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Sample records for ancient egyptian herbal

  1. Ancient Egyptian surgical heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Aly

    2010-12-01

    Egyptian medicine influenced the medicine of neighboring cultures, including the culture of ancient Greece. From Greece, its influence spread onward, thereby affecting Western civilization significantly. The oldest extant Egyptian medical texts are six papyri: The Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus and the Ebers Medical Papyrus are famous. PMID:21208098

  2. [Ancient Egyptian Odontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghult, B

    1999-01-01

    In ancient Egypt during the reign of Pharaoh Djoser, circa 2650 BC, the Step Pyramid was constructed by Imhotep. He was later worshiped as the God of Medicine. One of his contemporaries was the powerful writer Hesy who is reproduced on a panel showing a rebus of a swallow, a tusk and an arrow. He is therefore looked upon as being the first depicted odontologist. The art of writing begun in Egypt in about 3100 BC and the medical texts we know from different papyri were copied with hieratic signs around 1900-1100 BC. One of the most famous is the Papyrus Ebers. It was purchased by professor Ebers on a research travel to Luxor in 1873. Two years later a beautiful facsimile in color was published and the best translation came in 1958 in German. The text includes 870 remedies and some of them are related to teeth and oral troubles like pain in the mouth, gingivitis, periodontitis and cavities in the teeth. The most common oral pain was probably pulpitis caused by extreme attrition due to the high consumption of bread contaminated with soil and/or quern minerals. Another text is the Papyrus Edwin Smith with four surgical cases of dental interest. The "toothworms" that were presumed to bring about decayed teeth have not been identified in the medical texts. It was not until 1889 W.D. Miller presented a scientific explanation that cavities were caused by bacteria. In spite of extensive research only a few evidence of prosthetic and invasive treatments have been found and these dental artifacts have probably been made post mortem. Some of the 150 identified doctors were associated with treatments of disorders of the mouth. The stele of Seneb from Sa'is during the 26th dynasty of Psamtik, 664-525 BC, shows a young man who probably was a dental healer well known to Pharaoh and his court. Clement of Alexandria mentions circa 200 AD that the written knowledge of the old Egyptians was gathered in 42 collections of papyri. Number 37-42 contained the medical writings. The

  3. Did the ancient Egyptians migrate to ancient Nigeria?

    OpenAIRE

    Jock M. Agai

    2014-01-01

    Literatures concerning the history of West African peoples published from 1900 to 1970 debate�the possible migrations of the Egyptians into West Africa. Writers like Samuel Johnson and�Lucas Olumide believe that the ancient Egyptians penetrated through ancient Nigeria but Leo�Frobenius and Geoffrey Parrinder frowned at this opinion. Using the works of these early�20th century writers of West African history together with a Yoruba legend which teaches�about the origin of their earliest ancesto...

  4. A probabilistic model of Ancient Egyptian writing

    OpenAIRE

    Nederhof, Mark Jan; Rahman, Fahrurrozi

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates a probabilistic model to describe how signs form words in Ancient Egyptian writing. This applies to both hieroglyphic and hieratic texts. The model uses an intermediate layer of sign functions. Experiments are concerned with finding the most likely sequence of sign functions that relates a given sequence of signs and a given sequence of phonemes. Postprint

  5. Moessbauer effect study of ancient Egyptian pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in examining ancient Egyptian pottery. From the values of Moessbauer parameters and the differences for the individual samples, conclusions could be drawn as to the temperature of baking and the kind of clay used in various archaeological periods. (A.K.)

  6. Did the ancient Egyptians migrate to ancient Nigeria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jock M. Agai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Literatures concerning the history of West African peoples published from 1900 to 1970 debate�the possible migrations of the Egyptians into West Africa. Writers like Samuel Johnson and�Lucas Olumide believe that the ancient Egyptians penetrated through ancient Nigeria but Leo�Frobenius and Geoffrey Parrinder frowned at this opinion. Using the works of these early�20th century writers of West African history together with a Yoruba legend which teaches�about the origin of their earliest ancestor(s, this researcher investigates the theories that the�ancient Egyptians had contact with the ancient Nigerians and particularly with the Yorubas.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: There is an existing ideology�amongst the Yorubas and other writers of Yoruba history that the original ancestors of�the Yorubas originated in ancient Egypt hence there was migration between Egypt and�Yorubaland. This researcher contends that even if there was migration between Egypt and�Nigeria, such migration did not take place during the predynastic and dynastic period as�speculated by some scholars. The subject is open for further research.

  7. Did the ancient egyptians discover Algol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Porceddu, S.; Porceddu, S.; Lyytinen, J.; Kajatkari, P.; Markkanen, T.; Toivari-Viitala, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fabritius discovered the first variable star, Mira, in 1596. Holwarda determined the 11 months period of Mira in 1638. Montanari discovered the next variable star, Algol, in 1669. Its period, 2.867 days, was determined by Goodricke (178). Algol was associated with demon-like creatures, "Gorgon" in ancient Greek and "ghoul" in ancient Arab mythology. This indicates that its variability was discovered much before 1669 (Wilk 1996), but this mythological evidence is ambiguous (Davis 1975). For thousands of years, the Ancient Egyptian Scribes (AES) observed stars for timekeeping in a region, where there are nearly 300 clear nights a year. We discovered a significant periodicity of 2.850 days in their calendar for lucky and unlucky days dated to 1224 BC, "the Cairo Calendar". Several astrophysical and astronomical tests supported our conclusion that this was the period of Algol three millennia ago. The "ghoulish habits" of Algol could explain this 0.017 days period increase (Battersby 2012).

  8. A new look at old bread: ancient Egyptian baking

    OpenAIRE

    Delwen Samuel

    1999-01-01

    Despite abundant archaeological, pictorial and textual evidence of ancient Egyptian life and death, we have little detailed information about the staple diet of most of the population. Now experimental work by a postdoctoral Wellcome Research Fellow in Bioarchaeology at the Institute is revealing how the ancient Egyptians made their daily bread.

  9. Connecting Philosophy of Ancient Egyptians to Modern Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Aminuddin Hassan; Nurul A.A.K. Anuar; Norhasni Z. Abiddin

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Associating any knowledge from ancient Egyptians to modern civilization and thinking was important and had its own value. The process of understanding knowledge related to ancient Egyptians is actually based on the nature of philosophical thought. Approach: In the discussion of ancient Egypt philosophy, it is important to look at it from the perspectives of the four branches of philosophy; metaphysics, epistemology, axiology and logic. Metaphysics has two elements, which ar...

  10. Connecting Philosophy of Ancient Egyptians to Modern Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminuddin Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Associating any knowledge from ancient Egyptians to modern civilization and thinking was important and had its own value. The process of understanding knowledge related to ancient Egyptians is actually based on the nature of philosophical thought. Approach: In the discussion of ancient Egypt philosophy, it is important to look at it from the perspectives of the four branches of philosophy; metaphysics, epistemology, axiology and logic. Metaphysics has two elements, which are ontology and cosmology. Arguments in ontology explain why most activities of people from the ancient Egypt involved agriculture and how they perceived their lives in the midst of this activity, this includes the concept of human creator; treatment to man and woman; and Egyptians’ Gods and Goddesses. In addition, cosmology analyses the universe; everything inside and out of it, as well as what makes them stay and move. Results: Whereas, epistemology refers to how ancient Egyptians appreciated the existence of knowledge among them by considering the sources, types, categories and importance of particular knowledge that was gained in different ways. Besides, the aspects of axiology are also discussed here, especially in the ancient Egypt’s hieroglyphics. This writing discusses the level of aesthetical value posed by all these Egyptians, even at the time of about 3000 B.C. They could discuss to form pictographic as their written language. This activity lasted for thousands of years. Conclusion: Last but not the least, logic is another aspect that can be used in the discussion across metaphysics, epistemology and also axiology, for instance, the thinking of the philosophy behind Egyptians life. This writing relates the philosophy of ancient Egypt with the life of the modern world, not only in Egypt, but also in another part of the world, which exist from the impact of the philosophy of ancient Egypt. Modern views of Egyptians’ thinking are often vastly based

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopic analysis of ancient Egyptian pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten pieces of Egyptian pottery ware and eleven silt samples collected at Hierakonopolis (Nile River, Egypt) were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Three Nile silt samples and three pottery sherds were test fired and refired in an oxidized atmosphere up to 11000C. Changes of the Moessbauer parameters depend upon the firing temperatures as well as the firing atmosphere. (Auth.)

  12. Back to the roots - dermatology in ancient Egyptian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Although ancient Greek and Roman medicine is generally considered the origin of European medicine, there is evidence in ancient Egyptian texts suggesting a precursor role of ancient Egyptian medicine in this regard. What did Greek and Roman physicians learn from their Egyptian counterparts? Of the medical papyri discovered to date, the largest and most significant - the Ebers papyrus and the Smith papyrus - originate from the beginning of the New Kingdom, however, they were - at least in part - already written during the Old Kingdom. Considering the times, the spectrum of diseases treated as well as the range of conservative and surgical treatment methods was truly astounding. Taking a medical history, performing a thorough manual examination, and assessing clinical findings constituted key components in establishing a diagnosis. Apart from hygienic aspects, skin and hair disorders, the treatment of acute and chronic wounds and injuries as well as cosmetic procedures took on an important role. Even back then, physicians sought to assess inflammatory processes with respect to their cardinal features, implement graded wound therapy, and treat diseases with allopathic drugs. The 'channel theory' prevalent at that time, in which the unimpeded flow of bodily fluids was considered a fundamental prerequisite for health, may likely be regarded as precursor of ancient Greek humoral pathology. The latter became the basis for the subsequently established theory of the four humors, and was thus essential for the entire field of medieval medicine. PMID:27027749

  13. Unwrapping an Ancient Egyptian Mummy Using X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a project of unwrapping an ancient Egyptian mummy using x-ray computed tomography (CT). About 600 x-ray CT images were obtained through the mummified body of a female named Tjetmutjengebtiu (or Jeni for short), who was a singer in the great temple of Karnak in Egypt during the 22nd dynasty (c 945-715 BC). The x-ray CT images…

  14. Radiation levels in ancient Egyptian mummies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation levels were studied in the mummies room and some galleries in the Egyptian museum as well as in the medical museum of the Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University. ''gamma'' and β radiation levels show almost background values in direct contrast to some mummies in the closed mummies room and inside the glass cases used for protection. Radon decay products in the room atmosphere and inside the glass cases enclosing some mummies show slightly higher levels than the background which were attributed to inefficient ventilation. After reasonable ventilation during the work these levels approached the normal values. High resolution γ-ray spectroscopy measurements for the aerosol samples on the filters have shown background values. The results indicated that the mummies do not contain any radioactivity content or any radioactive sources as was previously suggested. (Author)

  15. X-ray analysis of pigments on ancient Egyptian monuments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancient pigments were analyzed using PIXE and XRD methods in the laboratory, which were painted on ancient Egyptian monuments. On the other hand, those on monuments remaining with entire shape were investigated using the hand-held type of an XRF spectrometer and an X-ray diffractometer in the field. For the laboratory experiment, several wall fragments of the Malqata palace in ancient Egypt (18th Dynasty, ca. 1390 B.C.) were investigated. In the field experiment, the block of Ramesses II (19th Dynasty, ca. 1270 B.C.), the Wooden Coffin of Neb-sny (18th Dynasty, ca. 1400 B.C.), the Funerary Stele of Amenemhat (11th Dynasty, ca. 2000 B.C.), and the painted walls of the Tomb of Userhat (18th Dynasty, ca. 1400 B.C.) were investigated. From white and blue colored parts, huntite and Egyptian blue were found, respectively, which are a very rare mineral and an artificial pigment prepared only in ancient Egypt, respectively. (author)

  16. Computed tomography of ancient Egyptian mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood-Nash, D C

    1979-12-01

    This first report of the application of computed tomography (CT) to the study of ancient mummies, the desiccated brain of a boy and the body of a young woman within her cartonnage, shows that CT is uniquely suitable for the study of such antiquities, a study that does not necessitate destruction of the mummy or its cartonnage. Exquisite images result that are of great paleoanatomical, paleopathological, and archeological significance.

  17. An investigation into the ancient Egyptian cultural influences on the Yorubas of Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Jock M. Agai

    2013-01-01

    There are many cultural practices that connect ancient Egyptians to the Yorubas and the new interpretation of the Oduduwa legend suggests that the Yorubas have originated or are influenced mainly by the Egyptians. The attestation of Egypt as the main influencer of the Yoruba culture made Egypt significant in the study of the history of the Yoruba people. Some writers are beginning to think that the ancient Egyptians were responsible for introducing and spreading many cultures amongst the Yoru...

  18. Imaging of Ancient Egyptian Animal Mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Lidija M; Atherton-Woolham, Stephanie D; Adams, Judith E

    2015-01-01

    Human mummies have long been studied by using imaging as a primary investigative method. Mummified animal remains from ancient Egypt are less well researched, yet much can be learned about species diversity and the methods of preservation. Noninvasive imaging methods enable mummy bundles to remain intact, with no detrimental physical effects, thus ensuring protection of a valuable archaeological resource. This article is based on the research experience gathered during 13 years (2000-2012) with 152 animal mummies held in the collections of 17 museums in the United Kingdom. Conventional radiography, computed radiography, digital radiography, and computed tomography (CT) available in the clinical setting were used to assess the value of each imaging modality in the study of animal mummies and related material. Radiography proved to be an excellent research method that provided initial insight into the contents of the mummy bundle, and CT contributed additional useful detail in some cases. Paleoradiologic analyses enabled information on mummy bundle contents to be proved, including the nature of the skeletal remains and the methods of mummification. An optimum method involving radiography and CT is described. PMID:26562240

  19. A modern appraisal of ancient Etruscan herbal practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Bartels, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    that the "Etruscan Herbal" contains such plants as valerian and henbane, which with regard to their hypnotic and delirium-easing effects, respectively, may have been used in a more ritual and magical way by ancient herbalists and societies throughout the ancient Mediterranean. Without a doubt though, the application...

  20. Population continuity or population change: formation of the ancient Egyptian state

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewski, Sonia R.

    2007-01-01

    The origins of the ancient Egyptian state and its formation have received much attention, through analysis of mortuary contexts, skeletal material, and trade. Genetic diversity was analyzed by studying craniometric variation within a series of six time-successive Egyptian populations in order to investigate the evidence for migration over the period of the development of social hierarchy and the Egyptian state. Craniometric variation, based upon 16 measurements, was assessed through principal...

  1. Dose Assessment of Natural Radioactivity in Ancient Egyptian Monuments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within an environmental radiation investigation of the ancient Egyptian monuments sites, 151 environmental samples were analyzed using γ-ray spectrometers based on HPGe detectors. The results show that the activity concentration values of the naturally occurring radionuclides; 238U (22'6Ra), 232Th, and 40K respectively, are within the world average ranges.Two models for calculation of absorbed dose rate due to gamma emission from radionuclides in the studied soil, limestone and adobe samples were evaluated. The first model was established based on constant value of sample density. The second model takes the density variation into consideration. Two sets of conversion factors were evaluated. A comparison between the results of calculation of the absorbed dose of the studied samples based on the model adopted by UNSCEAR and on our two models was carried out and discussed. (authors)

  2. Synchrotron radiation analysis on ancient Egyptian vitreous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancient Egyptian vitreous materials, namely faience and glass, share the same elemental composition. But they appear to have originated separately. Faience objects appear as early as the Predynastic period, and glass was introduced from Mesopotamia during the New Kingdom. These faience and glass objects were not of daily use, rather they were regarded as religious symbols or luxury status goods. Most of the products were coloured blue, but we see an increased use of other colours during the New Kingdom (c.1550-1069BC). This tendency corresponds to the period of both territorial and political expansion of Egypt. A non-destructive SR-XRF experiment at SPring-8 was conducted last winter, aiming to determine the regional trait of elemental composition by examining the pattern and ratio of rare earth elements. As a result, we could observe some distinctive rare earth elements that may indicate regional variation. (author)

  3. Synchrotron radiation analysis on ancient Egyptian vitreous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamahana, Kyoko [Tokai Univ., Hiratsuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Lecture of Egyptian Archaeology

    2000-07-01

    Ancient Egyptian vitreous materials, namely faience and glass, share the same elemental composition. But they appear to have originated separately. Faience objects appear as early as the Predynastic period, and glass was introduced from Mesopotamia during the New Kingdom. These faience and glass objects were not of daily use, rather they were regarded as religious symbols or luxury status goods. Most of the products were coloured blue, but we see an increased use of other colours during the New Kingdom (c.1550-1069BC). This tendency corresponds to the period of both territorial and political expansion of Egypt. A non-destructive SR-XRF experiment at SPring-8 was conducted last winter, aiming to determine the regional trait of elemental composition by examining the pattern and ratio of rare earth elements. As a result, we could observe some distinctive rare earth elements that may indicate regional variation. (author)

  4. Investigation of Ancient Egyptian Baking and Brewing Methods by Correlative Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel

    1996-07-26

    Ancient Egyptian methods of baking and brewing are investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy of desiccated bread loaves and beer remains. The results suggest that current conceptions about ancient Egyptian bread and beer making should be modified. Bread was made not only with flour from raw grain, but sometimes also with malt and with yeast. Brewing blended cooked and uncooked malt with water; the mixture was strained free of husk before inoculation with yeast. PMID:8662535

  5. Green Restaurant: An Ancient Touch of Chinese Herbal Food

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ambra Schillirò

    2010-01-01

    @@ The first time Ⅰ entered the restaurant Green,inside the five-star Radegast Lake View Hotel in Chongwen District of Beijing,I was incredibly surprised.All around were red lights,a room reminiscent of the splendor of ancient China and simply delicious herbal cuisine.

  6. Green Restaurant: An Ancient Touch of Chinese Herbal Food

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ambra; Schilliro

    2010-01-01

    The first time I entered the restaurant Green, inside the five-star Radegast Lake View Hotel in Chongwen District of Beijing, I was incredibly surprised. All around were red lights, a room reminiscent of the splendor of ancient China and simply delicious herbal cuisine.

  7. An investigation into the ancient Egyptian cultural influences on the Yorubas of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jock M. Agai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There are many cultural practices that connect ancient Egyptians to the Yorubas and the new interpretation of the Oduduwa legend suggests that the Yorubas have originated or are influenced mainly by the Egyptians. The attestation of Egypt as the main influencer of the Yoruba culture made Egypt significant in the study of the history of the Yoruba people. Some writers are beginning to think that the ancient Egyptians were responsible for introducing and spreading many cultures amongst the Yorubas. As more Yorubas are tracing their origins and the origins of their culture to ancient Egypt, this research investigates whether the Egyptians were the originators and the main spreaders of the afterlife culture in Yorubaland.

  8. Moessbauer effect of the origin of the colour in the ancient Egyptian black ware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of ancient Egyptian pottery, Roman pottery and modern pottery were examined by Moessbauer spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction with the aim of establishing the origin of the black colour of the Egyptian pottery. The Moessbauer spectra and the values of isomer shift and quadrupole splitting were used to decide on the presence of magnetic or non-magnetic ferrous or ferricions. (A.K.)

  9. Genetic Drift. The ancient Egyptian dwarfs of the Walters Art Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Chahira

    2010-10-01

    The ancient Egyptians left an impressive artistic legacy documenting many aspects of their society including the existence of dwarfs as highly valued members. In previous publications in the Journal, I discussed dwarfs and skeletal dysplasia in ancient Egypt. In this study, I examined the ancient Egyptian representations of dwarfs of the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. One of the highlights of the collection is a group of five ivory figurines from Predynastic Times (pre 3500-3100 BCE) depicting a couple, a man with a child, and two females. Representations from other periods include ordinary as well as dwarf deities. The dwarf gods, Bes and Ptah, are frequently depicted holding or biting snakes or standing on crocodiles symbolizing their ability to ward off dangers. A couple of statuettes from the Greco-Roman Period that, in contrast to earlier Egyptian Periods, depict harsh physical anomalies, twisted bodies, and facial pain. The artistic impression can be interpreted as either tragic or humorous. The grotesque depiction of dwarfs during the Greco-Roman Period in ancient Egypt is believed to be due to a greater infusion of Hellenistic influence. This study provides a microcosm of the legacy of dwarfs in ancient Egypt and supports the premise that dwarfs were accepted and integrated in the ancient Egyptian society, and with a few exceptions, their disorder was not depicted as a physical handicap. PMID:20799327

  10. Count like an egyptian a hands-on introduction to ancient mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, David

    2014-01-01

    The mathematics of ancient Egypt was fundamentally different from our math today. Contrary to what people might think, it wasn't a primitive forerunner of modern mathematics. In fact, it can't be understood using our current computational methods. Count Like an Egyptian provides a fun, hands-on introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. David Reimer guides you step-by-step through addition, subtraction, multiplication, and more. He even shows you how fractions and decimals may have been calculated-they technically didn't exist in the land of the pharaohs.

  11. PROPAGANDA IN ANCIENT EGYPTIAN TEXTS:AN ATTEMPT AT DEFINITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter; Beylage; IHAC

    2002-01-01

    In Egyptology dealing with both historical and literary texts often raises thequestion of their political intention.The almost fixed plot of the "Knigsnovelle”and the“annals,"typical forms of recording Egyptian history,seems to reflect therigid Egyptian view of history anchored in ideology.The historical course ofevents,what we may call“reality,”is less significant than the course postulated

  12. Elemental concentrations in bones from an ancient Egyptian mummy and from a recent man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in elemental concentrations in bones taken from an ancient Egyptian mummy and a contemporary man were investigated by using proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) in combination with Rutherford backscattering (RBS). Remarkable differences were noticed in the Fe/Ca and Pb/Ca relative concentrations, which were consistently higher in the contemporary man. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. An Ancient Egyptian Diagonal Star Table in Mallawi, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Sarah; Cockcroft, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A coffin belonging to an Egyptian Middle Kingdom official Hor-em-hetepu, on public display in the Mallawi Monuments Museum, Egypt, contains a previously-unpublished diagonal star table (or "diagonal star clock"). This table adds to the other twenty-four examples of this type of astronomical record or calendar from around 2100 B.C. The table displays a regular diagonal pattern of decan (star or asterism) names, with some interesting points of content, epigraphy, and typology.

  14. Variation in ancient Egyptian stature and body proportions

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewski, Sonia R.

    2003-01-01

    Stature and the pattern of body proportions were investigated in a series of six time-successive Egyptian populations in order to investigate the biological effects on human growth of the development and intensification of agriculture, and the formation of state-level social organization. Univariate analyses of variance were performed to assess differences between the sexes and among various time periods. Significant differences were found both in stature and in raw long bone length measureme...

  15. Non-destructive analysis of ancient Egyptian vitreous materials by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical compositions of ancient Egyptian glass are one of the key information for identifying the location of the original material for production. The ordinary chemical analysis is however restricted because variable remains can not be destroyed. Thus sensitive analytical method in non-destructive manner is required. The neutron activation analysis was used in this research and the content of Ca, Cl, Al and Mn were found in ancient Egyptian glass and peak area of them were compared with those in the sand samples taken from several areas around Egypt because sand was thought as the raw material of such glasses. As a result, we found three different patterns in chemical compositions in the surrounding sand samples and we expect this pattern might be a good indicator of location of raw sand material. (author)

  16. Transcultural use of narcotic water lilies in ancient Egyptian and Maya drug ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboden, W A

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons are made between ancient ritual uses of the flowers of Nymphaea (Nymphaeaceae) in Maya and Egyptian civilizations. Recurrent motifs encountered in the art of both of these ancient civilizations suggests that the role fo the water lily was that of a narcotic (psychodysleptic) used to mediate ecstasis among a priestly caste. Relevant literature is reviewed as are chemical data. Elements in the complex belief systems of these two civilizations need to be reinterpreted in view of the use of two water lilies as ritual narcotics. The species implicated are Nymphaea caerulea Sav., in Egypt, and N. ampla DC., among the Maya. PMID:7007741

  17. LAMQS analysis applied to ancient Egyptian bronze coins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some Egyptian bronze coins, dated VI-VII sec A.D. are analyzed through different physical techniques in order to compare their composition and morphology and to identify their origin and the type of manufacture. The investigations have been performed by using micro-invasive analysis, such as Laser Ablation and Mass Quadrupole Spectrometry (LAMQS), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Electronic (SEM) and Optical Microscopy, Surface Profile Analysis (SPA) and density measurements. Results indicate that the coins have a similar bulk composition but significant differences have been evidenced due to different constituents of the patina, bulk alloy composition, isotopic ratios, density and surface morphology. The results are in agreement with the archaeological expectations, indicating that the coins have been produced in two different Egypt sites: Alexandria and Antinoupolis. A group of fake coins produced in Alexandria in the same historical period is also identified.

  18. LAMQS analysis applied to ancient Egyptian bronze coins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.i [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone, 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Caridi, F.; Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone, 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Mondio, G.; Serafino, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia ed Ingegneria Elettronica dell' Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone, 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Caltabiano, M.; Castrizio, E.D. [Dipartimento di Lettere e Filosofia dell' Universita di Messina, Polo Universitario dell' Annunziata, 98168 Messina (Italy); Paniz, E.; Salici, A. [Carabinieri, Reparto Investigazioni Scientifiche, S.S. 114, Km. 6, 400 Tremestieri, Messina (Italy)

    2010-05-15

    Some Egyptian bronze coins, dated VI-VII sec A.D. are analyzed through different physical techniques in order to compare their composition and morphology and to identify their origin and the type of manufacture. The investigations have been performed by using micro-invasive analysis, such as Laser Ablation and Mass Quadrupole Spectrometry (LAMQS), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Electronic (SEM) and Optical Microscopy, Surface Profile Analysis (SPA) and density measurements. Results indicate that the coins have a similar bulk composition but significant differences have been evidenced due to different constituents of the patina, bulk alloy composition, isotopic ratios, density and surface morphology. The results are in agreement with the archaeological expectations, indicating that the coins have been produced in two different Egypt sites: Alexandria and Antinoupolis. A group of fake coins produced in Alexandria in the same historical period is also identified.

  19. Characterization of pigments and colors used in ancient Egyptian boat models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analyses of pigments originating from well dated ancient boat models found in Egyptian graves were used for characterization and for dating tasks of unknown objects. A nearly destruction free sampling technique using cotton buds was applied for sampling these valuable artifacts for a subsequent Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF) analysis. Two relevant collections of Egyptian object of art were at our disposal, one of the Agyptisches Museum Berlin and the second of the British Museum London. Three groups of colors were studied, they originate from white, red and blue/green paints, respectively. The results of the analyses performed on micro-amounts of paints (< 1 μg) show that some artifacts were misclassified and belong to other epochs. Some others were retouched with modern colors. In general, it can be stated that results obtained by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry may dissipate some uncertainties when applying classical archaeological dating methods

  20. Modeling the dependency of radon concentration levels inside ancient Egyptian tombs on the ambient temperature variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentration inside partially closed places like dwellings, caves and tombs, depends on many parameters. Some parameters are known quantitatively as radon exhalation rate for walls, decay constant, surface to volume ratio and outdoor concentration while other parameters as ventilation rate is in common known qualitatively due to useless of traditional methods (tracer gases) in many places as ancient Egyptian tombs. This work introduces a derived mathematical model to evaluate the sensitivity of radon concentration levels inside single sided opening places as ancient Egyptian tombs on the ambient temperature differences. The obtained formula for the natural ventilation rate depends on the indoor and outdoor temperature difference and the geometrical dimensions of the doorway. The effects of in and out flow mixing, air viscosity, streamline contraction, swirling flow and turbulence, were taken into consideration in terms of an empirical correction factor. According UNSCEAR reports, the exhalation rate Φ=Craλrn fρs(1-ε)L; Cra the effective radium content, λrn decay constant, f emanation fraction, ρs soil grain density, ε porosity and L diffusion length, these are approximately static parameters but the variability of ambient temperature introduces a source of energy of fluctuating strength to radon atoms in rocks which controls the flow rate and the ambient content of radon. Therefore, the change of outdoor and indoor temperature difference causes fluctuation of value and direction of volume flow rate in such places consequently causes the daily variation and on average the seasonal variation of radon concentration. Therefore according to the present model, the daily accurate expectation of radon concentrations inside ancient Egyptian tombs, require precise measurements of indoor and outdoor temperatures

  1. The significance of petroleum bitumen in ancient Egyptian mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K A; Ikram, S; Evershed, R P

    2016-10-28

    Mummification was practised in ancient Egypt for more than 3000 years, emerging from initial observations of buried bodies preserved by natural desiccation. The use of organic balms (and other funerary practices) was a later introduction necessitated by more humid burial environments, especially tombs. The dark colour of many mummies led to the assumption that petroleum bitumen (or natural asphalt) was ubiquitous in mummification; however, this has been questioned for more than 100 years. We test this by investigating 91 materials comprising balms, tissues and textiles from 39 mummies dating from ca 3200 BC to AD 395. Targeted petroleum bitumen biomarker (steranes and hopanes) analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM, m/z 217 and 191) showed no detectable bitumen use before the New Kingdom (ca 1550-1070 BC). However, bitumen was used in 50% of New Kingdom to Late Period mummies, rising to 87% of Ptolemaic/Roman Period mummies. Quantitative determinations using (14)C analyses reveal that even at peak use balms were never more than 45% w/w bitumen. Critically, the dark colour of balms can be simulated by heating/ageing mixtures of fats, resins and beeswax known to be used in balms. The application of black/dark brown balms to bodies was deliberate after the New Kingdom reflecting changing funerary beliefs and shifts in religious ideology.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644983

  2. Radiological safety assessment inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Saqqara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kameesy, S U; Salama, E; El-Fiki, S A; Ehab, M; Rühm, W

    2016-12-01

    Many archaeological sites in Egypt are unique worldwide, such as ancient tombs and pyramids, because they document fundamental developments in human civilization that took place several thousands of years ago. For this reason, these sites are visited by numerous visitors every year. The present work is devoted to provide a pre-operational radiological baseline needed to quantify occupational radiation exposure at the famous Saqqara region in Cairo, Egypt. A hyperpure Ge detector has been used in the γ-ray spectrometric analysis while the (222)Rn concentration was measured using a portable radon monitor RTM 1688-2, SARAD. The mean specific activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the samples collected from the interior walls of the Saqqara tombs were determined and found to show average values of 16, 8.5 and 45 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The concentration of radon was measured inside the tombs Serapeum, South tomb and the Zoser Pyramid (fifth level) and an associated average working level of 0.83 WL was obtained. In order to avoid the health hazards associated with the exposure to radon during the long period of work inside these tombs, proposed solutions are introduced. PMID:26988604

  3. Characterization of Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings, the Excavations of Cairo University at Saqqara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at characterizing some Egyptian wall paintings discovered during the excavations of Cairo University (since 1988 and recently in 2005 at Saqqara area in the south of Cairo. There, a number of tombs dating back to the 19th dynasty (c.1293–1185 BC were discovered. The walls of these tombs are carved with bass and raised reliefs and painted with different colours. The characterization of the wall paintings was done by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (backscattered electron mode, BSE equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS, micro XRF spectrometry (µ-XRF, and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The analysis of the examined samples indicated that the blue pigment is Egyptian blue (Cuprorivaite, the green pigment is Egyptian green, the red pigment is red ochre, and the yellow pigment is a blended layer of yellow ochre and orpiment (As2S3. The results will help in providing an image concerning some painting materials used during the new Kingdom in ancient Egypt

  4. "IREP EN KEMET" Wine of Ancient Egypt: Documenting the Viticulture and Winemaking Scenes in the Egyptian Tombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch-Jané, M. R.; Fonseca, S.; Ibrahim, M.

    2013-07-01

    Presented are the research objectives of the project "Irep en Kemet", Wine of Ancient Egypt, and the content of the project's website. This research aims at documenting the complete corpus of wine in ancient Egypt and analysing the data (iconography, textual sources and artefacts) to unveil the importance of the ancient Egyptian wine culture legacy in the Mediterranean region. At this stage, a bibliographical researchable database relevant to wine, viticulture and winemaking in the ancient Egypt has been completed, with 197 entries including articles, books, chapters in book, academic thesis (PhD and MA), essay, abstracts, on-line articles and websites. Moreover, a scene-detail database for the viticulture and winemaking scenes in the Egyptian private tombs has been recorded with 97 entries, some of them unpublished, and the collected data is under study. The titles of the tombs' owners and the texts related to the scenes will be also recorded. A photographic survey of the graves containing images related with viticulture and winemaking will be carried out in order to have the most accurate information on the location and stage of conservation of those images. Our main goal is to provide scholars with a complete, comprehensive archaeological and bibliographical database for the scenes of viticulture and winemaking depicted in the Egyptian private tombs throughout the ancient Egyptian history. The project's website (http://www.wineofancientegypt.com) will include all the collected data, the study and analysis, the project's history and team members, publications as well as the results of our research.

  5. Developing an interactive computational system to simulate radon concentration inside ancient egyptian tombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RSSP (Radon Scale Software Package) is an interactive support system that simulates the radon concentration inside ancient Egyptian tombs and the consequences on the population in terms of internal and external exposure. RSSP consists of three interconnected modules: the first one simulates the radon concentration inside ancient Egyptian tombs using a developed mathematical model. This model introduces the possibility of controlling the rate of radon accumulation via additional artificial ventilation systems. The source of inputs is an editable database for the tombs includes the geometrical dimensions and some environmental parameters like temperature and outdoor radon concentration at the tombs locations. The second module simulates the absorbed dose due to internal exposure of radon and its progeny. The third module simulates the absorbed dose due to external exposure of Gamma rays emitted from the tomb wall rocks. RSSP introduces the facility of following the progress of radon concentration as well as Internal and external absorbed dose in a wide range of time (seconds, minutes, hours and days) via numerical data and the corresponding graphical interface

  6. CT of a Ptolemaic period mummy from the ancient Egyptian City of Akhmim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Steve S; Elias, Jonathan P; Hysell, Mark E; Hallowell, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Mummies associated with the ancient city of Akhmim in Egypt provide an important portal for radiologic research concerning the ancient Egyptian population. As part of an ongoing investigation, a mummy of Akhmimic derivation owned by the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was scanned with a 16-detector row computed tomographic scanner. The resultant images helped confirm that the mummy was that of a female in her late teens. Although the deliberate omission of hieroglyphic texts on the painted coffin rendered the deceased individual anonymous, it is noteworthy that great care had been taken in preparing the corpse for burial. The mummy represents conscientious work by the embalmers, work that is broadly consistent with methods used during the early Ptolemaic period for well-to-do persons. Features of bodily decomposition, including the rotary dissociation of the C1 and C2 vertebral bodies and a missing right patella, point to neglect of the body prior to its recovery and mummification. The fact that the body was well prepared but thinly wrapped and interred in an uninscribed coffin further suggests that the deceased was not of the community that eventually performed the mummification. This evidence is not inconsistent with a scenario involving the body's postmortem immersion in water. Although it cannot be determined with certainty whether the deceased was a drowning victim, it appears that the treatment of the body followed protocols developed in connection with an ancient Egyptian tradition that persons dying in, or retrieved from, the Nile River were embalmed with special care. PMID:19001656

  7. Egyptian Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lull, José; Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    The ancient Egyptians had a wide range of constellations, which populated the skies of ancient Egypt (see Chap. 133, "Orientation of Egyptian Temples: An Overview", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_146) for more than three millennia, whose knowledge has come to us through lists of stars and other representations which have mainly appeared in a dozen of coffins, a few clepsydrae, and a good set of astronomical ceilings. Hence, by making very simple assumptions and using the information provided by the ancient Egyptian sky-watchers, it is possible to uncover a great part of the ancient Egyptian firmament. This celestial tapestry was populated by the images of animals, symbols, and divinities that were most significant in understanding the Egyptian interpretation of the cosmos.

  8. External and internal exposure to natural radiations inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Saqqara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some ancient Egyptian tombs in Saqqara are closed for visit to undergo fixation processes. The workers inside these tombs exposed to natural radiations from natural Gamma emitters (external exposure) and inhale unknown radon doses (internal exposure) for long periods. The external exposure in all studied tombs is lower than the maximum recommended action level. The internal exposure in terms of annual effective dose in the south tomb is equal to 28.83mSv/year which highly exceed the recommended level (3-10mSv/year). In this tomb, the external exposure is equal to 21.43μSv/year. This reflects the hazards of radon over the other natural radiations in the closed area. Among the workers inside the studied tombs, the expected morality is equal to 0.0033%, 0.0199% and 0.0724% for the south entrance of Zoser pyramid, the Serapeum tomb, and the south tomb respectively. ctively

  9. Annual dose measurements and TL-dating of ancient Egyptian pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of the dating of ancient Egyptian pottery, pottery sherds were collected from three archaeological tombs in Nazlet El Samman region, Giza zone (Egypt). The annual dose from natural background was measured by gamma spectrosocopic technique as well as thermoluminescence (TL) measurements. The results of both methods are in good agreement with a consistency of 99.69%. The extracted quartz exhibited TL dating peaks at about (305 ± 5)oC. The TL dating shows an age of 4301 ± 100 years for the examined pottery which belongs to the ''Fourth Dynasty'' in the ''OlKingdom'' . The uncertainties in TL dating using the additive method are much lower than that of archaeologists. (author)

  10. External and internal exposure to natural radiations inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Saqqara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Elmagd, M. [National Institute for Standard, Radiation Measurements Department, P.O. Box 136 Giza code no. 12211 (Egypt)]. E-mail: abo_elmgd@hotmail.com; Metwally, S.M. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11566, Cairo (Egypt); Elmongy, S.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety, Cairo (Egypt); Salama, E. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11566, Cairo (Egypt); El-Fiki, S.A. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11566, Cairo (Egypt)

    2006-02-15

    Some ancient Egyptian tombs in Saqqara are closed for visit to undergo fixation processes. The workers inside these tombs exposed to natural radiations from natural Gamma emitters (external exposure) and inhale unknown radon doses (internal exposure) for long periods. The external exposure in all studied tombs is lower than the maximum recommended action level. The internal exposure in terms of annual effective dose in the south tomb is equal to 28.83mSv/year which highly exceed the recommended level (3-10mSv/year). In this tomb, the external exposure is equal to 21.43{mu}Sv/year. This reflects the hazards of radon over the other natural radiations in the closed area. Among the workers inside the studied tombs, the expected morality is equal to 0.0033%, 0.0199% and 0.0724% for the south entrance of Zoser pyramid, the Serapeum tomb, and the south tomb respectively. ctively.

  11. Reconstruction of vertical and L-shaped ancient Egyptian sundials and methods for measuring time

    CERN Document Server

    Vodolazhskaya, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of the study of design features of vertical and L-shaped ancient Egyptian sundials. With the help of astronomical methods were developed their models, based on which the reconstruction of a sundial was held. Also, the original scheme is a simple way to fairly precise of measurement of time with them has been developed. Large urgency of the task due to the lack of similar models and schemes to date. Model offered by us, which describes the vertical sundial, is a vertical sundial, with a sloping gnomon, which takes into account latitude of area. It is based on the assumption of the existence in ancient Egypt representations about an hour (and a half hour) of equal duration throughout the day, does not depend on the time of year. Offered by us model is characterized by marking hour lines from 6 to 12 hours after each hour. From 12 to 12.5 hours produced displacement in the markup of hour lines on half an hour, then the markup is repeated every hour. As a consequence, the reconstr...

  12. D Reconstruction of Ancient Egyptian Rock-Cut Tombs: the Case of M.I.D.A.N.05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabil, M.; Betrò, M.; Metwally, M. N.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we present an on-going work to reconstruct a 3D model of M.I.D.A.N.05., an ancient Egyptian tomb located in Luxor. The reconstruction aims at producing a high quality 3D model of the tomb to help in archaeological investigation and other scientific uses. We present details about the different stages of the used reconstruction pipeline, the results so far, and the evaluation of the results in view of the project objectives.

  13. "Confused by Multiple Deities, Ancient Egyptians Embraced Monotheism": Analysing Historical Thinking and Inclusion in Egyptian History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Ehaab D.

    2016-01-01

    Egyptian history textbooks are examined through the prism of historical thinking dimensions and skills, utilizing a critical discourse analysis. The analysis focuses on how the textbooks portray two historically significant events: the advent of Christianity (ca. 33 CE) and Islam (ca. 641 CE) to Egypt. It reveals that the historical narrative…

  14. Shifting Milestones of Natural Sciences: The Ancient Egyptian Discovery of Algol's Period Confirmed

    CERN Document Server

    Jetsu, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    The Ancient Egyptians wrote Calendars of Lucky and Unlucky Days that assigned astronomically influenced prognoses for each day of the year. The best preserved of these calendars is the Cairo Calendar (hereafter CC) dated to 1244--1163 B.C. We have presented evidence that the 2.85 days period in the lucky prognoses of CC is equal to that of the eclipsing binary Algol during this historical era. We wanted to find out the vocabulary that represents Algol in the mythological texts of CC. Here we show that Algol was represented as Horus and thus signified both divinity and kingship. The texts describing the actions of Horus are consistent with the course of events witnessed by any naked eye observer of Algol. These descriptions support our claim that CC is the oldest preserved historical document of the discovery of a variable star. The period of the Moon, 29.6 days, has also been discovered in CC. We show that the actions of Seth were connected to this period, which also strongly regulated the times described as ...

  15. Passive and active measurements of radon-related parameters inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Luxor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its related parameters were measured using passive (CR-39) and active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The measurements were performed throughout the winter and summer seasons. The average radon concentration inside the tombs ranges from 96.9+/-10.8 to 415+/-43Bqm-3 in winter and from 86.4+/-13.8 to 6102.8+/-573.6 in summer. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.228+/-0.02 to 0.95+/-0.05. The effective doses for the tomb workers, the tour guide and visitors were calculated. Active measurements show that radon exhalation rates range from 0.68+/-0.30 to 1.47+/-0.27Bqm-2h-1 and from 0.60+/-0.03 to 1.42+/-0.05Bqm-2h-1 for passive measurements. The real radium content was determined for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. Radon exhalation rates were correlated with the real radium content. A good correlation was found between active and passive measurements of radon exhalation rate

  16. Shifting Milestones of Natural Sciences: The Ancient Egyptian Discovery of Algol's Period Confirmed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, Lauri; Porceddu, Sebastien

    2015-12-01

    The Ancient Egyptians wrote Calendars of Lucky and Unlucky Days that assigned astronomically influenced prognoses for each day of the year. The best preserved of these calendars is the Cairo Calendar (hereafter CC) dated to 1244-1163 B.C. We have presented evidence that the 2.85 days period in the lucky prognoses of CC is equal to that of the eclipsing binary Algol during this historical era. We wanted to find out the vocabulary that represents Algol in the mythological texts of CC. Here we show that Algol was represented as Horus and thus signified both divinity and kingship. The texts describing the actions of Horus are consistent with the course of events witnessed by any naked eye observer of Algol. These descriptions support our claim that CC is the oldest preserved historical document of the discovery of a variable star. The period of the Moon, 29.6 days, has also been discovered in CC. We show that the actions of Seth were connected to this period, which also strongly regulated the times described as lucky for Heaven and for Earth. Now, for the first time, periodicity is discovered in the descriptions of the days in CC. Unlike many previous attempts to uncover the reasoning behind the myths of individual days, we discover the actual rules in the appearance and behaviour of deities during the whole year.

  17. Passive and active measurements of radon-related parameters inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Luxor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Elmagd, M. [Radiation Measurements Department, National Institute for Standard, Giza (Egypt)]. E-mail: abo_elmgd@hotmail.com; Metwally, S.M. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Fiki, S.A. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Eissa, H.M. [Radiation Measurements Department, National Institute for Standard, Giza (Egypt); Salama, E. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-01-15

    Radon and its related parameters were measured using passive (CR-39) and active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The measurements were performed throughout the winter and summer seasons. The average radon concentration inside the tombs ranges from 96.9+/-10.8 to 415+/-43Bqm{sup -3} in winter and from 86.4+/-13.8 to 6102.8+/-573.6 in summer. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.228+/-0.02 to 0.95+/-0.05. The effective doses for the tomb workers, the tour guide and visitors were calculated. Active measurements show that radon exhalation rates range from 0.68+/-0.30 to 1.47+/-0.27Bqm{sup -2}h{sup -1} and from 0.60+/-0.03 to 1.42+/-0.05Bqm{sup -2}h{sup -1} for passive measurements. The real radium content was determined for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. Radon exhalation rates were correlated with the real radium content. A good correlation was found between active and passive measurements of radon exhalation rate.

  18. Detection of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites using satellite remote sensing and digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrie, Robert K.

    2011-11-01

    Satellite remote sensing is playing an increasingly important role in the detection and documentation of archaeological sites. Surveying an area from the ground using traditional methods often presents challenges due to the time and costs involved. In contrast, the multispectral synoptic approach afforded by the satellite sensor makes it possible to cover much larger areas in greater spectral detail and more cost effectively. This is especially the case for larger scale regional surveys, which are helping to contribute to a better understanding of ancient Egyptian settlement patterns. This study presents an overview of satellite remote sensing data products, methodologies, and image processing techniques for detecting lost or undiscovered archaeological sites with reference to Egypt and the Near East. Key regions of the electromagnetic spectrum useful for site detection are discussed, including the visible near-infrared (VNIR), shortwave infrared (SWIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and microwave (radar). The potential of using Google Earth as both a data provider and a visualization tool is also examined. Finally, a case study is presented for detecting tell sites in Egypt using Landsat ETM+, ASTER, and Google Earth imagery. The results indicated that principal components analysis (PCA) was successfully able to detect and differentiate tell sites from modern settlements in Egypt's northwestern Nile Delta region.

  19. Application of polymers in consolidation of a rare painted ancient Egyptian piece from a group of Osiris cloths of the twenty first dynasties in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at conserve and display of a rare painted ancient Egyptian textile piece. Also to evaluate a new technique defined with reactivation technique to reinforcement of historical painted textiles. Many different investigation methods have been carried out the object to identify the fiber, paints, and other materials have used in preparing of the ancient object. Also the statement of the objects was investigated using a light and scanning electron microscope. In this study new textile samples were prepared by using new textile, painting and pending materials and techniques similar to ancient ones. Then prepared samples were deteriorated by artificial age to be simulated to the ancient ones. The aged textile samples simulated to ancient ones were treated with three selected adhesives in different percentages by using reactivation technique. All treated and untreated samples before and after aging were evaluated by different methods. The old restoration on the ancient textile object was removed and then the object was consolidated with the adhesive using the tested technique. Finally the treated object was displayed in standard method. This study confirm that the evaluated technique is very simple, effective and good technique which can be applied by using simple tools that are common present in conservation Labs of all Egyptian museums. This technique is technique solve a lot of problems that the conservators are meet in consolidation of deteriorated ancient Egyptian textiles in Museums in Egypt

  20. Passive and Active Measurements of Radon related parameters inside ancient Egyptian Tombs in Luxor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentration and its exhalation rate were measured using active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) and passive (CR-39) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Kings valley in Luxor. The measurements were performed during the winter season of tourism (15/10/2003 up to 09/02/2004). The real radium content was determine for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. The average radon concentration inside the tombs based on the active technique ranges from 116 42 to 362 115 Bq m-3 and the exhalation rate ranges from 0.68 to 1.47 Bq m-2 h-1. For passive measurements, the average radon concentrations inside the tombs vary from 88 5 to 517 8 Bq m-3 while the exhalation rate ranges from 0.60 to 1.42 0.05 Bq m-2 h-1. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.10 0.04 to 0.99 0.14 based on Can and Bare measurement method. The effective dose rate inside the tombs varies from 0.11 0.04 to 4.28 0.68 Sv/h, based on UNSCEAR 2000 dose conversion factors for radon and its progeny. Radon exhalation rate was correlated with the real radium content. Moreover, a good correlation was found between active and passive measurements. So it may be useful to use passive technique in large scale instead of the active one

  1. An ancient Egyptian problem:the diophantine equation 4/n=1/x+1/y+1/z, n>or=2

    OpenAIRE

    Zelator, Konstantine

    2009-01-01

    From the Rhind Papyrus and other extant sources, we know that the ancient Egyptians were very iterested in expressing a given fraction into a sum of unit fractions, that is fractions whose numerators are equal to 1. One of the problems that has come down to us in the last 60 years, is known as the Erdos- Strauss conjecture which states that for each positive integer n>1; the fraction 4/n can be decomposed into a sum of three distinct unit fractions. Since 1950, a numberof partial results have...

