WorldWideScience

Sample records for anchored reference genetic

  1. Genetics Home Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Search Home Health Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Share: Email Facebook Twitter Genetics Home Reference provides consumer-friendly information about the effects of genetic variation on human health. Health Conditions More than 1,200 health ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: PURA syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TJ, Vreeburg M, Rouhl RPW, Stevens SJC, Stegmann APA, Schieving J, Pfundt R, van Dijk K, Smeets ... article on PubMed Central More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: SADDAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description SADDAN (severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans) is a ... Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans Other Diagnosis ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: osteopetrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy Genetic Testing Registry: Osteopetrosis autosomal dominant type 1 Genetic Testing Registry: Osteopetrosis autosomal dominant ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: homocystinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an increased risk of abnormal blood clotting, and brittle bones that are prone to fracture ( osteoporosis ) or other ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: piebaldism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be a feature of other conditions, such as Waardenburg syndrome ; these conditions have other genetic causes and additional ... 140S. Review. Citation on PubMed Spritz RA. Piebaldism, Waardenburg syndrome, and related disorders of melanocyte development. Semin Cutan ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: sialuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inheritance of sialuria, an inborn error of feedback inhibition. Am J Hum Genet. 2001 Jun;68(6): ... Links Data Files & API Site Map Subscribe Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: sitosterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also helps regulate cholesterol levels in a similar fashion; normally about 50 percent of cholesterol in the ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Familial hypercholesterolemia Encyclopedia: High blood cholesterol and triglycerides Encyclopedia: Xanthoma Health Topic: Cholesterol Health Topic: High Cholesterol in Children and Teens Health Topic: Lipid Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: citrullinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. Learn more about the genes associated with citrullinemia ... GeneReview: Citrin Deficiency GeneReview: Citrullinemia Type I GeneReview: Urea Cycle Disorders Overview MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hereditary Urea Cycle Abnormality National ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some studies suggest that additional genetic changes can influence the development of retinoblastoma ; these changes may help explain variations ... usually occurs in childhood, typically leading to the development of ... and there is no family history of the disease. Affected individuals are born ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glutaric acidemia type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glutaric acidemia type 1 in patients of Lumbee heritage from North Carolina. Mol Genet Metab. 2006 May; ... 825-8. Review. Citation on PubMed More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Farber lipogranulomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... features. Type 1 is the most common, or classical, form of this condition and is associated with ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management Resources Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Kleefstra syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ... G, Tzioumi D, Sillence DO, Mowat D. Three patients with terminal deletions within the subtelomeric region of chromosome 9q. ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: diastrophic dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition Diastrophic dwarfism DTD Related Information How are genetic conditions and ... 2 links) Health Topic: Bone Diseases Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: lactose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thomas MG, Swallow DM. Lactose digestion and the evolutionary genetics of lactase persistence. Hum Genet. 2009 Jan; ... genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Alopecia areata ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: CLPB deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of CLPB is associated with congenital microcephaly, severe encephalopathy and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. J Med Genet. 2015 ... genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Kniest dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include a rounded upper back that also curves to the side ( kyphoscoliosis ), severely flattened bones of ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Carpenter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deformed hips, a rounded upper back that also curves to the side ( kyphoscoliosis ), and knees that are ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Czech dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as a rounded upper back that also curves to the side ( kyphoscoliosis ). Some people with Czech ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Winchester syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones ( osteoporosis ) throughout the skeleton. These abnormalities make bones brittle and more prone to fracture. The bone abnormalities ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes A variety of genetic and environmental factors are likely involved in the development of ulcerative colitis . Recent studies have identified variations in dozens of genes that may be linked ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: osteoglophonic dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Osteoglophonic dysplasia Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) Seattle Children's Hospital: Dwarfism and Bone Dysplasias General Information from MedlinePlus (5 ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ADNP syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and ... It is estimated to account for 0.17 percent of all cases of autism spectrum disorder, making it one of the most common ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 500 to 1,000 people of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. The other forms of Gaucher disease are uncommon and do not occur more frequently in people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Tietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... represent a severe form of a disorder called Waardenburg syndrome , which can also be caused by MITF gene ... MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes. Eur J Hum Genet. 2012 May;20(5): ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: fumarase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... V, Tomlinson IP. The FH mutation database: an online database of fumarate hydratase mutations involved in the MCUL (HLRCC) tumor syndrome and congenital fumarase deficiency. BMC Med Genet. 2008 Mar 25;9:20. doi: 10.1186/1471-2350- ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults, the rashes typically occur on the wrists, ankles, and eyelids in addition to the bend of ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic ... Manual Consumer Version The University of Chicago Medicine World ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do well on tasks that involve spoken language, music, and learning by repetition (rote memorization). Affected individuals ... Resources (5 links) Disease InfoSearch: Williams syndrome Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah MalaCards: williams-beuren ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: thanatophoric dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thanatophoric dysplasia and their potential therapeutic implications for achondroplasia. Am J Med Genet A. 2010 Jan;152A( ... of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 disorders: the achondroplasia family of skeletal dysplasias, Muenke craniosynostosis, and Crouzon ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hyperinsulinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic: Hypoglycemia Health Topic: Metabolic Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Congenital hyperinsulinism Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Hypoglycemia and Low Blood Sugar in Children Cook Children's Hospital (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Liddle syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3. Citation on PubMed Snyder PM, Price MP, McDonald FJ, Adams CM, Volk KA, Zeiher BG, Stokes ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Andermann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FQ, Mercado A, Siesser WB, George AL Jr, McDonald MP, Bouchard JP, Mathieu J, Delpire E, Rouleau ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Muenke syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shanske AL, Jehee FS, Bueno MR, Knightly C, McDonald-McGinn D, Zackai EH, Muenke M. Muenke syndrome ( ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Renpenning syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21. Citation on PubMed Tapia VE, Nicolaescu E, McDonald CB, Musi V, Oka T, Inayoshi Y, Satteson ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary pancreatitis Hereditary pancreatitis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spondylothoracic dysostosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal-length arms and legs, called short-trunk dwarfism. The spine and rib abnormalities, which are present ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Dwarfism Health Topic: Spine Injuries and Disorders Genetic and ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: geleophysic dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition geleophysic dwarfism Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Geleophysic dwarfism Educational Resources (8 links) American Heart Association: Atrial ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Danon disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are compartments in the cell that digest and recycle materials. The role the LAMP-2 protein plays ... Page Boucek D, Jirikowic J, Taylor M. Natural history of Danon disease. Genet Med. 2011 Jun;13( ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Miller syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sangiorgi E, Neri G. Limb anomalies: Developmental and evolutionary aspects. Am J Med Genet. 2002 Dec 30; ... genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Alopecia areata ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition arthritis, rheumatoid RA Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: essential thrombocythemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... splice donor mutation in the thrombopoietin gene causes hereditary thrombocythaemia. Nat Genet. 1998 Jan;18(1):49-52. ... deficiency Depression Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease type 1 All New & ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Stormorken syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ichthyosis), headaches, and difficulty with reading and spelling (dyslexia). Related Information What does it mean if a ... new syndrome: thrombocytopathia, muscle fatigue, asplenia, miosis, migraine, dyslexia and ichthyosis. Clin Genet. 1985 Nov;28(5): ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Joubert syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as Ashkenazi Jewish, French-Canadian, and Hutterite populations. Related Information What information about a genetic condition ... of many types of cells, including brain cells (neurons) and certain cells in the kidneys and liver. ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: genitopatellar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypoplasia, renal anomalies, facial dysmorphism, and mental retardation GPS Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... Kwan A, Schlaubitz S, Barsh GS, Enns GM, Hudgins L. Genitopatellar syndrome: expanding the phenotype and excluding mutations ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Crohn disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JH. Host-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease. Nature. 2012 Nov 1; ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leigh-like syndrome 3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome MEGDHEL syndrome SERAC1 ... Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial erythrocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors. Another form of acquired erythrocytosis, called polycythemia vera , results from somatic (non-inherited) mutations in other ... haematol.13250. Citation on PubMed Percy MJ, Rumi E. Genetic origins and clinical phenotype of familial and ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, it can be difficult to ... These individuals may actually have CFC syndrome or Noonan syndrome , which are caused by mutations in related genes. ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Schindler disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... childhood, with some features of autism spectrum disorders. Autism spectrum disorders are characterized by impaired communication and socialization skills. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. The urea cycle is a sequence of reactions ... links) Baby's First Test GeneReview: Arginase Deficiency GeneReview: Urea Cycle Disorders Overview MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality National ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Changes Variations in the MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 , PMS2 , or EPCAM gene increase the risk of developing Lynch syndrome . The MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 , and PMS2 genes are involved in the repair of errors ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition basal cell nevus syndrome BCNS Gorlin-Goltz syndrome NBCCS nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome Related Information ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome Health Topic: Skin Cancer Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Vocal Tic Disorder Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome GTS TD Tourette Disorder Tourette's Disease TS Related ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome Health Topic: Tourette Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Griscelli syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tezcan I, Ersoy F, Houdusse A, Fischer A, de Saint Basile G. Griscelli syndrome restricted to hypopigmentation results from a melanophilin defect ( ... N, Bianchi D, Fischer A, Le Deist F, de Saint Basile G. Mutations in RAB27A ... syndrome associated with haemophagocytic syndrome. Nat Genet. 2000 Jun; ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Rett syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) Boston Children's Hospital GeneReview: MECP2-Related Disorders MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Rett Syndrome RettSyndrome.org: Rett Syndrome Clinics General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: trisomy 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 15;93(6):801-3. Citation on PubMed Hall HE, Chan ER, Collins A, Judis L, Shirley S, ... CRISPR-Cas9? What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Disease InfoSearch: Deafness Harvard Medical School Center for Hereditary Deafness Hereditary Hearing ... Available from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1434/ Citation on ... Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: alcohol use disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use disorder can cause major health, social, and economic problems, and can endanger affected individuals and others ... Available from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK424857/ Citation on PubMed Zhu EC, Soundy TJ, ... Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary ...

  1. A second-generation anchored genetic linkage map of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Hardip R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, a small kangaroo used for decades for studies of reproduction and metabolism, is the model Australian marsupial for genome sequencing and genetic investigations. The production of a more comprehensive cytogenetically-anchored genetic linkage map will significantly contribute to the deciphering of the tammar wallaby genome. It has great value as a resource to identify novel genes and for comparative studies, and is vital for the ongoing genome sequence assembly and gene ordering in this species. Results A second-generation anchored tammar wallaby genetic linkage map has been constructed based on a total of 148 loci. The linkage map contains the original 64 loci included in the first-generation map, plus an additional 84 microsatellite loci that were chosen specifically to increase coverage and assist with the anchoring and orientation of linkage groups to chromosomes. These additional loci were derived from (a sequenced BAC clones that had been previously mapped to tammar wallaby chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, (b End sequence from BACs subsequently FISH-mapped to tammar wallaby chromosomes, and (c tammar wallaby genes orthologous to opossum genes predicted to fill gaps in the tammar wallaby linkage map as well as three X-linked markers from a published study. Based on these 148 loci, eight linkage groups were formed. These linkage groups were assigned (via FISH-mapped markers to all seven autosomes and the X chromosome. The sex-pooled map size is 1402.4 cM, which is estimated to provide 82.6% total coverage of the genome, with an average interval distance of 10.9 cM between adjacent markers. The overall ratio of female/male map length is 0.84, which is comparable to the ratio of 0.78 obtained for the first-generation map. Conclusions Construction of this second-generation genetic linkage map is a significant step towards complete coverage of the tammar wallaby

  2. A second-generation anchored genetic linkage map of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenwei; Webley, Lee; Wei, Ke-jun; Wakefield, Matthew J; Patel, Hardip R; Deakin, Janine E; Alsop, Amber; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Cooper, Desmond W; Nicholas, Frank W; Zenger, Kyall R

    2011-08-19

    The tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, a small kangaroo used for decades for studies of reproduction and metabolism, is the model Australian marsupial for genome sequencing and genetic investigations. The production of a more comprehensive cytogenetically-anchored genetic linkage map will significantly contribute to the deciphering of the tammar wallaby genome. It has great value as a resource to identify novel genes and for comparative studies, and is vital for the ongoing genome sequence assembly and gene ordering in this species. A second-generation anchored tammar wallaby genetic linkage map has been constructed based on a total of 148 loci. The linkage map contains the original 64 loci included in the first-generation map, plus an additional 84 microsatellite loci that were chosen specifically to increase coverage and assist with the anchoring and orientation of linkage groups to chromosomes. These additional loci were derived from (a) sequenced BAC clones that had been previously mapped to tammar wallaby chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), (b) End sequence from BACs subsequently FISH-mapped to tammar wallaby chromosomes, and (c) tammar wallaby genes orthologous to opossum genes predicted to fill gaps in the tammar wallaby linkage map as well as three X-linked markers from a published study. Based on these 148 loci, eight linkage groups were formed. These linkage groups were assigned (via FISH-mapped markers) to all seven autosomes and the X chromosome. The sex-pooled map size is 1402.4 cM, which is estimated to provide 82.6% total coverage of the genome, with an average interval distance of 10.9 cM between adjacent markers. The overall ratio of female/male map length is 0.84, which is comparable to the ratio of 0.78 obtained for the first-generation map. Construction of this second-generation genetic linkage map is a significant step towards complete coverage of the tammar wallaby genome and considerably extends that of the first

  3. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management Resources Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Ateleiotic dwarfism Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant isolated somatotropin deficiency ...

  4. Leave or Stay as a Risky Choice: Effects of Salary Reference Points and Anchors on Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guanxing; Wang, X. T.; Li, Aimei

    2018-01-01

    Within a risky choice framework, we examine how multiple reference points and anchors regulate pay perception and turnover intentions in real organizational contexts with actual employees. We hypothesize that the salary range is psychologically demarcated by three reference points into four regions, the minimum requirement (MR), the status quo (SQ), and the goal (G). Three studies were conducted: Study 1 analyzed the relationship between turnover intention and the subjective likelihood of falling into each of four expected salary regions; Study 2 tested the mediating effect of pay satisfaction on salary reference point-dependent turnover intention; and Study 3 explored the anchoring effect of estimated peer salaries. The results show that turnover intention was higher in the region below MR or between SQ and G but lower in the region above G or between MR and SQ. That is, turnover intention can be high even in situations of salary raise, if the raise is below a salary goal (i.e., leaving for a lack of opportunity) and low even in situations of salary loss, if the expected salary is still above the MR (i.e., staying for security). In addition, turnover intention was regulated by pay satisfaction and peer salaries. In conclusion, turnover intention can be viewed as a risky choice adapted to salary reference points. PMID:29872409

  5. A genetically anchored physical framework for Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saski, Christopher A; Feltus, Frank A; Staton, Margaret E; Blackmon, Barbara P; Ficklin, Stephen P; Kuhn, David N; Schnell, Raymond J; Shapiro, Howard; Motamayor, Juan Carlos

    2011-08-16

    The fermented dried seeds of Theobroma cacao (cacao tree) are the main ingredient in chocolate. World cocoa production was estimated to be 3 million tons in 2010 with an annual estimated average growth rate of 2.2%. The cacao bean production industry is currently under threat from a rise in fungal diseases including black pod, frosty pod, and witches' broom. In order to address these issues, genome-sequencing efforts have been initiated recently to facilitate identification of genetic markers and genes that could be utilized to accelerate the release of robust T. cacao cultivars. However, problems inherent with assembly and resolution of distal regions of complex eukaryotic genomes, such as gaps, chimeric joins, and unresolvable repeat-induced compressions, have been unavoidably encountered with the sequencing strategies selected. Here, we describe the construction of a BAC-based integrated genetic-physical map of the T. cacao cultivar Matina 1-6 which is designed to augment and enhance these sequencing efforts. Three BAC libraries, each comprised of 10× coverage, were constructed and fingerprinted. 230 genetic markers from a high-resolution genetic recombination map and 96 Arabidopsis-derived conserved ortholog set (COS) II markers were anchored using pooled overgo hybridization. A dense tile path consisting of 29,383 BACs was selected and end-sequenced. The physical map consists of 154 contigs and 4,268 singletons. Forty-nine contigs are genetically anchored and ordered to chromosomes for a total span of 307.2 Mbp. The unanchored contigs (105) span 67.4 Mbp and therefore the estimated genome size of T. cacao is 374.6 Mbp. A comparative analysis with A. thaliana, V. vinifera, and P. trichocarpa suggests that comparisons of the genome assemblies of these distantly related species could provide insights into genome structure, evolutionary history, conservation of functional sites, and improvements in physical map assembly. A comparison between the two T. cacao

  6. A genetically anchored physical framework for Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn David N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fermented dried seeds of Theobroma cacao (cacao tree are the main ingredient in chocolate. World cocoa production was estimated to be 3 million tons in 2010 with an annual estimated average growth rate of 2.2%. The cacao bean production industry is currently under threat from a rise in fungal diseases including black pod, frosty pod, and witches' broom. In order to address these issues, genome-sequencing efforts have been initiated recently to facilitate identification of genetic markers and genes that could be utilized to accelerate the release of robust T. cacao cultivars. However, problems inherent with assembly and resolution of distal regions of complex eukaryotic genomes, such as gaps, chimeric joins, and unresolvable repeat-induced compressions, have been unavoidably encountered with the sequencing strategies selected. Results Here, we describe the construction of a BAC-based integrated genetic-physical map of the T. cacao cultivar Matina 1-6 which is designed to augment and enhance these sequencing efforts. Three BAC libraries, each comprised of 10× coverage, were constructed and fingerprinted. 230 genetic markers from a high-resolution genetic recombination map and 96 Arabidopsis-derived conserved ortholog set (COS II markers were anchored using pooled overgo hybridization. A dense tile path consisting of 29,383 BACs was selected and end-sequenced. The physical map consists of 154 contigs and 4,268 singletons. Forty-nine contigs are genetically anchored and ordered to chromosomes for a total span of 307.2 Mbp. The unanchored contigs (105 span 67.4 Mbp and therefore the estimated genome size of T. cacao is 374.6 Mbp. A comparative analysis with A. thaliana, V. vinifera, and P. trichocarpa suggests that comparisons of the genome assemblies of these distantly related species could provide insights into genome structure, evolutionary history, conservation of functional sites, and improvements in physical map

  7. A second-generation anchored genetic linkage map of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Hardip R; Wakefield Matthew J; Wei Ke-jun; Webley Lee; Wang Chenwei; Deakin Janine E; Alsop Amber; Marshall Graves Jennifer A; Cooper Desmond W; Nicholas Frank W; Zenger Kyall R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, a small kangaroo used for decades for studies of reproduction and metabolism, is the model Australian marsupial for genome sequencing and genetic investigations. The production of a more comprehensive cytogenetically-anchored genetic linkage map will significantly contribute to the deciphering of the tammar wallaby genome. It has great value as a resource to identify novel genes and for comparative studies, and is vital for the ongoing...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Meesmann corneal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was first described in a large, multi-generational German family with more than 100 affected members. Since ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management Resources Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked acrogigantism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that is caused by pituitary gland abnormalities (pituitary gigantism). Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PubMed Wanders RJ, Waterham HR. Peroxisomal disorders I: biochemistry and genetics of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. Clin Genet. ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: severe congenital neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... Genetic Testing Registry: Severe congenital neutropenia 2, autosomal dominant Genetic Testing Registry: Severe congenital neutropenia 3, autosomal ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: progressive external ophthalmoplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and can affect both males and females, but fathers do not pass traits associated with changes in ... Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 1 ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: neurofibromatosis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the NF1 gene are associated with Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NFNS). Am J Med Genet A. 2003 May ... mutations represent the major molecular event underlying neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2005 Dec;77(6): ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: arterial tortuosity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries are fixed, the extra length twists and curves. Other blood vessel abnormalities that may occur in ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: 3-M syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as a rounded upper back that also curves to the side (kyphoscoliosis) or exaggerated curvature of ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital contractural arachnodactyly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underdeveloped muscles, a rounded upper back that also curves to the side ( kyphoscoliosis ), permanently bent fingers and ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... curved lower back ( lordosis ) and a spine that curves to the side ( scoliosis ). People with spondylocarpotarsal synostosis ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Freeman-Sheldon syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affected individuals may also have a spine that curves to the side ( scoliosis ). People with Freeman-Sheldon ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone to fracture. Affected individuals often have ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: lysinuric protein intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stature, muscle weakness, impaired immune function, and progressively brittle bones that are prone to fracture ( osteoporosis ). A lung ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in people with Hispanic, Japanese, or African Caribbean heritage, whereas type II primarily occurs in people of Northern European descent. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Adams-Oliver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hum Genet. 2014 Mar;22(3):374-8. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2013.159. Epub 2013 Jul ... Genet. 2012 Aug 10;91(2):391-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.07.005. Citation ... Genet. 2015 Sep 3;97(3):475-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.07.015. Epub ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease with ichthyosis Triglyceride storage disease with ichthyosis triglyceride storage disease with impaired long-chain fatty acid ... Lipid Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  4. Pointing and Reference in Sign Language and Spoken Language: Anchoring vs. Identifying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà, Gemma; Zwets, Martine

    2013-01-01

    In both signed and spoken languages, pointing serves to direct an addressee's attention to a particular entity. This entity may be either present or absent in the physical context of the conversation. In this article we focus on pointing directed to nonspeaker/nonaddressee referents in Sign Language of the Netherlands (Nederlandse Gebarentaal,…

  5. Genetics Home Reference: rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rare type of ovarian cancer called small cell cancer of the ovary hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT). Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic ... Cancer Institute: Childhood Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) and Conditions Associated with T Cell Lymphoneia (PDF) Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Severe ... Diseases Immune Deficiency Foundation Jeffrey Modell Foundation National Organization for Rare ... OMIM (1 link) SEVERE COMBINED IMMUNODEFICIENCY, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE, T CELL-NEGATIVE, B CELL-NEGATIVE, NK CELL-NEGATIVE, DUE ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Amish lethal microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 in 500 newborns in the Old Order Amish population of Pennsylvania. It has not been found outside this population. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ... gene cause Amish lethal microcephaly . The SLC25A19 gene provides instructions for ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: epilepsy-aphasia spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Szepetowski P, Scheffer IE, Mefford HC. GRIN2A mutations cause epilepsy-aphasia spectrum disorders. Nat Genet. 2013 Sep;45( ... Neubauer BA, Biskup S, von Spiczak S. Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes. Nat Genet. 2013 Sep;45( ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Jackson-Weiss syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jabs EW, Li X, Scott AF, Meyers G, Chen W, Eccles M, Mao JI, Charnas LR, Jackson CE, Jaye M. Jackson-Weiss and Crouzon syndromes are allelic with mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. Nat Genet. 1994 Nov;8(3):275-9. Erratum in: Nat Genet 1995 Apr;9(4):451. Citation on PubMed Robin ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: van der Woude syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency Van der Woude syndrome is believed to occur in 1 in 35,000 to 1 in 100,000 people, based on data from Europe and Asia. Van der Woude syndrome ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Paget disease of bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is most common in people of western European heritage. Early-onset Paget disease of bone is much rarer. This form of the disorder has been reported in only a few families. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia), a decreased ability to feel vibrations, muscle wasting (amyotrophy), and reduced bladder control. The ... and Therapies General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia), a decreased ability to feel vibrations, reduced bladder control, and high-arched feet ( pes ... and Therapies General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: chylomicron retention disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflexes (hyporeflexia) and a decreased ability to feel vibrations. Related Information What does it mean if a ... Encyclopedia: Malabsorption General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ornithine translocase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. The urea cycle is a sequence of reactions ... First Test GeneReview: Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria ... Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality National ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: optic atrophy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nerve Atrophy Encyclopedia: Visual Acuity Test Health Topic: Color Blindness Health Topic: Optic Nerve Disorders Genetic and Rare ... Disease InfoSearch: Optic atrophy 1 Kids Health: What's Color Blindness? MalaCards: autosomal dominant optic atrophy, classic form Merck ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: aromatase excess syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in females can cause symptoms such as irregular menstrual periods and short stature. Learn more ... pattern, which means a genetic rearrangement involving one copy of the CYP19A1 gene in each cell is ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition CPHD panhypopituitarism Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... Mody S, Brown MR, Parks JS. The spectrum of hypopituitarism caused by PROP1 mutations. Best Pract Res Clin ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: tetrasomy 18p

