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Sample records for ancestral duplication highly-conserved

  1. A recent duplication revisited: phylogenetic analysis reveals an ancestral duplication highly-conserved throughout the Oryza genus and beyond

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    Cooke Richard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of gene duplication in the structural and functional evolution of genomes has been well documented. Analysis of complete rice (Oryza sativa genome sequences suggested an ancient whole genome duplication, common to all the grasses, some 50-70 million years ago and a more conserved segmental duplication between the distal regions of the short arms of chromosomes 11 and 12, whose evolutionary history is controversial. Results We have carried out a comparative analysis of this duplication within the wild species of the genus Oryza, using a phylogenetic approach to specify its origin and evolutionary dynamics. Paralogous pairs were isolated for nine genes selected throughout the region in all Oryza genome types, as well as in two outgroup species, Leersia perrieri and Potamophila parviflora. All Oryza species display the same global evolutionary dynamics but some lineage-specific features appear towards the proximal end of the duplicated region. The same level of conservation is observed between the redundant copies of the tetraploid species Oryza minuta. The presence of orthologous duplicated blocks in the genome of the more distantly-related species, Brachypodium distachyon, strongly suggests that this duplication between chromosomes 11 and 12 was formed as part of the whole genome duplication common to all Poaceae. Conclusion Our observations suggest that recurrent but heterogeneous concerted evolution throughout the Oryza genus and in related species has led specifically to the extremely high sequence conservation occurring in this region of more than 2 Mbp.

  2. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

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    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  3. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral “Salicoid” Genome Duplication

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    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the “salicoid” duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  4. Two Rounds of Whole Genome Duplication in the AncestralVertebrate

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    Dehal, Paramvir; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-04-12

    The hypothesis that the relatively large and complex vertebrate genome was created by two ancient, whole genome duplications has been hotly debated, but remains unresolved. We reconstructed the evolutionary relationships of all gene families from the complete gene sets of a tunicate, fish, mouse, and human, then determined when each gene duplicated relative to the evolutionary tree of the organisms. We confirmed the results of earlier studies that there remains little signal of these events in numbers of duplicated genes, gene tree topology, or the number of genes per multigene family. However, when we plotted the genomic map positions of only the subset of paralogous genes that were duplicated prior to the fish-tetrapod split, their global physical organization provides unmistakable evidence of two distinct genome duplication events early in vertebrate evolution indicated by clear patterns of 4-way paralogous regions covering a large part of the human genome. Our results highlight the potential for these large-scale genomic events to have driven the evolutionary success of the vertebrate lineage.

  5. Genesis of the vertebrate FoxP subfamily member genes occurred during two ancestral whole genome duplication events.

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    Song, Xiaowei; Tang, Yezhong; Wang, Yajun

    2016-08-22

    The vertebrate FoxP subfamily genes play important roles in the construction of essential functional modules involved in physiological and developmental processes. To explore the adaptive evolution of functional modules associated with the FoxP subfamily member genes, it is necessary to study the gene duplication process. We detected four member genes of the FoxP subfamily in sea lampreys (a representative species of jawless vertebrates) through genome screenings and phylogenetic analyses. Reliable paralogons (i.e. paralogous chromosome segments) have rarely been detected in scaffolds of FoxP subfamily member genes in sea lampreys due to the considerable existence of HTH_Tnp_Tc3_2 transposases. However, these transposases did not alter gene numbers of the FoxP subfamily in sea lampreys. The coincidence between the "1-4" gene duplication pattern of FoxP subfamily genes from invertebrates to vertebrates and two rounds of ancestral whole genome duplication (1R- and 2R-WGD) events reveal that the FoxP subfamily of vertebrates was quadruplicated in the 1R- and 2R-WGD events. Furthermore, we deduced that a synchronous gene duplication process occurred for the FoxP subfamily and for three linked gene families/subfamilies (i.e. MIT family, mGluR group III and PLXNA subfamily) in the 1R- and 2R-WGD events using phylogenetic analyses and mirror-dendrogram methods (i.e. algorithms to test protein-protein interactions). Specifically, the ancestor of FoxP1 and FoxP3 and the ancestor of FoxP2 and FoxP4 were generated in 1R-WGD event. In the subsequent 2R-WGD event, these two ancestral genes were changed into FoxP1, FoxP2, FoxP3 and FoxP4. The elucidation of these gene duplication processes shed light on the phylogenetic relationships between functional modules of the FoxP subfamily member genes. PMID:27188254

  6. Demonstration of the Coexistence of Duplicated LH Receptors in Teleosts, and Their Origin in Ancestral Actinopterygians.

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    Gersende Maugars

    Full Text Available Pituitary gonadotropins, FSH and LH, control gonad activity in vertebrates, via binding to their respective receptors, FSHR and LHR, members of GPCR superfamily. Until recently, it was accepted that gnathostomes possess a single FSHR and a single LHR, encoded by fshr and lhcgr genes. We reinvestigated this question, focusing on vertebrate species of key-phylogenetical positions. Genome analyses supported the presence of a single fshr and a single lhcgr in chondrichthyans, and in sarcopterygians including mammals, birds, amphibians and coelacanth. In contrast, we identified a single fshr but two lhgcr in basal teleosts, the eels. We further showed the coexistence of duplicated lhgcr in other actinopterygians, including a non-teleost, the gar, and other teleosts, e.g. Mexican tetra, platyfish, or tilapia. Phylogeny and synteny analyses supported the existence in actinopterygians of two lhgcr paralogs (lhgcr1/ lhgcr2, which do not result from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (3R, but likely from a local gene duplication that occurred early in the actinopterygian lineage. Due to gene losses, there was no impact of 3R on the number of gonadotropin receptors in extant teleosts. Additional gene losses during teleost radiation, led to a single lhgcr (lhgcr1 or lhgcr2 in some species, e.g. medaka and zebrafish. Sequence comparison highlighted divergences in the extracellular and intracellular domains of the duplicated lhgcr, suggesting differential properties such as ligand binding and activation mechanisms. Comparison of tissue distribution in the European eel, revealed that fshr and both lhgcr transcripts are expressed in the ovary and testis, but are differentially expressed in non-gonadal tissues such as brain or eye. Differences in structure-activity relationships and tissue expression may have contributed as selective drives in the conservation of the duplicated lhgcr. This study revises the evolutionary scenario and nomenclature of

  7. [Duodenal duplication].

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    Ilari, J; Martorell, R; Morales, M; Capdevila, M; Mairal, J A; Teixidó, M; Casadellá, A

    1998-01-01

    Cystic duplication of the duodenum is a rare anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract. This is a report of a newborn with a cystic duplication of duodenum diagnosed prenatally. It's relevant the few clinical symptoms of a such big mass. The surgical procedure was excision of the cyst, with a good post operative curse. PMID:9662869

  8. Estimating Ancestral Population Parameters

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    Wakeley, J.; Hey, J.

    1997-01-01

    The expected numbers of different categories of polymorphic sites are derived for two related models of population history: the isolation model, in which an ancestral population splits into two descendents, and the size-change model, in which a single population undergoes an instantaneous change in size. For the isolation model, the observed numbers of shared, fixed, and exclusive polymorphic sites are used to estimate the relative sizes of the three populations, ancestral plus two descendent...

  9. Ancestral Relationships Using Metafounders

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    Legarra, Andres; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Vitezica, Zulma G;

    2015-01-01

    Recent use of genomic (marker-based) relationships shows that relationships exist within and across base population (breeds or lines). However, current treatment of pedigree relationships is unable to consider relationships within or across base populations, although such relationships must exist...... due to finite size of the ancestral population and connections between populations. This complicates the conciliation of both approaches and, in particular, combining pedigree with genomic relationships. We present a coherent theoretical framework to consider base population in pedigree relationships....... We suggest a conceptual framework that considers each ancestral population as a finite-sized pool of gametes. This generates across-individual relationships and contrasts with the classical view where each population is considered as an infinite, unrelated pool. Several ancestral populations may be...

  10. Gallbladder duplication

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    Yagan Pillay

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Duplication of the gallbladder is a rare congenital abnormality, which requires special attention to the biliary ductal and arterial anatomy. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy with intraoperative cholangiography is the appropriate treatment in a symptomatic gallbladder. The removal of an asymptomatic double gallbladder remains controversial.

  11. Mapping ancestral genomes with massive gene loss: a matrix sandwich problem.

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    Gavranović, Haris; Chauve, Cedric; Salse, Jérôme; Tannier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Ancestral genomes provide a better way to understand the structural evolution of genomes than the simple comparison of extant genomes. Most ancestral genome reconstruction methods rely on universal markers, that is, homologous families of DNA segments present in exactly one exemplar in every considered species. Complex histories of genes or other markers, undergoing duplications and losses, are rarely taken into account. It follows that some ancestors are inaccessible by these met...

  12. Ancient eudicot hexaploidy meets ancestral eurosid gene order

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    Zheng, Chunfang; Chen, Eric; Albert, Victor A.; Lyons, Eric; Sankoff, David

    2013-01-01

    Background A hexaploidization event over 125 Mya underlies the evolutionary lineage of the majority of flowering plants, including very many species of agricultural importance. Half of these belong to the rosid subgrouping, containing severals whose genome sequences have been published. Although most duplicate and triplicate genes have been lost in all descendants, clear traces of the original chromosome triples can be discerned, their internal contiguity highly conserved in some genomes and ...

  13. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes.

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    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-09-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  14. The roles of whole-genome and small-scale duplications in the functional specialization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes.

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    Mario A Fares

    Full Text Available Researchers have long been enthralled with the idea that gene duplication can generate novel functions, crediting this process with great evolutionary importance. Empirical data shows that whole-genome duplications (WGDs are more likely to be retained than small-scale duplications (SSDs, though their relative contribution to the functional fate of duplicates remains unexplored. Using the map of genetic interactions and the re-sequencing of 27 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes evolving for 2,200 generations we show that SSD-duplicates lead to neo-functionalization while WGD-duplicates partition ancestral functions. This conclusion is supported by: (a SSD-duplicates establish more genetic interactions than singletons and WGD-duplicates; (b SSD-duplicates copies share more interaction-partners than WGD-duplicates copies; (c WGD-duplicates interaction partners are more functionally related than SSD-duplicates partners; (d SSD-duplicates gene copies are more functionally divergent from one another, while keeping more overlapping functions, and diverge in their sub-cellular locations more than WGD-duplicates copies; and (e SSD-duplicates complement their functions to a greater extent than WGD-duplicates. We propose a novel model that uncovers the complexity of evolution after gene duplication.

  15. Ancestral reconstruction of tick lineages.

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    Mans, Ben J; de Castro, Minique H; Pienaar, Ronel; de Klerk, Daniel; Gaven, Philasande; Genu, Siyamcela; Latif, Abdalla A

    2016-06-01

    Ancestral reconstruction in its fullest sense aims to describe the complete evolutionary history of a lineage. This depends on accurate phylogenies and an understanding of the key characters of each parental lineage. An attempt is made to delineate our current knowledge with regard to the ancestral reconstruction of the tick (Ixodida) lineage. Tick characters may be assigned to Core of Life, Lineages of Life or Edges of Life phenomena depending on how far back these characters may be assigned in the evolutionary Tree of Life. These include housekeeping genes, sub-cellular systems, heme processing (Core of Life), development, moulting, appendages, nervous and organ systems, homeostasis, respiration (Lineages of Life), specific adaptations to a blood-feeding lifestyle, including the complexities of salivary gland secretions and tick-host interactions (Edges of Life). The phylogenetic relationships of lineages, their origins and importance in ancestral reconstruction are discussed. Uncertainties with respect to systematic relationships, ancestral reconstruction and the challenges faced in comparative transcriptomics (next-generation sequencing approaches) are highlighted. While almost 150 years of information regarding tick biology have been assembled, progress in recent years indicates that we are in the infancy of understanding tick evolution. Even so, broad reconstructions can be made with relation to biological features associated with various lineages. Conservation of characters shared with sister and parent lineages are evident, but appreciable differences are present in the tick lineage indicating modification with descent, as expected for Darwinian evolutionary theory. Many of these differences can be related to the hematophagous lifestyle of ticks. PMID:26868413

  16. Conserved intron positions in FGFR genes reflect the modular structure of FGFR and reveal stepwise addition of domains to an already complex ancestral FGFR.