  2. Research advances on the anti-aging profile of Fructus lycii: An ancient Chinese herbal medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sze, SCW; Chang, RCC; Zhang, KY; Tong, Y; Song, J.; Wong, RNS

    2008-01-01

    Fructus lycii is a common Chinese herbal medicine used in China for nearly 2000 years. It has beneficial effects on eyes, liver and kidneys; and it has long been considered to be an anti-aging herb in ancient Chinese medicine. Modern studies have partially probed the magic anti-aging property of F. lycii. The beneficial effects of F. lycii on aging are largely attributed to its bioactive components such as polysaccharides, carotenoids and flavonoids. This review focuses on the anti-aging aspe...

  3. Characteristics of ancient Egyptian glazed ceramic objects from Fatimid and Mamluk periods as revealed by ion beam analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Hamada; M, Abd El Hady M.

    2012-07-01

    Ion beam analysis (PIXE, μPIXE) has been successfully applied in analysis of archaeological materials, it has many advantages. In this work Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) used in analysis of ancient Egyptian glazed ceramic from 10th to the 16th centuries (Fatimid and Mamluk periods). Glazed ceramic samples from Al-Fustat Excavation store have been chosen to represent different colours (green, blue, brown, black ...etc), the colours of glaze depend on many factors such as oxides present in the glaze layer, fluxes and the conditions in which objects had been manufactured in the past. Ion Beam allows the identification of elemental composition of the glaze layer i.e., the information about colorants used in glaze, which is of great importance for compositional data play a key role in solving questions concerning dating, provenance, technology, use and the relationship between ancient cultures with the environment.

  4. Characteristics of ancient Egyptian glazed ceramic objects from Fatimid and Mamluk periods as revealed by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam analysis (PIXE, μPIXE) has been successfully applied in analysis of archaeological materials, it has many advantages. In this work Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) used in analysis of ancient Egyptian glazed ceramic from 10th to the 16th centuries (Fatimid and Mamluk periods). Glazed ceramic samples from Al-Fustat Excavation store have been chosen to represent different colours (green, blue, brown, black ...etc), the colours of glaze depend on many factors such as oxides present in the glaze layer, fluxes and the conditions in which objects had been manufactured in the past. Ion Beam allows the identification of elemental composition of the glaze layer i.e., the information about colorants used in glaze, which is of great importance for compositional data play a key role in solving questions concerning dating, provenance, technology, use and the relationship between ancient cultures with the environment.

  5. [Removal of weremit from the abdomen. Interpretation and efficacy of an ancient Egyptian prescription by the newest scientific results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Júlia; Győry, Hedvig; Blázovics, Anna

    2015-12-13

    Significant percentage of today's knowledge of ancient Egyptian medicine has been acquired from papyri left behind from various periods of Egyptian history. The longest and the most comprehensive is the Ebers papyrus, kept at the University Museum of Leipzig, which was written more than one thousand years before Hippocrates (c. 460-377 BC). One of the riddles among the prescriptions of the Ebers papyrus Eb20 has been used in order to remove the so called "wemyt" weremit from the abdomen with the help of a drink, which consists of "jnnk", Conyza dioscoridis in milk or sweet beer. The authors assume that the disease could be an infection of Schistosoma haematobium and/or Schistosoma mansoni. Nowadays the tea of Conyza dioscoridis is widely used as an important part of traditional medicine against rheumatism, intestinal distention and cramps, as well as an antiperspirant, and with external use for wound healing. The authors' intent is to interpret the efficacy of the above-mentioned ancient prescription with the help of modern medical and pharmaceutical knowledge. PMID:26639646

  6. ‘Answering the calls of the living’: collaborative practice in archaeology and ancient Egyptian daily life exhibitions in Western museums

    OpenAIRE

    Tully, Gemma

    2010-01-01

    Western museum displays of Egyptology are in need of an overhaul. The study of the ancient Egyptian past and the methods by which museums represent this past are affected by over two hundred years of Western tradition. This tradition, founded in a time of nation-building, led to the establishment of a narrow set of understandings of ancient Egypt. Focused on elite individuals, death and religious practices, early Egyptological scholarship and museum display created an environment in which the...

  7. [The Zagreb Etruscan ceremonial fragment and an ancient Egyptian medical papyrus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grmek, M D

    1995-01-01

    The Archeological museum in Zagreb treasures the linen strips of an Egyptian mummy with inscriptions in Etruscan, and an Egyptian medical papyrus. The Etruscan text has been deciphered, but only a small part has been translated. This religious-magical ceremonial might be in relation with theurgical measures for health protection, promotion and restitution. The medical text on the papyrus is a hieratic script dating back to Pharaonic New Kingdom, probably a fragment of a medicine book similar to the Ebers papyrus. This article provides its transcription and translation. Three recipes for a powder and ointments which were used in the local treatment of inflammed moist skin lesions are presented. PMID:8656978

  8. Micro-PIXE analysis of an ancient Egyptian papyrus: Identification of pigments used for the 'Book of the Dead'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a study of colours and inks of an ancient Egyptian papyrus using an external proton microprobe in PIXE mode. Representing the Book of the Dead, this papyrus is dated from the 19th dynasty, New Kingdom (c.1295-1186 BC). Elemental maps were obtained by moving the papyrus under a fixed focused external beam using a motorised support. The maps were compared to photographic pictures taken in visible light. Inks used in the hieroglyph text appeared to be based on carbon (black) and iron oxide (red). Coloured drawings illustrating the text showed a wider palette: hematite, ochre, orpiment, Egyptian blue, verdigris. Most intriguing was the observation in several parts of the drawing of a whitish pigment containing strontium. Deposits of strontium-rich minerals (e.g. strontianite, celestite) have been identified in Egypt. The exact nature and the archaeological implications of this pigment have still to be determined. Finally, fine powder and coarse grains of arsenic oxide were observed, probably remaining from an early preservation treatment against insect attacks after excavation

  9. Micro-PIXE analysis of an ancient Egyptian papyrus: Identification of pigments used for the ``Book of the Dead''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, A.-M. B.; Calligaro, T.; Colinart, S.; Dran, J. C.; Lövestam, N. E. G.; Moignard, B.; Salomon, J.

    2001-07-01

    This paper reports a study of colours and inks of an ancient Egyptian papyrus using an external proton microprobe in PIXE mode. Representing the Book of the Dead, this papyrus is dated from the 19th dynasty, New Kingdom (c.1295-1186 BC). Elemental maps were obtained by moving the papyrus under a fixed focused external beam using a motorised support. The maps were compared to photographic pictures taken in visible light. Inks used in the hieroglyph text appeared to be based on carbon (black) and iron oxide (red). Coloured drawings illustrating the text showed a wider palette: hematite, ochre, orpiment, Egyptian blue, verdigris. Most intriguing was the observation in several parts of the drawing of a whitish pigment containing strontium. Deposits of strontium-rich minerals (e.g. strontianite, celestite) have been identified in Egypt. The exact nature and the archaeological implications of this pigment have still to be determined. Finally, fine powder and coarse grains of arsenic oxide were observed, probably remaining from an early preservation treatment against insect attacks after excavation.

  10. Of the Egyptians, Ancient Greeks, Jesus, and Teaching Personal Economics in Grades K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Thomas A.

    Through this review of literature, the economic attitudes and patterns in ancient Egypt are interpreted. The paper also explains the economic ideas of the ancient Greek philosophers and of Jesus of Nazareth. It observes that societal deterioration, prompted by economic-focused pursuits and different societal interpretations, may occur based on…

  11. Finding Hidden Chemistry in Ancient Egyptian Artifacts: Pigment Degradation Taught in a Chemical Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gime´nez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the application of the study of ancient technology and science on teaching (and learning) chemistry in Chemical Engineering Undergraduate studies. Degradation patterns of pigments used in Ancient Egypt were incorporated in the syllabus of the course entitled "Technological and Scientific…

  12. Finding hidden chemistry in ancient egyptian artifacts: Pigment degradation taught in a chemical engineering course

    OpenAIRE

    Giménez Izquierdo, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the application of the study of ancient technology and science on teaching (and learning) chemistry in Chemical Engineering Undergraduate studies. Degradation patterns of pigments used in Ancient Egypt were incorporated in the syllabus of the course entitled

  13. Molecular confirmation of Schistosoma and family relationship in two ancient Egyptian mummies

    OpenAIRE

    Matheson, C. D.; David, R; Spigelman, M.; Donoghue, H. D.

    2014-01-01

    Egg morphology and immunocytochemistry have identified schistosomiasis in ancient Egypt. Our study aimedbto detect and characterize schistosomal DNA in mummified human tissue. Liver samples from the mummy Nekht-Ankh (c. 3900 BP) and intestinal samples from Khnum-Nakht, possibly his brother, were analyzed using PCR primers suitable for fragmented ancient DNA, specific for either Schistosoma mansoni or Schistosoma haematobium. Mitochondrial primers examined any relationship between the supposed...

  14. Combined FT-Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric study of ancient Egyptian sarcophagal fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Stern, Ben; Villar, Susana E Jorge; David, A Rosalie

    2007-02-01

    The application of combined Raman spectroscopic and GC-MS analytical techniques for the characterisation of organic varnish residues from Egyptian Dynastic funerary sarcophagal and cartonnage fragments from the Graeco-Roman period, ca. 2200 BP, is described. The nondestructive use of Raman spectroscopy was initially employed to derive information about the specific location of organic material on the specimens, which were then targeted in specific areas using minimal sampling for GC-MS analysis. In the case of the sarcophagal fragment, a degraded yellow-brown surface treatment was identified as a Pistacia spp. resin; this provides additional evidence for the use of this resin, which has previously been identified in Canaanite transport amphorae, varnishes and "incense" bowls in an Egyptian Late Bronze Age archaeological context. The cartonnage fragment also contained an organic coating for which the Raman spectrum indicated a degradation that was too severe to facilitate identification, but the GC-MS data revealed that it was composed of a complex mixture of fatty acid residues. The combined use of GC-MS and Raman spectroscopy for the characterisation of organic materials in an archaeological context is advocated for minimisation of sampling and restriction to specifically identified targets for museum archival specimens. PMID:16896625

  15. Combined FT-Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric study of ancient Egyptian sarcophagal fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Stern, Ben; Villar, Susana E Jorge; David, A Rosalie

    2007-02-01

    The application of combined Raman spectroscopic and GC-MS analytical techniques for the characterisation of organic varnish residues from Egyptian Dynastic funerary sarcophagal and cartonnage fragments from the Graeco-Roman period, ca. 2200 BP, is described. The nondestructive use of Raman spectroscopy was initially employed to derive information about the specific location of organic material on the specimens, which were then targeted in specific areas using minimal sampling for GC-MS analysis. In the case of the sarcophagal fragment, a degraded yellow-brown surface treatment was identified as a Pistacia spp. resin; this provides additional evidence for the use of this resin, which has previously been identified in Canaanite transport amphorae, varnishes and "incense" bowls in an Egyptian Late Bronze Age archaeological context. The cartonnage fragment also contained an organic coating for which the Raman spectrum indicated a degradation that was too severe to facilitate identification, but the GC-MS data revealed that it was composed of a complex mixture of fatty acid residues. The combined use of GC-MS and Raman spectroscopy for the characterisation of organic materials in an archaeological context is advocated for minimisation of sampling and restriction to specifically identified targets for museum archival specimens.

  16. 3-D reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mummy using X-ray computer tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, C; Hughes, S W; Whittaker, D K; Taylor, J; Davis, R; Spencer, A J; Tonge, K; Sofat, A

    1994-12-01

    Computer tomography has been used to image and reconstruct in 3-D an Egyptian mummy from the collection of the British Museum. This study of Tjentmutengebtiu, a priestess from the 22nd dynasty (945-715 BC) revealed invaluable information of a scientific, Egyptological and palaeopathological nature without mutilation and destruction of the painted cartonnage case or linen wrappings. Precise details on the removal of the brain through the nasal cavity and the viscera from the abdominal cavity were obtained. The nature and composition of the false eyes were investigated. The detailed analysis of the teeth provided a much closer approximation of age at death. The identification of materials used for the various amulets including that of the figures placed in the viscera was graphically demonstrated using this technique.

  17. The Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Ancient Egyptian Population from Baharia Oasis, the Greco Roman Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokia Abd ElShafy Soliman El-Banna*, , Azza Mohamed Sarry El-Din*, Fatma Ahmed Eid**, Walaa Yousef Mohamed Ali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D deficiency is considered to be the most common nutritional deficiency and also one of the most common undiagnosed medical conditions in the world. Vitamin D is naturally present only in minor amounts in most foods; the great majority is synthesized by the action of ultraviolet light on chemical precursors in the skin. The manifestation of vitamin D deficiency in sub adults is referred to as rickets, and in adults, osteomalacia . Rickets and osteomalacia are the sub adult and adult expressions of a disease in which the underlying problem is a failure to mineralize bone protein (osteoid. The most common cause of this disease is a physiological deficiency in vitamin D. The associated problems include deformed bones. Material and Methods: This study aimed to investigate the skeletal remains of ancient Egyptians from Baharia Oasis population for lesions indicative of vitamin D deficiency (rickets and osteomalacia. The material consisted of 1075 commingled bones (38 sub adults and1037 adults. They were recovered from Baharia oasis. Results: The results showed that, there was no evidence of rickets in sub adult group. The prevalence of osteomalacia in adult Baharia populations was 7.4% ; all were adult males. This result could indicate that this population was subjected to sunlight all over the year and their diet was rich of calcium and phosphorus. Conclusion: These few cases that were found may be due to mechanical stress during wine and textile production.

  18. An ancient Egyptian problem:the diophantine equation 4/n=1/x+1/y+1/z, n>or=2

    CERN Document Server

    Zelator, Konstantine

    2009-01-01

    From the Rhind Papyrus and other extant sources, we know that the ancient Egyptians were very iterested in expressing a given fraction into a sum of unit fractions, that is fractions whose numerators are equal to 1. One of the problems that has come down to us in the last 60 years, is known as the Erdos- Strauss conjecture which states that for each positive integer n>1; the fraction 4/n can be decomposed into a sum of three distinct unit fractions. Since 1950, a numberof partial results have been achieved, see references [1]- [8]; and also [10] and[11]. In this work we contribute four theorems. In Theorem 2, we prove that if the fraction 4/n is not equal to a sum of three distinct unit fractions, then each prime divisor of n; must be congruent to 1 modulo24. Moreover, if n contains a divisor noncongruent to 1mod24; then such a decomposition does exist and it is explicitly given.

  19. New Ancient Egyptian Human Mummies from the Valley of the Kings, Luxor: Anthropological, Radiological, and Egyptological Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühli, Frank; Ikram, Salima; Bickel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The Valley of the Kings (arab. Wadi al Muluk; KV) situated on the West Bank near Luxor (Egypt) was the site for royal and elite burials during the New Kingdom (ca. 1500-1100 BC), with many tombs being reused in subsequent periods. In 2009, the scientific project "The University of Basel Kings' Valley Project" was launched. The main purpose of this transdisciplinary project is the clearance and documentation of nonroyal tombs in the surrounding of the tomb of Pharaoh Thutmosis III (ca. 1479-1424 BC; KV 34). This paper reports on newly discovered ancient Egyptian human mummified remains originating from the field seasons 2010-2012. Besides macroscopic assessments, the remains were conventionally X-rayed by a portable X-ray unit in situ inside KV 31. These image data serve as basis for individual sex and age determination and for the study of probable pathologies and embalming techniques. A total of five human individuals have been examined so far and set into an Egyptological context. This project highlights the importance of ongoing excavation and science efforts even in well-studied areas of Egypt such as the Kings' Valley. PMID:26347313

  20. Analysis of a prehistoric Egyptian iron bead with implications for the use and perception of meteorite iron in ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Diane; Tyldesley, Joyce; Lowe, Tristan; Withers, Philip J.; Grady, Monica M.

    2013-06-01

    Tube-shaped beads excavated from grave pits at the prehistoric Gerzeh cemetery, approximately 3300 BCE, represent the earliest known use of iron in Egypt. Using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and micro X-ray microcomputer tomography, we show that microstructural and chemical analysis of a Gerzeh iron bead is consistent with a cold-worked iron meteorite. Thin fragments of parallel bands of taenite within a meteoritic Widmanstätten pattern are present, with structural distortion caused by cold-working. The metal fragments retain their original chemistry of approximately 30 wt% nickel. The bulk of the bead is highly oxidized, with only approximately 2.4% of the total bead volume remaining as metal. Our results show that the first known example of the use of iron in Egypt was produced from a meteorite, its celestial origin having implications for both the perception of meteorite iron by ancient Egyptians and the development of metallurgical knowledge in the Nile Valley.

  1. A radiologic study of an ancient Egyptian mummy with a prosthetic toe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Bob; Vinh, Phuong; Schuster, Michael; Mayforth, Howard; Johnson Chapin, Emily

    2015-06-01

    A radiologic examination (both CT and traditional X-ray) of two mummies curated at the Albany Institute of History and Art revealed the identity of the mummified remains as well as details of the person's life style parameters (markers of occupational stress). These mummies, brought to the Institute over 100 years ago, were unstudied until 1989. This preliminary study led to the misappropriation of the remains, and subsequent switching of the remains within their coffins. Recent and more detailed analyses lead to the correct identification of sex, a re-association of the remains to their interment coffins, as well as a detailed analysis of occupational markers. A prosthetic toe was identified in one of the mummies which lead to the functional exploration of prosthetics in the past including their use as part of funerary processing in ancient Egypt. Finally, details of the embalming process place the wrapped mummy within the time frame identified on the coffin of the mummy identified as Ankhefenmut as well as confirming his social status. PMID:25998639

  2. Fo Shou San, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction, protects endothelial function through increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy W C Bi

    Full Text Available Fo Shou San (FSS is an ancient herbal decoction comprised of Chuanxiong Rhizoma (CR; Chuanxiong and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (ASR; Danggui in a ratio of 2:3. Previous studies indicate that FSS promotes blood circulation and dissipates blood stasis, thus which is being used widely to treat vascular diseases. Here, we aim to determine the cellular mechanism for the vascular benefit of FSS. The treatment of FSS reversed homocysteine-induced impairment of acetylcholine (ACh-evoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in aortic rings, isolated from rats. Like radical oxygen species (ROS scavenger tempol, FSS attenuated homocysteine-stimulated ROS generation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, and it also stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO as measured by fluorescence dye and biochemical assay. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of both Akt kinase and endothelial NO synthases (eNOS were markedly increased by FSS treatment, which was abolished by an Akt inhibitor triciribine. Likewise, triciribine reversed FSS-induced NO production in HUVECs. Finally, FSS elevated intracellular Ca(2+ levels in HUVECs, and the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA-AM inhibited the FSS-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation. The present results show that this ancient herbal decoction benefits endothelial function through increased activity of Akt kinase and eNOS; this effect is causally via a rise of intracellular Ca(2+ and a reduction of ROS.

  3. Ancient Records and Modern Research on the Mechanisms of Chinese Herbal Medicines in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, Chinese herbal medicines (CHM have been extensively and intensively studied through from both clinical and experimental perspectives and CHM have been proved to be effective in the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM. This study, by searching ancient records and modern research papers, reviewed CHM in terms of their clinical application and principal mechanism in the treatment of DM. We summarized the use of CHM mentioned in 54 famous ancient materia medica monographs and searched papers on the hypoglycemic effect of several representative CHM. Main mechanisms and limitations of CHM and further research direction for DM were discussed. On the basis of the study, we were led to conclude that TCM, as a main form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, was well recorded in ancient literatures and has less adverse effects as shown by modern studies. The mechanisms of CHM treatment of DM are complex, multilink, and multitarget, so we should find main hypoglycemic mechanism through doing research on CHM monomer active constituents. Many CHM monomer constituents possess noteworthy hypoglycemic effects. Therefore, developing a novel natural product for DM and its complications is of much significance. It is strongly significant to pay close attention to CHM for treatment of DM and its complications.

  4. Ancient Records and Modern Research on the Mechanisms of Chinese Herbal Medicines in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-ming; Liang, Feng-xia

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) have been extensively and intensively studied through from both clinical and experimental perspectives and CHM have been proved to be effective in the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study, by searching ancient records and modern research papers, reviewed CHM in terms of their clinical application and principal mechanism in the treatment of DM. We summarized the use of CHM mentioned in 54 famous ancient materia medica monographs and searched papers on the hypoglycemic effect of several representative CHM. Main mechanisms and limitations of CHM and further research direction for DM were discussed. On the basis of the study, we were led to conclude that TCM, as a main form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), was well recorded in ancient literatures and has less adverse effects as shown by modern studies. The mechanisms of CHM treatment of DM are complex, multilink, and multitarget, so we should find main hypoglycemic mechanism through doing research on CHM monomer active constituents. Many CHM monomer constituents possess noteworthy hypoglycemic effects. Therefore, developing a novel natural product for DM and its complications is of much significance. It is strongly significant to pay close attention to CHM for treatment of DM and its complications. PMID:25815039

  5. Micro-PIXE analysis of an ancient Egyptian papyrus: Identification of pigments used for the 'Book of the Dead'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, A.-M.B. E-mail: linneaus@wildmail.com; Calligaro, T.; Colinart, S.; Dran, J.C.; Loevestam, N.E.G.; Moignard, B.; Salomon, J

    2001-07-01

    This paper reports a study of colours and inks of an ancient Egyptian papyrus using an external proton microprobe in PIXE mode. Representing the Book of the Dead, this papyrus is dated from the 19th dynasty, New Kingdom (c.1295-1186 BC). Elemental maps were obtained by moving the papyrus under a fixed focused external beam using a motorised support. The maps were compared to photographic pictures taken in visible light. Inks used in the hieroglyph text appeared to be based on carbon (black) and iron oxide (red). Coloured drawings illustrating the text showed a wider palette: hematite, ochre, orpiment, Egyptian blue, verdigris. Most intriguing was the observation in several parts of the drawing of a whitish pigment containing strontium. Deposits of strontium-rich minerals (e.g. strontianite, celestite) have been identified in Egypt. The exact nature and the archaeological implications of this pigment have still to be determined. Finally, fine powder and coarse grains of arsenic oxide were observed, probably remaining from an early preservation treatment against insect attacks after excavation.

  6. Scenes from the past: CT-guided endoscopic recovery of a foreign object from the cranial cavity of an ancient Egyptian mummy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavka, Mislav; Petaros, Anja; Boščić, Drago; Kavur, Lovro; Janković, Ivor; Despot, Radovan; Trajković, Jelena; Brkljačić, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the value of computed tomography (CT)-guided endoscopy in the scientific study of mummified remains and the recovery of unidentified objects from ancient mummified remains. CT-guided endoscopy was performed on an Egyptian mummy from the Late Period to help retrieve an unidentified object from its skull. The combined use of CT and endoscopy facilitated the recovery of the object, minimizing further damage to the remains and to the object itself. The successful recovery of the brittle object allowed detailed analysis of the item to be performed in an attempt to determine the nature of its presence in the cranial cavity. It was confirmed that the object was a monocotyledon stem fragment. Relying on the existing literature on mummification and excerebration methods in ancient Egypt, we concluded that the stick was probably used for transnasal removal of the brain. The results of this study demonstrate the great potential of CT-guided endoscopy for minimally invasive recovery of small unidentified items from mummies that could yield important information about mummification procedures and the materials used to preserve bodies. PMID:23150862

  7. Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Virginia

    This four-week fourth grade social studies unit dealing with religious dimensions in ancient Egyptian culture was developed by the Public Education Religion Studies Center at Wright State University. It seeks to help students understand ancient Egypt by looking at the people, the culture, and the people's world view. The unit begins with outlines…

  8. Sit Like an Egyptian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The topic of Egypt is one that students are naturally intrigued and enthusiastic about. In this article, fifth graders create mosaic and mixed-media collaged chairs in their visual arts class as part of their overall study of the art and culture of ancient Egypt. The idea was to embellish a contemporary chair with Egyptian colors, themes, and…

  9. The Reasons and the Cultural Connotation of Ancient Egyptian Specter Worship%古埃及亡灵崇拜的原因及其文化蕴涵

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵克仁

    2012-01-01

    Nature worship, specter worship and Pharaoh Worship were the es- sential contents of ancient Egyptian religion. The specter worship was the intermedi- ate link of Egyptian religious development, so it has played a unique role for con- necting nature worship and specter worship. The specter worship was the inevitable result of nature worship, reflecting the Egyptian transition from Primitive society to Slave society; without doubt it was the embodiment of human Social forces. Besides, specter worship was also influenced by the Egyptian thinking mode and human geo- graphical environment in the Nile basin. Specter worship entailed the important infor- mation of Egyptian civilization. Specifically speaking, with rich cultural connation, Pyramid Texts, Coffin Texts and Book of the Dead demonstrated the evolution of the ancient Egyptian society, morality and Ethnic customs. The sculptures and paintings dominated by the concept to the worship of specter revealed the art level and popular aesthetic in ancient Egypt. The last but not the least, the establishment of mummies and the building of the pyramids contained philosophy in ancient Egypt.%自然崇拜、亡灵崇拜和法老崇拜是古埃及宗教的核心内容。亡灵崇拜是埃及宗教发展的中间环节,因而具有承上启下的独特作用。亡灵崇拜是埃及自然崇拜发展的必然结果,反映了埃及由原始社会向奴隶社会过渡的历史,因而是人间社会力量的折射。亡灵崇拜还受到埃及人思维模式和尼罗河人文地理环境的影响。亡灵崇拜中蕴涵着埃及文明的重要信息。金字塔文、棺文和亡灵书等死者之书反映了埃及当时的社会变迁、道德风尚和民族习俗,蕴涵着丰富的文化信息;在亡灵崇拜观念支配下进行的雕像、绘画,反映了当时的艺术水平与大众审美;木乃伊制作、金字塔建筑等冥世活动中蕴涵着埃及人的死亡哲学。

  10. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy in investigating Egyptian archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes the results of applications of the Moessbauer spectroscopy to investigate Ancient Egyptian pottery from the periods: Ancient Egyptian (3200-525 B.C.), Greek-Roman (320 B.C.-640 A.C.) and Early Islamic (800-1000 A.C.). Many objective informations deduced about: provinance, manufacturing techniques for different domestic purposes, civilization transfer between the Arab countries, methods of colouration and applying decorating glazes, and finally dating of ancient pottery. (orig.)

  11. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy in investigating Egyptian archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, N. A.; Sallam, H. A.

    1988-12-01

    This article summarizes the results of applications of the Mössbauer spectroscopy to investigate Ancient Egyptian pottery from the periods: Ancient Egyptian (3200 525 B.C.) Greek-Roman (320 B.C. 640 A.C.) and Early Islamic (800 1000 A.C.). Many objective informations deduced about: provinance, manufacturing techniques for different domestic purposes, civilization transfer between the Arab countries, methods of colouration and applying decorating glazes, and finally dating of ancient pottery.

  12. [Evolution of Egyptian neurosurgery: an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orief, Tamer

    2010-02-01

    This article describes the evolution of Egyptian neurosurgery. It highlights the experiences of the ancient Egyptians in treatment of the central nervous system diseases. These experiences were documented through their papyrus writings and their drawings over the walls in ancient temples. The aim of this article is not only to search for the roots of neurosurgery in Egypt but also to showcase the present and future status of neurosurgery. Neurosurgery developed as a specialty earlier in Egypt and has led the development of this specialty in Africa and the Middle East. It is worthwhile tracing the history of neurosurgery of past civilizations, ancient medicine, and the work of pioneers. PMID:20166531

  13. The ginseng of ancient herbalism research study%古之人参的本草学考证的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方琪; 毛泽玲

    2015-01-01

    From the ginseng of ancient origin and ginseng in literature are summarized, in order to solve the ginseng campanulaceae codonopsis or five plus families and ginseng.%从人参的古今产地及人参的文献资料中进行了综述,以期能够解决人参是桔梗科党参还是五加科人参之争。

  14. The Ancient Kemetic Roots of Library and Information Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulu, Itibari M.

    This paper argues that the ancient people of Kemet (Egypt), "the black land," built and operated the first major libraries and institutions of higher education in the world. Topics of discussion include the Ancient Egyptians as an African people; a chronology of Ancient Kemet; literature in Kemet; a history of Egyptian Librarianship; the…

  15. An Ancient Relation between Units of Length and Volume Based on a Sphere

    OpenAIRE

    Zapassky, Elena; Gadot, Yuval; Finkelstein, Israel; Benenson, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    The modern metric system defines units of volume based on the cube. We propose that the ancient Egyptian system of measuring capacity employed a similar concept, but used the sphere instead. When considered in ancient Egyptian units, the volume of a sphere, whose circumference is one royal cubit, equals half a hekat. Using the measurements of large sets of ancient containers as a database, the article demonstrates that this formula was characteristic of Egyptian and Egyptian-related pottery v...

  16. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background — Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them. Methods — I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentra...

  17. An Egyptianizing relief from Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanno, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    From the very first announcement of the theme of this congress it was evident that the "Egyptianizing" phenomenon would be one of the most recurring topics in the diverse contributions, especially those concerned with cultural aspects, such as art and religion, outside Egypt itself. It would be presumptuous of me, therefore, and futile, even to try to define the phenomenon. At this stage I would only wish to emphasize the distinction between a) the more ancient version of the "...

  18. Unilateral NMR, 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy and micro-analytical techniques for studying the materials and state of conservation of an ancient Egyptian wooden sarcophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Noemi; Presciutti, Federica; Di Tullio, Valeria; Doherty, Brenda; Marinelli, Anna Maria; Provinciali, Barbara; Macchioni, Nicola; Capitani, Donatella; Miliani, Costanza

    2011-03-01

    A multi-technique approach was employed to study a decorated Egyptian wooden sarcophagus (XXV-XXVI dynasty, Third Intermediate Period), belonging to the Museo del Vicino Oriente of the Sapienza University of Rome. Portable non-invasive unilateral NMR was applied to evaluate the conservation state of the sarcophagus. Moreover, using unilateral NMR, a non-invasive analytical protocol was established to detect the presence of organic substances on the surface and/or embedded in the wooden matrix. This protocol allowed for an educated sampling campaign aimed at further investigating the state of degradation of the wood and the presence of organic substances by (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The composition of the painted layer was analysed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Raman and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SERS/SERRS), infrared and GC-MS techniques, evidencing original components such as clay minerals, Egyptian green, indigo, natural gums, and also highlighting restoration pigments and alteration compounds. The identification of the wood, of great value for the reconstruction of the history of the artwork, was achieved by means of optical microscopy.

  19. Views of Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Guide. School Arts: Looking/Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Linda; Brenner, Carla

    This teaching guide discusses ancient Egyptian culture, the lithographs made by Napoleon's scientists in 1798-99 to study and record every aspect of Egypt, the world's subsequent fascination with Egypt, ancient Egyptian architecture, Egyptian writing, and archeologists' illustrations of Egypt. The guide suggests activities for elementary school,…

  20. THE GENIUS LOCI AT THE GREAT TEMPLE OF ABU SIMBEL: HERMENEUTIC READING IN THE ARCHITECTURAL LANGUAGE OF ANCIENT EGYPTIAN TEMPLES OF RAMSES II IN NUBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Ramzy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Archaeologists have long wondered about the Temple of Abu Simbel: its location within the Nubian territory far from major Egyptian cities, and its unique design. Utilizing the hermeneutic process of understanding the whole from the parts and then situating the whole within a bigger whole (context, this study is a trial to arrive at a better interpretation of this monument. Drawing on the characteristic analysis of the temple's Genius Loci as developed by Norberg-Schulz, as well as on Heidegger's anticipatory fore-structures, the study goes on to show that both of the location and the unique structure of the temple were the outcome of political and conceptual aspects of the period, more than being a religious tradition. Reaching this conclusion, another goal had been achieved, where the validity of hermeneutic analyses as a useful tool for discovering new dimensions about historical monuments and archaeological sites had been attested.

  1. Sub-pluvial Saqqara and its possible impact on ancient Egyptian civilization in the Old Kingdom Period (4600 - 4100 yrs BP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welc, Fabian; Marks, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    Geological and geoarchaeological investigations were carried out at several archaeological sites in northern Egypt within the Memphis Necropolis (Saqqara, Abusir, and Giza). Sedimentological analysis of exposures in western Saqqara, excavated by the Polish-Egyptian archaeological team led by Professor Karol Myśliwiec (Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures, Polish Academy of Sciences), supplied with significant paleoclimatic data and enabled reconstruction of regional climate change during the Old Kingdom Period (4600 - 4100 yrs BP). Potential influence of this climate change on development of the early Egyptian civilization in this area was determined. Examined exposures indicated that during the Old Kingdom Period the area of Saqqara (at present located in a desert) has been many a time flooded with sheet floods, water of which was heavily charged with debris moving down-slope. Performed geochemical and sedimentological analyses proved that climate in the Old Kingdom time was warm and relatively wet. In 4200 - 4100 yrs BP a quick climate change from wet to extremely dry occurred, with occasional stormy winds. These unfavorable climatic conditions were accompanied by catastrophically low seasonal floods of the Nile, resulting in famine and drought recorded in archaeological data and consequently, leading to a disintegration of the Egyptian state. The authors' investigations indicated that a climate change in Egypt in the second half of the 3rd millennium BC is however not as univocal as considered previously. Well-known gradual aridification of the north-eastern Africa, initiated about 5000 yrs BP, has not been unidirectional and was varied regionally. The collected data indicate univocally that there were quasi-cyclic climatic fluctuations. In spite of a distinct trend, the dry period has been interrupted by numerous short wet episodes, occurring during the interval 4600 - 4200 yrs BP and especially at the end of the Old Kingdom Period (ca. 4200 yrs BP

  2. Hair-offerings: an enigmatic Egyptian custom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Tassie

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available The Egyptians did not record the reasons that lay behind the offering of hair. Using an holistic approach, which combines both ethnographic and ethnohistoric evidence, insights may be gained into the ancient remains of these rituals and practices.

  3. Identification of proteins from 4200-year-old skin and muscle tissue biopsies from ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period shows evidence of acute inflammation and severe immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Ravishankar, Prathiba; Xavier, Dylan; Lim, Do Seon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-10-28

    We performed proteomics analysis on four skin and one muscle tissue samples taken from three ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period, approximately 4200 years old. The mummies were first dated by radiocarbon dating of the accompany-\\break ing textiles, and morphologically examined by scanning electron microscopy of additional skin samples. Proteins were extracted, separated on SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) gels, and in-gel digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified a total of 230 unique proteins from the five samples, which consisted of 132 unique protein identifications. We found a large number of collagens, which was confirmed by our microscopy data, and is in agreement with previous studies showing that collagens are very long-lived. As expected, we also found a large number of keratins. We identified numerous proteins that provide evidence of activation of the innate immunity system in two of the mummies, one of which also contained proteins indicating severe tissue inflammation, possibly indicative of an infection that we can speculate may have been related to the cause of death.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644972

  4. Thermoluminescence (TL) of Egyptian Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvoerer, M.; Delavergne, M.-C.; Chapoulie, R.

    1988-01-01

    Egyptian Blue is a synthesized crystalline pictorial pigment with formula CaCuSi/sub 4/O/sub 10/. It has been used in Egypt and Mesopotamia from the 3rd millenium B.C. A preliminary experiment on a recently synthesized sample showed that this pigment is thermoluminescent after ..beta.. irradiation (/sup 90/Sr). As the signal intensity grows linearly with the administered dose within the temperature range commonly used in TL dating, we have been looking for this phenomenon from archaeological pigments. It was encountered with two samples found in excavation. From its intensity and stability we concluded that Egyptian Blue can be dated using TL. This first and positive result encouraged us to extend the method to other types of mineral pigments synthesized by early man, and to suggest that it may be used for direct dating of ancient murals.

  5. Burns treatment in ancient times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija; Janjić, Zlata; Komarcević, Aleksandar; Pajić, Milos; Dobanovacki, Dusanka; Misković, Sanja Skeledzija

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of fire at the dawn of prehistoric time brought not only the benefits to human beings offering the light and heat, but also misfortune due to burns; and that was the beginning of burns treatment. Egyptian doctors made medicines from plants, animal products and minerals, which they combined with magic and religious procedures. The earliest records described burns dressings with milk from mothers of male babies. Goddess Isis was called upon to help. Some remedies and procedures proved so successful that their application continued for centuries. The Edwin Smith papyrus (1500 BC) mentioned the treatment of burns with honey and grease. Ebers Papyrus (1500 BC) contains descriptions of application of mud, excrement, oil and plant extracts. They also used honey, Aloe and tannic acid to heal burns. Ancient Egyptians did not know about microorganisms but they knew that honey, moldy bread and copper salts could prevent infections from dirt in burns healing. Thyme, opium and belladona were used for pain relief. In the 4th century BC, Hippocrates recorded that Greek and Roman doctors used rendered pig fat, resin and bitumen to treat burns. Mixture of honey and bran, or lotion of wine and myrrh were used by Celsus. Honey was also known in Ayurveda (Indian medicine) time. Ayurvedic records Characa and Sushruta included honey in their dressing aids to purify sores and promote the healing. Burn treatment in Chinese medicine was traditional. It was a compilation of philosophy, knowledge and herbal medicine. The successful treatment of burns started in recent time and it has been made possible by better knowledge of the pathophysiology of thermal injuries and their consequences, medical technology advances and improved surgical techniques. PMID:23888738

  6. Burns treatment in ancient times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija; Janjić, Zlata; Komarcević, Aleksandar; Pajić, Milos; Dobanovacki, Dusanka; Misković, Sanja Skeledzija

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of fire at the dawn of prehistoric time brought not only the benefits to human beings offering the light and heat, but also misfortune due to burns; and that was the beginning of burns treatment. Egyptian doctors made medicines from plants, animal products and minerals, which they combined with magic and religious procedures. The earliest records described burns dressings with milk from mothers of male babies. Goddess Isis was called upon to help. Some remedies and procedures proved so successful that their application continued for centuries. The Edwin Smith papyrus (1500 BC) mentioned the treatment of burns with honey and grease. Ebers Papyrus (1500 BC) contains descriptions of application of mud, excrement, oil and plant extracts. They also used honey, Aloe and tannic acid to heal burns. Ancient Egyptians did not know about microorganisms but they knew that honey, moldy bread and copper salts could prevent infections from dirt in burns healing. Thyme, opium and belladona were used for pain relief. In the 4th century BC, Hippocrates recorded that Greek and Roman doctors used rendered pig fat, resin and bitumen to treat burns. Mixture of honey and bran, or lotion of wine and myrrh were used by Celsus. Honey was also known in Ayurveda (Indian medicine) time. Ayurvedic records Characa and Sushruta included honey in their dressing aids to purify sores and promote the healing. Burn treatment in Chinese medicine was traditional. It was a compilation of philosophy, knowledge and herbal medicine. The successful treatment of burns started in recent time and it has been made possible by better knowledge of the pathophysiology of thermal injuries and their consequences, medical technology advances and improved surgical techniques.

  7. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy to study archaeological Egyptian pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer spectra have been used as ''fingerprints'' in obtaining information an ancient Egyptian pottery and in fine art. An empirical relation has been found that connects the natural radiation dose with the intensity ratio of the two non-magnetic central peaks. It was suggested that this relation be used for dating ancient pottery. 8 refs, 13 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Adoption in ancient times

    OpenAIRE

    Bisha Eugena

    2015-01-01

    Since in ancient times, in all human cultures, children transfered from biological parents to parents that want them to create family, for political alliances, for inheritance, for a future marriage, or to care for elderly parents. The practice of adoption was fairly common in different places and periods. Adoption is mention on Bible and Quran. Greeks, Romans, Egyptians and Babylonians had adoption systems.

  9. Ancient Egypt: Personal Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Arelene

    This teacher resource book provides information on ancient Egypt via short essays, photographs, maps, charts, and drawings. Egyptian social and religious life, including writing, art, architecture, and even the practice of mummification, is conveniently summarized for the teacher or other practitioner in a series of one to three page articles with…

  10. Bos primigenius in Ancient Egyptian art – historical evidence for the continuity of occurrence and ecology of an extinct key species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Beierkuhnlein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the habitat requirements and temporal stability of populations of extinct aurochs (Bos primigenius is surprisingly scarce. Reliable reports of this species, which by its domestication remains tremendously important for humans, are rare. As the species became extinct about 400 years ago and regionally disappeared much earlier, its behaviour and morphology are also under debate. Aurochs is also a crucial component of the mega-herbivore theory in nature conservation, but in fact its natural habitat and behaviour are unknown. Here, I report records of aurochs for the time period of Ancient Egypt. They are found in archaeological sites and literature, and in collections. Records of the species continue through all the periods of Ancient Egypt. In particular, hunting scenes illustrating the merits of high-ranking persons, in their graves (mastabas and temples, provide insights into the behaviour and ecology of the depicted game. Here, special attention is given to one outstanding hunting scene that is documented in a relief at the mortuary temple of Ramesses III (1175 BC, Medinet Habu, Egypt. Assisted by a group of hunters, the pharaoh kills three specimens of aurochs. The whole scene is stunningly realistic.  The adult specimen is fleeing towards the reed belt of the River Nile, suggesting that the species’ habitat was probably in large valley bottoms, where open grassland is regularly created by flooding. Endemic species of fish and game confirm that this scene took place in Lower Egypt. The regional populations of the North-African subspecies of aurochs probably went extinct shortly after this piece of art was produced. Records of species in ancient art can be very informative in terms of ecology and behaviour of species, especially when extinct species are addressed. In addition, the dating of old pieces of art containing biological information can be very precise, for instance when these refer to a historic personage. 

  11. Faience: the ceramic technology of ancient Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Faiences are ancient Egyptian ceramic materials, considered as "high-tech" products. The paper discussed the method by which the faiences were produced and the application of SEM and Raman spectroscopy to their analysis

  12. STANDARDIZATION OF HERBAL DRUGS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana A. Bele

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbal drugs have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of a range of diseases. Medicinal plants have played a key role in world health. There is a growing focus on the importance of medicinal plants in the traditional health care system (viz. Ayurveda, Unani, Homoeopathy, Yoga in solving health care problems. Systematic approach and well-designed methodologies for the standardization of herbal raw materials and herbal formulations are developed. In view of the growing interest in herbal medicines, methods for standardization of herbal drugs are developed and used in different formulation.

  13. Ægypticisme, ægyptomani. Egyptian revival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Michael Alexander

    2001-01-01

    To see Egypticism as merely a variety of neo-classicism sems too restrictive when one realizes the extent to which Western civilization has been inspired by Egypt. The interchangeability of terms covering that inspiration is confusing, so an attempt has been made to standardize them. The results...... are often contrary to what the ancients themselves would have understood or condoned. Practical considerations of form or a perenial sense of aesthetics, rather than Egyptian prototypes, may be behind much that looks Egyptian....

  14. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  15. Py-GC/MS, GC/MS and FTIR investigations on Late Roman-Egyptian adhesives from opus sectile: new insights into ancient recipes and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribechini, Erika; Orsini, Sibilla; Silvano, Flora; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2009-04-01

    An analytical protocol based on optical microscopy, Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), analytical pyrolysis in the presence of hexamethyldisilazane followed by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis (Py-GC/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethylsilylation (GC/MS) was used in the chemical characterisation of the original adhesives used to fix monochrome and mosaic glass and stone plaques coming from the Late Roman archaeological site of Antinoopolis (Egypt). FTIR analysis demonstrated the presence of calcite fragments, and Py-GC/MS and GC/MS analyses provided detailed molecular compositions, highlighting the presence of a wide range of compound classes including diterpenoid acids, tricyclic abietanes with a high degree of aromatisation, mid- and long-chain monocarboxylic fatty acids, mono- and di-hydroxy acids, alpha,omega-dicaboxylic fatty acids, n-alkanols, and n-alkanes. Characteristic biomarkers and their distribution patterns indicated the presence of pine pitch in all the adhesives, which in some cases was admixed with beeswax and brassicaceae seed oil. The results provided new insights into the complex recipes used by artisans in ancient Egypt in the production of adhesives and in the sophisticated manufacture of opus sectile decorations. PMID:19298883

  16. HERBAL LIPSTICK FORMULATION: A NEW APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Deepali Avinash

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Coloring skin particularly skin of face and lips is an ancient practice going back to prehistoric period. In present days the use of such product has increased and choice of shades of color, texture and luster have been changed and become wider. This can be observed from the fact that lipsticks are marked in hundreds of shades of colors to satisfy the demand of women. The present investigation was done to formulate herbal lipstick, since lipsticks are one of the key cosmetics to be used by the women. Attempt was also made to evaluate the formulated herbal lipstick. The word herbal is a symbol of safety in contrast to the synthetic one which has adverse effects on human health. Herbal preparations viz., herbal tablets, herbal tonics, herbal paste, herbal shampoo, herbal sindhur, herbal contraceptives and herbal lipstick has become popular among the consumer herbal medicines represent the fastest growing segment to heal the various ailments. Human being have been using herbs for different purpose like food, medicine, beatifying with advancement of science & technology use of natural things including plant has been reduced except for food, vegetarian takes plant& plant only. However there is resurgence of use of herbs both as drug and cosmetics. Due to various adverse effects of available synthetic preparation the present work was conceived by us to formulate a herbal lipstick having minimal or no side effects which will extensively used by the women of our communities with great surety and satisfaction.

  17. STANDARDIZATION OF HERBAL DRUGS: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Archana A. Bele; Anubha Khale

    2011-01-01

    Herbal drugs have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of a range of diseases. Medicinal plants have played a key role in world health. There is a growing focus on the importance of medicinal plants in the traditional health care system (viz. Ayurveda, Unani, Homoeopathy, Yoga) in solving health care problems. Systematic approach and well-designed methodologies for the standardization of herbal raw materials and herbal formulations are developed. In view of the growing...

  18. Curse of schistosomiasis on Egyptian liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdel-Rahman El-Zayadi

    2004-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease caused by a trematode blood fluke of the genus schistosoma that belongs to the schistosomatidae family.The ancient Egyptians contracted the disease more than 4 000 years ago.It was recognized through haematuria,the main sign of urinary bilharziasis was recorded in the Kahun papyrus 1900 B.C.as"a-a-a" disease[1].

  19. An ancient relation between units of length and volume based on a sphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zapassky

    Full Text Available The modern metric system defines units of volume based on the cube. We propose that the ancient Egyptian system of measuring capacity employed a similar concept, but used the sphere instead. When considered in ancient Egyptian units, the volume of a sphere, whose circumference is one royal cubit, equals half a hekat. Using the measurements of large sets of ancient containers as a database, the article demonstrates that this formula was characteristic of Egyptian and Egyptian-related pottery vessels but not of the ceramics of Mesopotamia, which had a different system of measuring length and volume units.

  20. An ancient relation between units of length and volume based on a sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapassky, Elena; Gadot, Yuval; Finkelstein, Israel; Benenson, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    The modern metric system defines units of volume based on the cube. We propose that the ancient Egyptian system of measuring capacity employed a similar concept, but used the sphere instead. When considered in ancient Egyptian units, the volume of a sphere, whose circumference is one royal cubit, equals half a hekat. Using the measurements of large sets of ancient containers as a database, the article demonstrates that this formula was characteristic of Egyptian and Egyptian-related pottery vessels but not of the ceramics of Mesopotamia, which had a different system of measuring length and volume units. PMID:22470489

  1. The Traditional Egyptian Antecedents of Graeco-Roman Post-Mortem Ascent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Gonzalez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the greater antiquity of Egyptian civilisation, when we refer to Egyptian and Graeco-Roman cultures, we are generally referring to cultures that were contiguous, and the profound impact that Egyptian ideas had upon the Graeco-Roman world cannot be denied. In key respects, Egyptian views of the afterlife foreshadowed Graeco-Roman, Jewish, and early Christian conceptions, particularly in terms of the motif of post-mortem ascent. Although the channels of transmission have been lost in antiquity, the motif may still be sketched clearly enough in both cultures to suggest that Egypt was an important source for its expression. After some methodological considerations, this essay will trace the motif of ascent as it was manifested in Graeco-Roman culture, and then analyze the nature of the ancient Egyptian evidence in order to suggest the existence of key elements of this same motif from the earliest times in ancient Egypt.