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The word "tetrasomy" is derived from "tetra," the Greek word for "four.") The extra genetic material from ... usually the mother. Most affected individuals have no history of the disorder in their family. However, rare ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Pallister-Hall syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manchester DK, Marcelis C, Mazzanti L, McCann E, McDonald MT, Mendelsohn NJ, Moeschler JB, Moghaddam B, Neri ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ben-Omran T, Hoffmann GF, de Lonlay P, McDonald MT, Meberg A, Muntau AC, Nuoffer JM, Parini ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Potocki-Shaffer syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PubMed Central Montgomery ND, Turcott CM, Tepperberg JH, McDonald MT, Aylsworth AS. A 137-kb deletion within ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E, Santani A, Adam MP, Barnett SS, Ganetzky R, McDonald-McGinn DM, Battaglia D, Bigoni S, Selicorni A, Sorge ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manchester DK, Marcelis C, Mazzanti L, McCann E, McDonald MT, Mendelsohn NJ, Moeschler JB, Moghaddam B, Neri ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... G, Jones MC, Kerstjens-Frederikse WS, Lidral AC, McDonald M, Nelson CC, Witte M, Glover TW. Clinical ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: popliteal pterygium syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E, de Lima RL, Daack-Hirsch S, Sander A, McDonald-McGinn DM, Zackai EH, Lammer EJ, Aylsworth AS, ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone growth disorder that results in short stature (dwarfism), skeletal abnormalities, and problems with vision and hearing. ... Diseases Health Topic: Connective Tissue Disorders Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the arms; speech difficulties (dysarthria); difficulty swallowing (dysphagia); involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus); mild hearing ... AH, Warner TT. A clinical, genetic and biochemical study of SPG7 mutations in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Brain. ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... microcephaly (MCPH): a review of clinical, molecular, and evolutionary findings. Am J Hum Genet. 2005 May;76( ... genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Alopecia areata ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition worsens, affected children develop spasticity leading to joint deformities (contractures) that restrict movement. Individuals with connatal ... Topic: Leukodystrophies Health Topic: Neurologic Diseases Health Topic: Neuromuscular Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: tuberous sclerosis complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 42. Citation on PubMed Northrup H, Koenig MK, Pearson DA, Au KS. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. 1999 Jul ... Tuberous sclerosis complex: advances in diagnosis, genetics, and management. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007 Aug;57(2): ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slow, prolonged contraction of muscles (dystonia); small, fast, "dance-like" motions (chorea); writhing movements of the limbs ( ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... involve slow, prolonged muscle contractions (dystonia); small, fast, "dance-like" motions (chorea); writhing movements of the limbs ( ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: benign essential blepharospasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyes, and eye irritation that is aggravated by wind, air pollution, sunlight, and other irritants. These symptoms ... find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition essential blepharospasm eyelid twitching primary ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: paroxysmal extreme pain disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include changes in temperature (such as a cold wind) and emotional distress as well as eating spicy ... find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition familial rectal pain PEPD PEXPD ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: isolated ectopia lentis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a common feature of genetic syndromes such as Marfan syndrome and Weill-Marchesani syndrome . Enlarge Frequency The prevalence ... 146 adults not meeting clinical diagnostic criteria for Marfan syndrome: further delineation of type 1 fibrillinopathies and focus ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: 17q12 duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... J, Li C, Roeder E, Cox S, Karaviti L, Pearson M, Kang SH, Sahoo T, Lalani SR, Stankiewicz ... genomic disorders from the duplication architecture of the human genome. Nat Genet. 2006 Sep;38(9):1038- ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: caudal regression syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... umbilical artery: Further support for a caudal regression-sirenomelia spectrum. Am J Med Genet A. 2007 Dec ... AK, Dickinson JE, Bower C. Caudal dysgenesis and sirenomelia-single centre experience suggests common pathogenic basis. Am ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Names for This Condition RSS Silver-Russell dwarfism Silver-Russell syndrome SRS Related Information How are ... M, Begemann M, Elbracht M. Epigenetic and genetic diagnosis of Silver-Russell syndrome. Expert Rev Mol Diagn. ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dilated cardiomyopathy: the complexity of a diverse genetic architecture. Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 Sep;10(9):531- ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: GABA-transaminase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Description GABA-transaminase deficiency is a brain disease (encephalopathy) that begins in infancy. Babies with this disorder ... genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: triple X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosome in only some of their cells. This phenomenon is called 46,XX/47,XXX mosaicism. Learn ... cells contributes to the genetic makeup of a child, the child will have an extra X chromosome ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 47,XYY syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosome in only some of their cells. This phenomenon is called 46,XY/47,XYY mosaicism . Learn ... cells contributes to the genetic makeup of a child, the child will have an extra Y chromosome ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 2 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic: Immune System and Disorders Health Topic: Lupus Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Complement component 2 deficiency Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (6 ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be more common in the Hutterite and Inuit populations. Related Information What information about a genetic ... palmitoyltransferase IA polymorphism P479L is common in Greenland Inuit and is associated with elevated plasma apolipoprotein A- ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support and Research Foundation: Genetic Changes Found in Cushing's Disease, Adrenal Tumors, and Adrenal Hyperplasia MalaCards: acth-independent ... macronodular adrenal hyperplasia 2 Merck Manual (Home Edition): Cushing ... Adrenal Diseases Foundation: Cushing's Syndrome Orphanet: Cushing syndrome due to ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Management Resources (1 link) GeneReview: Isolated Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Fragile X syndrome Fragile X syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Fragile X syndrome is a genetic condition that causes a ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: branchiootorenal/branchiootic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... branchiootorenal spectrum disorders). "Branchio-" refers to the second branchial arch, which is a structure in the developing ... BOR/BO syndrome, abnormal development of the second branchial arch can result in the formation of masses ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hypocalcemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals have features of a kidney disorder called Bartter syndrome in addition to hypocalcemia. These features can include ... sometimes referred to as autosomal dominant hypocalcemia with Bartter syndrome or Bartter syndrome type V. There are two ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. The urea cycle is a sequence of reactions ... Baby's First Test GeneReview: Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency GeneReview: Urea Cycle Disorders Overview MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality National ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Central Quintás-Cardama A, Cortes JE. Chronic myeloid leukemia: diagnosis and treatment. Mayo Clin Proc. 2006 Jul;81(7):973-88. Review. Citation on PubMed Skorski T. Genetic mechanisms of chronic myeloid leukemia blastic transformation. Curr Hematol Malig Rep. 2012 Jun; ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes The cause of autoimmune Addison disease is complex and not completely understood. A combination ... is not caused by an autoimmune reaction. Other causes include infections that ... adrenal glands. Addison disease can also be one of several features of ...

  14. A global reference for human genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auton, Adam; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; M. Altshuler, David

    2015-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Andersen-Tawil syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). The signs and symptoms of Andersen-Tawil syndrome ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic ... from the Nemours Foundation: Arrhythmias Merck Manual Consumer Version: Long QT Syndrome and Torsades de ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correlations with genotypes, gene therapy trials update, and future directions. J AAPOS. 2009 Dec;13(6):587-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2009.10.004. Review. Citation on PubMed Cremers FP, van den Hurk JA, den Hollander AI. Molecular genetics of Leber congenital amaurosis. Hum Mol ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: aldosterone-producing adenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nat Genet. 2013 Sep;45(9):1055-60. doi: 10.1038/ng.2716. Epub 2013 Aug 4. ... 2013 Apr;45(4):440-4, 444e1-2. doi: 10.1038/ng.2550. Epub 2013 Feb 17. ... Science. 2011 Feb 11;331(6018):768-72. doi: 10.1126/science.1198785. Citation on PubMed or ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be something about the ring structure itself that causes epilepsy. Seizures may occur because certain genes on the ... mapping of telomeric 14q32 deletions: search for the cause of seizures. Am J Med Genet A. ... L, Elia M, Vigevano F. Epilepsy in ring 14 chromosome syndrome. Epilepsy Behav. 2012 ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1: report of mutations in 3 children from India. J Appl Genet. 2010;51(1):107-10. doi: 10.1007/BF03195717. Citation on PubMed Steinberg SJ, Dodt G, Raymond GV, Braverman NE, Moser AB, Moser HW. Peroxisome biogenesis disorders. Biochim ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Almira YR, Zaldivar YG, Almarales DC, Góngora EM, Herrera MP, Batallán KE, Armiñán RR, Manresa MV, Cruz ... Falcón NS, Góngora EM, Almarales DC, Pérez LV, Herrera MP. Age-dependent risks in genetic counseling for ...

  1. A RAD-Based Genetic Map for Anchoring Scaffold Sequences and Identifying QTLs in Bitter Gourd (Momordica charantia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Junjie; Luo, Shaobo; Niu, Yu; Huang, Rukui; Wen, Qingfang; Su, Jianwen; Miao, Nansheng; He, Weiming; Dong, Zhensheng; Cheng, Jiaowen; Hu, Kailin

    2018-01-01

    Genetic mapping is a basic tool necessary for anchoring assembled scaffold sequences and for identifying QTLs controlling important traits. Though bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is both consumed and used as a medicinal, research on its genomics and genetic mapping is severely limited. Here, we report the construction of a restriction site associated DNA (RAD)-based genetic map for bitter gourd using an F2 mapping population comprising 423 individuals derived from two cultivated inbred lines, the gynoecious line ‘K44’ and the monoecious line ‘Dali-11.’ This map comprised 1,009 SNP markers and spanned a total genetic distance of 2,203.95 cM across the 11 linkage groups. It anchored a total of 113 assembled scaffolds that covered about 251.32 Mb (85.48%) of the 294.01 Mb assembled genome. In addition, three horticulturally important traits including sex expression, fruit epidermal structure, and immature fruit color were evaluated using a combination of qualitative and quantitative data. As a result, we identified three QTL/gene loci responsible for these traits in three environments. The QTL/gene gy/fffn/ffn, controlling sex expression involved in gynoecy, first female flower node, and female flower number was detected in the reported region. Particularly, two QTLs/genes, Fwa/Wr and w, were found to be responsible for fruit epidermal structure and white immature fruit color, respectively. This RAD-based genetic map promotes the assembly of the bitter gourd genome and the identified genetic loci will accelerate the cloning of relevant genes in the future. PMID:29706980

  2. A RAD-Based Genetic Map for Anchoring Scaffold Sequences and Identifying QTLs in Bitter Gourd (Momordica charantia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Cui

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic mapping is a basic tool necessary for anchoring assembled scaffold sequences and for identifying QTLs controlling important traits. Though bitter gourd (Momordica charantia is both consumed and used as a medicinal, research on its genomics and genetic mapping is severely limited. Here, we report the construction of a restriction site associated DNA (RAD-based genetic map for bitter gourd using an F2 mapping population comprising 423 individuals derived from two cultivated inbred lines, the gynoecious line ‘K44’ and the monoecious line ‘Dali-11.’ This map comprised 1,009 SNP markers and spanned a total genetic distance of 2,203.95 cM across the 11 linkage groups. It anchored a total of 113 assembled scaffolds that covered about 251.32 Mb (85.48% of the 294.01 Mb assembled genome. In addition, three horticulturally important traits including sex expression, fruit epidermal structure, and immature fruit color were evaluated using a combination of qualitative and quantitative data. As a result, we identified three QTL/gene loci responsible for these traits in three environments. The QTL/gene gy/fffn/ffn, controlling sex expression involved in gynoecy, first female flower node, and female flower number was detected in the reported region. Particularly, two QTLs/genes, Fwa/Wr and w, were found to be responsible for fruit epidermal structure and white immature fruit color, respectively. This RAD-based genetic map promotes the assembly of the bitter gourd genome and the identified genetic loci will accelerate the cloning of relevant genes in the future.

  3. Construction of reference chromosome-scale pseudomolecules for potato: integrating the potato genome with genetic and physical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D'Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A; Hamilton, John P; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J

    2013-11-06

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker-based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal "pseudomolecules".

  4. Construction of a reference genetic linkage map for carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Isobe, Sachiko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Tanase, Koji; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Onozaki, Takashi

    2013-10-26

    Genetic linkage maps are important tools for many genetic applications including mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs), identifying DNA markers for fingerprinting, and map-based gene cloning. Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) is an important ornamental flower worldwide. We previously reported a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-based genetic linkage map derived from Dianthus capitatus ssp. andrezejowskianus and a simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based genetic linkage map constructed using data from intraspecific F2 populations; however, the number of markers was insufficient, and so the number of linkage groups (LGs) did not coincide with the number of chromosomes (x = 15). Therefore, we aimed to produce a high-density genetic map to improve its usefulness for breeding purposes and genetic research. We improved the SSR-based genetic linkage map using SSR markers derived from a genomic library, expression sequence tags, and RNA-seq data. Linkage analysis revealed that 412 SSR loci (including 234 newly developed SSR loci) could be mapped to 17 linkage groups (LGs) covering 969.6 cM. Comparison of five minor LGs covering less than 50 cM with LGs in our previous RAPD-based genetic map suggested that four LGs could be integrated into two LGs by anchoring common SSR loci. Consequently, the number of LGs corresponded to the number of chromosomes (x = 15). We added 192 new SSRs, eight RAPD, and two sequence-tagged site loci to refine the RAPD-based genetic linkage map, which comprised 15 LGs consisting of 348 loci covering 978.3 cM. The two maps had 125 SSR loci in common, and most of the positions of markers were conserved between them. We identified 635 loci in carnation using the two linkage maps. We also mapped QTLs for two traits (bacterial wilt resistance and anthocyanin pigmentation in the flower) and a phenotypic locus for flower-type by analyzing previously reported genotype and phenotype data. The improved genetic linkage maps and SSR markers developed

  5. Genetic variability in Brazilian populations of Biomphalaria straminea complex detected by simple sequence repeat anchored polymerase chain reaction amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldeira Roberta L

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomphalaria glabrata, B. tenagophila and B. straminea are intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, in Brazil. The latter is of epidemiological importance in the northwest of Brazil and, due to morphological similarities, has been grouped with B. intermedia and B. kuhniana in a complex named B. straminea. In the current work, we have standardized the simple sequence repeat anchored polymerase chain reaction (SSR-PCR technique, using the primers (CA8RY and K7, to study the genetic variability of these species. The similarity level was calculated using the Dice coefficient and genetic distance using the Nei and Li coefficient. The trees were obtained by the UPGMA and neighbor-joining methods. We have observed that the most related individuals belong to the same species and locality and that individuals from different localities, but of the same species, present clear heterogeneity. The trees generated using both methods showed similar topologies. The SSR-PCR technique was shown to be very efficient in intrapopulational and intraspecific studies of the B. straminea complex snails.

  6. A High Resolution Genetic Map Anchoring Scaffolds of the Sequenced Watermelon Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Qinghe; Jiang, Jiao; Guo, Shaogui; Zhang, Haiying; Hou, Wenju; Zou, Xiaohua; Sun, Honghe; Gong, Guoyi; Levi, Amnon; Xu, Yong

    2012-01-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of the assembled genomic sequences of the elite Chinese watermelon line 97103 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus). The genetic map was constructed using an F8 population of 103 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). The RILs are derived from a cross between the line 97103 and the United States Plant Introduction (PI) 296341-FR (C. lanatus var. citroides) that contains resistance to fusarium wilt (races 0, 1, and 2). The genetic map consists of eleven linkage groups that include 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel) and 36 structure variation (SV) markers and spans ∼800 cM with a mean marker interval of 0.8 cM. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 11 BACs that produced chromosome-specifc signals, we have depicted watermelon chromosomes that correspond to the eleven linkage groups constructed in this study. The high resolution genetic map developed here should be a useful platform for the assembly of the watermelon genome, for the development of sequence-based markers used in breeding programs, and for the identification of genes associated with important agricultural traits. PMID:22247776

  7. Using the Genetics Home Reference Website | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Using the Genetics Home Reference Website Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... as the GHR website keeps growing. What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling provides information and support to ...

  8. Genetic analysis of glucosinolate variability in broccoli florets using genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allan F; Yousef, Gad G; Reid, Robert W; Chebrolu, Kranthi K; Thomas, Aswathy; Krueger, Christopher; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Jackson, Eric; Juvik, John A

    2015-07-01

    The identification of genetic factors influencing the accumulation of individual glucosinolates in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of glucosinolate levels in Brassica vegetables and will accelerate the development of vegetables with glucosinolate profiles tailored to promote human health. Quantitative trait loci analysis of glucosinolate (GSL) variability was conducted with a B. oleracea (broccoli) mapping population, saturated with single nucleotide polymorphism markers from a high-density array designed for rapeseed (Brassica napus). In 4 years of analysis, 14 QTLs were associated with the accumulation of aliphatic, indolic, or aromatic GSLs in floret tissue. The accumulation of 3-carbon aliphatic GSLs (2-propenyl and 3-methylsulfinylpropyl) was primarily associated with a single QTL on C05, but common regulation of 4-carbon aliphatic GSLs was not observed. A single locus on C09, associated with up to 40 % of the phenotypic variability of 2-hydroxy-3-butenyl GSL over multiple years, was not associated with the variability of precursor compounds. Similarly, QTLs on C02, C04, and C09 were associated with 4-methylsulfinylbutyl GSL concentration over multiple years but were not significantly associated with downstream compounds. Genome-specific SNP markers were used to identify candidate genes that co-localized to marker intervals and previously sequenced Brassica oleracea BAC clones containing known GSL genes (GSL-ALK, GSL-PRO, and GSL-ELONG) were aligned to the genomic sequence, providing support that at least three of our 14 QTLs likely correspond to previously identified GSL loci. The results demonstrate that previously identified loci do not fully explain GSL variation in broccoli. The identification of additional genetic factors influencing the accumulation of GSL in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of GSL levels in Brassicaceae and will accelerate development of vegetables with modified or enhanced GSL

  9. An anchored astronomical time-scale for the Turonian reference sections in the Umbria-Marche Basin, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, D.; Montanari, A.; Coccioni, R.

    2012-04-01

    In the Umbria-Marche basin, the aftermath of Ocean Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2, Bonarelli Level) is represented by the Turonian part of the Scaglia Rossa Formation. The Scaglia Rossa pelagic limestones were studied in the classic Contessa and Bottaccione sections near Gubbio, in the Umbria-Marche region of the northeastern Apennines of Italy. Oscillations between radiolarian cherts interbedded with foram-coccolith pelagic limestones are interpreted to follow the rhythm of precession and show hierarchical bundles, which are suggestive of eccentricity-related grouping. Eccentricity-bundles are correlated amongst the two studied sections. Moreover, the magnetic susceptibility signal of the Bottaccione section and the δ18O and δ13C record of both sections clearly demonstrate the imprint of precession and eccentricity. Eccentricity minima are associated with relatively warm periods (δ18O minima), characterized by an increased magnetic susceptibility signal and radiolarian blooms, which are expressed by frequent chert beds. Radiolarian blooms seem to hamper primary productivity, given that they correlate with δ13C minima. The delineated astronomical cycles constitute an eccentricity-based cyclostratigraphy for the Turonian part of the Scaglia Rossa. Moreover, the constructed cyclostratigraphy is anchored to numerical time by calibration with the astronomical solution La2010 (Laskar et al., 2011) and with recent radioisotopic ages from the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary interval near the GSSP in Colorado, USA (Meyers et al., 2012). The numerical age (93.9 ± 0.15 Ma; Meyers et al., 2012) of the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (0.75 m above the top of the Bonarelli Level in the Contessa section; Tsikos et al., 2004; Kennedy et al., 2005) is used as the pinpoint to which our astronomical time-scale is anchored. Using the anchored astronomical time-scale for the Turonian of the Umbria-Marche basin, the top of the Bonarelli Level is placed at 93.97 ± 0.25 Ma, and the boundary

  10. Genetics Home Reference: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individual is considered to have a fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) if the liver contains more than 5 to ... Resources Genetic Testing (2 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic 1 Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver ...