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    Rebscher, Nicole; Deichmann, Christina; Sudhop, Stefanie; Fritzenwanker, Jens Holger; Green, Stephen; Hassel, Monika

    2009-10-01

    We have analyzed the evolution of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase genes throughout a wide range of animal phyla. No evidence for an FGFR gene was found in Porifera, but we tentatively identified an FGFR gene in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The gene encodes a protein with three immunoglobulin-like domains, a single-pass transmembrane, and a split tyrosine kinase domain. By superimposing intron positions of 20 FGFR genes from Placozoa, Cnidaria, Protostomia, and Deuterostomia over the respective protein domain structure, we identified ten ancestral introns and three conserved intron groups. Our analysis shows (1) that the position of ancestral introns correlates to the modular structure of FGFRs, (2) that the acidic domain very likely evolved in the last common ancestor of triploblasts, (3) that splicing of IgIII was enabled by a triploblast-specific insertion, and (4) that IgI is subject to substantial loss or duplication particularly in quickly evolving genomes. Moreover, intron positions in the catalytic domain of FGFRs map to the borders of protein subdomains highly conserved in other serine/threonine kinases. Nevertheless, these introns were introduced in metazoan receptor tyrosine kinases exclusively. Our data support the view that protein evolution dating back to the Cambrian explosion took place in such a short time window that only subtle changes in the domain structure are detectable in extant representatives of animal phyla. We propose that the first multidomain FGFR originated in the last common ancestor of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. Additional domains were introduced mainly in the ancestor of triploblasts and in the Ecdysozoa. PMID:20016912

  17. Local synteny and codon usage contribute to asymmetric sequence divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene duplicates

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    Bergthorsson Ulfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicated genes frequently experience asymmetric rates of sequence evolution. Relaxed selective constraints and positive selection have both been invoked to explain the observation that one paralog within a gene-duplicate pair exhibits an accelerated rate of sequence evolution. In the majority of studies where asymmetric divergence has been established, there is no indication as to which gene copy, ancestral or derived, is evolving more rapidly. In this study we investigated the effect of local synteny (gene-neighborhood conservation and codon usage on the sequence evolution of gene duplicates in the S. cerevisiae genome. We further distinguish the gene duplicates into those that originated from a whole-genome duplication (WGD event (ohnologs versus small-scale duplications (SSD to determine if there exist any differences in their patterns of sequence evolution. Results For SSD pairs, the derived copy evolves faster than the ancestral copy. However, there is no relationship between rate asymmetry and synteny conservation (ancestral-like versus derived-like in ohnologs. mRNA abundance and optimal codon usage as measured by the CAI is lower in the derived SSD copies relative to ancestral paralogs. Moreover, in the case of ohnologs, the faster-evolving copy has lower CAI and lowered expression. Conclusions Together, these results suggest that relaxation of selection for codon usage and gene expression contribute to rate asymmetry in the evolution of duplicated genes and that in SSD pairs, the relaxation of selection stems from the loss of ancestral regulatory information in the derived copy.

  18. Caudal duplication syndrome.

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    Ramzan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Shoaib; Ali, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Complete duplication of genitourinary system, colon and vertebral column is a very rare and complex congenital condition termed as "caudal duplication syndrome" with variable presentations. This term is often quoted as a type of incomplete separation of mono-ovular twins or conjoined twinning. It is associated with other congenital malformations of the genitourinary, gastrointestinal and other organ systems. The hereby reported case, a 3-month-old male infant had presented with the classical form of the disease i.e., duplication of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary system and vertebral column with anterior abdominal wall hernia and a large lipomeningocele. PMID:24411548

  19. Caudal Duplication Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete duplication of genitourinary system, colon and vertebral column is a very rare and complex congenital condition termed as caudal duplication syndrome with variable presentations. This term is often quoted as a type of incomplete separation of mono-ovular twins or conjoined twinning. It is associated with other congenital malformations of the genitourinary, gastrointestinal and other organ systems. The hereby reported case, a 3-month-old male infant had presented with the classical form of the disease i.e., duplication of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary system and vertebral column with anterior abdominal wall hernia and a large lipomeningocele. (author)

  20. Tbx4/5 gene duplication and the origin of vertebrate paired appendages

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    Minguillon, Carolina; Gibson-Brown, Jeremy J.; Logan, Malcolm P.

    2009-01-01

    Paired fins/limbs are one of the most successful vertebrate innovations, since they are used for numerous fundamental activities, including locomotion, feeding, and breeding. Gene duplication events generate new genes with the potential to acquire novel functions, and two rounds of genome duplication took place during vertebrate evolution. The cephalochordate amphioxus diverged from other chordates before these events and is widely used to deduce the functions of ancestral genes, present in s...

  1. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia;

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients...

  2. Perspectives on Program Duplication

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    Morrison, Gail M.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about program duplication in higher education are often reminiscent of Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart's now famous remark about pornography: "I know it when I see it." The problem with that reaction is that, at least on its surface, this response seems intuitive and emotional, to say nothing of subjective and personal. The fact is…

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker

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    Berline eFopa Fomeju

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the

  4. Shrinkage Effect in Ancestral Maximum Likelihood

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    Mossel, Elchanan; Steel, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) is a method that simultaneously reconstructs a phylogenetic tree and ancestral sequences from extant data (sequences at the leaves). The tree and ancestral sequences maximize the probability of observing the given data under a Markov model of sequence evolution, in which branch lengths are also optimized but constrained to take the same value on any edge across all sequence sites. AML differs from the more usual form of maximum likelihood (ML) in phylogenetics because ML averages over all possible ancestral sequences. ML has long been known to be statistically consistent -- that is, it converges on the correct tree with probability approaching 1 as the sequence length grows. However, the statistical consistency of AML has not been formally determined, despite informal remarks in a literature that dates back 20 years. In this short note we prove a general result that implies that AML is statistically inconsistent. In particular we show that AML can `shrink' short edges in a t...

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 aminotransferases have functionally diverged from the ancestral-like Kluyveromyces lactis orthologous enzyme.

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    Maritrini Colón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene duplication is a key evolutionary mechanism providing material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The fate of duplicated gene copies has been amply discussed and several models have been put forward to account for duplicate conservation. The specialization model considers that duplication of a bifunctional ancestral gene could result in the preservation of both copies through subfunctionalization, resulting in the distribution of the two ancestral functions between the gene duplicates. Here we investigate whether the presumed bifunctional character displayed by the single branched chain amino acid aminotransferase present in K. lactis has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae, and whether this conservation has impacted S. cerevisiae metabolism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results show that the KlBat1 orthologous BCAT is a bifunctional enzyme, which participates in the biosynthesis and catabolism of branched chain aminoacids (BCAAs. This dual role has been distributed in S. cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 paralogous proteins, supporting the specialization model posed to explain the evolution of gene duplications. BAT1 is highly expressed under biosynthetic conditions, while BAT2 expression is highest under catabolic conditions. Bat1 and Bat2 differential relocalization has favored their physiological function, since biosynthetic precursors are generated in the mitochondria (Bat1, while catabolic substrates are accumulated in the cytosol (Bat2. Under respiratory conditions, in the presence of ammonium and BCAAs the bat1Δ bat2Δ double mutant shows impaired growth, indicating that Bat1 and Bat2 could play redundant roles. In K. lactis wild type growth is independent of BCAA degradation, since a Klbat1Δ mutant grows under this condition. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that BAT1 and BAT2 differential expression and subcellular relocalization has resulted in the distribution of the

  6. An Introduction to Duplicate Detection

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    Nauman, Felix

    2010-01-01

    With the ever increasing volume of data, data quality problems abound. Multiple, yet different representations of the same real-world objects in data, duplicates, are one of the most intriguing data quality problems. The effects of such duplicates are detrimental; for instance, bank customers can obtain duplicate identities, inventory levels are monitored incorrectly, catalogs are mailed multiple times to the same household, etc. Automatically detecting duplicates is difficult: First, duplicate representations are usually not identical but slightly differ in their values. Second, in principle

  7. The transformer genes in the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi provide new evidence for duplications independent of complementary sex determination.

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    Jia, L-Y; Xiao, J-H; Xiong, T-L; Niu, L-M; Huang, D-W

    2016-06-01

    Transformer (tra) is the key gene that turns on the sex-determination cascade in Drosophila melanogaster and in some other insects. The honeybee Apis mellifera has two duplicates of tra, one of which (complementary sex determiner, csd) is the primary signal for complementary sex-determination (CSD), regulating the other duplicate (feminizer). Two tra duplicates have been found in some other hymenopteran species, resulting in the assumption that a single ancestral duplication of tra took place in the Hymenoptera. Here, we searched for tra homologues and pseudogenes in the Hymenoptera, focusing on five newly published hymenopteran genomes. We found three tra copies in the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi. Further evolutionary and expression analyses also showed that the two duplicates (Csoltra-B and Csoltra-C) are under positive selection, and have female-specific expression, suggesting possible sex-related functions. Moreover, Aculeata species exhibit many pseudogenes generated by lineage-specific duplications. We conclude that phylogenetic reconstruction and pseudogene screening provide novel evidence supporting the hypothesis of independent duplications rather an ancestral origin of multiple tra paralogues in the Hymenoptera. The case of C. solmsi is the first example of a non-CSD species with duplicated tra, contrary to the previous assumption that derived tra paralogues function as the CSD locus. PMID:26748889

  8. Algorithms of Ancestral Gene Length Reconstruction

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    Alexander Bolshoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancestral sequence reconstruction is a well-known problem in molecular evolution. The problem presented in this study is inspired by sequence reconstruction, but instead of leaf-associated sequences we consider only their lengths. We call this problem ancestral gene length reconstruction. It is a problem of finding an optimal labeling which minimizes the total length’s sum of the edges, where both a tree and nonnegative integers associated with corresponding leaves of the tree are the input. In this paper we give a linear algorithm to solve the problem on binary trees for the Manhattan cost function .

  9. Craniofacial Duplication: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Suryawanshi, Pradeep; Deshpande, Mandar; Verma, Nitin; Mahendrakar, Vivek; Mahendrakar, Sandhya

    2013-01-01

    A craniofacial duplication or diprosopus is an unusual variant of conjoined twinning. The reported incidence is one in 180,000-15 million births and 35 cases have been reported till date. The phenotype is wide, with the partial duplication of a few facial structures to complete dicephalus. A complete duplication is associated with a high incidence of anomalies in the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system and the respiratory system, whereas no major anomalies a...

  10. Duplicity and Masses

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    Pourbaix, D.

    2005-01-01

    Duplicity is still the only hypothesis-free method to derive stellar masses. Whereas other techniques such as asteroseismology rely upon some stellar model, orbits of binary stars yield quantities directly related to either the sum of the masses or the individual masses of the two components. However, in order to derive those individual masses, it is necessary to combine at least two types of observations, e.g., visual and spectroscopic or photometric and spectroscopic. Gaia will make the three of them available but their combination will be an efficient source of masses for sub-groups of binaries only. For instance, given the precision of the radial velocities, how many orbital visual binaries (for which the mass sum is therefore accessible) will lead to a spectroscopic orbit required to derive the mass ratio and thus the individual masses?

  11. Annelid Distal-less/Dlx duplications reveal varied post-duplication fates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korchagina Natalia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dlx (Distal-less genes have various developmental roles and are widespread throughout the animal kingdom, usually occurring as single copy genes in non-chordates and as multiple copies in most chordate genomes. While the genomic arrangement and function of these genes is well known in vertebrates and arthropods, information about Dlx genes in other organisms is scarce. We investigate the presence of Dlx genes in several annelid species and examine Dlx gene expression in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. Results Two Dlx genes are present in P. lamarckii, Capitella teleta and Helobdella robusta. The C. teleta Dlx genes are closely linked in an inverted tail-to-tail orientation, reminiscent of the arrangement of vertebrate Dlx pairs, and gene conversion appears to have had a role in their evolution. The H. robusta Dlx genes, however, are not on the same genomic scaffold and display divergent sequences, while, if the P. lamarckii genes are linked in a tail-to-tail orientation they are a minimum of 41 kilobases apart and show no sign of gene conversion. No expression in P. lamarckii appendage development has been observed, which conflicts with the supposed conserved role of these genes in animal appendage development. These Dlx duplications do not appear to be annelid-wide, as the polychaete Platynereis dumerilii likely possesses only one Dlx gene. Conclusions On the basis of the currently accepted annelid phylogeny, we hypothesise that one Dlx duplication occurred in the annelid lineage after the divergence of P. dumerilii from the other lineages and these duplicates then had varied evolutionary fates in different species. We also propose that the ancestral role of Dlx genes is not related to appendage development.

  12. A role for gene duplication and natural variation of gene expression in the evolution of metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most eukaryotic genomes have undergone whole genome duplications during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that the function of these duplicated genes can diverge from the ancestral gene via neo- or sub-functionalization within single genotypes. An additional possibility is that gene duplicates may also undergo partitioning of function among different genotypes of a species leading to genetic differentiation. Finally, the ability of gene duplicates to diverge may be limited by their biological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test these hypotheses, I estimated the impact of gene duplication and metabolic function upon intraspecific gene expression variation of segmental and tandem duplicated genes within Arabidopsis thaliana. In all instances, the younger tandem duplicated genes showed higher intraspecific gene expression variation than the average Arabidopsis gene. Surprisingly, the older segmental duplicates also showed evidence of elevated intraspecific gene expression variation albeit typically lower than for the tandem duplicates. The specific biological function of the gene as defined by metabolic pathway also modulated the level of intraspecific gene expression variation. The major energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways showed decreased variation, suggesting that they are constrained in their ability to accumulate gene expression variation. In contrast, a major herbivory defense pathway showed significantly elevated intraspecific variation suggesting that it may be under pressure to maintain and/or generate diversity in response to fluctuating insect herbivory pressures. CONCLUSION: These data show that intraspecific variation in gene expression is facilitated by an interaction of gene duplication and biological activity. Further, this plays a role in controlling diversity of plant metabolism.

