between these forest domains in different periods and through both the Chaco and Cerrado. Additionally, the phylogeographic and ABC analyses supported that the Cerrado was the main route of connection between these rainforests, but without giving decisive evidence against a Chaco connection. Our study with A. flavirostris suggest that the biodiversity of the Andean and of the Atlantic forests could have been impacted (and perhaps enriched?) by cycles of connections through the Cerrado and Chaco. This recurrent cycle of connection between the Andean and the Atlantic Forest could have been important for the evolution of Neotropical forest taxa. In addition, we discussed taxonomic implications of the results and proposed to split the studied taxon into two full species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PROPOSING A DIGITAL INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION OF THE QHAPAQ ÑAN – ANDEAN ROAD SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Duperré

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ancient network of roads in the Andean region is one of the most important works of infrastructure in South America. The extensive territory where the main exchanges between their communities were locally performed is previous to the expansion of the Inca Empire. In the year 2014, the region was included on the World Heritage List by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. This communication network is the Qhapaq Ñan, Andean Road System. The Incas planned their route in the diverse landscape of the Andes to promote social and economic ties among the Andean communities. The routes originated in the central square of Cusco, creating cross-connections in a wide geographical area. The Tawantinsuyu depended on this sole route to link very distant production and worship centers. The Qhapaq Ñan was the result of a political project. Even nowadays, it continues to articulate the development of cultural traditions in the Andean region. The present contribution analyzes its transcendental importance as a Cultural Heritage and the singularity of its nomination by the UNESCO, as for the first time six countries are sharing common objectives towards guaranteeing its protection. Furthermore, this research explores the sense of timing in Latin American countries and the implicit challenges in the implementation of the new information technologies for the dissemination of information on Main Andean Road and for its conservation. Although many of the countries have already incorporated the necessary digital tools in this matter, we conclude that there is a need to implement an Integrated Digital Model for the coordinated management in the countries that form the region.

  6. Landscape genetics, historical isolation and cross-Andean gene flow in the wax palm, Ceroxylon echinulatum (Arecaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trénel, Philipp; Hansen, Michael M; Normand, Signe; Borchsenius, Finn

    2008-08-01

    Knowledge of the role of landscapes in shaping genetic connectivity and divergence is essential for understanding patterns of biogeography and diversity. This is particularly relevant for the Andes region, a major biodiversity hotspot of relatively recent origin. We examined the phylogeography and landscape genetics of the Andean wax palm Ceroxylon echinulatum (Arecaceae) that occurs in two narrow bands of montane forests on each side of the Andes in Ecuador and northeastern Peru. First, we tested the hypothesis of C. echinulatum being a geographic cline species crossing the Andes in the Amotape-Huancabamba zone (AHZ) of southern Ecuador/northern Peru, as indicated by observations on fruit morphology. Second, we assessed the timeframe of cross-Andean divergence, and third, we investigated the impact of contemporary and historical landscape features on observed spatio-genetic patterns. Individual-based Bayesian clustering (BC) identified a northeastern, southeastern, southwestern, and northwestern cluster, with areas of genetic discontinuity coinciding with the Andes and the Giron-Paute deflection. F-statistics derived from BC suggested an east-to-west dispersal history. Population-based analyses revealed strong genetic structuring at both small and large geographic scales. Interpopulation relationships and Mantel tests strongly supported the cline model with cross-Andean dispersal in the AHZ. Along the cline, gene flow measured as F(ST) was mainly limited by distance, with less but significant impact of climatic friction. Coalescent analysis revealed that cross-Andean divergence took place during the Quaternary. Significant historical isolation (R(ST) > F(ST)) was found in the southwestern population. The current study illustrates a joint effect of founder dynamics, divergence by distance and historical isolation on patterns of Andean diversity and distribution.

  7. Proposing a Digital Information System for the Management and Conservation of the Qhapaq ÑAN - Andean Road System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperré, G. N.

    2017-08-01

    The ancient network of roads in the Andean region is one of the most important works of infrastructure in South America. The extensive territory where the main exchanges between their communities were locally performed is previous to the expansion of the Inca Empire. In the year 2014, the region was included on the World Heritage List by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. This communication network is the Qhapaq Ñan, Andean Road System. The Incas planned their route in the diverse landscape of the Andes to promote social and economic ties among the Andean communities. The routes originated in the central square of Cusco, creating cross-connections in a wide geographical area. The Tawantinsuyu depended on this sole route to link very distant production and worship centers. The Qhapaq Ñan was the result of a political project. Even nowadays, it continues to articulate the development of cultural traditions in the Andean region. The present contribution analyzes its transcendental importance as a Cultural Heritage and the singularity of its nomination by the UNESCO, as for the first time six countries are sharing common objectives towards guaranteeing its protection. Furthermore, this research explores the sense of timing in Latin American countries and the implicit challenges in the implementation of the new information technologies for the dissemination of information on Main Andean Road and for its conservation. Although many of the countries have already incorporated the necessary digital tools in this matter, we conclude that there is a need to implement an Integrated Digital Model for the coordinated management in the countries that form the region.