  2. Egypt: A Simulation of Ancient Egyptian Civilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Marcia; Malcolm, Vivian

    This simulation allows students to travel north through the six divisions of the Nile River, with each major phase of the simulation called a "cataract". Students earn travel points as they sail the Nile from its source in Central Africa through the Sixth Cataract, all the way to the First Cataract, and then on to the delta where it flows into the…

  3. Ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Ashwin Balegar

    This thesis involves development of an interactive GIS (Geographic Information System) based application, which gives information about the ancient history of Egypt. The astonishing architecture, the strange burial rituals and their civilization were some of the intriguing questions that motivated me towards developing this application. The application is a historical timeline starting from 3100 BC, leading up to 664 BC, focusing on the evolution of the Egyptian dynasties. The tool holds information regarding some of the famous monuments which were constructed during that era and also about the civilizations that co-existed. It also provides details about the religions followed by their kings. It also includes the languages spoken during those periods. The tool is developed using JAVA, a programing language and MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) a product of ESRI (Environmental Science Research Institute) to create map objects, to provide geographic information. JAVA Swing is used for designing the user interface. HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) pages are created to provide the user with more information related to the historic period. CSS (Cascade Style Sheets) and JAVA Scripts are used with HTML5 to achieve creative display of content. The tool is kept simple and easy for the user to interact with. The tool also includes pictures and videos for the user to get a feel of the historic period. The application is built to motivate people to know more about one of the prominent and ancient civilization of the Mediterranean world.

  4. Therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease: the ancient meets the future--traditional Chinese herbal medicine, electroacupuncture, gene therapy and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Liang, Xi-Bin; Li, Feng-Qiao; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Liu, Xian-Yu; Wang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2008-10-01

    In China, it has been estimated that there are more than 2.0 million people suffering from Parkinson's disease, which is currently becoming one of the most common chronic neurodegenerative disorders during recent years. For many years, scientists have struggled to find new therapeutic approaches for this disease. Since 1994, our research group led by Drs. Ji-Sheng Han and Xiao-Min Wang of Neuroscience Research Institute, Peking University has developed several prospective treatment strategies for the disease. These studies cover the traditional Chinese medicine-herbal formula or acupuncture, and modern technologies such as gene therapy or stem cell replacement therapy, and have achieved some original results. It hopes that these data may be beneficial for the research development and for the future clinical utility for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Science in the Study of Ancient Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewski, Sonia; Shortland, Andrew; Rowland, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Egyptology has been dominated by the large quantity of written and pictorial material available. This amazing archaeology has opened up a wonderful view of the ancient Egyptian world. The importance of hieroglyphics and texts, and their interpretation, has led to other areas of archaeology playing much less prominence in the study of Egypt. Perhaps most notable in this is relative lack of the application of analytical science to answer Egyptian questions. This problem has been compounded by d...

  6. Sexual attitudes, preferences and infections in Ancient Egypt.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    This socio-sexual review of Ancient Egyptian society aims to increase awareness that the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is largely determined by the way a society is structured and how that structure functions. The prevalence of STDs in Ancient Egypt has been found to be low. This state of affairs was maintained for centuries. Although the structure of their society was rigidly hierarchical, Egyptian people made it function in an acceptable way. What might be learned is co...

  7. The thermoluminescence (TL) of Egyptian Blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egyptian Blue is a synthesized crystalline pictorial pigment with formula CaCuSi4O10. It has been used in Egypt and Mesopotamia from the 3rd millenium B.C. A preliminary experiment on a recently synthesized sample showed that this pigment is thermoluminescent after β irradiation (90Sr). As the signal intensity grows linearly with the administered dose within the temperature range commonly used in TL dating, we have been looking for this phenomenon from archaeological pigments. It was encountered with two samples found in excavation. From its intensity and stability we concluded that Egyptian Blue can be dated using TL. This first and positive result encouraged us to extend the method to other types of mineral pigments synthesized by early man, and to suggest that it may be used for direct dating of ancient murals. (author)

  8. The Effects of HeShouWu on Cardialgia Relief by Reviewing Ancient Herbal Literatures%何首乌止“心”痛功效的古代本草文献研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2015-01-01

    系统梳理先秦至民国时期百余部本草文献,发现其中有关何首乌止“心”痛的记载;对何首乌所止的“心”痛进行详细考究,发现在唐宋以前,古人常将胃脘痛称之为“心痛”,故认为何首乌止“心”痛实为止胃脘痛,临床可用于止胃脘阴虚内热之灼痛及内寒中生之冷痛。%Hundreds of herbal literatures from Pre-Qin period to Republican period were systematically sort-ed out and discovered the records relevant to HeShouWu(Fallopia multiflora Harald) in stopping heart pain. Through the thoroughly observation and study on the cardialgia relief by HeShouWu, the result showed that the ancient people often called gastric abscess as heart pain before Tang and Song dynasties, therefore stopping heart pain in fact was stopping the pain of gastric abscess and clinically it can be used to treat epigastric burning pain due to Yin deficiency and internal heat as well as crymodynia internally generated by coldness.

  9. Egyptian Arab Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work are given the principal news concerning petroleum and natural gas in Egyptian Arab Republic. An important discovery of natural gas has been made in Khalda (Egyptian Arab Republic). The discovery well will be temporarily abandoned until it is connected to the egyptian pipeline system. In 1996 the south Khalda will be explored with at least two well drilling. The transit duties by the Suez canal for liquefied natural gas exports have decreased of 35%. The Arab Petroleum Pipeline Company studies a connection project of the trans saudi pipeline with the Suez mediterranean pipeline. The Egyptian General Petroleum Corporation will furnish 2,5 milliards of m3 per year of natural gas to Israel during 20 years. (O.L.). 2 figs

  10. The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Picton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available University College London houses one of the world’s most important collections of ancient Egyptian material, the majority excavated by Flinders Petrie, his students and his successors in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is a museum of archaeology that helps to explain the development of a discipline that was in its infancy when Petrie worked in Egypt over a century ago. It is a teaching collection, its densely packed cases entrancing, and sometimes intimidating, visitors who rave about its old-fashioned feel, but it is anything but frozen in time.

  11. Ferulic acid enhances the chemical and biological properties of astragali radix: a stimulator for danggui buxue tang, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ken Y Z; Zhang, Zhen X; Du, Crystal Y Q; Zhang, Wendy L; Bi, Cathy W C; Choi, Roy C Y; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2014-02-01

    Danggui buxue tang, an ancient formula composed of astragali radix and Angelicae sinensis radix, has been used for treating menopausal irregularity in women for more than 800 years in China. In danggui buxue tang, the complete functions of astragali radix require the assistance of Angelicae sinensis radix, and both herbs have to work harmoniously in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic purposes. In order to analyze the relationship of the two herbs, the role of ferulic acid, a major chemical within Angelicae sinensis radix, in chemical and biological properties of astragali radix was determined. Using ferulic acid in the extraction of astragali radix, the amounts of astragaloside IV, calycosin, and formononetin were increased in the final extract; however, the astragali radix polysaccharide showed a minor increase. The chemical-enriched astragali radix extract showed robust induction in osteogenic and estrogenic activities in cultured osteosarcoma MG-63 and breast MCF-7 cells. However, ferulic acid itself did not show such biological responses. The current results strongly suggest that Angelicae sinensis radix-derived ferulic acid is a positive regulator for danggui buxue tang, which enhanced the solubilities of active ingredients derived from astragali radix, and which therefore increased the biological efficacies of danggui buxue tang. PMID:24488720

  12. Finding out egyptian gods' secret using analytical chemistry: biomedical properties of egyptian black makeup revealed by amperometry at single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsoba, Issa; Arbault, Stéphane; Walter, Philippe; Amatore, Christian

    2010-01-15

    Lead-based compounds were used during antiquity as both pigments and medicines in the formulation of makeup materials. Chemical analysis of cosmetics samples found in Egyptians tombs and the reconstitution of ancient recipes as reported by Greco-Roman authors have shown that two non-natural lead chlorides (laurionite Pb(OH)Cl and phosgenite Pb(2)Cl(2)CO(3)) were purposely synthesized and were used as fine powders in makeup and eye lotions. According to ancient Egyptian manuscripts, these were essential remedies for treating eye illness and skin ailments. This conclusion seems amazing because today we focus only on the well-recognized toxicity of lead salts. Here, using ultramicroelectrodes, we obtain new insights into the biochemical interactions between lead(II) ions and cells, which support the ancient medical use of sparingly soluble lead compounds. Submicromolar concentrations of Pb(2+) ions are shown to be sufficient for eliciting specific oxidative stress responses of keratinocytes. These consist essentially of an overproduction of nitrogen monoxide (NO degrees ). Owing to the biological role of NO degrees in stimulating nonspecific immunological defenses, one may argue that these lead compounds were deliberately manufactured and used in ancient Egyptian formulations to prevent and treat eye illnesses by promoting the action of immune cells.

  13. Design a Book: A Quest in Ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a classroom project that combines creative writing, basic book design, and social studies content. During this project, the authors' seventh grade students research a variety of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites while reviewing course material from a unit of study on ancient Egypt, practice project management skills…

  14. Ancient Pyramids Help Students Learn Math Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Courtney D.; Stump, Amanda M.; Lazaros, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an activity that allows students to use mathematics and critical-thinking skills to emulate processes used by the ancient Egyptians to prepare the site for the Pyramids of Giza. To accomplish this, they use three different methods. First, they create a square using only simple technological tools that were available to the…

  15. Unlocking the Mysteries of Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Maggie

    1995-01-01

    Describes the work of Egyptologist William Murnane who is recording the ritual scenes and inscriptions of a great columned hall from the days of the pharaohs. The 134 columns, covered with divine imagery and hieroglyphic inscriptions represent an unpublished religious text. Briefly discusses ancient Egyptian culture. Includes several photographs…

  16. Precursors of Vocational Psychology in Ancient Civilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Frank; Carson, Andrew D.

    1995-01-01

    Examines philosophical theories produced by two ancient civilizations (Eastern Mediterranean and Chinese) for applications to an applied psychology of work. Includes analysis of Egyptians, Semites, and Greeks, with a special emphasis on Plato. Suggests that many basic elements of vocational psychology were present during the first millennium B.C.…

  17. Night blindness and ancient remedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Hajar Al Binali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to briefly review the history of night blindness and its treatment from ancient times until the present. The old Egyptians, the Babylonians, the Greeks and the Arabs used animal liver for treatment and successfully cured the disease. The author had the opportunity to observe the application of the old remedy to a patient. Now we know what the ancients did not know, that night blindness is caused by Vitamin A deficiency and the animal liver is the store house for Vitamin A.

  18. Chapter 3: neurology in ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, George K; Steinberg, David A

    2010-01-01

    Neurology, in the modern sense, did not exist in ancient Egypt, where medicine was a compound of natural, magical and religious elements, with different practitioners for each form of healing. Nevertheless, Egyptian doctors made careful observations of illness and injury, some of which involved the nervous system. Modern scholars have three sources of information about Egyptian medicine: papyri, inscriptions, and mummified remains. These tell us that the Egyptians had words for the skull, brain, vertebrae, spinal fluid and meninges, though they do not say if they assigned any function to them. They described unconsciousness, quadriparesis, hemiparesis and dementia. We can recognize neurological injuries, such as traumatic hemiparesis and cervical dislocation with paraplegia, in the well known Edwin Smith surgical papyrus. Similarly recognizable in the Ebers papyrus is a description of migraine. An inscription from the tomb of the vizier Weshptah, dated c. 2455 BCE, seems to describe stroke, and Herodotus describes epilepsy in Hellenistic Egypt. We have very little understanding of how Egyptian physicians organized these observations, but we may learn something of Egyptian culture by examining them. At the same time, modern physicians feel some connection to Egyptian physicians and can plausibly claim to be filling a similar societal role. PMID:19892106

  19. Cats of the Pharaohs: Genetic Comparison of Egyptian Cat Mummies to their Feline Contemporaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jennifer D; Ikram, Salima; Knudsen, Joan; Bleiberg, Edward; Grahn, Robert A; Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-10-01

    The ancient Egyptians mummified an abundance of cats during the Late Period (664 - 332 BC). The overlapping morphology and sizes of developing wildcats and domestic cats confounds the identity of mummified cat species. Genetic analyses should support mummy identification and was conducted on two long bones and a mandible of three cats that were mummified by the ancient Egyptians. The mummy DNA was extracted in a dedicated ancient DNA laboratory at the University of California - Davis, then directly sequencing between 246 and 402 bp of the mtDNA control region from each bone. When compared to a dataset of wildcats (Felis silvestris silvestris, F. s. tristrami, and F. chaus) as well as a previously published worldwide dataset of modern domestic cat samples, including Egypt, the DNA evidence suggests the three mummies represent common contemporary domestic cat mitotypes prevalent in modern Egypt and the Middle East. Divergence estimates date the origin of the mummies' mitotypes to between two and 7.5 thousand years prior to their mummification, likely prior to or during Egyptian Predyanstic and Early Dynastic Periods. These data are the first genetic evidence supporting that the ancient Egyptians used domesticated cats, F. s. catus, for votive mummies, and likely implies cats were domesticated prior to extensive mummification of cats. PMID:22923880

  20. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  1. Chest surgical disorders in ancient Egypt: evidence of advanced knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Weder, Walter

    2012-03-01

    The ancient Egyptians laid the foundation for the development of the earliest recorded systems of medical treatment. Many specialties such as gynecology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, and chest disorders were subject to diagnosis, which were followed by an appropriate treatment. Here, we elucidate the remarkable level of their knowledge and understanding of anatomy and physiology in the field of chest medicine. Furthermore, we look at how ancient Egyptian physicians came to a diagnosis and treatment based on the thoracic cases in the Edwin Smith papyrus. PMID:22330033

  2. Irep en Kemet Project: Creating the Corpus of Wine in Ancient Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    M. R. Guasch-Jané; FONSECA, S.; Ibrahim, M.

    2012-01-01

    Presented are the research objectives of the project 'Irep en Kemet', Wine of Ancient Egypt, and the content of the website. This research project aims at documenting the complete corpus of wine in ancient Egypt and analysing the data (iconography, textual sources and artefacts) to unveil the importance of the ancient Egyptian wine culture legacy in the Mediterranean region. At this stage, a bibliographical researchable database relevant to wine, viticulture and winemaking in the ancient Egyp...

  3. Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum. Learning from Exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the exhibition "Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum" that explores the four major periods of Egyptian history. Provides background information on ancient Egypt and describes the art that was present in each of the four kingdoms. (CMK)

  4. Ancient Egypt in our Cultural Heritage?

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Vasiljević

    2016-01-01

    Inspiration derived from ancient Egypt is usually expressed through the Egyptian motifs in arts and popular culture of the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as through the non-scientific interpretations of the culture, very much based upon the Renaissance ones. The number and variety of material and non-material traces of this fascination are most expressed in the countries where, along with the early support for the institutional development of Egyptology, there existed economically potent ed...

  5. Identifying the Practice of Tattooing in Ancient Egypt and Nubia

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey J. Tassie

    2003-01-01

    Tattooing was practised by many ancient societies, including the ancient Egyptians and Nubians. Egypt, for example, boasts iconographic and physical evidence for tattooing for a period spanning at least 4000 years – the longest known history of tattooing in the world. The second oldest physical evidence for tattooing worldwide was recovered from Middle Kingdom contexts in Egypt and C-Group contexts in Nubia (the Hanslabjoch ice man being the oldest). It has been suggested that tattooing was a...

  6. Tech Talk for Social Studies Teachers: Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 10 Web sites concerning ancient Egypt that have materials appropriate for social studies classes. Includes virtual tours of Egypt and specific temples, explorations of the pyramids, archaeological and geographic information, and information on the Egyptian "Book of the Dead." (MJP)

  7. Symmetries in Images on Ancient Seals

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the presence of symmetries in images engraved on ancient seals, in particular on stamp seals. Mainly used to secure the containers from tampering and for owner's identification, these objects appeared during the 5th millennium BC in Mesopotamia. Usually the seals were engraved with simple images, suitable to communicate an immediate information. Rotational symmetries are already displayed by the most ancient stamp seals, whose images reach a quasi-perfect symmetry in their small circular or ovoid spaces. Bilateral symmetries are quite common in Egyptian scarab seals.

  8. The Restoration and Conservation of Egyptian Alabaster Vessels from the Early ERA in Atfiyah Museum Store - Helwan - Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi Abdel Kader, R.; Sayed Mohamed, S.

    2013-07-01

    Egypt is considered one of the most countries which contain a lot of cultural heritage; the Ancient Egyptian used a lot of stones for his life like: limestone, sandstone, granite and Egyptian Alabaster. The Egyptian Alabaster is used for his daily and eternal life, he made a lot of funerary furniture from this stone like: vessels, statues, Architectural elements in the temples, tombs and canopic jars to preserve his viscera from decomposition like: stomach, liver … etc in the mummification process. Egyptian Alabaster is a sedimentary rock especially chemical- origin sedimentary rocks, it deposits inside caves and around springs which consists of calcium carbonates (CaCO3), they are very fragile "hardness = 3 in Mohs hardness scale". The Egyptian Alabaster vessels expose to a lot of deterioration factors in the burial and exposure environment after excavation. The study case vessels are made of Egyptian alabaster stone and belong to the early era (First and second Egyptian dynasties) in Atfiyah museum store, these vessels exposed to a lot of deterioration factors in the burial and exposure environment like: soil pressure, air temperature variety, relative humidity and salts. The vessels are conserved at the restoration laboratory in Atfiyah museum store by a lot of restoration and conservation processes like: cleaning - consolidation - assembling process for the separated parts and completion for the lost parts.

  9. [Research on the citation of Herbal in Dongeuibogam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongzhi; Dang, Zhizheng

    2014-07-01

    Dongeuibogam is the most prestigious traditional medical book in Korea, written by Heo Joon, who codified it by picking the essence of Chinese traditional medical books before the Ming Dynasty and some other ancient Chinese books and sorted them out. Among the citations of this book, those marked as"Herbal" is more complicated. We made a preliminary research on the citations of such Herbal, from their distribution, sources, citation manners, pharmacological features, to find that 23 rolls of main text to include citations of Herbal in each roll. We also found that most Herbal referred by Heo Joon come from Zheng lei ben cao (Classified Materia Medica), and a few of the contents are mixed with the contents of other medical books. Heo Joon abstracted and modified the citations from the source literature, embodying his ideas of pursuing conciseness and practicability. PMID:25429883

  10. Egyptian Mythological Manuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens Kristoffer Blach

    From the hands of Greek mythographers a great number of myths have survived along with philosophical discussions of their meaning and relevance for the Greeks. It is little known that something similar existed in ancient Egypt where temple libraries and archives held scholarly literature used...... mythological narratives or key myths built upon the mythic cycles of the nationally venerated gods of Heliopolis. This creates a redundant structure in which the mythologies of the individual districts become echoes or actualizations of basic nationally recognized mythic patterns....

  11. Evaluation Of Potential Cytotoxic Effects Of Herbal Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanovic Ana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have played an important role in treating different diseases since ancient times. Bioactive components of medicinal plants are a good starting point for discovering new drugs such as chemotherapeutics. Currently, there are four classes of plant-derived chemotherapeutic drugs used in clinical practice. However, to discover new potential cytotoxic molecules, the research effort on herbal extracts has not diminished. The aim of this review was to evaluate the chemical constituents of plants that possess cytotoxicity, the signalling pathways responsible for this effect, and the influence of solvent polarity on potential cytotoxic effect and to present the cytotoxic activity of selected herbal extracts. The polyphenolic, anthraquinon, diterpneoid, triterpenoid, flavonoid, betulinic acid and berberine content contributes to cytotoxicity of herbal extracts. The inhibitory effect on cancer cells viability could be a consequence of the non-apoptotic processes, such as cell cycle arrestment, and the apoptotic process in tumour cells through different signalling pathways. The influence of solvent polarity on potential cytotoxic effect of herbal extracts should not be ignored. In general, the best cytotoxic activity was found in nonpolar and moderately polar herbal extracts. The herbal extract with IC50 below 30 μg/ml could be considered a very strong cytotoxic agent. Considering that many antitumor drugs have been discovered from natural products, further research on plants and plant-derived chemicals may result in the discovery of potent anticancer agents.

  12. TRADITIONAL CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZHU, YP; WOERDENBAG, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Herbal medicine, acupuncture and moxibustion, and massage and the three major constituent parts of traditional Chinese medicine. Although acupuncture is well known in many Western countries, Chinese herbal medicine, the mos important part of traditional Chinese medicine, is less well known in the We

  13. Experimental Study of the Egyptian blue degradation by the copper chloride cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Abadir, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Egyptian blue, which was the first synthetic pigment to be used in antiquity, consists of crystals of calcium-copper tetrasilicate. Based on previous investigations and literature synthesis recipes, different experiments to obtain this pigment have been made using the analytical techniques Raman and XRD. The main aim of this work was the study the pigment degradation by the copper chloride cancer and to investigate the application of Raman to the identification of ancient pigments.

  14. New considerations on construction methods of the Ancient Egyptian pyramids

    OpenAIRE

    Müller-Römer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Many authors have attempted to account for the construction methods of the Old Kingdom pyramids, offering a broad scope of hypotheses concerning construction processes, building phases, mechanical devices, and workforce. Still, none of these suggestions have proved quite conclusive. All previous explanations involving ramps start from the assumption that building blocks were conveyed upwards on sledges pulled by bulls or workmen. However, in this case, sufficiently long ramps with a lesser sl...

  15. 古埃及文明%Ancient Egyptian Civilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子平

    2010-01-01

    @@ 古埃及文明是一段时间跨度近3000年的人类古代文明,开始于大约公元前3100年那尔迈法老(Narmer pharaoh,也称美尼斯法老Menes pharaoh)统一上下埃及建立第一王朝,终止于公元前332埃及被马其顿帝国亚历山大大帝(Alexander the Great,336 BC-323BC)征服.

  16. Ancient Technologies: The Egyptian Sintered-Quartz Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2014-01-01

    To physicists and engineers, ceramics represent materials demonstrating excellent strength and hardness, materials that can serve as electrical insulators or conductors, some of them being able of a high-temperature superconductivity. To researchers working in archaeology and art history, ceramics mean objects such as figurines, tiles and tableware helping understanding cultures and technologies of the past. They are among the most common artifacts to be found in archaeological sites, because...

  17. HERBAL LIPSTICK FORMULATION: A NEW APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Meher Deepali Avinash; Alai Manoj Hari; Nikam Shreya Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Coloring skin particularly skin of face and lips is an ancient practice going back to prehistoric period. In present days the use of such product has increased and choice of shades of color, texture and luster have been changed and become wider. This can be observed from the fact that lipsticks are marked in hundreds of shades of colors to satisfy the demand of women. The present investigation was done to formulate herbal lipstick, since lipsticks are one of the key cosmetics to be used by th...

  18. Bhasma : The ancient Indian nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilipkumar Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicine use metals, but their use is also amply described in Chinese and Egyptian civilization in 2500 B.C. Bhasma are unique ayurvedic metallic/minerals preparation, treated with herbal juice or decoction and exposed for Ayurveda, which are known in Indian subcontinent since 7 th century A.D. and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Animal′s derivative such as horns, shells, feathers, metallic, nonmetallic and herbals are normally administered as Bhasma. A Bhasma means an ash obtained through incineration; the starter material undergoes an elaborate process of purification and this process is followed by the reaction phase, which involves incorporation of some other minerals and/or herbal extract. There are various importance of Bhasma like maintaining optimum alkalinity for optimum health, neutralizing harmful acids that lead to illness; because Bhasma do not get metabolized so they don′t produce any harmful metabolite, rather it breakdowns heavy metals in the body. Methods including for Bhasma preparation are parpati, rasayoga, sindora, etc., Bhasma which contain Fe, Cu, S or other manufacturing process plays a specific role in the final product(s. Particle size (1-2 μ reduced significantly, which may facilitate absorption and assimilation of the drug into the body system. Standardization of Bhasma is utmost necessary to confirm its identity and to determine its quality, purity safety, effectiveness and acceptability of the product. But the most important challenges faced by these formulations are the lack of complete standardization by physiochemical parameters.

  19. Bhasma : The ancient Indian nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sahu, Chandan Kumar; Haldar, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicine use metals, but their use is also amply described in Chinese and Egyptian civilization in 2500 B.C. Bhasma are unique ayurvedic metallic/minerals preparation, treated with herbal juice or decoction and exposed for Ayurveda, which are known in Indian subcontinent since 7(th) century A.D. and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Animal's derivative such as horns, shells, feathers, metallic, nonmetallic and herbals are normally administered as Bhasma. A Bhasma means an ash obtained through incineration; the starter material undergoes an elaborate process of purification and this process is followed by the reaction phase, which involves incorporation of some other minerals and/or herbal extract. There are various importance of Bhasma like maintaining optimum alkalinity for optimum health, neutralizing harmful acids that lead to illness; because Bhasma do not get metabolized so they don't produce any harmful metabolite, rather it breakdowns heavy metals in the body. Methods including for Bhasma preparation are parpati, rasayoga, sindora, etc., Bhasma which contain Fe, Cu, S or other manufacturing process plays a specific role in the final product(s). Particle size (1-2 μ) reduced significantly, which may facilitate absorption and assimilation of the drug into the body system. Standardization of Bhasma is utmost necessary to confirm its identity and to determine its quality, purity safety, effectiveness and acceptability of the product. But the most important challenges faced by these formulations are the lack of complete standardization by physiochemical parameters. PMID:24696811

  20. Anti-Inflammatory, gastrointestinal and hepatoprotective effects of Ocimum sanctum Linn: an ancient remedy with new application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyab, Amir A 'lam; Eshraghian, Ahad

    2013-12-01

    Herbal medicine has a long background equal to history of humankind. Several plants have been used as remedies in ancient Persian, Egyptian, Chinese and Indian civilizations. The plant Ocimum sanctum Linn. (Tulsi) is one of these medicinal plants with a wide variety of applications in traditional medicine. In modern era, it has been shown to be effective against diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cancers, bronchitis, and found to have anti-microbial properties. Several experimental studies have confirmed its anti-inflammatory properties and its role in modulation of both cellular and humeral immunity. Recently its efficacy against inflammatory response, hepatic injury and gastric ulcer has been elucidated in animal studies. In liver, essential oils and extracts of Ocimum sanctum could prevent oxidative stress by increasing glutathione peroxidae and catalase and were also effective in prevention of hepatic steatosis. In gastric epithelial tissue different derivatives of Ocimum sanctum had anti-ulcer and anti-secretory characteristics and could heal gastric ulceration. These beneficial properties of this medicinal plant can mainly originate from its major biochemically active constituents like eugenol, carvacrol, ursolic acid, β-caryophyllene and rosmarinic acid. Here in, we reviewed current literature about anti-inflammatory, gastric and hepatoprotective properties of Ocimum sanctum.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory, gastrointestinal and hepatoprotective effects of Ocimum sanctum Linn: an ancient remedy with new application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyab, Amir A 'lam; Eshraghian, Ahad

    2013-12-01

    Herbal medicine has a long background equal to history of humankind. Several plants have been used as remedies in ancient Persian, Egyptian, Chinese and Indian civilizations. The plant Ocimum sanctum Linn. (Tulsi) is one of these medicinal plants with a wide variety of applications in traditional medicine. In modern era, it has been shown to be effective against diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cancers, bronchitis, and found to have anti-microbial properties. Several experimental studies have confirmed its anti-inflammatory properties and its role in modulation of both cellular and humeral immunity. Recently its efficacy against inflammatory response, hepatic injury and gastric ulcer has been elucidated in animal studies. In liver, essential oils and extracts of Ocimum sanctum could prevent oxidative stress by increasing glutathione peroxidae and catalase and were also effective in prevention of hepatic steatosis. In gastric epithelial tissue different derivatives of Ocimum sanctum had anti-ulcer and anti-secretory characteristics and could heal gastric ulceration. These beneficial properties of this medicinal plant can mainly originate from its major biochemically active constituents like eugenol, carvacrol, ursolic acid, β-caryophyllene and rosmarinic acid. Here in, we reviewed current literature about anti-inflammatory, gastric and hepatoprotective properties of Ocimum sanctum. PMID:24266685

  2. Extraordinarily Egyptian Jewelry Fit for a Pharaoh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Berniece

    1999-01-01

    Presents an art lesson for sixth-grade students in which the students study the Egyptians' jewelry techniques and designs and create their own amulets. Provides background information on the importance of life after death to the Egyptians and how religion influenced the designing of their amulets. Describes the jewelry-making procedure. (CMK)

  3. Ancient Egypt, Sacred Science, and Transatlantic Romanticism

    OpenAIRE

    Redd, Marques Jerard

    2011-01-01

    Ancient Egyptian culture has been a powerful influence on a major tradition of English literature that runs from Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene (1596), one of whose major iconographic centers is the temple of Isis, to John Crowley's four-volume novel Ægypt (2007). My dissertation focuses on the Romantic period - the midpoint of this trajectory - because it is an extremely intense moment of this influence. In addition to the visions of Egypt presented in the Bible, Greco-Roman writers, a...

  4. Influence of nanotechnology on herbal drugs: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S H Ansari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have been widely used all over the world since ancient times and have been recognized by physicians and patients for their better therapeutic value as they have fewer adverse effects as compared with modern medicines. Phytotherapeutics need a scientific approach to deliver the components in a sustained manner to increase patient compliance and avoid repeated administration. This can be achieved by designing novel drug delivery systems (NDDS for herbal constituents. NDDSs not only reduce the repeated administration to overcome non-compliance, but also help to increase the therapeutic value by reducing toxicity and increasing the bioavailability. One such novel approach is nanotechnology. Nano-sized drug delivery systems of herbal drugs have a potential future for enhancing the activity and overcoming problems associated with plant medicines . Hence, integration of the nanocarriers as a NDDS in the traditional medicine system is essential to conflict more chronic diseases like asthma, diabetes, cancer, and others.

  5. The Survey of Memphis, capital of ancient Egypt: recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    David Jeffreys

    2008-01-01

    The Egypt Exploration Society has been conducting an archaeological survey of the site of Memphis and its surrounding area since 1981. A summary of the aims and achievements of the project appeared in Archaeology International 1999/2000. In the present article the field director reports on the progress made since then and considers some of the contextual aspects of this survey of the ancient Egyptian capital.

  6. On the Formation of the Early Territorial Statein Ancient Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    This article aims at a reinterpretation of the formation of the earlyterritorial state in ancient Egypt from a multi-perspective. In the light ofthe recent studies on the available written material and new excavations,the author seeks to prove that the emergence of the early territorial statewas the result of the interaction of various elements. In the author'sopinion, the strong political ambition of the Upper Egyptian ruling elitesplayed a decisive role in the process of unification.

  7. Estimation of natural radiation dose and of the age of ancient pottery by Moessbauer effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of natural radioactive radiation on the Moessbauer Effect (ME) spectra of ancient Egyptian pottery samples of known age has been studied. An empirical relation between the intensity ratio of the non-magnetic peaks and the dose has been established. It is suggested that this relation can be used for dating of ancient potteries as a new application of the ME spectroscopy in archaeology

  8. Effects and Mechanisms of Chinese Herbal Medicine in Ameliorating Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MIR injury is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary artery disease, which accounts for approximately 450,000 deaths a year in the United States alone. Chinese herbal medicine, especially combined herbal formulations, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of myocardial infarction for hundreds of years. While the efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine is well documented, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this review, we highlight recent studies which are focused on elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms using extracted compounds, single herbs, or herbal formulations in experimental settings. These studies represent recent efforts to bridge the gap between the enigma of ancient Chinese herbal medicine and the concepts of modern cell and molecular biology in the treatment of myocardial infarction.

  9. Spices, herbal xenobiotics and the stomach: Friends or foes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim; Abdulkarim; Al; Mofleh

    2010-01-01

    Spices and herbal remedies have been used since ancient times to treat a variety of disorders. It has been experimentally demonstrated that spices, herbs, and their extracts possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, lipid-lowering, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, antimutagenic and anticancer activities, besides their gastroprotective and anti-ulcer activities. Despite a number of reports on the toxicity of herbs and spices, they are generally accepted as safer alternatives to conventional...

  10. Art Activities about Mesopotamia, Egypt and Islam. Hands-On Ancient People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Yvonne Y.

    This book features objects of the Mesopotamian, the Egyptian, and Islamic cultures. In exploring important contributions in ancient art, the book presents visuals that are interpretations of authentic artifacts, usually in museum collections, or illustrations from archaeological publications and articles. Historical items (n=55+) have been adapted…

  11. [Gout and its manifestations, description and treatment in ancient times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alušík, Tomáš; Alušík, Štefan

    2015-01-01

    Gout is a very old disease, which exists for thousands of years. The first descriptions interpreted as the symptoms of gout can be found already in the Egyptian medical papyri dating to the 3rd mill. BC. In the Ancient world, many physicians dealt with the causes, diagnostics and the treatments of gout, such as Hippocrates of Cos, Diocles of Carystus or Claudios Galenos. A personified gout (as the goddess Podagra) is also to be found in the Ancient mythology and culture. Several human remnants of the people suffering from gout are preserved from the Antiquity as well.

  12. [Gout and its manifestations, description and treatment in ancient times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alušík, Tomáš; Alušík, Štefan

    2015-01-01

    Gout is a very old disease, which exists for thousands of years. The first descriptions interpreted as the symptoms of gout can be found already in the Egyptian medical papyri dating to the 3rd mill. BC. In the Ancient world, many physicians dealt with the causes, diagnostics and the treatments of gout, such as Hippocrates of Cos, Diocles of Carystus or Claudios Galenos. A personified gout (as the goddess Podagra) is also to be found in the Ancient mythology and culture. Several human remnants of the people suffering from gout are preserved from the Antiquity as well. PMID:26357863

  13. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen;

    2015-01-01

    , archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when...

  14. Ancient mitogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Simon Y W; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    the technical challenges that face researchers in the field. We catalogue the diverse sequencing methods and source materials used to obtain ancient mitogenomic sequences, summarise the associated genetic and phylogenetic studies that have been conducted, and evaluate the future prospects of the field....

  15. Identifying the Practice of Tattooing in Ancient Egypt and Nubia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey J. Tassie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Tattooing was practised by many ancient societies, including the ancient Egyptians and Nubians. Egypt, for example, boasts iconographic and physical evidence for tattooing for a period spanning at least 4000 years – the longest known history of tattooing in the world. The second oldest physical evidence for tattooing worldwide was recovered from Middle Kingdom contexts in Egypt and C-Group contexts in Nubia (the Hanslabjoch ice man being the oldest. It has been suggested that tattooing was also practised in the Predynastic period as evidenced by figurines with geometric designs, however, no physical evidence for tattooing has yet been found for this early period. Strangely there is almost no mention of tattooing in ancient Egyptian written records. Historical and ethnographic records indicate that tattooing was also practised much more recently in the Coptic, Islamic and modern eras. Unlike many past societies, tattooing in Egypt appears to have been a custom practised almost exclusively on women. Tattooing tools have not yet been positively identified from ancient Egypt. Ethnographic sources suggest that bundles of metal rods were used in Egypt’s more recent history. This paper discusses physical and iconographic evidence for tattooing in ancient Egypt and investigates whether five copper rods found at Kafr Hassan Dawood, a Predynastic to Early Dynastic site in the East Delta, could be physical evidence for tattooing during this early period.

  16. [Medicine in the pre-hippocratic civilization of ancient greece].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips Castro, Walter; Urenda Arias, Catalina

    2014-12-01

    The beginnings of the magical-religious conception of disease would go back to before the development of writing (prehistory). During ancient times the world was conceived as a place where the supernatural was essential for mankind's survival, therefore, explanations of all phenomena, including disease, were based on supernatural causes. With the development of Greek civilization began the establishment of a rational approach to the nature of the world, which gradually included medicine. But the origin of the rational and naturalist perspective of medicine is due in part to the influence of ancient Egyptian civilization. Various terms were used to refer to healing agents at the pre-Hippocratic period of ancient Greece: iatromantis, phôlarcos, ouliads, and asclepiads. Later, in the ancient Greek civilization, healing through prophecy was gradually replaced, though not entirely displaced, by a new medicine, based on a rational theoretical framework about health and disease: téchnê iatrikê. PMID:25643891

  17. No rheumatoid arthritis in ancient Egypt: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Rothschild, Bruce M

    2016-06-01

    Antiquity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains controversial, and its origins in Americas or in the Old World are disputed. Proponents of the latter frequently refer to RA in ancient Egypt, but validity of those claims has never been examined. Review of all reported RA cases from ancient Egypt revealed that none of them represent real RA, instead being either examples of changing naming conventions or of imprecise diagnostic criteria. Most cases represented osteoarthritis or spondyloarthropathies. Also review of preserved ancient Egyptian medical writings revealed many descriptions of musculoskeletal disorders, but none of them resembled RA. This suggests that RA was absent in ancient Egypt and supports the hypothesis of the New World origin of RA and its subsequent global spread in the last several centuries. PMID:26650735

  18. A Study of Ginger Herbal Pharmacopuncture for Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae-Woo Lee

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this study is to present the standard for practical application of ginger herbal pharmacopuncture Material and Methods : We refer to ancient literatures and the recent papers for ginger. Conclusions : The following results have been obtained 1. The effect of ginger(Zingiber officinale Roscoe is to "release exterior", "balance nutrient & defe nsive qi", "resolve phlegm", "arrest coughing", "warm the lungs". So ginger herbal pharmacopuncture can be applied to treating fever, chilling sign, headchae, snuffle and gasping cough due to cold affection and treating the symptoms like sputum and asthma that be revealed by pulmonary disease. 2. The effect of ginger is to "warm spleen and stomach", "arrest vomiting" "promote normal flow of water". So ginger herbal pharmacopuncture can be applied to treating nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension and diarrhea due to phlegm & dampness and treating edema. 3. The effect of ginger is to eliminate blood stasis. So ginger herbal pharmacopuncture can be applied to treating contusion, blood stasis, sprain and gynecologic disease. 4. Ginger can treat myalgia and pain due to wind-damp and have anti-inflammatory effect in pharmacology. So ginger herbal pharmacopuncture can be applied to treating disease of joint, ligament and muscle. 5. Ginger can resolve phlegm and resuscitate. So ginger herbal pharmacopuncture can be applied to treating unconsciousness. But, treating incipient cardiovascular accident, it needs to call your special attention to the danger of blood pressure increase. 6. In pharmacology, ginger is effective for antitumor, antioxidant effects and activating immunocyte. So ginger herbal pharmacopuncture can be applied to treating broadly varieties of tumor and allergic disease.

  19. Ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in royal Egyptian mummies of 18th -20th Dynasties? CT and archaeology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Sahar N; Hawass, Zahi

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To study the computed tomography(CT) images of royal Ancient Egyptian mummies dated to the 18th to early 20th Dynasties for the claimed diagnoses of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and to correlate the findings with the archaeology literature.Methods. We studied the CT images of 13 royal Ancient Egyptian mummies (1492–1153 BC) for evidence of AS and DISH and correlated our findings with the archaeology literature.Results. The findings of the CT scans excluded the diagnosis of AS, based on the absence of sacroiliac joint erosions or fusion of the facet joints. Four mummies fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for DISH:Amenhotep III (18th Dynasty), Ramesses II, his son Merenptah, and Ramesses III (19th to early 20th Dynasties).The diagnosis of DISH, a commonly a symptomatic disease of old age, in the 4 pharaohs is in concordance with their longevity and active lifestyles.Conclusion. CT findings excluded the diagnosis of AS in the studied royal Ancient Egyptian mummies and brought into question the antiquity of the disease. The CT features of DISH during this ancient period were similar to those commonly seen in modern populations,and it is likely that they will also be similar in the future.The affection of Ramesses II and his son Merenptah supports familial clustering of DISH. The process of mummification may induce changes in the spine that should be considered during investigations of disease in ancient mummies.

  20. Pharmacoeconomic Education in Egyptian Schools of Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Ahmed M.; Hussein, Mustafa; Abdulhalim, Abdulla M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the status of pharmacoeconomics education in Egyptian schools of pharmacy and compile and construct recommendations on how Egypt and similar countries could improve their educational infrastructure in pharmacoeconomics.

  1. Egyptian Agriculture in the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenzweig, C; Hillel, D.

    1994-01-01

    In order to perform a proper, integrated assessment of potential climate change impacts on Egypt it was necessary to accurately identify important and impending issues and problems which are and will be facing the Egyptian agriculture sector into the next century. To this aim, two experts in the fields of Agronomy and Irrigated Agriculture in the Middle East were asked to travel to Egypt in order to assess the current state of Egyptian agriculture and pose possible questions and scenarios tha...

  2. The Future of SMEs in Egyptian Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Alasrag, Hussien

    2007-01-01

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Egypt represent the greatest share of the productive units of the Egyptian economy, the current national policy directions address ways and means of developing the capacities of SMEs. This paper reviews the role of The Developmental Role of SMEs in Egyptian Economy. IT attempts at identifying the broad parameters within which an integrated government policy towards SME development can be formulated. The paper identifies the financial and non-financial co...

  3. The Archaeology of Egyptian Monasticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Louise

    The study of Egyptian monasticism has traditionally relied heavily on the rich corpus of textual sources, while the archaeological remains have been secondary to our understanding of monastic life. This imbalance has resulted in a situation where questions pertinent to the physical remains...... of monasteries ha ve largely remained unanswered. Based on first - hand archaeological material from the White Monastery federation and comparative material obtained through archaeological reports, the thesis addresses Egypt ian Monasticism in the transition from Late Antiquity to the Early Islamic period......, by examining three main themes through seven chapters. These themes are: 1. the relationship between the archaeological and textual sources pertinent to the White Monastery; 2. the diachronic development of the White Monastery and the process es that caused its abandonment; 3. the economy of the White...

  4. [Egypt: Selected Readings, Egyptian Mummies, and the Egyptian Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC.

    This resource packet presents information and resources on ancient Egypt. The bibliography includes readings divided into five sections: (1) "General Information" (46 items); (2) "Religion" (8 items); (3) "Art" (8 items); (4) "Hieroglyphics" (6 items); and (5) selections "For Young Readers" (11 items). The packet also includes readings on…

  5. Reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ancient technique that has stood the test of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forshaw, R J

    2015-07-01

    The first known recorded evidence for the reduction of a mandibular joint dislocation is documented in a papyrus dated to c. 1500 BC that originated from ancient Egypt. This same technique was later discussed by Hippocrates in Greece and the Hippocratic corpus is referred to in early Islamic writings. It is detailed in medieval European texts and eventually was incorporated into modern dental and medical practice. Today, mandibular joint dislocation is probably not that common but to be included in an important ancient Egyptian treatise, predominately concerned with trauma to the head and neck, could suggest it was a more frequent occurrence in antiquity. This could relate to the heavy tooth wear, frequent antemortem tooth loss and the related sequelae of severe malocclusion and overclosure evident in many surviving ancient Egyptian skulls. PMID:26114704

  6. Automated text categorization in a dead language. The detection of genres in Late Egyptian

    OpenAIRE

    Gohy, Stéphanie; Martin Leon, Benjamin; Polis, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a first step in applying machine learning methods typical of Automated Text Catego-rization (ATC) for Automatic Genre Identification (AGI) in Late Egyptian, a language written in either hieroglyphic or hieratic scripts that is found in documents from Ancient Egypt dating from ca. 1350-700 BCE. The study is divided into three parts. After a general intro¬duction on AGI (§1), we introduce the levels of annotation that are integrated in the Ramses corpus and can be used when perfor...

  7. Defining Astrology in Ancient and Classical History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Astrology in the ancient and classical worlds can be partly defined by its role, and partly by the way in which scholars spoke about it. The problem is complicated by the fact that the word is Greek - it has no Babylonian or Egyptian cognates - and even in Greece it was interchangeable with its cousin, 'astronomy'. Yet if we are to understand the role of the sky, stars and planets in culture, debates about the nature of ancient astrology, by both classical and modern scholars, must be taken into account. This talk will consider modern scholars' typologies of ancient astrology, together with ancient debates from Cicero in the 1st century BC, to Plotinus (204/5-270 AD) and Isidore of Seville (c. 560 - 4 April 636). It will consider the implications for our understanding of astronomy's role in culture, and conclude that in the classical period astrology may be best understood through its diversity and allegiance to competing philosophies, and that its functions were therefore similarly varied.

  8. Herbal Antibacterials: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chirag Modi; Shailesh Mody; Hitesh Patel; Ghanshyam Dudhatra; Avinash Kumar; Madhavi Awale

    2012-01-01

    Plants are rich source of antibacterial agents because they produce wide array of bioactive molecules, most of which probably evolved as chemical defense against predation or infection. A major part of the total population in developing countries still uses traditional folk medicine obtained from plant resources With an estimation of WHO that as many as 80% of world population living in rural areas rely on herbal traditional medicines as their primary health care, the study on properties and...

  9. Thermal and microscope analysis as a tool in the characterisation of ancient papyri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschi, E.; Luciano, G.; Carosi, F.; Cornara, L.; Montanari, C

    2004-08-15

    Analyses of papyrus plants (Cyperus papyrus L.) from the Botanical Garden of the University of Genova and Ciane River (Siracusa) were used as a basis for the detection of histological features in papyrus paper. Both modern and ancient papyrus papers were analysed. Modern papyrus were manufactured at 'Museo del Papiro di Siracusa'; two types of ancient papyrus (Egyptian and Greek-Roman, from Cairo Archaeological Museum) were studied. Sections of paper and plant stalks, taken 20 cm from the top, were examined under a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscope (OM). The lignificated parts of both the plant and paper were either red (using acid flouroglucine) or blue-green (using Toluidine Blue) and were refracting under polarised light microscopy. Calcium oxalate crystals and starch granules were also detected. It was clear that the ancient Egyptian paper is richer in starch in comparison to the Roman one. It could be presumed that the Egyptian paper contains starch, a material which naturally occurs in the plant as a reserve. It was, in fact, preferably found in the residuals of the vascular bundle sheath. Microscope observations were compared with the results obtained by thermal and calorimetric analyses (TG and DSC). Thermal curves were different depending on which part of the plant was used to manufacture the papyrus and probably depend on the amount of cellulose and lignin present. Moreover, the Egyptian and Greek-Roman were also different in thermal behaviour.

  10. Bio-politics and the promotion of traditional herbal medicine in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2006-01-01

    -politics that aims to promote the ‘appropriate’ use of traditional herbal medicines. While the Vietnamese case bears many parallels to other countries in this respect, notably China, Vietnam's ancient history of medicine, postcolonial isolation and extensive health delivery network have resulted in a unique strategy...

  11. Herbal nanoparticles: A patent review

    OpenAIRE

    Namdeo R Jadhav; Trupti Powar; Santosh Shinde; Sameer Nadaf

    2014-01-01

    Design and development of herbal nanoparticles has become a frontier research in the nanoformulation arena. To update researchers, an attempt has been made to review nanoformulation-based herbal patents. This article mainly covers herbal medicines are used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, Parkinsonism, pulmonary diseases, proliferative diseases, Alzheimer′s disease, diabetes, cancer therapy, anti-osteoporosis, and the like. It has been revealed that nanoparticles of Curcumin have...

  12. The effects of two Chinese herbal medicinal formulae vs. placebo controls for treatment of allergic rhinitis: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Rose YP; Chien, Wai Tong

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a chronic illness, affecting 10 to 40% of the worldwide population. Chinese herbal medicines, the treatment of allergic rhinitis, adopted thousands of years in ancient China, has recently raised much attention among researchers globally. This study evaluates the effects of two Chinese herbal formulae [Cure-allergic-rhinitis Syrup (CS) and Yu-ping-feng San (YS)] in treating undergraduate nursing students with allergic rhinitis over a 3-month follow-up, when comp...

  13. Times Ancient and Modern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albany, Eric

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the various algorithms used for multiplication. Repeated addition, arrays, the distributive law, Egyptian and Russian Peasant Multiplication, Gelosia, Napier's Rods and Genaille's Rods are all described, and examples of multiplying using each method are explained. (DT)

  14. Herbal Treatment in Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Gun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The digest has been prepared to review available clinical evidence on herbs used in treatment of menopause symptoms. Effectiveness of Humulus lupulus, Vitex agnus-castus, Dioskorea vilosa, Linum usitatissimum, Pinus pinaster, cruciferous vegetables, Cimicifuga racemosa L., Angelica sinensis, Oenothera biennis L., Hypericum perforatum L., Panax ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, Glycine soja, Trifolium pratense and Piper methysticum herbs were assessed for treatment of menopausal symptoms in the studies. Herbs used as alternative supplementary treatment for menopause symptoms have been found to have a limited effect. Thus more studies are warranted to assess effectiveness of herbal treatments for menopausal symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 520-530

  15. Rare Earth Elements in Egyptian Phosphorites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.S. ISMAEL

    2002-01-01

    Egyptian phosphorites from Abu Tartur (Western Desert), El Mahamide mine (Nile Valley) and Rabah mine (Eastern Desert) show variable degrees of relative REE enrichment.Black plateau phosphorites of Abu Tartur are substantially enriched in REE as compared to the Red Sea and Nile Valley phosphorites. P-rich organic matter from the Abu Tartur and Rabah mines recorded negative Ce and positive Eu anomalies. Positive Eu anomaly reveals an anoxic event prior to the phase of Late Cretaceous phosphate formation. Ce is a redox indicator. Mixing of sea water and upwelling during the Late Cretaceous was responsible for the recording of positive Eu and negative Ce anomalies in the Egyptian phosphorites.