  11. A high-density genetic map for anchoring genome sequences and identifying QTLs associated with dwarf vine in pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoyu; Ren, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Guo, Shaogui; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haiying; Jia, Zhangcai; Fei, Zhangjun; Xu, Yong; Li, Haizhen

    2015-12-24

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch.) is an economically important crop belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family. However, very few genomic and genetic resources are available for this species. As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence the pumpkin genome, high-density genetic map is essential for anchoring and orienting the assembled scaffolds. In addition, a saturated genetic map can facilitate quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. A set of 186 F2 plants derived from the cross of pumpkin inbred lines Rimu and SQ026 were genotyped using the genotyping-by-sequencing approach. Using the SNPs we identified, a high-density genetic map containing 458 bin-markers was constructed, spanning a total genetic distance of 2,566.8 cM across the 20 linkage groups of C. maxima with a mean marker density of 5.60 cM. Using this map we were able to anchor 58 assembled scaffolds that covered about 194.5 Mb (71.7%) of the 271.4 Mb assembled pumpkin genome, of which 44 (183.0 Mb; 67.4%) were oriented. Furthermore, the high-density genetic map was used to identify genomic regions highly associated with an important agronomic trait, dwarf vine. Three QTLs on linkage groups (LGs) 1, 3 and 4, respectively, were recovered. One QTL, qCmB2, which was located in an interval of 0.42 Mb on LG 3, explained 21.4% phenotypic variations. Within qCmB2, one gene, Cma_004516, encoding the gibberellin (GA) 20-oxidase in the GA biosynthesis pathway, had a 1249-bp deletion in its promoter in bush type lines, and its expression level was significantly increased during the vine growth and higher in vine type lines than bush type lines, supporting Cma_004516 as a possible candidate gene controlling vine growth in pumpkin. A high-density pumpkin genetic map was constructed, which was used to successfully anchor and orient the assembled genome scaffolds, and to identify QTLs highly associated with pumpkin vine length. The map provided a valuable resource for gene cloning and marker assisted breeding in pumpkin and

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hung SI. Recent advances in the genetics and immunology of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrosis. ... 2012 May 29. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central More from Genetics Home Reference ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Isolated EA/TEF is considered to be a multifactorial condition, which means that multiple gene variations and environmental factors likely contribute to its occurrence. ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: combined malonic and methylmalonic aciduria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health Topic: Lipid Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Combined malonic and methylmalonic aciduria Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Human Genome Research Institute: NHGRI Researchers Serve Up Mysterious ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ZAP70-related severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene is also involved in the activation of helper T cells (CD4+ T cells). These cells direct ... genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: DNMT3A overgrowth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms, including a rounded upper back that also curves to the side ( kyphoscoliosis ), heart defects, flat feet ( ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormalities including short stature and a spine that curves to the side ( scoliosis ). Other features of Marinesco- ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: activated PI3K-delta syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Diagnosis & Management Resources Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Immunodeficiency 14 Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases: Talking to Your Doctor ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: multicentric osteolysis, nodulosis, and arthropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones ( osteoporosis ) throughout the skeleton. These abnormalities make bones brittle and more prone to fracture. The bone abnormalities ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link) Genetic Testing Registry: Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) Cancer.Net: Leukemia - Eosinophilic: Treatment MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Eosinophil Count - Absolute Seattle ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ... Veltman JA, de Vries BB. Molecular characterisation of patients with subtelomeric 22q ... L, Enns GM, Hoyme HE. Terminal 22q deletion syndrome: a newly recognized cause of ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: GM2-gangliosidosis, AB variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Tay-Sachs disease, variant AB General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) ... AB variant Activator Deficiency/GM2 Gangliosidosis Activator-deficient Tay-Sachs disease GM2 Activator Deficiency Disease GM2 gangliosidosis, type AB ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 16p11.2 duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be ... Children's Hospital: Autism Spectrum Disorders National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: SYNGAP1-related intellectual disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intellectual disability develops epilepsy, and about half have autism spectrum disorder . Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in softening and weakening of the bones ( rickets ) in some individuals. If left untreated, congenital bile ... Encyclopedia: Cholestasis Health Topic: Liver Diseases Health Topic: Rickets Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to muscle weakness, clumsiness, and difficulty sensing vibrations. The skin is also commonly affected in people ... Lamp Examination General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition DCO dyschondrosteosis Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis LWD Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... of SHOX/PAR1 duplications in Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) and idiopathic short stature (ISS). J Clin Endocrinol ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Acute myeloid leukemia Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center National Cancer Institute: Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment St. Jude Children's Research Hospital General Information ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: scalp-ear-nipple syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the tissues that arise from the ectoderm (ectodermal dysplasia) and leads to the signs and symptoms of ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Ectodermal dysplasia Health Topic: Skin Conditions Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (6 links) Encyclopedia: Hypothyroidism Encyclopedia: Type 2 Diabetes Health Topic: Cardiomyopathy Health Topic: Lipid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Muscle Disorders Health Topic: Pancreatitis Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: 1p36 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hoyme HE, Dallapiccola B, Zackai E, Hudgins L, McDonald-McGinn D, Bahi-Buisson N, Romano C, Williams ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... An Y, Weavil SD, Chaing SH, Bali D, McDonald MT, Kishnani PS, Chen YT, Millington DS. Rare ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: 3q29 microduplication syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schmidt KR, Tervo R, Escobar LF, Friedrich CA, McDonald M, Campbell L, Ming JE, Zackai EH, Bejjani ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: 3q29 microdeletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schmidt KR, Tervo R, Escobar LF, Friedrich CA, McDonald M, Campbell L, Ming JE, Zackai EH, Bejjani ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donald JA, Kirk EP, Ziegler JB, Salzer U, McDonald GB, Wong M, Lindeman R, Buckley MF. Mutations ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone growth that results in very short stature (dwarfism). People with this condition have particularly short forearms ... Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome Encyclopedia: Polydactyly Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked cardiac valvular dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition congenital valvular heart disease CVD1 filamin-A-associated myxomatous mitral valve disease ... Valves (image) Encyclopedia: Mitral Valve Prolapse Health Topic: Heart Valve Diseases Health Topic: Mitral Valve Prolapse Genetic and Rare ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replicating itself in an organized, step-by-step fashion. PCNT gene mutations lead to the production of ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oxidation, several enzymes work in a step-wise fashion to break down (metabolize) fats and convert them ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency Encyclopedia: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test Encyclopedia: Hemolytic anemia Encyclopedia: Newborn jaundice Health Topic: Anemia Health Topic: G6PD Deficiency Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bladder control, an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), loss of sensation in the feet (peripheral neuropathy), ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic ... Manual Home Edition National Health Service (UK) Orphanet: Hereditary ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Canada, but it has since been found in populations worldwide. Related Information What information about a genetic ... are involved in chemical signaling between nerve cells ( neurons ). SYNE1 gene mutations that cause ARCA1 result in ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: REN-related kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (5 links) Encyclopedia: Hyperkalemia Encyclopedia: Renin Health Topic: Anemia Health Topic: Gout Health Topic: Kidney Diseases Additional NIH Resources (2 ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: uromodulin-associated kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Health Topic: Gout Health Topic: Kidney Diseases Health Topic: Kidney Failure ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BTBGD thiamine metabolism dysfunction syndrome 2 thiamine-responsive encephalopathy thiamine transporter-2 deficiency THMD2 Related Information How ... genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Severe Combined Immunodeficiency National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (6 links) Boston Children's Hospital Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah Great Ormond ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis II alpha/beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mucolipidosis II (I-cell disease) and mucolipidosis IIIA (classical pseudo-hurler polydystrophy) are caused by mutations in ... N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase gene (GNPTAB) in a French Canadian founder population. Clin Genet. 2008 Mar;73( ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1 (EIEE1) is a seizure disorder characterized by a type of seizure known as ... 2 links) Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: branchio-oculo-facial syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... face and neck. Its characteristic features include skin anomalies on the neck, malformations of the eyes and ears, and distinctive facial features. "Branchio-" refers to the branchial arches, which are structures in the developing embryo ...

  10. Genetic diversity in Monoporeia affinis at polluted and reference sites of the Baltic Bothnian Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guban, Peter; Wennerström, Lovisa; Elfwing, Tina; Sundelin, Brita; Laikre, Linda

    2015-04-15

    The amphipod Monoporeia affinis plays an important role in the Baltic Sea ecosystem as prey and as detritivore. The species is monitored for contaminant effects, but almost nothing is known about its genetics in this region. A pilot screening for genetic variation at the mitochondrial COI gene was performed in 113 individuals collected at six sites in the northern Baltic. Three coastal sites were polluted by pulp mill effluents, PAHs, and trace metals, and two coastal reference sites were without obvious connection to pollution sources. An off-coastal reference site was also included. Contaminated sites showed lower levels of genetic diversity than the coastal reference ones although the difference was not statistically significant. Divergence patterns measured as ΦST showed no significant differentiation within reference and polluted groups, but there was significant genetic divergence between them. The off-coastal sample differed significantly from all coastal sites and also showed lower genetic variation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: FOXP2-related speech and language disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skills such as walking and tying shoelaces, and autism spectrum disorders, which are conditions characterized by impaired communication and social interaction. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. In this condition, the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I ... Management Resources (4 links) Baby's First Test GeneReview: Urea Cycle Disorders Overview MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hereditary Urea Cycle Abnormality National ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. The urea cycle is a sequence of reactions ... Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: Urea Cycle Disorders Overview MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hereditary Urea Cycle Abnormality National ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (6 links) Disease InfoSearch: Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical MalaCards: genetic atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Anemia Merck Manual Consumer Version: ...

  15. Ethical issues in genetic counselling with special reference to haemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswamy, Vasantha

    2011-10-01

    Genetic counselling is provided in places where genetic tests are carried out. The process involves pre-test counselling as well as post-test counselling to enable the individuals to face the situation and take appropriate decisions with the right frame of mind. Major ethical principles which govern the attitudes and actions of counsellors include: respect for patient autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, or taking action to help benefit others and prevent harm, both physical and mental, and justice, which requires that services be distributed fairly to those in need. Other moral issues include veracity, the duty to disclose information or to be truthful, and respect for patient confidentiality. Nondirective counselling, a hallmark of this profession, is in accordance with the principle of individual autonomy. High prevalence of haemoglobinopathies with availability of good and sensitive carrier detection tests and prenatal diagnostic techniques makes these good candidates for population screening of carriers along with genetic counselling for primary prevention of the disease. Screening of the extended family members of the affected child, high risk communities and general population screening including antenatal women are the main target groups for planning a Haemoglobinopathy control programme. A critical mass of trained genetic counsellors who have understanding of the ethical issues and its appropriate handling with the required sensitivity is needed in India.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Sjögren-Larsson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Sjögren-Larsson syndrome Sjögren-Larsson syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... FALDH deficiency fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency ichthyosis oligophrenia syndrome Sjogren-Larsson syndrome SLS Related Information How are genetic ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resulting from uric acid crystals in the joints (gout), kidney disease, and high blood pressure in the ... particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in two genes, G6PC and SLC37A4 , cause GSDI. G6PC gene mutations ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: proximal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... characteristic features. Most cases of proximal 18q deletion syndrome are the result of a new (de novo) deletion and are not inherited from a ... J, Fox PT, Stratton RF, Perry B, Hale DE. Recurrent interstitial deletions of proximal 18q: a new syndrome involving expressive speech delay. Am J Med Genet ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There may also be other genetic or environmental factors that influence whether an affected individual is more likely to develop pain or fatigue. Learn more about the gene associated with corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency SERPINA6 Related Information What is a gene? What is a ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: 1q21.1 microdeletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reciprocal 1q21.1 deletions and duplications associated with microcephaly or macrocephaly and developmental and behavioral abnormalities. Nat Genet. 2008 Dec;40(12):1466-71. doi: 10.1038/ng.279. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Haldeman-Englert CR, Jewett T. ...

  1. The genetic basis for variation in resistance to infection in the Drosophila melanogaster genetic reference panel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Individuals vary extensively in the way they respond to disease but the genetic basis of this variation is not fully understood. We found substantial individual variation in resistance and tolerance to the fungal pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae Ma549 using the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP. In addition, we found that host defense to Ma549 was correlated with defense to the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pa14, and several previously published DGRP phenotypes including oxidative stress sensitivity, starvation stress resistance, hemolymph glucose levels, and sleep indices. We identified polymorphisms associated with differences between lines in both their mean survival times and microenvironmental plasticity, suggesting that lines differ in their ability to adapt to variable pathogen exposures. The majority of polymorphisms increasing resistance to Ma549 were sex biased, located in non-coding regions, had moderately large effect and were rare, suggesting that there is a general cost to defense. Nevertheless, host defense was not negatively correlated with overall longevity and fecundity. In contrast to Ma549, minor alleles were concentrated in the most Pa14-susceptible as well as the most Pa14-resistant lines. A pathway based analysis revealed a network of Pa14 and Ma549-resistance genes that are functionally connected through processes that encompass phagocytosis and engulfment, cell mobility, intermediary metabolism, protein phosphorylation, axon guidance, response to DNA damage, and drug metabolism. Functional testing with insertional mutagenesis lines indicates that 12/13 candidate genes tested influence susceptibility to Ma549. Many candidate genes have homologs identified in studies of human disease, suggesting that genes affecting variation in susceptibility are conserved across species.

  2. Using the Drosophila Melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel to Identify Toxicity Pathways for Toluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic information is needed to link effects of chemicals at molecular targets in high­ throughput screening assays to adverse outcomes in whole organisms. This study was designed to use the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), a set of genetically well...

  3. Construction of a genome-anchored, high-density genetic map for melon (Cucumis melo L.) and identification of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis race 1 resistance QTL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branham, Sandra E; Levi, Amnon; Katawczik, Melanie; Fei, Zhangjun; Wechter, W Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Four QTLs and an epistatic interaction were associated with disease severity in response to inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis race 1 in a recombinant inbred line population of melon. The USDA Cucumis melo inbred line, MR-1, harbors a wealth of alleles associated with resistance to several major diseases of melon, including powdery mildew, downy mildew, Alternaria leaf blight, and Fusarium wilt. MR-1 was crossed to an Israeli cultivar, Ananas Yok'neam, which is susceptible to all of these diseases, to generate a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 172 lines. In this study, the RIL population was genotyped to construct an ultra-dense genetic linkage map with 5663 binned SNPs anchored to the C. melo genome and exhibits the overall high quality of the assembly. The utility of the densely genotyped population was demonstrated through QTL mapping of a well-studied trait, resistance to Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (Fom) race 1. A major QTL co-located with the previously validated resistance gene Fom-2. In addition, three minor QTLs and an epistatic interaction contributing to Fom race 1 resistance were identified. The MR-1 × AY RIL population provides a valuable resource for future QTL mapping studies and marker-assisted selection of disease resistance in melon.

  4. The Ogden Anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, W E; Cerniglia, M W; Carro, A

    1998-06-01

    Many procedures performed by podiatric surgeons today require the use of a soft-tissue anchoring device. In recent years, many new anchoring devices have become available for use in the foot and ankle. The authors introduce a new soft-tissue anchoring device that has yet to be described in the podiatric literature and present two cases in which the new anchor was used.

  5. Genetically modified organisms in food and feed : annual report 2010 of the Dutch National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Molenaar, B.; Zaaijer, S.; Voorhuijzen, M.M.; Prins, T.W.; Kok, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Dutch National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (RIKILT - Institue of Food Safety). The report gives an overview of the NRL activities carried out in 2010. In 2010 RIKILT participated in one ring trial for inter laboratory validation

  6. Genetically modified organisms in food and feed : annual report of the Dutch National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Molenaar, B.; Zaaijer, S.; Voorhuijzen, M.M.; Prins, T.W.; Kok, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Dutch National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (RIKILT - Institute of Food Safety). The report gives an overview of the NRL activities carried out in 2011. In 2011 both RIKILT and the Routine Field Laboratory of the Netherlands Food

  7. Genetically modified organisms in food and feed : annual report 2012 of the Dutch National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Molenaar, B.; Zaaijer, S.; Prins, T.W.; Kok, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Dutch Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (RIKILT Wageningen UR). The report gives an overview of the NRL activities carried out in 2012. In 2012 the two Dutch Official Laboratories participated in several proficiency tests with good

  8. Serum chemistry reference values for the common genet (Genetta genetta): variations associated with Leishmania infantum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Javier; Chirife, Andrea D; Altet, Laura

    2015-03-01

    The role of wildlife in the epidemiology of leishmaniosis in under debate, and determining whether infection with Leishmania infantum causes illness in wild carnivores is important to determine its potential role as a reservoir. To provide for the first time serum biochemistry reference values for the common genet (Genetta genetta), and to determine variations associated with L. infantum infection. Twenty-five serum biochemistry parameters were determined in 22 wild-caught genets. Blood samples were analyzed for L. infantum DNA by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two female genets were positive for L. infantum DNA but did not show any external clinical sign upon physical examination. Among other variations in the biochemistry values of these genets, one presented a higher concentration of gamma-globulins and cholesterol, whereas the other genet presented increased creatinine, bilirubin, and chloride levels when compared to uninfected females. Sex-related differences in some parameters were also reported. Infection with L. infantum may sometimes be accompanied by abnormal serum biochemistry in wild carnivores. Clinical disease may occur in L. infantum-infected wild carnivores. This has implications in the epidemiology of leishmaniosis. In addition, the data provided here would also be useful as reference values for researchers or rehabilitators working with the common genet.

  9. Identification and assembly of genomes and genetic elements in complex metagenomic samples without using reference genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, H Bjørn; Almeida, Mathieu; Juncker, Agnieszka Sierakowska; Rasmussen, Simon; Li, Junhua; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Plichta, Damian R; Gautier, Laurent; Pedersen, Anders G; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Pelletier, Eric; Bonde, Ida; Nielsen, Trine; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Batto, Jean-Michel; Quintanilha Dos Santos, Marcelo B; Blom, Nikolaj; Borruel, Natalia; Burgdorf, Kristoffer S; Boumezbeur, Fouad; Casellas, Francesc; Doré, Joël; Dworzynski, Piotr; Guarner, Francisco; Hansen, Torben; Hildebrand, Falk; Kaas, Rolf S; Kennedy, Sean; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kultima, Jens Roat; Léonard, Pierre; Levenez, Florence; Lund, Ole; Moumen, Bouziane; Le Paslier, Denis; Pons, Nicolas; Pedersen, Oluf; Prifti, Edi; Qin, Junjie; Raes, Jeroen; Sørensen, Søren; Tap, Julien; Tims, Sebastian; Ussery, David W; Yamada, Takuji; Renault, Pierre; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Bork, Peer; Wang, Jun; Brunak, Søren; Ehrlich, S Dusko

    2014-08-01

    Most current approaches for analyzing metagenomic data rely on comparisons to reference genomes, but the microbial diversity of many environments extends far beyond what is covered by reference databases. De novo segregation of complex metagenomic data into specific biological entities, such as particular bacterial strains or viruses, remains a largely unsolved problem. Here we present a method, based on binning co-abundant genes across a series of metagenomic samples, that enables comprehensive discovery of new microbial organisms, viruses and co-inherited genetic entities and aids assembly of microbial genomes without the need for reference sequences. We demonstrate the method on data from 396 human gut microbiome samples and identify 7,381 co-abundance gene groups (CAGs), including 741 metagenomic species (MGS). We use these to assemble 238 high-quality microbial genomes and identify affiliations between MGS and hundreds of viruses or genetic entities. Our method provides the means for comprehensive profiling of the diversity within complex metagenomic samples.

  10. Influence of anchoring on miscarriage risk perception associated with amniocentesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Regina; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; Mastrobattista, Joan; Noblin, Sarah Jane; Refuerzo, Jerrie; Smith, Janice L; Singletary, Claire N

    2015-04-01

    One factor women consider when deciding whether to pursue amniocentesis is the risk of miscarriage. People use mechanisms like anchoring, or the prior belief regarding the magnitude of risk, as a frame of reference for new information. This study aimed to determine a woman's perception of miscarriage risk associated with amniocentesis before and after genetic counseling and to determine what factors anchor a woman's perception of miscarriage risk. One hundred thirteen women being seen for prenatal genetic counseling and possible amniocentesis at six Houston clinics participated in the two-part anonymous survey. While most women (56.7 %) perceived the risk as low or average pre-counseling and indicated the numeric risk of amniocentesis as risk as risk perception did not change after the genetic counseling session (60 %). Those who changed their feeling about the risk after counseling showed a decreased perception of the risk (p perception of the risk (p = 0.017) whereas those who declined amniocentesis were more likely to view the risk as high (p = 0.004). The only two anchoring factors that had an effect were having a friend or relative with a personal or family history of a genetic disorder (p = 0.001) and having a child already (p = 0.038); both were associated with a lower risk perception. The lack of significant factors may reflect the uniqueness of each patient's risk assessment framework and reinforces the importance of genetic counseling to elucidate individual concerns, particularly as non-invasive prenatal testing becomes more widely available and further complicates the prenatal testing landscape.

  11. Effect of endogenous reference genes on digital PCR assessment of genetically engineered canola events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigst Demeke

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR has been used for absolute quantification of genetically engineered (GE events. Absolute quantification of GE events by duplex ddPCR requires the use of appropriate primers and probes for target and reference gene sequences in order to accurately determine the amount of GE materials. Single copy reference genes are generally preferred for absolute quantification of GE events by ddPCR. Study has not been conducted on a comparison of reference genes for absolute quantification of GE canola events by ddPCR. The suitability of four endogenous reference sequences (HMG-I/Y, FatA(A, CruA and Ccf for absolute quantification of GE canola events by ddPCR was investigated. The effect of DNA extraction methods and DNA quality on the assessment of reference gene copy numbers was also investigated. ddPCR results were affected by the use of single vs. two copy reference genes. The single copy, FatA(A, reference gene was found to be stable and suitable for absolute quantification of GE canola events by ddPCR. For the copy numbers measured, the HMG-I/Y reference gene was less consistent than FatA(A reference gene. The expected ddPCR values were underestimated when CruA and Ccf (two copy endogenous Cruciferin sequences were used because of high number of copies. It is important to make an adjustment if two copy reference genes are used for ddPCR in order to obtain accurate results. On the other hand, real-time quantitative PCR results were not affected by the use of single vs. two copy reference genes. Keywords: Canola, Digital PCR, DNA extraction, GMO, Reference genes

  12. Effect of endogenous reference genes on digital PCR assessment of genetically engineered canola events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeke, Tigst; Eng, Monika

    2018-05-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been used for absolute quantification of genetically engineered (GE) events. Absolute quantification of GE events by duplex ddPCR requires the use of appropriate primers and probes for target and reference gene sequences in order to accurately determine the amount of GE materials. Single copy reference genes are generally preferred for absolute quantification of GE events by ddPCR. Study has not been conducted on a comparison of reference genes for absolute quantification of GE canola events by ddPCR. The suitability of four endogenous reference sequences ( HMG-I/Y , FatA(A), CruA and Ccf) for absolute quantification of GE canola events by ddPCR was investigated. The effect of DNA extraction methods and DNA quality on the assessment of reference gene copy numbers was also investigated. ddPCR results were affected by the use of single vs. two copy reference genes. The single copy, FatA(A), reference gene was found to be stable and suitable for absolute quantification of GE canola events by ddPCR. For the copy numbers measured, the HMG-I/Y reference gene was less consistent than FatA(A) reference gene. The expected ddPCR values were underestimated when CruA and Ccf (two copy endogenous Cruciferin sequences) were used because of high number of copies. It is important to make an adjustment if two copy reference genes are used for ddPCR in order to obtain accurate results. On the other hand, real-time quantitative PCR results were not affected by the use of single vs. two copy reference genes.

  13. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    To analyze patients with kidney cancer referred for evaluation at a high-volume genetics service at a comprehensive cancer center and identify factors associated with positive tests for hereditary cancer syndromes. A retrospective review of patients referred to the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was performed, and patients with a personal history of kidney cancer were identified. Patient and disease characteristics were reviewed. In all, 4 variables including age at diagnosis of kidney tumor, presence of syndromic manifestations, family history of kidney cancer, and number of primary malignancies were evaluated for association with positive test results in 2 groups: patients tested for renal cell carcinoma syndromes and Lynch syndrome. Guidance for genetic testing strategy in patients with kidney cancer is provided. Between 1999 and 2012, 120 patients with a history of kidney cancer were evaluated by the Clinical Genetics Service. The mean age at kidney cancer diagnosis was 52 years (interquartile range: 42-63), with 57% being women. A family history of kidney cancer was reported by 39 patients (33%). Time between diagnosis of first cancer and genetic consultation was 5 years in the remaining 23%. Overall, 95 patients were tested for genetic abnormalities with 27 (28%) testing positive. Testing for renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-related syndromes was performed on 43 patients, with 13 testing positive (30%). Lynch syndrome testing was positive in 9 patients (32%) after 28 were tested. In RCC-associated syndromes, young age of diagnosis was associated with positive test results. Conversely, syndromic manifestations and increasing number of primary malignancies were associated with positive Lynch testing. The discovery of inherited kidney cancer syndromes has provided a unique opportunity to identify patients at increased risk for cancer. Factors associated with positive genetic testing are unique to different syndromes. These data

  14. Charting the genotype-phenotype map: lessons from the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Trudy F C; Huang, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture (causal molecular variants, their effects, and frequencies) of quantitative traits is important for precision agriculture and medicine and predicting adaptive evolution, but is challenging in most species. The Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a collection of 205 inbred strains with whole genome sequences derived from a single wild population in Raleigh, NC, USA. The large amount of quantitative genetic variation, lack of population structure, and rapid local decay of linkage disequilibrium in the DGRP and outbred populations derived from DGRP lines present a favorable scenario for performing genome-wide association (GWA) mapping analyses to identify candidate causal genes, polymorphisms, and pathways affecting quantitative traits. The many GWA studies utilizing the DGRP have revealed substantial natural genetic variation for all reported traits, little evidence for variants with large effects but enrichment for variants with low P-values, and a tendency for lower frequency variants to have larger effects than more common variants. The variants detected in the GWA analyses rarely overlap those discovered using mutagenesis, and often are the first functional annotations of computationally predicted genes. Variants implicated in GWA analyses typically have sex-specific and genetic background-specific (epistatic) effects, as well as pleiotropic effects on other quantitative traits. Studies in the DGRP reveal substantial genetic control of environmental variation. Taking account of genetic architecture can greatly improve genomic prediction in the DGRP. These features of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits are likely to apply to other species, including humans. WIREs Dev Biol 2018, 7:e289. doi: 10.1002/wdev.289 This article is categorized under: Invertebrate Organogenesis > Flies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. One Novel Multiple-Target Plasmid Reference Molecule Targeting Eight Genetically Modified Canola Events for Genetically Modified Canola Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuqing; Li, Xiang; Wang, Canhua; Song, Guiwen; Pi, Liqun; Zheng, Lan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2017-09-27

    Multiple-target plasmid DNA reference materials have been generated and utilized as good substitutes of matrix-based reference materials in the analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Herein, we report the construction of one multiple-target plasmid reference molecule, pCAN, which harbors eight GM canola event-specific sequences (RF1, RF2, MS1, MS8, Topas 19/2, Oxy235, RT73, and T45) and a partial sequence of the canola endogenous reference gene PEP. The applicability of this plasmid reference material in qualitative and quantitative PCR assays of the eight GM canola events was evaluated, including the analysis of specificity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and performance of pCAN in the analysis of various canola samples, etc. The LODs are 15 copies for RF2, MS1, and RT73 assays using pCAN as the calibrator and 10 genome copies for the other events. The LOQ in each event-specific real-time PCR assay is 20 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and PEP assays are between 91% and 97%, and the squared regression coefficients (R 2 ) are all higher than 0.99. The quantification bias values varied from 0.47% to 20.68% with relative standard deviation (RSD) from 1.06% to 24.61% in the quantification of simulated samples. Furthermore, 10 practical canola samples sampled from imported shipments in the port of Shanghai, China, were analyzed employing pCAN as the calibrator, and the results were comparable with those assays using commercial certified materials as the calibrator. Concluding from these results, we believe that this newly developed pCAN plasmid is one good candidate for being a plasmid DNA reference material in the detection and quantification of the eight GM canola events in routine analysis.