  8. Two new cis-Andean species of the South American catfish genus Megalonema allied to trans-Andean Megalonema xanthum, with description of a new subgenus (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Lundberg

    Full Text Available A revised diagnosis of the pimelodid catfish genus Megalonema is given based on synapomorphic features of the Weberian complex and gas bladder. Megalonema xanthum from the Magdalena River is redescribed. Two new cis-Andean species of Megalonema are described, M. amaxanthum n. sp. from the Amazon River basin, and M. orixanthum n. sp. from the Orinoco River basin. These three species are differentially diagnosed by shape and size of the supraoccipital posterior process, adipose-fin shape, vertebral counts, eye size, premaxillary bone shape and dentition, length of the anal-fin base, width between the posterior nostrils and presence/absence of dentations on the pectoral spine. Eretmomegalonema new subgenus is established for M. xanthum, M. amaxanthum and M. orixanthum and supported by the uniquely synapomorphic paddle-like structure of its pelvic fin and hypertrophied basipterygium. Unambiguous synapomorphies indicate a sister-group relationship between M. amaxanthum and M. orixanthum, with M. xanthum basal to this pair. This topology is congruent with the Neogene origins of separate Magdalena, Amazon and Orinoco basins suggesting vicariant control of diversification of Eretmomegalonema.

  9. Imaging variations in the central Andean mantle and the subducting Nazca slab with teleseismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, Alissa

    The Nazca-South America convergent margin is marked by the presence of the Andean mountain belt, which stretches along the 8000-km long western margin of the South American plate. The subduction zone is characterized by significant along-strike changes in both upper plate structure and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the surrounding mantle, and the overriding plate. This dissertation summarizes the results of three finite frequency teleseismic tomography studies of the central Nazca-South America subduction zone which improve our understanding of how along-strike variations in the Andean mountain belt and the subducting Nazca plate interact with each other and with the surrounding mantle. This is accomplished by first focusing on two smaller adjacent regions of the central Andes to explore upper mantle variations and then by using a combined dataset, which covers a larger region, to image the deeply subducted Nazca slab to investigate the fate of the slab. The first study focuses on the central Andean upper mantle under the Altiplano-Puna Plateau where normally dipping subduction of the Nazca plate is occurring (18° to 28°S). The shallow mantle under the Eastern Cordillera is generally fast, consistent with either underthrusting of the Brazilian cratonic lithosphere from the east or a localized "curtain" of delaminating material. Additional evidence for delamination is seen in the form of high amplitude low velocities under the Puna Plateau, consistent with proposed asthenospheric influx following lithospheric removal. In the second study, we explore the transition between normal and flat subduction along the north edge of the Altiplano Plateau (8° to 21°S). We find that the Peruvian flat slab extends further inland along the projection of the Nazca Ridge than was previously proposed and that when re-steepening of the slab occurs, the slab dips very steeply (˜70°) down through the mantle

  10. Peculiar seismotectonic characteristics of Nazca's subducted slab, in the Andean region: Why do they exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, J.; Fernandes, C.

    2007-05-01

    The peculiar morphology of Wadati-Benioff Zone (WBZ) beneath Andean region presents controversial seismotectonic characteristics of the subducting Nazca plate beneath South American plate: WBZ with an almost flat behaviour under Central-Northern Peru region, and beneath Central Chile region, intercalated with steeply portion of the slab; the almost completely aseismic portion between 300 and 500 km of depth; the existence of deep earthquakes in South American and their controversial focal mechanism. There are several hypotheses trying to explain a suitable origin for those deep earthquakes that occur in depths between 500 and almost 700 km, where the occurrence of brittle failure is improbable to exist due to the presence of high temperature and pressure conditions at those depths. We propose in this work - based mainly in the spatial distribution of relocated hypocentres, and in the joint interpretation with recent published results related to seismotectonic aspects of Andean region - a top-to- northwest shear of the portion of Nazca subducting plate between 24°S and 01°S, in such an amount that its deepest corresponding extremes, at around 600 km of depth, seem to be presently, under latitudes between 29°S and 06°S, respectively. The proposed northwestern displacement of South American plate may be provoking that shear process of Nazca slab, which should be larger at shallower depths of the slab, and limited to those latitudes below the Andean region. The NW displacement of Nazca slab could explain the existence of flat subduction beneath Central-Northern Peru region as a consequence of a probable northwards migration of the buoyant Nazca ridge after subduction under South American plate in around 15°S. Similar explanation could be used for the flat WBZ beneath Central Chile and the Juan Fernandez ridge. This hypothesis permits to infer for some very deep South American earthquakes shear, planar mechanisms at high pressure, some times as almost horizontal

  11. Ecological Resilience and Resistance in the Hyper Diverse Forests on the Eastern Andean Flank (Mera, Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, H. F.; Gosling, W. D.; Montoya, E.; Sherlock, S.; Mothes, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Today the Neotropics contain some of the world's most biodiverse and threatened ecosystems. Sediments obtained from two radiocarbon infinite (>48,000 years) stratigraphic sections on the eastern Andean flank, provide new insight into the relationship between biodiversity and disturbance during the Pleistocene (~200,000 years). Pollen analysis of modern and fossil material indicates that hyper diverse forest vegetation has been a feature of the Andean flank landscape for 100,000 years (pollen richness: modern = 44, fossil = 48). Correlation of past vegetation with disturbance events (volcanic and fluvial) indicates the response of hyper-diverse forest to past landscape scale change. Pollen records from near Mera (01°27 S, 78°06 W; 1117 m asl) indicate two major changes in the pollen assemblage, with forest communities dominated by: i) Hedyosmum-Alnus-Ilex, and ii) Combretaceae-Melastomataceae-Myrtaceae. These two pollen assemblages most closely resemble modern vegetation cloud forest (2500-3400m asl) and lower montane rain forest (700-2499 m asl) respectively. Sedimentary evidence suggests that at least 21 volcanic events and three changes in the local fluvial regime perturbed the regional landscape during the period of deposition. However, there is no evidence for volcanic or fluvial disturbance events causing a persistent change in vegetation community. Volcanic events (tephra deposits) are associated with increased fire (charcoal particles), and changes in vegetation (pollen grains); however, within ~50cm of sediment accumulation above each tephra, pollen assemblages revert to pre-deposition compositions. Increased fluvial influence (gravel deposits) is associated with elevated input of pollen from taxa today found at higher elevations (Podocarpus-Celtis). The input of high elevation taxa concomitant with fluvial deposits is most likely indicative of an increase in long-distance transport of pollen along water courses originating in the Andes. Our data indicate