  16. Islam in Egyptian Education: Grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Charlotte M.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the important role that the religion of Islam plays in the education of Egyptian children. The scrutiny under which the Islamic world finds itself in the after-math of September 11, 2001 has resulted in calls for educational reform, not only from the outside world, but also from the Muslim world itself. The author has a…

  17. Egyptian plant species as new ozone indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Samia A; Laurence, J A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test and select one or more highly sensitive, specific and environmentally successful Egyptian bioindicator plants for ozone (O3). For that purpose more than 30 Egyptian species and cultivars were subjected to extensive screening studies under controlled environmental and pollutant exposure conditions to mimic the Egyptian environmental conditions and O3 levels in urban and rural sites. Four plant species were found to be more sensitive to O3 than the universally used O3-bioindicator, tobacco Bel W3, under the Egyptian environmental conditions used. These plant species, jute (Corchorus olitorius c.v. local), clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L. c.v. Masry), garden rocket (Eruca sativa c.v. local) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. c.v. local), ranked in order of decreasing sensitivity, exhibited typical O3 injury symptoms faster and at lower 03 concentrations than Bel W3. Three variables were tested in search of a reliable tool for the diagnosis and prediction of O3 response prior to the appearance of visible foliar symptoms: pigment degradation, stomatal conductance (g(s)) and net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation (Pnet). Pigment degradation was found to be unreliable in predicting species sensitivity to O3. Evidence supporting stomatal conductance involvement in 03 tolerance was found only in tolerant species. A good correlation was found between g(s), restriction of O3 and CO2 influx into the mesophyll tissues, and Pnet. Changes in Pnet seemed to depend largely on fluctuations in g(s).

  18. ICT BASED TELEMEDICINE FOR THE EGYPTIAN SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafez A. Fouad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The One of the most challenging problems that encounter the Egyptian society is the lack of significant health care in the rural areas. This problem leads to more severe problems that face the society; the patients from the different rural areas needs to travel to the Egyptian capital where the most experienced physicians are available. This will make overhead not only on the patient budget but on the country budget since the focus on the capital makes a severe traffic problem which threaten most of the economic sectors. The telemedicine is considered one of the most important solutions that could mitigate the accumulated problems of lack of experienced physicians in the Egyptian rural areas. The application of the telemedicine encounters several challenges in Egypt; the lack in the experience in dealing with the telemedicine in these areas and the problem of insufficient medical experts that could fulfil the gab. In this paper, a new ICT-based telemedicine system is proposed to serve the Egyptian society. The portal is already released and snapshots are included

  19. The eye and its diseases in Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, S R

    1997-06-01

    Based on a study of mummies, skeletons, burial rites, medical instruments, medicaments, literature and objets d'art from Ancient Egypt before the Hellenistic Period, the understanding of the eye, its diseases and their treatment at that time is described. Magic spells, religious rites and medical treatments, especially with eye ointments, were probably used often complementary to one another. We must be very cautious about our conclusions in regard to the effectiveness of the treatments. Eye diseases have been depicted only exceptionally in Egyptian art, except for blindness and 'symbolic blindness'. PMID:9253993

  20. Herbal Products and Your Anesthestic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biloba, Ginseng, Hoodia, Kava, St. John’s Wort, and Valerian. Herbal products are available as tablets, liquids, granules, ... with other medications that prolong effects of anesthesia. Valerian Increased sedative effects.

  1. Herbal nanoparticles: A patent review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namdeo R Jadhav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and development of herbal nanoparticles has become a frontier research in the nanoformulation arena. To update researchers, an attempt has been made to review nanoformulation-based herbal patents. This article mainly covers herbal medicines are used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, Parkinsonism, pulmonary diseases, proliferative diseases, Alzheimer′s disease, diabetes, cancer therapy, anti-osteoporosis, and the like. It has been revealed that nanoparticles of Curcumin have been widely designed to increase its bioavailability and for treatment of cancers like breast cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and so on. The common nanoformulated herbal medicines are Panax ginseng, Curcuma longa, Silybum marianum, Withania somnifera, Gymnema sylvestre, Salvia miltiorrhiza, and the like, having a profound future potential.

  2. Herbal Supplements: Cause for Concern?

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Borrione; Luigi Di Luigi; Nicola Maffulli; Fabio Pigozzi

    2008-01-01

    More than 1400 herbal products or herbal-derived compounds are commonly commercialised for health uses worldwide (Tyler, 1996). Herbs are considered dietary supplements, and therefore are subjected to a very limited form of regulation, and advertisements normally highlight their potential activities without mentioning any side effect. Also, herbs are generally believed to be 'natural', and hence safe. Many nutritional supplements contains herb compounds usually not present in the diet (e.g. G...

  3. Can astronomy enhance UNESCO World Heritage recognition? The paradigm of 4th Dynasty Egyptian pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The pyramids of Egypt, notably those of the 4th Dinasty as Giza, have always be considered an unmistikable part of human world heritage as the only surviving wonders of the Ancient World. Their majesty, technical hability and innovative character have always beeen considered as representative of ancient Egyptian ingenuity. However, past and present fringe theories about the pyramids and astronomy have always polluted the role of our discipline in the design, construction and symbolism of these impressive monuments. This is indeed unfear. Fortunately, things have started to change in the last couple of decades and now astronomy is interpreted as a neccessary tool for the correct interpretation of the astral eschatology present in the 5th and 6th Dynasty Texts of the Pyramids. Although the pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty are mute, there is however recent research showing that a strong astral symbolism could be hidden in many aspects of the complex architecture and in the design of these exceptional monuments. This idea comes from several hints obtained not only from planning and construction, but also from epigraphy and the analysis of celestial and local landscapes. Chronology also plays a most relevant role on this. The pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty at Meidum, Dahshur, Giza and Abu Rowash -- all of which enjoy UNESCO World Heritage recognition -- willl be scrutinized. As a consequence, we will show how astronomy can certainly enhance the face value of these extraordinary monuments as a definitive proof of the ancient Egyptian quest for Ma'at, i.e. their perennial obsesion for Cosmic Order.

  4. CoNeXT: Ancient Ink as Technology (University of Copenhagen Programme of Excellence)

    OpenAIRE

    Ryholt, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most profound technological advances in human intellectual history were the twin inventions of ink and papyrus by the Egyptians about 5,000 years ago. The advent of writing allowed information to be expanded beyond the mental capacity of any single individual and to be shared across time and space. The two inventions spread throughout the ancient Mediterranean to Greece, Rome and beyond, and they remain a central medium for communication in the modern world. X-ray synchrotron sourc...

  5. Ownership Structure and Firm Performance in the Egyptian Manufacturing Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelgouad, Ahmed Fayez; Pfeifer, Christian; John P. Weche Gelübcke

    2014-01-01

    We use the World Bank enterprise survey for the Egyptian manufacturing sector to study the correlation between the ownership structure (private vs. public, Egyptian vs. Arab foreign vs. non-Arab foreign) and firm performance, which we measure as sales per worker, capacity utilization, and net profit rate. Our main findings indicate that (1) productivity differences between Egyptian private and public firms are not significant, but firms with public ownership have a lower capacity utilization ...

  6. Investigating the use of Egyptian blue in Roman Egyptian portraits and panels from Tebtunis, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganio, Monica; Salvant, Johanna; Williams, Jane; Lee, Lynn; Cossairt, Oliver; Walton, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The use of the pigment Egyptian blue is investigated on a corpus of fifteen mummy portraits and Roman-period paintings from Tebtunis, Egypt, housed in the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. Egyptian blue has a strong luminescence response in the near infrared that can be exploited to created wide-field images noninvasively showing the distribution of the pigment on a work of art. A growing body of publications in the last decade highlights the increasing use of this tool and its sensitive detection limits. However, the technique is not wavelength specific. Both excitation and emission occur in a broad range. Although Egyptian blue has a strong emission in the NIR, a myriad of other compounds may emit light in this spectral region when excited in the visible. The limited number of studies including complementary analysis to verify the presence of Egyptian blue does not allow its identification on the basis of NIR luminescence alone. Through the use of in situ X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy of cross sections, this paper confirms the identification of Egyptian blue by NIR luminescence in unexpected areas, i.e., those not blue in appearance.

  7. Ancient analogues concerning stability and durability of cementitious wasteform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of cementitious materials goes back to ancient times. The Greeks and Romans used calcined limestone and later developed pozzolanic cement by grinding together lime and volcanic ash called open-quotes pozzolanclose quotes which was first found near Port Pozzuoli, Italy. The ancient Chinese used lime-pozzolanic mixes to build the Great Wall. The ancient Egyptians used calcined impure gypsum to build the Great Pyramid of Cheops. The extraordinary stability and durability of these materials has impressed us, when so much dramatically damaged infrastructure restored by using modern portland cement now requires rebuilding. Stability and durability of cementitious materials have attracted intensive research interest and contractors' concerns, as does immobilization of radioactive and hazardous industrial waste in cementitious materials. Nuclear waste pollution of the environment and an acceptable solution for waste management and disposal constitute among the most important public concerns. The analogy of ancient cementitious materials to modern Portland cement could give us some clues to study their stability and durability. This present study examines selected results of studies of ancient building materials from France, Italy, China, and Egypt, combined with knowledge obtained from the behavior of modern portland cement to evaluate the potential for stability and durability of such materials in nuclear waste forms

  8. Herbal panacea: The need for today in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Mukut; Rishi, Rahul; Satish, G; Divya, K T; Talukdar, Pratim; Maniyar, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Among ancient civilizations, India has been known to be a rich repository of medicinal plants. Herbal extracts have been used in traditional medicine for several thousand years. Some plants contain phytochemicals that have effects on the body. The use of phytotherapy is staging a comeback and an era of herbal renaissance is being revolutionized all over the globe. Herbs are a class of plants that are devoid of the woody tissue characteristic of shrubs or trees and have been known for their aromatic, flavoring, and medicinal values over the past centuries. Since the birth of contemporary practices, many have turned away from herbal therapies in favor of synthetic drugs. But these synthetic medicines can alter microbiota and have several side effects. However, the blind dependence on synthetics is over and people are returning to the naturals with the hope of safety and security. Hence, the search for alternative natural products continue. This review includes a few herbs, which can be used in dentistry as alternatives to allopathic medicines. PMID:27114947

  9. Apps for Ancient Civilizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This project incorporates technology and a historical emphasis on science drawn from ancient civilizations to promote a greater understanding of conceptual science. In the Apps for Ancient Civilizations project, students investigate an ancient culture to discover how people might have used science and math smartphone apps to make their lives…

  10. Rare Earth Elements in Egyptian Phosphorites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.S.ISMAEL

    2002-01-01

    Egyptian phosphorites from Abu Tartur(Western Desert),El Mahamide mine(Nile Valley) and Rabah mne(Eastern Desert)show variable degrees of relative REE enrichment.Black plateau phosphorites of Abu Tartur are substantially enriched in REE as compared to the Red Sea and Nile Valley phosphorites.P-rich organic matter from the Abu Tartur and Rabah mines recorded negative Ce and positive Eu anomalies.Positive Eu anomaly reveals an anoxic event prior to the phase of Late Cretaceous phosphate formation.Ce is a redox indicator.Mixing of sea water and upwelling during the Late Cretaceous was responsible for the recording of positive Eu and negative Ce anomalies in the Egyptian phosphorites.

  11. Contributions of Egyptian Women in Physics (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Nadi, Lotfia

    2009-04-01

    Physics is a dynamic, global field. Progress in research motivates scientists to explore new areas and find useful applications for their work. Femtosecond ultrashort pulsed lasers and progress in nanostructures to study the properties of extremely dense matter, as well as one-dimensional materials, are two examples of innovations that encourage students and scientists—male and female—to pursue physics. Young Egyptian women's contributions to physics grew from 46% in 2003 to 69% in 2008. This paper discusses the role of women in physics in Egypt; presents statistics regarding their contributions and presence at Egyptian universities and institutes; and gives information about their decision making leadership roles. Ideas, applicable in Egypt as well as in developing countries, to address problems facing women are raised.

  12. Herbal drugs and drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Dülger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal drugs are defined as any form of a plant or plant product that contains a single herb or combinations of herbs that are believed to have complementary effects. Although they are considered to be safe, because they are natural, they may have various adverse effects, and may interact with other herbal products or conventional drugs. These interactions are especially important for drugs with narrow therapeutic indices.In the present study, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of some most commanly used herbals (St John's wort, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, ginger, garlic, echinacea, ephedra and valerian with the conventional drugs were reviewed. Pharmacokinetic interactions involve mainly induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoproteins by the herbal medicine, thus changing the absorption and/or elimination rate and consequently the efficacy of the concommitantly used drugs. St John's wort, a well known enzyme inducer, decreases the efficacy of most of the other drugs that are known to be the substrates of these enzymes.Pharmacodynamic interactions may be due to additive or synergistic effects which results in enhanced effect or toxicity, or herbal medicines with antagonistic properties reduce drug efficacy and result in therapeutic failure. For exampla, St John's wort may have synergistic effects with other antidepressant drugs used by the patient, resulting in increased CNS effects.Herbals like ginseng, ginkgo, garlic, ginger were reported to increase bleeding time, thus potentiating the effect of anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents. In conclusion, patients should be warned against the interaction between the herbal products and conventional medicines.

  13. Mitochondrial genome sequence of Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon (Columba livia breed Egyptian swift).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Hong; Shi, Wei; Shi, Wan-Yu

    2015-06-01

    The Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon is a breed of fancy pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding. In this work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,239 bp and its overall base composition was estimated to be 30.2% for A, 24.0% for T, 31.9% for C and 13.9% for G, indicating an A-T (54.2%)-rich feature in the mitogenome. It contained the typical structure of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  14. Egyptian plant species as new ozone indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of more than 30 species of plants from Egypt screened for sensitivity to ozone, four were found to be suitable for use as bioindicators. - The aim of this study was to test and select one or more highly sensitive, specific and environmentally successful Egyptian bioindicator plants for ozone (O3). For that purpose more than 30 Egyptian species and cultivars were subjected to extensive screening studies under controlled environmental and pollutant exposure conditions to mimic the Egyptian environmental conditions and O3 levels in urban and rural sites. Four plant species were found to be more sensitive to O3 than the universally used O3-bioindicator, tobacco Bel W3, under the Egyptian environmental conditions used. These plant species, jute (Corchorus olitorius c.v. local), clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L. c.v. Masry), garden rocket (Eruca sativa c.v. local) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. c.v. local), ranked in order of decreasing sensitivity, exhibited typical O3 injury symptoms faster and at lower O3 concentrations than Bel W3. Three variables were tested in search of a reliable tool for the diagnosis and prediction of O3 response prior to the appearance of visible foliar symptoms: pigment degradation, stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation (Pnet). Pigment degradation was found to be unreliable in predicting species sensitivity to O3. Evidence supporting stomatal conductance involvement in O3 tolerance was found only in tolerant species. A good correlation was found between gs, restriction of O3 and CO2 influx into the mesophyll tissues, and Pnet. Changes in Pnet seemed to depend largely on fluctuations in gs

  15. Fifteen years experience: Egyptian metabolic lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekram M. Fateen

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: This study illustrates the experience of the reference metabolic lab in Egypt over 15 years. The lab began metabolic disorder screening by using simple diagnostic techniques like thin layer chromatography and colored tests in urine which by time updated and upgraded the methods to diagnose a wide range of disorders. This study shows the most common diagnosed inherited inborn errors of metabolism among the Egyptian population.

  16. Tuberculosis in ancient times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Cilliers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of an array of effective antibiotics, tuberculosis is still very common in developing countries where overcrowding, malnutrition and poor hygienic conditions prevail. Over the past 30 years associated HIV infection has worsened the situation by increasing the infection rate and mortality of tuberculosis. Of those diseases caused by a single organism only HIV causes more deaths internationally than tuberculosis. The tubercle bacillus probably first infected man in Neolithic times, and then via infected cattle, but the causative Mycobacteriacea have been in existence for 300 million years. Droplet infection is the most common way of acquiring tuberculosis, although ingestion (e.g. of infected cows’ milk may occur. Tuberculosis probably originated in Africa. The earliest path gnomonic evidence of human tuberculosis in man was found in osteo-archaeological findings of bone tuberculosis (Pott’s disease of the spine in the skeleton of anEgyptian priest from the 21st Dynasty (approximately 1 000 BC. Suggestive but not conclusiveevidence of tuberculotic lesions had been found in even earlier skeletons from Egypt and Europe. Medical hieroglyphics from ancient Egypt are silent on the disease, which could be tuberculosis,as do early Indian and Chinese writings. The Old Testament refers to the disease schachapeth, translated as phthisis in the Greek Septuagint. Although the Bible is not specific about this condition, tuberculosis is still called schachapeth in modern Hebrew. In pre-Hippocratic Greece Homer did not mention phthisis, a word meaning non-specific wasting of the body. However. Alexander of Tralles (6th century BC seemed to narrow the concept down to a specific disease, and in the Hippocratic Corpus (5th-4th centuries BC phthisis can be recognised as tuberculosis. It was predominantly a respiratory disease commonly seen and considered to be caused by an imbalance of bodily humours. It was commonest in autumn, winter and spring

  17. Enhancement of Nuclear Security Measures: Egyptian Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egypt benefited from the peaceful uses of nuclear energy since the second half of twentieth century and established several nuclear and radiation facilities, activities and practices such as research reactors, fuel fabrication facility, gamma irradiators, and utilization of radioactive sources in different applications. Consequently, Egypt’s concern is to enhance and improve the nuclear security systems in the above mentioned facilities, activities and practices as well as enhance the nuclear security regime on the national, regional and international levels. In this paper, several steps taken by Egypt in the field of nuclear security in its various aspects such as the legal and regulatory frameworks, physical protection of nuclear material and facilities, nuclear material accounting and security of radioactive sources will be presented. Egyptian human resources development strategy for the purpose of improving the efficiency, building, upgrading and strengthening the knowledge and skills of the personnel who are working in the nuclear and radiological fields as well as other activities that related to nuclear security will also be discussed. The Egyptian nuclear security strategy is under development taking in its consideration the present nuclear security measures and the future perspective to develop and improve the Egyptian nuclear security infrastructure. (author)

  18. Body composition in Egyptian Turner syndrome girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moushira Erfan Zaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This cross-sectional study was undertaken to construct the new body fat % curve and provide body composition reference data for adolescent girls with Turner syndrome (TS. They diagnosed cytogenetically by blood karyotyping and not treated with growth hormone (GH. Materials and Methods: The study included 70 TS girls from age 13 years to age 17 years. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance. Smoothed centile charts were derived by using the least mean square (LMS method. Results: The new body fat curves reflect the increase of body fat mass (FM from age 13 years to age 17 years. Body FM % of Egyptian TS girls was lower when compared with age-matched American untreated TS girls. Conclusion: This study presents the new body fat curves and reference values of body composition for untreated Egyptian TS adolescent girls. The present charts can be used for direct assessment of body FM % for Egyptian TS girls and evaluation for cases on GH treatment or other growth promoting therapy.

  19. Body composition in Egyptian Turner syndrome girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Moushira Erfan; Afifi, Hanan H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study was undertaken to construct the new body fat % curve and provide body composition reference data for adolescent girls with Turner syndrome (TS). They diagnosed cytogenetically by blood karyotyping and not treated with growth hormone (GH). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 70 TS girls from age 13 years to age 17 years. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance. Smoothed centile charts were derived by using the least mean square (LMS) method. RESULTS: The new body fat curves reflect the increase of body fat mass (FM) from age 13 years to age 17 years. Body FM % of Egyptian TS girls was lower when compared with age-matched American untreated TS girls. CONCLUSION: This study presents the new body fat curves and reference values of body composition for untreated Egyptian TS adolescent girls. The present charts can be used for direct assessment of body FM % for Egyptian TS girls and evaluation for cases on GH treatment or other growth promoting therapy. PMID:24019614

  20. Egyptian Romanized Arabic : a study of selected features from communication among Egyptian youth on Facebook

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Egyptian Romanized Arabic (ERA) is the Egyptian variety of the writing that arose when Arabic speakers joined the domain of computer-mediated communication. At a time when almost all text on the Web was in English, and only basic Roman letters were supported, they had to use the Roman script to communicate with each other in Arabic. Based on data from more than one hundred users, I hoped to draw a picture of how ERA is written in general. As there is no official orthography or spelling rules ...

  1. Use of herbals as galactagogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapantis, Antonia; Steinberg, Jennifer G; Schilit, Lea

    2012-04-01

    With a substantial number of women using herbal products to augment their milk production, this article will review available literature illustrating efficacy and adverse effects of using these products. Embase, PubMed, and EBSCO (all databases) were searched from inception to June 2011 using terms such as ‘‘galactagogue,’’ ‘‘galactogogue,’’ ‘‘herbal,’’ and ‘‘botanical’’ and the search was subsequently narrowed to specific herbals by name. Additional articles were obtained from article reference lists. Supplemental information was obtained with Natural Standard. All abstracts retrieved were evaluated for relevance and germane articles were included. Numerous lactation-stimulating herbals have been identified in the literature with varying degrees of evidence,mostly anecdotal. Use of torbangun, milk thistle, and fenugreek may correlate with increased milk supply. Evidence regarding adverse effects, pharmacodynamic properties, and pharmacokinetic effects remains scarce. Despite the fact that postpartum women may turn to herbal galactagogues, scant clinical evidence exists to justify their effectiveness. Further clinical trials are needed in order to substantiate these findings.

  2. Cyclosporine and Herbal Supplement Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Colombo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine (CyA is a well-known immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic window. Its bioavailability is affected by many other traditional drugs and herbal extracts. Cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 and protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp are involved in CyA bioavailability. Interactions of CyA with herbal extracts are not well known, but, given their increased concomitant use, it is important to know which extracts, many of which are commonly self-prescribed, can affect CyA blood concentrations. Decreased CyA blood concentration has been shown with St John’s wort in case reports and, in vivo animal studies, with ginger, liquorice, scutellariae radix, and quercetin. Increased CyA concentration has been reported in patients with grapefruit juice, chamomile, or berberine, and with cannabidiol or resveratrol in animal studies. Effects of Echinacea and Serenoa repens on CyA levels have not been shown consistently, but concomitant use should be avoided. Although findings from animal studies cannot be directly translated into humans, avoiding concomitant use of herbal extracts is prudent until human clinical studies have ruled out any possible interaction. Clinicians should interview their patients carefully about their use of herbal supplements before CyA administration, and those receiving CyA should be warned about possible interactions between herbal preparations and CyA.

  3. In vitro effect of some Egyptian herbal extracts against Blastocystis hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Andelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Mohamed, Rabie M

    2015-04-01

    Blastocystis hominis is an enteric parasite that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many animals. This emerging parasite has a worldwide distribution. It is often identified as the most common eukaryotic organism reported in human fecal samples that showed a dramatic increase in recent years. Metronidazole is the main therapy for blastocystosis. However, frequent reports of treatment failure suggesting isolates resistance to metronidazole. This study determined the growth pattern and in vitro susceptibility of B. hominis to nitazoxanide (NTZ), garlic, ginger, onion and turmeric. Fecal samples positive for Blastocystis were collected from patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and processed for culture. Cultured samples were subjected to examination by light microscopy. Herbs' extracts was freshly prepared. Drug susceptibility assays was done using 0.1 mg/ml of NTZ, garlic, ginger, onion and turmeric. Effects assessed on parasite culture after 24 hr. and 48 hr. Cultured fecal samples of B. hominis have identified several forms of the organism; vacuolar, granular, amoeboid and cyst forms within 24 hr. Nitazoxanide treatment significantly (P onion, and turmeric treatments insignificantly lowered the number of the parasite after 48 hr. (P < 0.15 & < 0.22 respectively). PMID:26012223

  4. Herbal Antibacterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag Modi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants are rich source of antibacterial agents because they produce wide array of bioactive molecules, most of which probably evolved as chemical defense against predation or infection. A major part of the total population in developing countries still uses traditional folk medicine obtained from plant resources With an estimation of WHO that as many as 80% of world population living in rural areas rely on herbal traditional medicines as their primary health care, the study on properties and uses of medicinal plants are getting growing interests. In recent years this interest to evaluate plants possessing antibacterial activity for various diseases is growing. Different solvent extracts (aqueous, alcohol and ethanol of leaves, flower and seed of various plants selected based on an ethnobotanical survey from India were subjected to in vitro antibacterial activity assay against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria employing different diffusion method. Based on local use of common diseases and Ethnobotanical knowledge, an attempt has been made to assess the antibacterial properties of selected medicinal plants viz. Argemone mexicana (Shialkanta, Aster lanceolatus (White panicle, Capparis thonningii and Capparis tomentosa (Woolly caper bush, Cardiospermum halicacabum (Balloonvine, Cassia alata (Herpetic alata, Centaurea sclerolepis, Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Cinnamon, Curcuma longa (Turmeric, Cymbopogon nervatus, Ficus religiosa (Peepal, Indigofera aspalathoides (Ajara, Marrubium vulgare (Horehound, Medicago Spp.(Medick, Burclover, Morus alba (Mulberry, Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi, Origanum marjorana (Marjoram, Oxalis corniculata (Amli, Piper nigrum (Kala mirch, Plectranthus amboinicus (Indian borage, Patharchur, Plumeria acutifolia (Kachuchi, Salvadora persica (Piludi, Salvia repens and Syzygium aromaticum (Clove for potential antibacterial activity against some important bacterial strains, namely Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus

  5. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN HERBAL MEDICINES AND COSMETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakh N Sahu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanophytomedicines are prepared from active phytoconstituents or standardized extracts. The world market for nanomedicine is estimated to reach $130.9 billion by the fiscal year 2016. Liposome nanoparticle (NP with entrapped doxorubicin has been reported to be 300 fold more effective because of better pharmacokinetic ability in treatment of Kaposi sarcoma. NP of paclitaxel is used in the treatment of breast cancer. It has increased water solubility, reduced toxicity and improved therapeutic index. Nanotized herbal drug containing active principles of veteh root, seawort, cassia twig and liquorice root is found to be effective in pulmonary, liver, bone, brain and skin cancer. The in-vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of polymeric nanoparticles containing curcumin reveal at least 9 fold increase in oral bioavailability when compared to curcumin administered with piperine as absorption enhancer. The green nanotechnology utilizes plant based phytochemicals in the overall synthesis and architecture of NP. Cumin and gum arabic are used for synthesis of gold NP that has reduced toxicity to living organism and environment. Bhasma used in Ayurveda is ancient but ultra modern nanomedicine prepared from metal. Swarna bhasma has particle size of 56 nm. NP in cosmetics has been used safely and effectively. NP ingredients like Zno and TiO2 have properties that provide greater degree of protection from sun. Liposome containing Aloe vera extract in size range less than 200 nm diameter has shown higher rate of cell proliferation and increased synthesis of collagenase in in vitro test using human skin fibroblast and epidermal keratinocytes.

  6. Deeper insight into maternal genetic assessments and demographic history for Egyptian indigenous chicken populations using mtDNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa A. Eltanany

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study principally sought to reveal the demographic expansion of Egyptian indigenous chickens (EIC using representative breeds: Sinai (North, Fayoumi (Middle and Dandarawi (South of Egypt as well as to deeply clarify their genetic diversity, possible matrilineal origin and dispersal routes. A total of 33 partial mitochondrial DNA sequences were generated from EIC and compared with a worldwide reference dataset of 1290 wild and domestic chicken sequences. Study populations had 12 polymorphic variable sites and 7 haplotypes. A lack of maternal substructure between EIC was detected (FST = 0.003. The unimodal mismatch distribution and negative values of Tajima’s D (−0.659 and Fu’s Fs (−0.157 indicated demographic expansion among EIC and pointed to Fayoumi as the oldest EIC population. Egyptian haplotypes were clustered phylogenetically into two divergent clades. Their phylogeography revealed an ancient single maternal lineage of Egyptian chickens likely derived from Indian-Subcontinent. Moreover, a recent maternal commercial heritage possibly originated in Yunnan-Province and/or surrounding areas was admixed restrictedly into Sinai. It is implied that Egypt was an entry point for Indian chicken into Africa and its further dispersal route to Europe. This study provides a clue supporting the previous assumption that urged utilizing consistent founder populations having closely related progenitors for synthetizing a stabilized homogenous crossbreed as a sustainable discipline in breeding program.

  7. Deeper insight into maternal genetic assessments and demographic history for Egyptian indigenous chicken populations using mtDNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltanany, Marwa A; Hemeda, Shabaan A

    2016-09-01

    This study principally sought to reveal the demographic expansion of Egyptian indigenous chickens (EIC) using representative breeds: Sinai (North), Fayoumi (Middle) and Dandarawi (South) of Egypt as well as to deeply clarify their genetic diversity, possible matrilineal origin and dispersal routes. A total of 33 partial mitochondrial DNA sequences were generated from EIC and compared with a worldwide reference dataset of 1290 wild and domestic chicken sequences. Study populations had 12 polymorphic variable sites and 7 haplotypes. A lack of maternal substructure between EIC was detected (F ST  = 0.003). The unimodal mismatch distribution and negative values of Tajima's D (-0.659) and Fu's Fs (-0.157) indicated demographic expansion among EIC and pointed to Fayoumi as the oldest EIC population. Egyptian haplotypes were clustered phylogenetically into two divergent clades. Their phylogeography revealed an ancient single maternal lineage of Egyptian chickens likely derived from Indian-Subcontinent. Moreover, a recent maternal commercial heritage possibly originated in Yunnan-Province and/or surrounding areas was admixed restrictedly into Sinai. It is implied that Egypt was an entry point for Indian chicken into Africa and its further dispersal route to Europe. This study provides a clue supporting the previous assumption that urged utilizing consistent founder populations having closely related progenitors for synthetizing a stabilized homogenous crossbreed as a sustainable discipline in breeding program. PMID:27489728

  8. Herbal medicine in healthcare--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosihuzzaman, Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    It is generally accepted by all concerned that modern pharmaceuticals will remain out of reach of many people and 'health for all' may only be realized by the use of adequately assessed herbal products. Mankind has been using herbal medicine for healing right from the beginning of human civilization. With the advent of 'modern medicine' herbal products have been looked down upon, especially by western societies. Yet, in recent times, use of herbal medicine for heathcare has increased steadily all over the world. However, serious concerns are being realized regarding the safety, claimed efficacy and quality of herbal products used as herbal medicine, nutraceuticals, health food and cosmetics. Although herbal products are generally considered safe due to their age-old usage, significant side effects have been reported for many herbal products, including herbal medicine. Accidental contamination and intentional adulteration are considered as primary reasons for the side effects. The historical perspective and the philosophy of herbal medical practice along with its present status in the light of present day science have been reviewed and included in the present article. Assurance of safety by identification of contaminants and assessment of toxicity has been outlined. Assessment of claimed efficacy of herbal medicine is difficult due to its holistic approach. Practical ways of assessing efficacy of herbal medicine by adapting the methodologies used for modern pharmaceutical are described. The maintenance of standard of herbal medicine has been stressed and pragmatic approaches of assuring quality of herbal medicine by using modern tools of fingerprinting the chemical profile of herbal medicine are discussed. As much of the traditional herbal medical knowledge is scattered around the world at the family and community levels, and more so in the indigeneous people, the knowledge base is continuously being lost and so needs immediate documentation. Difficulties in

  9. Egyptian Art Institutions and Art Education from 1908 to 1951

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This study of Egyptian aesthetics interprets the historical and political context of artistic discourse in the early twentieth century. In a period marked by intense struggle between landlords and rural laborers during the Depression and World War II, the author compares the rise of the Egyptian Surrealists, from the late 1930s, and the…

  10. The Sine-Egyptian Joint Business Council Business Forum Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ On December 25, Chairman Wan Jifei led the Chinese business delegation attending the Sino-Egyptian Joint Business Council Business Forum co-hosted by the CCPIT and the Sino-Egyptian Business Council in Cairo, Egypt. Chinese vice Premier Li Keqiang who was on a visit to Egypt attended the forum and addressed the opening ceremony.

  11. The supposed Egyptian earthquakes of 184 and 95 B.C. Critical review and some lines of research in historical seismology using Greek papyri from Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mazza

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of a project to update the data collected in the catalogue of Guidoboni et al.(1994, we noticed that two Egyptian earthquakes of 184 and 95 B.C. mentioned in the catalogue of Ambraseys et al. (1994, p. 20 were not included. A search to verify whether these two events should be added to the list of seismic events in the ancient Mediterranean area led to the conclusion that the two Egyptian earthquakes of 184 and 95 B.C. never occurred. The texts cited by the authors (a papyrus and an inscription seem to deal with other events; in fact the word seismós, which has among others the meaning of 'earthquake', in these sources means 'blackmail' or 'extortion'. This conclusion leads to further discussion of relationships between ancient history and historical seismology and in particular of the use of Greek papyri from Egypt to study ancient earthquakes. A research project on Greek papyri, which will also consider other kinds of evidence such as Coptic literary and documentary texts, has been initiated by a group of researchers belonging to the SGA, in order to continue investigation of ancient earthquakes in the Mediterranean area.

  12. Short report: cysticercosis in an Egyptian mummy of the late Ptolemaic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Fabrizio; Masetti, Massimo; Locci, Maria Teresa; Ciranni, Rosalba; Fornaciari, Gino

    2006-04-01

    We describe here an ancient case of cysticercosis that was discovered in an Egyptian mummy of a young woman of about 20 years of age who lived in the late Ptolemaic period (second to first centuries b.c.). On removal of the stomach and its rehydration, a cystic lesion in the stomach wall was observed by naked eye. Microscopical examination of sections of this lesion revealed a cystic structure, with a wall, with numerous projecting eversions, a characteristic feature of the larval stage (cysticercus) of the human tapeworm Taenia solium (or "pig tapeworm"). Immunohistochemical testing with serum from a T. solium-infected human confirmed the identity of the cyst. This finding is the oldest on record of the antiquity of this zoonotic parasite. This observation also confirms that, in Hellenistic Egypt, the farming of swine, along with man an intermediate host of this parasite, was present, and supports other archeological evidence. PMID:16606991

  13. Physicochemical characterization of thermally aged Egyptian linen dyed with organic natural dyestuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkoumelis, N.; El-Gaoudy, H.; Varella, E.; Kovala-Demertzi, D.

    2013-08-01

    A number of organic natural dyestuffs used in dyeing in ancient times, i.e. indigo, madder, turmeric, henna, cochineal, saffron and safflower, have been used to colour Egyptian fabrics based on linen. Their physicochemical properties have been evaluated on thermally aged linen samples. The aged dyed linen samples were thoroughly examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and tensile strength and elongation measurements. It was found that, in the molecular level, dyes interact mainly with the cellulose compounds of the aged linen while in the macroscopic level tensile and elongation parameters are altered. Tensile strength is positively related to the dye treatment while elongation depends specifically on the type of the dye used. Results converge that the dyed textiles did indeed play a role as protecting agents affecting strength and reducing thermal deterioration.

  14. SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS AFFECTING EVOLUTION OF ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim MAMDOUH ABBAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to determine the factors affecting evolution of Activity Based Costing (ABC system in Egyptian case. The study used the survey method to describe and analyze these factors in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. Accordingly, the number of received questionnaires was 392 (23 Egyptian manufacturing firms in the first half of 2013. Finally, the study stated some influencing factors for evolution this system (ABC in Egyptian manufacturing firms.

  15. Scenes from the past: multidetector CT of Egyptian mummies of the Redpath Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Andrew D; Garvin, Gregory J; Hurnanen, Jaana H; Williams, Licd Lana; Lawson, Barbara; Nelson, Andrew J; Tampieri, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    As a nondestructive method of historical and anthropologic inquiry, imaging has played an important role in mummy studies over the past several decades. Recent technologic advances have made multidetector computed tomography (CT) an especially useful means for deepening the present understanding of ancient cultures by examining preserved human remains. In April 2011, three ancient Egyptian human mummies from the Redpath Museum of McGill University were examined with 320-section multidetector CT as part of the IMPACT Radiological Mummy Database project headquartered at the University of Western Ontario. Whole-body scanning was performed with a section thickness of 0.5 mm and a peak voltage of 120 kVp, and the raw CT datasets were postprocessed by using smooth body and high-resolution bone convolution filters. Two of the mummies were scanned at different energy levels (80 and 135 keV). The high-resolution CT scans revealed the details of mummification and allowed observations about the socioeconomic and health status of the human subjects based on both the mummification technique used and the appearance of the remains, particularly the bones and teeth. The paleopathologic information obtained from the scans confirmed some findings in studies performed in the same mummies in the late 19th and 20th centuries. The CT scans also demonstrated a high degree of variability in Egyptian mortuary practice, variability that is not generally recognized in the literature. Unusual features that were observed included a relatively uncommon retained heart in mummy RM2718, retained lungs in a mummy from which the heart had been extracted (RM2720), and a cartonnage plaque placed over the left abdomen of a mummy that had been eviscerated transperineally (RM2717). PMID:22787004

  16. Evidence for prehistoric origins of Egyptian mummification in late Neolithic burials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana; Higham, Thomas F G; Oldfield, Ron; O'Connor, Terry P; Buckley, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Traditional theories on ancient Egyptian mummification postulate that in the prehistoric period (i.e. the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods, 5th and 4th millennia B.C.) bodies were naturally desiccated through the action of the hot, dry desert sand. Although molding of the body with resin-impregnated linen is believed to be an early Pharaonic forerunner to more complex processes, scientific evidence for the early use of resins in artificial mummification has until now been limited to isolated occurrences during the late Old Kingdom (c. 2200 B.C.), their use becoming more apparent during the Middle Kingdom (c. 2000-1600 BC). We examined linen wrappings from bodies in securely provenanced tombs (pit graves) in the earliest recorded ancient Egyptian cemeteries at Mostagedda in the Badari region (Upper Egypt). Our investigations of these prehistoric funerary wrappings using a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and thermal desorption/pyrolysis (TD/Py)-GC-MS have identified a pine resin, an aromatic plant extract, a plant gum/sugar, a natural petroleum source, and a plant oil/animal fat in directly AMS-dated funerary wrappings. Predating the earliest scientific evidence by more than a millennium, these embalming agents constitute complex, processed recipes of the same natural products, in similar proportions, as those utilized at the zenith of Pharaonic mummification some 3,000 years later. The antibacterial properties of some of these ingredients and the localized soft-tissue preservation that they would have afforded lead us to conclude that these represent the very beginnings of experimentation that would evolve into the famous mummification practice of the Pharaonic period. PMID:25118605

  17. Scenes from the past: multidetector CT of Egyptian mummies of the Redpath Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Andrew D; Garvin, Gregory J; Hurnanen, Jaana H; Williams, Licd Lana; Lawson, Barbara; Nelson, Andrew J; Tampieri, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    As a nondestructive method of historical and anthropologic inquiry, imaging has played an important role in mummy studies over the past several decades. Recent technologic advances have made multidetector computed tomography (CT) an especially useful means for deepening the present understanding of ancient cultures by examining preserved human remains. In April 2011, three ancient Egyptian human mummies from the Redpath Museum of McGill University were examined with 320-section multidetector CT as part of the IMPACT Radiological Mummy Database project headquartered at the University of Western Ontario. Whole-body scanning was performed with a section thickness of 0.5 mm and a peak voltage of 120 kVp, and the raw CT datasets were postprocessed by using smooth body and high-resolution bone convolution filters. Two of the mummies were scanned at different energy levels (80 and 135 keV). The high-resolution CT scans revealed the details of mummification and allowed observations about the socioeconomic and health status of the human subjects based on both the mummification technique used and the appearance of the remains, particularly the bones and teeth. The paleopathologic information obtained from the scans confirmed some findings in studies performed in the same mummies in the late 19th and 20th centuries. The CT scans also demonstrated a high degree of variability in Egyptian mortuary practice, variability that is not generally recognized in the literature. Unusual features that were observed included a relatively uncommon retained heart in mummy RM2718, retained lungs in a mummy from which the heart had been extracted (RM2720), and a cartonnage plaque placed over the left abdomen of a mummy that had been eviscerated transperineally (RM2717).

  18. Evidence for prehistoric origins of Egyptian mummification in late Neolithic burials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jones

    Full Text Available Traditional theories on ancient Egyptian mummification postulate that in the prehistoric period (i.e. the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods, 5th and 4th millennia B.C. bodies were naturally desiccated through the action of the hot, dry desert sand. Although molding of the body with resin-impregnated linen is believed to be an early Pharaonic forerunner to more complex processes, scientific evidence for the early use of resins in artificial mummification has until now been limited to isolated occurrences during the late Old Kingdom (c. 2200 B.C., their use becoming more apparent during the Middle Kingdom (c. 2000-1600 BC. We examined linen wrappings from bodies in securely provenanced tombs (pit graves in the earliest recorded ancient Egyptian cemeteries at Mostagedda in the Badari region (Upper Egypt. Our investigations of these prehistoric funerary wrappings using a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and thermal desorption/pyrolysis (TD/Py-GC-MS have identified a pine resin, an aromatic plant extract, a plant gum/sugar, a natural petroleum source, and a plant oil/animal fat in directly AMS-dated funerary wrappings. Predating the earliest scientific evidence by more than a millennium, these embalming agents constitute complex, processed recipes of the same natural products, in similar proportions, as those utilized at the zenith of Pharaonic mummification some 3,000 years later. The antibacterial properties of some of these ingredients and the localized soft-tissue preservation that they would have afforded lead us to conclude that these represent the very beginnings of experimentation that would evolve into the famous mummification practice of the Pharaonic period.

  19. Veterinary herbal medicines in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available India has a rich and diversified flora. It is seen that synthetic drugs could pose serious problems, are toxic and costly. In contrast to this, herbal medicines are relatively nontoxic, cheaper and are eco-friendly. Moreover, the people have used them for generations. They have also been used in day-to-day problems of healthcare in animals. 25% of the drugs prescribed worldwide come from plants. Almost 75% of the medicinal plants grow naturally in different states of India. These plants are known to cure many ailments in animals like poisoning, cough, constipation, foot and mouth disease, dermatitis, cataract, burning, pneumonia, bone fractures, snake bites, abdominal pains, skin diseases etc. There is scarce review of such information (veterinary herbals in the literature. The electronic and manual search was made using various key words such as veterinary herbal, ethno-veterinary medicines etc. and the content systematically arranged. This article deals with the comprehensive review of 45 medicinal plant species that are official in Indian Pharmacopoeia (IP 2014. The botanical names, family, habitat, plant part used and pharmacological actions, status in British Pharmacopoeia 2014, USP 36 are mentioned. Also, a relationship between animal and human dose, standardization and regulatory aspects of these selected veterinary herbals are provided.

  20. Determinants of the Egyptian labour migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, M; Metwally, M

    1992-03-01

    The objective is to summarize the pattern of Egyptian migration to Arab oil-producing countries (AOPC), to review some factors that are important determinants of labor movement based on theory, and to empirically model the migration rate to AOPC and to Saudi Arabia. Factors are differentiated as to their relative importance. Push factors are the low wages, high inflation rate, and high population density in Egypt; pull factors are higher wages. It is predicted that an increase in income from destination countries has a significant positive impact on the migration rate. An increase in population density stimulates migration. An increase in inflation acts to increase out-migration with a 2-year lag, which accommodates departure preparation. Egypt's experience with labor migration is described for the pre-oil boom, and the post-oil boom. Several estimates of labor migration are given. Government policy toward migration is positive. Theory postulates migration to be determined by differences in the availability of labor, labor rewards between destination and origin, and the cost of migration. In the empirical model, push factors are population density, the current inflation rate, and the ratio of income/capita in AOPC to Egypt. The results indicate that the ratio of income/capita had a strong pull impact and population density had a strong push impact. The inflation rate has a positive impact with a lag estimated at 2 years. Prior to the Camp David Accord, there was a significant decrease in the number of Egyptian migrants due to political tension. The findings support the classical theory of factor mobility. The consequences of migration on the Egyptian economy have been adverse. Future models should disaggregate data because chronic shortages exist in some parts of the labor market. Manpower needs assessment would be helpful for policy makers.

  1. German-Egyptian seminar on environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial development and scientific advancement have opened new frontiers of interest and challenges. Anthropogenic activities are increasingly upsetting the natural environmental balance and are at the same time shifting from local impact to global importance. Science is confronted with the challenge to answer the question of what are the consequences of anthropogenic changes to the environment and to help politics formulate countermeasures for the sake of a sustainable future. Protect results achieved within the Egyptian-German cooperation were presented to the scientific community and to the interested public and discussions on future lines of actions took place. (orig./KW)

  2. The Egyptian Arab Spring and Political Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Gad El ashkar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study elaborates and analyzes the phenomenon and concept of political Islam, the reasons of the increased role of the Islamists and their political and reformist tendencies in the light of the Egyptian revolution of Arab Spring, reasons and the main factors that have contributed on their advent into power and their influence in that time, the issue of the application of Islamic Sharia and complex realities about this dilemma. The revolutions of Arab Spring, including the Egyptian revolution, are considered one of the most important and most dangerous events in the XXI century after the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, not only in the Middle East but throughout the world because of their impact on peace and global security. The growth of the phenomenon of political Islam and the advent of Islamists into power in Egypt has represented one of the most remarkable features of this sudden revolution. No doubt that the issue of the relationship between Islam and the state's political system raises many confusing questions for many people. In this sense the importance of this study will directly identify the fact that the leadership of Islamists in Egypt is not the implementation of Islamic Sharia but their movements and ideology.

  3. Antibacterial activity of selected Egyptian ethnomedicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashait, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Medicinal plants have recently received the attention of the antimicrobial activity of plants and their metabolites due to the challenge of growing incidences of drug-resistant pathogens. The aims of this study were to determine the antibacterial activities of plant extracts used as ethnomedicinal in Egypt. Methodology and Results: Investigations were carried out to assess the antibacterial efficiency of 11 plant extracts used as ethnopharmacological among Egyptian native people against infectious diseases. Crude methanol, ethanol,chloroform, hexane, acetone and aqueous extract of plants were tested for antibacterial activity in vitro against ten bacterial isolates using the disc diffusion method test. Discs were impregnated with 2 mg/mL of different solvent extracts. Among all the crude extracts, the methanol extract showed the highest activity than other extracts. P. harmala and S. officinalis exhibited highest antibacterial activity against gram positive and negative bacteria while the remainingplants extracts showed less activity. All the plant extracts showed no significant effect against the Bordetella bronchisepta ATCC 4617 except the extracts of M. fragrans and L. sativum. E. coli is the most sensitive microorganism tested, with the lowest MIC value (0.5 mg/mL in the presence of the plant extract of P. harmala and S. officinalis.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Results obtained herein, may suggest that the ethnomedicinal Egyptian plants possess antimicrobial activity and therefore, they can be used in biotechnological fields as natural preservative ingredients in food and/or pharmaceutical industry.

  4. Studying Ancient History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Robin

    1982-01-01

    Defends the value and relevance of the study of ancient history and classics in history curricula. The unique homogeneity of the classical period contributes to its instructional manageability. A year-long, secondary-level course on fifth-century Greece and Rome is described to illustrate effective approaches to teaching ancient history. (AM)

  5. Effectiveness of Herbal and Non-Herbal Toothpastes in Reducing Dental Plaque Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citra L. Yuwono

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining good oral hygiene in orthodontic patients is important and as the community interest in herbal ingredients increases, herbal toothpaste was developed. Its effectiveness against dental plaque accumulation is still under debate. Herbal toothpaste has not been tested in fixed orthodontic patients. Objective: To study the effectivenes differences between herbal toothpaste and non-herbal toothpaste. Methods: This randomized, double blind clinical trial was participated by 16 subjects aged range 15-35 years who were planned for fixed orthodontic. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the type of toothpaste used. Plaque accumulations were measured according to Löe and Sillness plaque index on Ramfjord teeth before and two weeks after bonding. Results: Wilcoxon test result showed there was no significant reduction of plaque index on herbal toothpaste usage nor significant increase on non-herbal toothpaste usage. Mann-Whitney test showed no significant differences between herbal and non-herbal toothpaste. Conclusion: There was no significant differences in plaque acummulation between usage of herbal toothpaste nor usage of non-herbal toothpaste. There was no significant effectiveness differences between those toothpastes in fixed orthodontic patients, although herbal toothpaste usage showed a reduction of plaque index, whereas non-herbal toothpaste usage showed an increase of plaque index.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v19i3.143

  6. Pollutant lead reveals the pre-Hellenistic occupation and ancient growth of Alexandria, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véron, A.; Goiran, J. P.; Morhange, C.; Marriner, N.; Empereur, J. Y.