  16. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd McElroy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously presented anchors on participants' judgments. Our findings indicate that participants high in openness-to-experience were significantly more influenced by anchoring cues relative to participants low in this trait. These findings were consistent across two different types of anchoring tasks providing convergent evidence for our hypothesis.

  17. Which Individuals To Choose To Update the Reference Population? Minimizing the Loss of Genetic Diversity in Animal Genomic Selection Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia E. Eynard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic selection (GS is commonly used in livestock and increasingly in plant breeding. Relying on phenotypes and genotypes of a reference population, GS allows performance prediction for young individuals having only genotypes. This is expected to achieve fast high genetic gain but with a potential loss of genetic diversity. Existing methods to conserve genetic diversity depend mostly on the choice of the breeding individuals. In this study, we propose a modification of the reference population composition to mitigate diversity loss. Since the high cost of phenotyping is the limiting factor for GS, our findings are of major economic interest. This study aims to answer the following questions: how would decisions on the reference population affect the breeding population, and how to best select individuals to update the reference population and balance maximizing genetic gain and minimizing loss of genetic diversity? We investigated three updating strategies for the reference population: random, truncation, and optimal contribution (OC strategies. OC maximizes genetic merit for a fixed loss of genetic diversity. A French Montbéliarde dairy cattle population with 50K SNP chip genotypes and simulations over 10 generations were used to compare these different strategies using milk production as the trait of interest. Candidates were selected to update the reference population. Prediction bias and both genetic merit and diversity were measured. Changes in the reference population composition slightly affected the breeding population. Optimal contribution strategy appeared to be an acceptable compromise to maintain both genetic gain and diversity in the reference and the breeding populations.

  18. Which Individuals To Choose To Update the Reference Population? Minimizing the Loss of Genetic Diversity in Animal Genomic Selection Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynard, Sonia E; Croiseau, Pascal; Laloë, Denis; Fritz, Sebastien; Calus, Mario P L; Restoux, Gwendal

    2018-01-04

    Genomic selection (GS) is commonly used in livestock and increasingly in plant breeding. Relying on phenotypes and genotypes of a reference population, GS allows performance prediction for young individuals having only genotypes. This is expected to achieve fast high genetic gain but with a potential loss of genetic diversity. Existing methods to conserve genetic diversity depend mostly on the choice of the breeding individuals. In this study, we propose a modification of the reference population composition to mitigate diversity loss. Since the high cost of phenotyping is the limiting factor for GS, our findings are of major economic interest. This study aims to answer the following questions: how would decisions on the reference population affect the breeding population, and how to best select individuals to update the reference population and balance maximizing genetic gain and minimizing loss of genetic diversity? We investigated three updating strategies for the reference population: random, truncation, and optimal contribution (OC) strategies. OC maximizes genetic merit for a fixed loss of genetic diversity. A French Montbéliarde dairy cattle population with 50K SNP chip genotypes and simulations over 10 generations were used to compare these different strategies using milk production as the trait of interest. Candidates were selected to update the reference population. Prediction bias and both genetic merit and diversity were measured. Changes in the reference population composition slightly affected the breeding population. Optimal contribution strategy appeared to be an acceptable compromise to maintain both genetic gain and diversity in the reference and the breeding populations. Copyright © 2018 Eynard et al.

  19. A statistical assessment of differences and equivalences between genetically modified and reference plant varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amzal Billy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safety assessment of genetically modified organisms is currently often performed by comparative evaluation. However, natural variation of plant characteristics between commercial varieties is usually not considered explicitly in the statistical computations underlying the assessment. Results Statistical methods are described for the assessment of the difference between a genetically modified (GM plant variety and a conventional non-GM counterpart, and for the assessment of the equivalence between the GM variety and a group of reference plant varieties which have a history of safe use. It is proposed to present the results of both difference and equivalence testing for all relevant plant characteristics simultaneously in one or a few graphs, as an aid for further interpretation in safety assessment. A procedure is suggested to derive equivalence limits from the observed results for the reference plant varieties using a specific implementation of the linear mixed model. Three different equivalence tests are defined to classify any result in one of four equivalence classes. The performance of the proposed methods is investigated by a simulation study, and the methods are illustrated on compositional data from a field study on maize grain. Conclusions A clear distinction of practical relevance is shown between difference and equivalence testing. The proposed tests are shown to have appropriate performance characteristics by simulation, and the proposed simultaneous graphical representation of results was found to be helpful for the interpretation of results from a practical field trial data set.

  20. Career anchors and learning plan (part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is divided into three parts. The first part concentrates on how important career is for an individual, organization and society. The author establishes that understanding of career has changed dramatically and does not only refer to climbing up the career ladder, but also moving off or even down the career ladder. The notion of career, as a lifelong and professional path, encompasses all aspects of human personality and their roles acquired through one's life. On basis of vast and longitudinal research, where the author has studied career anchors of individuals, it is the objective of the author to find out on basis of what grounds do the individuals decide to take certain directions in their careers and how learning contributes to such decisions. As a source the author has used Shein's theory of career anchors. Part one describes in greater detail 8 different career anchors and introduces their main features with the findings of the research, which refer to the analysis of professions (work positions and established career anchors. The author thus verifies the hypothesis that career anchors do exist in our area.

  1. The redesigned Forensic Research/Reference on Genetics-knowledge base, FROG-kb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Kenneth K; Soundararajan, Usha; Rajeevan, Haseena; Pakstis, Andrew J; Moore, Katherine N; Ropero-Miller, Jeri D

    2018-03-01

    The Forensic Resource/Reference on Genetics-knowledge base (FROG-kb) web site was introduced in 2011 and in the five years since the previous publication ongoing research into how the database can better serve forensics has resulted in extensive redesign of the database interface and functionality. Originally designed as a prototype to support forensic use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), FROG-kb provides a freely accessible web interface that facilitates forensic practice and can be useful for teaching and research. Based on knowledge gained through its use, the web interface has been redesigned for easier navigation through the multiple components. The site also has functional enhancements, extensive new documentation, and new reference panels of SNPs with new curated data. FROG-kb focuses on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and provides reference population data for several published panels of individual identification SNPs (IISNPs) and several published panels of ancestry inference SNPs (AISNPs). For each of the various marker panels with reference population data, FROG-kb calculates random match probabilities (RMP) and relative likelihoods of ancestry for a user-entered genotype profile (either completely or partially specified). Example genotype profiles are available and the User's Manual presents interpretation guidelines for the calculations. The extensive documentation along with ongoing updates makes FROG-kb a comprehensive tool in facilitating use of SNPs in forensic practice and education. An overview of the new FROG-kb with examples and material explaining the results of its use are presented here. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multilayered Genetic and Omics Dissection of Mitochondrial Activity in a Mouse Reference Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yibo; Williams, Evan G.; Dubuis, Sébastien; Mottis, Adrienne; Jovaisaite, Virginija; Houten, Sander M.; Argmann, Carmen A.; Faridi, Pouya; Wolski, Witold; Kutalik, Zoltán; Zamboni, Nicola; Auwerx, Johan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The manner by which genotype and environment affect complex phenotypes is one of the fundamental questions in biology. In this study, we quantified the transcriptome—a subset of the metabolome—and, using targeted proteomics, quantified a subset of the liver proteome from 40 strains of the BXD mouse genetic reference population on two diverse diets. We discovered dozens of transcript, protein, and metabolite QTLs, several of which linked to metabolic phenotypes. Most prominently, Dhtkd1 was identified as a primary regulator of 2-aminoadipate, explaining variance in fasted glucose and diabetes status in both mice and humans. These integrated molecular profiles also allowed further characterization of complex pathways, particularly the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). UPRmt shows strikingly variant responses at the transcript and protein level that are remarkably conserved among C. elegans, mice, and humans. Overall, these examples demonstrate the value of an integrated multilayered omics approach to characterize complex metabolic phenotypes. PMID:25215496

  3. The Mosaic Ancestry of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel and the D. melanogaster Reference Genome Reveals a Network of Epistatic Fitness Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, John E.

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of Drosophila melanogaster derive from both European and African source populations, but despite their importance for genetic research, patterns of ancestry along their genomes are largely undocumented. Here, I infer geographic ancestry along genomes of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and the D. melanogaster reference genome, which may have implications for reference alignment, association mapping, and population genomic studies in Drosophila. Overall, the proportion of African ancestry was estimated to be 20% for the DGRP and 9% for the reference genome. Combining my estimate of admixture timing with historical records, I provide the first estimate of natural generation time for this species (approximately 15 generations per year). Ancestry levels were found to vary strikingly across the genome, with less African introgression on the X chromosome, in regions of high recombination, and at genes involved in specific processes (e.g., circadian rhythm). An important role for natural selection during the admixture process was further supported by evidence that many unlinked pairs of loci showed a deficiency of Africa–Europe allele combinations between them. Numerous epistatic fitness interactions may therefore exist between African and European genotypes, leading to ongoing selection against incompatible variants. By focusing on hubs in this network of fitness interactions, I identified a set of interacting loci that include genes with roles in sensation and neuropeptide/hormone reception. These findings suggest that admixed D. melanogaster samples could become an important study system for the genetics of early-stage isolation between populations. PMID:26354524

  4. Finding the joker among the maize endogenous reference genes for genetically modified organism (GMO) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternò, Annalisa; Marchesi, Ugo; Gatto, Francesco; Verginelli, Daniela; Quarchioni, Cinzia; Fusco, Cristiana; Zepparoni, Alessia; Amaddeo, Demetrio; Ciabatti, Ilaria

    2009-12-09

    The comparison of five real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods targeted at maize ( Zea mays ) endogenous sequences is reported. PCR targets were the alcohol dehydrogenase (adh) gene for three methods and high-mobility group (hmg) gene for the other two. The five real-time PCR methods have been checked under repeatability conditions at several dilution levels on both pooled DNA template from several genetically modified (GM) maize certified reference materials (CRMs) and single CRM DNA extracts. Slopes and R(2) coefficients of all of the curves obtained from the adopted regression model were compared within the same method and among all of the five methods, and the limit of detection and limit of quantitation were analyzed for each PCR system. Furthermore, method equivalency was evaluated on the basis of the ability to estimate the target haploid genome copy number at each concentration level. Results indicated that, among the five methods tested, one of the hmg-targeted PCR systems can be considered equivalent to the others but shows the best regression parameters and a higher repeteability along the dilution range. Thereby, it is proposed as a valid module to be coupled to different event-specific real-time PCR for maize genetically modified organism (GMO) quantitation. The resulting practicability improvement on the analytical control of GMOs is discussed.

  5. Mouse IDGenes: a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Michaela; Preusse, Martin; Zhang, Jingzhong; Schechter, Julia; Mayer, Daniela; Lentes, Bernd; Theis, Fabian; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Trümbach, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The study of developmental processes in the mouse and other vertebrates includes the understanding of patterning along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial- lateral axis. Specifically, neural development is also of great clinical relevance because several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism disorders or drug addiction and also brain malformations are thought to have neurodevelopmental origins, i.e. pathogenesis initiates during childhood and adolescence. Impacts during early neurodevelopment might also predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. The neural tube develops from its precursor tissue, the neural plate, in a patterning process that is determined by compartmentalization into morphogenetic units, the action of local signaling centers and a well-defined and locally restricted expression of genes and their interactions. While public databases provide gene expression data with spatio-temporal resolution, they usually neglect the genetic interactions that govern neural development. Here, we introduce Mouse IDGenes, a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain. The database is highly curated and offers detailed information about gene expressions and the genetic interactions at the developing mid-/hindbrain boundary. To showcase the predictive power of interaction data, we infer new Wnt/β-catenin target genes by machine learning and validate one of them experimentally. The database is updated regularly. Moreover, it can easily be extended by the research community. Mouse IDGenes will contribute as an important resource to the research on mouse brain development, not exclusively by offering data retrieval, but also by allowing data input. http://mouseidgenes.helmholtz-muenchen.de. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Long-term response to genomic selection: effects of estimation method and reference population structure for different genetic architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaansen, John W M; Coster, Albart; Calus, Mario P L; van Arendonk, Johan A M; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2012-01-24

    Genomic selection has become an important tool in the genetic improvement of animals and plants. The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of breeding value estimation method, reference population structure, and trait genetic architecture, on long-term response to genomic selection without updating marker effects. Three methods were used to estimate genomic breeding values: a BLUP method with relationships estimated from genome-wide markers (GBLUP), a Bayesian method, and a partial least squares regression method (PLSR). A shallow (individuals from one generation) or deep reference population (individuals from five generations) was used with each method. The effects of the different selection approaches were compared under four different genetic architectures for the trait under selection. Selection was based on one of the three genomic breeding values, on pedigree BLUP breeding values, or performed at random. Selection continued for ten generations. Differences in long-term selection response were small. For a genetic architecture with a very small number of three to four quantitative trait loci (QTL), the Bayesian method achieved a response that was 0.05 to 0.1 genetic standard deviation higher than other methods in generation 10. For genetic architectures with approximately 30 to 300 QTL, PLSR (shallow reference) or GBLUP (deep reference) had an average advantage of 0.2 genetic standard deviation over the Bayesian method in generation 10. GBLUP resulted in 0.6% and 0.9% less inbreeding than PLSR and BM and on average a one third smaller reduction of genetic variance. Responses in early generations were greater with the shallow reference population while long-term response was not affected by reference population structure. The ranking of estimation methods was different with than without selection. Under selection, applying GBLUP led to lower inbreeding and a smaller reduction of genetic variance while a similar response to selection was

  7. Conceptualization and Exploration of Composite Career Anchors: An Analysis of Information Systems Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Hindupur V.; Potosky, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Information systems professionals (n=163) completed measures of career anchors and outcomes (career/job satisfaction, job performance, perceived advancement prospects); 46% had multiple dominant anchors and these individuals did not have significantly different career outcomes than those with single dominant anchors. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  8. Anchoring Proteins as Regulators of Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, Alessia; Ghigo, Alessandra; Scott, John D.; Hirsch, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and temporal organization of signal transduction is coordinated through the segregation of signaling enzymes in selected cellular compartments. This highly evolved regulatory mechanism ensures the activation of selected enzymes only in the vicinity of their target proteins. In this context, cAMP-responsive triggering of protein kinase A is modulated by a family of scaffold proteins referred to as A-kinase anchoring proteins. A-kinase anchoring proteins form the core of multiprotein complexes and enable simultaneous but segregated cAMP signaling events to occur in defined cellular compartments. In this review we will focus on the description of A-kinase anchoring protein function in the regulation of cardiac physiopathology. PMID:22859670

  9. Association of functional genetic variants of A-kinase anchoring protein 10 with QT interval length in full-term Polish newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoniewska, Beata; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Clark, Jeremy Simon; Gorący, Iwona; Horodnicka-Józwa, Anita; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej

    2015-03-16

    A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs) coordinate the specificity of protein kinase A signaling by localizing the kinase to subcellular sites. The 1936G (V646) AKAP10 allele has been associated in adults with low cholinergic/vagus nerve sensitivity, shortened PR intervals in ECG recording and in newborns with increased blood pressure and higher cholesterol cord blood concentration. The aim of the study was to answer the question of whether 1936A > G AKAP10 polymorphism is associated with the newborn electrocardiographic variables. Electrocardiograms were recorded from 114 consecutive healthy Polish newborns (55 females, 59 males), born after 37 gestational weeks to healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies. All recordings were made between 3(rd) and 7(th) day of life to avoid QT variability. The heart rate per minute and duration of PR, QRS, RR and QT intervals were usually measured. The ECGs were evaluated independently by three observers. At birth, cord blood of neonates was obtained for isolation of genomic DNA. The distribution of anthropometric and electrocardiographic variables in our cohort approached normality (skewness G variant and QTc interval in Polish newborns.

  10. The Mosaic Ancestry of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel and the D. melanogaster Reference Genome Reveals a Network of Epistatic Fitness Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, John E

    2015-12-01

    North American populations of Drosophila melanogaster derive from both European and African source populations, but despite their importance for genetic research, patterns of ancestry along their genomes are largely undocumented. Here, I infer geographic ancestry along genomes of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and the D. melanogaster reference genome, which may have implications for reference alignment, association mapping, and population genomic studies in Drosophila. Overall, the proportion of African ancestry was estimated to be 20% for the DGRP and 9% for the reference genome. Combining my estimate of admixture timing with historical records, I provide the first estimate of natural generation time for this species (approximately 15 generations per year). Ancestry levels were found to vary strikingly across the genome, with less African introgression on the X chromosome, in regions of high recombination, and at genes involved in specific processes (e.g., circadian rhythm). An important role for natural selection during the admixture process was further supported by evidence that many unlinked pairs of loci showed a deficiency of Africa-Europe allele combinations between them. Numerous epistatic fitness interactions may therefore exist between African and European genotypes, leading to ongoing selection against incompatible variants. By focusing on hubs in this network of fitness interactions, I identified a set of interacting loci that include genes with roles in sensation and neuropeptide/hormone reception. These findings suggest that admixed D. melanogaster samples could become an important study system for the genetics of early-stage isolation between populations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Inter-laboratory analysis of selected genetically modified plant reference materials with digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobnik, David; Demšar, Tina; Huber, Ingrid; Gerdes, Lars; Broeders, Sylvia; Roosens, Nancy; Debode, Frederic; Berben, Gilbert; Žel, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR), as a new technology in the field of genetically modified (GM) organism (GMO) testing, enables determination of absolute target copy numbers. The purpose of our study was to test the transferability of methods designed for quantitative PCR (qPCR) to dPCR and to carry out an inter-laboratory comparison of the performance of two different dPCR platforms when determining the absolute GM copy numbers and GM copy number ratio in reference materials certified for GM content in mass fraction. Overall results in terms of measured GM% were within acceptable variation limits for both tested dPCR systems. However, the determined absolute copy numbers for individual genes or events showed higher variability between laboratories in one third of the cases, most possibly due to variability in the technical work, droplet size variability, and analysis of the raw data. GMO quantification with dPCR and qPCR was comparable. As methods originally designed for qPCR performed well in dPCR systems, already validated qPCR assays can most generally be used for dPCR technology with the purpose of GMO detection. Graphical abstract The output of three different PCR-based platforms was assessed in an inter-laboratory comparison.

  12. A novel reference plasmid for the qualitative detection of genetically modified rice in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS), the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), the ubiquitin gene (Ubi), the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt), that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001) that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC). pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice.

  13. A Novel Reference Plasmid for the Qualitative Detection of Genetically Modified Rice in Food and Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S, the ubiquitin gene (Ubi, the bar gene, and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (Hpt, that are commonly present in GM rice. Therefore, we constructed a novel plasmid (pBJGMM001 that contains fragments of these elements and two endogenous reference genes (the sucrose phosphate synthase gene, SPS, and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene, PEPC. pBJGMM001 can serve as a standard for detecting 96% of GM rice lines in China. The primers, amplicons, reaction mixture, and PCR program were developed based on Chinese National Standards. The protocol was validated and determined to be suitable for practical use in monitoring and identifying GM rice.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder have been from Saudi Arabia, Portugal, or Spain. Related Information What information about a genetic condition ... Targets Orphanet: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria Screening, Technology, and Research in Genetics Virginia Department of Health ( ...

  15. Which individuals to choose to update the reference population? Minimizing the loss of genetic diversity in animal genomic selection programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eynard, Sonia E.; Croiseau, Pascal; Laloë, Denis; Fritz, Sebastien; Calus, Mario P.L.; Restoux, Gwendal

    2018-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is commonly used in livestock and increasingly in plant breeding. Relying on phenotypes and genotypes of a reference population, GS allows performance prediction for young individuals having only genotypes. This is expected to achieve fast high genetic gain but with a

  16. Career anchors and values from different career management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cunha da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To analyze the relationships between career anchors and young Generation Y professionals’ values, from the career concept perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Research concerning the proposed objective was carried out through quantitative research involving 189 Business Administration majors from a Catholic university in São Paulo, Brazil. We used two instruments to identify the career anchors and values of respondents: Schein (1990 and Schwartz (1994, respectively. We used statistical techniques to explore the relationships between career anchors and values. Findings – Among the results, mention should be made to the statistical relationships found between analyzed career anchors and values. It is also important to stress that, although the Lifestyle career anchor was predominantly present in the conglomerate division, this anchor was the predominant characteristic in the differentiation of the smaller group of respondents, the new career group. The General Management Career Anchor, which presents a lower incidence, is the predominant characteristic of the larger group, referring to organizational careers. As well as the Lifestyle career anchor, the Hedonism value was predominant among respondents. Originality/value – The need to consider the following was found: Generation Y presents generational characteristics that drive people management to propose work structures that offer activities to generate learning, pleasure, self-fulfillment and conciliation between work and personal life.

  17. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  18. Endogenous Reference Genes and Their Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Genetically Modified Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Litao; Quan, Sheng; Zhang, Dabing

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous reference genes (ERG) and their derivate analytical methods are standard requirements for analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Development and validation of suitable ERGs is the primary step for establishing assays that monitoring the genetically modified (GM) contents in food/feed samples. Herein, we give a review of the ERGs currently used for GM wheat analysis, such as ACC1, PKABA1, ALMT1, and Waxy-D1, as well as their performances in GM wheat analysis. Also, we discussed one model for developing and validating one ideal RG for one plant species based on our previous research work.

  19. Effects of anchoring and adjustment in the evaluation of product pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaad, Eitan; Sayag, Neta; Ezer, Aliya

    2010-08-01

    Anchoring and adjustment comprise a heuristic that creates expectations. Two types of anchors were applied on participants' evaluation of products: the price reference of the product (maximum, minimum, or no price reference) and the context in which the products were evaluated (the prestige of the shopping center). Results showed that both factors anchored evaluations of products' value. Context effects were explained by the different expectations of visitors in prestigious (looking for quality) and less prestigious (seeking a bargain) centers.