  13. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  14. Taking High Conservation Value from Forests to Freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Robin; Morgan, Siân K.; Morgan, Alexis J.

    2015-07-01

    The high conservation value (HCV) concept, originally developed by the Forest Stewardship Council, has been widely incorporated outside the forestry sector into companies' supply chain assessments and responsible purchasing policies, financial institutions' investment policies, and numerous voluntary commodity standards. Many, if not most, of these newer applications relate to production practices that are likely to affect freshwater systems directly or indirectly, yet there is little guidance as to whether or how HCV can be applied to water bodies. We focus this paper on commodity standards and begin by exploring how prominent standards currently address both HCVs and freshwaters. We then highlight freshwater features of high conservation importance and examine how well those features are captured by the existing HCV framework. We propose a new set of freshwater `elements' for each of the six values and suggest an approach for identifying HCV Areas that takes out-of-fence line impacts into account, thereby spatially extending the scope of existing methods to define HCVs. We argue that virtually any non-marine HCV assessment, regardless of the production sector, should be expanded to include freshwater values, and we suggest how to put those recommendations into practice.

  15. Gains of ubiquitylation sites in highly conserved proteins in the human lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong Seon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modification of lysine residues of specific proteins by ubiquitin modulates the degradation, localization, and activity of these target proteins. Here, we identified gains of ubiquitylation sites in highly conserved regions of human proteins that occurred during human evolution. Results We analyzed human ubiquitylation site data and multiple alignments of orthologous mammalian proteins including those from humans, primates, other placental mammals, opossum, and platypus. In our analysis, we identified 281 ubiquitylation sites in 252 proteins that first appeared along the human lineage during primate evolution: one protein had four novel sites; four proteins had three sites each; 18 proteins had two sites each; and the remaining 229 proteins had one site each. PML, which is involved in neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration, acquired three sites, two of which have been reported to be involved in the degradation of PML. Thirteen human proteins, including ERCC2 (also known as XPD and NBR1, gained human-specific ubiquitylated lysines after the human-chimpanzee divergence. ERCC2 has a Lys/Gln polymorphism, the derived (major allele of which confers enhanced DNA repair capacity and reduced cancer risk compared with the ancestral (minor allele. NBR1 and eight other proteins that are involved in the human autophagy protein interaction network gained a novel ubiquitylation site. Conclusions The gain of novel ubiquitylation sites could be involved in the evolution of protein degradation and other regulatory networks. Although gains of ubiquitylation sites do not necessarily equate to adaptive evolution, they are useful candidates for molecular functional analyses to identify novel advantageous genetic modifications and innovative phenotypes acquired during human evolution.

  16. Different patterns of evolution for duplicated DNA repair genes in bacteria of the Xanthomonadales group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aires Karina A

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA repair genes encode proteins that protect organisms against genetic damage generated by environmental agents and by-products of cell metabolism. The importance of these genes in life maintenance is supported by their high conservation, and the presence of duplications of such genes may be easily traced, especially in prokaryotic genomes. Results The genome sequences of two Xanthomonas species were used as the basis for phylogenetic analyses of genes related to DNA repair that were found duplicated. Although 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses confirm their classification at the basis of the gamma proteobacteria subdivision, differences were found in the origin of the various genes investigated. Except for lexA, detected as a recent duplication, most of the genes in more than one copy are represented by two highly divergent orthologs. Basically, one of such duplications is frequently positioned close to other gamma proteobacteria, but the second is often positioned close to unrelated bacteria. These orthologs may have occurred from old duplication events, followed by extensive gene loss, or were originated from lateral gene transfer (LGT, as is the case of the uvrD homolog. Conclusions Duplications of DNA repair related genes may result in redundancy and also improve the organisms' responses to environmental challenges. Most of such duplications, in Xanthomonas, seem to have arisen from old events and possibly enlarge both functional and evolutionary genome potentiality.

  17. Characterisation of monotreme caseins reveals lineage-specific expansion of an ancestral casein locus in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Using a milk-cell cDNA sequencing approach we characterised milk-protein sequences from two monotreme species, platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and found a full set of caseins and casein variants. The genomic organisation of the platypus casein locus is compared with other mammalian genomes, including the marsupial opossum and several eutherians. Physical linkage of casein genes has been seen in the casein loci of all mammalian genomes examined and we confirm that this is also observed in platypus. However, we show that a recent duplication of beta-casein occurred in the monotreme lineage, as opposed to more ancient duplications of alpha-casein in the eutherian lineage, while marsupials possess only single copies of alpha- and beta-caseins. Despite this variability, the close proximity of the main alpha- and beta-casein genes in an inverted tail-tail orientation and the relative orientation of the more distant kappa-casein genes are similar in all mammalian genome sequences so far available. Overall, the conservation of the genomic organisation of the caseins indicates the early, pre-monotreme development of the fundamental role of caseins during lactation. In contrast, the lineage-specific gene duplications that have occurred within the casein locus of monotremes and eutherians but not marsupials, which may have lost part of the ancestral casein locus, emphasises the independent selection on milk provision strategies to the young, most likely linked to different developmental strategies. The monotremes therefore provide insight into the ancestral drivers for lactation and how these have adapted in different lineages. PMID:19874726

  18. Duplications of the Y-chromosome specific loci P25 and 92R7 and forensic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Brión, Maria; Parson, Walther;

    2004-01-01

    methodologies were used in order to detect the SNP alleles and the PSVs of the loci. All results obtained with the various typing techniques supported the conclusion. The allele distributions of the binary markers were analysed in more than 600 males with seven different haplogroups. For P25, the ancestral...... allele C was found in several samples from different haplogroups. The derived allele A was always present with an additional C variant. Haplogroup P was defined by the derived allele A at the 92R7 locus. However, the ancestral allele G was always associated with an A variant due to the duplication....

  19. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  20. Partial 1q Duplications and Associated Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marcos L.M.; Baroneza, José E.; Teixeira, Patricia; Medina, Cristina T.N.; Cordoba, Mara S.; Versiani, Beatriz R.; Roese, Liege L.; Freitas, Erika L.; Fonseca, Ana C.S.; dos Santos, Maria C.G.; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Rosenberg, Carla; Oliveira, Silviene F.; Ferrari, Iris; Mazzeu, Juliana F.

    2016-01-01

    Duplications of the long arm of chromosome 1 are rare. Distal duplications are the most common and have been reported as either pure trisomy or unbalanced translocations. The paucity of cases with pure distal 1q duplications has made it difficult to delineate a partial distal trisomy 1q syndrome. Here, we report 2 patients with overlapping 1q duplications detected by G-banding. Array CGH and FISH were performed to characterize the duplicated segments, exclude the involvement of other chromosomes and determine the orientation of the duplication. Patient 1 presents with a mild phenotype and carries a 22.5-Mb 1q41q43 duplication. Patient 2 presents with a pure 1q42.13qter inverted duplication of 21.5 Mb, one of the smallest distal 1q duplications ever described and one of the few cases characterized by array CGH, thus contributing to a better characterization of distal 1q duplication syndrome. PMID:27022331

  1. True Intramural Esophageal Duplication Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Al-Riyami

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal duplication is the second most common site of gastrointestinal duplication and most cases present with complications. These complications include bleeding, infection, dysphagia, and dyspnea. We report an incidental case of a true intramural esophageal duplication cyst in a new military recruit. The patient was diagnosed in Armed Forces Hospital, Oman. The patient came for a pre-recruitment routine check-up, he was found to have a suspicious soft tissue lesion on chest X-ray. He was referred to the thoracic surgeon for further investigations. The investigations included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging chest scans, barium swallow, endoscopy and, finally, an endoscopic ultrasound. All workup pointed to a diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst; therefore, the decision was made to excise the lesion after discussion with the patient about the possible diagnosis and nature of the treatment. The cyst was completely excised thoracoscopically with uneventful recovery. The patient was discharged a few days later and was doing well in subsequent visits to the outpatient department. The histopathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a true congenital duplication cyst, which was lined by pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium overlying double layers of thick bundles of smooth muscle fibers.

  2. Modification of gene duplicability during the evolution of protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo D'Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of genes encoding highly connected and essential proteins are selected against in several species but not in human, where duplicated genes encode highly connected proteins. To understand when and how gene duplicability changed in evolution, we compare gene and network properties in four species (Escherichia coli, yeast, fly, and human that are representative of the increase in evolutionary complexity, defined as progressive growth in the number of genes, cells, and cell types. We find that the origin and conservation of a gene significantly correlates with the properties of the encoded protein in the protein-protein interaction network. All four species preserve a core of singleton and central hubs that originated early in evolution, are highly conserved, and accomplish basic biological functions. Another group of hubs appeared in metazoans and duplicated in vertebrates, mostly through vertebrate-specific whole genome duplication. Such recent and duplicated hubs are frequently targets of microRNAs and show tissue-selective expression, suggesting that these are alternative mechanisms to control their dosage. Our study shows how networks modified during evolution and contributes to explaining the occurrence of somatic genetic diseases, such as cancer, in terms of network perturbations.

  3. Dynamic Epigenetic Control of Highly Conserved Noncoding Elements

    KAUST Repository

    Seridi, Loqmane

    2014-10-07

    Background Many noncoding genomic loci have remained constant over long evolutionary periods, suggesting that they are exposed to strong selective pressures. The molecular functions of these elements have been partially elucidated, but the fundamental reason for their extreme conservation is still unknown. Results To gain new insights into the extreme selection of highly conserved noncoding elements (HCNEs), we used a systematic analysis of multi-omic data to study the epigenetic regulation of such elements during the development of Drosophila melanogaster. At the sequence level, HCNEs are GC-rich and have a characteristic oligomeric composition. They have higher levels of stable nucleosome occupancy than their flanking regions, and lower levels of mononucleosomes and H3.3, suggesting that these regions reside in compact chromatin. Furthermore, these regions showed remarkable modulations in histone modification and the expression levels of adjacent genes during development. Although HCNEs are primarily initiated late in replication, about 10% were related to early replication origins. Finally, HCNEs showed strong enrichment within lamina-associated domains. Conclusion HCNEs have distinct and protective sequence properties, undergo dynamic epigenetic regulation, and appear to be associated with the structural components of the chromatin, replication origins, and nuclear matrix. These observations indicate that such elements are likely to have essential cellular functions, and offer insights into their epigenetic properties.

  4. Antibody Recognition of a Highly Conserved Influenza Virus Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Bhabha, Gira; Elsliger, Marc-André; Friesen, Robert H.E.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Throsby, Mark; Goudsmit, Jaap; Wilson, Ian A.; Scripps; Crucell

    2009-05-21

    Influenza virus presents an important and persistent threat to public health worldwide, and current vaccines provide immunity to viral isolates similar to the vaccine strain. High-affinity antibodies against a conserved epitope could provide immunity to the diverse influenza subtypes and protection against future pandemic viruses. Cocrystal structures were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 angstrom resolutions for broadly neutralizing human antibody CR6261 Fab in complexes with the major surface antigen (hemagglutinin, HA) from viruses responsible for the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic and a recent lethal case of H5N1 avian influenza. In contrast to other structurally characterized influenza antibodies, CR6261 recognizes a highly conserved helical region in the membrane-proximal stem of HA1 and HA2. The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. The CR6261 epitope identified here should accelerate the design and implementation of improved vaccines that can elicit CR6261-like antibodies, as well as antibody-based therapies for the treatment of influenza.

  5. Differences in evolutionary pressure acting within highly conserved ortholog groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In highly conserved widely distributed ortholog groups, the main evolutionary force is assumed to be purifying selection that enforces sequence conservation, with most divergence occurring by accumulation of neutral substitutions. Using a set of ortholog groups from prokaryotes, with a single representative in each studied organism, we asked the question if this evolutionary pressure is acting similarly on different subgroups of orthologs defined as major lineages (e.g. Proteobacteria or Firmicutes. Results Using correlations in entropy measures as a proxy for evolutionary pressure, we observed two distinct behaviors within our ortholog collection. The first subset of ortholog groups, called here informational, consisted mostly of proteins associated with information processing (i.e. translation, transcription, DNA replication and the second, the non-informational ortholog groups, mostly comprised of proteins involved in metabolic pathways. The evolutionary pressure acting on non-informational proteins is more uniform relative to their informational counterparts. The non-informational proteins show higher level of correlation between entropy profiles and more uniformity across subgroups. Conclusion The low correlation of entropy profiles in the informational ortholog groups suggest that the evolutionary pressure acting on the informational ortholog groups is not uniform across different clades considered this study. This might suggest "fine-tuning" of informational proteins in each lineage leading to lineage-specific differences in selection. This, in turn, could make these proteins less exchangeable between lineages. In contrast, the uniformity of the selective pressure acting on the non-informational groups might allow the exchange of the genetic material via lateral gene transfer.