    2006-03-01

    It is generally accepted that Alexandria ad Aegyptum was founded ex nihilo in 331 BC by Alexander the Great, rapidly growing into one of antiquity's most opulent economic and intellectual centers. However, ancient texts by Strabo (17.1.6) and Pliny (NH 5.11.62) suggest the existence of a pre-Hellenistic settlement named Rhakotis. This literary evidence has fuelled contentious scholarly debate for decades. Here we present new geochemical data from Alexandria's ancient bay sediments, elucidating unequivocal proof for pollutant lead (Pb) input into the harbor during the Egyptian Old Kingdom (2686-2181 BC). A second contamination peak is detected during the Iron Age (1000-800 BC), at the end of the prosperous Ramesses reigns. These findings evidence thriving pre-Hellenistic settlements in Alexandria. During the Greek and Roman periods, we expound the largest Pb pollution ever encountered in ancient city sediments with Pb levels twice as high as those measured in contemporary industrialized estuaries.

  7. Bioreactor technology for herbal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants have been an important source of medicine for thousands of years and herbs are hot currency in the world today. During the last decade, popularity of alternative medicine increased significantly worldwide with noticeable trend. This in turn accelerated the global trade of herbal raw materials and herbal products and created greater scope for Asian countries that possess the major supply of herbal raw materials within their highly diversified tropical rain forest. As such, advanced bioreactor culture system possesses a great potential for large scale production than the traditional tissue culture system. Bioreactor cultures have many advantages over conventional cultures. Plant cells in bioreactors can grow fast and vigorously in shorter period as the culture conditions in bioreactor such as temperature, pH, concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide and nutrients can be optimised by on-line manipulation. Nutrient uptake can also be enhanced by continuous medium circulation, which ultimately increased cell proliferation rate. Consequently, production period and cost are substantially reduced, product quality is controlled and standardized as well as free of pesticide contamination and production of raw material can be conducted all year round. Taking all these into consideration, current research efforts were focused on varying several parameters such as inoculation density, air flow, medium formulation, PGRs etc. for increased production of cell and organ cultures of high market demand herbal and medicinal plants, particularly Eurycoma longifolia, Panax ginseng and Labisia pumila. At present, the production of cell and organ culture of these medicinal plants have also been applied in airlift bioreactor with different working volumes. It is hope that the investment of research efforts into this advanced bioreactor technology will open up a bright future for the modernization of agriculture and commercialisation of natural product. (author)

  8. Five prevalent antiprotozoal herbal drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Azadbakht; Masoud Azadbakht2

    2008-01-01

    , (Received 21 Jun, 2008 ; Accepted 12 Nov, 2008) AbstractAccording to the statistics provided by the World Health Organization (WHO), about 80% of the world population nowadays uses herbal drugs for treatment of diseases. Natural products obtained from medicinal plants, serve as a great source for drug production and are the main basis of new drug compounds. Unicellular organisms (Protozoa) are the cause of deaths and sp...

  9. Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with bright future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Janmejai K; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Chamomile is one of the most ancient medicinal herbs known to mankind. It is a member of Asteraceae/Compositae family and represented by two common varieties viz. German Chamomile (Chamomilla recutita) and Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). The dried flowers of chamomile contain many terpenoids and flavonoids contributing to its medicinal properties. Chamomile preparations are commonly used for many human ailments such as hay fever, inflammation, muscle spasms, menstrual disorders, insomnia, ulcers, wounds, gastrointestinal disorders, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids. Essential oils of chamomile are used extensively in cosmetics and aromatherapy. Many different preparations of chamomile have been developed, the most popular of which is in the form of herbal tea consumed more than one million cups per day. In this review we describe the use of chamomile in traditional medicine with regard to evaluating its curative and preventive properties, highlight recent findings for its development as a therapeutic agent promoting human health. PMID:21132119

  10. General fire protection guidelines for Egyptian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the regulatory requirements that will provide and ensure fire protection of Egyptian nuclear installations. Two or more classes of occupancy are considered to occur in the same building or structure. Fire protection measures and systems were reviewed for four of the Egyptian nuclear installations. These are Egypt's first research reactor (ET-RR-1) building and systems, hot laboratories buildings and facilities, the building including the AECL type JS-6500 industrial cobalt-60 gamma irradiator ''Egypt's Mega Gamma I'' and Egypt's second research multi-purpose reactor (MPR). A brief review is given about fire incidents in Egypt, and descriptions of the only fire reported at one of the Egyptian nuclear installations over more than 35 years of operating these installations. The study outlines the various aspects of fire protection with a view to define the relevant highlights and scope of an Egyptian guidelines. (author)

  11. Studies of natural radioactivity of some Egyptian rock phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    226Ra, 235U, 232Th and 40K activity concentrations (Bq/kg) in some Egyptian phosphate samples have been measured using HPGe gamma spectrometer. Also their radium equivalent activities were calculated and discussed. (author)

  12. Egyptian international labor migration and social processes: toward regional integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, R R

    1988-01-01

    This article reviews evidence that contemporary Egyptian international labor migration to oil-rich Arab countries has followed a classic social process which starts with a homo economicus phase, advances into a goal reorientation phase, and ends with the establishment of diaspora communities in destination societies. The history of Egyptian migration, current estimates of migration, the role of Egyptians in selected Arab countries, and emergent processes all were found to support the predictions of the social process model. Particularly important support comes from the finding that all social classes participated in this migration. For 1982, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, based on individual consulate figures, reported 2.9 million migrants in oil-rich countries. Conclusions suggest the likelihood that Egyptian migration processes will promote economic and perhaps social integration in the region. PMID:12281731

  13. Herbal Medicines for Leucorrhea According to Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdari, Sahar; Hajimehdipoor, Homa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leucorrhea or vaginal discharge is a conventional complaint. It is generally whitish, yellowish, or greenish vaginal discharge in females that might be normal or a symptom of infection. It is almost mucus discharge, which exhibit exfoliation of vaginal epithelial cells due to estrogen influence on the vaginal mucosa. It is important to identify the differences between physiologic and pathologic discharges. Leucorrhea is a well-known disease in Iranian traditional medicine (ITM). In their manuscripts, the word “Sayalan-e rahem” was used by Avicenna and some other Iranian traditional practitioners to describe this condition. Ancient practitioners believed that excessive residue (kesrate fozool) and weakness of digestion (Za’afe hazm) were the main causes of leucorrhea, for which herbal therapy was the main proposed treatment. In the present study, medicinal plants used in ITM for leucorrhea are introduced. Methods: In this research, six Iranian traditional textbooks including Canon of Medicine (Avicena 980-1037 AD), A-Hawi (Razes 865-925 AD), Tuhfat ul-Momineen (Mo’men tonekaboni, 17th century), Makhzan-ul-Adwiah (Aghili 18th century), Ikhtiarat Badi’i (Ansari 1329-1404 AD), and al-jāmi li-mufradāt al-adwiyawa al-aghdhiy (Ibn al-Baitar 1197 AD) were studied and searched for anti-leucorrhea medicines. Then the herbal medicines were selected and scored depending on their frequency in the above-mentioned textbooks. Additional attention was paid to provide the most suitable scientific name for each plant. Results: This study introduced many Materia Medica with anti-leucorrhea activity and among them seven herbs including Rubus fruticosus L., Rhus coriaria L., Phoenix dactylifera L., Pimpinella anisum L., Rumex acetosa L., Olea europaea L. and Quercus lusitanica Lam. showed the most repetition in ITM prescriptions. Conclusion: These herbs can be introduced as new anti-leucorrhea herbal medicines for clinical research.

  14. A reappraisal of herbal medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah; Da-Costa-Rocha, Ines; Lawrence, M Jayne; Cable, Colin; Heinrich, Michael

    Complementary and alternative medicine is increasingly popular, and encompasses a number of systems and therapies based on diverse theories and practices, such as homoeopathy, traditional herbalism, reiki, ayurvedic medicine and traditional Chinese medicine. While many are based on metaphysical concepts for which there is no sound evidence, for herbal medicines there is a rational, scientific basis and increasing clinical evidence. This article suggests herbal medicines should no longer be considered part of CAM, but instead sit alongside conventional medicines. PMID:23155905

  15. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug...

  16. Molecular characterization of eimeria species naturally infecting egyptian baldi chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar M Gadelhaq

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coccidiosis is a serious protozoal disease of poultry. The identification of Eimeria species has important implications for diagnosis and control as well as for epidemiology. The molecular characterization of Eimeria species infecting Egyptian baladi chickens was investigated.Eimeria species oocysts were harvested from intestines of naturally infected Egyptian baldi chickens. The morphometry characterization of oocysts along with COCCIMORPH software was done. The DNA was extracted initially by freezing and thawing then the prepared samples was subjected to commercial DNA kits. The DNA products were analyzed through conventional polymerase chain reaction by using amplified region (SCAR marker.The PCR results confirmed the presence of 7 Eimeria species in the examined fecal samples of Egyptian baldi breed with their specific ampilicon sizes being E. acervulina (811bp, E. brunette (626bp, E. tenella (539bp, E. maxima (272bp, E. necatrix (200bp, E. mitis (327bp and E. praecopx (354bp. A sequencing of the two most predominant species of Eimeria was done, on E. tenella and E. máxima. Analysis of the obtained sequences revealed high identities 99% between Egyptian isolates and the reference one. Similarly, E. maxima isolated from Egyptian baldi chickens showed 98% nucleotide identities with the reference strain. Only single nucleotide substitution was observed among the Egyptian E. tenella isolates (A181G when compared to the reference one. The Egyptian isolates acquired 4 unique mutations (A68T, C164T, G190A and C227G in compared with the reference sequence.This is the first time to identify the 7 species of Eimeria from Egyptian baladi chickens.

  17. Indoor environmental corrosion of Ag-based alloys in the Egyptian Museum (Cairo, Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, G. M.; Angelini, E.; Riccucci, C.; de Caro, T.; Mezzi, A.; Faraldi, F.; Caschera, D.; Giuliani, C.; Di Carlo, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the indoor environmental corrosion of Ag-based alloys after long-term exposure in a showcase of an exhibition room and in the open atmosphere at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo (Egypt). In order to simulate the corrosion processes that occur at the surface of archaeological artefacts, Ag-based alloys with chemical composition, metallurgical features and micro-chemical structure similar to those of ancient alloys have been purposely produced as sacrificial reference samples. Our findings show that corrosion phenomena on alloy surface are mainly caused by environmental sulphur and chlorine containing species that react in different ways depending on the exhibition conditions and on the alloy composition. This approach allows to identify the degradation agents and mechanisms that really take place at the surface of objects similar to ancient artefacts without the necessity of sampling them. Moreover, it is possible to get useful indications for the safe storage or exhibition of silver archaeological artefacts, their cleaning and conservation.

  18. External Application of Herbal Medicine to Acupoints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Application of herbal medicine to acupoints is to regulate the meridians, yin-yang, and qi and blood for preventing and treating diseases through the pharmacological action of herbal medicines and with their stimulation to the acupoints. This article explains how to apply herbal medicines and gave the examples for the treatment of hypertension, asthma, chronic bronchitis and allergic rhinitis. Application of herbal medicines to acupoints is one of the important components of TCM, which shows satisfactory effects in treatment of some chronic diseases.

  19. Attitude of Egyptian consumer towards irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at the evaluation of the opinion and attitude of the consumer as to what extent they accept or refuse food preservation by radiation. Also detect the method that can attract the consumers to adopt the technique and ensure the success handling of irradiated in egyptian market. One thousand and twenty two poll sheets were collected. The questionnaire was supported with simplified information about the use of atomic energy and radiation for peaceful purpose. From the results, 62.43% of the total sample size accepted the radiation technology persons that were convinced with the advantage of using irradiated food reached 70.45% . As to keep on being applied of the technology 73.97% of the total sample size agreed persons said yes to irradiated food for consumption if it is made available in the market were 57.53%

  20. Spectral signature of Egyptian crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crude petroleum oils are complex mixtures of diverse hydrocarbons, in widely varying compositions, that originate from a variety of geological sources. Fluorescence emission spectra have been measured for two types of Egyptian crude petroleum oil, its light and heavy products over a broad range of excitation and emission wavelengths. Both types of crude oil products are characterized by spectral signatures with a differing topography: the number of fluorescent peaks, their coordinates (λex, λem) on the plane of the three dimensions spectrum, and the shape of the bands formed by the contour line density, changeable in either direction. The refined light oil shows emission spectra at λmax between 350 and 500 nm according to the excitation wavelength. The refined heavy oil shows very broad unstructured emission spectra with λmax > 400 nm. As a group, they could certainly be distinguished from the light oil samples and most of the crude oil

  1. Examination of an Egyptian mummy - stereolithography applied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the techniques of three dimensional imaging and stereolithography based on serial CAT-scans applied to the examination of the skull of an Egyptian mummy. Both the three dimensional image and the polymeric cast of the mummy skull presented finer details. It was confirmed that the subject was a male, approximately 30 - 35 years old. Fracturing of the ethmoid bone, e=sequelae to the removal of the brain, was observed in both types of presentations. Apart from this and signs of parodontitis, no pathology was observed. Stereolithography is a most powerful, non-destructive approach to the study of mummies. It might solve some of the problems of reburials, and further be of value in forensic medicine and paleo-ontology. (authors)

  2. Esotericism Ancient and Modern

    OpenAIRE

    Frazer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Leo Strauss presents at least two distinct accounts of the idea that the authors in the political-philosophical canon have often masked their true teachings. A weaker account of esotericism, dependent on the contingent fact of persecution, is attributed to the moderns, while a stronger account, stemming from a necessary conflict between philosophy and society, is attributed to the ancients. Although most interpreters agree that Strauss here sides with the ancients, this view fails to consider...

  3. The Administration of Syria and Palestine under Egyptian Rule (1831-1840)

    OpenAIRE

    HOFMAN, Yıtzhak

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the administration of Syria and Palestine under Egyptian rule from 1831 to 1840 and also gives detailed information about the administrative structure of Syria formed by the Egyptians.

  4. Egyptians, Maya, Minoans. Learning Works Enrichment Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Susanna

    The activities in this instructional resource book are designed to be used by gifted 4-8th grade students as independent research guides or in guided or cooperative learning environments. The activities are organized in three sections which focus the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Maya, and Minoa. The activities presented encourage development of…

  5. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv; Mukerjee, Alok

    2013-04-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds. PMID:23620848

  6. Instruction to Authors of Chinese Herbal Medicines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Chinese Herbal Medicines, an international journal sponsored by the Tianjin Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Institute of Medicinal Plant Develop-ment. The Journal s purpose is to provide a forum for the studies on Chinese herbal medicines, traditional medicines, and natural products.

  7. Herbal products: Marketing strategies and legislation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooyenga, P.A.; Witkamp, R.F.; Groen, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Marketing of herbal products in the European Union (EU) has been regulated under national legislation for years, leading to differences in legal status of these herbal products. In one member state, a product may be regulated as a food supplement, while in the other member state the same product is

  8. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Kesarwani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal, and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds.

  9. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds. PMID:23620848

  10. Herbal Medicine and Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Applications and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of herbal medicine in the treatment of liver cancer has a long tradition. The compounds derived from the herb and herbal composites are of considerable interest among oncologists. In the past, certain herbal compounds and herbal composite formulas have been studied through in vitro and in vivo as an anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC agent, enhancing our knowledge about their biologic functions and targets. However there is a significant distinction between the herbal medicine and the herbal production even though both are the plant-based remedies used in the practice. In this article, for the sake of clarity, the effective herbal compounds and herbal composite formulas against HCC are discussed, with emphasizing the basic conceptions of herbal medicine in order to have a better understanding of the prevention and treatment of HCC by herbal active compounds and herbal composite formulas.

  11. SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS AFFECTING EVOLUTION OF ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC) SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS

    OpenAIRE

    Karim MAMDOUH ABBAS

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation aims to determine the factors affecting evolution of Activity Based Costing (ABC) system in Egyptian case. The study used the survey method to describe and analyze these factors in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. Accordingly, the number of received questionnaires was 392 (23 Egyptian manufacturing firms) in the first half of 2013. Finally, the study stated some influencing factors for evolution this system (ABC) in Eg...

  12. Radiological assessment of the Egyptian Mediterranean coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of extensive sampling, gamma spectrometry, laboratory analyses, data evaluation and comparison with the reference data, the following assessment has been carried out. The radiological assessment has been done for a wide scale study area (about 1100 km) from El- Salloum in the west of the Mediterranean coast of Egypt to El-Arish in the east. The environmental radiological assessment steps are based on the criteria previously mentioned. The sources of radioactivity possibly reach the Egyptian Mediterranean coast can be summarized as: primordial and radiogenic radionuclides (e.g. 40K, 238U and 232Th series), cosmic rays and cosmogenic radionuclides (e.g. 7Be), fertilizers (e.g. superphosphate), black sand (transported by Nile River), fallout (either from nuclear testing or Chernobyl), seawater currents (transported either natural or man-made), Suez Canal (subject to receive a radioactive releasing and effluents from either nuclear power ships or submarines passes through the canal), biological migration and sedimentary longshore movement (e.g. Anguilla anguilla), atmospheric radioactivity (e.g. 222Rn and its daughters), domestic and medical sewage (minor source, short half-life), depleted uranium dust (possibly), satellite and aircraft accident (accidentally) and rarely loss of industrial radioactive source (incidentally). El-Salloum, Rashid and El-Gamil have been considered as concentrated basins for the majority of the radioisotopes. This suggestion was due to the special topographical features of these three stations, which make the accumulation of the radioactive isotopes possible. Calculations of outdoor absorbed dose rate for human population at all stations under investigation from 238U, 232Th and 40K were carried out. The calculated absorbed dose rate has been distinguished the coast into normal areas and Rashid black sand area as high background area. The range of calculated dose was 8.39-38.5 μGy/h. Good agreement was observed with NCRP

  13. Reconstructing Ancient Egyptian Diet through Bone Elemental Analysis Using LIBS (Qubbet el Hawa Cemetery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Darwish Al-Khafif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important advantages of LIBS that make it suitable for the analysis of archeological materials is that it is a quasi-nondestructive technique. Archeological mandibles excavated from Qubbet el Hawa Cemetery, Aswan, were subjected to elemental analysis in order to reconstruct the dietary patterns of the middle class of the Aswan population throughout three successive eras: the First Intermediate Period (FIP, the Middle Kingdom (MK, and the Second Intermediate Period (SIP. The bone Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios were significantly correlated, so the Sr/Ca ratios are considered to represent the ante-mortem values. It was suggested that the significantly low FIP Sr/Ca compared to that of both the MK and the SIP was attributed to the consumption of unusual sorts of food and imported cereals during years of famine, while the MK Sr/Ca was considered to represent the amelioration of climatic, social, economic, and political conditions in this era of state socialism. The SIP Sr/Ca, which is nearly the same as that of the MK, was considered to be the reflection of the continuity of the individualism respect and state socialism and a reflection of agriculture conditions amelioration under the reign of the 17th Dynasty in Upper Egypt.

  14. Discoloration of Ancient Egyptian Mural Paintings by Streptomyces Strains and Methods of Its Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Ali SAKR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces isolated from mural paintings at Tell Basta and Tanis tombs were identified using 16S rDNA sequencing method. These Streptomyces strains caused discoloration of mural paintings with irreversible red stains of carotenoid pigment. A mixture of n-hexan and acetone (92:8 v/v was the best solvent for extracting and purification of red pigment from biomass of Streptomyces. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF were the most effective in treatment of these red stains without changing the paintings or stone surfaces.

  15. Cross-sectional analysis of long bones in a sample of ancient Egyptians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moushira Erfan Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Workers had higher level of skeletal robusticity than High Officials which could reflect their higher levels of mobility and physical workload. The study suggests that different activity patterns can significantly affect the bone structure.

  16. Muslim Egyptian and Lebanese Students' Conceptions of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujaoude, Saouma; Wiles, Jason R.; Asghar, Anila; Alters, Brian

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we investigated distinctions among the diversity of religious traditions represented by Lebanese and Egyptian Muslim high school students regarding their understanding and acceptance of biological evolution and how they relate the science to their religious beliefs. We explored secondary students' conceptions of evolution among members of three Muslim sects—Sunni, Shiite, and Druze—in two cultural contexts; one in which the overwhelming majority of the population is Muslim (Egypt) and another in which there is a sizable Christian community (Lebanon). Data were collected via surveys that examined students' scientific and religious understandings of evolution among 162 Egyptian students (all Sunni Muslims; 63% females and 37% males) and 629 Lebanese students (38.5% Sunni, 38% Shiite, and 23.5% Druze; 49% females and 51% males). Additional data were collected via semi-structured interviews with 30 Lebanese students to allow triangulation of data for accuracy and authenticity. Results indicate that many Egyptian and Lebanese Muslim students have misconceptions about evolution and the nature of science which often lead to rejection of evolution. Also, Lebanese Sunni and Shiite students and Egyptian Sunni students tend to exhibit high levels of religiosity, and these students report that their religious beliefs influence their positions regarding evolution. Finally, Sunni and Shiite Lebanese students have religious beliefs, conceptions of evolution, and positions regarding evolution similar to those of Sunni Egyptian students. These conceptions and positions, however, are substantially different from those of Druze Lebanese students.

  17. The effect of thermal aging and color pigments on the Egyptian linen properties evaluated by physicochemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gaoudy, H.; Kourkoumelis, N.; Varella, E.; Kovala-Demertzi, D.

    2011-11-01

    Archaeologists in Egypt discovered ancient colored textiles in great quantities in comparison with the analogous uncolored ones. Furthermore, the latter are far more deteriorated. Most research investigations into archaeological linen have been concerned with manufacture, restoration, and conservation but little information is available about the properties of the fibers, and particularly their chemical and physical properties after dyeing with natural dyes or painted with pigments. The aim of this study is to evaluate the physicochemical properties of Egyptian linen textiles coloring with a variety of pigments used in painting in ancient times after thermally aged to get linen samples which are similar as possible to the ancient linen textiles. The evaluations were based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and tensile strength, and elongation measurements. Results showed that beyond cosmetic reasons, colored textiles did indeed play a role as protecting agents affecting strength and reducing thermal deterioration. Specifically, in the molecular level, pigments under study seem to interact to cellulose and lignin compounds of the aged linen while in the macroscopic level tensile and elongation parameters are altered. Electron microscopy confirms that pigment particles are deposited on and between the fibers' surfaces.

  18. Dental indicators of health and stress in early Egyptian and Nubian agriculturalists: a difficult transition and gradual recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Anne P; Stock, Jay T

    2007-12-01

    Although agriculture is now the globally predominant mode of food production, studies of the skeletal remains of early agriculturalists have indicated high levels of physiological stress and poor health relative to hunter-gatherers in similar environments. Previous studies identifying this trend in different regions prompt further research of the causes and effects of subsistence transitions in human societies. Here, 242 dentitions from five ancient Egyptian and Nubian populations are examined: 38 individuals from Jebel Sahaba (Upper Paleolithic), 56 from Badari (Predynastic), 54 from Naqada (Predynastic), 47 from Tarkhan (Dynastic), and 47 from Kerma (Dynastic). These populations span the early period of agricultural intensification along the Nile valley. Skeletal remains were scored for the presence of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) of the dentition, an established indicator of physiological stress and growth interruption. The prevalence of LEH was highest in the "proto-agricultural" (pastoralist) Badari population, with a gradual decline throughout the late Predynastic and early Dynastic periods of state formation. This suggests that the period surrounding the emergence of early agriculture in the Nile valley was associated with high stress and poor health, but that the health of agriculturalists improved substantially with the increasing urbanization and trade that accompanied the formation of the Egyptian state. This evidence for poor health among proto- and early agriculturalists in the Nile valley supports theories that agricultural intensification occurred as a response to ecological or demographic pressure rather than simply as an innovation over an existing stable subsistence strategy. PMID:17786997

  19. Traditional use and safety of herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davyson de L. Moreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the European Union, traditional herbal medicines that are regarded as "acceptably safe, albeit not having a recognized level of efficacy" fit into a special category of drugs ("traditional herbal medicine products" for which requirements of non-clinical and clinical studies are less rigorous. A regulation proposal published by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance (Anvisa defines a similar drug category ("traditional phytotherapeutic products" for registration purposes. Regarding herbal medicines, both agencies seem to be lenient regarding proof of efficacy, and consider long-standing folk use as evidence of safety and a waiver of a thorough toxicological evaluation. Nonetheless, several herbal products and constituents with a long history of folk usage are suspected carcinogenic and/or hepatotoxic. Herbal products have also been shown to inhibit and/or induce drug-metabolizing enzymes. Since herbal medicines are often used in conjunction with conventional drugs, kinetic and clinical interactions are a cause for concern. A demonstration of the safety of herbal medicines for registration purposes should include at least in vitroand in vivogenotoxicity assays, long-term rodent carcinogenicity tests (for drugs intended to be continuously used for > 3 months or intermittently for > 6 months, reproductive and developmental toxicity studies (for drugs used by women of childbearing age, and investigation of the effects on drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  20. Radiological assessment of the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of extensive sampling, gamma spectrometry, laboratory analyses, data evaluation and comparison with the reference data, the following assessment has been carried out. The radiological assessment has been done for a wide scale study area (about 1100 km) from El-Salloum in the west of the Mediterranean coast of Egypt to El-Arish in the east. The environmental radiological assessment steps are based on the criteria previously mentioned. The sources of radioactivity possibly reach the Egyptian Mediterranean coast can be summarized as: primordial and radiogenic radionuclides (e.g. 40K, 23'8U and 232Th series), cosmic rays and cosmogenic radionuclides (e.g. 7Be), fertilizers (e.g. superphosphate), black sand (transported by the Nile River), fallout (either from nuclear testing or Chernobyl), seawater currents (transported either natural or man-made), Suez Canal (subject to receive a radioactive releasing and effluents from either nuclear power ships or submarines passing through the Canal), biological migration and sedimentary longshore movement (e.g. Anguilla anguilla), atmospheric radioactivity (e.g. 222Rn and its daughters), domestic and medical sewage (minor source, short half-life), depleted uranium dust (possibly), satellite and aircraft accident (accidental) and rarely loss of industrial radioactive source (incidentally). El-Salloum, Rashid and El-Gamil have been considered as concentrated basins for the majority of the radioisotopes. This suggestion was due to the special topographical features of these three stations, which make the accumulation of the radioactive isotopes possible. Calculations of outdoor absorbed dose rate for human population at all stations under investigation from 238U, 232Th and 40K were carried out. The calculated absorbed dose rate has been distinguished the coast into normal areas and Rashid black sand area as high background area. The range of calculated dose was 8.39-38.5 nGy/h. Good agreement was observed with NCRP

  1. [Psychiatry in ancient Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón Narváez, G

    1992-12-01

    Using studies on prehispanic and early post-conquest documents of Ancient Mexico--such as the Badianus Manuscript, also known as Libellus de Medicinalibus Indorum Herbis, and Brother Bernardino de Sahagún's famous work History of the Things of the New Spain, a description of some existing medical and psychiatric problems, and treatments Ancient Aztecs resorted to, is presented. The structure of the Aztec family, their problems with the excessive ingestion of alcoholic beverages, and the punishments native authorities had implemented in order to check alcoholism up are also described. PMID:1341125

  2. Four Cases of Dysthymic Disorder and General Malaise Successfully Treated with Traditional Herbal (Kampo Medicines: Kamiuntanto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kogure

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional herbal (Kampo medicines have been used since ancient times to treat patients with mental disorders. In the present report, we describe four patients with dysthymia successfully treated with Kampo medicines: Kamiuntanto (KUT. These four patients fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV criteria for dysthymic disorder with easy fatigability and sleeplessness, but did not fulfill the criteria for major depressive disorder. Treatment with KUT relieved depressive status, fatigue and sleeplessness in these patients. As a result, their QOL (quality of life was considerably improved. KUT may be useful as an additional or alternative treatment for dysthymia, especially in the field of primary health care.

  3. Five prevalent antiprotozoal herbal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Azadbakht1

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available , (Received 21 Jun, 2008 ; Accepted 12 Nov, 2008 AbstractAccording to the statistics provided by the World Health Organization (WHO, about 80% of the world population nowadays uses herbal drugs for treatment of diseases. Natural products obtained from medicinal plants, serve as a great source for drug production and are the main basis of new drug compounds. Unicellular organisms (Protozoa are the cause of deaths and spread of diseases in various societies, especially in developing countries. There are anti-malaria herbal dugs produced from various medicinal plants, some of which are used for treatment of the disease and some under study. The first anti-malaria drug was quinine, produced from bark of the Cinchona tree. Recently, the drug artemisinin has been introduced by Chinese scientists for the treatment of malaria and is currently used extensively. Coetaneous leishmaniosis (salak is one of the endemic diseases in most parts of Iran. Common drugs used against leishmaniosis (such as glucantim, have severe side-effects and in 10 to 25% of cases, there is a recurrence of the disease. Emetine is one of the drugs obtained from a root of the plant Ipecac, which is used for treatment of the disease sub-cutaneously. Giardiasis is an acute protozoan infection usually with no clinical symptoms, however, may appear as acute or chronic diarrhea. According to the announcement of WHO, more than 2/3 of the world’s population is infected with intestinal parasites and the prevalence of giardia is higher than other intestinal parasites. Herbal drugs, such as wild garlic, eucalyptus and thyme, are some of the major plants which can annihilate the giarda cysts. Annually, 75000 to 100000 people die of amebiasis (dysentery worldwide. Due to the motility of the organism, it causes sever pathological changes and sometimes colon ulcers, and if entered into the blood stream, it may appear as liver or brain abscess. Medicinal plants such as ipecac, mango, and papaya

  4. The Egyptian legislation for safe transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Egyptian legislation related the safe transport of radioactive materials, a licence is required for the transport, import and or export these materials. The licence is granted, upon a written application to NCNSRC-AEA. All the procedures and conditions for granting the NCNSRC-AEA licence to handle/ transport radioactive materials/wastes have been developed according to the international and Egyptian legislation. The procedures for transit of ships carrying radioactive materials in Suez Canal are also constructed. The NCNSRC-AEA experts are entitled to accept or to refuse the transit of ships carrying radioactive materials in the Suez Canal, in the Egyptian regional waters, in the sea harbours or in the exclusive economic zones of Egypt according to the national and international regulations. (author)

  5. Chinese herbal medicine for treatment of dislipidemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyun Wu; Jianwei Bei; Jiao Guo

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of dislipidemia is increasing rapidly in China and there has been a growing interest in Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of hyperlipidemia both inside and outside China. In this article, lipids regulating effects of 9 herbs or their extracts and 5 herbal formulae which have been published in English-language literature are reviewed. Although evidence from animals and humans consistently supports the therapeutic activities of these Chinese herbal medicines, few multi-center large-scale clinical trials have been conducted to confirm the efficacy and evaluate their safety.

  6. Herbal Medicine Today: Clinical and Research Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Firenzuoli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is the use of medicinal plants for prevention and treatment of diseases: it ranges from traditional and popular medicines of every country to the use of standardized and tritated herbal extracts. Generally cultural rootedness enduring and widespread use in a Traditional Medical System may indicate safety, but not efficacy of treatments, especially in herbal medicine where tradition is almost completely based on remedies containing active principles at very low and ultra low concentrations, or relying on magical-energetic principles.

  7. HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Borrione

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 1400 herbal products or herbal-derived compounds are commonly commercialised for health uses worldwide (Tyler, 1996. Herbs are considered dietary supplements, and therefore are subjected to a very limited form of regulation, and advertisements normally highlight their potential activities without mentioning any side effect. Also, herbs are generally believed to be 'natural', and hence safe. Many nutritional supplements contains herb compounds usually not present in the diet (e.g. Ginko biloba, horse- chestnut, and only 10% of the herbs used in nutritional supplements are commonly present in the food (e.g. garlic, soy, blueberry, green the, ginger, curcuma (Eisenberg et al., 1993. There is much interest in "alternative natural approaches" in sport. It is appealing for athletes to use 'natural' substances with similar activity to 'pharmacological' ones in term of improving performance, are not considered doping, and are considered side-effects free (Table 1. Indeed, many herbal dietary supplements marketed on internet are presented as legal alternative to illicit drugs (Denneey et al., 2005. EcdysteroidsEcdysteroids are the steroid hormones of arthropods (Figure 1. They also occur in some plants, where they are known as phytoecdysteroids, and are believed to contribute to deter invertebrate predators. In insects, they regulate moulting and metamorphosis, may regulate reproduction and diapause. Most actions of ecdysteroids are mediated by intracellular receptor complexes, which regulate gene expression in a tissue- and development-specific manner (Lehmann et al 1989.Several phytoecdysteroids have anabolic growth-promoting effects on mice, rats, pigs and Japanese quails. Ecdysteroids stimulate muscle growth, and this anabolic effect promotes increased physical performance without training. Ecdysteroids are also able to increase muscle ATP content in vitamin D-deprived rats (Báthori, 2002. Ecdysteroids stimulate protein synthesis in the

  8. Philosophical and Aesthetic Conception of Helen’s Image in Goethe’s Tragedy “Faust” and Mythological Opera by Hofmannsthal “The Egyptian Helen”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharypina T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis concerns the interpretation of the story about Helen of Troy in the Goethe tragedy “Faust” and in the Hofmannsthal mythological opera “The Egyptian Helen” in terms of succession and development of philosophical and aesthetic conception of image. For the first time the work on the opera “The Egyptian Helen” is considered as a fruitful period of the combined creation of Hugo von Hofmannsthal and Richard Strauss on the basis of Nietzsche’s antiquity reception. It is proved, that in the Hofmannsthal’s philosophical and aesthetic views the conception of the opera “Helen” is the symbol of synthesis of opposite view points on antique perception of the world and the basic sources of the ancient Greek art. The light Olympic Greece of Winckelmann and Goethe and the spontaneous titanism, Dionysus’s ecstasy and Nietzsche’s, Burckhardt’s, Bachofen’s archaic mysticism merged in Helen’s “Mystic wedding”. The basis for such unification serves an invincible life instinct of an ancient Greek, who becomes apparent in ability to moral transformation and revival by force of overcoming inevitable things in human existence of suffering.

  9. Ancient ports of Kalinga

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    which plied between Kalinga and south east Asian countries. Nanda Raja, is said to have attacked Kalinga with the intention of getting access to the sea for the landlocked Kingdom of Magadha (Bihar). The ancient texa Artha Sastra (3rd-4th century B...

  10. Ancient deforestation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J Donald

    2011-01-01

    The image of the classical Mediterranean environment of the Greeks and Romans had a formative influence on the art, literature, and historical perception of modern Europe and America. How closely does is this image congruent with the ancient environment as it in reality existed? In particular, how forested was the ancient Mediterranean world, was there deforestation, and if so, what were its effects? The consensus of historians, geographers, and other scholars from the mid-nineteenth century through the first three quarters of the twentieth century was that human activities had depleted the forests to a major extent and caused severe erosion. My research confirmed this general picture. Since then, revisionist historians have questioned these conclusions, maintaining instead that little environmental damage was done to forests and soils in ancient Greco-Roman times. In a reconsideration of the question, this paper looks at recent scientific work providing proxy evidence for the condition of forests at various times in ancient history. I look at three scientific methodologies, namely anthracology, palynology, and computer modeling. Each of these avenues of research offers support for the concept of forest change, both in abundance and species composition, and episodes of deforestation and erosion, and confirms my earlier work.

  11. Printing Ancient Terracotta Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadecki, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Standing in awe in Xian, China, at the Terra Cotta warrior archaeological site, the author thought of sharing this experience and excitement with her sixth-grade students. She decided to let her students carve patterns of the ancient soldiers to understand their place in Chinese history. They would make block prints and print multiple soldiers on…

  12. Creative Ventures: Ancient Civilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Rebecca

    The open-ended activities in this book are designed to extend the imagination and creativity of students and encourage students to examine their feelings and values about historic eras. Civilizations addressed include ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Mayan, Stonehenge, and Mesopotamia. The activities focus upon the cognitive and affective pupil…

  13. Ancient Egypt: History 380.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Laraine D.

    "Ancient Egypt," an upper-division, non-required history course covering Egypt from pre-dynastic time through the Roman domination is described. General descriptive information is presented first, including the method of grading, expectation of student success rate, long-range course objectives, procedures for revising the course, major course…

  14. A Vibrant Ancient City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGTONG

    2004-01-01

    LIJIANG is a small city onthe Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau in southern Chinawith an 800-year history.Word of its ancient language and music, and unique natural scenery has spread over the decades, and Lijiang is now known throughout the world. It was added

  15. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-08-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future.

  16. Herbal Supplements and Hepatotoxicity: A Short Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslan, Haszianaliza; Suhaimi, Farihah Haji; Das, Srijit

    2015-10-01

    Herbal products have gained popularity over the past few decades. The reasons attributed to the rise in popularity are cheaper costs, easy availability, patient compliance and fewer side effects. However, liver toxicity following consumption of herbal remedies is on the increase. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the mechanism of action of the herbal supplements on the liver. Occasionally, herbal supplements may also interact with conventional drugs. The present review focusses on a few herbs such as Aloe barbadensis, Atractylis gummifera, Centella asiatica, Mitragyna speciosa, Morinda citrifolia, Larea tridentata, Symphytum officinale, Teucrium chamaedrys and Xanthium strumarium, which are reported to cause hepatotoxicity in humans and animals. Prior knowledge on hepatotoxicity caused by herbs may be beneficial for clinicians and medical practitioners. PMID:26669124

  17. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future. PMID:27570425

  18. Ancient Egypt measured by radio-carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors recall how carbon dating has been used for decades in Egyptian archaeology, and how biases and errors have been solved. They also describe how this technique is now supported by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and thus allowed a better chronological knowledge of the Egyptian history. AMS indeed allows the measuring of extremely small isotopic rates from very small archaeological samples

  19. Composition of Egyptian nerolì oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Sciarrone, Danilo; Schipilliti, Luisa; Trozzi, Alessandra; Fakhry, Hussein A; Dugo, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    The bitter orange flower oil (or neroli) is an essential product, largely used in perfumery. Neroli is obtained by hydrodistillation or steam distillation, from the flowers of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.). Since a long time neroli production is limited and its cost on the market is considerably high. The annual production in Tunisia and Morocco is ca. 1500 Kg, representing more than 90% of the worldwide production. A small amount ofneroli is also produced in Egypt, Spain and Comorros (not exceeding 150 kg totally). Due to the high cost, the producers and the users have tried to obtain less expensive products, with odor characters close to that of neroli oil to be used as substitute and sometimes as adulterants of the genuine oil. In this study are investigated five samples of Egyptian neroli oils produced in 2008 and 2009, in the same industrial plant, declared genuine by the producer. For all the samples the composition was determined by GC/FID and by GC/MS-LRI; the samples were also analyzed by esGC to determine the enantiomeric distribution of twelve volatiles and by GC-C-IRMS for the determination of the delta13C(VPDB) values of some mono and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, alcohols and esters. The analytical procedures allowed to quantitatively determining 86 components. In particular the variation of the composition seems to be dependent on the period of production. In fact, the amount of linalool decreases from March to April while linalyl acetate presents an opposite trend, increasing in the same period. The RSD determined for the delta13C(VPDB) are very small (max. 3.89%), ensuring the authenticity of all samples. The results are also discussed in function of the limits provided by the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) (2004), AFNOR (1995) and ISO (2002) regulations for genuine neroli oils. PMID:21834247

  20. Emerging Trends of Herbal Care in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Gunjan; Jalaluddin, Md.; Rout, Purnendu; Mohanty, Rajat; Dileep, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Herbs are staging a comeback and herbal ‘renaissance’ is happening all over the globe. The herbal products, today, symbolize safety, in contrast to the synthetics that are regarded as unsafe to humans and the environment. A herb, botanically speaking, is any plant that lacks the woody tissue which is characteristic of shrubs or trees. More specifically, herbs are plants which are used medicinally or for their flavour or scent. Herbs with medicinal properties are a useful and an effective sour...

  1. Herbal products: Marketing strategies and legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Hooyenga Pieter; Witkamp Renger; Groen Kees

    2009-01-01

    Marketing of herbal products in the European Union (EU) has been regulated under national legislation for years, leading to differences in legal status of these herbal products. In one member state, a product may be regulated as a food supplement, while in the other member state the same product is considered a medicinal product, thereby subjected to medicinal law. To provide free movement of these products in the inner market, new legislation has been set to improve harmonization. This raise...

  2. Using of Herbal Product in Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zerrin Gamsizkan; Alev Yücel; Murat Kartal

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study has been conducted to determine of outpatients’ level of knowledge and perspectives with herbal products therapy (phytotherapy) and herbal products. Material and Method: Present study is designed with the participation of the outpatients coming to a family practice clinic in Ankara between July 2008 and April 2009. This study is a type of descriptive study. In this research, a specifically developed questionnaire including 8 questions was applied for the patients. Re...

  3. Herbal products: Marketing strategies and legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooyenga Pieter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing of herbal products in the European Union (EU has been regulated under national legislation for years, leading to differences in legal status of these herbal products. In one member state, a product may be regulated as a food supplement, while in the other member state the same product is considered a medicinal product, thereby subjected to medicinal law. To provide free movement of these products in the inner market, new legislation has been set to improve harmonization. This raises the question what the appropriate positioning and marketing strategy for a herbal product will be under this new EU legislation. This review describes the legal status and registration procedures of different categories of herbal products, taking into account technical requirements and interesting market perspectives . Information was collected from legislation, guidance and official documents published by the European Commission, European Food Safety Authority and the European Medicines Agency. In addition, information was found in conference presentations and the scientific literature from Medline and Scopus. The EU market of herbal products will change considerably in the near future. Many products now marketed as food supplements will be expected to be registered as traditional herbal medicinal product in the future. However, it will take years for the EU to fully implement the new rules for harmonization.

  4. Pictorial Metaphor in Selected Egyptian Newspapers Cartoons during the 25th of January 2011 Egyptian Revolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Abdel Aziz Ashmawi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metaphor is persuasive in having cognitive, emotional and aesthetic effect. It has been argued that any visual representation can be considered a metaphor if it represents a metaphoric thought. Chartris-Black’s Critical Metaphor Analysis and Forceville’s model of pictorial metaphor are both used to analyze the data under investigation. Chateris-Black’s Critical Metaphor Analysis is used based on the idea that the use of metaphors helps in conveying the underlying ideologies of the writers. Moreover, Forceville’s model of pictorial metaphor aims at investigating various types of pictorial metaphor in different genres. The political cartoons investigated in this study are drawn from three independent newspapers: Al Dastour, Al Masry Al Youm and Al Youm AL Sabea during the 25th of January 2011 Egyptian Revolution. This study aims at exploring how metaphors are expressed in the visual mode, more specifically in newspapers cartoons, tracing the use of pictorial metaphor in selected independent newspapers cartoons during the eighteen days of the 25th of January 2011 Egyptian revolution, and finally, identifying the cartoonists’ underlying ideological motivations and their attitudes to the revolution, which ultimately direct the audience’s ideology. The results of this study suggest that Chateris-Black’s Critical Metaphor Analysis can be applied not only on the textual level, but also on the semiotic and pictorial ones. In addition, metaphors are frequently used in political cartoons to evoke strong emotive effect and reinforce ideologies to achieve persuasion. Keywords: Pictorial Metaphor, Critical Metaphor Analysis, political cartoon

  5. Identification and Quantification of the Major Constituents in Egyptian Carob Extract by Liquid Chromatography–Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owis, Asmaa Ibrahim; El-Naggar, El-Motaz Bellah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carob - Ceratonia siliqua L., commonly known as St John's-bread or locust bean, family Fabaceae - is one of the most useful native Mediterranean trees. There is no data about the chromatography methods performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for determining polyphenols in Egyptian carob pods. Objective: To establish a sensitive and specific liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) methodology for the identification of the major constituents in Egyptian carob extract. Materials and Methods: HPLC with diode array detector and ESI-mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for the identification and quantification of phenolic acids, flavonoid glycosides, and aglycones in the methanolic extract of Egyptian C. siliqua. The MS and MSn data together with HPLC retention time of phenolic components allowed structural characterization of these compounds. Peak integration of ions in the MS scans had been used in the quantification technique. Results: A total of 36 compounds were tentatively identified. Twenty-six compounds were identified in the negative mode corresponding to 85.4% of plant dry weight, while ten compounds were identified in the positive mode representing 16.1% of plant dry weight, with the prevalence of flavonoids (75.4% of plant dry weight) predominantly represented by two methylapigenin-O-pentoside isomers (20.9 and 13.7% of plant dry weight). Conclusion: The identification of various compounds present in carob pods opens a new door to an increased understanding of the different health benefits brought about by the consumption of carob and its products. SUMMARY This research proposed a good example for the rapid identification of major constituents in complex systems such as herbs using sensitive, accurate and specific method coupling HPLC with DAD and MS, which facilitate the clarification of phytochemical composition of herbal medicine for better understanding of their nature and

  6. Parenting Style, Individuation, and Mental Health of Egyptian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan; Menshar, Kariman E.

    2006-01-01

    Three questionnaires that measure parenting style, adolescent-family connectedness, and mental health were administered to 351 Egyptian adolescents. Results show that in rural communities the authoritarian style is more predominant in the parenting of male adolescents, while the authoritative style is more predominant in the parenting of female…

  7. The Case for (Social) Entrepreneurship Education in Egyptian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, David A.; Ibrahim, Nagwa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore awareness of social entrepreneurship amongst Egyptian students and to determine what is needed to create more graduate social entrepreneurs. Design/methodology/approach: The theoretical framework is Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior. Data collection is a questionnaire survey of 183 of the 2,000…

  8. Shifting Pedagogical Space: Egyptian Educators Use of Moodle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jayson; Finholt-Daniel, Matt; Sales, Greg; Flora, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on exploring the outcomes of an e-learning initiative in Egypt. Researchers conducted training with 17 Egyptian educators on how to build, maintain, and teach using Moodle, an online content management system. The researchers evaluated the outputs of the training using the Technology Adoption Model (TAM) in an effort to assess…

  9. Strategic Leadership and Its Application in Egyptian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany R. Alalfy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Today's universities operate in a climate of great change, along with increased responsibilities and accountability from Internal and external customers. This has resulted in calls for a new kind of leadership working to help the university to improve educational services and face more challenges, called strategic leadership, at the university level. Aim of study defining of Egyptian leadership universities pattern of modern leadership styles, named as Strategic leadership (concept, objectives, roles, requirements, and application obstacles. Relate to the suffering of the Egyptian universities of many problems that limit their efficiency and effectiveness. This led to the need to search for new approaches as strategic leadership for eliminate of these problems. The study used a descriptive approach for its suitability for the nature of the study. The study found multiple reasons for the application of strategic leadership style in Egyptian universities as a result of  the problems the leaderships of the Egyptian universities suffer from  which limits its efficiency and effectiveness. Study recommended starting applying this pattern quickly after all the positive results it achieved in many universities.   

  10. Space and protest: A tale of two Egyptian squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed, A.A.; Van Nes, A.; Salheen, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Protests and revolts take place in public space. How they can be controlled or how protests develop depend on the physical layout of the built environment. This study reveals the relationship between urban space and protest for two Egyptian squares: Tahrir Square and Rabaa Al-Adawiya in Cairo. For a

  11. In-depth micro-spectrochemical analysis of archaeological Egyptian pottery shards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedr, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Old Egyptian pottery samples have been in-depth microchemically analyzed using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Samples from two different ancient Islamic eras, Mamluk (1250-1517 AD), Fatimid (969-1169 AD) in addition to samples from the Roman period (30 BC-395 AD) were investigated. LIBS provided the analytical data necessary to study in micrometric steps the depth profiling of various elements in each sample. Common elements such as silicon, calcium, and aluminum relevant to the originally manufactured and processed clay, showed up in all the investigated samples. EDX and XRD techniques that have been used in the present work provided important chemical insight about the structure of the samples. The obtained analytical results demonstrated the possibility of using LIBS technique in performing in situ spectrochemical analysis of archaeological pottery. This leads to fast in-depth spatial characterization of the samples in the micron range with nearly invisible surface destructive effects. There is no doubt that this can help in restoration and conservation of such precious objects.