  20. Introducing the Forensic Research/Reference on Genetics knowledge base, FROG-kb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevan, Haseena; Soundararajan, Usha; Pakstis, Andrew J; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2012-09-01

    Online tools and databases based on multi-allelic short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are actively used in forensic teaching, research, and investigations. The Fst value of each CODIS marker tends to be low across the populations of the world and most populations typically have all the common STRP alleles present diminishing the ability of these systems to discriminate ethnicity. Recently, considerable research is being conducted on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be considered for human identification and description. However, online tools and databases that can be used for forensic research and investigation are limited. The back end DBMS (Database Management System) for FROG-kb is Oracle version 10. The front end is implemented with specific code using technologies such as Java, Java Servlet, JSP, JQuery, and GoogleCharts. We present an open access web application, FROG-kb (Forensic Research/Reference on Genetics-knowledge base, http://frog.med.yale.edu), that is useful for teaching and research relevant to forensics and can serve as a tool facilitating forensic practice. The underlying data for FROG-kb are provided by the already extensively used and referenced ALlele FREquency Database, ALFRED (http://alfred.med.yale.edu). In addition to displaying data in an organized manner, computational tools that use the underlying allele frequencies with user-provided data are implemented in FROG-kb. These tools are organized by the different published SNP/marker panels available. This web tool currently has implemented general functions possible for two types of SNP panels, individual identification and ancestry inference, and a prediction function specific to a phenotype informative panel for eye color. The current online version of FROG-kb already provides new and useful functionality. We expect FROG-kb to grow and expand in capabilities and welcome input from the forensic community in identifying datasets and functionalities that will be most helpful

  1. Genetic structure, diversity, and allelic richness in composite collection and reference set in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Cholenahalli LL

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genetic resources (PGR are the basic raw materials for future genetic progress and an insurance against unforeseen threats to agricultural production. An extensive characterization of PGR provides an opportunity to dissect structure, mine allelic variations, and identify diverse accessions for crop improvement. The Generation Challenge Program http://www.generationcp.org conceptualized the development of "composite collections" and extraction of "reference sets" from these for more efficient tapping of global crop-related genetic resources. In this study, we report the genetic structure, diversity and allelic richness in a composite collection of chickpea using SSR markers, and formation of a reference set of 300 accessions. Results The 48 SSR markers detected 1683 alleles in 2915 accessions, of which, 935 were considered rare, 720 common and 28 most frequent. The alleles per locus ranged from 14 to 67, averaged 35, and the polymorphic information content was from 0.467 to 0.974, averaged 0.854. Marker polymorphism varied between groups of accessions in the composite collection and reference set. A number of group-specific alleles were detected: 104 in Kabuli, 297 in desi, and 69 in wild Cicer; 114 each in Mediterranean and West Asia (WA, 117 in South and South East Asia (SSEA, and 10 in African region accessions. Desi and kabuli shared 436 alleles, while wild Cicer shared 17 and 16 alleles with desi and kabuli, respectively. The accessions from SSEA and WA shared 74 alleles, while those from Mediterranean 38 and 33 alleles with WA and SSEA, respectively. Desi chickpea contained a higher proportion of rare alleles (53% than kabuli (46%, while wild Cicer accessions were devoid of rare alleles. A genotype-based reference set captured 1315 (78% of the 1683 composite collection alleles of which 463 were rare, 826 common, and 26 the most frequent alleles. The neighbour-joining tree diagram of this reference set represents

  2. Genetics Home Reference: short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... An Y, Weavil SD, Chaing SH, Bali D, McDonald MT, Kishnani PS, Chen YT, Millington DS. Rare ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Maisenbacher MK, Bolivar J, Bauer M, Zackai EH, McDonald-McGinn D, Nowaczyk MM, Murray M, Hustead V, ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  4. A statistical assessment of differences and equivalences between genetically modified and reference plant varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, van der H.; Perry, J.N.; Amzal, B.; Paoletti, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Safety assessment of genetically modified organisms is currently often performed by comparative evaluation. However, natural variation of plant characteristics between commercial varieties is usually not considered explicitly in the statistical computations underlying the assessment.

  5. Radioprotection of the environment: on the context of biodiversity and evolutionary theory. A reference organism has no genetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedervall, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    The recent efforts to define a basis for radioprotection of the environment include some concepts and ideas related to various endpoints which need a clarification. This paper focuses on the biodiversity concept and the context of individuals of a species as well as that of the species as a gene pool. A major problem with the ambition to radioprotect biodiversity is the concept 'reference organism' which has no genetic properties and therefore is in contradiction with a real biological species. Biodiversity and the species (gene pool) concept are, just as any other areas of biology, integral parts of evolutionary theory. With the reference organism as a basis no meaningful reasoning can take place which relates data on radioactivity levels or mutations to potential effects on populations or biodiversity. It is therefore suggested that the national and international bodies involved in radioprotection of the environment take advantage of evolutionary theory as a reference frame. (author)

  6. Development and application of a multi-targeting reference plasmid as calibrator for analysis of five genetically modified soybean events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Cao, Yiwei; Wang, Canhua; Pan, Liangwen; Yang, Litao

    2015-04-01

    Reference materials are important in accurate analysis of genetically modified organism (GMO) contents in food/feeds, and development of novel reference plasmid is a new trend in the research of GMO reference materials. Herein, we constructed a novel multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, which contained seven event-specific sequences of five GM soybeans (MON89788-5', A2704-12-3', A5547-127-3', DP356043-5', DP305423-3', A2704-12-5', and A5547-127-5') and sequence of soybean endogenous reference gene Lectin. We evaluated the specificity, limit of detection and quantification, and applicability of pSOY in both qualitative and quantitative PCR analyses. The limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 20 copies in qualitative PCR, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) in quantitative PCR was 10 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and Lectin assays were higher than 90%, and the squared regression coefficients (R(2)) were more than 0.999. The quantification bias varied from 0.21% to 19.29%, and the relative standard deviations were from 1.08% to 9.84% in simulated samples analysis. All the results demonstrated that the developed multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, was a credible substitute of matrix reference materials, and could be used as a reliable reference calibrator in the identification and quantification of multiple GM soybean events.

  7. Global Distribution of Human-Associated Fecal Genetic Markers in Reference Samples from Six Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, René E; Reischer, Georg H; Ixenmaier, Simone K; Derx, Julia; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Ebdon, James E; Linke, Rita; Egle, Lukas; Ahmed, Warish; Blanch, Anicet R; Byamukama, Denis; Savill, Marion; Mushi, Douglas; Cristóbal, Héctor A; Edge, Thomas A; Schade, Margit A; Aslan, Asli; Brooks, Yolanda M; Sommer, Regina; Masago, Yoshifumi; Sato, Maria I; Taylor, Huw D; Rose, Joan B; Wuertz, Stefan; Shanks, Orin C; Piringer, Harald; Mach, Robert L; Savio, Domenico; Zessner, Matthias; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2018-05-01

    Numerous bacterial genetic markers are available for the molecular detection of human sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, widespread application is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding geographical stability, limiting implementation to a small number of well-characterized regions. This study investigates the geographic distribution of five human-associated genetic markers (HF183/BFDrev, HF183/BacR287, BacHum-UCD, BacH, and Lachno2) in municipal wastewaters (raw and treated) from 29 urban and rural wastewater treatment plants (750-4 400 000 population equivalents) from 13 countries spanning six continents. In addition, genetic markers were tested against 280 human and nonhuman fecal samples from domesticated, agricultural and wild animal sources. Findings revealed that all genetic markers are present in consistently high concentrations in raw (median log 10 7.2-8.0 marker equivalents (ME) 100 mL -1 ) and biologically treated wastewater samples (median log 10 4.6-6.0 ME 100 mL -1 ) regardless of location and population. The false positive rates of the various markers in nonhuman fecal samples ranged from 5% to 47%. Results suggest that several genetic markers have considerable potential for measuring human-associated contamination in polluted environmental waters. This will be helpful in water quality monitoring, pollution modeling and health risk assessment (as demonstrated by QMRAcatch) to guide target-oriented water safety management across the globe.

  8. The Holding Power of Anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The efficiency of an anchor may be expressed as the ratio (holding force + weight of anchor). In dry sand .... the market at the beginning of the coming season in three sizes, namely 20, 35 and. 60 lb. These are ... Taylor frozen-flow hypothesis.

  9. A decision tree for the genetic diagnosis of deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 (DADA2): a French reference centres experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Mélanie; Duflos, Claire; Melki, Isabelle; Bessis, Didier; Bonhomme, Axelle; Martin, Hélène; Doummar, Diane; Valence, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Diana; Carme, Emilie; Genevieve, David; Heimdal, Ketil; Insalaco, Antonella; Franck, Nathalie; Queyrel-Moranne, Viviane; Tieulie, Nathalie; London, Jonathan; Uettwiller, Florence; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Belot, Alexandre; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Hentgen, Véronique; Boursier, Guilaine; Touitou, Isabelle; Sarrabay, Guillaume

    2018-04-23

    Deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 (DADA2) is a recently described autoinflammatory disorder. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis. We aimed to describe the identifying symptoms and genotypes of patients referred to our reference centres and to improve the indications for genetic testing. DNA from 66 patients with clinically suspected DADA2 were sequenced by Sanger or next-generation sequencing. Detailed epidemiological, clinical and biological features were collected by use of a questionnaire and were compared between patients with and without genetic confirmation of DADA2. We identified 13 patients (19.6%) carrying recessively inherited mutations in ADA2 that were predicted to be deleterious. Eight patients were compound heterozygous for mutations. Seven mutations were novel (4 missense variants, 2 predicted to affect mRNA splicing and 1 frameshift). The mean age of the 13 patients with genetic confirmation was 12.7 years at disease onset and 20.8 years at diagnosis. Phenotypic manifestations included fever (85%), vasculitis (85%) and neurological disorders (54%). Features best associated with a confirmatory genotype included fever with neurologic or cutaneous attacks (odds ratio [OR] 10.71, p = 0.003 and OR 10.9, p < 0.001), fever alone (OR 8.1, p = 0.01), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) level with neurologic involvement (OR 6.63, p = 0.017). Our proposed decision tree may help improve obtaining genetic confirmation of DADA2 in the context of autoinflammatory symptoms. Prerequisites for quick and low-cost Sanger analysis include one typical cutaneous or neurological sign, one marker of inflammation (fever or elevated CRP level), and recurrent or chronic attacks in adults.

  10. Not all Anchors Weigh Equally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Michael; Velazquez, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    The anchoring bias is a reliable effect wherein a person's judgments are affected by initially presented information, but it is unknown specifically why this effect occurs. Research examining this bias suggests that elements of both numeric and semantic priming may be involved. To examine this, the present research used a phenomenon wherein people treat numeric information presented differently in Arabic numeral or verbal formats. We presented participants with one of many forms of an anchor that represented the same value (e.g., twelve hundred or 1,200). Thus, we could examine how a concept's meaning and its absolute numeric value affect anchoring. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that people respond to Arabic and verbal anchors differently. Experiment 3 showed that these differences occurred largely because people tend to think of numbers in digit format. This suggests that one's conceptual understanding of the anchored information matters more than its strict numeric value.

  11. Outcomes of the modified Brostrom procedure using suture anchors for chronic lateral ankle instability--a prospective, randomized comparison between single and double suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byung-Ki; Kim, Yong-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Choi, Eui-Sung; Shon, Hyun-Chul; Park, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The present prospective, randomized study was conducted to compare the clinical outcomes of the modified Brostrom procedure using single and double suture anchors for chronic lateral ankle instability. A total of 50 patients were followed up for more than 2 years after undergoing the modified Brostrom procedure. Of the 50 procedures, 25 each were performed using single and double suture anchors by 1 surgeon. The Karlsson scale had improved significantly to 89.8 points and 90.6 points in the single and double anchor groups, respectively. Using the Sefton grading system, 23 cases (92%) in the single anchor group and 22 (88%) in the double anchor group achieved satisfactory results. The talar tilt angle and anterior talar translation on stress radiographs using the Telos device had improved significantly to an average of 5.7° and 4.6 mm in the single anchor group and 4.5° and 4.3 mm in the double anchor group, respectively. The double anchor technique was superior with respect to the postoperative talar tilt. The single and double suture anchor techniques produced similar clinical and functional outcomes, with the exception of talar tilt as a reference of mechanical stability. The modified Brostrom procedure using both single and double suture anchors appears to be an effective treatment method for chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of Anchoring Mechanism of Fully Grouted Prestressed Anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEN Zhi-jie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some researchers have been carried out on analysis of the influence of the full grouted prestressed anchor shape of borehole wall on its carrying capacity. Based on the self-affine fractal feature of anchor borehole wall structural plane, the relation equation among structural plane shear strength, liquid injection pressure, tensile load and structural plane fractal dimension D was built, the instability judgment criterion of anchoring bearing strata and rock structural plane was determined, the solving equations of disintegrated rock support density were derived. Based on the experimental results, the theoretical basis of support design under the disintegrated rock condition was offered.

  13. Not all nutrition claims are perceived equal: anchoring effects and moderating mechanisms in food advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Hye Jin; Hove, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Despite the increased use of health claims in food advertising, few studies have investigated how specific nutrition claims have differential effects depending on how they are presented. In this context, the current study tests the anchoring hypothesis. Anchoring refers to a common human tendency to evaluate information differently depending on the presence or absence of a numerical "anchor" or reference point. Two (pilot and main) experimental studies explore anchoring effects on audience response to food advertising both directly and moderated by cognitive, motivational, and message factors. The pilot study finds that food product ads employing nutrition claims with an anchor rather than without an anchor generate two results: First, participants perceive the product to have lower fat/lower calorie contents (anchoring hypothesis); second, they prefer the messages with an anchor over those without an anchor. The main study reports that when anchoring is successfully evoked, it produces favorable attitudes toward the ad, favorable attitudes toward the brand, and purchase intention-but only when moderated by health orientation, claim believability, and nutrition knowledge. Practical implications are provided with respect to regulatory guidelines and effective communication strategies for promoting low-fat and low-calorie products in food advertising.

  14. Identification and assembly of genomes and genetic elements in complex metagenomic samples without using reference genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Almeida, Mathieu; Juncker, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    of microbial genomes without the need for reference sequences. We demonstrate the method on data from 396 human gut microbiome samples and identify 7,381 co-abundance gene groups (CAGs), including 741 metagenomic species (MGS). We use these to assemble 238 high-quality microbial genomes and identify...

  15. Equivalence testing using existing reference data: An example with genetically modified and conventional crops in animal feeding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voet, Hilko; Goedhart, Paul W; Schmidt, Kerstin

    2017-11-01

    An equivalence testing method is described to assess the safety of regulated products using relevant data obtained in historical studies with assumedly safe reference products. The method is illustrated using data from a series of animal feeding studies with genetically modified and reference maize varieties. Several criteria for quantifying equivalence are discussed, and study-corrected distribution-wise equivalence is selected as being appropriate for the example case study. An equivalence test is proposed based on a high probability of declaring equivalence in a simplified situation, where there is no between-group variation, where the historical and current studies have the same residual variance, and where the current study is assumed to have a sample size as set by a regulator. The method makes use of generalized fiducial inference methods to integrate uncertainties from both the historical and the current data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Reference Plasmid for the Qualitative Detection of Genetically Modified Rice in Food and Feed

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Liang; Dong, Mei; An, Na; Liang, Lixia; Wan, Yusong; Jin, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the world. Genetically modified (GM) technology has been used in rice to confer herbicide tolerance and pathogen or insect resistance. China invests heavily in research on GM rice. By the end of 2014, at least 250 transgenic rice lines had been developed in China. To monitor the presence of GM rice in food and feed, we collected information on foreign elements from 250 transgenic rice lines and found 5 elements, including the Agrobacterium tumef...

  17. Korean Variant Archive (KOVA): a reference database of genetic variations in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmoon; Seo, Jihae; Park, Jinman; Nam, Jae-Yong; Choi, Ahyoung; Ignatius, Jason S; Bjornson, Robert D; Chae, Jong-Hee; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Sanghyuk; Park, Woong-Yang; Baek, Daehyun; Choi, Murim

    2017-06-27

    Despite efforts to interrogate human genome variation through large-scale databases, systematic preference toward populations of Caucasian descendants has resulted in unintended reduction of power in studying non-Caucasians. Here we report a compilation of coding variants from 1,055 healthy Korean individuals (KOVA; Korean Variant Archive). The samples were sequenced to a mean depth of 75x, yielding 101 singleton variants per individual. Population genetics analysis demonstrates that the Korean population is a distinct ethnic group comparable to other discrete ethnic groups in Africa and Europe, providing a rationale for such independent genomic datasets. Indeed, KOVA conferred 22.8% increased variant filtering power in addition to Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) when used on Korean exomes. Functional assessment of nonsynonymous variant supported the presence of purifying selection in Koreans. Analysis of copy number variants detected 5.2 deletions and 10.3 amplifications per individual with an increased fraction of novel variants among smaller and rarer copy number variable segments. We also report a list of germline variants that are associated with increased tumor susceptibility. This catalog can function as a critical addition to the pre-existing variant databases in pursuing genetic studies of Korean individuals.

  18. Collaborative ring trial of the papaya endogenous reference gene and its polymerase chain reaction assays for genetically modified organism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiaojun; Li, Feiwu; Guo, Jinchao; Li, Xiang; Xu, Junfeng; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-11-27

    The papaya (Carica papaya L.) Chymopapain (CHY) gene has been reported as a suitable endogenous reference gene for genetically modified (GM) papaya detection in previous studies. Herein, we further validated the use of the CHY gene and its qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays through an interlaboratory collaborative ring trial. A total of 12 laboratories working on detection of genetically modified organisms participated in the ring trial and returned test results. Statistical analysis of the returned results confirmed the species specificity, low heterogeneity, and single-copy number of the CHY gene among different papaya varieties. The limit of detection of the CHY qualitative PCR assay was 0.1%, while the limit of quantification of the quantitative PCR assay was ∼25 copies of haploid papaya genome with acceptable PCR efficiency and linearity. The differences between the tested and true values of papaya content in 10 blind samples ranged from 0.84 to 6.58%. These results indicated that the CHY gene was suitable as an endogenous reference gene for the identification and quantification of GM papaya.

  19. An endogenous reference gene of common and durum wheat for detection of genetically modified wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Shinjiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Nishitsuji, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Matsuoka, Yasuyuki; Arami, Shin-Ichiro; Sato, Megumi; Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Kurimoto, Youichi; Mano, Junichi; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    To develop a method for detecting GM wheat that may be marketed in the near future, we evaluated the proline-rich protein (PRP) gene as an endogenous reference gene of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (Triticum durum L.). Real-time PCR analysis showed that only DNA of wheat was amplified and no amplification product was observed for phylogenetically related cereals, indicating that the PRP detection system is specific to wheat. The intensities of the amplification products and Ct values among all wheat samples used in this study were very similar, with no nonspecific or additional amplification, indicating that the PRP detection system has high sequence stability. The limit of detection was estimated at 5 haploid genome copies. The PRP region was demonstrated to be present as a single or double copy in the common wheat haploid genome. Furthermore, the PRP detection system showed a highly linear relationship between Ct values and the amount of plasmid DNA, indicating that an appropriate calibration curve could be constructed for quantitative detection of GM wheat. All these results indicate that the PRP gene is a suitable endogenous reference gene for PCR-based detection of GM wheat.

  20. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. III: Evaluation using a panel of reference foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents an exploratory evaluation of four functional components of a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) for crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods in a concordance study. Two independent raters assigned concern levels to 20 reference GM foods using a rating form based on the proposed RBCS. The four components of evaluation were: (1) degree of concordance, (2) distribution across concern levels, (3) discriminating ability of the scheme, and (4) ease of use. At least one of the 20 reference foods was assigned to each of the possible concern levels, demonstrating the ability of the scheme to identify GM foods of different concern with respect to potential health risk. There was reasonably good concordance between the two raters for the three separate parts of the RBCS. The raters agreed that the criteria in the scheme were sufficiently clear in discriminating reference foods into different concern levels, and that with some experience, the scheme was reasonably easy to use. Specific issues and suggestions for improvements identified in the concordance study are discussed.

  1. Insights into DDT Resistance from the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joshua M; Battlay, Paul; Gledhill-Smith, Rebecca S; Good, Robert T; Lumb, Chris; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Robin, Charles

    2017-11-01

    Insecticide resistance is considered a classic model of microevolution, where a strong selective agent is applied to a large natural population, resulting in a change in frequency of alleles that confer resistance. While many insecticide resistance variants have been characterized at the gene level, they are typically single genes of large effect identified in highly resistant pest species. In contrast, multiple variants have been implicated in DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster ; however, only the Cyp6g1 locus has previously been shown to be relevant to field populations. Here we use genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify DDT-associated polygenes and use selective sweep analyses to assess their adaptive significance. We identify and verify two candidate DDT resistance loci. A largely uncharacterized gene, CG10737 , has a function in muscles that ameliorates the effects of DDT, while a putative detoxifying P450, Cyp6w1 , shows compelling evidence of positive selection. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  2. STABILITY IN REAL TIME OF SOME CRYOPRESERVED MICROBIAL STRAINS WITH REFERENCE TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA VINTILĂ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the viability of microorganisms from Collection of Industrial Microorganisms from Faculty of Animal Science and Biotechnology – Timisoara, during freezing and thawing as part of cryopreservation technique. The stability in real time of 19 strains cryopreserved in 16% glycerol was evaluated during a 6-months period. The strains studied were: Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Rhizobium meliloti, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride, Bacillus globigii, Bacillus licheniformis, and 9 strains of Bacillus subtilis. The strains cryopreserved at -20oC and -70oC were activated using the fast thawing protocol. A better cell recovery was achieved with the -70oC protocol reaching an average viability for E. coli of 86,3%, comparing with 78,6% in -20oC protocol. The cell recovery percentages for the other strains were: 92,4% for L. acidophilus, 93,9% for A.niger, 89% for A. oryzae, 86,7% for T. viride, 94,2% for R. meliloti, 82,1% for S. cerevisiae, 89,9% for B. licheniformis. Regarding the viability of genetically modified microorganisms, the values shows a good recovering after freezing and thawing, even after 180 days of cryopreservation. With the -20oC protocol lower viability was observed due probably to the formation of eutectic mixtures and recrystalization processes.

  3. Memory for Dialogue: Recalling an Anchor through Talk and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Pam

    This paper reports on a project involving student recall of the dialogue in a movie and retention of the "anchor," which in this case refers to a videotape recording of "To Kill a Mockingbird." The project looked at how students retained knowledge over a few days and what kind of activities resulted from expertise with an…

  4. Molecular biology from bench-to-bedside - which colorectal cancer patients should be referred for genetic counselling and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Dysager, Lars; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is associated with deficiency of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. However, most MLH1 deficient tumours are sporadic in origin, and they can be identified if harbouring a BRAF V600E mutation or hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. The aim of this study...... (PMS2 were negative in 29 cases (10%). DNA quality allowed BRAF analysis in 27 of these with 14 mutations and 13 wild-type. DNA quality allowed methylation analysis in 11 of the 13 BRAF wild-type, and all but one were methylated. Subsequently, Lynch syndrome could...... was to validate our previously suggested clinically applicable strategy based on molecular characteristics for identifying which patients to refer for genetic counselling. The strategy was validated in an unselected cohort of 287 colorectal cancer patients. All tumours were tested for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6...

  5. Genetic potentiality of indigenous rice genotypes from Eastern India with reference to submergence tolerance and deepwater traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayani Goswami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Submergence tolerance in rice varieties is crucial for maintaining stable yields in low land areas, where recurrence of flooding is a constant phenomenon during monsoon. We have conducted detailed physiological and genotyping studies of 27 rice genotypes and one wild rice relative, popularly grown in low land areas of the two major rice growing states of eastern India, West Bengal and Odisha with a focus on submergence tolerance traits and Sub1 loci. We found that these genotypes show varying degree (50–100% survival rate during post submergence recovery period, and high degree of polymorphism in the Sub1 linked rice microsatellite loci RM219 and RM7175. Detailed allelic diversity study of Sub1A loci suggests that rice varieties IR42, Panibhasha, Khoda and Kalaputia share a common allele that is different from FR13A, Keralasundari, Bhashakalmi, Kumrogore. Two other genotypes Meghi and Khoda shares both alleles of Sub1A loci (present in IR42 and FR13A groups in addition to a new variant. Detailed sequence analysis of the amplified product for the Sub1A loci from these genotypes showed several single nucleotide changes with respect to reference Oryza sativa Sub1A loci (DQ011598. Three rice genotypes (Meghi, Bhashakalmi and Keralasundari showed beneficial properties in relation to induced submergence stress and can be considered as valuable genetic source in context of utilization of natural rice genetic resources in breeding program for submergence tolerance.