  12. Erosion of particulate organic material from an Andean river and its delivery to the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathryn; Hilton, Robert; West, A. Joshua; Robles Caceres, Arturo; Grocke, Darren; Marthews, Toby; Asner, Greg; New, Mark; Mahli, Yadvinder

    2016-04-01

    Organic carbon and nutrients discharged by mountainous rivers can play an important role in biogeochemical cycles from regional to global scales. The eastern Andes host productive forests on steep, rapidly eroding slopes, a combination that is primed to deliver sediment, carbon and nutrients to the lowland Amazon River. We quantify clastic sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) discharge for the Kosñipata River, Peru, an Andean tributary of the Madre de Dios River, using suspended sediment samples and discharge measurements over one year at two gauging stations. Calculations of sediment yield on the basis of this data suggest that the Madre de Dios basin may have erosion rates ˜10 times greater than the Amazon Basin average. The total POC yield over the sampling period was up to five times higher than the yield in the lowland Amazon Basin, with most POC (70-80%) exported between December and March in the wet season. We use radiocarbon, stable C isotopes and C/N ratios to distinguish between the erosion and discharge of POC from sedimentary rocks (petrogenic POC) and POC eroded from the modern terrestrial biosphere, from vegetation and soil (biospheric POC). We find that biospheric POC discharge was significantly enhanced during flood events, over that of clastic sediment and petrogenic POC. The ultimate fate of the eroded POC may play a central role in the net carbon budget of Andean forest. In these forests, net productivity minus heterotrophic respiration is close to zero at the scale of forest plots, and the erosion of biospheric POC by this Andean river is sufficiently rapid that its fate downstream (sedimentary burial/preservation versus oxidation/degradation) may determine whether the mountain forest is a carbon sink or source to the atmosphere. In addition, the measured discharge of petrogenic POC suggests that fluxes from the Andes may be considerably higher than measured downstream in the Madeira River. If this petrogenic POC is oxidised rather

  13. Integración regional andina en salud Health in Andean regional integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Agudelo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A pesar su historia compartida, los países de la Región Andina presentan una diversidad social y política que genera realidades sanitarias heterogéneas y procesos de integración complejos. Se han dado por décadas procesos generales, como la Asociación Latinoamericana de Libre Comercio y la Asociación Latinoamericana de Integración, o de alcance regional como la Comunidad Andina de Naciones, la Comunidad del Caribe y el Mercado Común Centroamericano. En el campo específico de la salud se cuenta con un instrumento en la Región Andina, el Convenio Hipólito Unánue, creado en 1971. Estos procesos de integración se han concentrado en los aspectos económicos, con base en acuerdos de preferencias arancelarias, los cuales han generado, en el largo plazo, un intercambio comercial apreciable. En el campo de la salud se ha avanzado menos, en términos de procesos que ponen en común experiencias nacionales, conocimientos y capacidades. El análisis de las experiencias de integración en salud muestra que esta depende de las fortalezas de cada país y, en gran parte, de los procesos políticos nacionales.Despite their shared history, the Andean countries are socially and politically diverse, with heterogeneous health realities and complex integration processes. General developments such as the Latin American Free Trade Association and Latin American Integration Association have existed for decades, along with others of a regional scope, like the Andean Community of Nations, Caribbean Community, and Central American Common Market. The health field has a specific instrument in the Andean Region called the Hipólito Unánue Agreement, created in 1971. Integration processes have concentrated on economic aspects, based on preferential customs agreements that have led to an important long-term increase in trade. Less progress has been made in the field of health in terms of sharing national experiences, knowledge, and capabilities. Analysis of

  14. Análisis geométrico de la fracturación del frente de levantamiento de la Sierra de San Luis Geometric analysis of the fractures of the uplift front of the Sierra de San Luis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Sales

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de conocer nuevos aspectos sobre la fracturación que caracteriza a los márgenes occidental y septentrional de la sierra de San Luis, donde se ha concentrado el levantamiento andino, se relevó a lo largo de los mismos una población de 975 fallas conteniendo estrías de fricción. Dichos datos fueron analizados mediante programas de computación que discriminan la participación proporcional de cada uno de los componentes del vector rechazo total, en función de la actitud espacial de las superficies de fallas y del ángulo de rake de las estrías. En el frente serrano septentrional, las fallas muestran un notorio predominio de la componente horizontal longitudinal (L del vector rechazo total, pese a la diferente actitud espacial de las fracturas relevadas. Una situación muy semejante se observó en el frente occidental, aunque entre los sectores norte, centro y sur del mismo se reconocieron diferentes relaciones proporcionales entre el vector rechazo horizontal longitudinal (L y las componentes del rechazo horizontal transversal (T y vertical (V. Los resultados destacan una importante participación de la componente horizontal longitudinal en la deformación global del macizo, pero el rol de los movimientos transcurrentes en el levantamiento y deformación de este bloque pampeano, no ha podido ser aún cuantificado.In order to address new issues regarding the fractures that characterize the western and northern margins of the Sierra de San Luis, where the Andean uplift has been concentrated, a population of 975 faults with preserved slickenlines was surveyed. Such data were analyzed through a software for calculating the proportional participation of each component of the total slip vector, through strike, dip and slickenline rake data. At the northern range front, fault data show a strong imposition of the longitudinal horizontal component (L, despite the variety of fault attitudes in space. A similar situation was