  12. Comets in ancient India

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2014-01-01

    The Indo-aryans of ancient India observed stars and constellations for ascertaining auspicious times for sacrificial rites ordained by vedas. It is but natural that they would have recounted in the vedic texts about comets. In Rigveda ($\\sim $ 1700 - 1500 BC) and Atharvaveda ($\\sim $ 1150 BC), there are references to dhumaketus and ketus, which stand for comets in Sanskrit. Varahamihira in 550 AD and Ballala Sena ($\\sim $ 1100 - 1200 AD) have described a large number of comets recorded by ancient seers such as Parashara, Vriddha Garga, Narada, Garga, etc. In this article, I conjecture that an episode narrated in Mahabharata of a radiant king, Nahusha, ruling the heavens, and later turning into a serpent after he had kicked the seer Agastya (also the star Canopus), is a mythological retelling of a cometary event.

  13. Ancient human microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    Very recently, we discovered a vast new microbial self: the human microbiome. Our native microbiota interface with our biology and culture to influence our health, behavior, and quality of life, and yet we know very little about their origin, evolution, or ecology. With the advent of industrialization, globalization, and modern sanitation, it is intuitive that we have changed our relationship with microbes, but we have little information about the ancestral state of our microbiome, and therefore, we lack a foundation for characterizing this change. High-throughput sequencing has opened up new opportunities in the field of paleomicrobiology, allowing us to investigate the evolution of the complex microbial ecologies that inhabit our bodies. By focusing on recent coprolite and dental calculus research, we explore how emerging research on ancient human microbiomes is changing the way we think about ancient disease and how archaeological studies can contribute to a medical understanding of health and nutrition today. PMID:25559298

  14. 雷公藤的本草考证%Herbal Textual Research on Tripterygium Wilfordii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高伟; 刘梦婷; 程琪庆; 潘国凤; 王秀娟

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Tripterygium wilfordii has a great application prospect in immunological diseases, nerve protection and tumor control, but the toxicity limits its application. Based on textual research of Tripterygium wilfordii, alias, source of production, and attenuated measures were identified, providing herbalist basis for development of resource-related varieties. Methods: Analyzed description of Tripterygium wilfordii from the ancient herbal books and local herbal books of past dynasties. Results: First records about Tripterygium wilfordii started from herbal books in Qing Dynasty. The information about compatibility can provide guidance for attenuation.%目的:通过对雷公藤的本草考证,收集雷公藤别名,明确药材的来源,为其资源相关品种的开发提供本草学依据,并从古籍中寻找是否有减毒措施.方法:考证历代本草及地方本草对雷公藤或其别名的描述,进行分析.结果:历代本草对雷公藤的记载不够清晰,清代以后的本草开始记载,从中总结出配伍解毒等方面内容,可为临床应用或减毒提供依据和线索.

  15. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and herbal medicines: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; Silva, Patricia Bento da; Ramos, Matheus Aparecido Dos Santos; Negri, Kamila Maria Silveira; Bauab, Taís Maria; Chorilli, Marlus

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been widely used around the world since ancient times. The advancement of phytochemical and phytopharmacological sciences has enabled elucidation of the composition and biological activities of several medicinal plant products. The effectiveness of many species of medicinal plants depends on the supply of active compounds. Most of the biologically active constituents of extracts, such as flavonoids, tannins, and terpenoids, are highly soluble in water, but have low absorption, because they are unable to cross the lipid membranes of the cells, have excessively high molecular size, or are poorly absorbed, resulting in loss of bioavailability and efficacy. Some extracts are not used clinically because of these obstacles. It has been widely proposed to combine herbal medicine with nanotechnology, because nanostructured systems might be able to potentiate the action of plant extracts, reducing the required dose and side effects, and improving activity. Nanosystems can deliver the active constituent at a sufficient concentration during the entire treatment period, directing it to the desired site of action. Conventional treatments do not meet these requirements. The purpose of this study is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and herbal medicines.

  16. Screening for hepatocellular carcinoma by Egyptian physicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sahar; M; Hassany; Ehab; F; Abdou; Moustafa; Mohamed; El; Taher; Afaf; Adel; Abdeltwab; Hubert; E; Blum

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the practice of Egyptian physicians in screening patients for hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). METHODS: The study included 154 physicians from all over Egypt caring for patients at risk for HCC. The study was based on a questionnaire with 20 items. Each questionnaire consisted of two parts:(1) personal information regarding the physician(name, age, specialty and type of health care setting); and(2) professional experience in the care of patients at risk for HCC development(screening, knowledge about the cause and natural course of liver diseases and HCC risk). RESULTS: Sixty-eight percent of doctors with an MD degree, 48% of doctors with a master degree or a diploma and 40% of doctors with a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery certificate considered the hepatitis C virus(HCV) genotype as risk factor for HCC development(P < 0.05). Ninety percent of physicians specialized in tropical medicine, internal medicine or gastroenterology and 67% of physicians in other specialties advise patients to undergo screening for HCV and hepatitis B virus infection as well as liver cirrhosis(P < 0.05). Eighty-six percent of doctors in University Hospitals and 69% of Ministry of Health(MOH) doctors consider HCV infection as the leading cause of HCC in Egypt(P < 0.05). Seventy-two percent of doctors with an MD degree, 55% of doctors with a master degree or a diploma, 56% of doctors with an MBBCH certificate, 74% of doctors in University Hospitals and 46% of MOH hospital doctors consider abdominal ultrasonography as the most important investigation in HCC screening(P < 0.05). Sixty-five percent of physicians in tropical medicine, internal medicine or gastroenterology and 37% of physicians in other specialties recommend as HCC screening interval of 3 mo(P < 0.05). Seventy-one percent of doctors with an MD degree, 50% of doctors with a master degree or diploma and 60% of doctors with an MBBCH certificate follow the same recommendation.CONCLUSION: In Egypt, physicians

  17. Evaluation of antiplaque and antigingivitis effect of herbal mouthwash in treatment of plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized, clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanand Aspalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ayurvedic drugs have been used since ancient times to treat diseases including periodontal diseases. Oral rinses made from ayurvedic medicines are used in periodontal therapy to control bleeding and reduce inflammation. The aim of this clinical study is to verify the efficacy of herbal mouthwash containing Pilu, Bibhitaka, Nagavalli, Gandhapura taila, Ela, Peppermint satva, and Yavani satva on reduction of plaque and gingivitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 volunteers with clinical signs of mild to moderate gingivitis were selected and assigned to Group A (only scaling done and Group B (scaling along with the use of herbal mouthwash. After recording the clinical parameters, the patients were instructed to use herbal mouthwash 15 ml for 30 s twice daily after food in Group B and oral hygiene instructions were given to all patients. Plaque and gingivitis assessment were carried out using the plaque index (Silness nd Loe, 1964, Gingival index (Loe And Silness, 1963, Gingival bleeding index (Ainamo and Bay, 1975 at baseline and at 21 days of the herbal mouthwash use. Statistically analysis was carried out using the student′s t-test for normally distributed data and Wilcoxson test or Mann-Whitney U-test for skewed data. Results: Our results showed that herbal mouthwash was effective in treatment of plaque induced gingivitis in Group B when compared with the Group A. Conclusion: Herbal mouthwash is effective in treatment of plaque induced gingivitis and can be effectively used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy with lesser side-effects.

  18. Suicide in ancient Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, K; Tsoukalas, G; Kontaxaki, M-I; Karamanou, M; Androutsos, G

    2014-01-01

    The theme of suicide appears several times in ancient Greek literature. However, each such reference acquires special significance depending on the field from which it originates. Most of the information found in mythology, but the suicide in a mythological tale, although in terms of motivation and mental situation of heroes may be in imitation of similar incidents of real life, in fact is linked with the principles of the ancient Greek religion. In ancient drama and mainly in tragedies suicide conduces to the tragic hypostasis of the heroes and to the evolution of the plot and also is a tool in order to be presented the ideas of poets for the relations of the gods, the relation among gods and men and the relation among the men. In ancient Greek philosophy there were the deniers of suicide, who were more concerned about the impact of suicide on society and also these who accepted it, recognizing the right of the individual to put an end to his life, in order to avoid personal misfortunes. Real suicides will be found mostly from historical sources, but most of them concern leading figures of the ancient world. Closer to the problem of suicide in the everyday life of antiquity are ancient Greek medicines, who studied the phenomenon more general without references to specific incidents. Doctors did not approve in principal the suicide and dealt with it as insane behavior in the development of the mental diseases, of melancholia and mania. They considered that the discrepancy of humors in the organ of logic in the human body will cause malfunction, which will lead to the absurdity and consequently to suicide, either due to excessive concentration of black bile in melancholia or due to yellow bile in mania. They believed that greater risk to commit suicide had women, young people and the elderly. As therapy they used the drugs of their time with the intention to induce calm and repression in the ill person, therefore they mainly used mandragora. In general, we would say

  19. Suicide in ancient Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, K; Tsoukalas, G; Kontaxaki, M-I; Karamanou, M; Androutsos, G

    2014-01-01

    The theme of suicide appears several times in ancient Greek literature. However, each such reference acquires special significance depending on the field from which it originates. Most of the information found in mythology, but the suicide in a mythological tale, although in terms of motivation and mental situation of heroes may be in imitation of similar incidents of real life, in fact is linked with the principles of the ancient Greek religion. In ancient drama and mainly in tragedies suicide conduces to the tragic hypostasis of the heroes and to the evolution of the plot and also is a tool in order to be presented the ideas of poets for the relations of the gods, the relation among gods and men and the relation among the men. In ancient Greek philosophy there were the deniers of suicide, who were more concerned about the impact of suicide on society and also these who accepted it, recognizing the right of the individual to put an end to his life, in order to avoid personal misfortunes. Real suicides will be found mostly from historical sources, but most of them concern leading figures of the ancient world. Closer to the problem of suicide in the everyday life of antiquity are ancient Greek medicines, who studied the phenomenon more general without references to specific incidents. Doctors did not approve in principal the suicide and dealt with it as insane behavior in the development of the mental diseases, of melancholia and mania. They considered that the discrepancy of humors in the organ of logic in the human body will cause malfunction, which will lead to the absurdity and consequently to suicide, either due to excessive concentration of black bile in melancholia or due to yellow bile in mania. They believed that greater risk to commit suicide had women, young people and the elderly. As therapy they used the drugs of their time with the intention to induce calm and repression in the ill person, therefore they mainly used mandragora. In general, we would say

  20. Evaluation of the Mechanical Durability of the Egyptian Machine Readable Booklet Passport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mahmoud Yosri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 the first Egyptian booklet Machine Readable Passport/ MRP has been issued and its security and informative standard quality levels were proved in a research published in 2011. Here the durability profiles of the Egyptian MRP have been evaluated. Seven mechanical durability tests were applied on the Egyptian MRP. Such tests are specified in the International Civil Aviation Organization / ICAO standard requirements documents. These seven very severe durability tests resulted in that the Egyptian MRP has achieved better & higher results than the values detected in ICAO-Doc N0232: Durability of Machine Readable Passports - Version: 3.2. Hence, this research had proved the complete conformance between the Egyptian MRP mechanical durability profiles to the international requirements. The Egyptian booklet MRP doesn’t need any obligatory modification concerning its mechanical durability profiles.

  1. Striking presence of Egyptian blue identified in a painting by Giovanni Battista Benvenuto from 1524.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredal-Jørgensen, Jørn; Sanyova, Jana; Rask, Vibeke; Sargent, Maria Louise; Therkildsen, Rikke Hoberg

    2011-09-01

    Egyptian blue has been identified in a painting from 1524 by the Italian artist Ortolano Ferrarese (Giovanni Battista Benvenuto). Egyptian blue is the oldest known synthetic pigment, invented by the Egyptians in the fourth dynasty (2613-2494 BC) of the Old Kingdom and extensively used throughout Antiquity. From about 1000 A.D., it disappeared from the historical record and was only reinvented in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The discovery of Egyptian blue in Ortolano Ferrarese's painting from 1524 shows that Egyptian blue was in fact available in the period from which it is normally considered not to exist. The identification of Egyptian blue is based on optical microscopy supported by energy-dispersive spectroscopy and visual light photon-induced spectroscopy, and finally confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy. PMID:21678119

  2. Drug interactions in African herbal remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Werner; Steenkamp, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Herbal usage remains popular as an alternative or complementary form of treatment, especially in Africa. However, the misconception that herbal remedies are safe due to their "natural" origins jeopardizes human safety, as many different interactions can occur with concomitant use with other pharmaceuticals on top of potential inherent toxicity. Cytochrome P450 enzymes are highly polymorphic, and pose a problem for pharmaceutical drug tailoring to meet an individual's specific metabolic activity. The influence of herbal remedies further complicates this. The plants included in this review have been mainly researched for determining their effect on cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein drug transporters. Usage of herbal remedies, such as Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Sutherlandia frutescens and Harpagophytum procumbensis popular in Africa. The literature suggests that there is a potential for drug-herb interactions, which could occur through alterations in metabolism and transportation of drugs. Research has primarily been conducted in vitro, whereas in vivo data are lacking. Research concerning the effect of African herbals on drug metabolism should also be approached, as specific plants are especially popular in conjunction with certain treatments. Although these interactions can be beneficial, the harm they pose is just as great. PMID:21756221

  3. THE VALUE RELEVANCE OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS’ BOTTOM LINES IN THE EMERGING EGYPTIAN CAPITAL MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Abousamak, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the value relevance of the bottom lines of the financial statements in the Egyptian context after the inception of the new version of Egyptian Accounting Standards of 2006. Considering the tradition accounting value of conservatism and the firm size, the price and return models are operationalized using a sample of the most actively traded companies on the Egyptian Stock Market in the period from 2007-2009. Three important conclusions captured from th...

  4. Dance in Ancient Greek Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Spalva, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The greatness and harmony of ancient Greece has had an impact upon the development of the Western European culture to this day. The ancient Greek culture has influenced contemporary literature genres and systems of philosophy, principles of architecture, sculpture and drama and has formed basis for such sciences as astronomy and mathematics. The art of ancient Greece with its penchant for beauty and clarity has been the example of the humanity’s search for an aesthetic ideal. Despite only bei...

  5. Herbal Products: Benefits, Limits, and Applications in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Del Prete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine soughts and encompasses a wide range of approaches; its use begun in ancient China at the time of Xia dynasty and in India during the Vedic period, but thanks to its long-lasting curative effect, easy availability, natural way of healing, and poor side-effects it is gaining importance throughout the world in clinical practice. We conducted a review describing the effects and the limits of using herbal products in chronic liver disease, focusing our attention on those most known, such as quercetin or curcumin. We tried to describe their pharmacokinetics, biological properties, and their beneficial effects (as antioxidant role in metabolic, alcoholic, and viral hepatitis (considering that oxidative stress is the common pathway of chronic liver diseases of different etiology. The main limit of applicability of CAM comes from the lacking of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials giving a real proof of efficacy of those products, so that anecdotal success and personal experience are frequently the driving force for acceptance of CAM in the population.

  6. Why did ancient people have atherosclerosis?: from autopsies to computed tomography to potential causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory S; Wann, L Samuel; Allam, Adel H; Thompson, Randall C; Michalik, David E; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Lombardi, Guido P; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Valladolid, Clide M; Abd El-Maksoud, Gomaa; Al-Tohamy Soliman, Muhammad; Badr, Ibrahem; el-Halim Nur el-Din, Abd; Clarke, Emily M; Thomas, Ian G; Miyamoto, Michael I; Kaplan, Hillard S; Frohlich, Bruno; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Zink, Albert; Finch, Caleb E

    2014-06-01

    Computed tomographic findings of atherosclerosis in the ancient cultures of Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest and the Aleutian Islands challenge our understanding of the fundamental causes of atherosclerosis. Could these findings be true? Is so, what traditional risk factors might be present in these cultures that could explain this apparent paradox? The recent computed tomographic findings are consistent with multiple autopsy studies dating as far back as 1852 that demonstrate calcific atherosclerosis in ancient Egyptians and Peruvians. A nontraditional cause of atherosclerosis that could explain this burden of atherosclerosis is the microbial and parasitic inflammatory burden likely to be present in ancient cultures inherently lacking modern hygiene and antimicrobials. Patients with chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of today, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection, experience premature atherosclerosis and coronary events. Might the chronic inflammatory load of ancient times secondary to infection have resulted in atherosclerosis? Smoke inhalation from the use of open fires for daily cooking and illumination represents another potential cause. Undiscovered risk factors could also have been present, potential causes that technologically cannot currently be measured in our serum or other tissue. A synthesis of these findings suggests that a gene-environmental interplay is causal for atherosclerosis. That is, humans have an inherent genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis, whereas the speed and severity of its development are secondary to known and potentially unknown environmental factors. PMID:25667093

  7. Effective Components of Chinese Herbal Compound Decoction and Maillard Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹治云; 陈旭征; 张恩达; 杜建

    2009-01-01

    This paper intends to explore the color changes considered to be Maillard reaction during the process of Chinese herbal medicine.The Maillard reaction products(MRPs) are often in substantial proportions of Chinese herbal compound decoctions but their effects are often neglected.By considering the effects of MRPs in studies of effective components on Chinese herbal compounds,a new perspective is established in future researches of Chinese herbal compound decoctions.

  8. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; Triantafillidis, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most import...

  9. The politics of herbal drugs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B H

    2000-08-01

    Hanbang, the Korean medical practice with origins in classical Chinese texts, is a prominent part of the Korean health care system. Hanbang physicians, called hanuisas, are looked down on by biomedical doctors, but their practice has enjoyed increasing popularity for several decades. As the market for herbal preparations has become more lucrative, biomedical pharmacists have begun to participate in it. The Pharmaceutical Act in 1993 explicitly allowed pharmacists to prescribe and dispense herbal drugs. This provoked a bitter public conflict between hanuisas and pharmacists, involving street demonstrations and strikes. The hanuisas asserted that the pharmacists were unqualified to assume their traditional practice. They also agitated for recognition in the state-sponsored system of health care and for the state's support for developing Hanbang medicine. This paper attributes the conflicts concerning Hanbang to the expanding market for herbal preparations, Korean nationalism, and to the oversupply of biomedical pharmacists. PMID:10868666

  10. Traditional herbal medicine in Far-west Nepal: a pharmacological appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha Keshab P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant species have long been used as principal ingredients of traditional medicine in far-west Nepal. The medicinal plants with ethnomedicinal values are currently being screened for their therapeutic potential but their data and information are inadequately compared and analyzed with the Ayurveda and the phytochemical findings. Methods The present study evaluated ethnomedicinal plants and their uses following literature review, comparison, field observations, and analysis. Comparison was made against earlier standard literature of medicinal plants and ethnomedicine of the same area, the common uses of the Ayurveda and the latest common phytochemical findings. The field study for primary data collection was carried out from 2006-2008. Results The herbal medicine in far-west Nepal is the basis of treatment of most illness through traditional knowledge. The medicine is made available via ancient, natural health care practices such as tribal lore, home herbal remedy, and the Baidhya, Ayurveda and Amchi systems. The traditional herbal medicine has not only survived but also thrived in the trans-cultural environment with its intermixture of ethnic traditions and beliefs. The present assessment showed that traditional herbal medicine has flourished in rural areas where modern medicine is parsimoniously accessed because of the high cost and long travel time to health center. Of the 48 Nepalese medicinal plants assessed in the present communication, about half of the species showed affinity with the common uses of the Ayurveda, earlier studies and the latest phytochemical findings. The folk uses of Acacia catechu for cold and cough, Aconitum spicatum as an analgesic, Aesculus indica for joint pain, Andrographis paniculata for fever, Anisomeles indica for urinary affections, Azadirachta indica for fever, Euphorbia hirta for asthma, Taxus wallichiana for tumor control, and Tinospora sinensis for diabetes are consistent with the latest

  11. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  12. Mathematics in ancient Greece

    CERN Document Server

    Dantzig, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    More than a history of mathematics, this lively book traces mathematical ideas and processes to their sources, stressing the methods used by the masters of the ancient world. Author Tobias Dantzig portrays the human story behind mathematics, showing how flashes of insight in the minds of certain gifted individuals helped mathematics take enormous forward strides. Dantzig demonstrates how the Greeks organized their precursors' melange of geometric maxims into an elegantly abstract deductive system. He also explains the ways in which some of the famous mathematical brainteasers of antiquity led

  13. Ancient concrete works

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the ancient Romans were the first to create and use concrete. This is not true, as we can easily learn from the Latin literature itself. For sure, Romans were able to prepare high-quality hydraulic cements, comparable with the modern Portland cements. In this paper, we will see that the use of concrete is quite older, ranging back to the Homeric times. For instance, it was used for the floors of some courts and galleries of the Mycenaean palace at Tiryns

  14. Herbal extracts in diets for broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Goulart Petrolli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of feeding herbal extracts for broilers on performance and histology of the intestinal mucosa and its effects on the profiting from the metabolizable energy of experimental diets. For so, two experiments were conducted. In experiment I, the inclusion of different herbal extracts in diets on performance and intestinal histology of broilers was evaluated, and in experiment II, the values of apparent metabolizable energy and metabolizable energy corrected by the nitrogen balance of the experimental diets were studied. Treatments consisted of: positive control diet; positive control + avilamycin; negative control; negative control + 100 ppm of a complex containing three different herbal medicines (pepper, cinnamon and oregano; negative control + 75 ppm garlic extract; negative control + 150 ppm garlic extract. In the performance experiment, which comprised the period of 1 to 40 days of age, 960 male broilers were distributed in a randomized block design, with six treatments and eight replicates, with 20 birds per experimental unit. In experiment II, the method adopted was the traditional of total excreta collection with male broiler chicks in the age of 14 to 24 days, in a completely randomized design, with six treatments and eight replicates with five birds per experimental unit. The intestinal villus height was improved with addition of the composite containing the three herbal extracts; however, crypt depth and villus/crypt ratio were not affected. The use of herbal extract in diets for broilers promotes performance similar to that with the use of antibiotics. Herbal extracts can be incorporated into diets replacing antibiotics without compromising the metabolizable energy of diets, performance or intestinal mucosa for broilers in the period of 1 to 40 days of age.

  15. Herbal medicine use among Turkish patients with chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevver Tulunay

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: In this study herbal medicine use was found to be higher among patients who had been diagnosed with chronic diseases. Therefore physicians should be aware of herbal medicine usage of their patients and inform them about the effectivity and side effects of herbal medicines. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 217-220

  16. Egyptian Activism against Female Genital Cutting as Catachrestic Claiming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Van Raemdonck

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with questions of the politics of location in knowledge and norm production within the context of Egyptian feminist activism for abandoning female genital cutting practices. It seeks to determine underlying schemes of international campaigning discourse and analyzes how these predicate and complicate Egyptian postcolonial activism. It draws on a broad literature study in addition to fieldwork in Cairo consisting of in-depth interviews with activists and policy makers. My focus is on the national Task Force against FGM from 1994 until 1999 and its subsequent cooptation by the National Council of Childhood and Motherhood. I argue through the concept of catachresis that location matters in setting the terms of anti-FGC discourse and its relation to religion.

  17. Isolation of genetically diverse Marburg viruses from Egyptian fruit bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Towner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In July and September 2007, miners working in Kitaka Cave, Uganda, were diagnosed with Marburg hemorrhagic fever. The likely source of infection in the cave was Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus based on detection of Marburg virus RNA in 31/611 (5.1% bats, virus-specific antibody in bat sera, and isolation of genetically diverse virus from bat tissues. The virus isolates were collected nine months apart, demonstrating long-term virus circulation. The bat colony was estimated to be over 100,000 animals using mark and re-capture methods, predicting the presence of over 5,000 virus-infected bats. The genetically diverse virus genome sequences from bats and miners closely matched. These data indicate common Egyptian fruit bats can represent a major natural reservoir and source of Marburg virus with potential for spillover into humans.

  18. Associations between psychosocial problems and personality disorders among Egyptian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbheiry, Abd-Elraqeep; Emam, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between psychosocial problems and personality disorders among a sample of 817 Egyptian adolescents (408 males and 409 females). Using 15 subscales from the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale (APS-long form) we assessed prevalence rates of a number of internalizing and externalizing psychosocial disorders. Additionally, we investigated whether there are gender differences in psychopathology among Egyptian adolescents and to what extent can psychosocial problems predict specific personality disorders. Stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that the participants experienced higher levels of PD, AV, and BD. Gender differences were found in certain personality disorders as well as in externalizing and internalizing psychosocial problems. A number of externalizing and internalizing psychosocial problems were highly predictive of specific personality disorders.

  19. Exploring Ancient Skies A Survey of Ancient and Cultural Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, David H

    2011-01-01

    Exploring Ancient Skies brings together the methods of archaeology and the insights of modern astronomy to explore the science of astronomy as it was practiced in various cultures prior to the invention of the telescope. The book reviews an enormous and growing body of literature on the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean, the Far East, and the New World (particularly Mesoamerica), putting the ancient astronomical materials into their archaeological and cultural contexts. The authors begin with an overview of the field and proceed to essential aspects of naked-eye astronomy, followed by an examination of specific cultures. The book concludes by taking into account the purposes of ancient astronomy: astrology, navigation, calendar regulation, and (not least) the understanding of our place and role in the universe. Skies are recreated to display critical events as they would have appeared to ancient observers—events such as the supernova of 1054 A.D., the "lion horoscope," and the Star of Bethlehem. Explori...

  20. Dietary Behaviour Pattern and Physical Activity in Overweight and Obese Egyptian Mothers: Relationships with Their Children's Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayera E. Hassan

    2016-09-01

    CONCLUSION: Improper dietary patterns, nonworking mothers and big family size are associated with obesity among Egyptian women. Emphasis should be given to increasing physical activity and encourage healthier diets among Egyptian mothers and their children.

  1. Transnational Politics, Women & the Egyptian Revolution: Examples from Paris

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller-Funk, Lea

    2014-01-01

    The revolutionary process in Egypt since 2011 has not only mobilized masses in Egypt, but has also led to a massive politicization and polarization of Egyptian communities abroad. Women from different generations became active in the protests claiming their agency to participate in changing their country. Cyberactivism became a particularly important vehicle for women to participate politically in the revolutionary process. This paper looks at transnational political networks in Paris working...

  2. Financing Resources for Egyptian Small and Medium Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Rola Nabil El Kabbani; Christian Kalhoefer

    2011-01-01

    Even though small and medium enterprises (SMEs) represent the majority of the Egyptian firms, their value added is relatively low. According to previous research, SMEs face a financing gap that causes undercapitalization and represents an obstacle that hinders SMEs from growth. This paper analyzes the current situation of SMEs in Egypt and addresses the question whether the financing problem still exists. In addition, we discuss the role of venture capital as a possible source of financing. B...

  3. Strategic Leadership and Its Application in Egyptian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Today's universities operate in a climate of great change, along with increased responsibilities and accountability from Internal and external customers. This has resulted in calls for a new kind of leadership working to help the university to improve educational services and face more challenges, called strategic leadership, at the university level. Aim of study defining of Egyptian leadership universities pattern of modern leadership styles, named as Strategic leadership (concept, objective...

  4. Isolation of genetically diverse Marburg viruses from Egyptian fruit bats.

    OpenAIRE

    Towner, Jonathan S.; Amman, Brian R.; Sealy, Tara K.; Serena A Reeder Carroll; Comer, James A.; Alan Kemp; Robert Swanepoel; Paddock, Christopher D.; Stephen Balinandi; Marina L Khristova; Formenty, Pierre B.H.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Miller, David M.; Reed, Zachary D.; John T. Kayiwa

    2009-01-01

    Author Summary Marburg virus, similar to its close cousin Ebola virus, can cause large outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever (HF) in rural Africa with case fatalities approaching 90%. For decades, a long-standing enigma has been the identity of the natural reservoir of this deadly virus. In this report, we identify the cave-dwelling Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) as a natural host of Marburg virus based on multiple lines of evidence which include, for the first time ever, the isolation o...

  5. Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 in an Egyptian girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 (KCS1 (OMIM 244460 is a rare syndrome characterized by growth retardation, uniformly small slender long bones with medullary stenosis, thickened cortex of the long bones, hypocalcemia possibly with tetany at an early age and normal intelligence. The primary outcome of KCS1 is short stature. We present here an Egyptian girl aged 32 months with typical feature of KCS1.

  6. The Egyptian Farming Practices Technological Development and Its Determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Abdou, Amin I.

    2005-01-01

    Tendency toward application of advanced technology in farming practices has been accelerated in Egypt since the mid Seventies of the last century. Both domestic technology generation and foreign technology transfer were encouraged. High-quality cultivars, mechanized farming operations, and modern agricultural systems, such as protected agriculture and organic farming were strongly introduced. As such, this study tended to assess the Egyptian experience in farming modernization, areas of succe...

  7. New Terpenes from the Egyptian Soft Coral Sarcophyton ehrenbergi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elkhateeb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigations of the Egyptian soft coral Sarcophyton ehrenbergi have led to the isolation of compounds 1–3 as well as the previously reported marine cembranoid diterpene sarcophine (4. Structures were elucidated by comprehensive NMR and HRMS experimentation. Isolated compounds were in vitro assayed for cytotoxic activity against human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2 and breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 cell lines.

  8. ASTRONOMICAL ALGORITHMS OF EGYPTIAN PYRAMIDS SLOPES AND THEIR MODULES DIVIDER

    OpenAIRE

    Aboulfotouh, Hossam M. K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to show the astronomical design principles that are encoded in the geometrical forms of the largest five pyramids of the fourth Egyptian dynasty, in Giza and Dahshur plateaus, based on using the pyramids’ design-modules that are mentioned in the so-called Rhind Mathematical Papyrus. It shows the astronomical algorithms for quantifying the slopes of pyramids, with reference to specific range of earth’s axial tilt, within spherical co-ordinates system. Besid...

  9. Biodiversity of Bacterial Ecosystems in Traditional Egyptian Domiati Cheese▿

    OpenAIRE

    El-Baradei, Gaber; Delacroix-Buchet, Agnès; Ogier, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial biodiversity occurring in traditional Egyptian soft Domiati cheese was studied by PCR-temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (TTGE) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Bands were identified using a reference species database (J.-C. Ogier et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70:5628-5643, 2004); de novo bands having nonidentified migration patterns were identified by DNA sequencing. Results reveal a novel bacterial profile and extensive bacterial biodiversity in Do...

  10. HOW EGYPTIAN CONTRACTING COMPANIES TRANSLATE PROJECTS' QUALITY TO PROJECTS' PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Said SHAWKY HOZIEN; REFAAT HASSAN ABDEL-RAZEK; ADEL AHMED EL-KORDI; SHAFIK SHAWKY KHOURY

    2011-01-01

    A model for continuous quality improvement for Egyptian contracting projects’ (CQIM) is developed through the extensive reviewing of the Total Quality Management (TQM), Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)literature, preceding researches, consensus opinions of managers and experts of the construction industry and the quality management system (ISO 9000). This model comprises of 13 main factors divided into 9 CQI constructs and 4 Indices, the Indices are broken down to 46 practical measures, w...

  11. Safety concerns of herbal products and traditional Chinese herbal medicines: Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and aristolochic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many countries, including the United States, herbal supplements, tisanes and vegetable products, including traditional Chinese medicines, are largely unregulated and their content is not registered, monitored or verified. Consequently, potent plant toxins including dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids ...

  12. Authenticity in ancient DNA studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske

    2006-01-01

    Ancient DNA studies represent a powerful tool that can be used to obtain genetic insights into the past. However, despite the publication of large numbers of apparently successful ancient DNA studies, a number of problems exist with the field that are often ignored. Therefore, questions exist as ...

  13. Salt weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Nevin; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Hamed, Ayman; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica

    2013-04-01

    weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures Nevin Aly Mohamed (1), Miguel Gomez - Heras(2), Ayman Hamed Ahmed (1), and Monica Alvarez de Buergo(2). (1) Faculty of Pet. & Min. Engineering- Suez Canal University, Suez, Egypt, (2) Instituto de Geociencias (CSIC-UCM) Madrid. Spain. Limestone is one of the most frequent building stones in Egypt and is used since the time of ancient Egyptians and salt weathering is one of the main threats to its conservation. Most of the limestone used in historical monuments in Cairo is a biomicrite extracted from the Mid-Eocene Mokattam Group. During this work, cylindrical samples (2.4 cm diameter and approx. 4.8 cm length) were subjected, in a purpose-made simulation chamber, to simulated laboratory weathering tests with fixed salt concentration (10% weight NaCl solution), at different temperatures, which were kept constant throughout each test (10, 20, 30, 40 oC). During each test, salt solutions flowed continuously imbibing samples by capilarity. Humidity within the simulation chamber was reduced using silica gel to keep it low and constant to increase evaporation rate. Temperature, humidity inside the simulation chamber and samples weight were digitally monitored during each test. Results show the advantages of the proposed experimental methodology using a continuous flow of salt solutions and shed light on the effect of temperature on the dynamics of salt crystallization on and within samples. Research funded by mission sector of high education ministry, Egypt and Geomateriales S2009/MAT-1629.

  14. Tamil merchant in ancient Mesopotamia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliya Gounder Palanichamy

    Full Text Available Recent analyses of ancient Mesopotamian mitochondrial genomes have suggested a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian civilization. There is no consensus on the origin of the ancient Mesopotamians. They may be descendants of migrants, who founded regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or they may be merchants who were involved in trans Mesopotamia trade. To identify the Indian source population showing linkage to the ancient Mesopotamians, we screened a total of 15,751 mitochondrial DNAs (11,432 from the literature and 4,319 from this study representing all major populations of India. Our results although suggest that south India (Tamil Nadu and northeast India served as the source of the ancient Mesopotamian mtDNA gene pool, mtDNA of these ancient Mesopotamians probably contributed by Tamil merchants who were involved in the Indo-Roman trade.

  15. Tamil merchant in ancient Mesopotamia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Malliya Gounder; Mitra, Bikash; Debnath, Monojit; Agrawal, Suraksha; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Recent analyses of ancient Mesopotamian mitochondrial genomes have suggested a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian civilization. There is no consensus on the origin of the ancient Mesopotamians. They may be descendants of migrants, who founded regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or they may be merchants who were involved in trans Mesopotamia trade. To identify the Indian source population showing linkage to the ancient Mesopotamians, we screened a total of 15,751 mitochondrial DNAs (11,432 from the literature and 4,319 from this study) representing all major populations of India. Our results although suggest that south India (Tamil Nadu) and northeast India served as the source of the ancient Mesopotamian mtDNA gene pool, mtDNA of these ancient Mesopotamians probably contributed by Tamil merchants who were involved in the Indo-Roman trade. PMID:25299580

  16. Herbal medicine--sets the heart racing!

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, E

    2010-07-01

    The potential for pharmaceuticals to produce side effects and drug interactions is well known to medical practitioners and the lay public alike. However, the potential for alternative medicines to produce such effects is less widely known. We describe a potentially dangerous interaction between a herbal medicine and concomitant selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) ingestion.

  17. Herbal Medicine Along the Trail of Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Melinda B.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an assignment that allows students to explore the life of the Cherokee Indians during a tragic period in history when the U.S. Government removed the Cherokees from their ancestral homeland. Students demonstrate learning by creating skits that incorporate Cherokee history, culture, and herbal remedies. (ZWH)

  18. Latest Progress on Chinese Herbal Medicines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianjin Press of Chinese Herbal Medicines

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHM) has been recently included in the Wanfang Database-Digital Periodical Group, China Academic Journals Integrated Online Database, Index of Copernicus (IC) in Poland, Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) in USA, and Ulrich's Periodicals Directory domestically and abroad.

  19. Online sources of herbal product information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Christopher; Baergen, Ralph; Puckett, Derek

    2014-02-01

    Herbal products are commonly used to treat clinical conditions and are often purchased online without the supervision of a healthcare provider. The use of herbals remains controversial because of widespread exaggerated claims of clinical efficacy and safety. We conducted an online search of 13 common herbals (including black cohosh, echinacea, garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, kava, saw palmetto, and St John's wort) and reviewed the top 50 Web sites for each using a Google search. We analyzed clinical claims, warnings, and other safety information. A total of 1179 Web sites were examined. Less than 8% of retail sites provided information regarding potential adverse effects, drug interactions, and other safety information; only 10.5% recommended consultation with a healthcare professional. Less than 3% cited scientific literature to accompany their claims. Key safety information is still lacking from many online sources of herbal information. Certain nonretail site types may be more reliable, but physicians and other healthcare professionals should be aware of the variable quality of these sites to help patients make more informed decisions. PMID:24290486

  20. Herbal Medicine for Market Potential in Malaysia: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to side effects of synthetic drugs, herbal products are rapidly gaining popularity in the world market. The global herbal market in 2010 was US$65 billion and is estimated to hit US$93 billion in 2015. The Malaysian herbal market is estimated to expand from RM7 billion in 2010 to about RM29 billion by 2020. Inspite of its rich biodiversity and well-practised knowledge of herbal medicine amongst its multi cultured population, the share of Malaysia in the global herbal market is very small and not up to the mark. The present article will deal with the measures to be adopted for global promotion of Malaysian herbal products. The scenario and perceptions of herbal medicine are discussed. (author)

  1. Ancient Chinese Sundials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kehui

    Timekeeping was essential in the agricultural society of ancient China. The use of sundials for timekeeping was associated with the use of the gnomon, which had its origin in remote antiquity. This chapter studies three sundials (guiyi 晷仪) from the Qin and Han dynasties, the shorter shadow plane sundial (duanying ping yi 短影平仪) invented by Yuan Chong in the Sui Dynasty, and the sundial chart (guiyingtu 晷影图) invented by Zeng Minxing in the Southern Song dynasty. This chapter also introduces Guo Shoujing's hemispherical sundial (yang yi 仰仪). A circular stone sundial discovered at the Small Wild Goose Pagoda in Xi'an is also mentioned. It is dated from the Sui and Tang dynasties. A brief survey of sundials from the Qing dynasty shows various types of sundials.

  2. Genetic characterization of Egyptian and Italian sheep breeds using mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman E. Othman

    2015-06-01

    The matrix of pairwise differences among breeds was used to perform a Principal Component Analysis (PCA. This analysis showed that the Italian breeds are clearly separated from the Egyptian breeds; moreover the Egyptian Barki breed is separated from Ossimi and Rahmani.

  3. Egyptian Symbols and Figures. Hieroglyphs [and] Scroll Paintings. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This lesson introduces students to the writing, art, and religious beliefs of ancient Egypt through hieroglyphs, one of the oldest writing systems in the world, and through tomb paintings. Hieroglyphs consist of pictures of familiar objects that represent sounds and were used in ancient Egypt from about 3100 BC to 400 CE. In the first part of the…

  4. ASPECTS OF OBSTACLES FOR APPLYING ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru STEFEA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The following investigation aims to determine the aspects of obstacles for applying Activity Based Costing (ABC system in the Egyptian case and the significant differences among the effects of such obstacles . The Study used the survey method to describe and analyze the obstacles in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. This survey used the number of 392 questionnaires that were used throughout the total of 23 Egyptian manufacturing firms, during the first half of 2013. Finally, the study found some influencing obstacles for applying this system (ABC and there were significant differences among the aspects of obstacles for applying ABC system in the Egyptian manufacturing firms.

  5. Abrasive supply for ancient Egypt revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the major research scheme 'Synchronization of Civilizations in the Eastern Mediterranean Region in the 2nd Millennium B.C' instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine 30 elements in pumice from archaeological excavations to reveal their specific volcanic origin. In ancient time, the widespread pumiceous products of several eruptions in the Aegean region have been used as abrasive tools and were therefore popular trade objects. The correlation of such archaeological findings to a specific eruption of known age would therefore allow to certify a maximum age of the respective stratum ('dating by first appearance'). Pumices from the Aegean region can easily be distinguished by their trace element distribution patterns. This has been shown by previous studies of the group. The elements Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, V, Yb, Zr and Zn were determined in 16 samples of pumice lumps from excavations in Tell-el-Dab'a and Tell-el-Herr (Egypt). Two irradiation cycles and five measurement runs were applied. To show the accuracy of the results obtained, typical samples of the most important pumice sources in the Aegean region, particularly from Milos, Nisyros, Kos and Thera were analyzed together with the Egyptian samples of unknown origin. A reliable identification of the samples is achieved by comparing these results to the database compiled in previous studies. The geographical positions of these islands are shown. Within the error range, most of the elements determined in typical representatives of Milos, Nisyros, Kos and Santorini were in perfect agreement with values from the literature. On the basis of the Cluster graphics presented, it is possible to relate unknown pumice to its primary source, just by comparing the relation of a few elements, like Ta-Eu and Th-Hf. One concludes that all samples except one can be related to the Minoan eruption of Thera

  6. [Herbological study of the botanical origin of Chinese crude drugs "Du-hua" and "Qiang-hua" in ancient China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikage, Masayuki; Ochimori, Akane

    2007-01-01

    The Chinese crude drug Qiang-hua was listed as an alias of Du-hua in Shen-nong-ben-cao-jing, an herbal journal written during the Han Dynasty, China. Du-hua and Qiang-hua are recognized as different herbs in China these days; the main botanical origin of Du-hua is Angelica spp. and that of Qiang-hua is Notopterygium spp., of the family Umbelliferae. To make clear the botanical origins of Du-hua and Qiang-hua in ancient China, the authors made a herbological study. The findings were as follows: the name of Qiang-hua was given to the genuine Du-hua, which is produced in Qiang Province, an ancient province located in northwest China; the botanical origin of Qiang-hua is presumed to be Notopterygium incisum Ting ex H.T. Chang and N. forbesii Boissieu based on both the morphology and habitat written in ancient herbal journals. Both species are prescribed as having the plant origin of Qiang-hua in the present Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Therefore, we concluded that Du-hua and Qiang-hua were essentially the same drug, and were originally derived from the Notopterygium species in ancient China.

  7. A multi-analytical approach to gold in Ancient Egypt: Studies on provenance and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissot, I., E-mail: isabeltissot@gmail.com [LIBPhys – UNL, Faculty of Science and Technology, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Campo Grande, 1649-004 Lisbon (Portugal); Troalen, L.G. [National Museums Scotland, Collections Services Department, 242 West Granton Road, Edinburgh EH5 1JA (United Kingdom); Manso, M. [LIBPhys – UNL, Faculty of Science and Technology, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Faculdade de Belas-Artes da Universidade de Lisboa, Largo da Academia Nacional de Belas-Artes, 1249-058 Lisbon (Portugal); Ponting, M. [Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, University of Liverpool, 12-14 Abercromby Square, Liverpool L69 7WZ (United Kingdom); Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Barreiros, M.A. [LNEG, I.P., Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Shaw, I. [Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, University of Liverpool, 12-14 Abercromby Square, Liverpool L69 7WZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, M.L. [LIBPhys – UNL, Faculty of Science and Technology, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Guerra, M.F. [ArchAm, UMR 8096 CNRS - Université Paris Sorbonne, MAE, 21 allée de l' Université, 92023 Nanterre (France)

    2015-06-01

    Recent results from a three-year multi-disciplinary project on Ancient Egyptian gold jewellery revealed that items of jewellery from the Middle Kingdom to the New Kingdom were manufactured using a variety of alluvial gold alloys. These alloys cover a wide range of colours and the majority contain Platinum Group Elements inclusions. However, in all the gold foils analysed, these inclusions were found to be absent. In this work a selection of gilded wood and leather items and gold foil fragments, all from the excavations by John Garstang at Abydos (primarily from Middle Kingdom graves), were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-Ray Fluorescence (μXRF), Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (µPIXE) and Double Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (D{sup 2}XRF). The work allowed us to characterise the composition of the base-alloys and also to reveal the presence of Pt at trace levels, confirming the use of alluvial gold deposits. Corrosion products were also investigated in the foils where surface tarnish was visually observed. Results showed that the differences in the colour of corrosion observed for the foils are related not only to the thickness of the corrosion layer but also to a multi-layer structure containing the various corrosion products. - Highlights: • Multi-analytical protocol based on techniques with different MDLs and spatial resolution • Application of D{sup 2}XRF developed at synchrotron BESSY II for determination of Pt in Au with a MDL of 1 ppm • Egyptian gold alloys have nanoporous corrosion layers where distinct corrosion phases could be identified. • Egyptian gold foils are made with different gold base alloys, but all containing alluvial gold.

  8. A multi-analytical approach to gold in Ancient Egypt: Studies on provenance and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results from a three-year multi-disciplinary project on Ancient Egyptian gold jewellery revealed that items of jewellery from the Middle Kingdom to the New Kingdom were manufactured using a variety of alluvial gold alloys. These alloys cover a wide range of colours and the majority contain Platinum Group Elements inclusions. However, in all the gold foils analysed, these inclusions were found to be absent. In this work a selection of gilded wood and leather items and gold foil fragments, all from the excavations by John Garstang at Abydos (primarily from Middle Kingdom graves), were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-Ray Fluorescence (μXRF), Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (µPIXE) and Double Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (D2XRF). The work allowed us to characterise the composition of the base-alloys and also to reveal the presence of Pt at trace levels, confirming the use of alluvial gold deposits. Corrosion products were also investigated in the foils where surface tarnish was visually observed. Results showed that the differences in the colour of corrosion observed for the foils are related not only to the thickness of the corrosion layer but also to a multi-layer structure containing the various corrosion products. - Highlights: • Multi-analytical protocol based on techniques with different MDLs and spatial resolution • Application of D2XRF developed at synchrotron BESSY II for determination of Pt in Au with a MDL of 1 ppm • Egyptian gold alloys have nanoporous corrosion layers where distinct corrosion phases could be identified. • Egyptian gold foils are made with different gold base alloys, but all containing alluvial gold

  9. Ancient Astronomical Monuments of Athens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossiou, E.; Manimanis, V. N.

    2010-07-01

    In this work, four ancient monuments of astronomical significance found in Athens and still kept in the same city in good condition are presented. The first one is the conical sundial on the southern slope of the Acropolis. The second one is the Tower of the Winds and its vertical sundials in the Roman Forum of Athens, a small octagonal marble tower with sundials on all 8 of its sides, plus a water-clock inside the tower. The third monument-instrument is the ancient clepsydra of Athens, one of the findings from the Ancient Agora of Athens, a unique water-clock dated from 400 B.C. Finally, the fourth one is the carved ancient Athenian calendar over the main entrance of the small Byzantine temple of the 8th Century, St. Eleftherios, located to the south of the temple of the Annunciation of Virgin Mary, the modern Cathedral of the city of Athens.

  10. Layout of Ancient Maya Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylesworth, Grant R.

    Although there is little doubt that the ancient Maya of Mesoamerica laid their cities out based, in part, on astronomical considerations, the proliferation of "cosmograms" in contemporary scholarly discourse has complicated matters for the acceptance of rigorous archaeoastronomical research.

  11. Letter to the editor: Genetics and the archaeology of ancient Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Aaron J; King, Roy J

    2013-12-01

    This letter is a call for DNA testing on ancient skeletal materials from the southern Levant to begin a database of genetic information of the inhabitants of this crossroads region. In this region, during the Iron I period traditionally dated to circa 1200-1000 BCE, archaeologists and biblical historians view the earliest presence of a group that called itself Israel. They lived in villages in the varied hill countries of the region, contemporary with urban settlements in the coastal plains, inland valleys, and central hill country attributed to varied indigenous groups collectively called Canaanite. The remnants of Egyptian imperial presence in the region lasted until around 1150 BCE, postdating the arrival of an immigrant group from the Aegean called the Philistines circa 1175 BCE. The period that follows in the southern Levant is marked by the development of territorial states throughout the region, circa 1000-800 BCE. These patrimonial kingdoms, including the United Kingdom of Israel and the divided kingdoms of northern Israel and Judah, coalesced varied peoples under central leadership and newly founded administrative and religious bureaucracies. Ancient DNA testing will give us a further refined understanding of the individuals who peopled the region of the southern Levant throughout its varied archaeological and historic periods and provide scientific data that will support, refute, or nuance our sociohistoric reconstruction of ancient group identities. These social identities may or may not map onto genetic data, but without sampling of ancient DNA we may never know. A database of ancient DNA will also allow for comparisons with modern DNA samples collected throughout the greater region and the Mediterranean littoral, giving a more robust understanding of the long historical trajectories of regional human genetics and the genetics of varied ancestral groups of today's Jewish populations and other cultural groups in the modern Middle East and Mediterranean

  12. Orientatio ad Sidera (OAS): a comprehensive project for cultural astronomy research in ancient Mediterranean cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio; César González-García, A.; Rodríguez-Antón, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade (starting in 2005), the OAS Project has been run, with the support of the Spanish research agencies. Within its framework, research on cultural astronomy has been developed for a series of ancient cultures from the Atlantic Islands to the Arabian Peninsula with the Meditterranean Sea as the pricipal axis of the project. A catalogue of studies has been performed in a set of cultures such as the Megalithic Phenomenon, ancient Egypt, Middle East Bronze and Iron Age civilizations and the Roman World, among many others. In this essay a general scope of the project and a series of most interesting outcomes will be presented. The evolutionary ties of the megalithic monuments of the Iberian Peninsula and elsewhere, the pattern of orientation of Egyptian temples and skyscaping practices within the Hittite, Commagenian or Nabataean cultures, among others, will be shown; finishing in a comprehensive, statistical and comparative study of the orientation patterns of thousands of ancient monuments of the Mediterranean region. Finally, a sketch of our most recent, still ongoing, research on the astronomical and non-astronomical practices used in the planning of cities in the Roman World will be a compelling and promising closing remark of our analysis.