  6. Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences and its applications

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    Grishin Nick V

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern-day proteins were selected during long evolutionary history as descendants of ancient life forms. In silico reconstruction of such ancestral protein sequences facilitates our understanding of evolutionary processes, protein classification and biological function. Additionally, reconstructed ancestral protein sequences could serve to fill in sequence space thus aiding remote homology inference. Results We developed ANCESCON, a package for distance-based phylogenetic inference and reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences that takes into account the observed variation of evolutionary rates between positions that more precisely describes the evolution of protein families. To improve the accuracy of evolutionary distance estimation and ancestral sequence reconstruction, two approaches are proposed to estimate position-specific evolutionary rates. Comparisons show that at large evolutionary distances our method gives more accurate ancestral sequence reconstruction than PAML, PHYLIP and PAUP*. We apply the reconstructed ancestral sequences to homology inference and functional site prediction. We show that the usage of hypothetical ancestors together with the present day sequences improves profile-based sequence similarity searches; and that ancestral sequence reconstruction methods can be used to predict positions with functional specificity. Conclusions As a computational tool to reconstruct ancestral protein sequences from a given multiple sequence alignment, ANCESCON shows high accuracy in tests and helps detection of remote homologs and prediction of functional sites. ANCESCON is freely available for non-commercial use. Pre-compiled versions for several platforms can be downloaded from ftp://iole.swmed.edu/pub/ANCESCON/.

  7. Evolution of developmental roles of Pax2/5/8 paralogs after independent duplication in urochordate and vertebrate lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cañestro Cristian

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication provides opportunities for lineage diversification and evolution of developmental novelties. Duplicated genes generally either disappear by accumulation of mutations (nonfunctionalization, or are preserved either by the origin of positively selected functions in one or both duplicates (neofunctionalization, or by the partitioning of original gene subfunctions between the duplicates (subfunctionalization. The Pax2/5/8 family of important developmental regulators has undergone parallel expansion among chordate groups. After the divergence of urochordate and vertebrate lineages, two rounds of independent gene duplications resulted in the Pax2, Pax5, and Pax8 genes of most vertebrates (the sister group of the urochordates, and an additional duplication provided the pax2a and pax2b duplicates in teleost fish. Separate from the vertebrate genome expansions, a duplication also created two Pax2/5/8 genes in the common ancestor of ascidian and larvacean urochordates. Results To better understand mechanisms underlying the evolution of duplicated genes, we investigated, in the larvacean urochordate Oikopleura dioica, the embryonic gene expression patterns of Pax2/5/8 paralogs. We compared the larvacean and ascidian expression patterns to infer modular subfunctions present in the single pre-duplication Pax2/5/8 gene of stem urochordates, and we compared vertebrate and urochordate expression to infer the suite of Pax2/5/8 gene subfunctions in the common ancestor of olfactores (vertebrates + urochordates. Expression pattern differences of larvacean and ascidian Pax2/5/8 orthologs in the endostyle, pharynx and hindgut suggest that some ancestral gene functions have been partitioned differently to the duplicates in the two urochordate lineages. Novel expression in the larvacean heart may have resulted from the neofunctionalization of a Pax2/5/8 gene in the urochordates. Expression of larvacean Pax2/5/8 in the endostyle, in

  8. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmbhatt Sonal

    2008-11-01

    consistent with an ancestral salmonid genome duplication hypothesis. Genome resources, including a new 32 K microarray, provide valuable new tools to study salmonids.

  9. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst. (orig.)

  10. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumbach, K.; Baker, D.H.; Weigert, J.; Altman, R.P.

    1988-05-01

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst.

  11. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of ...

  12. Multiple enteric duplications in an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplications of the alimentary tract are an uncommon entity in children. The occurrence of multiple duplications in different segments of the gastrointestinal tract has been reported, but it is unusual. This is a report of an infant who had esophageal, gastric, and duodenal duplications. (orig.)

  13. On Duplication in Mathematical Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, Adam; Schwarzweller, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Building a repository of proof-checked mathematical knowledge is without any doubt a lot of work, and besides the actual formalization process there also is the task of maintaining the repository. Thus it seems obvious to keep a repsoitory as small as possible, in particular each piece of mathematical knowledge should be formalized only once. In this paper, however, we claim that it might be reasonable or even necessary to duplicate knowledge in a mathematical repository. We analyze different...

  14. The early stages of duplicate gene evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Richard C; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Gene duplications are one of the primary driving forces in the evolution of genomes and genetic systems. Gene duplicates account for 8–20% of the genes in eukaryotic genomes, and the rates of gene duplication are estimated at between 0.2% and 2% per gene per million years. Duplicate genes are believed to be a major mechanism for the establishment of new gene functions and the generation of evolutionary novelty, yet very little is known about the early stages of the evolution of duplicated gen...

  15. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes

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    Makino Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. Results We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD or small-scale duplication (SSD, and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. Conclusions Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  16. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  17. Whole genome duplications and expansion of the vertebrate GATA transcription factor gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowerman Bruce

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GATA transcription factors influence many developmental processes, including the specification of embryonic germ layers. The GATA gene family has significantly expanded in many animal lineages: whereas diverse cnidarians have only one GATA transcription factor, six GATA genes have been identified in many vertebrates, five in many insects, and eleven to thirteen in Caenorhabditis nematodes. All bilaterian animal genomes have at least one member each of two classes, GATA123 and GATA456. Results We have identified one GATA123 gene and one GATA456 gene from the genomic sequence of two invertebrate deuterostomes, a cephalochordate (Branchiostoma floridae and a hemichordate (Saccoglossus kowalevskii. We also have confirmed the presence of six GATA genes in all vertebrate genomes, as well as additional GATA genes in teleost fish. Analyses of conserved sequence motifs and of changes to the exon-intron structure, and molecular phylogenetic analyses of these deuterostome GATA genes support their origin from two ancestral deuterostome genes, one GATA 123 and one GATA456. Comparison of the conserved genomic organization across vertebrates identified eighteen paralogous gene families linked to multiple vertebrate GATA genes (GATA paralogons, providing the strongest evidence yet for expansion of vertebrate GATA gene families via genome duplication events. Conclusion From our analysis, we infer the evolutionary birth order and relationships among vertebrate GATA transcription factors, and define their expansion via multiple rounds of whole genome duplication events. As the genomes of four independent invertebrate deuterostome lineages contain single copy GATA123 and GATA456 genes, we infer that the 0R (pre-genome duplication invertebrate deuterostome ancestor also had two GATA genes, one of each class. Synteny analyses identify duplications of paralogous chromosomal regions (paralogons, from single ancestral vertebrate GATA123 and GATA456

  18. Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences and its applications

    OpenAIRE

    Grishin Nick V; Pei Jimin; Cai Wei

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Modern-day proteins were selected during long evolutionary history as descendants of ancient life forms. In silico reconstruction of such ancestral protein sequences facilitates our understanding of evolutionary processes, protein classification and biological function. Additionally, reconstructed ancestral protein sequences could serve to fill in sequence space thus aiding remote homology inference. Results We developed ANCESCON, a package for distance-based phylogenetic ...

  19. Molecular paleontology: a biochemical model of the ancestral ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Lenz, Timothy K.; Peters, Jessica K; Fang, Po-Yu; Schneider, Dana M.; Anderson, Eric J.; Preeprem, Thanawadee; Bowman, Jessica C.; O'Neill, Eric B.; Lie, Lively; Athavale, Shreyas S.; Gossett, J. Jared; Trippe, Catherine; Murray, Jason; Anton S. Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Ancient components of the ribosome, inferred from a consensus of previous work, were constructed in silico, in vitro and in vivo. The resulting model of the ancestral ribosome presented here incorporates ∼20% of the extant 23S rRNA and fragments of five ribosomal proteins. We test hypotheses that ancestral rRNA can: (i) assume canonical 23S rRNA-like secondary structure, (ii) assume canonical tertiary structure and (iii) form native complexes with ribosomal protein fragments. Footprinting exp...

  20. Narrow, duplicated internal auditory canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, T. [Servico de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Avenida Torrado da Silva, 2801-951, Almada (Portugal); Shayestehfar, B. [Department of Radiology, UCLA Oliveview School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Lufkin, R. [Department of Radiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2003-05-01

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) constitutes a relative contraindication to cochlear implantation because it is associated with aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve or its cochlear branch. We report an unusual case of a narrow, duplicated IAC, divided by a bony septum into a superior relatively large portion and an inferior stenotic portion, in which we could identify only the facial nerve. This case adds support to the association between a narrow IAC and aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The normal facial nerve argues against the hypothesis that the narrow IAC is the result of a primary bony defect which inhibits the growth of the vestibulocochlear nerve. (orig.)

  1. Gene-interleaving patterns of synteny in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome: are they proof of an ancient genome duplication event?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Feng-Jie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent comparative genomic studies claim local syntenic gene-interleaving relationships in Ashbya gossypii and Kluyveromyces waltii are compelling evidence for an ancient whole-genome duplication event in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We here test, using Hannenhalli-Pevzner rearrangement algorithms that address the multiple genome rearrangement problem, whether syntenic patterns are proof of paleopolyploidization. Results We focus on (1 pairwise comparison of gene arrangement sequences in A. gossypii and S. cerevisiae, (2 reconstruction of gene arrangements ancestral to A. gossypii, S. cerevisiae, and K. waltii, (3 synteny patterns arising within and between lineages, and (4 expected gene orientation of duplicate gene sets. The existence of syntenic patterns between ancestral gene sets and A. gossypii, S. cerevisiae, and K. waltii, and other evidence, suggests that gene-interleaving relationships are the natural consequence of topological rearrangements in chromosomes and that a more gradual scenario of genome evolution involving segmental duplication and recombination constitutes a more parsimonious explanation. Furthermore, phylogenetic trees reconstructed under alternative hypotheses placed the putative whole-genome duplication event after the divergence of the S. cerevisiae and K. waltii lineages, but in the lineage leading to K. waltii. This is clearly incompatible with an ancient genome duplication event in S. cerevisiae. Conclusion Because the presence of syntenic patterns appears to be a condition that is necessary, but not sufficient, to support the existence of the whole-genome duplication event, our results prompt careful re-evaluation of paleopolyploidization in the yeast lineage and the evolutionary meaning of syntenic patterns. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Kenneth H. Wolfe (nominated by Nicolas Galtier, Austin L. Hughes (nominated by Eugene Koonin, Mikhail S. Gelfand, and Mark Gerstein.

  2. Identification of the ancestral killer immunoglobulin-like receptor gene in primates

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    Coggill Penny

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR are essential immuno-surveillance molecules. They are expressed on natural killer and T cells, and interact with human leukocyte antigens. KIR genes are highly polymorphic and contribute vital variability to our immune system. Numerous KIR genes, belonging to five distinct lineages, have been identified in all primates examined thus far and shown to be rapidly evolving. Since few KIR remain orthologous between species, with only one of them, KIR2DL4, shown to be common to human, apes and monkeys, the evolution of the KIR gene family in primates remains unclear. Results Using comparative analyses, we have identified the ancestral KIR lineage (provisionally named KIR3DL0 in primates. We show KIR3DL0 to be highly conserved with the identification of orthologues in human (Homo sapiens, common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla, rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta and common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus. We predict KIR3DL0 to encode a functional molecule in all primates by demonstrating expression in human, chimpanzee and rhesus monkey. Using the rhesus monkey as a model, we further show the expression profile to be typical of KIR by quantitative measurement of KIR3DL0 from an enriched population of natural killer cells. Conclusion One reason why KIR3DL0 may have escaped discovery for so long is that, in human, it maps in between two related leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor clusters outside the known KIR gene cluster on Chromosome 19. Based on genomic, cDNA, expression and phylogenetic data, we report a novel lineage of immunoglobulin receptors belonging to the KIR family, which is highly conserved throughout 50 million years of primate evolution.

  3. MarcXimiL : near duplicates detection

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Jan Brice; Borel, Alain

    2011-01-01

    MarcXimiL is an open source tool which works on MARCXML records and calculates similarity indices between these records. After a short theoretical introduction, the tutorial will focus on how to install, parametrize and use the tool. This tool can be implemented in order to : * prevent creation of duplicates (similar records are shown during the validation process) * identify duplicates into batch files before ingest * find duplicates inside a collection * suggest to users similar records to ...

  4. Title Based Duplicate Detection of Web Documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. M. Kiruthika

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, the concept of web crawling has received remarkable significance owing to extreme development of the World Wide Web. Very large amounts of web documents are swarming the web making the search engines less appropriate to the users. Among the vast number of web documents are many duplicates and near duplicates i.e. variants derived from the same original web document due to which additional overheads are created for search engines by which their performance and quality is significantly affected. Web crawling research community has extensively recognized the need for detection of duplicate and near duplicate web pages. Providing the users with relevant results for their queries in the first page without duplicates and redundant results is a vital requisite. Also, this problem of duplication should be avoided to save storage as well as to improve search quality. The near duplicate web pages are detected followed by the storage of crawled web pages in to repositories. The detection of near duplicates conserves network bandwidth, brings down storage cost and enhances the quality of search engines. In this paper, we have discussed a feasible method for detection of near-duplicate web documents based on the title of the documents which will help to reduce the overhead of search engines and improve their performance.

  5. Recombination and evolution of duplicate control regions in the mitochondrial genome of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum.