  15. Planet Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    A more adequate name for Planet Earth could be Planet Ocean, seeing that ocean water covers more than seventy percent of the planet's surface and plays a fundamental role in the survival of almost all living species. Actually, oceans are aqueous solutions of extraordinary importance due to its direct implications in the current living conditions of our planet and its potential role on the continuity of life as well, as long as we know how to respect the limits of its immense but finite capacities. We may therefore state that natural aqueous solutions are excellent contexts for the approach and further understanding of many important chemical concepts, whether they be of chemical equilibrium, acid-base reactions, solubility and oxidation-reduction reactions. The topic of the 2014 edition of GIFT ('Our Changing Planet') will explore some of the recent complex changes of our environment, subjects that have been lately included in Chemistry teaching programs. This is particularly relevant on high school programs, with themes such as 'Earth Atmosphere: radiation, matter and structure', 'From Atmosphere to the Ocean: solutions on Earth and to Earth', 'Spring Waters and Public Water Supply: Water acidity and alkalinity'. These are the subjects that I want to develop on my school project with my pupils. Geographically, our school is located near the sea in a region where a stream flows into the sea. Besides that, our school water comes from a borehole which shows that the quality of the water we use is of significant importance. This project will establish and implement several procedures that, supported by physical and chemical analysis, will monitor the quality of water - not only the water used in our school, but also the surrounding waters (stream and beach water). The samples will be collected in the borehole of the school, in the stream near the school and in the beach of Carcavelos. Several physical-chemical characteristics related to the quality of the water will

  16. Size class structure, growth rates, and orientation of the central Andean cushion Azorella compacta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Kleier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Azorella compacta (llareta; Apiaceae forms dense, woody, cushions and characterizes the high elevation rocky slopes of the central Andean Altiplano. Field studies of an elevational gradient of A. compacta within Lauca National Park in northern Chile found a reverse J-shape distribution of size classes of individuals with abundant small plants at all elevations. A new elevational limit for A. compacta was established at 5,250 m. A series of cushions marked 14 years earlier showed either slight shrinkage or small degrees of growth up to 2.2 cm yr−1. Despite their irregularity in growth, cushions of A. compacta show a strong orientation, centered on a north-facing aspect and angle of about 20° from horizontal. This exposure to maximize solar irradiance closely matches previous observations of a population favoring north-facing slopes at a similar angle. Populations of A. compacta appear to be stable, or even expanding, with young plants abundant.

  17. Size class structure, growth rates, and orientation of the central Andean cushion Azorella compacta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenary, Tim; Graham, Eric A.; Stenzel, William; Rundel, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Azorella compacta (llareta; Apiaceae) forms dense, woody, cushions and characterizes the high elevation rocky slopes of the central Andean Altiplano. Field studies of an elevational gradient of A. compacta within Lauca National Park in northern Chile found a reverse J-shape distribution of size classes of individuals with abundant small plants at all elevations. A new elevational limit for A. compacta was established at 5,250 m. A series of cushions marked 14 years earlier showed either slight shrinkage or small degrees of growth up to 2.2 cm yr−1. Despite their irregularity in growth, cushions of A. compacta show a strong orientation, centered on a north-facing aspect and angle of about 20° from horizontal. This exposure to maximize solar irradiance closely matches previous observations of a population favoring north-facing slopes at a similar angle. Populations of A. compacta appear to be stable, or even expanding, with young plants abundant. PMID:25802811

  18. The Sabethines of Northern Andean Coffee-Growing Regions of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaza-Vasco, Juan; López-Rubio, Andrés; Galeano, Juan; Uribe, Sandra; Vélez, Iván; Porter, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Sampling for sabethine mosquitoes occurred intermittently from September 2007 to April 2013 in 17 municipalities, located in 5 departments (divisions) in the northern Andean coffee-growing regions of Colombia. Of the 9 genera within the Sabethini tribe known to occur in the Neotropical region, 6 were encountered including 15 species: Jonhbelkinia ulopus, Limatus durhamii, Sabethes ignotus, Sa. luxodens, Sa. undosus, Shannoniana fluviatilis, Trichoprosopon compressum, Tr. digitatum, Tr. evansae, Tr. pallidiventer s.l., Tr. pallidiventer s.s., Wyeomyia arthrostigma, Wy. oblita, Wy. ulocoma, and Wy. undulata. The species Sa. luxodens and Wy. undulata constitute new records for Colombia. These records broaden the knowledge of this important group that includes some important species related to the arbovirus transmission. Records are from the northern Colombian Andes, a region noted for coffee cultivation and ecotourism.

  19. [Possibilities of Lupinus mutabolis and Lupinus albus in the Andean countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, R; von Baer, E

    1977-12-01

    Lupinus albus and Lupinus mutabilis may achieve importance among the andean countries in which soy bean can not grow due to ecological reasons. Both lupin varieties are outstanding because of their high protein and oil content. Its alkaloid content limits the lupins usage; however the bitter substances can be eliminated by means of genetic selection or technological processing. Beside the intoxication caused by alkaloids exists the lupinosis, which is caused by a micotoxin. This disease can be observed when animals pasture forages which suffered under a secundary attack of fungus. According to the results obtained up to date other antimetabolic substances present in the legums have no significant importance. The lupin seed flour is adequate for animal consumption, being used for this effect in different countries. Starting next year there exist the prospects of employing Lupinus mutabilis as an oil source in Peru and Lupinus albus as proteic flour in Chile.