  13. Reconstructing ancient genomes and epigenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-01-01

    DNA studies have now progressed to whole-genome sequencing for an increasing number of ancient individuals and extinct species, as well as to epigenomic characterization. Such advances have enabled the sequencing of specimens of up to 1 million years old, which, owing to their extensive DNA damage and...... contamination, were previously not amenable to genetic analyses. In this Review, we discuss these varied technical challenges and solutions for sequencing ancient genomes and epigenomes....

  14. Herbal treatment of the urinary system diseases based on 16(th) and 17(th) century herbals in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Janusz; Rutkowski, Boleslaw

    2016-02-01

    The medicinal use of herbs is a principal achievement of human ingenuity. The most renowned doctors of antiquity: Hippocrates, Dioscorides, Theophrastus, Pliny the Elder and Galen mentioned herbs in their works. The first printed herbal was published in Mainz in 1485. Outstanding scientists e.g. Otto Brunfels, Hieronymus Bock, Leonard Fuchs and Andreo Mattiola published herbals in the 16th century. Polish doctors also contributed to the development of herbal treatment. The first work: Of Herbs and their Potency by Stefan Falimirz, published in 1534, triggered other publications in the 16th century, the age of herbals. In 1542, Hieronymus Spiczynski published a herbal: Of Local and Overseas Herbs and their Potency. Then, in 1568, Marcin Siennik published his: Herbal, which is the Description of Local and Overseas Herbs, their Potency and Application. In 1595, Marcin of Urzedow published: The Polish Herbal, the Books of Herbs. Completed in mid-16th century, it was only published 22 years after his death. The last work discussed is Herbal Known in Latin as published in 1613 by Simon Syrenius a graduate of Ingolstadt and Padua universities and lecturer at the Academy of Krakow. The work was Europes most complete elaboration on herbal treatment. The herbs described in the herbals worked as diuretics, demulcents, analgesics, relaxants and preventives of kidney stones. Published in Polish, they are still to be found in Poland. All the works presented herein are held by the Library of the Seminary of Wloclawek, and the Ossolinski National Institute in Wroclaw. PMID:26913886

  15. Expression of therapeutic misconception amongst Egyptians: a qualitative pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Henry J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that research participants fail to appreciate the difference between research and medical care, labeling such phenomenon as a "therapeutic misconception" (TM. Since research activity involving human participants is increasing in the Middle East, qualitative research investigating aspects of TM is warranted. Our objective was to assess for the existence of therapeutic misconception amongst Egyptians. Methods Study Tool: We developed a semi-structured interview guide to elicit the knowledge, attitudes, and perspectives of Egyptians regarding medical research. Setting: We recruited individuals from the outpatient settings (public and private at Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt. Analysis: Interviews were taped, transcribed, and translated. We analyzed the content of the transcribed text to identify the presence of a TM, defined in one of two ways: TM1 = inaccurate beliefs about how individualized care can be compromised by the procedures in the research and TM2 = inaccurate appraisal of benefit obtained from the research study. Results Our findings showed that a majority of participants (11/15 expressed inaccurate beliefs regarding the degree with which individualized care will be maintained in the research setting (TM1 and a smaller number of participants (5/15 manifested an unreasonable belief in the likelihood of benefits to be obtained from a research study (TM2. A total of 12 of the 15 participants were judged to have expressed a TM on either one of these bases. Conclusion The presence of TM is not uncommon amongst Egyptian individuals. We recommend further qualitative studies investigating aspects of TM involving a larger sample size distinguished by different types of illnesses and socio-economic variables, as well as those who have and have not participated in clinical research.

  16. Investigation of liquid wax components of Egyptian jojoba seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mallah, Mohammed Hassan; El-Shami, Safinaz Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Egyptian jojoba seeds newly cultivated in Ismailia desert in Egypt promoted us to determine its lipid components. Fatty alcohols, fatty acids, wax esters and sterols patterns were determined by capillary GLC whereas, tocopherols profile, isopropenoid alcohols and sterylglycosides were determined by HPLC. The Egyptian seeds are rich in wax esters (55 %) with fatty alcohols C20:1 and C22:1 as major components and amounted to 43.0 % and 45.6 % respectively followed by C24:1 and C18:1(9.6 % and 1.3 % respectively). The fatty acids profile showed that C20:1 is the major constituent (60 %) followed by C18:1 and C22:1 (14.5 and 11.8 % respectively) whereas C24:1 was present at low concentration amounted to 1.6 %. In addition, the Egyptian jojoba wax contained C18:2 fatty acid at a level of 8.7 %. Wax esters composition showed that the local wax had C42 and C40 esters as major components amounted to 51.1 and 30.1 % respectively. Also, it had C44 and C38 at reasonable amounts (10.0 and 6.3 % respectively). Whereas C36 and C46 were present at lower concentrations amounted to 1.4 and 1.1 respectively. The sterols analysis showed the presence of campe-, stigma-, beta-sito-, and isofuco- sterol amounting to 18.4 %, 6.9 %, 68.7 %, and 6.0 % respectively. The tocopherols pattern revealed that the local seed wax contained gamma-tocopherol as major constituent (79.2 %) followed by alpha-tocopherol (20.3 %). beta-tocopherol as well as delta-tocopherol were found as minor constituents. The isopropenoid alcohols and the sterylglycosides (free and acylated) were not detected. The wax is proposed to be used in oleo chemistry and cosmetics.

  17. HERBAL REMEDIES FOR GASTROPROTECTIVE ACTION: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Patel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have great importance in maintaining the health of every person. Demands of Herbal medicines are increasing in both developed and developing countries due to growing recognition of natural plants being lesser no. of side effect, easily available in surrounding place with low coast. Different parts of the plant have different active substances and these active substances may vary in their extent of activity and concentration. Most of active principles are present in leaves, flower, fruit, bark, root & seeds of the plant. Gastric diseases are a major and worldwide very common problem in every age of person. Its 90% arises commonly due to mostly used of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory category of drug and about 8 to 10% by used of most spicy and fast food(Junk Food. In this review we have described some medicinal plants with respect to their Gastroprotective action.

  18. Herbal Extract as Hepatoprotective-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Jain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal practioners have prescribed ayurved and drug from herbal origin as a system of medicine in India over centuries. Popularity of herbal is increasing globally. More efforts need to be directed towards methodological scientific evaluation for their safety and efficacy by subjecting to vigrous preclinical studies followed by clinical trials to unravel the mysteries hidden in plants. Hepatic disease stand as one of the foremost health troubles worldwide with liver cirhosis and drug induced liver injury accounting 9th leading cause of death in western and developing countries.In this review article attempt has been made to compile reported hepatoprotective plants from India and aboard and may be useful to health professional’s scientists’ scholar working in the field of pharmacology, therapeutics and pharmacognosy to develop evidence based alternative medicine to cure different kinds of liver disease in man and animals.

  19. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer "cure".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-08-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to "cure" cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, "wonder cures" are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a "miracle" where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a "cure" for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented. PMID:27652207

  20. HERBAL APPROACHES FOR DIARRHOEA: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Komal; Kumar Sunil; Rana A C

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhoea is the one of the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in many developing countries effecting mainly the infants and children’s. There are many synthetic drug treatments for diarrhoea like loperamide, bismuth subsalicylate and racecadotril. But these drugs have more side effects like nausea, abdominal discomfort, headache etc. Many herbal plants available which have anti-diarrhoeal activity with lesser side-effects than the conventional drugs. The review focuses on the vario...

  1. Tianjin Press of Chinese Herbal Medicines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Chinese Traditional and Herbal Drugs The journal started publication monthly since January 1970, is an academic and technical journal sponsored by Chinese Pharmaceutical Association and Tianjin Institute of Pharmaceutical Research. The journal which has a long history over 40 years offers the columns of research papers, brief reports, reviews, dissertation, and special treatises to report the recent achievements of the basic study, production, quality

  2. THROMBOLYTIC & CYTOTOXIC EFFECT OF DIFFERENT HERBAL EXTRACTS

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan Newaz Khan et al.

    2011-01-01

    An in-vitro thrombolytic model was used to check the clot lysis effect of four herbal extracts viz., Honey, Nigella sativa, Capsicum frutescens, Brassica oleracea, combination of Honey & Nigella sativa and Honey & Capsicum frutescens along with Streptokinase as a positive control and water as a negative control. And also brine shrimp lethality bio-assay was done using brine shrimp Nauplii and 5% of DMSO as a solvent for the ethanol extracts of Nigella sativa & Capsicum frutescens and Honey. U...

  3. Prevention of cadmium bioaccumulation by herbal adaptogens

    OpenAIRE

    K Bharavi; A. Gopala Reddy; G S Rao; Ravi Kumar, P.; D Srinivas Kumar; P Prabhu Prasadini

    2011-01-01

    Objectives : To evaluate the effect of various herbal adaptogens such as shade-dried powders of Withania somnifera, Ocimum sanctum, Asperagus recemosus, Andrographis paniculata, Asphaltum panjabinum (Shilajith), Gymnema sylvestre, Spirulina platensis, and Panex ginseng on cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative stress and its accumulation in broiler chicken. Materials and Methods : A total of 80 male broiler chicks of day old age were randomly assigned to 10 equal groups. Group 1 birds were fed wi...

  4. The quest for a herbal contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, R R

    1993-01-01

    An oral herbal contraceptive would allow couples control their fertility without consulting a health worker, which in turn would likely markedly increase the number of couples practicing family planning. Other advantages of such a contraceptive would include the familiarity rural people have with herbal medicines, the fewer side effects associated with herbal preparations, their ready availability from local sources, and protection of privacy. There are many references to plants in India with antifertility properties. Since 1966, the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has been conducting research to identify a herbal contraceptive, as have other organizations. Plants that have exhibited antifertility activity in clinical trials include Hibiscus rosasinensis (benzene extract of the flower petals suppresses implantation); Rudrapushpaka (extract of the flower petals prevents pregnancy); Embelia ribes (pregnancy prevention); Davcus carota, Butea monosperma, and Sapindus trifoliatis (seeds have an anti-implantation effect); and Mentha arvensis (leaves have anti-implantation effect). The Central Drug Research Institute in Lucknow, India, in collaboration with the US National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, and the ICMR confirm anti-implantation activity in Ferula jaeschkeana, Bupleurum marginatum, Lepidium capitatum, Caesalpinia sepiaria, Lonicera japonica, Juniperus communis, Lotus corniculatus, Lamium allum, and Acacia farnesiana. In China, scientists have evaluated the cotton-seed extract gossypol as a male contraceptive. They are now studying the possible antifertility effect on men of the plant Tripterygium wilfordii. From all the aforementioned plants as well as others under investigation, three possible types of contraceptives could be developed: an anti-ovulatory contraceptive; a postcoital contraceptive; and a male contraceptive. Some obstacles to their development include difficulties in obtaining adequate quantities of the herbs, a

  5. HERBAL PLANTS AS AN ANT REPELLENT

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari PS*, Jangam SS Chaudhari SV, Baheti KG, Patil SU and Jadhav GB

    2013-01-01

    The present study focused on developing effective ant repellent from herbal plant extracts. The extracts of mentioned plants were prepared by grinding with water. The aqueous extracts were treated individually as well as in different combination against 15 ants at dose levels of 1%, 5%, 10%. Observations were made at 5 min of time intervals for total period of 15 min. Highest % repellency was recorded in cucumber-mint (100%) , lemon-garlic (100%), garlic-mint (100%) & all plant mixture (1...

  6. Herbal versus synthetic drugs; beliefs and facts

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi Ali; Majlesi Maedeh; Rafieian-Kopaei Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Herbal therapy is a holistic therapy, integrating emotional, mental and spiritual levels. Life style, emotional, mental and spiritual considerations are part of any naturopathic approach. The use of herbs does not generally involve "drug" actions or adverse effects. Although medicinal plants are widely used and assumed to be safe, however, they can potentially be toxic. Where poisoning from medicinal plants has been reported, it usually has been due to misidentification of the plants in the f...

  7. Gamma dose measurements indoor and outdoor of some egyptian buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some physical parameters affecting the basic dosimetric properties of carbonized aluminum oxide were studied such as Response, Dose recovery, reproducibility, linearity and lower limit of detection. Indoor and Outdoor gamma radiation dose rates were measured inside and outside some Egyptian buildings using Al2 O3-C environmental thermo luminescence dosimeters for 70 days. For these purpose twenty dosimeters of TLD chips were positioned indoor and ten dosimeters were positioned outdoor inside a thin black polythene 30 cm long pipe at one meter above ground as a reference height

  8. Tolerance, quality and storability of gamma-irradiated Egyptian rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma irradiation on some organoleptic and physico-chemical properties and the storability of Egyptian rice was investigated. Radiation up to 50krad was chosen as an adequate dose causing non-significant changes in eating and cooking qualities. The effect of irradiation on degradation of starch and protein molecules is demonstrated on the basis of studies on the viscosity and solubility of rice paste. Irradiation at relatively low dose levels up to 50krad did not affect the chemical and nutritional qualities of rice regarding amino acids and B vitamins. It was also found that irradiation maintains better storability of rice under ambient temperature. (author)

  9. Identification of herbal medicinal materials using DNA barcodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming LI; Hui CAO; Paul Pui-Hay BUT; pang-Chui SHAW

    2011-01-01

    Herbal medicinal materials have been used worldwide for centuries to maintain health and to treat disease. However, adulteration of herbal medicines remains a major concern of users and industry for reasons of safety and efficacy. Identification of herbal medicinal materials by DNA technology has been widely applied,started from the mid-1990s. In recent years, DNA barcoding of global plant species using four standard barcodes (rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA and ITS) has been a major focus in the fields of biodiversity and conservation. These DNA barcodes can also be used as reliable tools to facilitate the identification of herbal medicinal materials for the safe use of herbs, quality control, and forensic investigation. Many studies have applied these DNA barcodes for the identification of herbal medicinal species and their adulterants. The present article reviews efforts in the identification of herbal medicinal materials using the standard DNA barcodes and other DNA sequence-based markers.

  10. [Herbal medicines alternative to synthetical medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A M; Schilcher, H; Loew, D

    2013-12-16

    Herbal pharmaceuticals in medical practice are similarly used as chemically well defined drugs. Like other synthetical drugs, they are subject to pharmaceutical legislature (AMG) and EU directives. It is to differentiate between phytopharmaceuticals with effectiveness of proven indications and traditional registered herbal medicine. Through the Health Reform Act January 2004 and the policy of the Common Federal Committee (G-BA)on the contractual medical care from March 2009--with four exceptions--Non-prescription Phytopharmaka of the legal Health insurance is no longer (SHI) refundable and must be paid by the patients. The result is that more and more well-established preparations disappear from the market. This article gives an overview of practical relevant indications for herbal medicines, which according to its licensing status, the scientific assessment by the Cochrane Collaboration and the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) and evidence-based Medicine (EBM)/ meta-analyzes as an alternative to synthetics can be used. PMID:24934061

  11. Safety concerns of herbal products and traditional Chinese herbal medicines: dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and aristolochic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegelmeier, Bryan L; Brown, Ammon W; Welch, Kevin D

    2015-12-01

    In many countries, including the United States, herbal supplements, tisanes and vegetable products, including traditional Chinese medicines, are largely unregulated and their content is not registered, monitored or verified. Consequently, potent plant toxins including dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and other potential carcinogens can contaminate these products. As herbal and food supplement producers are left to their own means to determine the safety and purity of their products prior to marketing, disturbingly often good marketing practices currently in place are ignored and content is largely undocumented. Historical examples of poisoning and health issues relating to plant material containing dehydopyrrolizidine alkaloids and aristolochic acids were used as examples to demonstrate the risk and potential toxicity of herbal products, food supplements, or traditional medicines. More work is needed to educate consumers of the potential risk and require the industry to be more responsible to verify the content and insure the safety of their products. PMID:26152912

  12. Latest Progress in Tianjin Press of Chinese Herbal Medicines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Four journals including Chinese Traditional and Herbal Drugs (CTHD), Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHM), Drugs & Clinic (DC), and Drug Evaluation Research (DER) are edited and published by Tianjin Press of Chinese Herbal Medicines. CTHD was first published in 1970 and has been playing a great role for Chinese materia medica (CMM), especially in its present modernization. CTHD has successively won several honors in recent years, such as the 2nd State

  13. Therapeutic Applications of Herbal Medicines for Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ning-Sun Yang; Wen-Chi Wei; Feng-Yin Jian; Shu-Yi Yin

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal herbs and their derivative phytocompounds are being increasingly recognized as useful complementary treatments for cancer. A large volume of clinical studies have reported the beneficial effects of herbal medicines on the survival, immune modulation, and quality of life (QOL) of cancer patients, when these herbal medicines are used in combination with conventional therapeutics. Here, we briefly review some examples of clinical studies that investigated the use of herbal medicines fo...

  14. The Effect of Herbal Drugs on Neonatal Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    F Khoshnevisan; M Safari; SH Nabavizadeh

    2005-01-01

    Background: Using herbal drugs is the common way for treatment of diseases in traditional and alternative medicine. These drugs have important role and strong cultural background among people in treatment of hyper-billirubinemia. It is necessary to evaluate the effect of herbal drugs by scientific methods. The goal of this study is to investigate the in vitro effect of common herbal drugs used traditionally in management of neonatal hyperbillirubinemia. Methods: in this study 0.5 cc of 5 comm...

  15. Marketing strategies of herbal products sold in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Polívková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    General objective of this thesis is to analyse the Czech market with herbal products from the point of view of the customers, and mainly to identify adult customers’ habits in usage of herbal products and its linkage to their demographic and socio economic data. The habits are related to the frequency of usage of herbal products, its relation to illnesses and medicaments used for treating, source of information and place of purchase of those products. Each of those indicators are also examine...

  16. Regulation of herbal medicines in Brazil: advances and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Cecília Bezerra Carvalho; João Paulo Silvério Perfeito; Leandro Viana Costa e Silva; Lívia Santos Ramalho; Robelma France de Oliveira Marques; Dâmaris Silveira

    2011-01-01

    The National Policy of Integrative and Complementary Practices (PNPIC) in the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS), and The National Policy of Medicinal Plants and Herbal Medicines (PNPMF) were launched in 2006. Based on these, the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) re-edited rules related to herbal medicines such as the Guideline to herbal medicine registration (RDC 14/10), the Good Manufacture Practices Guideline (RDC 17/10) and the List of references to assess the safety and ef...

  17. Storms in Ancient Egypt: the Examples of Historical Natural Disasters Impacts on the Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Anastasia

    2013-04-01

    Though rain storms are infrequent in Egypt, which is normally a rainless country, some Ancient Egyptian texts give accounts of violent storms and rains. Actually, even small amounts of rain in that area could cause huge impact, as none of the water was absorbed by soil, and, running off, it could create dangerous torrents. The Tempest stele, circa 1550 BC, recounts a highly destructive storm happened during the reign of Ahmose I, the king of Egypt's 18 dynasty. The catastrophy is described in details, including the specific noise, overall darkness, torrent so that no torch could be lit. Many houses were washed into the river, temples, tombs and pyramids damaged and collapsed. The stele commemorates the restoration works made by the king who was able to cope with this great disaster and "re-establish the Two Lands". Some egyptologists believe that this event is related to the Minoan eruption of Thera, but this is unlikely given the description in the stele.

  18. A Review of Herbal Medicine in Iranian Traditional Manuscripts for Treatment of Participatory Gastric Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Mehrnaz; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Hamedi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Participatory gastric headache is a type of headache described in Iranian traditional medicine. It is defined as a headache not originated from the head and neck disorders; rather the pain in the head is caused by gastric dysfunction and its disorders. Treatment of this type of headache is completely reliant on the treatment of the gastric complaint. Reviewing Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) literature, a broad spectrum of herbal medicines that could be useful in the treatment of this type of headache is described. Accordingly, this review was performed to gather and discuss the therapeutic management of this disorder in ITM and evaluating related characteristics of each medicinal herb. Methods: In this study, medicinal plants prescribed for gastric headache from different ancient Iranian literature is documented. The botanical name, family name, part used, temperaments, rout of administration and dosage forms are provided in this article. Results: About 40 plants, mainly used orally, were prescribed for the treatment of participatory gastric headache. Most of them have the astringent effect, which is related to their dryness temperament. Therefore, they could strengthen the stomach and prevent ascending vapors into the brain that in turn helps to get relief from headache. In addition, they possess reinforcement effect on the brain. Conclusion: In general, herbal medicines with tonic characteristics could be effective in participatory gastric headache.

  19. Herbal medicines: old and new concepts, truths and misunderstandings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Carmona

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Men have been using herbal medicines for thousands of years. The advantages of this type of therapeutics include good availability, local cultural aspects, individual preferences, the increasing demand for natural and organic products, and the already validated synergistic effects of herbal medicines. However, ethically, the scope and limits of these drugs need to be established not only by ethnopharmacological evidences but also by scientific investigations, which confirm the therapeutic effects. With this study, we propose to discuss the possible advantages of using herbal medicines instead of purified compounds, the truth and myths about herbal medicines, drug discovery, and the implications for medical education and health care.

  20. Public Knowledge about Herbal Beverages in Penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munaver Nazir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF STUDY:To explore public knowledge and perceptions of the efficacy, safety and reason to consume herbal beveragesincluding ginseng tea, gingko biloba tea and tongka ali tea.METHOD:This study was conducted in the state of Penang in June 2007. Participants were recruited at random;respondents were interviewed using a 19 item questionnaire. Non- parametric statistics was applied to analysethe data.RESULTS:Four hundred participants were recruited. Most of the respondents 228(57.0% were habitual consumers ofherbal beverages. 249(62.25% respondents believed that herbal beverages improved their health status.193(48.25% believed that herbal beverages boost the energy level of user and 120(30.0% used them toprevent diseases. 300(75% respondents agreed with the statement that herbal beverages are safe to use andthat they have less side effect than conventional medicines available on the market. Female respondents weremore likely to report using herbal beverages for slimming 78(19.5% and for cosmetic purposes 74(18.5%.However, the use of herbal beverages to boost energy levels was more frequent among male respondents.Respondents aged 18 – 25 years were significantly more likely to report the use of herbal beverages to preventcoughs and flu.CONCLUSION:This potentially ill advised and dangerous consumption of herbal beverages may delay appropriate help seekingfor various medical illnesses. In addition lack of knowledge about the side effects of herbal beverages may putusers at risk of side effects.

  1. THE STUDY FOR THE PHARMACY RANGE OF HERBAL MEDICINAL PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Rusakova; I. V. Ralchenko; I. Ya. Gerbert; S. I. Verdiyeva

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary state of the plant drugs market requires a close attention of researches and herbal drugs producers. Constant change of correlation between the use of synthetic drugs and natural origin drugs, and the constant change of herbal drugs range determines the necessity of updating of our knowledge about what herbal medicinal products and of what producers are more required. Regular control of the herbal medicinal products market is possible to implement with different methods. They...

  2. Taxonomic status and origin of the Egyptian weasel (Mustela subpalmata) inferred from mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Mónica; Bos, Arthur R; Hoath, Richard; Schembri, Patrick J; Lymberakis, Petros; Cento, Michele; Ghawar, Wissem; Ozkurt, Sakir O; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Merilä, Juha; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Egyptian weasel (Mustela subpalmata) is a small mustelid with a distribution restricted to the lower Nile Valley and the Nile Delta. Traditionally considered a subspecies of the least weasel (M. nivalis), it is currently recognized as a separate species based on morphology. Here we present the first genetic assessment of the taxonomic status of the Egyptian weasel by comparing mitochondrial DNA (Cytochrome b gene and control region) sequences to those of least weasels from the western Palearctic, with a focus on the Mediterranean region. Our results provide no evidence to support the view that the Egyptian weasel is genetically distinct from the least weasel, as we found that, for both Cytochrome b and control region, haplotypes were shared between the two taxa. Specifically, the Cytochrome b and control region haplotypes detected in the Egyptian weasel were also present in M. nivalis from Turkey and Malta, two populations genetically analysed here for the first time. Our results suggest that the Egyptian weasel is distinct from the least weasel populations currently living in the Maghreb, which were inferred to be the result of an earlier colonization of North Africa, but the genetic data alone do not allow us to determine whether the Egyptian weasel is native or introduced. Nevertheless, the observed genetic patterns, together with the weasel fossil record in Israel and the unique commensal lifestyle of the Egyptian weasel, are consistent with the hypothesis that the Egyptian population is a relict of past range expansion from the Levant into Egypt. We suggest that the large size and characteristic sexual dimorphism of the Egyptian weasel are likely to represent ecotypic variation, but genomic studies are required to clarify the extent of its functional genetic divergence.

  3. Hydrolysis of Glycosidic Flavonoids during the Preparation of Danggui Buxue Tang: An Outcome of Moderate Boiling of Chinese Herbal Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Li Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical change during boiling of herbal mixture is a puzzle. By using Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT, a herbal decoction that contains Astragali Radix (AR and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (ASR, we developed a model in analyzing the hydrolysis of flavonoid glycosides during the boiling of herbal mixture in water. A proper preparation of DBT is of great benefit to the complete extraction of bioactive ingredients. Boiling of DBT in water increased the solubility of AR-derived astragaloside IV, calycosin, formononetin, calycosin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, and ononin in a time- and temperature-dependent manner: the amounts of these chemicals reached a peak at 2 h. The glycosidic resides of AR, calycosin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, and ononin could be hydrolyzed during the moderate boiling process to form calycosin and formononetin, respectively. The hydrolysis efficiency was strongly affected by pH, temperature, and amount of herbs. Interestingly, the preheated herbs were not able to show this hydrolytic activity. The current results supported the rationality of ancient preparation of DBT in boiling water by moderate heat.

  4. Assessing the Impact of Social Media on the 25 January 2011 Egyptian Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gawhry, Lilas N.

    2012-01-01

    In the light of the dramatic events of the 25 January 2011 Egyptian Revolution, many media sources gave too much credit to social media and often labeled it as the Facebook and Twitter revolution while dismissing the role of Egypts most important asset, the Egyptian citizens. This thesis aimed to explore the role and impact of the new social media on sustained social mobilization and the outcome of the 25 January 2011 Egyptian Revolution that led to the ousting of former President Hosni Mubar...

  5. Detection and molecular characterization of Egyptian isolates of grapevine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattouh, F; Ratti, C; El-Ahwany, A M D; Aleem, E Abdel; Babini, A R; Autonell, C Rubies

    2014-01-01

    Selected commercial and/or local vineyards and nurseries in three different governorates of Egypt (Alexandria, El-Beheira and El-Menofia) were surveyed for symptoms indicative of infection by grapevine viruses. Leaf samples from red-fruited and white-fruited Vitis vinefera were tested for grapevine leafroll associated viruses (GLRaV-1, GLRaV-2, and GLRaV-3), grapevine viruses A and B (GVA, GVB), grapevine rupestris stem pitting virus (GRSPaV), grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), and grapevine fleck virus (GFKV) from early April to late October 2010. Incidence of these viruses was assessed by RT-PCR in 60 different samples. Selected amplicons were sequenced. While GVA was the most wide spread (30%), GLRaV-1, GVB, GFLV, and GFKV were not detected during the survey. However, GVA, GLRaV-2, GLRaV-3, and GRSPaV were detected in the form of single infection or in mixed infections of 2 to 4 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on all Egyptian isolates of GLRaV-2 (4), GLRaV-3 (7), GVA (3), and GRSPaV (6). GRSPaV was detected for the first time in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis provided insights into the evolutionary relationship between the reported Egyptian isolates and other previously reported isolates. PMID:24957718

  6. Atypical pathogens in community acquired pneumonia of Egyptian children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deraz TE; El Sahriggy SA; Shaheen MA; Motawea AA; Gomaa HE; Fawzy SH; Mohamed AA

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Diagnosis of atypical pathogens as an aetiology for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)in chil-dren is a challenge world wide.The aim of this study was to detect the frequency of atypical pathogens as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)in Egyptian children.Methods:From 50 children (with age ranged from 2 months to 1 2 years)hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia;respiratory sputum samples were collected by induction or spontaneously.All samples were subjected to conventional cultures and Polymer-ase Chain Reaction(PCR)technique DNA extraction for identification of Mycoplasma,Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila.Results:A definite pathogen was identified in 78% of the studied children;30%typical bacteria,8% candida albicans and atypical bacteria in 40% of the pneumonic children.Chlamydia pneumoniae was isolated from 26% of the children while Mycoplasma pneumoniae was isolated from 1 4%, whereas Legionella pneumophilla was not isolated at all.Conclusion:Atypical pathogens are evident as a po-tential aetiology for community-acquired pneumonia in (1 3.3%)of young and (80%)of older Egyptian chil-dren.

  7. Wall paintings facies and their possible genetic correlates in the ancient Pompeii: A bio-anthropologic message from the past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Marco; Ruini, Cristel

    2016-09-10

    The figurative arts and precisely the ancient Pompeian wall paintings portraits can provide an additional source of information in supplementing bio-anthropological studies. There are several genetic diseases with a wide spectrum of congenital bone stigmata in association to distinctive facial features. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also named nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by unusual skeletal changes, such as macrocephaly, facial asymmetry, hypertelorism, frontal and parietal bossing caused by germline mutations of the gene PTCH1. The Gorlin syndrome, clinically defined in 1963, existed during Dynastic Egyptian times, as revealed by a spectrum of skeletal findings compatible with the syndrome in mummies dating back to three thousand years ago and, most likely, in the ancient population of Pompeii. In the present research, we discuss the potential relationship between Pompeian wall paintings portrait and the cranio-metric bone changes revealed among the Pompeian skull collections assuming that the ancient portraits can constitute an important tool that should be strictly integrated with osteologic and biomolecular data in order to argue a syndromic diagnosis in ancient population. PMID:27107679

  8. Overview Of Life And Civilization In Ancient Egypt نظرة عامة على الحياة والحضارة في مصر القديمة

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Zaky

    2008-01-01

    - Sources of ancient Egyptian history.- Introduction to ancient Egyptian civilization.- Part of Daily Life. يتناول المقال بالعرض مصادر دراسة تاريخ مصر القديم، ومدخل للحضارة المصرية القديمة، جزء من الحياة اليومية للمصري القديم.

  9. Overview Of Life And Civilization In Ancient Egypt نظرة عامة على الحياة والحضارة في مصر القديمة

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zaky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available - Sources of ancient Egyptian history.- Introduction to ancient Egyptian civilization.- Part of Daily Life. يتناول المقال بالعرض مصادر دراسة تاريخ مصر القديم، ومدخل للحضارة المصرية القديمة، جزء من الحياة اليومية للمصري القديم.

  10. Ancient DNA in Greece. Problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The promise associated with early 'ancient DNA' results has not been translated into routine techniques of value to archaeologists. The reasons for this are partly technical - ancient DNA analysis is an extremely difficult technique - and partly practical - ancient DNA analysis is often an 'after thought' to an archaeological project. In this paper ancient human DNA analysis is briefly reviewed paying particular attention to specimens originating from Greek archaeological contexts. Problems commonly encountered during ancient DNA research are summarised and recommendations for future strategies in the application of ancient DNA in archaeology are proposed. (author)

  11. Ancient Chinese Methods Are Remarkably Effective for the Preparation of Artemisinin-Rich Extracts of Qing Hao with Potent Antimalarial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Hsu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ancient Chinese herbal texts as far back as the 4th Century Zhou hou bei ji fang describe methods for the use of Qing Hao (Artemisia annua for the treatment of intermittent fevers. Today, the A. annua constituent artemisinin is an important antimalarial drug and the herb itself is being grown and used locally for malaria treatment although this practice is controversial. Here we show that the ancient Chinese methods that involved either soaking, (followed by wringing or pounding, (followed by squeezing the fresh herb are more effective in producing artemisinin-rich extracts than the usual current method of preparing herbal teas from the dried herb. The concentrations of artemisinin in the extracts was up to 20-fold higher than that in a herbal tea prepared from the dried herb, but the amount of total artemisinin extracted by the Chinese methods was much less than that removed in the herbal tea. While both extracts exhibited potent in vitro activities against Plasmodium falciparum, only the pounded juice contained sufficient artemisinin to suppress parasitaemia in P. berghei infected mice. The implications of these results are discussed in the context of malaria treatment using A. annua infusions.

  12. Herbal infusions used for induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciganda, Carmen; Laborde, Amalia

    2003-01-01

    Plants and herbs have been used to induce abortions but there is very little published information describing the commonly used ones. The purpose of this report is to describe the herbal products used to induce abortions, and to enhance awareness and understanding of their toxic effects. A descriptive retrospective survey was conducted on the calls received by the Montevideo Poison Centre between 1986 and 1999 concerning the ingestion of herbal infusions with abortive intent. A total of 86 cases involving 30 different plant species were identified. The species most frequently involved were ruda (Ruta chalepensis/graveolens), cola de quirquincho (Lycopodium saururus), parsley (Petroselinum hortense), and an over-the-counter herbal product named Carachipita. The components of Carachipita are pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium), yerba de la perdiz (Margiricarpus pinnatus), oregano (Origanum vulgare), and guaycuri (Statice brasiliensis). Abortion occurred in 23 cases after the ingestion of parsley, ruda, Carachipita, celery, Cedron, francisco alvarez, floripon, espina colorada. Out of the 23 cases, 15 involved the only the ingestion of plants, 4 cases used injected drugs (presumably hormones), and in 4 cases there was associated self-inflicted instrumental manipulation. Multiple organ system failure occurred in those patients who had ingested ruda (alone or in combination with parsley or fennel), Carachipita, arnica, or bardana. Deaths occurred in one case of Carachipita ingestion and in 4 cases of ruda ingestion (2 cases of ruda alone, 2 cases of ruda with parsley and fennel). Self-inflicted instrumental manipulations were found in 4 of the patients with multiple organ system failure and in one of those who died. The results of this report are not conclusive, but it appears that the ingestion of plants to induce abortion involves the risk of severe morbidity and mortality. PMID:12807304

  13. Herbal infusions used for induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciganda, Carmen; Laborde, Amalia

    2003-01-01

    Plants and herbs have been used to induce abortions but there is very little published information describing the commonly used ones. The purpose of this report is to describe the herbal products used to induce abortions, and to enhance awareness and understanding of their toxic effects. A descriptive retrospective survey was conducted on the calls received by the Montevideo Poison Centre between 1986 and 1999 concerning the ingestion of herbal infusions with abortive intent. A total of 86 cases involving 30 different plant species were identified. The species most frequently involved were ruda (Ruta chalepensis/graveolens), cola de quirquincho (Lycopodium saururus), parsley (Petroselinum hortense), and an over-the-counter herbal product named Carachipita. The components of Carachipita are pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium), yerba de la perdiz (Margiricarpus pinnatus), oregano (Origanum vulgare), and guaycuri (Statice brasiliensis). Abortion occurred in 23 cases after the ingestion of parsley, ruda, Carachipita, celery, Cedron, francisco alvarez, floripon, espina colorada. Out of the 23 cases, 15 involved the only the ingestion of plants, 4 cases used injected drugs (presumably hormones), and in 4 cases there was associated self-inflicted instrumental manipulation. Multiple organ system failure occurred in those patients who had ingested ruda (alone or in combination with parsley or fennel), Carachipita, arnica, or bardana. Deaths occurred in one case of Carachipita ingestion and in 4 cases of ruda ingestion (2 cases of ruda alone, 2 cases of ruda with parsley and fennel). Self-inflicted instrumental manipulations were found in 4 of the patients with multiple organ system failure and in one of those who died. The results of this report are not conclusive, but it appears that the ingestion of plants to induce abortion involves the risk of severe morbidity and mortality.

  14. Association of Interleukin 27 gene polymorphism and risk of Hepatitis B viral infection in Egyptian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser B.M. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data suggested that polymorphisms in the IL-27 gene may not contribute to HBV susceptibility. Further studies with large sample size should be conducted to validate these results in Egyptian population.

  15. Serum Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, and Adiponectin as Predictors of Atherosclerotic Risk among Obese Egyptian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas R. Abdel Hameed

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results revealed that ADMA, Adiponectin and lipid profile can be considered as predictive biomarkers in prediction and prevention of atherosclerotic risk in the future among overweight and obese Egyptian children.

  16. Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Herbal Products: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan TATAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, consumption of herbal products has become widespread both in Turkey and worldwide. However, the safety of these products is substantially controversial. We here present a case of acute kidney injury in a patient with excessive use of herbal products for cardio-protective purposes.

  17. Green Medicine: Traditional Mexican-American Herbal Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Eliseo

    Traditional Mexican American herbal potions and remedies and their history are explained in an introductory book for the general reader. The importance of curanderismo, or green medicine, in Mexican and Mexican American cultures is explored. A brief history traces the herbal aspects of curanderismo through Mayan and Aztec cultures, the Spanish…

  18. Herbal mixtures in the traditional medicine of Eastern Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández, J.; Volpato, G.

    2004-01-01

    Herbal mixtures in the traditional medicine of Eastern Cuba. Traditional herbal mixtures in Eastern Cuba are investigated through interviews with 130 knowledgeable people and traditional healers of the provinces of Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. One hundred seventy plant species and other products

  19. Herbal Product Use in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem BİÇEN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recently, despite the developments in diagnosis and treatment of diseases, herbal product use in patients with chronic diseases has become more frequent. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency of herbal medicine use in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, used products, source of information, whether they were giving information to their clinicians about this subject and cost of used products. MATERIAL and METHODS: The investigation has been performed with 100 CKD patients. A questionnaire form has been used in collecting data about the patients. RESULTS: The herbal use rate in our study was 37%. The most used herbal products were ready products and stinging nettle. There was no relation between herbal product use and age, gender, educatin level, marital status (p>0.05. 87% of the patients indicated that monthly cost of the product was lower than 50 Turkish Liras. 78.4% of the patients defined that they didn't give information to their clinicians about the herbal product they used. CONCLUSION: A significant part of the patients with CKD use herbal products and do not give information to the clinicians about this subject. The physicians following the patients with CKD should examine the use of herbal products.

  20. Diagnosis of public programs focused on herbal medicines in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Ely Eduardo Saranz; Bandeira, Mary Anne Medeiros; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes

    2011-07-01

    The present study is aimed to diagnose the current public programs focused on herbal medicines in Brazil by means of in loco visits to 10 programs selected by means of questionnaires sent to 124 municipalities that count on herbal medicine services. The main purpose of the implementation of program programs is related to the development of medicinal herbs. 70% of them are intended for the production of herbal medicines and 50% are aimed to ensure the access of the population to medicinal plants and or herbal medicines. The initiative of the implementation of these programs was related to the managers (60%). The difficulties in this implementation were due to the lack of funding (100%) of the programs. In 60% of the programs, the physicians did not adhere to herbal medicine services due to the lack of knowledge of the subject. Training courses were proposed (80%) to increase the adhesion of prescribers to the system. Some municipalities use information obtained from patients to assess the therapeutic efficiency of medicinal plants and herbal medicines. Of the programs underway, cultivation of medicinal plants was observed in 90% and 78% of them adopt quality control. In most programs, this control is not performed in accordance with the legal requirements. The programs focused on medicinal plants and herbal medicines implemented in Brazil face some chronic problems of infrastructure, management, operational capacity and self-sustainability, which can be directly related to the absence of a national policy on medicinal plants and herbal medicines.

  1. Safety of herbal preparations on the Dutch market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martena, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The use and availability of herbal preparations covered by food law is increasing in the Netherlands and in other European Member States. Correspondingly, safety concerns relating to herbal preparations are growing as well. The aim of the present PhD project was therefore to review the toxicity of s

  2. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin:An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kritika Kesarwani; Rajiv Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds.

  3. Chinese herbal medicine for severe acute respiratory syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Manheimer, Eric; Shi, Yi;

    2004-01-01

    To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically.......To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically....

  4. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin:An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kritika; Kesarwani; Rajiv; Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Recently,the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines.However,many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size,resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability.Nowadays with the advancement in the technology,novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems.For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes,microspheres,nanoparticles,transferosomes,ethosomes,lipid based systems etc.have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs.Many herbal compounds including quercetin,genistein,naringin,sinomenine,pipeline,glycvrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability.The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs(herbal),and to achieve better therapeutic response.An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action(wherever reported)and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability,exhibited particularly by natural compounds.

  5. [Entrapment of herbal extracts in biodegradable microcapsules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodina, T N; Rumsh, L D; Kunizhev, S M; Sukhorukov, G B; Vorozhtsov, G N; Fel'dman, B M; Rusanova, A V; Vasil'eva, T V; Strukova, S M; Markvicheva, E A

    2007-01-01

    The microcapsules with entrapped herbal water-soluble extracts Plantago major and Calendula officinalis L. (HE) were prepared by LbL-adsorption of carrageenan and modificated chitosan onto CaCO3 microparticles with their subsequent dissolving after the treatment of EDTA. Entrapment of HE was performed by adsorption and co-precipitation techniques. The co-precipitation provided better entrapment of HE compared to adsorption. In vitro release kinetics in an artificial gastric juice (AGJ) was studied. The HE release was shown to accelerate gastric ulcer treatment in a rat model.

  6. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Chavan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts.

  7. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Rousette Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Viruses of the Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Genera

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Megan E.B.; Schuh, Amy J.; Amman, Brian R.; Sealy, Tara K.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    The Egyptian rousette bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) is a natural reservoir for marburgviruses and a consistent source of virus spillover to humans. Cumulative evidence suggests various bat species may also transmit ebolaviruses. We investigated the susceptibility of Egyptian rousettes to each of the five known ebolaviruses (Sudan, Ebola, Bundibugyo, Taï Forest, and Reston), and compared findings with Marburg virus. In a pilot study, groups of four juvenile bats were inoculated with one of the e...

  8. An Investigation of Electronic Learning in Higher Education: The Egyptian Context

    OpenAIRE

    El-Gamal, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated e-Learning acceptance, adoption and implementation in the Egyptian higher education. The study also explored the attitudes and perceptions towards the acceptance and readiness for e-Learning from a variety of perspectives. The degree of meeting local needs and the main factors of improvement that e-Learning could provide to the Egyptian higher education sector are also investigated. The study achieved its aim through answering the following research questions: ...

  9. The future of the independent Egyptian music in the digital era

    OpenAIRE

    Maraghah, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is investigating the impact of the digital era with its technological advanced components and revolutionized information platforms on shaping the future of the independent Egyptian music. The author investigated this impact through conducting fifteen semi structured qualitative interviews between the 15th of December 2012 to 25th of January 2013 with the relevant Independent Egyptian Music stakeholders who gave the researcher a better insight of what is the optimal business model(...

  10. Isolation and characterization of 18 microsatellite loci in the Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus)

    OpenAIRE

    Agudo, Rosa; Roques, Séverine; Galarza, Juan A.; Rico, Ciro; Hiraldo, F.; Donázar, José A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed 18 new microsatellite loci for the endangered Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). Microsatellite loci were screened for variation in two different populations belonging to separate subspecies: the nominal N. p. percnopterus and the Canarian N. p. majorensis. Mean expected heterosygosities were respectively 0.51 and 0.46, while the mean number of alleles per locus was 4.7 and 3.9. These new markers allow further genetic studies for the endangered Canarian Egyptian Vulture. ©...

  11. Potential Health Risk of Herbal Distillates and Decoctions Consumption in Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F; Akhbarizadeh, R; Keshavarzi, B; Tavakoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Concentration of 26 elements in 16 different herbal distillates and 5 herbal decoctions, were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elemental content of five raw herbal materials used for making decoctions and seven distilled and boiled residues were also evaluated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The results indicated that herbal products display a wide range of elemental concentrations. Compared with world health regulations, the concentrations of the elements in herbal distillates and decoctions did not exceed the recommended limits. The analysis of herbal extracts did not show a significant transfer of toxic elements during decoction preparation. Comparison of elemental content among fresh herbal material and herbal distillate and decoction of the same herb showed that, besides the elemental abundance of herbal organs, the ionic potential of elements also play an important role in elemental content of herbal products. Based on the results of the research, it seems that most health benefits attributed to herbal products (especially herbal distillates) are more related to their organic compounds rather than elemental composition. Calculated hazard quotient (HQ) and hazard index (HI) were used to evaluate the noncarcinogenic health risk from individual and combined metals via daily consumption of 100 ml of herbal distillates and 250 ml of herbal decoctions. Both HQs and HI through consumption of herbal distillates and herbal decoctions (except Valerian) were below 1. Apparently, daily consumption of herbal distillates and decoctions at the indicated doses poses no significant health risk to a normal adult. PMID:25778835

  12. Context Effects in Western Herbal Medicine: Fundamental to Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, James

    2016-01-01

    Western herbal medicine (WHM) is a complex healthcare system that uses traditional plant-based medicines in patient care. Typical preparations are individualized polyherbal formulae that, unlike herbal pills, retain the odor and taste of whole herbs. Qualitative studies in WHM show patient-practitioner relationships to be collaborative. Health narratives are co-constructed, leading to assessments, and treatments with personal significance for participants. It is hypothesized that the distinct characteristics of traditional herbal preparations and patient-herbalist interactions, in conjunction with the WHM physical healthcare environment, evoke context (placebo) effects that are fundamental to the overall effectiveness of herbal treatment. These context effects may need to be minimized to demonstrate pharmacological efficacy of herbal formulae in randomized, placebo-controlled trials, optimized to demonstrate effectiveness of WHM in pragmatic trials, and consciously harnessed to enhance outcomes in clinical practice. PMID:26613625

  13. Herbal Medicine Scenario in India and European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Agarwal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines are the synthesis of therapeutic experiences of generations of practising physicians of indigenous systems of medicine for over hundreds of years while nutraceuticals are nutritionally ormedicinally enhanced foods with health benefits of recent origin and marketed in developed countries. Herbal medicines are also ingreat demand in the developed world for primary health care because of their efficacy, safety and lesser side effects. They also offer therapeutics for age-related disorders like memory loss, osteoporosis, immune disorders, etc. for which no modern medicine is available. WHO too has not systematically evaluated traditional medicines despite the fact that it is used for primary health care by about 80% of the world population. However, in 1991 WHO developed guidelines for the assessment of herbal medicine. Suggestions for herbal medicine standardization are outlined. The scenario and perceptions of herbal medicine are discussed.

  14. Therapeutic Applications of Herbal Medicines for Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yi Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal herbs and their derivative phytocompounds are being increasingly recognized as useful complementary treatments for cancer. A large volume of clinical studies have reported the beneficial effects of herbal medicines on the survival, immune modulation, and quality of life (QOL of cancer patients, when these herbal medicines are used in combination with conventional therapeutics. Here, we briefly review some examples of clinical studies that investigated the use of herbal medicines for various cancers and the development of randomized controlled trials (RCTs in this emerging research area. In addition, we also report recent studies on the biochemical and cellular mechanisms of herbal medicines in specific tumor microenvironments and the potential application of specific phytochemicals in cell-based cancer vaccine systems. This review should provide useful technological support for evidence-based application of herbal medicines in cancer therapy.

  15. Understanding Malaria: Fighting an Ancient Scourge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Malaria Fighting an Ancient Scourge U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Understanding Malaria Fighting an Ancient Scourge U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ...

  16. Phylogenetic estimation of timescales using ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molak, Martyna; Lorenzen, Eline; Shapiro, Beth;

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, ancient DNA has increasingly been used for estimating molecular timescales, particularly in studies of substitution rates and demographic histories. Molecular clocks can be calibrated using temporal information from ancient DNA sequences. This information comes from the ages...

  17. The eye and its diseases in Ancient Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. Ry

    1997-01-01

    Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification......Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification...