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    Chenfei Zheng

    Full Text Available Complete mitochondrial (mt genome sequences with duplicate control regions (CRs have been detected in various animal species. In Testudines, duplicate mtCRs have been reported in the mtDNA of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum, which has three living subspecies. However, the evolutionary pattern of these CRs remains unclear. In this study, we report the completed sequences of duplicate CRs from 20 individuals belonging to three subspecies of this turtle and discuss the micro-evolutionary analysis of the evolution of duplicate CRs. Genetic distances calculated with MEGA 4.1 using the complete duplicate CR sequences revealed that within turtle subspecies, genetic distances between orthologous copies from different individuals were 0.63% for CR1 and 1.2% for CR2app:addword:respectively, and the average distance between paralogous copies of CR1 and CR2 was 4.8%. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed from the CR sequences, excluding the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs at the 3' end using three methods: neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood algorithm, and Bayesian inference. These data show that any two CRs within individuals were more genetically distant from orthologous genes in different individuals within the same subspecies. This suggests independent evolution of the two mtCRs within each P. megacephalum subspecies. Reconstruction of separate phylogenetic trees using different CR components (TAS, CD, CSB, and VNTRs suggested the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicate CRs. Consequently, recombination events were detected using RDP software with break points at ≈290 bp and ≈1,080 bp. Based on these results, we hypothesize that duplicate CRs in P. megacephalum originated from heterological ancestral recombination of mtDNA. Subsequent recombination could have resulted in homogenization during independent evolutionary events, thus maintaining the functions of duplicate CRs in the mtDNA of P

  6. RECENT SEGMENTAL DUPLICATIONS IN THE CATTLE GENOME

    Science.gov (United States)

    We assessed the content, structure, and distribution of segmental duplications (> or =90% sequence identity, > or =5 kb length) within the newest public version of the Bos taurus genome assembly (bta_3.1). The overall fraction of duplicated sequence within the cattle assembly is approximately equiva...

  7. Molecular evolution of the duplicated TFIIAγ genes in Oryzeae and its relatives

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    Sun Hong-Zheng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication provides raw genetic materials for evolutionary novelty and adaptation. The evolutionary fate of duplicated transcription factor genes is less studied although transcription factor gene plays important roles in many biological processes. TFIIAγ is a small subunit of TFIIA that is one of general transcription factors required by RNA polymerase II. Previous studies identified two TFIIAγ-like genes in rice genome and found that these genes either conferred resistance to rice bacterial blight or could be induced by pathogen invasion, raising the question as to their functional divergence and evolutionary fates after gene duplication. Results We reconstructed the evolutionary history of the TFIIAγ genes from main lineages of angiosperms and demonstrated that two TFIIAγ genes (TFIIAγ1 and TFIIAγ5 arose from a whole genome duplication that happened in the common ancestor of grasses. Likelihood-based analyses with branch, codon, and branch-site models showed no evidence of positive selection but a signature of relaxed selective constraint after the TFIIAγ duplication. In particular, we found that the nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratio (ω = dN/dS of the TFIIAγ1 sequences was two times higher than that of TFIIAγ5 sequences, indicating highly asymmetric rates of protein evolution in rice tribe and its relatives, with an accelerated rate of TFIIAγ1 gene. Our expression data and EST database search further indicated that after whole genome duplication, the expression of TFIIAγ1 gene was significantly reduced while TFIIAγ5 remained constitutively expressed and maintained the ancestral role as a subunit of the TFIIA complex. Conclusion The evolutionary fate of TFIIAγ duplicates is not consistent with the neofunctionalization model that predicts that one of the duplicated genes acquires a new function because of positive Darwinian selection. Instead, we suggest that subfunctionalization might be involved in

  8. Concomitant duplications of opioid peptide and receptor genes before the origin of jawed vertebrates.

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    Görel Sundström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The opioid system is involved in reward and pain mechanisms and consists in mammals of four receptors and several peptides. The peptides are derived from four prepropeptide genes, PENK, PDYN, PNOC and POMC, encoding enkephalins, dynorphins, orphanin/nociceptin and beta-endorphin, respectively. Previously we have described how two rounds of genome doubling (2R before the origin of jawed vertebrates formed the receptor family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Opioid peptide gene family members were investigated using a combination of sequence-based phylogeny and chromosomal locations of the peptide genes in various vertebrates. Several adjacent gene families were investigated similarly. The results show that the ancestral peptide gene gave rise to two additional copies in the genome doublings. The fourth member was generated by a local gene duplication, as the genes encoding POMC and PNOC are located on the same chromosome in the chicken genome and all three teleost genomes that we have studied. A translocation has disrupted this synteny in mammals. The PDYN gene seems to have been lost in chicken, but not in zebra finch. Duplicates of some peptide genes have arisen in the teleost fishes. Within the prepropeptide precursors, peptides have been lost or gained in different lineages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ancestral peptide and receptor genes were located on the same chromosome and were thus duplicated concomitantly. However, subsequently genetic linkage has been lost. In conclusion, the system of opioid peptides and receptors was largely formed by the genome doublings that took place early in vertebrate evolution.

  9. Isolation of ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2010-11-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle. PMID:21029545

  10. Isolation of Ancestral Sylvatic Dengue Virus Type 1, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2010-01-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle.

  11. Are survival processing memory advantages based on ancestral priorities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderstrom, Nicholas C; McCabe, David P

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has suggested that our memory systems are especially tuned to process information according to its survival relevance, and that inducing problems of "ancestral priorities" faced by our ancestors should lead to optimal recall performance (Nairne & Pandeirada, Cognitive Psychology, 2010). The present study investigated the specificity of this idea by comparing an ancestor-consistent scenario and a modern survival scenario that involved threats that were encountered by human ancestors (e.g., predators) or threats from fictitious creatures (i.e., zombies). Participants read one of four survival scenarios in which the environment and the explicit threat were either consistent or inconsistent with ancestrally based problems (i.e., grasslands-predators, grasslands-zombies, city-attackers, city-zombies), or they rated words for pleasantness. After rating words based on their survival relevance (or pleasantness), the participants performed a free recall task. All survival scenarios led to better recall than did pleasantness ratings, but recall was greater when zombies were the threat, as compared to predators or attackers. Recall did not differ for the modern (i.e., city) and ancestral (i.e., grasslands) scenarios. These recall differences persisted when valence and arousal ratings for the scenarios were statistically controlled as well. These data challenge the specificity of ancestral priorities in survival-processing advantages in memory. PMID:21327372

  12. MRI in congenital duplication of urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital urethral duplication is a rare anomaly, with less than 200 cases described in the literature. The investigations that are usually performed are micturating cystourethrography (MCU) and retrograde urethrography (RGU), which can diagnose the presence of duplication but cannot diagnose the precise relationship of the duplicated urethra with other pelvic structures. MRI, because of the excellent tissue contrast that it provides and its multiplanar ability, can demonstrate with precision, the size, shape and position of the two urethras. We describe below a case where MRI was able to show this exquisitely

  13. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  14. Duplicated Ižnternal Juguler Vein

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    Ahmet Kirbas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available    Duplicated internal juguler vein (DIJV is a rare anomaly and reported incidence is 0.4 % in the literature. A 45-year-old female patient was referred to our hospital because of non pulsatile neck swelling. The magnetic resonance image (MRI showed left IJVs divided at the angles of the mandible running anterior to the common carotid artery until anterior mediastinal level. Clinicians should be aware of the rare possibility of duplicated IJVs in patients presenting with neck swelling. The development of imaging technics have revealed more cases of duplicated internal juguler vein.

  15. Evidence and evolutionary analysis of ancient whole-genome duplication in barley predating the divergence from rice

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    Grosse Ivo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Well preserved genomic colinearity among agronomically important grass species such as rice, maize, Sorghum, wheat and barley provides access to whole-genome structure information even in species lacking a reference genome sequence. We investigated footprints of whole-genome duplication (WGD in barley that shaped the cereal ancestor genome by analyzing shared synteny with rice using a ~2000 gene-based barley genetic map and the rice genome reference sequence. Results Based on a recent annotation of the rice genome, we reviewed the WGD in rice and identified 24 pairs of duplicated genomic segments involving 70% of the rice genome. Using 968 putative orthologous gene pairs, synteny covered 89% of the barley genetic map and 63% of the rice genome. We found strong evidence for seven shared segmental genome duplications, corresponding to more than 50% of the segmental genome duplications previously determined in rice. Analysis of synonymous substitution rates (Ks suggested that shared duplications originated before the divergence of these two species. While major genome rearrangements affected the ancestral genome of both species, small paracentric inversions were found to be species specific. Conclusion We provide a thorough analysis of comparative genome evolution between barley and rice. A barley genetic map of approximately 2000 non-redundant EST sequences provided sufficient density to allow a detailed view of shared synteny with the rice genome. Using an indirect approach that included the localization of WGD-derived duplicated genome segments in the rice genome, we determined the current extent of shared WGD-derived genome duplications that occurred prior to species divergence.

  16. Concerted Evolution of Duplicate Control Regions in the Mitochondria of Species of the Flatfish Family Bothidae (Teleostei: Pleuronectiformes.

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    Dong-He Li

    Full Text Available Mitogenomes of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes exhibit the greatest diversity of gene rear-rangements in teleostean fishes. Duplicate control regions (CRs have been found in the mito-genomes of two flatfishes, Samariscus latus (Samaridae and Laeops lanceolata (Bothidae, which is rare in teleosts. It has been reported that duplicate CRs have evolved in a concerted fashion in fishes and other animals, however, whether concerted evo-lution exists in flatfishes remains unknown. In this study, based on five newly sequenced and six previously reported mitogenomes of lefteye flounders in the Bothidae, we explored whether duplicate CRs and concerted evolution exist in these species. Results based on the present study and previous reports show that four out of eleven bothid species examined have duplicate CRs of their mitogenomes. The core regions of the duplicate CRs of mitogenomes in the same species have identical, or nearly identical, sequences when compared to each other. This pattern fits the typical characteristics of concerted evolution. Additionally, phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis also provided evidence to support the hypothesis that duplicate CRs evolved concertedly. The core region of concerted evolution is situated at the conserved domains of the CR of the mitogenome from the termination associated sequences (TASs to the conserved sequence blocks (CSBs. Commonly, this region is con-sidered to regulate mitochondrial replication and transcription. Thus, we hypothesize that the cause of concerted evolution of the duplicate CRs in the mtDNAs of these four bothids may be related to some function of the conserved sequences of the CRs during mitochondrial rep-lication and transcription. We hope our results will provide fresh insight into the molecular mechanisms related to replication and evolution of mitogenomes.

  17. Title Based Duplicate Detection of Web Documents

    OpenAIRE

    Kiruthika, M.; Mrs. Smita Dange; Sandhya, P

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, the concept of web crawling has received remarkable significance owing to extreme development of the World Wide Web. Very large amounts of web documents are swarming the web making the search engines less appropriate to the users. Among the vast number of web documents are many duplicates and near duplicates i.e. variants derived from the same original web document due to which additional overheads are created for search engines by which their performance and quality is signi...

  18. : Autism and 7q11 duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Depienne, Christel; Héron, Delphine; Betancur, Catalina; Benyahia, Baya; Trouillard, Oriane; Bouteiller, Delphine; Verloes, Alain; Leguern, Eric; Leboyer, Marion; Brice, Alexis

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromosomal rearrangements, arising from unequal recombination between repeated sequences, are found in a subset of patients with autism. Duplications involving loci associated with behavioural disturbances constitute an especially good candidate mechanism. The Williams-Beuren critical region (WBCR), located at 7q11.23, is commonly deleted in Williams-Beuren microdeletion syndrome (WBS). However, only four patients with a duplication of the WBCR have been reported to date: one wit...