  20. Mercury Contamination in an Indicator Fish Species from Andean Amazonian Rivers Affected by Petroleum Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jena; Coomes, Oliver T; Mainville, Nicolas; Mergler, Donna

    2015-09-01

    Elevated mercury (Hg) concentrations in fish from Amazonia have been associated with gold-mining, hydroelectric dams and deforestation but few studies consider the role of petroleum extraction. Hg levels were determined in fish samples collected in three river basins in Ecuador and Peru with contrasting petroleum exploitation and land-use characteristics. The non-migratory, piscivorous species, Hoplias malabaricus, was used as a bioindicator. The rate of Hg increase with body weight for this species was significantly higher on the Corrientes River, near the site of a recent oil spill, than on the other two rivers. In the absence of substantial deforestation and other anthropogenic sources in the Corrientes River basin, this finding suggests that oil contamination in Andean Amazonia may have a significant impact on Hg levels in fish.

  1. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwanodi, Oroma

    2017-09-08

    This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness.

  2. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oroma Nwanodi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness.

  3. Spatial modeling of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Andean region of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flórez, Mauricio; Ocampo, Clara Beatriz; Valderrama-Ardila, Carlos; Alexander, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify environmental risk factors for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Colombia and map high-risk municipalities. The study area was the Colombian Andean region, comprising 715 rural and urban municipalities. We used 10 years of CL surveillance: 2000-2009. We used spatial-temporal analysis - conditional autoregressive Poisson random effects modelling - in a Bayesian framework to model the dependence of municipality-level incidence on land use, climate, elevation and population density. Bivariable spatial analysis identified rainforests, forests and secondary vegetation, temperature, and annual precipitation as positively associated with CL incidence. By contrast, livestock agroecosystems and temperature seasonality were negatively associated. Multivariable analysis identified land use - rainforests and agro-livestock - and climate - temperature, rainfall and temperature seasonality - as best predictors of CL. We conclude that climate and land use can be used to identify areas at high risk of CL and that this approach is potentially applicable elsewhere in Latin America. PMID:27355214

  4. Voices and Agencies in the Education of Young Rural Andean Women: A Qualitative Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Alvarado

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study describes the voices and agencialities of female rural Andean students enrolled in high school. The study explores how educational practices and discourses in the school and family context impact these young women’s voices and agencialities. Also analyzed are the actions they are taking to change their existing situation. The post-structural approach and theories of resistance, voice and power inform the literature review and analysis of the study, which describes the many educational and sociocultural obstacles the young women face: an educational curriculum not adapted to their needs, untrained teachers with low expectations for their students’ future, and an educational environment that silences their voices. The results show that despite of all obstacles, these women have a firm determination to seek a different future, rather than live under the oppressive patriarchal cycle their mothers and female relatives have endured.

  5. ANDEAN COSMOLOGY AND RELIGION: A HISTORICAL DYNAMICS OF ENCOUNTERS, MISSED CONNECTIONS AND REUNIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avelar Araujo Santos Junior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Religiosity of contemporary Andean indigenous peoples is constituted by a complex interaction between theology and the original items from the Christianized and ideologies historically produced phenomena such as taxation, interpenetration, removal, syncretism, resistance and reinvention. Embedded in this context was developed as a way of enhancing identity particular worldview is quite representative of their feelings and attitudes about the world, mainly in what it says respect to their territory and their community experiences and patterns of reciprocity in the socialization of traditions. Thus, our proposal in this article is to analyze some of the different elements of the symbolic representation, mythological and ritualistic of these communities, characterized by persistent conflict between a hegemonic dominance of the creative and creative autonomy.

  6. Collaborative networks and patent production in Andean Community of Nations universities (UCANS, 2005-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Agüero Aguilar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The competitiveness and technological development of a region are measured by the degree of innovation supporting them. The quantity and quality of patents generated and applied in production dynamics serve as an element for evaluation. In this sense, universities play a role as generators and transmitters of knowledge. So it is important to identify the level of their collaboration and the trends in terms of technology application in order to establish future policies for development in this sector. This article identifies the degree of collaboration, types of patents, actors (primary and secondary and dynamics of patents produced at the Andean Community of Nations universities during the period 2005-2015 and present in the European Patent Office database. In conclusion, there is a great disparity between CAN universities regarding patent production, so it is necessary to strengthen the collaborative level among universities in this community. Nevertheless, an increase is seen in the production of patents.

  7. Invertebrate metacommunity structure and dynamics in an andean glacial stream network facing climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andino, Patricio;

    2015-01-01

    theory as a conceptual framework to better understand how river network structure influences the spatial organization of aquatic communities in glacierized catchments. At 51 stream sites in an Andean glacierized catchment (Ecuador), we sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, measured physico......-chemical and food resource conditions, and calculated geographical, altitudinal and glaciality distances among all sites. Using partial redundancy analysis, we partitioned community variation to evaluate the relative strength of environmental conditions (e.g., glaciality, food resource) vs. spatial processes (e.......g., overland, watercourse, and downstream directional dispersal) in organizing the aquatic metacommunity. Results revealed that both environmental and spatial variables significantly explained community variation among sites. Among all environmental variables, the glacial influence component best explained...