  6. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  7. Event-specific qualitative and quantitative detection of five genetically modified rice events using a single standard reference molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Saet-Byul; Roh, Hyo-Jeong; Shin, Min-Ki; Moon, Gui-Im; Hong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2017-07-01

    One novel standard reference plasmid, namely pUC-RICE5, was constructed as a positive control and calibrator for event-specific qualitative and quantitative detection of genetically modified (GM) rice (Bt63, Kemingdao1, Kefeng6, Kefeng8, and LLRice62). pUC-RICE5 contained fragments of a rice-specific endogenous reference gene (sucrose phosphate synthase) as well as the five GM rice events. An existing qualitative PCR assay approach was modified using pUC-RICE5 to create a quantitative method with limits of detection correlating to approximately 1-10 copies of rice haploid genomes. In this quantitative PCR assay, the square regression coefficients ranged from 0.993 to 1.000. The standard deviation and relative standard deviation values for repeatability ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 and 0.10% to 0.67%, respectively. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (Korea) validated the method and the results suggest it could be used routinely to identify five GM rice events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Simplified design of flexible expansion anchored plates for nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, N.K.; Hingorani, N.V.; Longlais, T.G.; Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL)

    1984-01-01

    In nuclear power plant construction, expansion anchored plates are used to support pipe, cable tray and HVAC duct hangers, and various structural elements. The expansion anchored plates provide flexibility in the installation of field-routed lines where cast-in-place embedments are not available. General design requirements for expansion anchored plate assemblies are given in ACI 349, Appendix B (1). The manufacturers recommend installation procedures for their products. Recent field testing in response to NRC Bulletin 79-02 (2) indicates that anchors, installed in accordance with manufacturer's recommended procedures, perform satisfactorily under static and dynamic loading conditions. Finite element analysis is a useful tool to correctly analyze the expansion anchored plates subject to axial tension and biaxial moments, but it becomes expensive and time-consuming to apply this tool for a large number of plates. It is, therefore, advantageous to use a simplified method, even though it may be more conservative as compared to the exact method of analysis. This paper presents a design method referred to as the modified rigid plate analysis approach to simplify both the initial design and the review of as-built conditions

  9. The Holding Power of Anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as the chain begins to drag along the ground; and it also serves, by lying flat on the ground, to keep the palm set at the correct angle as it buries itself. In stockless anchors there are two digging blades set on opposite sides of the shank, and hinged to it by a horizontal hinge which allows them to set themselves at the correct.

  10. Why do women not return family history forms when referred to breast cancer genetics services? A mixed-method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Kirstie A; Steel, Michael; Goudie, David; McLeish, Lorna; Dunlop, Jackie; Myring, Jessica; Sullivan, Frank; Berg, Jonathan; Humphris, Gerry; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2015-10-01

    Personal and family data forms, completed by women referred to breast cancer genetics clinics, are valuable tools for verification and extension of family history, crucial steps in accurate risk evaluation. A significant minority of women do not complete and return these forms, despite reminders, even when completion is a pre-requisite for a clinic appointment. To facilitate access of women at increased familial risk of breast cancer to screening and counselling services by investigating reasons for non-return of the forms. Based on a single regional 'breast cancer family' service in the UK, Analysis of quantitative data comparing women who did not return forms (n = 55) with those who had done so (n = 59), together with qualitative evaluation of potential barriers to form-completion through semi-structured telephone interviews with a random subset of 'non-returners' (n = 23). Non-returners have higher proportions of the very young (below the age at which surveillance could be offered) and of women from lower social deprivation categories. Interviews revealed that the majority of non-returners are anxious, rather than unconcerned about their breast cancer risk and circumstances and attitudes contributed to non-compliance. Twenty-one participants confirmed that they would welcome an appointment at a 'breast cancer family' clinic, but nine did not attend for the appointment. They were significantly younger than those who attend, but were not at lower familial risk. Many women who fail to complete and return a family history form would benefit from risk assessment and genetic counselling. Several steps are suggested that might help them access the relevant services. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... we stand? J Ophthalmol. 2014;2014:641708. doi: 10.1155/2014/641708. Epub 2014 Aug 28. Review. Citation ... keratoconus. Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:795738. doi: 10.1155/2015/795738. Epub 2015 May 17. Review. Citation ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: pilomatricoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before birth, as well as the maintenance and repair of adult tissues. Among its many activities, beta-catenin appears to be necessary for the normal function of hair follicles . This protein is active in cells that make up a part of the hair ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: histidinemia

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    ... Changes Histidinemia is caused by mutations in the HAL gene, which provides instructions for making an enzyme ... expressed) primarily in the liver and the skin . HAL gene mutations lead to the production of a ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: microphthalmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: coloboma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: achromatopsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 24 [updated 2016 Feb 25]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: galactosemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 [updated 2017 Mar 9]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: choroideremia

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    ... out its protein escort function. This lack of functional REP-1 prevents Rab proteins from reaching and ... the cells of the retina causes the progressive vision loss characteristic of choroideremia . Learn more about the ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: adermatoglyphia

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    ... a feature of several rare syndromes classified as ectodermal dysplasias, including a condition called Naegeli-Franceschetti-Jadassohn syndrome/ ... and Advocacy Resources (2 links) National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias Resource List from the University of Kansas Medical ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: pseudoachondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R, Susic M, Montufar-Solis D, Duke PJ, Cole WG. Chondrocyte cell death and intracellular distribution of ... a 7-year comprehensive analysis of the known disease genes identify novel and recurrent mutations and provides ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SA, Fain PR, Ferrara TM, Ben S, Riccardi SL, Cole JB, Gowan K, Holland PJ, Bennett DC, Luiten ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: abetalipoproteinemia

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    ... condition may also develop an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa , in which breakdown of the light-sensitive layer ( ... cause vision loss. In individuals with abetalipoproteinemia , the retinitis pigmentosa can result in complete vision loss. People with ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Achondroplasia Achondroplasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Achondroplasia is a form of short-limbed dwarfism. The ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: fibrochondrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 Oct 10;528(2):367-8. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2013.07.038. Epub 2013 Jul ... 2012 Dec 15;511(2):480-1. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2012.09.069. Epub 2012 Sep ... 2010 Nov 12;87(5):708-12. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2010.10.009. Epub 2010 Oct ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2008 Oct 16;455(7215):967-70. doi: 10.1038/nature07398. Citation on PubMed Maris JM. Recent advances ... 2008 Oct 16;455(7215):930-5. doi: 10.1038/nature07261. Epub 2008 Aug 24. Citation on PubMed ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: galactosialidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other symptoms seen in some individuals with this type include intellectual disability, hearing loss, and a cherry-red spot. Children ... somewhat different than those of the other two types. This form is ... intellectual disability. People with this form typically also have dark ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Phenylketonuria Phenylketonuria Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Phenylketonuria (commonly known as PKU) is an inherited disorder ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: trimethylaminuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also be caused by other factors. The strong body odor may result from an excess of certain proteins ... of trimethylaminuria or experience temporary episodes of strong body odor. Related Information What does it mean if a ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: neuroferritinopathy

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    ... individuals develop a gradual decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Personality changes such as reduced inhibitions and difficulty controlling emotions may also occur as the disorder progresses. Related ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hemophilia

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    ... 6(9):1517-24. Review. Citation on PubMed Graw J, Brackmann HH, Oldenburg J, Schneppenheim R, Spannagl ... Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): University of ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... year in the United States. This type of cancer occurs much more frequently in Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand, where it is related to infection with a parasite that is common there. For unknown reasons, cholangiocarcinoma ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: leprosy

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    ... condition occurs worldwide, but is most common in India, Brazil, and other areas with warm climates. Between ... the differential clinical outcomes of leprosy. Infect Dis Poverty. 2017 Feb 6;6(1):5. doi: 10. ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Schizophrenia is a brain disorder classified as a psychosis, ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: aspartylglucosaminuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sources for This Page Aronson NN Jr. Aspartylglycosaminuria: biochemistry and molecular biology. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1999 Oct ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: otulipenia

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    ... Zhou Q, Yu X, Demirkaya E, Deuitch N, Stone D, Tsai WL, Kuehn HS, Wang H, Yang D, Park YH, Ombrello AK, Blake M, Romeo T, Remmers EF, Chae JJ, Mullikin JC, Güzel F, Milner JD, Boehm M, Rosenzweig SD, Gadina M, Welch SB, Özen S, Topaloglu R, Abinun M, Kastner DL, Aksentijevich I. Biallelic hypomorphic ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hypochondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the elbows, a sway of the lower back ( lordosis ), and bowed legs. These signs are generally less ... Management Resources (2 links) GeneReview: Hypochondroplasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Lordosis General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: osteoarthritis

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    ... damage is caused as the body attempts to repair and rebuild these tissues. The immune system, which plays a role in ... the result of the body's failed attempts to repair this damage. In healthy ... of the tissue. This balance is lost in osteoarthritis , leading to ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: melorheostosis

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    ... how do mutations occur? How can gene mutations affect health and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern This condition is not inherited from a parent, and it cannot be passed down to children. It arises from somatic mutations in bone cells ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hypochondrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Achondrogenesis Health Topic: Connective Tissue Disorders Health Topic: Dwarfism Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of ... T, Nishimura G, Watanabe H, Arisaka O. Prenatal diagnosis of hypochondrogenesis using fetal MRI: a case report. ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: trichothiodystrophy

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    ... that affects many parts of the body. The hallmark of this condition is brittle hair that is ... the skin or an increased risk of skin cancer. Many people with trichothiodystrophy report that they do ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: cystinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a condition characterized by accumulation of the amino acid cystine (a building block of proteins) within cells. ... adolescence, include muscle deterioration, blindness, inability to swallow, diabetes, thyroid and nervous system problems, and an inability ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: acatalasemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and 1 in 25,000 people in Switzerland. The prevalence of acatalasemia in other populations is unknown. Related Information What information about a ... A new type of inherited catalase deficiencies: its characterization and comparison ... and Swiss type of acatalasemia. Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2001 Mar-Apr; ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: depression

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    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Depression Depression Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Depression (also known as major depression or major depressive ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: alkaptonuria

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    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alkaptonuria Alkaptonuria Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alkaptonuria is an inherited condition that causes urine to ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: porphyria

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    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... PubMed Badminton MN, Elder GH. Molecular mechanisms of dominant expression in porphyria. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2005; ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: narcolepsy

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    ... brain called the hypothalamus. These cells normally produce chemicals called hypocretins (also known as orexins), which have many important functions in the body. In particular, hypocretins regulate the daily sleep-wake cycle. It is unclear what triggers the death of ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: preeclampsia

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    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Preeclampsia Preeclampsia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy in which affected ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: bradyopsia

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    ... such as when walking out of a darkened movie theater into daylight. Their eyes also have trouble ... Robson AG, Holder GE. Pathognomonic (diagnostic) ERGs. A review and update. Retina. 2013 Jan;33(1):5- ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: polymicrogyria

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    ... the condition. Bilateral forms of polymicrogyria tend to cause more severe neurological problems. Signs and symptoms of these conditions can include recurrent seizures (epilepsy), delayed development, crossed eyes, problems with speech and ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosinemia

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    ... individuals with tyrosinemia type II have some degree of intellectual disability. Tyrosinemia type III is the rarest of the three types. The characteristic features of this type include intellectual disability, seizures, and periodic loss of balance and coordination ( ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: sialidosis

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    ... called neuraminidase 1 (NEU1), which is found in lysosomes . Lysosomes are compartments within the cell that use enzymes ... is lacking, sialic acid-containing compounds accumulate inside lysosomes. Conditions such as sialidosis that cause molecules to ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: hyperprolinemia

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    ... converting it to the amino acid glutamate. The conversion between proline and glutamate, and the reverse reaction ... Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What are ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: desmosterolosis

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    ... 2001 Aug 22. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Zolotushko J, Flusser H, Markus B, Shelef I, Langer Y, Heverin M, Björkhem I, Sivan S, Birk OS. The desmosterolosis phenotype: spasticity, microcephaly and micrognathia with agenesis of corpus callosum and ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: erythromelalgia

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    ... These episodes are usually triggered by increased body temperature, which may be caused by exercise or entering ... legs. Erythromelalgia is often considered a form of peripheral neuropathy because it affects the peripheral nervous system, ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hypophosphatasia

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    ... by a softening of the bones known as osteomalacia. In adults, recurrent fractures in the foot and ... Management Resources (2 links) GeneReview: Hypophosphatasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Osteomalacia General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  16. Characterization of an area of reference for inhalable particulate matter (PM2.5) associated with genetic biomonitoring in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva da Silva, Cristiane; Rossato, Juliana Marzari; Vaz Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2015-01-15

    Humans are exposed to health-impairing air pollutants, especially children who are more sensitive to cancer-causing toxins. This study described an area of reference for inhalable particulates (PM2.5) by chemical (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and mutagenic characterization associated with the genetic biomonitoring of children (aged 5-11 years). The area studied was in a small town in Brazil, used as reference in previous studies. Organic matter of PM2.5 (extracted with dichloromethane) was evaluated for mutagenesis in a Salmonella/microsome (microsuspension) assay, in strains measuring frameshift error (TA98, YG1021 and YG1024) and base pair substitution (TA100) of DNA, in the presence and absence of rat liver metabolization fraction (S9). Exposure was studied analyzing a sample of 45 children using comet assay (peripheral blood lymphocytes) and micronucleus (exfoliated buccal mucosa cells). PM2.5 concentration for the period was 9% (25.89-64.71 μg/m3) events above WHO limit value (25 μg/m3). Mutagenesis responses (revertants/m3) varied from negative (spring) to 8.3±0.69 (autumn) (-S9) and 5.4±0.36 (winter) (+S9), in strain TA98, and for TA100, in spring, from negative to 14.8±4.23 (-S9) and 17.5±2.72 (+S9). YG strain results show mononitroarenes and aromatic amines. Mean biomonitoring values were established for MN, 0.3±0.41 (‰) and for other cell types a variation from 0.6±0.73 (‰), nuclear buds to 57.5±24.92 (‰), karyorrhexis. Comet assay means were 23.1±12.44; 7.3±11.66 and 0.9±2.30 for tail length, intensity and moment, respectively. There was no difference for sex and age for the different parameters. A significant difference in confounding factors was observed for passive smoking and MN induction. PAHs and mutagenesis in the air may be related to local vehicular emissions. These results challenge the definition of areas of reference for air pollution associated with human biomonitoring including the region studied. Copyright © 2014

  17. Estimation of parameters for the electrostatic discharge current equation with real human discharge events reference using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsivelis, P S; Gonos, I F; Stathopulos, I A

    2010-01-01

    Thorough study of the electrostatic discharge (ESD) current equation shows that it may be different from the equation proposed in the IEC 61000-4-2 Standard. This problem is dealt with in this paper. Using a 2.5 GHz digital oscilloscope and a 50 Ω Pellegrini target as the measuring system, and a dc power supply to provide a charging voltage of 2 kVdc, a series of measurements were performed, so real human-to-metal ESD current waveforms were recorded. Treating the average waveform as a reference, a genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to the equation of the IEC 61000-4-2 Standard for the ESD current, in order to achieve its best fitting to the data set. Four different error norms were used for the GA applications. The best result of the applications of each of them was saved and compared to the others. Thus, a very satisfactory modification of the Standard's equation is presented, which is closer to the real ESD current waveform

  18. Data for identification of GPI-anchored peptides and ω-sites in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Masuishi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present data obtained using a focused proteomics approach to identify the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored peptides in 19 human cancer cell lines. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs, which localize to the outer leaflet of the membrane microdomains commonly referred to as lipid rafts play important roles in diverse biological processes. Due to the complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety, it has been difficult to identify GPI-anchored peptide sequences on the proteomic scale by database searches using tools such as MASCOT. Here we provide data from 73 ω-sites derived from 49 GPI-APs in 19 human cancer cell lines. This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and ω-sites using TiO2-based affinity purification followed by hydrogen fluoride treatment” (Masuishi et al., 2016 [1].

  19. Nominal Anchors in the CIS

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M Keller; Thomas J Richardson

    2003-01-01

    Monetary policy has become increasingly important in the countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) as fiscal adjustment and structural reforms have taken root. Inflation has been brought down to relatively low levels in almost all of these countries, raising the question of what should be the appropriate nominal anchor at this stage. Formally, almost all CIS countries have floating exchange rate regimes, yet in practice they manage their exchange rates very heavily, perhaps be...

  20. El “Anclaje y Ajuste”, una herramienta de Marketing para analizar el poder de las referencias en el Arte, el Diseño y la Arquitectura = "Anchoring and Adjustment", a Marketing tool to analyse references in Art, Design and Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo García-Badell

    2014-12-01

    , it is taken for granted that artistic and creative works' judgments are also influenced by references. However, there is a big lack of study in the way those judgments are made. From an economic point of view, we would like to describe how a product would be sold only knowing how it has been designed. However, in terms of Marketing it seems nonsensical to think about the selling consequences without studying the Consumer Behaviour before the definitive choice. The “Anchoring and Adjustment” effect describes, from a Marketing point of view, how references are needed to judge any product. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explain how “Anchoring and Adjustment” effect works and how it could be used to further Art, Design, and Architecture analyses.

  1. Unintended anchors: Building rating systems and energy performance goals for U.S. buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Leidy; Mack, Daniel; Klapthor, Brent; Tunstall, Casey; Harrison, Jennilee

    2010-01-01

    In the U.S., where buildings account for 40% of energy use, commercial buildings use more energy per unit area than ever before. However, exemplary buildings demonstrate the feasibility of much better energy performance at no additional first cost. This research examines one possible explanation for this inconsistency. The aim is to investigate whether the anchoring bias, which refers to our tendency to gravitate towards a pre-defined standard regardless of its relevance, influences energy performance goals in building design. The scope examines professionals who help set energy performance goals for U.S. buildings. Prior to being asked to set an energy performance goal, these professionals were randomly directed to one of three series of questions. One series set an anchor of 90% energy reduction beyond standard practice, one set a 30% anchor, and one set no anchor. Respondents exposed to the 90% anchor, and respondents exposed to no anchor at all, set higher energy performance goals than respondents exposed to the 30% anchor. These results suggest that building rating systems that only reward incremental energy improvements may inadvertently create anchors, thereby discouraging more advanced energy performance goals and inhibiting energy performance that is technically and economically feasible.

  2. Development of Certified Matrix-Based Reference Material as a Calibrator for Genetically Modified Rice G6H1 Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Li, Liang; Yang, Hui; Li, Xiaying; Zhang, Xiujie; Xu, Junfeng; Zhang, Dabing; Jin, Wujun; Yang, Litao

    2018-04-11

    The accurate monitoring and quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are key points for the implementation of labeling regulations, and a certified reference material (CRM) acts as the scaleplate for quantifying the GM contents of foods/feeds and evaluating a GMO analytical method or equipment. Herein we developed a series of CRMs for transgenic rice event G6H1, which possesses insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant traits. Three G6H1 CRMs were produced by mixing seed powders obtained from homozygous G6H1 and its recipient cultivar Xiushui 110 at mass ratios of 49.825%, 9.967%, and 4.986%. The between-bottle homogeneity and within-bottle homogeneity were thoroughly evaluated with consistent results. The potential DNA degradation in transportation and shelf life were evaluated with an expiration period of at least 12 months. The property values of three CRMs (G6H1 a , G6H1 b , G6H1 c ) were given as (49.825 ± 0.448) g/kg, (9.967 ± 1.757) g/kg, and (4.986 ± 1.274 g/kg based on mass fraction ratio, respectively. Furthermore, the three CRMs were characterized with values of (5.01 ± 0.08)%, (1.06 ± 0.22)%, and (0.53 ± 0.11)% based on the copy number ratio using the droplet digital PCR method. All results confirmed that the produced G6H1 matrix-based CRMs are of high quality with precise characterization values and can be used as calibrators in GM rice G6H1 inspection and monitoring and in evaluating new analytical methods or devices targeting the G6H1 event.

  3. Characterizing the flow of stirred vessels with anchor type impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.C. Peixoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in chemical industries, there are few works which studies anchor type impellers and only a fraction of the works investigate these systems under a computational approach. The great majority refers to turbine impellers, specially Rushton turbines, under turbulent flow. Anchor impellers are used specially for highly viscous flow, typical of polymer reactions. The viscosity is normally in the range 1000-10000 cp. Since this range of viscosity describe highly viscous flows, the reactions for anchor agitated systems are normally carried out under laminar flow. This work presents a detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach to study the behaviour of stirred vessels using anchor impellers. The axial plane of the tank, which is being modelled, is divided into small control volumes, which collectively is referred to as the mesh, or grid. In each of these cells the momentum balance, energy and mass conservation, which describes the model, are rewritten algebraically using the finite volumes method to relate such variables as velocity, pressure and temperature to values in neighbouring cells. The equations are then solved numerically, and the results yield the flow corresponding to the model. Since the geometry of a vessel with anchor impellers strictly calls for a three dimensional method, an approximation is made to account for the effect of the blades (Kuncewics, 1992. The main objective of this work is to give a detailed description of the flow generated by this axial impeller with a view to indicate ways in which the design and operation of these systems can be improved.

  4. Application of genotyping-by-sequencing on semiconductor sequencing platforms: a comparison of genetic and reference-based marker ordering in barley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mascher

    Full Text Available The rapid development of next-generation sequencing platforms has enabled the use of sequencing for routine genotyping across a range of genetics studies and breeding applications. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS, a low-cost, reduced representation sequencing method, is becoming a common approach for whole-genome marker profiling in many species. With quickly developing sequencing technologies, adapting current GBS methodologies to new platforms will leverage these advancements for future studies. To test new semiconductor sequencing platforms for GBS, we genotyped a barley recombinant inbred line (RIL population. Based on a previous GBS approach, we designed bar code and adapter sets for the Ion Torrent platforms. Four sets of 24-plex libraries were constructed consisting of 94 RILs and the two parents and sequenced on two Ion platforms. In parallel, a 96-plex library of the same RILs was sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq 2000. We applied two different computational pipelines to analyze sequencing data; the reference-independent TASSEL pipeline and a reference-based pipeline using SAMtools. Sequence contigs positioned on the integrated physical and genetic map were used for read mapping and variant calling. We found high agreement in genotype calls between the different platforms and high concordance between genetic and reference-based marker order. There was, however, paucity in the number of SNP that were jointly discovered by the different pipelines indicating a strong effect of alignment and filtering parameters on SNP discovery. We show the utility of the current barley genome assembly as a framework for developing very low-cost genetic maps, facilitating high resolution genetic mapping and negating the need for developing de novo genetic maps for future studies in barley. Through demonstration of GBS on semiconductor sequencing platforms, we conclude that the GBS approach is amenable to a range of platforms and can easily be modified as new

  5. Experimental testing of anchoring devices for bottom rails in partially anchored timber frame shear walls

    OpenAIRE

    Caprolu, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Källsner and Girhammar have presented a new plastic design method of wood-framed shear walls at ultimate limit state. This method allows the designer to calculate the load-carrying capacity of shear walls partially anchored, where the leading stud is not anchored against the uplift.The anchorage system of shear walls is provided from anchor bolts and hold downs. Anchor bolts provide horizontal shear continuity between the bottom rail and the foundation. Hold downs are directly connected from ...