  19. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  20. Distal Xq duplication and functional Xq disomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schluth-Bolard Caroline

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Distal Xq duplications refer to chromosomal disorders resulting from involvement of the long arm of the X chromosome (Xq. Clinical manifestations widely vary depending on the gender of the patient and on the gene content of the duplicated segment. Prevalence of Xq duplications remains unknown. About 40 cases of Xq28 functional disomy due to cytogenetically visible rearrangements, and about 50 cases of cryptic duplications encompassing the MECP2 gene have been reported. The most frequently reported distal duplications involve the Xq28 segment and yield a recognisable phenotype including distinctive facial features (premature closure of the fontanels or ridged metopic suture, broad face with full cheeks, epicanthal folds, large ears, small and open mouth, ear anomalies, pointed nose, abnormal palate and facial hypotonia, major axial hypotonia, severe developmental delay, severe feeding difficulties, abnormal genitalia and proneness to infections. Xq duplications may be caused either by an intrachromosomal duplication or an unbalanced X/Y or X/autosome translocation. In XY males, structural X disomy always results in functional disomy. In females, failure of X chromosome dosage compensation could result from a variety of mechanisms, including an unfavourable pattern of inactivation, a breakpoint separating an X segment from the X-inactivation centre in cis, or a small ring chromosome. The MECP2 gene in Xq28 is the most important dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the abnormal phenotype in duplications of distal Xq. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and is confirmed by CGH array techniques. Differential diagnoses include Prader-Willi syndrome and Alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation, X linked (ATR-X. The recurrence risk is significant if a structural rearrangement is present in one of the parent, the most frequent situation being that of an intrachromosomal duplication inherited from the mother. Prenatal diagnosis is performed by

  1. Multiway admixture deconvolution using phased or unphased ancestral panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchhouse, Claire; Marchini, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel method for inferring the local ancestry of admixed individuals from dense genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data. The method, called MULTIMIX, allows multiple source populations, models population linkage disequilibrium between markers and is applicable to datasets in which the sample and source populations are either phased or unphased. The model is based upon a hidden Markov model of switches in ancestry between consecutive windows of loci. We model the observed haplotypes within each window using a multivariate normal distribution with parameters estimated from the ancestral panels. We present three methods to fit the model-Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling, the Expectation Maximization algorithm, and a Classification Expectation Maximization algorithm. The performance of our method on individuals simulated to be admixed with European and West African ancestry shows it to be comparable to HAPMIX, the ancestry calls of the two methods agreeing at 99.26% of loci across the three parameter groups. In addition to it being faster than HAPMIX, it is also found to perform well over a range of extent of admixture in a simulation involving three ancestral populations. In an analysis of real data, we estimate the contribution of European, West African and Native American ancestry to each locus in the Mexican samples of HapMap, giving estimates of ancestral proportions that are consistent with those previously reported. PMID:23136122

  2. Duplication and relocation of the functional DPY19L2 gene within low copy repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Joseph

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low copy repeats (LCRs are thought to play an important role in recent gene evolution, especially when they facilitate gene duplications. Duplicate genes are fundamental to adaptive evolution, providing substrates for the development of new or shared gene functions. Moreover, silencing of duplicate genes can have an indirect effect on adaptive evolution by causing genomic relocation of functional genes. These changes are theorized to have been a major factor in speciation. Results Here we present a novel example showing functional gene relocation within a LCR. We characterize the genomic structure and gene content of eight related LCRs on human Chromosomes 7 and 12. Two members of a novel transmembrane gene family, DPY19L, were identified in these regions, along with six transcribed pseudogenes. One of these genes, DPY19L2, is found on Chromosome 12 and is not syntenic with its mouse orthologue. Instead, the human locus syntenic to mouse Dpy19l2 contains a pseudogene, DPY19L2P1. This indicates that the ancestral copy of this gene has been silenced, while the descendant copy has remained active. Thus, the functional copy of this gene has been relocated to a new genomic locus. We then describe the expansion and evolution of the DPY19L gene family from a single gene found in invertebrate animals. Ancient duplications have led to multiple homologues in different lineages, with three in fish, frogs and birds and four in mammals. Conclusion Our results show that the DPY19L family has expanded throughout the vertebrate lineage and has undergone recent primate-specific evolution within LCRs.

  3. Using paleogenomics to study the evolution of gene families: origin and duplication history of the relaxin family hormones and their receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Yegorov

    Full Text Available Recent progress in the analysis of whole genome sequencing data has resulted in the emergence of paleogenomics, a field devoted to the reconstruction of ancestral genomes. Ancestral karyotype reconstructions have been used primarily to illustrate the dynamic nature of genome evolution. In this paper, we demonstrate how they can also be used to study individual gene families by examining the evolutionary history of relaxin hormones (RLN/INSL and relaxin family peptide receptors (RXFP. Relaxin family hormones are members of the insulin superfamily, and are implicated in the regulation of a variety of primarily reproductive and neuroendocrine processes. Their receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR's and include members of two distinct evolutionary groups, an unusual characteristic. Although several studies have tried to elucidate the origins of the relaxin peptide family, the evolutionary origin of their receptors and the mechanisms driving the diversification of the RLN/INSL-RXFP signaling systems in non-placental vertebrates has remained elusive. Here we show that the numerous vertebrate RLN/INSL and RXFP genes are products of an ancestral receptor-ligand system that originally consisted of three genes, two of which apparently trace their origins to invertebrates. Subsequently, diversification of the system was driven primarily by whole genome duplications (WGD, 2R and 3R followed by almost complete retention of the ligand duplicates in most vertebrates but massive loss of receptor genes in tetrapods. Interestingly, the majority of 3R duplicates retained in teleosts are potentially involved in neuroendocrine regulation. Furthermore, we infer that the ancestral AncRxfp3/4 receptor may have been syntenically linked to the AncRln-like ligand in the pre-2R genome, and show that syntenic linkages among ligands and receptors have changed dynamically in different lineages. This study ultimately shows the broad utility, with some caveats, of

  4. Allelic lineages of the ficolin genes (FCNs are passed from ancestral to descendant primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hummelshøj

    Full Text Available The ficolins recognize carbohydrates and acetylated compounds on microorganisms and dying host cells and are able to activate the lectin pathway of the complement system. In humans, three ficolin genes have been identified: FCN1, FCN2 and FCN3, which encode ficolin-1, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3, respectively. Rodents have only two ficolins designated ficolin-A and ficolin-B that are closely related to human ficolin-1, while the rodent FCN3 orthologue is a pseudogene. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 have so far only been observed in humans. Thus, we performed a systematic investigation of the FCN genes in non-human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non-human primates and the human FCN genes. Several variations in the FCN genes were found in more than one primate specie suggesting that they were carried from one species to another including humans. The amino acid diversity of the ficolins among human and non-human primate species was estimated by calculating the Shannon entropy revealing that all three proteins are generally highly conserved. Ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 showed the highest diversity, whereas ficolin-3 was more conserved. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were present in non-human primate sera with the same characteristic oligomeric structures as seen in human serum. Taken together all the FCN genes show the same characteristics in lower and higher primates. The existence of trans-species polymorphisms suggests that different FCN allelic lineages may be passed from ancestral to descendant species.

  5. A cascade of complex subtelomeric duplications during the evolution of the hominoid and Old World monkey genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geel, Michel; Eichler, Evan E; Beck, Amy F; Shan, Zhihong; Haaf, Thomas; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Frants, Rune R; de Jong, Pieter J

    2002-01-01

    Subtelomeric duplications of an obscure tubulin "genic" segment located near the telomere of human chromosome 4q35 have occurred at different evolutionary time points within the last 25 million years of the catarrhine (i.e., hominoid and Old World monkey) evolution. The analyses of these segments reported here indicate an exceptional level of evolutionary instability. Substantial intra- and interspecific differences in copy number and distribution are observed among cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) and hominoid genomes. Characterization of the hominoid duplicated segments reveals a strong positional bias within pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions of the genome. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis from predicted proteins and comparisons of nucleotide-substitution rates, we present evidence of a conserved b-tubulin gene among the duplications. Remarkably, the evolutionary conservation has occurred in a nonorthologous fashion, such that the functional copy has shifted its positional context between hominoids and cercopithecoids. We propose that, in a chimpanzee-human common ancestor, one of the paralogous copies assumed the original function, whereas the ancestral copy acquired mutations and eventually became silenced. Our analysis emphasizes the dynamic nature of duplication-mediated genome evolution and the delicate balance between gene acquisition and silencing. PMID:11731935

  6. Ancestral gene and "complementary" antibody dominate early ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Peter

    2013-05-01

    According to N.K. Jerne the somatic generation of immune recognition occurs in conjunction with germ cell evolution and precedes the formation of the zygote, i.e. operates before clonal selection. We propose that it is based on interspecies inherent, ancestral forces maintaining the lineage. Murine oogenesis may be offered as a model. So in C57BL/10BL sera an anti-A reactive, mercapto-ethanol sensitive glycoprotein of up to now unknown cellular origin, but exhibiting immunoglobulin M character, presents itself "complementary" to a syngeneic epitope, which encoded by histocompatibility gene A or meanwhile accepted ancestor of the ABO gene family, arises predominantly in ovarian tissue and was detected statistically significant exclusively in polar glycolipids. Reports either on loss, pronounced expressions or de novo appearances of A-type structures in various conditions of accelerated growth like germ cell evolution, wound healing, inflammation and tumor proliferation in man and ABO related animals might show the dynamics of ancestral functions guarantying stem cell fidelity in maturation and tissue renewal processes. Procedures vice versa generating pluripotent stem cells for therapeutical reasons may indicate, that any artificially started growth should somehow pass through the germ line from the beginning, where according to growing knowledge exclusively the oocyte's genome provides a completely channeling ancestral information. In predatory animals such as the modern-day sea anemone, ancestral proteins, particularly those of the p53 gene family govern the reproduction processes, and are active up to the current mammalian female germ line. Lectins, providing the dual function of growth promotion and defense in higher plants, are suggested to represent the evolutionary precursors of the mammalian immunoglobulin M molecules, or protein moiety implying the greatest functional diversity in nature. And apart from any established mammalian genetic tree, a common vetch

  7. Eleven ancestral gene families lost in mammals and vertebrates while otherwise universally conserved in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danchin Etienne GJ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene losses played a role which may have been as important as gene and genome duplications and rearrangements, in modelling today species' genomes from a common ancestral set of genes. The set and diversity of protein-coding genes in a species has direct output at the functional level. While gene losses have been reported in all the major lineages of the metazoan tree of life, none have proposed a focus on specific losses in the vertebrates and mammals lineages. In contrast, genes lost in protostomes (i.e. arthropods and nematodes but still present in vertebrates have been reported and extensively detailed. This probable over-anthropocentric way of comparing genomes does not consider as an important phenomena, gene losses in species that are usually described as "higher". However reporting universally conserved genes throughout evolution that have recently been lost in vertebrates and mammals could reveal interesting features about the evolution of our genome, particularly if these losses can be related to losses of capability. Results We report 11 gene families conserved throughout eukaryotes from yeasts (such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to bilaterian animals (such as Drosophila melanogaster or Caenorhabditis elegans. This evolutionarily wide conservation suggests they were present in the last common ancestors of fungi and metazoan animals. None of these 11 gene families are found in human nor mouse genomes, and their absence generally extends to all vertebrates. A total of 8 out of these 11 gene families have orthologs in plants, suggesting they were present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA. We investigated known functional information for these 11 gene families. This allowed us to correlate some of the lost gene families to loss of capabilities. Conclusion Mammalian and vertebrate genomes lost evolutionary conserved ancestral genes that are probably otherwise not dispensable in eukaryotes. Hence, the human

  8. Artificial and natural duplicates in pyrosequencing reads of metagenomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artificial duplicates from pyrosequencing reads may lead to incorrect interpretation of the abundance of species and genes in metagenomic studies. Duplicated reads were filtered out in many metagenomic projects. However, since the duplicated reads observed in a pyrosequencing run also include natural (non-artificial duplicates, simply removing all duplicates may also cause underestimation of abundance associated with natural duplicates. Results We implemented a method for identification of exact and nearly identical duplicates from pyrosequencing reads. This method performs an all-against-all sequence comparison and clusters the duplicates into groups using an algorithm modified from our previous sequence clustering method cd-hit. This method can process a typical dataset in ~10 minutes; it also provides a consensus sequence for each group of duplicates. We applied this method to the underlying raw reads of 39 genomic projects and 10 metagenomic projects that utilized pyrosequencing technique. We compared the occurrences of the duplicates identified by our method and the natural duplicates made by independent simulations. We observed that the duplicates, including both artificial and natural duplicates, make up 4-44% of reads. The number of natural duplicates highly correlates with the samples' read density (number of reads divided by genome size. For high-complexity metagenomic samples lacking dominant species, natural duplicates only make up Conclusions Our method is available from http://cd-hit.org as a downloadable program and a web server. It is important not only to identify the duplicates from metagenomic datasets but also to distinguish whether they are artificial or natural duplicates. We provide a tool to estimate the number of natural duplicates according to user-defined sample types, so users can decide whether to retain or remove duplicates in their projects.