  8. Microsatellite isolation and characterization for Colletotrichum spp, causal agent of anthracnose in Andean blackberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulanda, M L; López, A M; Isaza, L; López, P

    2014-09-26

    The genus Colletotrichum, comprised of pathogenic fungi that affect plants grown worldwide, causes the disease known as anthracnose in several fruit and vegetable species. Several studies conducted on plants have shown that the disease is characterized by the presence of one or several species of the fungus attacking the fruit or other organs of the same host. To develop and implement effective control strategies, it is vital to understand the genetic structure of the fungus in agricultural systems, identify associated Colletotrichum species, and define the subpopulations responsible for the disease. Molecular tools were accordingly developed to characterize genotypic populations of Colletotrichum spp, causal agent of anthracnose in commercial crops of Andean blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth.). A microsatellite-enriched library for Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was developed to identify and characterize microsatellite loci among isolates collected in R. glaucus plantations. Thirty microsatellites were developed and tested in 36 isolates gathered from eight different blackberry-production areas of Colombia. Ten pairs of microsatellites were polymorphic.

  9. An Environmental Watch System for the Andean countries: El Observatorio Andino

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, Ángel G; Velasquez, Ramon; Monterrey, Luis; Leon, Gloria; Ruiz, Franklyn; Recalde, Cristina; Cadena, Jaime; Mejia, Raul; Paredes, Marcos; Bazo, Juan; Reyes, Carmen; Carrasco, Gualberto; Castellon, Yaruska; Villarroel, Claudia; Quintana, Juan; Urdaneta, Avel

    2010-01-01

    An experimental Environmental Watch System, the so-called Observatorio Andino-OA (Observatorio Andino), has been implemented in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Chile over the past two years. The OA is a collaborative and regional network that aims to monitor several environmental variables and develop accurate forecasts based on different scientific tools. Its overall goal is to improve risk assessments, set up Early Warning Systems, support decision-making processes, and provide easily- and intuitively-understandable spatial maps to end-users. The initiative works under the scientific and logistic coordination of the Centro de Modelado Cient\\'ifico (CMC) at Zulia University, Venezuela, and the Centro Internacional para la Investigaci\\'on del Fen\\'omeno 'El Ni\\~no' (CIIFEN), and is operated at a local level by the National Weather Services (NWSs) of the aforementioned six Andean nations. The OA provides several freely-available model outputs including meteorological and hydrological forecasts...

  10. Ocean Uses: Hawaii (PROUA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Pacific Regional Ocean Uses Atlas (PROUA) Project is an innovative partnership between NOAA and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) designed to...

  11. Phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae in a sub-Andean forest from the Norte de Santander, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hoyos-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The recognition of communities of arthropods with medical importance in natural systems constitutes an important step in the prediction of possible epidemic events and/or emergence of infectious diseases in the human population. This is due to anthropogenic impact in natural areas and landscape modification, which changes the dynamics of pathogenic agents, reservoirs, and vector insects. In this study, an inventory was compiled of species of the genus Lutzomyia present in sub-Andean forest from the confluence of the Pamplonita River basin. Methods: CDC-light and Shannon traps were used for collecting adult phlebotomine sandflies during the month of October 2013 in a sub-Andean forest from river basin Pamplonita. All specimens were identified using morphological keys. The epidemiological relevance of each species was reported using a literature review about natural infection or vector incrimination with Leishmania species or other pathogens microorganism. Results: A total of 2755 specimens belonging to eight species of the genus Lutzomyia were collected. Out of the eight species, seven belonged to the group verrucarum (Lutzomyia sp - townsendi series, L. ovallesi, L. spinicrassa, L. serrana, L. townsendi, L. nuneztovari and L. pia, while one belonged to the subgenus Helcocyrtomyia (L. hartmanni. A new registry of L. townsendi was observed for the Norte de Santander department. Interpretation & conclusion: The appreciable diversity of the verrucarum group observed in this area suggest further investigation on the biogeography and evolution of this group, and epidemiological risk for human populations around this area, as there are reports of Leishmania natural infection and favourable conditions for domestication of phlebotomines in rural towns.

  12. Accumulation rate in a tropical Andean glacier as a proxy for northern Amazon precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Ribeiro, Rafael; Simões, Jefferson Cardia; Ramirez, Edson; Taupin, Jean-Denis; Assayag, Elias; Dani, Norberto

    2017-04-01

    Andean tropical glaciers have shown a clear shrinkage throughout the last few decades. However, it is unclear how this general retreat is associated with variations in rainfall patterns in the Amazon basin. To investigate this question, we compared the annual net accumulation variations in the Bolivian Cordillera Real (Andes), which is derived from an ice core from the Nevado Illimani (16° 37' S, 67° 46' W), covering the period 1960-1999 using the Amazonian Rainfall Index, Northern Atlantic Index (TNA), Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The accumulation rate at the Nevado Illimani ice core decreased by almost 25% after 1980, from 1.02 w.eq. a-1 (water equivalent per year) in the 1961-1981 period to 0.76 w.eq. a-1 in the 1981-1999 period. The Northern Amazonian Rainfall (NAR) index best reflects changes in accumulation rates in the Bolivian ice core. Our proposal is based on two observations: (1) This area shows reduced rainfall associated with a more frequent and intense El Niño (during the positive phase of the MEI). The opposite (more rain) is true during La Niña phases. (2) Comparisons of the ice core record and NAR, PDO, and MEI indexes showed similar trends for the early 1980s, represented by a decrease in the accumulation rates and its standard deviations, probably indicating the same causality. The general changes observed by early 1980s coincided with the beginning of a PDO warm phase. This was followed by an increase in the Amazonian and tropical Andean precipitation from 1999, coinciding with a new PDO phase. However, this increase did not result in an expansion of the Zongo Glacier area.