  6. Anchor Bolt Position in Base Plate In Terms Of T and J Anchor Bolt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    b Osman Mohamad Hairi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, L anchor bolt system has been used for a long period of time in construction industry as one of the distributing load structures. However, there are some weaknesses in L anchor bolt which may straighten and pullup when charged with tensile load. Current practices prefer to use other types of anchor bolt systems, such as headed studs anchor bolt system to replace the L anchor bolt design. There has been lack of studies to prove that it is more effective in terms of performance. A new T anchor bolt which was basically modified from headed studs anchor bolt was proposed in this study to compare its performance of tensile loading in concrete failure to typical L design. This study aims to determine whether the T anchor bolt system gives better performance as compared to an L anchor bolt system. The performance was rated based on tensile loading on concrete failure pattern. A pullout test was conducted on two different anchor bolt systems, namely L and T. The anchor bolt embedded depth, h in concrete were varied according to their hook or bend radius. Each sample was repeated twice. There were totally eight samples. The hook or bend radius used were 50 mm and 57.5 mm for sample L1 and L2, respectively. 90-degree bend were used on sample T1 and T2. Based on test results, it can be seen that the performance of concrete failure pattern under tensile load on both L and T anchor bolt design samples with 200 mm embedment depth was better than deeper embedment depth of 230 mm. But the L anchor bolt design gives the best results as compared to T design. Although T anchor bolt design shows higher resistance before first bond failure to the concrete sample. T anchor bolt was analysed and needed deeper embedment depth to allow formation of cone pull-out shape to acquire better performance.

  7. Optimization Analysis Model of Self-Anchored Suspension Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hangers of self-anchored suspension bridge need to be tensioned suitably during construction. In view of this point, a simplified optimization calculation method of cable force for self-anchored suspension bridge has been developed based on optimization theories, such as minimum bending energy method, and internal force balanced method, influence matrix method. Meanwhile, combined with the weak coherence of main cable and the adjacently interaction of hanger forces, a simplified analysis method is developed using MATLAB, which is then compared with the optimization method that consider the main cable's geometric nonlinearity with software ANSYS in an actual example bridge calculation. This contrast proves the weak coherence of main cable displacement and the limitation of the adjacent cable force influence. Furthermore, a tension program that is of great reference value has been developed; some important conclusions, advices, and attention points have been summarized.

  8. Link Anchors in Images: Is there Truth?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aly, Robin; McGuinness, Kevin; Kleppe, Martijn; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; O'Connor, Noel; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    2012-01-01

    While automatic linking in text collections is well understood, little is known about links in images. In this work, we investigate two aspects of anchors, the origin of a link, in images: 1) the requirements of users for such anchors, e.g. the things users would like more information on, and 2)

  9. 76 FR 30301 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Part 1812 RIN 2700-AD64 Commercial... consistent with NASA's authority under Section 401 of the Commercial Space Competitiveness Act (CSCA) of 1992. NASA may enter into multi-year anchor tenancy contracts for commercial space goods or services. Anchor...

  10. Ringstone anchors from Gujarat, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    of Dwarka and Somanath have yielded several ringstone anchors along with other stone anchors such as triangular and grapnel types. The raw material used for these ring stones comprises basalt, sandstone and limestone. Earlier, these anchors were identified...

  11. Genetic differentiation in Gammarus fossarum and G. caparti (Crustacea, Amphipoda) with reference to G. pulex pulex in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, Maarten; Dalfsen, van Jan

    1989-01-01

    Genetic differentiation among G. fossarum Koch, 1835 from different stations in Germany, Switzerland, Belgium and northern France, and the closely related Belgian form G. caparti Pètre-Stroobants, 1980 was investigated by electrophoresis at 20 enzyme loci. Although morphologically variable,

  12. Systems genetics of metabolism: the use of the BXD murine reference panel for multiscalar integration of traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreux, Pénélope A.; Williams, Evan G.; Koutnikova, Hana; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Champy, Marie-France; Henry, Hugues; Schoonjans, Kristina; Williams, Robert W.; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is achieved by complex molecular and cellular networks that differ significantly among individuals and are difficult to model with genetically engineered lines of mice optimized to study single gene function. Here, we systematically acquired metabolic phenotypes by using the

  13. International collaborative study of the endogenous reference gene, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of genetically modified rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxi; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Haibo; Guo, Jinchao; Mazzara, Marco; Van den Eede, Guy; Zhang, Dabing

    2009-05-13

    One rice ( Oryza sativa ) gene, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), has been proven to be a suitable endogenous reference gene for genetically modified (GM) rice detection in a previous study. Herein are the reported results of an international collaborative ring trial for validation of the SPS gene as an endogenous reference gene and its optimized qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems. A total of 12 genetically modified organism (GMO) detection laboratories from seven countries participated in the ring trial and returned their results. The validated results confirmed the species specificity of the method through testing 10 plant genomic DNAs, low heterogeneity, and a stable single-copy number of the rice SPS gene among 7 indica varieties and 5 japonica varieties. The SPS qualitative PCR assay was validated with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1%, which corresponded to about 230 copies of haploid rice genomic DNA, while the limit of quantification (LOQ) for the quantitative PCR system was about 23 copies of haploid rice genomic DNA, with acceptable PCR efficiency and linearity. Furthermore, the bias between the test and true values of eight blind samples ranged from 5.22 to 26.53%. Thus, we believe that the SPS gene is suitable for use as an endogenous reference gene for the identification and quantification of GM rice and its derivates.

  14. A specific endogenous reference for genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) DNA quantification by real-time PCR targeting lectin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Rossi, Gabriela B; Zimmermann, Naíra F; Oliveira, Jaison P; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-11-01

    The Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified (GM) common bean was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Methods for the quantification of this new genetically modified organism (GMO) are necessary. The development of a suitable endogenous reference is essential for GMO quantification by real-time PCR. Based on this, a new taxon-specific endogenous reference quantification assay was developed for Phaseolus vulgaris L. Three genes encoding common bean proteins (phaseolin, arcelin, and lectin) were selected as candidates for endogenous reference. Primers targeting these candidate genes were designed and the detection was evaluated using the SYBR Green chemistry. The assay targeting lectin gene showed higher specificity than the remaining assays, and a hydrolysis probe was then designed. This assay showed high specificity for 50 common bean samples from two gene pools, Andean and Mesoamerican. For GM common bean varieties, the results were similar to those obtained for non-GM isogenic varieties with PCR efficiency values ranging from 92 to 101 %. Moreover, this assay presented a limit of detection of ten haploid genome copies. The primers and probe developed in this work are suitable to detect and quantify either GM or non-GM common bean.

  15. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Paul Khajuria

    Full Text Available The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777 of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%, experimental validation success rate (81% and polymorphic potential (55% of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48% detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%. An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777 having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7-23 cM longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped

  16. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  17. High-throughput physical map anchoring via BAC-pool sequencing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cviková, Kateřina; Cattonaro, F.; Alaux, M.; Stein, N.; Mayer, K.F.X.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Bartoš, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, APR 11 (2015) ISSN 1471-2229 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-08786S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Physical map * Contig anchoring * Next generation sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.631, year: 2015

  18. Development of a Novel Reference Plasmid for Accurate Quantification of Genetically Modified Kefeng6 Rice DNA in Food and Feed Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reference plasmids are an essential tool for the quantification of genetically modified (GM events. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR is the most commonly used method to characterize and quantify reference plasmids. However, the precision of this method is often limited by calibration curves, and qPCR data can be affected by matrix differences between the standards and samples. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR approach that can be used to accurately measure the novel reference plasmid pKefeng6 and quantify the unauthorized variety of GM rice Kefeng6, eliminating the issues associated with matrix effects in calibration curves. The pKefeng6 plasmid was used as a calibrant for the quantification of Kefeng6 rice by determining the copy numbers of event- (77 bp and taxon-specific (68 bp fragments, their ratios, and their concentrations. The plasmid was diluted to five different concentrations. The third sample (S3 was optimized for the quantification range of dPCR according to previous reports. The ratio between the two fragments was 1.005, which closely approximated the value certified by sequencing, and the concentration was found to be 792 copies/μL. This method was precise, with an RSD of ~3%. These findings demonstrate the advantages of using the dPCR method to characterize reference materials.

  19. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Schmutz, Jeremy; Wang, Hao; Percifield, Ryan; Hawkins, Jennifer; Pontaroli, Ana C; Estep, Matt; Feng, Liang; Vaughn, Justin N; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Barry, Kerrie; Lindquist, Erika; Hellsten, Uffe; Deshpande, Shweta; Wang, Xuewen; Wu, Xiaomei; Mitros, Therese; Triplett, Jimmy; Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chu-Yu; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita; Wang, Lin; Li, Pinghua; Sharma, Manoj; Sharma, Rita; Ronald, Pamela C; Panaud, Olivier; Kellogg, Elizabeth A; Brutnell, Thomas P; Doust, Andrew N; Tuskan, Gerald A; Rokhsar, Daniel; Devos, Katrien M

    2012-05-13

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The ∼400-Mb assembly covers ∼80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  20. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L [ORNL; Schmutz, Jeremy [Hudson Alpha Institute of Biotechnology; Wang, Hao [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Percifield, Ryan [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hawkins, Jennifer [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Pontaroli, Ana C. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Estep, Matt [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Feng, Liang [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Vaughn, Justin N [ORNL; Grimwood, Jane [Hudson Alpha Institute of Biotechnology; Jenkins, Jerry [Hudson Alpha Institute of Biotechnology; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lindquist, Erika [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hellsten, Uffe [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wang, Xuewen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Wu, Xiaomei [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Mitros, Therese [University of California, Berkeley; Triplett, Jimmy [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita [Oklahoma State University; Wang, Lin [Cornell University; Li, Pinghua [Cornell University; Sharma, Manoj [University of California, Davis; Sharma, Rita [University of California, Davis; Ronald, Pamela [University of California, Davis; Panaud, Olivier [Universite de Perpignan, Perpignan, France; Kellogg, Elizabeth A. [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Brutnell, Thomas P. [Cornell University; Doust, Andrew N. [Oklahoma State University; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Rokhsar, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Devos, Katrien M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The ~400-Mb assembly covers ~80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  1. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The {approx}400-Mb assembly covers {approx}80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  2. Anchoring effects on early autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Daniel L; Bishara, Anthony J; Mugayar-Baldocchi, Marino A

    2017-10-01

    Studies of childhood memory typically show that our earliest memories come from between three and four years of age. This finding is not universal, however. The age estimate varies across cultures and is affected by social influences. Research from the judgments and decision-making literature suggests that these estimates might also involve a judgment under uncertainty. Therefore, they might be susceptible to less social influences such as heuristics and biases. To investigate this possibility, we conducted two experiments that used anchoring paradigms to influence participants' estimates of their age during early autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1, participants answered either a high-anchor or a low-anchor question, and were warned that the anchor was uninformative; they went on to estimate their age during their earliest autobiographical memory. In Experiment 2, we replicated Experiment 1 and extended the design to examine additional early autobiographical memories. In both experiments, participants in the low-anchor condition gave earlier age estimates than those in the high-anchor condition. These results provide new insights into the methods used to investigate autobiographical memory. Moreover, they show that reports of early autobiographical memories can be influenced by a relatively light touch - a change to a single digit in a single question.

  3. Improving performance by anchoring movement and "nerves".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iso-Ahola, Seppo E; Dotson, Charles O; Jagodinsky, Adam E; Clark, Lily C; Smallwood, Lorraine L; Wilburn, Christopher; Weimar, Wendi H; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-10-01

    Golf's governing bodies' recent decision to ban all putting styles "anchoring one end of the club against the body" bridges an important practical problem with psychological theory. We report the first experiment testing whether anchoring provides technical and/or psychological advantage in competitive performance. Many "greats" of professional golf from Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus to Tiger Woods have argued against anchoring, believing that it takes "nerves" out of competitive performance and therefore artificially levels the playing field. To shed more light on the issue, we tested participants' performance with anchored and unanchored putters under low and high pressure when controlling for the putter length. We found no statistically significant evidence for a technical advantage due to anchoring but a clear psychological advantage: participants who anchored their putters significantly outperformed unanchored counterparts under high, but not low, pressure. Results provide tentative evidence for the ban's justification from a competitive standpoint. However, before any definite conclusions can be made, more research is needed when using high-level golfers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  5. An earth anchor system: installation and design guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.L. Copstead; D.D. Studier

    1990-01-01

    A system for anchoring the guylines and skylines of cable yarding equipment is presented. A description of three types of tipping plate anchors is given. Descriptions of the installation equipment and methods specific to each type are given. Procedures for determining the correct number of anchors to install are included, as are guidelines for installing the anchors so...

  6. Genetic polymorphism in sympatric species of the genus Phlebotomus, with special reference to Phlebotomus perniciosus and Phlebotomus longicuspis (Diptera, Phlebotomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Sánchez J.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA assay was used to study genetic variation within and between five Phlebotomusspecies belonging to three subgenera: P. (Larroussius ariasi, P. (L. longicuspis, P. (L. perniciosus, P.(Paraphlebotomus sergenti and P. (Phlebotomus papatasi sympatric in southern Spain and proven vector of leishmaniasis. Two cluster analysis were proposed: one according to sandfly species and populations, the second according individual specimens of Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus longicuspis s.l. and intermediate morphological specimens between these species. The results obtained are closely correlated with the taxonomy classically accepted for the subgenera and with the automatic classifications made by other authors which use morphological and isoenzymatic data. The validity of the species Phlebotomus longicuspisis also discussed.

  7. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Ma

    Full Text Available Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants' WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain.

  8. Categorization and Willingness to Pay for New Products : The Role of Category Cues as Value Anchors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, B.; Gemser, G.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on textual category cues and their influence on consumers' willingness to pay for new products. It examines whether an anchoring effect occurs when consumers are provided with textual category cues that refer consumers toward a particular product category. This article argues that

  9. The Model of Career Anchors as a Tool in the Analysis of Instructional Developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carol

    1981-01-01

    Examines the importance of human systems as a relevant aspect of development processes and looks at the career anchor model proposed by Schein as a possible area in the analysis of the instructional developer/client relationships. Fourteen references are listed. (Author/LLS)

  10. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins are required for cell wall synthesis and morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, C Stewart; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Brininstool, Ginger; Sedbrook, John C; Hamann, Thorsten; Poindexter, Patricia; Somerville, Chris

    2005-04-01

    Mutations at five loci named PEANUT1-5 (PNT) were identified in a genetic screen for radially swollen embryo mutants. pnt1 cell walls showed decreased crystalline cellulose, increased pectins, and irregular and ectopic deposition of pectins, xyloglucans, and callose. Furthermore, pnt1 pollen is less viable than the wild type, and pnt1 embryos were delayed in morphogenesis and showed defects in shoot and root meristems. The PNT1 gene encodes the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of mammalian PIG-M, an endoplasmic reticulum-localized mannosyltransferase that is required for synthesis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. All five pnt mutants showed strongly reduced accumulation of GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that they all have defects in GPI anchor synthesis. Although the mutants are seedling lethal, pnt1 cells are able to proliferate for a limited time as undifferentiated callus and do not show the massive deposition of ectopic cell wall material seen in pnt1 embryos. The different phenotype of pnt1 cells in embryos and callus suggest a differential requirement for GPI-anchored proteins in cell wall synthesis in these two tissues and points to the importance of GPI anchoring in coordinated multicellular growth.

  11. Ultimate load capacities of expansion anchor bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnecki, R.M.; Manrique, M.A.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of available experimental expansion anchor bolt test data is presented. These data were collected as part of programs by the nuclear industry to address generic issues related to verification of seismic adequacy of equipment in nuclear power plants. Some of the data presented are suitable for use in seismic probabilistic risk assessments. For example, mean values of ultimate strength, along with their standard deviation and coefficients of variation, for a range of most typical expansion anchor bolt sizes are presented. Effects of interaction between shear and tension, edge distance, spacing, and cracking of the concrete are presented in a manner that is more suitable for use in deterministic evaluations. Related industry programs to derive anchor bolt capacities are briefly discussed. Recommendations for areas of further investigation are also presented

  12. The First Survey of Distribution of Inherited Deafness Patterns in Individuals Referred to Genetic Center of Ahvaz Welfare Organization, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohammadian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Deafness is a heterogeneous disorder induced by genetic and environmental factors. It is the most common hereditary sensory-neural disorder that affects 1/1000 to 1/2000 of the newborns. More than 70% of hearing loss cases are caused by genetic disorders, 85% of which result from nonsyndromic autosomal recessive sensory-neural hearing loss. Up to now, more than 100 genes contributing in hearing loss have been determined. Alteration of these genes may result in hearing loss.This study was performed to identify the inheritance patterns of deafness and its relation with ethnicity, gender and consanguineous marriages.Methods: In this survey, data from 356 families affected by hearing loss and referred to welfare organization of Ahvaz during the time were collected based on sex, ethnic groups and relativeness.Results: The results state a high frequency of autosomal recessive deafness caused by consanguineous marriages within Arab and non-Arab ethnic groups (p<0.05. But no significant difference in gender."nConclusion: In conclusion, the high frequency of autosomal recessive deafness among the population with a high frequency of consanguineous marriages is considerable. The dominant pattern of deafness observed in this population was autosomal recessive.

  13. SNP discovery and chromosome anchoring provide the first physically-anchored hexaploid oat map and reveal synteny with model species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah E Oliver

    Full Text Available A physically anchored consensus map is foundational to modern genomics research; however, construction of such a map in oat (Avena sativa L., 2n = 6x = 42 has been hindered by the size and complexity of the genome, the scarcity of robust molecular markers, and the lack of aneuploid stocks. Resources developed in this study include a modified SNP discovery method for complex genomes, a diverse set of oat SNP markers, and a novel chromosome-deficient SNP anchoring strategy. These resources were applied to build the first complete, physically-anchored consensus map of hexaploid oat. Approximately 11,000 high-confidence in silico SNPs were discovered based on nine million inter-varietal sequence reads of genomic and cDNA origin. GoldenGate genotyping of 3,072 SNP assays yielded 1,311 robust markers, of which 985 were mapped in 390 recombinant-inbred lines from six bi-parental mapping populations ranging in size from 49 to 97 progeny. The consensus map included 985 SNPs and 68 previously-published markers, resolving 21 linkage groups with a total map distance of 1,838.8 cM. Consensus linkage groups were assigned to 21 chromosomes using SNP deletion analysis of chromosome-deficient monosomic hybrid stocks. Alignments with sequenced genomes of rice and Brachypodium provide evidence for extensive conservation of genomic regions, and renewed encouragement for orthology-based genomic discovery in this important hexaploid species. These results also provide a framework for high-resolution genetic analysis in oat, and a model for marker development and map construction in other species with complex genomes and limited resources.

  14. Comparison of Suture-Based Anchors and Traditional Bioabsorbable Anchors in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, W Chad; Tsai, Michael A; Parks, Brent G; Miller, Stuart D

    We compared the pullout strength of a suture-based anchor versus a bioabsorbable anchor in the distal fibula and calcaneus and evaluated the relationship between bone mineral density and peak load to failure. Eight paired cadaveric specimens underwent a modified Broström procedure and Achilles tendon reattachment. The fibula and calcaneus in the paired specimens received either a suture-based anchor or a bioabsorbable suture anchor. The fibular and calcaneal specimens were loaded to failure, defined as a substantial decrease in the applied load or pullout from the bone. In the fibula, the peak load to failure was significantly greater with the suture-based versus the bioabsorbable anchors (133.3 ± 41.8 N versus 76.8 ± 35.3 N; p = .002). No significant difference in load with 5 mm of displacement was found between the 2 groups. In the calcaneus, no difference in the peak load to failure was found between the 2 groups, and the peak load to failure with 5 mm of displacement was significantly lower with the suture-based than with the bioabsorbable anchors (52.2 ± 9.8 N versus 75.9 ± 12.4 N; p = .003). Bone mineral density and peak load to failure were significantly correlated in the fibula with the suture-based anchor. An innovative suture-based anchor had a greater peak load to failure compared with a bioabsorbable anchor in the fibula. In the calcaneus, the load at 5 mm of displacement was significantly lower in the suture-based than in the bioabsorbable group. The correlation findings might indicate the need for a cortical bone shelf with the suture-based anchor. Suture-based anchors could be a viable alternative to bioabsorbable anchors for certain foot and ankle procedures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  16. Chemical biology of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    CSIR-IIIM. Chemical biology of. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors. Ram Vishwakarma. CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu. N ti l I tit t f I l. N. D lhi. National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi. Piramal Life Sciences Ltd, Mumbai ...

  17. Method and apparatus for dismantling mechanical anchors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovskiy, Yu P; Chendev, F S; Gritsayuk, B I; Gubin, N I; Osipov, S P

    1982-01-01

    This apparatus is designed to reduce the amount of labor required to dismantle mechanical anchors while at the same time lowering expenditures for lumber. Longwall beams and timber skips are used to support the cap and any fractured rock faces. The apparatus itself has grooves, vertical guides, and a drive system to position the longwall beams.

  18. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhuang

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  19. Stone anchors from the Okhamandal region, Gujarat Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundaresh; Gaur, A.S.; Gudigar, P.; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    During marine archaeological explorations since 1983, off Dwarka, a large number of stone anchors were discovered and dated to 1400 BC, comparing with anchors found in Mediterranean waters. In recent archaeological explorations off Dwarka, Bet...