  9. Spatial overlap between environmental policy instruments and areas of high conservation value in forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson

    Full Text Available In order to safeguard biodiversity in forest we need to know how forest policy instruments work. Here we use a nationwide network of 9400 plots in productive forest to analyze to what extent large-scale policy instruments, individually and together, target forest of high conservation value in Norway. We studied both instruments working through direct regulation; Strict Protection and Landscape Protection, and instruments working through management planning and voluntary schemes of forest certification; Wilderness Area and Mountain Forest. As forest of high conservation value (HCV-forest we considered the extent of 12 Biodiversity Habitats and the extent of Old-Age Forest. We found that 22% of productive forest area contained Biodiversity Habitats. More than 70% of this area was not covered by any large-scale instruments. Mountain Forest covered 23%, while Strict Protection and Wilderness both covered 5% of the Biodiversity Habitat area. A total of 9% of productive forest area contained Old-Age Forest, and the relative coverage of the four instruments was similar as for Biodiversity Habitats. For all instruments, except Landscape Protection, the targeted areas contained significantly higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas not targeted by these instruments. Areas targeted by Strict Protection had higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas targeted by other instruments, except for areas targeted by Wilderness Area which showed similar proportions of Biodiversity Habitats. There was a substantial amount of spatial overlap between the policy tools, but no incremental conservation effect of overlapping instruments in terms of contributing to higher percentages of targeted HCV-forest. Our results reveal that although the current policy mix has an above average representation of forest of high conservation value, the targeting efficiency in terms of area overlap is limited. There is a need to improve forest conservation and a potential to cover

  10. Spatial overlap between environmental policy instruments and areas of high conservation value in forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne; Søgaard, Gunnhild; Rusch, Graciela M; Barton, David N

    2014-01-01

    In order to safeguard biodiversity in forest we need to know how forest policy instruments work. Here we use a nationwide network of 9400 plots in productive forest to analyze to what extent large-scale policy instruments, individually and together, target forest of high conservation value in Norway. We studied both instruments working through direct regulation; Strict Protection and Landscape Protection, and instruments working through management planning and voluntary schemes of forest certification; Wilderness Area and Mountain Forest. As forest of high conservation value (HCV-forest) we considered the extent of 12 Biodiversity Habitats and the extent of Old-Age Forest. We found that 22% of productive forest area contained Biodiversity Habitats. More than 70% of this area was not covered by any large-scale instruments. Mountain Forest covered 23%, while Strict Protection and Wilderness both covered 5% of the Biodiversity Habitat area. A total of 9% of productive forest area contained Old-Age Forest, and the relative coverage of the four instruments was similar as for Biodiversity Habitats. For all instruments, except Landscape Protection, the targeted areas contained significantly higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas not targeted by these instruments. Areas targeted by Strict Protection had higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas targeted by other instruments, except for areas targeted by Wilderness Area which showed similar proportions of Biodiversity Habitats. There was a substantial amount of spatial overlap between the policy tools, but no incremental conservation effect of overlapping instruments in terms of contributing to higher percentages of targeted HCV-forest. Our results reveal that although the current policy mix has an above average representation of forest of high conservation value, the targeting efficiency in terms of area overlap is limited. There is a need to improve forest conservation and a potential to cover this need by better

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: effect on viral replication of mutations at highly conserved residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, P M; Wilson, W; Byles, E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-01-01

    Sequence comparisons of the integrase (IN) proteins from different retroviruses have identified several highly conserved residues. We have introduced mutations at 16 of these sites into the integrase gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and analyzed the phenotypes of the resulting viruses. The viruses were all normal for p24 content and reverse transcriptase activity. In addition, all of the mutants could infect T-cell lines and undergo reverse transcription, as assessed by PCR analysi...

  12. Spatial Overlap between Environmental Policy Instruments and Areas of High Conservation Value in Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne; Søgaard, Gunnhild; Rusch, Graciela; Barton, David Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    In order to safeguard biodiversity in forest we need to know how forest policy instruments work. Here we use a nationwide network of 9400 plots in productive forest to analyze to what extent large-scale policy instruments, individually and together, target forest of high conservation value in Norway. We studied both instruments working through direct regulation; Strict Protection and Landscape Protection, and instruments working through management planning and voluntary schemes of forest cert...

  13. Highly conserved non-coding sequences are associated with vertebrate development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Woolfe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to protein coding sequence, the human genome contains a significant amount of regulatory DNA, the identification of which is proving somewhat recalcitrant to both in silico and functional methods. An approach that has been used with some success is comparative sequence analysis, whereby equivalent genomic regions from different organisms are compared in order to identify both similarities and differences. In general, similarities in sequence between highly divergent organisms imply functional constraint. We have used a whole-genome comparison between humans and the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes, to identify nearly 1,400 highly conserved non-coding sequences. Given the evolutionary divergence between these species, it is likely that these sequences are found in, and furthermore are essential to, all vertebrates. Most, and possibly all, of these sequences are located in and around genes that act as developmental regulators. Some of these sequences are over 90% identical across more than 500 bases, being more highly conserved than coding sequence between these two species. Despite this, we cannot find any similar sequences in invertebrate genomes. In order to begin to functionally test this set of sequences, we have used a rapid in vivo assay system using zebrafish embryos that allows tissue-specific enhancer activity to be identified. Functional data is presented for highly conserved non-coding sequences associated with four unrelated developmental regulators (SOX21, PAX6, HLXB9, and SHH, in order to demonstrate the suitability of this screen to a wide range of genes and expression patterns. Of 25 sequence elements tested around these four genes, 23 show significant enhancer activity in one or more tissues. We have identified a set of non-coding sequences that are highly conserved throughout vertebrates. They are found in clusters across the human genome, principally around genes that are implicated in the regulation of development

  14. Highly Conserved Non-Coding Sequences Are Associated with Vertebrate Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolfe Adam

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to protein coding sequence, the human genome contains a significant amount of regulatory DNA, the identification of which is proving somewhat recalcitrant to both in silico and functional methods. An approach that has been used with some success is comparative sequence analysis, whereby equivalent genomic regions from different organisms are compared in order to identify both similarities and differences. In general, similarities in sequence between highly divergent organisms imply functional constraint. We have used a whole-genome comparison between humans and the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes, to identify nearly 1,400 highly conserved non-coding sequences. Given the evolutionary divergence between these species, it is likely that these sequences are found in, and furthermore are essential to, all vertebrates. Most, and possibly all, of these sequences are located in and around genes that act as developmental regulators. Some of these sequences are over 90% identical across more than 500 bases, being more highly conserved than coding sequence between these two species. Despite this, we cannot find any similar sequences in invertebrate genomes. In order to begin to functionally test this set of sequences, we have used a rapid in vivo assay system using zebrafish embryos that allows tissue-specific enhancer activity to be identified. Functional data is presented for highly conserved non-coding sequences associated with four unrelated developmental regulators (SOX21, PAX6, HLXB9, and SHH, in order to demonstrate the suitability of this screen to a wide range of genes and expression patterns. Of 25 sequence elements tested around these four genes, 23 show significant enhancer activity in one or more tissues. We have identified a set of non-coding sequences that are highly conserved throughout vertebrates. They are found in clusters across the human genome, principally around genes that are implicated in the regulation of development

  15. Ancestral Origins and Genetic History of Tibetan Highlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dongsheng; Lou, Haiyi; Yuan, Kai; Wang, Xiaoji; Wang, Yuchen; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Yan; Yang, Xiong; Deng, Lian; Zhou, Ying; Feng, Qidi; Hu, Ya; Ding, Qiliang; Yang, Yajun; Li, Shilin; Jin, Li; Guan, Yaqun; Su, Bing; Kang, Longli; Xu, Shuhua

    2016-09-01

    The origin of Tibetans remains one of the most contentious puzzles in history, anthropology, and genetics. Analyses of deeply sequenced (30×-60×) genomes of 38 Tibetan highlanders and 39 Han Chinese lowlanders, together with available data on archaic and modern humans, allow us to comprehensively characterize the ancestral makeup of Tibetans and uncover their origins. Non-modern human sequences compose ∼6% of the Tibetan gene pool and form unique haplotypes in some genomic regions, where Denisovan-like, Neanderthal-like, ancient-Siberian-like, and unknown ancestries are entangled and elevated. The shared ancestry of Tibetan-enriched sequences dates back to ∼62,000-38,000 years ago, predating the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and representing early colonization of the plateau. Nonetheless, most of the Tibetan gene pool is of modern human origin and diverged from that of Han Chinese ∼15,000 to ∼9,000 years ago, which can be largely attributed to post-LGM arrivals. Analysis of ∼200 contemporary populations showed that Tibetans share ancestry with populations from East Asia (∼82%), Central Asia and Siberia (∼11%), South Asia (∼6%), and western Eurasia and Oceania (∼1%). Our results support that Tibetans arose from a mixture of multiple ancestral gene pools but that their origins are much more complicated and ancient than previously suspected. We provide compelling evidence of the co-existence of Paleolithic and Neolithic ancestries in the Tibetan gene pool, indicating a genetic continuity between pre-historical highland-foragers and present-day Tibetans. In particular, highly differentiated sequences harbored in highlanders' genomes were most likely inherited from pre-LGM settlers of multiple ancestral origins (SUNDer) and maintained in high frequency by natural selection. PMID:27569548

  16. Are Hox genes ancestrally involved in axial patterning? Evidence from the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Chiori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a "Hox code" predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations.

  17. An Ancestral Role for CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 Proteins in Both Ethylene and Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumura, Yuki; Pierik, Ronald; Kelly, Steven; Sakuta, Masaaki; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2015-09-01

    Land plants have evolved adaptive regulatory mechanisms enabling the survival of environmental stresses associated with terrestrial life. Here, we focus on the evolution of the regulatory CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) component of the ethylene signaling pathway that modulates stress-related changes in plant growth and development. First, we compare CTR1-like proteins from a bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (representative of early divergent land plants), with those of more recently diverged lycophyte and angiosperm species (including Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]) and identify a monophyletic CTR1 family. The fully sequenced P. patens genome encodes only a single member of this family (PpCTR1L). Next, we compare the functions of PpCTR1L with that of related angiosperm proteins. We show that, like angiosperm CTR1 proteins (e.g. AtCTR1 of Arabidopsis), PpCTR1L modulates downstream ethylene signaling via direct interaction with ethylene receptors. These functions, therefore, likely predate the divergence of the bryophytes from the land-plant lineage. However, we also show that PpCTR1L unexpectedly has dual functions and additionally modulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. In contrast, while AtCTR1 lacks detectable ABA signaling functions, Arabidopsis has during evolution acquired another homolog that is functionally distinct from AtCTR1. In conclusion, the roles of CTR1-related proteins appear to have functionally diversified during land-plant evolution, and angiosperm CTR1-related proteins appear to have lost an ancestral ABA signaling function. Our study provides new insights into how molecular events such as gene duplication and functional differentiation may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of regulatory mechanisms in plants. PMID:26243614

  18. The ancestral activation promiscuity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

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    Kuhn Misty L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in algae and plants. In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, ADP-Glc PPase is mainly activated by 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA and to a lesser extent by other metabolites. In this work, we analyzed the activation promiscuity of ADP-Glc PPase subunits from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, the green alga Ostreococcus tauri, and potato (Solanum tuberosum tuber by comparing a specificity constant for 3-PGA, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP, fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. Results The 3-PGA specificity constant for the enzymes from Anabaena (homotetramer, O. tauri, and potato tuber was considerably higher than for other activators. O. tauri and potato tuber enzymes were heterotetramers comprising homologous small and large subunits. Conversely, the O. tauri small subunit (OtaS homotetramer was more promiscuous because its FBP specificity constant was similar to that for 3-PGA. To explore the role of both OtaS and OtaL (O. tauri large subunit in determining the specificity of the heterotetramer, we knocked out the catalytic activity of each subunit individually by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, the mutants OtaSD148A/OtaL and OtaS/OtaLD171A had higher specificity constants for 3-PGA than for FBP. Conclusions After gene duplication, OtaS seemed to have lost specificity for 3-PGA compared to FBP. This was physiologically and evolutionarily feasible because co-expression of both subunits restored the specificity for 3-PGA of the resulting heterotetrameric wild type enzyme. This widespread promiscuity seems to be ancestral and intrinsic to the enzyme family. Its presence could constitute an efficient evolutionary mechanism to accommodate the ADP-Glc PPase regulation to different metabolic needs.

  19. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawa, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication. PMID:16736662

  20. Decomposition of Parallel Copies with Duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Purohit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available SSA form is becoming more popular in the context of JIT compilation since it allows the compiler to perform important optimizations like common sub-expression elimination or constant propagation without the drawbacks of keeping huge data structures in memory or requiring a lot of computing power. The recent approach of SSA-based register allocation performs SSA elimination after register allocation. F. Bouchez et al. proposed parallel copy motion to prevent the splitting of edges when going out of colored SSA by moving the code that should be assigned to the edges to a more convenient place. Duplications in parallel copies pose some problems when moving them. In this paper an approach has been developed to decompose parallel copies so that duplications can be handled separately and parallel copies can be easily moved away without duplication. A simple and elegant application is moving duplicated copies out of critical edges. This is often beneficial compared to the alternative splitting the edge.

  1. Incomplete urethral duplication in an adult male.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, N F

    2012-09-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly with less than 200 cases reported. It predominantly occurs in males and is nearly always diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. It is defined as a complete second passage from the bladder to the dorsum of the penis or as an accessory pathway that ends blindly on the dorsal or ventral surface.

  2. Our experience with unusual gastrointestinal tract duplications in infants

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    Bilal Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Classical duplications may present along any part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT from mouth to anus. Atypical or unusual rare varieties of GIT duplications may also occur, but with different anatomical features. Materials and Methods: We reviewed our 5-year record (February 2008-January 2013 to describe clinical profile of unusual GIT duplications in neonates and small infants. Results: Three patients with atypical variety of GIT duplications were managed in our department during this tenure. Two were females and one male. Age was ranged between 11 days and 2 months. All patients presented with massive abdominal distension causing respiratory embarrassment in two of them. In all patients, the pre-operative differential diagnoses also included GIT duplication cysts. Computerized tomography (CT scan showed single huge cyst in one and multiple cysts in two patients. In one patient the CT scan also depicted a thoracic cyst in relation to posterior mediastinum. At operation, one patient had colonic tubular duplication cyst along with another isolated duplication cyst, the second case had a tubular duplication cyst of ileum with its segmental dilatation, and in the third case two isolated duplications were found. Duplication cysts were excised along with mucosal stripping in one patient, cyst excision and intestinal resection and anastomosis in one patient, and only cysts excision in one. All patients did well post-operatively. Conclusion: We presented unusual GIT duplications. These duplications are managed on similar lines as classical duplications with good prognosis when dealt early.