  13. Acceleration and novelty: community restoration speeds recovery and transforms species composition in Andean cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah Jane; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M

    2016-01-01

    Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. This study investigates the efficacy of community-based tree-planting projects to accelerate cloud forest recovery, as compared to unassisted natural regeneration. This study takes place in northwest Andean Ecuador, where the majority of the original, highly diverse cloud forests have been cleared, in five communities that initiated tree-planting projects to restore forests in 2003. In 2011, we identified tree species along transects in planted forests (n = 5), naturally regenerating forests (n = 5), and primary forests (n = 5). We also surveyed 120 households about their restoration methods, tree preferences, and forest uses. We found that tree diversity was higher in planted than in unplanted secondary forest, but both were less diverse than primary forests. Ordination analysis showed that all three forests had distinct species compositions, although planted forests shared more species with primary forests than did unplanted forests. Planted forests also contained more animal-dispersed species in both the planted canopy and in the unplanted, regenerating understory than unplanted forests, and contained the highest proportion of species with use value for local people. While restoring forest increased biodiversity and accelerated forest recovery, restored forests may also represent novel ecosystems that are distinct from the region's previous ecosystems and, given their usefulness to people, are likely to be more common in the future.

  14. DNA Barcoding of an Assembly of Montane Andean Butterflies (Satyrinae): Geographical Scale and Identification Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, M A; Cadavid, I C; Valdés, L; Álvarez, C F; Uribe, S I; Vila, R; Pyrcz, T W

    2017-01-23

    DNA barcoding is a technique used primarily for the documentation and identification of biological diversity based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Butterflies have received particular attention in DNA barcoding studies, although varied performance may be obtained due to different scales of geographic sampling and speciation processes in various groups. The montane Andean Satyrinae constitutes a challenging study group for taxonomy. The group displays high richness, with more of 550 species, and remarkable morphological similarity among taxa, which renders their identification difficult. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of DNA barcodes in the identification of montane Andean satyrines and the effect of increased geographical scale of sampling on identification performance. Mitochondrial sequences were obtained from 104 specimens of 39 species and 16 genera, collected in a forest remnant in the northwest Andes. DNA barcoding has proved to be a useful tool for the identification of the specimens, with a well-defined gap and producing clusters with unambiguous identifications for all the morphospecies in the study area. The expansion of the geographical scale with published data increased genetic distances within species and reduced those among species, but did not generally reduce the success of specimen identification. Only in Forsterinaria rustica (Butler, 1868), a taxon with high intraspecific variation, the barcode gap was lost and low support for monophyly was obtained. Likewise, expanded sampling resulted in a substantial increase in the intraspecific distance in Morpho sulkowskyi (Kollar, 1850); Panyapedaliodes drymaea (Hewitson, 1858); Lymanopoda obsoleta (Westwood, 1851); and Lymanopoda labda Hewitson, 1861; but for these species, the barcode gap was maintained. These divergent lineages are nonetheless worth a detailed study of external and genitalic morphology variation, as well as ecological features, in order to determine the potential

  15. Uptake of Hg2+ by picocyanobacteria in natural water from four Andean lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diéguez M.C.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In lake food webs, planktonic bacteria and algae represent the greatest bioconcentration step for Hg2+ and monomethyl-Hg (MeHg. As they are the most abundant organisms in planktonic trophic webs and also the main food resource for herbivorous plankton, they can mobilize large amounts of Hg to higher trophic levels. In Andean Patagonian lakes (Argentina, dissolved organic matter (DOM concentration and character, coupled with photo-reactions, play a central role in the complexation of Hg2+ in the water column and can even regulate the uptake of Hg2+ by planktonic algae. In this investigation we evaluated the DOM character of natural waters (NW from four Andean lakes and studied its influence on the uptake of 197Hg2+ in a strain of the picocyanobacteria Synechococcus by using Hg2+ labeled with 197Hg2+. The uptake of radiolabeled Hg2+ by Synechococcus showed different magnitude in NW of lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Morenito and Escondido. Increasing lake DOM concentration reduced the bioavailability of Hg2+ as indicated by the lower uptakes rates found in NW with higher complexity and concentration of the DOM pool. Uptakes of Hg2+ by this picocyanobacteria contrasted among NW from pelagic (surface and bottom and littoral compartments of Lake Escondido which suggest that the entry of this metal may be highly variable even in the same environment. The study of the uptake of radiolabeled Hg2+ in a set of dilutions of NW from Lake Escondido demonstrated that the bioavailability of Hg2+ decrease with increasing DOM concentration.

  16. Hydrological connectivity of alluvial Andean valleys: a groundwater/surface-water interaction case study in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Pablo; Anibas, Christian; Batelaan, Okke; Huysmans, Marijke; Wyseure, Guido

    2016-06-01

    The Andean region is characterized by important intramontane alluvial and glacial valleys; a typical example is the Tarqui alluvial plain, Ecuador. Such valley plains are densely populated and/or very attractive for urban and infrastructural development. Their aquifers offer opportunities for the required water resources. Groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction generally entails recharge to or discharge from the aquifer, dependent on the hydraulic connection between surface water and groundwater. Since GW-SW interaction in Andean catchments has hardly been addressed, the objectives of this study are to investigate GW-SW interaction in the Tarqui alluvial plain and to understand the role of the morphology of the alluvial valley in the hydrological response and in the hydrological connection between hillslopes and the aquifers in the valley floor. This study is based on extensive field measurements, groundwater-flow modelling and the application of temperature as a groundwater tracer. Results show that the morphological conditions of a valley influence GW-SW interaction. Gaining and losing river sections are observed in narrow and wide alluvial valley sections, respectively. Modelling shows a strong hydrological connectivity between the hillslopes and the alluvial valley; up to 92 % of recharge of the alluvial deposits originates from lateral flow from the hillslopes. The alluvial plain forms a buffer or transition zone for the river as it sustains a gradual flow from the hills to the river. Future land-use planning and development should include concepts discussed in this study, such as hydrological connectivity, in order to better evaluate impact assessments on water resources and aquatic ecosystems.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiderveen, Grady H; Padder, Bilal A; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Song, Qijian; Kelly, James D

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS). Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481) included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219) tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans.