  20. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  1. AnchorDock: Blind and Flexible Anchor-Driven Peptide Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Niv, Masha Y

    2015-05-05

    The huge conformational space stemming from the inherent flexibility of peptides is among the main obstacles to successful and efficient computational modeling of protein-peptide interactions. Current peptide docking methods typically overcome this challenge using prior knowledge from the structure of the complex. Here we introduce AnchorDock, a peptide docking approach, which automatically targets the docking search to the most relevant parts of the conformational space. This is done by precomputing the free peptide's structure and by computationally identifying anchoring spots on the protein surface. Next, a free peptide conformation undergoes anchor-driven simulated annealing molecular dynamics simulations around the predicted anchoring spots. In the challenging task of a completely blind docking test, AnchorDock produced exceptionally good results (backbone root-mean-square deviation ≤ 2.2Å, rank ≤15) for 10 of 13 unbound cases tested. The impressive performance of AnchorDock supports a molecular recognition pathway that is driven via pre-existing local structural elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Career Paths, Images and Anchors: A Study with Brazilian Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimnik, Zelia Miranda; de Oliveira, Luiz Claudio Vieira; Sant'anna, Anderson De Souza; Barros, Delba Teixeira Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses career anchors changes associated to images and professionals trajectories. Its main question: Do anchors careers change through time? We conducted twelve interviews involving professionals from the Administration Area, applying Schein's Career Anchors Inventory (1993). We did the same two years later. In both of them, the…

  3. A general pipeline for the development of anchor markers for comparative genomics in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Jens

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete or near-complete genomic sequence information is presently only available for a few plant species representing a large phylogenetic diversity among plants. In order to effectively transfer this information to species lacking sequence information, comparative genomic tools need to be developed. Molecular markers permitting cross-species mapping along co-linear genomic regions are central to comparative genomics. These "anchor" markers, defining unique loci in genetic linkage maps of multiple species, are gene-based and possess a number of features that make them relatively sparse. To identify potential anchor marker sequences more efficiently, we have established an automated bioinformatic pipeline that combines multi-species Expressed Sequence Tags (EST and genome sequence data. Results Taking advantage of sequence data from related species, the pipeline identifies evolutionarily conserved sequences that are likely to define unique orthologous loci in most species of the same phylogenetic clade. The key features are the identification of evolutionarily conserved sequences followed by automated design of intron-flanking Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR primer pairs. Polymorphisms can subsequently be identified by size- or sequence variation of PCR products, amplified from mapping parents or populations. We illustrate our procedure in legumes and grasses and exemplify its application in legumes, where model plant studies and the genome- and EST-sequence data available have a potential impact on the breeding of crop species and on our understanding of the evolution of this large and diverse family. Conclusion We provide a database of 459 candidate anchor loci which have the potential to serve as map anchors in more than 18,000 legume species, a number of which are of agricultural importance. For grasses, the database contains 1335 candidate anchor loci. Based on this database, we have evaluated 76 candidate anchor loci

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Barth syndrome

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    ... intelligence but often have difficulty performing tasks involving math or visual-spatial skills such as puzzles. Males with Barth syndrome have increased levels of a substance called 3-methylglutaconic acid in ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Clouston syndrome

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    ... Nakamura M, Farooq M, Fujikawa H, Kibbi AG, Ito M, Dahdah M, Matta M, Diab H, Shimomura Y. GJB6, of which mutations underlie Clouston syndrome, is a potential direct target gene of p63. J Dermatol Sci. 2013 Feb; ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

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    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Parkinson disease Parkinson disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Parkinson disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: anauxetic dysplasia

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    ... complex called mitochondrial RNA-processing endoribonuclease, or RNase MRP. The RNase MRP enzyme is thought to be involved in several ... RNA produced from the gene, and the RNase MRP enzyme containing the altered noncoding RNA is impaired ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

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    ... disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. When this has been accomplished, the body ordinarily stops the inflammatory response to prevent damage to its own cells and tissues. Mechanical stress on the joints, such as occurs ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin thrombophilia

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    ... complications may include pregnancy-induced high blood pressure ( preeclampsia ), slow fetal growth, and early separation of the ... from the 2005 William Beaumont Hospital Symposium on Molecular Pathology. J Mol Diagn. 2006 Sep;8(4): ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: myotonia congenita

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    ... Manual Consumer Version: Congenital Myopathies Orphanet: Thomsen and Becker disease Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Muscular Dystrophy Association National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Resource ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Noonan syndrome

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    ... growth spurt that results in shortened stature. Most males with Noonan syndrome have undescended testes (cryptorchidism), which may contribute to infertility (inability to father a child) later in life. Females with Noonan syndrome can experience delayed puberty but ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: ethylmalonic encephalopathy

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    ... 0004.2010.01457.x. Citation on PubMed García-Silva MT, Ribes A, Campos Y, Garavaglia B, Arenas ... R, Lamantea E, Mandel H, Balestri P, Garcia-Silva MT, Vollmer B, Rinaldo P, Hahn SH, Leonard ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Dent disease

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    ... body effectively. Some people with Dent disease develop rickets , a bone disorder that results when the levels ... including calcium) in the blood become too low. Rickets can be associated with weakening and softening of ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: aromatase deficiency

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    ... to impaired female sexual development, unusual bone growth, insulin resistance, and other signs and symptoms of aromatase deficiency . In women who are pregnant with an affected fetus, excess androgens in the ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Sandhoff disease

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    ... Cooper A, Ferrie CD. Juvenile Sandhoff disease--nine new cases and a review of the literature. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2004;27(2):241-9. Review. Citation on PubMed Tay SK, Low PS, Ong HT, Loke KY. Sandhoff disease--a case report of 3 siblings and a review of potential therapies. Ann Acad ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Roberts syndrome

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    ... feet are located very close to the body (phocomelia). People with Roberts syndrome may also have abnormal ... may live into adulthood. A condition called SC phocomelia syndrome was originally thought to be distinct from ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Netherton syndrome

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    ... skin inflammation and allergy by loss of protease inhibition. Cell Tissue Res. 2013 Feb;351(2):289- ... Links Data Files & API Site Map Subscribe Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: craniofacial microsomia

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    ... the first and second pharyngeal arches (also called branchial or visceral arches). Tissue layers in the six ... dysplasia CFM facioauriculovertebral dysplasia FAV first and second branchial arch syndrome first and second pharyngeal arch syndromes ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Poland syndrome

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    ... hand with abnormally short fingers (brachydactyly); small, underdeveloped (vestigial) fingers; and some fingers that are fused together ( ... cases, severely affected individuals have abnormalities of internal organs such as a lung or a kidney, or ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Leigh syndrome

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    ... Syndrome Overview. 2015 Oct 1. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: pachyonychia congenita

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    ... 27 [updated 2014 Jul 24]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: primary hyperoxaluria

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    ... 19 [updated 2014 Jul 17]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Stickler syndrome

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    ... 9 [updated 2017 Mar 16]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

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    ... 2 [updated 2016 Sep 29]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: campomelic dysplasia

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    ... 31 [updated 2013 May 9]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: myotonic dystrophy

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    ... 17 [updated 2015 Oct 22]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: oculocutaneous albinism

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    ... 17 [updated 2017 Sep 7]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Timothy syndrome

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    ... 15 [updated 2015 Jul 16]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: xeroderma pigmentosum

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    ... 20 [updated 2016 Sep 29]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

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    ... 26 [updated 2017 Feb 2]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: cutis laxa

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    ... 9 [updated 2016 Aug 18]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Pendred syndrome

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    ... 28 [updated 2014 May 29]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Wagner syndrome

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    ... 3 [updated 2016 Jan 7]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Caffey disease

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    ... Mundlos S, Sillence D, Ala Kokko L, Seidman JG, Cole WG, Jüppner H. A novel COL1A1 mutation in infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease) expands the spectrum of collagen-related disorders. J ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Cole disease

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    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Cole disease Cole disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Cole disease is a disorder that affects the skin. People ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: osteogenesis imperfecta

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    ... 2008 Jul;40(7):927. Citation on PubMed Cole WG. Advances in osteogenesis imperfecta. Clin Orthop Relat ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: dystonia 6

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    ... neck, causing problems with speaking (dysarthria) and eating (dysphagia). Eyelid twitching (blepharospasm) may also occur. Involvement of ... dystonia, DYT6 type The Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia and Parkinson Foundation: What Is Dystonia? Patient Support and Advocacy ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Sotos syndrome

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    ... gene are the primary cause of Sotos syndrome , accounting for up to 90 percent of cases. Other ... Sotos syndrome cases occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family. Most of ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Perrault syndrome

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    ... Severely affected girls do not begin menstruation by age 16 (primary amenorrhea), and most never have a menstrual period. Less severely affected women have an early loss of ovarian function (primary ovarian insufficiency); their ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Fraser syndrome

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    ... FRAS1 gene mutations are the most common cause, accounting for about half of cases of Fraser syndrome . ... Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: multiminicore disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are less common than the classic form, together accounting for about 25 percent of all cases. The ... making a protein called selenoprotein N. Although its function is unknown, researchers suspect that this protein may ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: proopiomelanocortin deficiency

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    ... are constantly hungry, which leads to excessive feeding (hyperphagia). The babies continuously gain weight and are severely ... brain dysregulates the body's energy balance, leading to overeating and severe obesity. POMC deficiency is a rare ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Refsum disease

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    ... disease is caused by an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa . This disorder affects the retina , the light-sensitive ... the retina gradually deteriorate. The first sign of retinitis pigmentosa is usually a loss of night vision, which ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: acromicric dysplasia

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    ... These facial differences become less apparent in adulthood. Intelligence is unaffected in this disorder, and life expectancy ... tissues and organs. Additionally, microfibrils store molecules called growth factors, including transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: cleidocranial dysplasia

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    ... motor skills such as crawling and walking, but intelligence is unaffected. Related Information What does it mean ... Pawlowska E, Blasiak J. RUNX2: A Master Bone Growth Regulator That May Be Involved in the DNA ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Larsen syndrome

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    ... with Larsen syndrome can survive into adulthood and intelligence is unaffected. Related Information What does it mean ... B appears to be important for normal cell growth and division (proliferation) and maturation (differentiation) of chondrocytes ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: oculodentodigital dysplasia

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    ... likely interferes with normal cell growth and cell specialization, processes that determine the shape and function of ... NORD) The Foundation Fighting Blindness University of Kansas Medical Center Resource List: Hard of Hearing/Deafness Scientific ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Grange syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene activity (expression), repair of damaged DNA, cell specialization (differentiation), and cell growth and division (proliferation). Researchers ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Jacobsen syndrome

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    ... compulsive behavior (such as shredding paper), a short attention span, and easy distractibility. Many people with Jacobsen syndrome have been diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Jacobsen syndrome is also ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

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    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... cancer, childhood Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Glanzmann thrombasthenia

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    ... Aug 8. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Pillitteri D, Pilgrimm AK, Kirchmaier CM. Novel Mutations in the GPIIb and GPIIIa Genes in Glanzmann Thrombasthenia. Transfus Med Hemother. 2010;37( ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

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    ... 1-16. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Thöny B, Blau N. Mutations in the BH4-metabolizing genes GTP cyclohydrolase I, 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase, sepiapterin ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: cap myopathy

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    ... crawling, standing, and walking. They may fall frequently, tire easily, and have difficulty running, climbing stairs, or ... does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: boomerang dysplasia

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    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Boomerang dysplasia Boomerang dysplasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Boomerang dysplasia is a disorder that affects the development ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

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    ... do not have celiac disease . On average, a diagnosis of celiac disease is not made until 6 to 10 years ... and tissues and leads to the signs and symptoms of celiac disease . Almost all people with celiac disease have specific ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Alagille syndrome

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    ... abnormalities. This combination of heart defects is called tetralogy of Fallot . People with Alagille syndrome may have distinctive facial ... the disorder, such as a heart defect like tetralogy of Fallot, or a characteristic facial appearance. These individuals do ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: metatropic dysplasia

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    ... is a skeletal disorder characterized by short stature (dwarfism) with other skeletal abnormalities. The term "metatropic" is ... my area? Other Names for This Condition metatropic dwarfism metatropic dysplasia type 1 Related Information How are ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Mabry syndrome

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    ... 2013 Apr 4;92(4):575-83. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2013.03.008. Citation on PubMed ... 2010 Mar-Apr;53(2):85-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ejmg.2010.01.002. Epub 2010 Jan ... 2012 Jul 13;91(1):146-51. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.05.004. Epub 2012 Jun ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: centronuclear myopathy

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    ... 2014 Aug 7;95(2):218-26. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.07.004. Epub 2014 Jul ... 2012 Aug 10;91(2):365-71. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.06.012. Epub 2012 Jul ... Disord. 2010 Apr;20(4):223-8. doi: 10.1016/j.nmd.2010.01.014. Epub 2010 Feb ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Robinow syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 Apr 2;96(4):623-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.02.010. Epub 2015 Mar ... 2015 Apr 2;96(4):612-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.02.015. Epub 2015 Mar ... 16. pii: S0002-9297(17)30422-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.10.002. [Epub ahead of ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: malignant hyperthermia

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    ... 1722-30. Review. Citation on PubMed Litman RS, Rosenberg H. Malignant hyperthermia: update on susceptibility testing. JAMA. ... 27(10):977-89. Review. Citation on PubMed Rosenberg H, Davis M, James D, Pollock N, Stowell ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: fundus albipunctatus

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    ... Lorenz B, Sander B, Larsen M, Eckstein C, Rosenberg T. Lack of autofluorescence in fundus albipunctatus associated ... Preising M, Lorenz B, Sander B, Larsen M, Rosenberg T. Fundus albipunctatus associated with compound heterozygous mutations ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

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    ... Jan;73(2):169-75. doi: 10.1002/pros.22552. Epub 2012 Jun 21. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Nakagawa H. Prostate cancer genomics by high-throughput technologies: genome-wide association study and sequencing analysis. Endocr ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Krabbe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breaks down certain fats called galactolipids. One galactolipid broken down by galactosylceramidase, called galactosylceramide, is an important ... the production of myelin, is toxic if not broken down by galactosylceramidase. GALC gene mutations severely reduce ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: ovarian cancer

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    ... is most often associated with mutations in the MLH1 or MSH2 gene and accounts for between 10 ... AKT1 BARD1 BRCA1 BRCA2 BRIP1 CDH1 CHEK2 CTNNB1 MLH1 MRE11 MSH2 MSH6 NBN OPCML PALB2 PIK3CA PMS2 ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: methylmalonic acidemia

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    ... Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens ... patients with the cblD inborn error of cobalamin metabolism. J Pediatr. 2009 Apr;154(4):551-6. ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: argininosuccinic aciduria

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    ... Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens ... and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism. J Nutr. 2004 Oct;134(10 Suppl):2775S- ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: WAGR syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the chromosome 11 deletion includes an additional gene, BDNF . This gene is active (expressed) in the brain ... nerve cells ( neurons ). The protein produced from the BDNF gene is thought to be involved in the ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Wolfram syndrome

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    ... important in the pancreas , where the protein is thought to help process a protein called proinsulin into the mature hormone ... individuals. The death of cells in other body systems likely causes the various signs and symptoms of ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pyrimidines also impedes the final step of the process, which produces molecules called beta-aminoisobutyric acid and beta-alanine. Both of these molecules are thought to protect the nervous system and help it function properly. Reduced production of ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Marfan syndrome Marfan syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Marfan syndrome KidsHealth from Nemours Foundation MalaCards: marfan syndrome Orphanet: Marfan syndrome Your Genes Your Health from Cold Spring ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: nemaline myopathy

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    ... deformities, abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), and joint deformities (contractures). Most people with nemaline myopathy are ... Centre for Rare Diseases Washington University, St. Louis: Neuromuscular Disease Center Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: pontocerebellar hypoplasia

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    ... PCH1 also have very weak muscle tone (hypotonia), joint deformities called contractures, vision impairment, and breathing and ... InfoSearch: Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 MalaCards: pontocerebellar hypoplasia Neuromuscular Disease Center, Washington University, St. Louis: Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Angelman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gentile JK, Tan WH, Horowitz LT, Bacino CA, Skinner SA, Barbieri-Welge R, Bauer-Carlin A, Beaudet ... article on PubMed Central Tan WH, Bacino CA, Skinner SA, Anselm I, Barbieri-Welge R, Bauer-Carlin ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: bipolar disorder

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    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Bipolar disorder Bipolar disorder Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Partington syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Demeer B, Poirier K, Biancalana V, Pinoit JM, Julia S, Chelly J, Devys D, Mandel JL. ARX polyalanine ... The phenotypic spectrum of ARX mutations. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2005 Feb;47(2):133-7. Review. ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Down syndrome

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    ... called autism spectrum disorders, which affect communication and social interaction. People with Down syndrome often experience a gradual ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development GeneEd National Human Genome Research Institute National ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Miyoshi myopathy

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    ... links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Muscular Dystrophy Cincinnati Children's Hospital: Molkentin Lab: Mechanisms of Duchenne and Miyoshi Myopathy Disease InfoSearch: Miyoshi myopathy Jain ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: blepharocheilodontic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and mouth. This protein is involved in the attachment of cells to one another (cell adhesion). The p120-catenin protein helps keep E-cadherin in its proper place in the cell membrane, preventing it from being ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Brody myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 (SERCA1). The SERCA1 enzyme is found in skeletal muscle cells, specifically in the membrane of a structure called the sarcoplasmic reticulum . This structure plays a major role in muscle contraction and relaxation by storing and releasing positively charged ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sticks together (because of a force called surface tension) after exhalation, causing the alveoli to collapse. As a result, filling the lungs with air on each breath becomes very difficult, and the delivery of oxygen ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Gilbert syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... instance because of dehydration, prolonged periods without food (fasting), illness, vigorous exercise, or menstruation. Some people with ... to conjugated bilirubin. Glucuronidation makes bilirubin dissolvable in water so that it can be removed from the ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: trisomy 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hallahan T, Jackson L; First Trimester Maternal Serum Biochemistry and Fetal Nuchal Translucency Screening (BUN) Study Group. ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fanconi anemia: at the crossroads of DNA repair. Biochemistry (Mosc). 2011 Jan;76(1):36-48. Review. ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Helmick CG, Felson DT, Lawrence RC, Gabriel S, Hirsch R, Kwoh CK, Liang MH, Kremers HM, Mayes MD, Merkel PA, Pillemer SR, Reveille JD, Stone JH; National Arthritis Data Workgroup. Estimates of the ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: CHARGE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome are often born with an unusually small penis (micropenis) and undescended testes (cryptorchidism). Abnormalities of external genitalia are seen less often in affected females. Puberty can be incomplete or delayed in affected males ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: clopidogrel resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Clopidogrel resistance Clopidogrel resistance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Clopidogrel resistance is a condition in which the drug clopidogrel ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: frontonasal dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... respective protein. As a result, the regulation of cell organization during development of the head and face is ... Craniofacial Association: A Guide to Understanding Frontonasal Dysplasia (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: ... Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Operation Smile Resource List ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Blau syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance Ocular Immunology and Uveitis Foundation Stop Childhood Auto Inflammatory Diseases (CAID) Now Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Health Topic: Allergy Health Topic: Asthma Health Topic: Asthma in Children Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Educational Resources (12 links) American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: Allergies Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: What ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial candidiasis

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    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Familial candidiasis Familial candidiasis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial candidiasis is an inherited tendency to develop infections caused ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Kawasaki disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how do mutations occur? How can gene mutations affect health and development? More about ... but the inheritance pattern is unknown. Children of parents who have had Kawasaki disease have twice the ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Tangier disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Maxfield FR, Tabas I. Role of cholesterol and lipid organization in disease. Nature. 2005 Dec 1;438(7068):612-21. ... Hubácek JA. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in human metabolism and diseases. Physiol Res. 2004;53(3):235-43. Review. ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial dysautonomia

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    ... of developmental delay. Additional signs and symptoms in school-age children include bed wetting, episodes of vomiting, reduced sensitivity to temperature changes and pain, poor balance, abnormal curvature of ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

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    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Carney complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cortisol (hypercortisolism) can lead to the development of Cushing syndrome. This syndrome causes weight gain in the face ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Cushing's Syndrome Educational Resources (6 links) Disease InfoSearch: Carney Complex ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and they vary widely among affected individuals. A hallmark feature of ECCL is a noncancerous tumor under ... increased risk of developing a type of brain cancer called a glioma. The brain and spinal cord ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network: Sterol & Isopernoid Research Consortium Educational Resources (5 ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Hartsfield syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hands and feet called ectrodactyly. During early development before birth, the brain normally divides into two halves, the right and left hemispheres . Holoprosencephaly occurs when the brain fails to ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: acrocallosal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... callosum occurs when the tissue that connects the left and right halves of the brain (the corpus callosum ) fails to form normally during the early stages of development before birth. Other brain abnormalities, including the growth ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain divides into two halves ( hemispheres ) during early development. Holoprosencephaly occurs when the brain fails to divide properly into the right and left hemispheres. This condition is called nonsyndromic to distinguish ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Perry syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Resources (5 links) American Parkinson Disease Association Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research National Alliance on ... Apr;20(4):388-93. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.01.010. Epub 2014 Jan 22. ... C, Ross OA, Brown LA, Castanedes-Casey M, Dickson DW, Wszolek ZK. DCTN1 mutations in ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type 1 hemochromatosis results from mutations in the HFE gene, and type 2 hemochromatosis results from mutations in ... about the genes associated with hereditary hemochromatosis HAMP HFE HJV PNPLA3 SLC40A1 TFR2 Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation and how do ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: essential tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Essential tremor Essential tremor Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Essential tremor is a movement disorder that causes involuntary, rhythmic ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: gestational diabetes

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    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Gestational diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Beta thalassemia Beta thalassemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Beta thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alpha thalassemia Alpha thalassemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cranioectodermal dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Citation on PubMed Taschner M, Bhogaraju S, Lorentzen E. Architecture and function of IFT complex proteins in ciliogenesis. ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Gillespie syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally become noticeable in early childhood when the individual is learning these skills. People with Gillespie syndrome usually continue ... syndrome is unknown. Only a few dozen affected individuals have been described in the medical ... accounts for about 2 percent of cases of aniridia . ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... closer to the equator, such as in Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and parts of South America, where about 1 ... personal health condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional . About Selection Criteria for Links Data Files & ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: prion disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which have overlapping signs and symptoms, include familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), and fatal ... Sc . Sporadic forms of prion disease include sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI), and variably protease- ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: periventricular heterotopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the two sex chromosomes . The inheritance is dominant if one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the condition. A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: dyskeratosis congenita

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. When dyskeratosis congenita is caused by mutations in other genes, it can be inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern. Autosomal dominant means one ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Kallmann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in other genes, it often has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, which means one copy of an altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the disorder. In some cases, an affected person inherits the mutation from an affected mother or father . Other cases result from new mutations in the ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... in known genes account for 58% of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Adv Exp Med Biol. 2008; ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... is characterized by hematuria. Alport syndrome has autosomal dominant inheritance in about 5 percent of cases. People ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: opioid addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Opioid addiction Opioid addiction Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Opioid addiction is a long-lasting (chronic) disease that can ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Cockayne syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cockayne syndrome type II is also known as cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, and while some ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome Educational Resources (8 links) ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: parathyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skeletal problems. These problems include increased urine production (polyuria), deposits of calcium in the kidneys (nephrocalcinosis) leading ... Institute: Parathyroid Cancer Treatment PDQ National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Primary Hyperparathyroidism Educational ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Greenberg dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of certain hormones and digestive acids. During cholesterol synthesis, the sterol reductase function of the lamin B receptor allows ... this loss causes the condition. Absence of the sterol reductase function disrupts the normal synthesis of cholesterol within cells. This absence may also ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Raynaud phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about 15 minutes after the cold exposure or stressor has ended and involves mild discomfort such as ... condition, occurring in 3 to 5 percent of adults worldwide. It is more common in females than ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: systemic scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Systemic scleroderma Systemic scleroderma Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Systemic scleroderma is an autoimmune disorder that affects the skin ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ocular albinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... structures that produce and store a pigment called melanin. Melanin is the substance that gives skin, hair, and ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: propionic acidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cerdá C, Scholl-Bürgi S, Skovby F, Wijburg F, MacDonald A, Martinelli D, Sass JO, Valayannopoulos V, Chakrapani ... Cerdá C, Scholl-Bürgi S, Skovby F, Wijburg F, MacDonald A, Martinelli D, Sass JO, Valayannopoulos V, Chakrapani ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body's daily ( circadian ) rhythms, such as the sleep-wake cycle; others that help control the movement (migration) of nerve cells during brain development; and still others involved in sending and receiving chemical signals in the brain. In particular, several genes ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Dupuytren contracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contract. The increased number of myofibroblasts in this disorder cause abnormal contraction of the fascia and produce excess amounts ... protein called type III collagen. The combination of abnormal contraction and excess type III ... risk factors for developing Dupuytren contracture may ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aspartic acid (NAA), which is predominantly found in neurons in the brain. The function of NAA is unclear. Researchers had suspected that ... in the transport of water molecules out of neurons. Mutations in the ASPA gene reduce the function of aspartoacylase, which prevents the normal breakdown of ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Pfeiffer syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Craniosynostosis Information Page Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center: Craniosynostosis Collaboration ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Moebius syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Educational Resources (5 links) Children's Craniofacial Association: A Guide to Understanding Moebius Syndrome ( ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Fabry disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke: Fabry's Disease Information Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Lipid Storage Diseases Fact Sheet Educational Resources (8 links) Children Living With Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK): Fabry ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzon syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Craniosynostosis Information Page Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital Collaboration for Craniofacial Development and Disorders, Johns ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Apert syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Craniosynostosis Information Page Educational Resources (9 links) Boston Children's Hospital Collaboration for Craniofacial Development and Disorders, Johns ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Knobloch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institute: Facts About Retinal Detachment National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Encephaloceles Educational Resources (6 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Retinal Disorders Q&A Disease InfoSearch: Knobloch ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hidradenitis suppurativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apr;60(4):539-61; quiz 562-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2008.11.911. Review. ... Acad Dermatol. 2009 Jul;61(1):51-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2009.02.013. Epub ... Dermatol Clin. 2010 Oct;28(4):779-93. doi: 10.1016/j.det.2010.07.003. Review. ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Omenn syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immunodeficiency. Front Immunol. 2014 Apr 22;5:162. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00162. Erratum in: Front ... immunodeficiency. Front Immunol. 2014 Apr 22;5:162. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00162. Erratum in: Front ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Klinefelter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usual. Testosterone is the hormone that directs male sexual development before birth and during puberty. A shortage of ... genes on the X chromosome interfere with male sexual development, often preventing the testes from functioning normally and ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spina bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a condition in which the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. As a result, when the spine forms, ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Meckel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when a structure called the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. Meckel syndrome can also cause problems with ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: spondylocostal dysostosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when a structure called the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. Examples of neural tube defects that occur ...