  18. Parenting style, individuation, and mental health of Egyptian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan; Menshar, Kariman E

    2006-02-01

    Three questionnaires that measure parenting style, adolescent-family connectedness, and mental health were administered to 351 Egyptian adolescents. Results show that in rural communities the authoritarian style is more predominant in the parenting of male adolescents, while the authoritative style is more predominant in the parenting of female adolescents. In urban communities, on the other hand, the authoritarian style was more predominant in the parenting of female adolescents. The connectedness of all female adolescents with their family was stronger than that of male adolescents. The connectedness of girls was found to be more emotional and financial in villages and to be more functional in town. Female adolescents reported a higher frequency of psychological disorders. Mental health was associated with authoritative parenting, but not with authoritarian parenting. It seems that authoritarian parenting within an authoritarian culture is not as harmful as within a liberal culture.

  19. HOW EGYPTIAN CONTRACTING COMPANIES TRANSLATE PROJECTS' QUALITY TO PROJECTS' PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said SHAWKY HOZIEN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A model for continuous quality improvement for Egyptian contracting projects’ (CQIM is developed through the extensive reviewing of the Total Quality Management (TQM, Continuous Quality Improvement (CQIliterature, preceding researches, consensus opinions of managers and experts of the construction industry and the quality management system (ISO 9000. This model comprises of 13 main factors divided into 9 CQI constructs and 4 Indices, the Indices are broken down to 46 practical measures, while the CQI constructs are further divided into 58 sub-factors consisting of 231 practical requirements, all targeting the evaluation and improvement of the overall project performance (OPP . This model assists its users to assess their points of weaknesses and strengths, by setting-up a road map for improvement, utilizing a guided framework. This model is used as a benchmarking tool to achieve the goal of this research “Projects' Continuous Quality Improvement”.

  20. Fallout Radioactivity in Some Egyptian Lakes Bottom Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the Egyptian environmental radioactivity monitoring program, the fallout radioactivity levels in Qarun, Bardawill and Ed ku lakes bottom sediments have been measured. The specific activities of 137Cs were measured using gamma ray spectrometer based on Hyper pure germanium detector. The specific activities of plutonium isotopes(238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Pu) were measured using alpha spectrometry based on surface battier detectors and liquid scintillation spectrometry after radiochemical separation. The activity ratios 239+240Pu/137Cs, 239+240Pu/241Pu, and 238Pu/ 239+240Pu were calculated. The results seemed to confirm that fallout radioactivity is mainly due to nuclear weapons testing fallout

  1. The Reasons social media contributed to 2011 Egyptian Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Minatullah Sohail, Nadine Chebib

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, social media has become very significant for social networking. In the past, itsmain use was personal, but nowadays, its becoming part of all facets of our lives, social andpolitical. In the first quarter of 2011, the Middle East has witnessed many popular uprisings thathave yet to reach an end. While these uprisings have often been termed “FacebookRevolutions” or “Twitter Revolutions”, there are many ambiguities as to the extent to whichsocial media affected these movements. In this paper we discuss the role of social media andits impact on the 2011 Egyptian revolution. Though the reasons for the uprising were manifold,we will focus on how social media facilitated and accelerated the movement.

  2. Wisdom of an Ancient City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE JIANXIONG

    2010-01-01

    @@ The famous painting,Along the River During Qingming Festival,impresses visitors at the China Pavilion not iust because of the animated figures in the electronic version of the painting but because it shows a prosperous view of Kaifeng,capital of the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127).It also showcases the wisdom of city planning in ancient China.

  3. The ancient art of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Allan

    2013-12-01

    Revision of Freud's theory requires a new way of seeking dream meaning. With the idea of elaborative encoding, Sue Llewellyn has provided a method of dream interpretation that takes into account both modern sleep science and the ancient art of memory. Her synthesis is elegant and compelling. But is her hypothesis testable? PMID:24304762

  4. Ancient medicine--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Lipozencić, Jasna; Pucarin-Cvetković, Jasna; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Schachter, Neil; Mucić-Pucić, Branka; Neralić-Meniga, Inja

    2008-01-01

    Different aspects of medicine and/or healing in several societies are presented. In the ancient times as well as today medicine has been closely related to magic, science and religion. Various ancient societies and cultures had developed different views of medicine. It was believed that a human being has two bodies: a visible body that belongs to the earth and an invisible body of heaven. In the earliest prehistoric days, a different kind of medicine was practiced in countries such as Egypt, Greece, Rome, Mesopotamia, India, Tibet, China, and others. In those countries, "medicine people" practiced medicine from the magic to modern physical practices. Medicine was magical and mythological, and diseases were attributed mostly to the supernatural forces. The foundation of modern medicine can be traced back to ancient Greeks. Tibetan culture, for instance, even today, combines spiritual and practical medicine. Chinese medicine developed as a concept of yin and yang, acupuncture and acupressure, and it has even been used in the modern medicine. During medieval Europe, major universities and medical schools were established. In the ancient time, before hospitals had developed, patients were treated mostly in temples. PMID:18812066

  5. The Echoes of Ancient Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzman, Haim

    2006-01-01

    Several artifacts found at the Gesher Benot Ya'aqov, or Daughters of Jacob Bridge, archaeological site in Israel provide a picture of ancient human ancestors that is different from the once accepted by most scholars. The discoveries by Israeli archaeologist Naama Goren-Inbar suggest that humans developed language and other key abilities far…

  6. Adult Reading of Ancient Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Frederick H.

    Traditionally, students of ancient languages have been taught to translate rather than read. The four most popular current approaches to language instruction--the grammar-translation method, the direct-reading or inductive approach, the audiolingual method, and the structural approach--all have inherent deficiencies that are magnified when applied…

  7. Antioxidant screening of medicinal herbal teas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speisky, Hernán; Rocco, Claudia; Carrasco, Catalina; Lissi, Eduardo A; López-Alarcón, Camilo

    2006-06-01

    Herbal tea consumption is deeply and widely rooted amongst South-American populations. In view of the involvement of oxygen- and nitrogen-reactive species in the ethiogenesis of several diseases, the antioxidant properties of some of the herbal teas most commonly consumed in the southern regions was assessed in vitro. Around one-third of the 13 examined herbs, displayed a substantially higher ability to scavenge ABTS(+.) radicals (TEAC assay), and to quench the pro-oxidant species, hypochlorite (HClO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Amongst the tested herbs, teas prepared from Haplopappus baylahuen, Rosa moschata and Peumus boldus showed the highest TEAC and HClO-quenching activities. These herbs were around 5- to 7-fold more potent than the least active herbs. Based on the TEAC assay, 150 mL of tea prepared from H. baylahuen, R. moschata and P. boldus would be equivalent to around 200 mg of Trolox). Teas from H. baylahuen and P. boldus were also found to be particularly potent in quenching HClO. In the ONOO(-) assay, H. baylahuen and Buddleia globosa showed the highest activities. The results obtained suggest that the regular consumption of teas prepared from some of these herbs may be useful potentially to provide the organism with molecules capable of protecting the gastrointestinal tract against certain pathologically relevant oxidant species. PMID:16619353

  8. Herbal treatment for osteoporosis: a current review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Siu, Wing-Sum

    2013-04-01

    Osteoporosis is an aging problem. The declining bone mineral density (BMD) enhances the chances of fractures during minor falls. Effective pharmaceuticals are available for a rapid improvement of BMD. However, hormonal treatment gives serious complications, and bisphosphonates may lead to odd fractures of long bones, resulting from excessive rigidity of the cortical components. Many medicinal herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine, known as kidney tonics, have been tested for their effects on bone metabolism in the laboratory and clinically. Three of these, viz. Herba epimedii (, Yín Yáng Huò), Fructus ligustri lucidi (, Nǚ Zhēn Zi), and Fructus psoraleae (, Bǔ Gǔ Zhī) were chosen to form a herbal formula, ELP. ELP was tested on in vitro platforms and was shown to have both osteoblastic and anti- osteoclastic action. ELP tested on ovariectomized rats also showed BMD protection. ELP was then put on a placebo- controlled randomized clinical trial. BMD protection was obvious among those women with the onset of menopause beyond 10 years (P 0.05). Although a thorough literature review on the herbal treatment effects did not give convincing answers to the use of Chinese herbs in osteoporosis, our study supports more research and trials in this area, while we are looking for safe and effective agents to keep the bone metabolism in a balanced state. PMID:24716161

  9. The regulation of herbal medicines in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complementary medicines, including herbal medicines in Australia are regulated under therapeutics goods legislation. Based on risk, Australia has developed a two tiered approach to the regulation of therapeutic goods. Listed medicines are considered to be of lower risk than Registered medicines. Most, but not all, complementary medicines are Listed medicines. Managing the risk associated with therapeutic goods, including complementary medicines, is exerted through the processes of licensing of manufacturers; pre-market assessment of products; and post-market regulatory activity. Herbal medicines may be associated with low or high risk depending on the toxicity of ingredients, proposed dosage, appropriateness of the indications and claims for self-diagnosis and management and the potential for adverse reactions. Registered medicines are individually evaluated for safety, quality and efficacy before they are released onto the market. Listed medicines are individually assessed by the Therapeutic Goods Administration for compliance with legislation, they are not evaluated before release. They may only be formulated from ingredients that have undergone pre-market evaluation for safety and quality and are considered low risk. Listed complementary medicines may only carry indications and claims for the symptomatic relief of non-serious conditions, health maintenance, health enhancement and risk reduction. An important feature of risk management in Australia is that early market access for low risk complementary medicines is supported by appropriate post-market regulatory activity

  10. Hepatotoxicity and the present herbal hepatoprotective scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyankar Dey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the metabolic and physiological processes of our body as well as the detoxification of various drugs and xenobiotic chemicals occur in the liver. During this detoxification process, the reactive chemical intermediates damage the liver severely. There are several commercially available drugs, consumption of which results in idiosyncratic drug reaction mediated hepatotoxicity. Drug induced hepatotoxicity is a burning problem in this regard and several drugs are withdrawn from the market due to their hepatotoxic nature. Today, worldwide search of non-hepatotoxic drugs, especially potent hepatoprotective drugs have led towards the screening of numerous herbal products. Pharmaceutical companies and scientific communities have started to consider the therapeutic efficiency of the plant-based hepatoprotective remedies. Different herbs are mentioned in various ethnopharmacological practices possessing hepatoprotective capacities and around the globe, such herbs are still used by people to cure certain liver diseases. Therefore, we have documented the various aspects of hepatotoxicity and an overview on the current scenario of the hepatoprotective herbal remedies.

  11. Herbal versus synthetic drugs; beliefs and facts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal therapy is a holistic therapy, integrating emotional, mental and spiritual levels. Life style, emotional, mental and spiritual considerations are part of any naturopathic approach. The use of herbs does not generally involve "drug" actions or adverse effects. Although medicinal plants are widely used and assumed to be safe, however, they can potentially be toxic. Where poisoning from medicinal plants has been reported, it usually has been due to misidentification of the plants in the form, in which they are sold, or incorrectly preparation and administration by inadequately trained personnel. There are some "drug like" plants remedies that their actions approach that of pharmaceuticals. Herbalists use these plants in treatment strategies and in countries such as Britain their vast availability is restricted by law. Digitalis is one of these examples and the number of these plants is not a lot. The mechanisms by which the herbs generally act are not established, however, most of medicinal plants possess antioxidant activities. The plants have been shown to effective by this property is various conditions including cancer, memory deficit and Alzheimer, atherosclerosis, diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases. Antioxidant activities of herbal medicines are also effective in reducing the toxicities of toxic agents or other drugs.

  12. Ancient Egyptian Pottery from the Subsurface Floodplain of the Saqqara Memphis Area: Its Mineralogical and Geochemical Implications*

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdan, M.A.; Martínez Manent, Salvador; Garcia Vallès, Maite; Nogués, Joaquim M.; Hassan, F.A.; Flower, R J; Aly, M. H.; Senussi, A.; Ebrahim, E. S.

    2013-01-01

    Potsherds recovered from the Saqqara-Memphis floodplain in Egypt, dated according to their typology and radiocarbon dating of the included sediments, are analysed geochemically and mineralogically to identify source materials and fabrication characteristics. Pottery layers were identified and potsherds were recovered from several settlement levels. Sherd typology was used to identify sherds from four periods (the Old and New Kingdoms, and from the Late Period to the Ptolemaic). The Pharaonic ...

  13. Comparison among GPR measurements and ultrasonic tomographies with different inversion strategies applied to the basement of an ancient egyptian sculpture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambuelli, Luigi; Bohm, Gualtiero; Capizzi, Patrizia; Cardarelli, Ettore; Cosentino, Pietro; D'Onofrio, Laurent; Marchisio, Mario

    2010-05-01

    By the late 2008 one of the most important pieces of the "Museo delle Antichità Egizie" in Turin, the sculpture of the Pharaoh with god Amun, was planned to be one of the masterpieces of a travelling exhibition in Japan. The "Fondazione Museo delle Antichità Egizie di Torino", managing the museum, was concerned with the integrity of the basement of the statue which actually presents visible signs of restorations dating back to the early IXX century. The questions put by the museum managers were to estimate the internal extension of some visible fractures, to search for unknown internal ones and to provide information about the overall mechanical strength of the basement. In order to tackle the first and second questions a GPR reflection survey of the basement along three sides was performed and the results were assembled in a 3D rendering. As far as the third question is concerned, two parallel, horizontal ultrasonic 2D tomographies across the basement were made with a source-receiver layout able to acquire, for each section, 723 ultrasonic signals correspondent to different transmitter and receiver positions. The ultrasonic tomographic data were inverted using different software based upon different algorithms. The obtained velocity images were then compared with the GPR results and with the visible joints on the basement. A critical analysis of the comparisons is finally presented.

  14. Antibiotic Extraction as a Recent Biocontrol Method for Aspergillus Niger andAspergillus Flavus Fungi in Ancient Egyptian mural paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, R. Elmitwalli; Fatma, Helmi M.; Rizk, Mohammed A.; Hagrassy, Abeer F.

    Biodeterioration of mural paintings by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus Fungi has been proved in different mural paintings in Egypt nowadays. Several researches have studied the effect of fungi on mural paintings, the mechanism of interaction and methods of control. But none of these researches gives us the solution without causing a side effect. In this paper, for the first time, a recent treatment by antibiotic "6 penthyl α pyrone phenol" was applied as a successful technique for elimination of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. On the other hand, it is favorable for cleaning Surfaces of Murals executed by tembera technique from the fungi metabolism which caused a black pigments on surfaces.

  15. “Behind every mask there is a face, and behind that a story”. Egyptian bioarchaeology and ancient identities

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewski, Sonia R.

    2015-01-01

    Bioarchaeology is more than “just” the study of the biological aspects of archaeology. It is more than “just” paleopathology, although this is frequently how the wider community views osteoarchaeology or bioarchaeology (Perry 2007). Bioarchaeology is the study of people who lived in the past, carried out using archaeology, but with a framework situated within, and developed from, biological methods. The key word is “people” as it is the people, or more specifically the individuals themselves,...

  16. Microbial quality of some medicinal herbal products in Kashan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazroi Arani Navid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of medicinal plants has risen worldwide. In Iran, herbal waters and rose waters are of traditional medicinal products and as a result, they are widespreadly consumed. Therefore, diagnosis of microbial quality of these products is important. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbial quality of herbal extracts distributed in Kashan, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive study, 256 samples of herbal waters and 191 samples of rose waters (total samples of 447 distributed in Kashan during 2012 to 2013 were purchased and transferred to laboratory. Then microbial tests such as total aerobic bacterial count, mold and yeast count, total coliforms, and detection of Enterococcus, Pseudomonas and sulphite-reducing Clostridia were evaluated based on national standard of Iran. Results: Contamination with Pseudomonas and Enterococcus was observed in the herbal water samples. 196 cases (43.84% of the total samples, 113 cases (44.15% of the herbal waters and 83 cases (43.45% of the rose waters were usable based on the national standard of Iran. Neither herbal waters nor rosewater samples were contaminated by E.Coli and Sulphite-reducing clostridia. Additionally, none of the rosewater samples was contaminated by Coliforms and Pseudomonas. Conclusion: Based on the findings and due to the fact that these products are contaminated with aerobic mesophilic bacteria, mold and yeast, to minimize the risks we recommend to apply pasteurized temperature, high-quality packaging material and hygiene observance in processing time of herbal waters and rose waters.

  17. Herbal therapy: what every facial plastic surgeon must know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribitkin, E D; Boger, G

    2001-01-01

    Herbal medicine (phytomedicine) uses remedies possessing significant pharmacological activity and, consequently, potential adverse effects and drug interactions. The explosion in sales of herbal therapies has brought many products to the marketplace that do not conform to the standards of safety and efficacy that physicians and patients expect. Unfortunately, few surgeons question patients regarding their use of herbal medicines, and 70% of patients do not reveal their use of herbal medicines to their physicians and pharmacists. All surgeons should question patients about the use of the following common herbal remedies, which may increase the risk of bleeding during surgical procedures: feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, and Asian ginseng. Physicians should exercise caution in prescribing retinoids or advising skin resurfacing in patients using St John's wort, which poses a risk of photosensitivity reaction. Several herbal medicines, such as aloe vera gel, contain pharmacologically active ingredients that may aid in wound healing. Practitioners who wish to recommend herbal medicines to patients should counsel them that products labeled as supplements have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration and that no guarantee of product quality can be made. PMID:11368667

  18. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Kusum Devi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in increasing the efficacy and reducing the side effects of various herbal compounds and herbs. This is the basic idea behind incorporating novel method of drug delivery in herbal medicines. Thus it is important to integrate novel drug delivery system and Indian Ayurvedic medicines to combat more serious diseases. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research can solve the scientific needs (such as determination of pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, site of action, accurate dose required etc. of herbal medicines to be incorporated in novel drug delivery system, such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies, which can be used for herbal actives together with some examples.

  19. SOME HERBAL PLANTS INTRODUCTION IN HERBAL GARDEN FOR THEIR MULTIPLICATION AND FOR EX-SITU CONSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. PATEL

    2015-01-01

    Collection  of  varied  Medicinal  and  Aromatic  plant  parts  for  their  further propagation  and  conservation  purpose  was  made  from  different  sites  of  the Chhattisgarh state.  Plant parts applied to develop new plants for their ex-situ conservation. Some plant species were directly collected from various sources to introduce in the Herbal Garden. All  the  Medicinal  and  aromatic  Plants  introduced  in  Herbal  Garden  were properly managed for their further growth and development.

  20. CURRENT SCENARIO OF HERBAL TECHNOLOGY WORLD WIDE: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Agarwal*, Shashi Alok , Amreen Fatima and Amita Verma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the basic concepts of herbal technology which is used worldwide. 21st century is the century of Biology mechanical and propelled by scientific knowledge and hi-tech expertise. Herbal technology, are going to be the most influential elements that are fundamental for success and welfare for the people of nations. Information on the herbal technology was collected via electronic search (using pub med, scifinder, Google Scholar and web of science and library search for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Furthermore, information also was obtained from some local books on ethnopharmacology. Nutraceutical are food or part of the food that grant medical or health benefits together with the prevention or cure of the disease. Cosmaceuticals are the largest accumulation to the health trade and are described as cosmetic products with drug; they are the fastest increased segment in the skin care market. Biopesticides are cost effective, safer, readily available, and ecological and therefore more environment- friendly and will offer substitute to conventional pesticides. Herbal drugs represent a major contribute to all the formally recognized systems of health in India. An upward trend has been experimental in the research on herbals. Export–Import reports reveal that the global trade of herbal technology and plant originated products is around US $250 billion. In the present article, an attempt has been made to present an overview of the herbal technology in the international market and intends to throw in the knowledge about Herbal drugs, Nutraceuticals, Cosmaceuticals, and Biopesticides which comes under herbal technology.

  1. Chemical Adulterants in Herbal Medicinal Products: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahan, Jacob; Howard, Dylan; Almalki, Ahmad J; Gupta, Mahabir P; Calderón, Angela I

    2016-04-01

    Many herbal medicinal products have been found to contain synthetic prescription drugs as chemical adulterants. This has become evident by the number of toxicity cases and adverse reactions reported in which casualties were reported via analytical techniques that detected the presence of chemical adulterants in them, which could be responsible for their toxicity. The adulteration of herbal medicinal products with synthetic drugs continues to be a serious problem for regulatory agencies. This review provides up to date information on cases of toxicity, major chemical adulterants in herbal medicinal products, and current analytical techniques used for their detection. PMID:27054916

  2. Challenges and guidelines for clinical trial of herbal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abida Parveen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organization (WHO has defined herbal medicines as finished labeled medicinal product that contain an active ingredient, aerial, or underground parts of the plant or other plant material or combinations. According to a report of WHO, about 80% of the world population is reported to rely on traditional medicine for their primary health care needs. Even in the developed countries, complementary or alternative medicine is gaining popularity. A report of a global survey on national policy on traditional medicine and regulation of herbal medicines indicated that about 50 countries including China, Japan, and Germany already have their national policy and laws on regulations of traditional medicines. Herbal drugs possess a long history of its use and better patient tolerance. These are cheaper and easily available in countries like India due to rich agro culture conditions. However, reckless utilization of resources threatens the sustainability of several plant species. Traditional medicines are governed by the Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1940 and the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules of 1945. In 1959, the Government of India amended the Drugs and Cosmetics Act to include drugs that are derived from traditional Indian medicine. In 1993, the guidelines for the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines developed by an expert committee directed that the procedures laid down by the office of the Drug Controller General of India for allopathic drugs should be followed for all traditional and herbal products to enter into clinical trials for any therapeutic condition. However, there are certain loop holes in the clinical trials of herbal drugs as the lack of stringent bylaws and regulations. Hence, a deep insight of important challenges and major regulatory guidelines for clinical trial of herbal drugs and botanicals is discussed in the present communication. There is lack of scientific evidence to evaluate safety and efficacy of herbal drugs. The quality

  3. [Toxic hepatitis due to the use of Ruta herbal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaev, Elena; Zeller, Lior; Biton, Amnon; Barski, Leonid

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, the use of herbal medicine by the general population is increasing. There are many known side effects resulting from these treatments. Despite the known side effects, physicians tend to neglect the anamnesis details regarding this issue and research budgets of these drugs are relatively low compared with conventional medicine, thus causing a lack of updated information. In this case report, we present an example of toxic hepatitis due to use of Ruta herbal medicine, an unfamiliar side effect of the common herbal medicine Ruta.

  4. Application of Analytic Signal and Euler Deconvolution in Archaeo-Magnetic Prospection for Buried Ruins at the Ancient City of Pelusium, NW Sinai, Egypt: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Akram Mekhael; Sauck, William August; Shendi, El-Arabi Hendi; Rashed, Mohamed Ahmed; Abd El-Maksoud, Mohamed

    2013-07-01

    Progress in the past three decades in geophysical data processing and interpretation techniques was particularly focused in the field of aero-geophysics. The present study is to demonstrate the application of some of these techniques, including Analytic Signal, Located Euler Deconvolution, Standard Euler Deconvolution, and 2D inverse modelling, to help in enhancing and interpreting the archeo-magnetic measurements. A high-resolution total magnetic field survey was conducted at the ancient city of Pelusium (name derived from the ancient Pelusiac branch of the Nile, and recently called Tell el-Farama), located in the northwestern corner of the Sinai Peninsula. The historical city had served as a harbour throughout the Egyptian history. Different ruins at the site have been dated back to late Pharaonic, Graeco-Roman, Byzantine, Coptic, and Islamic periods. An area of 10,000 m2, to the west of the famous huge red brick citadel of Pelusium, was surveyed using the magnetic method. The chosen location was recommended by the Egyptian archaeologists, where they suspected the presence of buried foundations of a temple to the gods Zeus and Kasios. The interpretation of the results revealed interesting shallow-buried features, which may represent the Temple's outer walls. These walls are elongated in the same azimuth as the northern wall of the citadel, which supports the hypothesis of a controlling feature such as a former seacoast or shore of a distributary channel.

  5. The Clinical Study on Acupuncture Sensation in CC, CF and BV Herbal Acupuncture -The Basic Study on Placebo Herbal Acupuncture-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Jung-Chul

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to find out whether NS(normal saline is able to be constituted as an appropriate control group for CC(Cervi Cornu Parvum herbal acupuncture, CF(Carthami-Flos herbal acupuncture and BV(bee venom herbal acupuncture. Methods : NS and three herbal acupuncture were inserted into Quchi(LI 11 of the subjects. After 5 minutes the subjects completed a questionnaire rating the intensity of 21 kinds of acupuncture sensation; hurting, penetrating, sharp, aching, intense, spreading, radiating, tingling, pricking, stinging, pulling, heavy, dull, numb, electric, shocking, hot, burning, cool, pulsing, and throbbing. We compared subjective evaluations of acupuncture sensation between or among the groups. Results : As for CC half items of the acupuncture sensation were significantly different from NS. As for CF all items were not significantly different from NS. As for CC all items were significantly different from NS except one item. In general the score of CF acupuncture sensation was lower than the others and the score of BV acupuncture sensation was higher than the others from comparison of sensation among herbal acupunctures(CC, CF, BV. Conclusion : We found that NS is able to be an appropriate placebo herbal acupuncture for CF. Further study is needed for new placebo herbal acupuncture for CC and BV.

  6. TRADITIONAL MEDICINAL PLANTS: ANCIENT AND MODERN APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, S C; Ahmad, S. Aziz

    1992-01-01

    History of medicine and plants dates back to remote past when herbal treatment was the only answer to all kind of ailments. Nowadays, greater emphasis is again being laid to phytotherapy all over the world. Besides, cultivation-cum-setting up herbal gardens are also mooted on hills and plain areas as management of all kinds of diseases is possible through plant drugs sans toxicity.

  7. Autism: Pathophysiology and Promising Herbal Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Sarrafchi, Amir; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a comprehensive growth abnormality in which social skills, language, communication, and behavioral skills are developed with delay and as diversionary. The reasons for autism are unclear, but various theories of genetics, immunity, biological, and psychosocial factors have been proffered. In fact, autism is a complex disorder with distinct causes that usually co-occur. Although no medicine has been recognized to treat this disorder, pharmacological treatments can be effective in reducing its signs, such as self-mutilation, aggression, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors, inattention, hyperactivity, and sleeping disorders. Recently, complementary and alternative approaches have been considered to treat autism. Ginkgo biloba is one of the most effective plants with an old history of applications in neuropsychological disorders which recently is used for autism. The present review discusses the recent findings, pathophysiology, and etiology of autism and thereafter addresses the promising results of herbal remedies.

  8. HERBAL APPROACHES FOR DIARRHOEA: A REVIEW

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    Komal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhoea is the one of the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in many developing countries effecting mainly the infants and children’s. There are many synthetic drug treatments for diarrhoea like loperamide, bismuth subsalicylate and racecadotril. But these drugs have more side effects like nausea, abdominal discomfort, headache etc. Many herbal plants available which have anti-diarrhoeal activity with lesser side-effects than the conventional drugs. The review focuses on the various plants which have been proved for their anti-diarrhoeal activity in experimental animal models. This review also focused the in-vivo animal models such as castor oil induced diarrhoea, gastrointestinal motility test, magnesium sulphate induced diarrhoea and serotonin induced diarrhoea.

  9. SCOPE OF HERBAL ANTHELMINTICS: AN AYURVEDIC PERSPECTIVE

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    Singh Karam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by helminthes are quite common and comprise a very large group of infestations and infections in human beings. The Krimi Roga (worm infestation is one of the most common diseases found in paediatric practice. Helminthiasis is prevalent globally (1/3 of world’s population harbours them, but is more common in developing countries with poorer personal and environmental hygiene. In Vedic and Ayurvedic literatures, the word krimi is vague term used to denote tiny living being. Acharyas described krimis in various Samhitas in detail and they also believed that krimi also act as an etiological factor in various disease e.g. krimija shiorroga, hridaroga etc. Because of the fewer side effects, the importance of herbal drugs in remedy has tremendously increased in the recent years. A wide variety of plants possess narrow or broad spectrum anthelminthic activities which are naturally available.

  10. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  11. Chinese herbal medicine research in eczema treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Ping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eczema is a chronic relapsing atopic dermatitis (AD associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance and poor quality of life of the patient. Treatment of eczema includes use of emollient, topical and systemic antimicrobial agents, corticosteroid or immunomodulating agents. Many patients also seek alternative treatments such as dietary avoidance, supplementation or both. This article reviews the basic pathophysiology of eczema and clinical trials involving Chinese medicine in the treatment of eczema. Research reports on Chinese herbal medicine for eczema were retrieved from PubMed and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews for this review. Only a few RCTs demonstrated the efficacy (or lack of efficacy of Chinese medicinal herbs in treating atopic eczema. Further larger scale trials are warranted.

  12. [Herbal supplements in sports: use and abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprino, Luciano; Braganò, Maria Cristina; Botrè, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    The use of natural supplements, included herbal supplements, by athletes has become an habit which often lacks any valid scientific rationale. It appears evident that this habit may entail health risks (including more or less serious adverse effects), consequent either: 1) to the pharmacodynamic effects of the drugs at high doses; or 2) to the occurrence of accumulation especially when their administration is not justified by a reduced synthesis or an increased demand; or 3) to the occurrence of intolerance; or, finally, 4) to the presence of unlabelled ingredients. The abuse of this kind of products always entails risks to the consumer, not only to the elite athlete, that can incur an adverse analytical finding on the occasion of anti-doping tests, but also to the amateur sportsman, for the possible occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADR). PMID:16037647

  13. Ethnoveterinary importance of herbal galactogogues - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mohanty

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Galactogogues elicit pharmacological effects, resulting in increased prolactin concentration through interactions with dopamine receptors and thereby augmenting milk supply. Commercially available synthetic drugs induce adverse effect on the neuro-endocrine axis of lactation physiology. Their prolonged uses have caused toxicity which opens a detrimental platform to normal health status of both human and animals. So the researchers have developed a keen interest in traditional herbs, because these are easily available, cheap and with a hope that they may not leave any toxic residues in milk. Phyto-pharmacological research on natural products can contribute for the discovery of new active compounds with novel structures which may serve as a lead for the development of new galactogogues. Although majority of these herbal preparations have not been evaluated their traditional use suggests that they are safe and effective. The purpose of this review paper was to succinctly review recent progress made in the field of commercially available and tranditional galactogogues.

  14. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Ghasemian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil’s claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle.

  15. Impact of herbal medicines on physical impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrubasik, C; Black, A; Müller-Ladner, U; Chrubasik, S

    2008-06-01

    The usefulness of recording physical impairment during intervention studies in chronic low back patients has been questioned. A re-analysis of all of our studies investigating aqueous extracts of Harpagophytum procumbens and a proprietary ethanolic Salix extract for chronic non-specific low back pain revealed that the "physical impairment" component of the Arhus low back pain index changed very little during treatment despite appreciable changes in the other two components, "pain" and "disability", over time. For comparison, we also extracted data from the literature on the topical use of capsaicin, which showed the same thing. There may be little to lose from omitting the time-consuming assessments of "physical impairment" in studies of the (primarily analgesic) effectiveness of herbal preparations. PMID:17964131

  16. Models of ancient sound vases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruel, Per V.

    2002-11-01

    Models were made of vases described by Vitruvius in Rome in about the year 70 A.D. and of sound vases (lydpotter) placed in Danish churches from 1100-1300 A.D. Measurements of vase's resonant frequencies and damping (reradiation) verified that the model vases obeyed expected physical rules. It was concluded that the excellent acoustical quality of many ancient Greek and Roman theaters cannot be ascribed to the vases placed under their seats. This study also found that sound vases placed in Nordic churches could not have shortened the reverberation time because there are far too few of them. Moreover, they could not have covered a broad frequency range. It remains a mystery why vases were installed under the seats of ancient Greek theaters and why, 1000 years later, Danes placed vases in their churches.

  17. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paijmans, Johanna L.A.; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences...... (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well....... To date, at least 124 partially or fully assembled mitogenomes from more than 20 species have been obtained, and, given the rapid progress in sequencing technology, this number is likely to dramatically increase in the future. The increased information content offered by analysing full mitogenomes has...

  18. Molecular analysis of ancient caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, Marc; Montiel, Rafael; Smerling, Andrea; Solórzano, Eduvigis; Díaz, Nancy; Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A; Jiménez-Marín, Andrea R; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2014-09-01

    An 84 base pair sequence of the Streptococcus mutans virulence factor, known as dextranase, has been obtained from 10 individuals from the Bronze Age to the Modern Era in Europe and from before and after the colonization in America. Modern samples show four polymorphic sites that have not been found in the ancient samples studied so far. The nucleotide and haplotype diversity of this region have increased over time, which could be reflecting the footprint of a population expansion. While this segment has apparently evolved according to neutral evolution, we have been able to detect one site that is under positive selection pressure both in present and past populations. This study is a first step to study the evolution of this microorganism, analysed using direct evidence obtained from ancient remains.

  19. ANCIENT BREAD STAMPS FROM JORDAN

    OpenAIRE

    Kakish, Randa

    2014-01-01

    Marking bread was an old practice performed in different parts of the old world. It was done for religious, magical, economic and identification purposes. Bread stamps differ from other groups of stamps. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to identify such stamps, displayed or stored, in a number of Jordanian Archaeological Museums. A col-lection of twelve ancient bread stamps were identified and studied. Two of the stamps were of unknown provenance while the others came from al-Shuneh, D...

  20. Ancient Technology in Contemporary Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Bruce A.

    1982-01-01

    Archaeologists have shown that ancient man developed the ability to produce cutting blades of an extreme degree of sharpness from volcanic glass. The finest of these prismatic blades were produced in Mesoamerica about 2,500 years ago. The technique of production of these blades was rediscovered 12 years ago by Dr. Don Crabtree, who suggested possible uses for the blades in modern surgery. Blades produced by Dr. Crabtree have been used in experimental microsurgery with excellent results. Anima...

  1. Splendid Arts Fram Ancient Capitals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    IT was in the golden autumn in Beijing, when the sky was high and the air clear, that I hurried to Zhongshan Park to witness the display of the songs and dances of the seven Chinese ancient capitals. The flower beds arranged for the celebration of National Day were still there and the colorful blooms looked especially bright in the sunshine. The seven cities which have served as capitals in Chinese history are Beijing,

  2. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Abhyankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry.

  3. Analysis of Ancient DNA in Microbial Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgé, Olivier; Bennett, E Andrew; Massilani, Diyendo; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Melanie; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing has led to a breakthrough in the analysis of ancient genomes, and the subsequent genomic analyses of the skeletal remains of ancient humans have revolutionized the knowledge of the evolution of our species, including the discovery of a new hominin, and demonstrated admixtures with more distantly related archaic populations such as Neandertals and Denisovans. Moreover, it has also yielded novel insights into the evolution of ancient pathogens. The analysis of ancient microbial genomes allows the study of their recent evolution, presently over the last several millennia. These spectacular results have been attained despite the degradation of DNA after the death of the host, which results in very short DNA molecules that become increasingly damaged, only low quantities of which remain. The low quantity of ancient DNA molecules renders their analysis difficult and prone to contamination with modern DNA molecules, in particular via contamination from the reagents used in DNA purification and downstream analysis steps. Finally, the rare ancient molecules are diluted in environmental DNA originating from the soil microorganisms that colonize bones and teeth. Thus, ancient skeletal remains can share DNA profiles with environmental samples and identifying ancient microbial genomes among the more recent, presently poorly characterized, environmental microbiome is particularly challenging. Here, we describe the methods developed and/or in use in our laboratory to produce reliable and reproducible paleogenomic results from ancient skeletal remains that can be used to identify the presence of ancient microbiota. PMID:26791510

  4. An empirical investigation on factors influencing export of herbal supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Hajmirzahosseini Yazdi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, there have been growing interests in business development of herbal supplements in many developing countries especially in Iran. Herbal supplements are used to cure many deceases such as medicating anxiety, acne, weight loss, depression, etc. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to detect important factors influencing exporting herbal supplements. The proposed study designs a questionnaire consists of 31 questions, distributes it among 210 experts who are professional in the area of production and distribution of herbal supplements and using factor analysis, the study detects eight factors including supportive laws and regulations, organizational atmosphere, marketing structure, knowledge oriented, feasibility study, research and development, competitive strategy and partnership strategies.

  5. Study and application of herbal disinfectants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Bin

    2004-12-01

    Disinfection means killing or removing pathogenic microorganisms in media to realize a harmless process. A disinfectant, which is also referred to as a disinfection medicine in relevant regulations, is the medicine used to kill microorganisms for the purpose of disinfection. The disinfectants prepared from plants (including traditional Chinese herbal medicines) and the extracts thereof are called herbal disinfectants. China has a long history of using herbal disinfectants. As early as in 533 A.D., the use of Cornel to sterilize well water was recorded in Necessary Techniques for Qi People by Jia Enxie of the Beiwei Dynasty. During the Dragon Boat Festival, people often use fumigants made of traditional Chinese herbal medicines like Chinese Atractylodes, Argy Wormwood Leaf and Red Arsenic Sulfide to smoke their houses, so as to ward off plagues and drive away evils. In fact this is now a kind of disinfection practice. PMID:15745254

  6. Use of herbal remedies among patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozbeh, Jamshid; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence, types, and associated factors for the use of herbal remedies in hemodialysis patients. Two hundred participants were selected by stratified sampling and were systematically interviewed. One hundred and twenty-six patients (63%) had used herbal remedies some time since their initiation of dialysis treatment. The users of herbal remedies had a significantly older age than nonusers, but no other significant differences were observed. The most prevalent complaints that led to herbal remedies use were gastroenterological complaints, flushing, and excessive thirst. Cichorium intybus, Borage officinalis, Mentha longifolia, and Matricaria recutita were the most prevalently used herbs in our patients. More study should be done on safety and efficacy of these herbs for hemodialysis patients. PMID:24241097

  7. Study and application of herbal disinfectants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Bin

    2004-12-01

    Disinfection means killing or removing pathogenic microorganisms in media to realize a harmless process. A disinfectant, which is also referred to as a disinfection medicine in relevant regulations, is the medicine used to kill microorganisms for the purpose of disinfection. The disinfectants prepared from plants (including traditional Chinese herbal medicines) and the extracts thereof are called herbal disinfectants. China has a long history of using herbal disinfectants. As early as in 533 A.D., the use of Cornel to sterilize well water was recorded in Necessary Techniques for Qi People by Jia Enxie of the Beiwei Dynasty. During the Dragon Boat Festival, people often use fumigants made of traditional Chinese herbal medicines like Chinese Atractylodes, Argy Wormwood Leaf and Red Arsenic Sulfide to smoke their houses, so as to ward off plagues and drive away evils. In fact this is now a kind of disinfection practice.

  8. Overview STUDY AND APPLICATION OF HERBAL DISINFECTANTS IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO-BIN CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Disinfection means killing or removing pathogenic microorganisms in media to realize a harmless process. A disinfectant, which is also referred to as a disinfection medicine in relevant regulations, is the medicine used to kill microorganisms for the purpose of disinfection. The disinfectants prepared from plants (including traditional Chinese herbal medicines) and the extracts thereof are called herbal disinfectants[1]. China has a long history of using herbal disinfectants. As early as in 533 A.D., the use of Cornel to sterilize well water was recorded in Necessary Techniques for Qi People by Jia Enxie of the Beiwei Dynasty[2]. During the Dragon Boat Festival, people often use fumigants made of traditional Chinese herbal medicines like Chinese Atractylodes, Argy Wormwood Leaf and Red Arsenic Sulfide to smoke their houses, so as to ward off plagues and drive away evils[3]. In fact this is now a kind of disinfection practice.

  9. Recent development in novel drug delivery systems of herbal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel technologies have been developed recently for drug delivery systems. The use of herbal formulations for novel drug delivery systems is more advantageous and has more benefits compared to others. The use of liposome, ethosome, phytosomes, emulsion, microsphere, solid lipid nanoparticles of herbal formulation has enhanced the therapeutic effects of plant extracts. With the use of all these, targeted delivery of the formulation is achieved, due to which the formulation demonstrates effect on the site, and the bioavailability of the formulation is also increased. With these novel drug delivery systems, the actives and extracts which are used in herbal formulations demonstrate enhancement in stability, sustained release of formulation, protection from toxicity and improved therapeutic efficacy. The main purpose of developing alternative drug delivery technologies is to increase efficiency of drug delivery and safety in the process of drug delivery and provide more convenience for the patient. The present paper includes information about novel formulations of herbal formulations.

  10. Key to mass literacy or professor's hobby? Fiske's project to write Egyptian Arabic with the Latin alphabet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zack

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this essay is the alphabetization project of Daniel Willard Fiske (1831-1904). Fiske’s project would allow the Egyptians to adopt a new alphabet based on the Latin one, and to adopt Egyptian Arabic as their official written language. The project was inspired by Fiske’s discussions wit

  11. Hegemony for Beginners: Egyptian Activity in the Southern Levant during the Second Half of the Fourth Millennium B.C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav Anđelković

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available After a modest start in the mid-20th century, thousands of Protodynastic Egyptian objects have been unearthed and identified as such in the Southern Levant, including serekh-signs of several Dynasty 0 (Narmer, "Double Falcon", Ny-Hor, IryHor, Ka, and 1st Dynasty (Hor Aha pharaohs. The explanatory models presented so far fail to integrate the totality of the archaeologically manifested parameters, especially considering the impact of the last fifteen years of finds and their contextual and other analysis, into the proper semiotic matrix. The conundrum of Egyptian activity in the Southern Levant displays, at the same time, features of a small-scale trading partner, a colonizer, and a suzerain. Egyptian pottery of local origin provides an indication of a south-north flow of the Egyptian daily-life repertoire of pottery types, or rather their contents, between the Egyptian-related sites, that clearly demonstrates an Egyptian distribution system operating on an intra-regional level in the Early Bronze IB Southern Levant. The ‘Egyptian phenomenon’ is far from being unique since reestablishment of a similar geopolitical pattern, only on a considerably greater scale, can be recognized during the New Kingdom – the Egyptian province in Asia.

  12. An investigation into the ancient abortion laws: comparing ancient Persia with ancient Greece and Rome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Hassan; Zargaran, Arman; Vatanpour, Azadeh; Abedini, Ehsan; Adhami, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    Since the dawn of medicine, medical rights and ethics have always been one of mankind's concerns. In any civilisation, attention paid to medical laws and ethics depends on the progress of human values and the advancement of medical science. The history of various civilisations teaches that each had its own views on medical ethics, but most had something in common. Ancient civilisations such as Greece, Rome, or Assyria did not consider the foetus to be alive and therefore to have human rights. In contrast, ancient Persians valued the foetus as a living person equal to others. Accordingly, they brought laws against abortion, even in cases of sexual abuse. Furthermore, abortion was considered to be a murder and punishments were meted out to the mother, father, and the person performing it. PMID:24304111

  13. Herbal Medicines for Acute Kidney Injury: Evidence, Gaps and Frontiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérian Bunel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a major health threat worldwide. The literature on herbal intervention in AKI was searched from English and Chinese databases and reports were critically analyzed in terms of preventing AKI, promoting repair and regeneration, enhancing extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins, and preventing progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD. Altogether, 16 herbal formulae and a few extracts derived from individual herbs were reported to prevent or mitigate AKI in animal models induced by renal ischemia/reperfusion, cisplastin, gentamicin, glycerol, adenine, sepsis or physical exhaustion. Four formulae and six individual herbs were reported to accelerate recovery and/or to prevent CKD in established AKI animal models. Intrarectal herbal medicines, with or without simultaneous oral administration, were reported in six clinical trials and in an animal model to increase extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins. Additional 13 clinical trials reported oral or intravenous herbal interventions in AKI of different etiologies. Despite recurring problems, notably poor compliance with good practice guidelines for clinical trials and for authentication, naming and quality control of herbal materials, accumulating experimental data on the preventive effects of herbal medicines in AKI look encouraging and urge for better, definitive trials to guide clinical practice. Herbal enemas promoting extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins seem cost-effective, but better clinical evidence is certainly needed before any affirmative recommendation be made for AKI patients without access to dialysis. New frontiers, however, lie in those herbal remedies that promote repair/regeneration and prevent chronicity after AKI. Recent experimental data suggest that this may be possible.

  14. Triphala: The Thai traditional herbal formulation for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ariyaphong Wongnoppavich; Kanjana Jaijoi; Seewaboon Sireeratawong

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, Thai herbal plants are widely accepted in alternative medicine for treatment patients suffering deleterious diseases such as cancer. Having a variety of indications, several herbal formulas including Triphala have been routinely used as health tonic in Thai traditional and Ayurvedic medicines. The formulation of Triphala is a mixture of fruits of three plants: Phyllanthus emblica Linn., Terminalia chebula Retz. and Terminalia bellerica (Gaertn.) Roxb., all of which were reported to ...

  15. HERBAL PRODUCT REALIZATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH WHO AND ISO GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Ameh et al

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Following the Alma-Ata Declaration of 1978, the World Health Organization (WHO began the issuance of guidelines for developing standardized herbal preparations from Traditional Medicine (TM. Similarly in 1987, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO launched the most anticipated industrial standard (ISO 9001 in world history. The seventh (7th clause of ISO 9001’s eight clauses is devoted to “Product Realization”- a quality management system (QMS procedure that includes: planning of product realization; appreciation of customer-related processes; design and development processes; purchasing; production and service provision; and control of measuring and monitoring equipment. Purpose: The article takes a hard look at the QMS processes involved in product realization and the critical stages of the WHO model of herbal drug development from TM, with a view to devising a framework that can be used to promote the production of quality herbal products, commencing from the stage of ethnobotanical survey, through the laboratory, to the clinic.Methodology: Both the WHO model of herbal drug development and the 7th clause of ISO 9001:2008 were critically reviewed and combined to yield a framework that is discussed within the context of guiding herbal drug development from TM. Results and Discussion: The resulting WHO-ISO framework of herbal product realization is discussed in terms of its relevance to practical problems of GMP-production using herbal starting materials, given their innate variability in composition, potency and appearance. Conclusion: The provisions of ISO 9001’s seventh clause can, to a large extent, be applied to the production of quality herbal products developed in accordance with WHO.

  16. Isolation of Cronobacter sakazakii from different herbal teas

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanović Marija M.; Katić Vera; Kuzmanović Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Bacground/Aim. Cronobacter sakazakii (C. sakazakii) is an emerging food-borne pathogen that has increasingly raised interest among the whole public community and food industry, especially in the production of powder infant formula. It has been isolated from water, sediment and soil. The question is whether this pathogen can be present in herbal teas. Herbal teas are widely used for great number of health problems, as an additional or sometimes only “medicine” given. The aim of this stud...

  17. REVIEW ON QUALITY SAFETY AND LEGISLATION FOR HERBAL PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Vishal; Patel N.M; Patel.P.M

    2011-01-01

    In the last few decades, there has been exponential growth in the field of herbal medicine. The growing use of botanicals (drug and other products derived from plants) by the public is forcing moves to evaluate the health claims of these agents and to develop standards of quality and manufacture. It is clear that the herbal industry needs to follow strict guidelines and that regulations are needed. This article presents the element of methods of different aspects on quality control and standa...

  18. Herbal hepatoxicity from Chinese skullcap: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Leslie; Aronsohn, Andrew; Hart, John; Jensen, Donald

    2012-01-01

    The use of herbal supplements has increased considerably over the last decade. We report a case of an elderly woman who began taking Move Free Advanced for arthritis, which in addition to glucosamine and chondroitin, contained two herbal ingredients, Chinese skullcap and Black Catechu. Our patient presented with significant cholestasis and hepatitis which significantly improved after discontinuation of the supplement. Since neither the patient nor the treating physician recognized this supple...

  19. Moxibustion with Chinese herbal has good effect on allergic rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Cunyun; Peng, Congjian; Wei, Guojian; Huang, Xuhui; Fu, Tingting; Du, Yu; Wang, Changjun

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a chronic inflammatory disease of rhino-ocular mucosa, affecting up to 40% of population worldwide. Chinese herbal medicines and Acupuncture, adopted thousands of years in China, has good effect on allergic rhinitis. This study evaluates the effects of Moxibustion with Chinese herbal in treating patients with allergic rhinitis over a 1-year follow-up. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in a sample of 355 participants recruited from Guangdong general hospital...

  20. ADULTRATION AND SUBSTITUTION IN HERBAL DRUGS: A CRITICAL ANAYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Poornima B

    2010-01-01

    The adulteration and Substitution of the herbal drugs is the burning problem in herbal industry and it has caused a major treat in the research on commercial natural products. The deforestation and extinction of many species and incorrect identification of many plants has resulted in adulteration and substitution of raw drugs. The concept of substitution prevailed ages back and in Ayurveda we can find this in the treatise of Bhavaprakasha and Yogaratnakara.This article throws the light on th...