  18. Temperature dependence of the distribution of organochlorine compounds in the mosses of the Andean mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimalt, Joan O; Borghini, Francesca; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Barra, Ricardo; García, Carlos J Torres; Focardi, Silvano

    2004-10-15

    Organochlorine compounds (OC), namely pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexanes, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), and DDTs, have been studied in mosses distributed over three altitude gradients of the Andean mountains in Chile at 18 degrees S (3200-4500 m above sea level), 37 degrees S (345-1330 m), and 45 degrees S (10-700 m). The observed concentrations range among the lowestvalues ever reported in remote sites, but they are still higher than those found in previously studied Antarctic areas. The log transformed OC concentrations show a significant linear dependence from reciprocal of temperature independently of the origin of the compounds, e.g. industrial, agricultural, or mixed. In the case of the more volatile OC these correlations involve variance percentages higher than 50%. This good agreement gives further ground to temperature as the driving factor for the retention of long-range transported OC in remote ecosystems, including those in the southern hemisphere such as the Andean mountains. In the context of the samples selected for study, the temperature dependences in the areas of similar latitude are related to altitude. Thus, all OC in the highest altitude gradient (18 degrees S) and most compounds in the other two profiles (37 degrees S and 45 degrees S) exhibit higher concentrations with decreasing annual average temperature and thus increase with elevation above sea level. However, theoretical examination of the exponential equation relating OC concentrations to reciprocal of absolute temperatures shows that besides the temperature differences between highest and lowest elevation, the most relevant factor determining the OC concentration gradients is the lowest temperature value of each altitudinal series. That is, the point at highest elevation.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grady H Zuiderveen

    Full Text Available Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS. Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481 included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219 tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans.

  20. A novel candidate region for genetic adaptation to high altitude in Andean populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Valverde

    Full Text Available Humans living at high altitude (≥ 2,500 meters above sea level have acquired unique abilities to survive the associated extreme environmental conditions, including hypoxia, cold temperature, limited food availability and high levels of free radicals and oxidants. Long-term inhabitants of the most elevated regions of the world have undergone extensive physiological and/or genetic changes, particularly in the regulation of respiration and circulation, when compared to lowland populations. Genome scans have identified candidate genes involved in altitude adaption in the Tibetan Plateau and the Ethiopian highlands, in contrast to populations from the Andes, which have not been as intensively investigated. In the present study, we focused on three indigenous populations from Bolivia: two groups of Andean natives, Aymara and Quechua, and the low-altitude control group of Guarani from the Gran Chaco lowlands. Using pooled samples, we identified a number of SNPs exhibiting large allele frequency differences over 900,000 genotyped SNPs. A region in chromosome 10 (within the cytogenetic bands q22.3 and q23.1 was significantly differentiated between highland and lowland groups. We resequenced ~1.5 Mb surrounding the candidate region and identified strong signals of positive selection in the highland populations. A composite of multiple signals like test localized the signal to FAM213A and a related enhancer; the product of this gene acts as an antioxidant to lower oxidative stress and may help to maintain bone mass. The results suggest that positive selection on the enhancer might increase the expression of this antioxidant, and thereby prevent oxidative damage. In addition, the most significant signal in a relative extended haplotype homozygosity analysis was localized to the SFTPD gene, which encodes a surfactant pulmonary-associated protein involved in normal respiration and innate host defense. Our study thus identifies two novel candidate genes and

  1. Differential uplift and incision of the Yakima River terraces, central Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Adrian M; Amos, Colin B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan; Staisch, Lydia; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Sherrod, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The fault-related Yakima folds deform Miocene basalts and younger deposits of the Columbia Plateau in central Washington State. Geodesy implies ~2 mm/yr of NNE directed shortening across the folds, but until now the distribution and rates of Quaternary deformation among individual structures has been unclear. South of Ellensburg, Washington, the Yakima River cuts a ~600 m deep canyon across several Yakima folds, preserving gravel-mantled strath terraces that record progressive bedrock incision and related rock uplift. Here we integrate cosmogenic isochron burial dating of the strath terrace gravels with lidar analysis and field mapping to quantify rates of Quaternary differential incision and rock uplift across two folds transected by the Yakima River: Manastash and Umtanum Ridge. Isochron burial ages from in situ produced 26Al and 10Be at seven sites across the folds date episodes of strath terrace formation over the past ~2.9 Ma. Average bedrock incision rates across the Manastash (~88 m/Myr) and Umtanum Ridge (~46 m/Myr) anticlines are roughly 4 to 8 times higher than rates in the intervening syncline (~14 m/Myr) and outside the canyon (~10 m/Myr). These contrasting rates demonstrate differential bedrock incision driven by ongoing Quaternary rock uplift across the folds at rates corresponding to ~0.13 and ~0.06 mm/yr shortening across postulated master faults dipping 30 ± 10°S beneath the Manastash and Umtanum Ridge anticlines, respectively. The reported Quaternary shortening across the anticlines accounts for ~10% of the ~2 mm/yr geodetic budget, suggesting that other Yakima structures actively accommodate the remaining contemporary deformation.

  2. The topographic signature of Quaternary tectonic uplift in the Ardennes massif (Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sougnez

    2011-04-01