  3. Evolution by gene duplication of Medicago truncatula PISTILLATA-like transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Edelín; Fares, Mario A; Yenush, Lynne; Rochina, Mari Cruz; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A

    2016-04-01

    PISTILLATA (PI) is a member of the B-function MADS-box gene family, which controls the identity of both petals and stamens in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Medicago truncatula (Mt), there are two PI-like paralogs, known as MtPI and MtNGL9. These genes differ in their expression patterns, but it is not known whether their functions have also diverged. Describing the evolution of certain duplicated genes, such as transcription factors, remains a challenge owing to the complex expression patterns and functional divergence between the gene copies. Here, we report a number of functional studies, including analyses of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, and reverse genetic approaches designed to demonstrate the respective contributions of each M. truncatula PI-like paralog to the B-function in this species. Also, we have integrated molecular evolution approaches to determine the mode of evolution of Mt PI-like genes after duplication. Our results demonstrate that MtPI functions as a master regulator of B-function in M. truncatula, maintaining the overall ancestral function, while MtNGL9 does not seem to have a role in this regard, suggesting that the pseudogenization could be the functional evolutionary fate for this gene. However, we provide evidence that purifying selection is the primary evolutionary force acting on this paralog, pinpointing the conservation of its biochemical function and, alternatively, the acquisition of a new role for this gene. PMID:26773809

  4. Fast phylogeny reconstruction through learning of ancestral sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaescu, Radu; Rao, Satish

    2008-01-01

    Given natural limitations on the length DNA sequences, designing phylogenetic reconstruction methods which are reliable under limited information is a crucial endeavor. There have been two approaches to this problem: reconstructing partial but reliable information about the tree (\\cite{Mo07, DMR08,DHJ06,GMS08}), and reaching "deeper" in the tree through reconstruction of ancestral sequences. In the latter category, \\cite{DMR06} settled an important conjecture of M.Steel, showing that, under the CFN model of evolution, all trees on $n$ leaves with edge lengths bounded by the Ising model phase transition can be recovered with high probability from genomes of length $O(\\log n)$ with a polynomial time algorithm. Their methods had a running time of $O(n^{10})$. Here we enhance our methods from \\cite{DHJ06} with the learning of ancestral sequences and provide an algorithm for reconstructing a sub-forest of the tree which is reliable given available data, without requiring a-priori known bounds on the edge lengths o...

  5. The ancestral process of long term seed bank models

    CERN Document Server

    Blath, Jochen; Kurt, Noemi; Spanò, Dario

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for the evolution of genetic types in the presence of so-called seed banks, i.e., where individuals may obtain their genetic type from ancestors which have lived in the near as well as the very far past. The classical Wright-Fisher model, as well as a seed bank model with bounded age distribution considered by Kaj, Krone and Lascoux (2001) are special cases of our model. We discern three parameter regimes of the seed bank age distribution, which lead to substantially different behaviour in terms of genetic variability, in particular with respect to fixation of types and time to the most recent common ancestor. We prove that for age distributions with finite mean, the rescaled ancestral process converges to a time-changed Kingman coalescent, while in the case of infinite mean, ancestral lineages might not merge at all with positive probability. Further, we present a construction of the forward in time process in equilibrium. The mathematical methods are based on renewal theory, the urn p...

  6. Characterization of duplicated Dunaliella viridis SPT1 genes provides insights into early gene divergence after duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhenwei; Meng, Xiangzong; Sun, Zhenhua; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2008-10-15

    The sodium-dependent phosphate transporter gene from unicellular green algae Dunaliella viridis, DvSPT1, shares similarity with members of Pi transporter family. Sequencing analysis of D. viridis BAC clone containing the DvSPT1 gene revealed two inverted duplicated copies of this gene (DvSPT1 and DvSPT1-2 respectively). The duplication covered most of both genes except for their 3' downstream region. The duplicated genomic sequences exhibited 97.9% identity with a synonymous divergence of Ks=0.0126 in the coding region. This data indicated very recent gene duplication in D. viridis genome, providing an excellent opportunity to investigate sequence and expression divergence of duplicated genes at an early stage. Scattered point mutations and length polymorphism of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were predominant among the sequence divergence soon after gene duplication. Due to sequence divergence in the 5' regulatory regions and a swap of the entire 3' downstream regions (3'-UTR), DvSPT1 and DvSPT1-2 showed expression divergence in response to extra-cellular NaCl concentration changes. According to their expression patterns, the two diverged gene copies would provide better adaptation to a broader range of extra-cellular NaCl concentration. Furthermore, Southern blot analysis indicated that there might be a large phosphate transporter gene family in D. viridis. PMID:18662752

  7. An ancient history of gene duplications, fusions and losses in the evolution of APOBEC3 mutators in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münk Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The APOBEC3 (A3 genes play a key role in innate antiviral defense in mammals by introducing directed mutations in the DNA. The human genome encodes for seven A3 genes, with multiple splice alternatives. Different A3 proteins display different substrate specificity, but the very basic question on how discerning self from non-self still remains unresolved. Further, the expression of A3 activity/ies shapes the way both viral and host genomes evolve. Results We present here a detailed temporal analysis of the origin and expansion of the A3 repertoire in mammals. Our data support an evolutionary scenario where the genome of the mammalian ancestor encoded for at least one ancestral A3 gene, and where the genome of the ancestor of placental mammals (and possibly of the ancestor of all mammals already encoded for an A3Z1-A3Z2-A3Z3 arrangement. Duplication events of the A3 genes have occurred independently in different lineages: humans, cats and horses. In all of them, gene duplication has resulted in changes in enzyme activity and/or substrate specificity, in a paradigmatic example of convergent adaptive evolution at the genomic level. Finally, our results show that evolutionary rates for the three A3Z1, A3Z2 and A3Z3 motifs have significantly decreased in the last 100 Mya. The analysis constitutes a textbook example of the evolution of a gene locus by duplication and sub/neofunctionalization in the context of virus-host arms race. Conclusions Our results provide a time framework for identifying ancestral and derived genomic arrangements in the APOBEC loci, and to date the expansion of this gene family for different lineages through time, as a response to changes in viral/retroviral/retrotransposon pressure.

  8. Evolution of the KCS gene family in plants: the history of gene duplication, sub/neofunctionalization and redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hai-Song; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Sun, Xiao-Qin; Li, Mi-Mi; Hang, Yue-Yu; Xue, Jia-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) play an important role in the survival and development of plants, and VLCFA synthesis is regulated by β-ketoacyl-CoA synthases (KCSs), which catalyze the condensation of an acyl-CoA with malonyl-CoA. Here, we present a genome-wide survey of the genes encoding these enzymes, KCS genes, in 28 species (26 genomes and two transcriptomes), which represents a large phylogenetic scale, and also reconstruct the evolutionary history of this gene family. KCS genes were initially single-copy genes in the green plant lineage; duplication resulted in five ancestral copies in land plants, forming five fundamental monophyletic groups in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, KCS genes duplicated to generate 11 genes of angiosperm origin, expanding up to 20-30 members in further-diverged angiosperm species. During this process, tandem duplications had only a small contribution, whereas polyploidy events and large-scale segmental duplications appear to be the main driving force. Accompanying this expansion were variations that led to the sub- and neofunctionalization of different members, resulting in specificity that is likely determined by the 3-D protein structure. Novel functions involved in other physiological processes emerged as well, though redundancy is also observed, largely among recent duplications. Conserved sites and variable sites of KCS proteins are also identified by statistical analysis. The variable sites are likely to be involved in the emergence of product specificity and catalytic power, and conserved sites are possibly responsible for the preservation of fundamental function. PMID:26563433

  9. Presentation and Surgical Management of Duodenal Duplication in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C. Jadlowiec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal duplications in adults are exceedingly rare and their diagnosis remains difficult as symptoms are largely nonspecific. Clinical presentations include pancreatitis, biliary obstruction, gastrointestinal bleeding from ectopic gastric mucosa, and malignancy. A case of duodenal duplication in a 59-year-old female is presented, and her treatment course is reviewed with description of combined surgical and endoscopic approach to repair, along with a review of historic and current recommendations for management. Traditionally, gastrointestinal duplications have been treated with surgical resection; however, for duodenal duplications, the anatomic proximity to the biliopancreatic ampulla makes surgical management challenging. Recently, advances in endoscopy have improved the clinical success of cystic intraluminal duodenal duplications. Despite these advances, surgical resection is still recommended for extraluminal tubular duplications although combined techniques may be necessary for long tubular duplications. For duodenal duplications, a combined approach of partial excision combined with mucosal stripping may offer advantage.

  10. National-scale analysis for the identification of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maesano M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, forests cover about one third of the national territory. In recent years, sustainability has been applied to forest management through the introduction of the Sustainable Forest Management (SFM concept. Since the Rio Conference, several initiatives at international and governmental level aimed to realize the SFM concept by the establishment of a set of principles with general validity. One of the most successful initiatives is the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC, which has developed a system of voluntary certification specific for the forestry sector, as well as 10 principles and 56 criteria for good forest management. The concept of High Conservation Value Forest concept (HCVFs was defined in 1999 by FSC under Principle 9, and its application requires the identification of six categories of High Conservation Values (HCV. The aim of this study was to define the parameters for the HCVFs Italian forests, A first national mapping for the first level of High Conservation Value was developed focusing on protected areas, threatened and endangered species and the ecosystemic temporal use. Protected areas may constitute the basis of the SFM. This work is the result of data processing and distribution analysis through the intersection of vectorial data of national forests areas in ArcMap, on the basis of available information. Protected forest areas represent 34% of the national forest area. The different categories of protected areas contribute differently to protection, in particular the larger amount of preserved forests (22.96% falls within Sites of Community Importance (SCI. The analysis of highly protected forest types revealed major differences likely linked to site ecological conditions, which are extremely variable over the country. The HCVF concept is applied in the forest certification field and can be used in sustainable forest management, planning and land use, and policy commitments.

  11. Gene duplication, modularity and adaptation in the evolution of the aflatoxin gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobek Judy L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biosynthesis of aflatoxin (AF involves over 20 enzymatic reactions in a complex polyketide pathway that converts acetate and malonate to the intermediates sterigmatocystin (ST and O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST, the respective penultimate and ultimate precursors of AF. Although these precursors are chemically and structurally very similar, their accumulation differs at the species level for Aspergilli. Notable examples are A. nidulans that synthesizes only ST, A. flavus that makes predominantly AF, and A. parasiticus that generally produces either AF or OMST. Whether these differences are important in the evolutionary/ecological processes of species adaptation and diversification is unknown. Equally unknown are the specific genomic mechanisms responsible for ordering and clustering of genes in the AF pathway of Aspergillus. Results To elucidate the mechanisms that have driven formation of these clusters, we performed systematic searches of aflatoxin cluster homologs across five Aspergillus genomes. We found a high level of gene duplication and identified seven modules consisting of highly correlated gene pairs (aflA/aflB, aflR/aflS, aflX/aflY, aflF/aflE, aflT/aflQ, aflC/aflW, and aflG/aflL. With the exception of A. nomius, contrasts of mean Ka/Ks values across all cluster genes showed significant differences in selective pressure between section Flavi and non-section Flavi species. A. nomius mean Ka/Ks values were more similar to partial clusters in A. fumigatus and A. terreus. Overall, mean Ka/Ks values were significantly higher for section Flavi than for non-section Flavi species. Conclusion Our results implicate several genomic mechanisms in the evolution of ST, OMST and AF cluster genes. Gene modules may arise from duplications of a single gene, whereby the function of the pre-duplication gene is retained in the copy (aflF/aflE or the copies may partition the ancestral function (aflA/aflB. In some gene modules, the

  12. Highly conserved repetitive DNA sequence, (TTAGGG)n, present at the telomeres of human chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly conserved repetitive DNA sequence, (TTAGGG)n, has been isolated from a human recombinant repetitive DNA library. Quantitative hybridization to chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry indicates that comparable amounts of this sequence are present on each human chromosome. Both fluorescent in situ hybridization and BAL-31 nuclease digestion experiments reveal major clusters of this sequence at the telomeres of all human chromosomes. The evolutionary conservation of this DNA sequence, its terminal chromosomal location in a variety of higher eukaryotes (regardless of chromosome number or chromosome length), and its similarity to functional telomeres isolated from lower eukaryotes suggest that this sequence is a functional human telomere

  13. Localization of Type 1 Diabetes susceptibility in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 by high density SNP mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jose Luis; Li, Wentian; Lee, Annette; Martinez, Alfonso; Chandrasekaran, Alamelu; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Khalili, Houman; de la Concha, Emilio G; Urcelay, Elena; Gregersen, Peter K

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the ancestral haplotype 18.2 (AH18.2) carries additional susceptibility gene to Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). We analyzed 10 DR3/TNFa1b5 homozygous subjects in order to establish the conservation of the AH18.2 and then compared this conserved region with other DR3 haplotype, the AH8.1. The Illumina's HumanHap550 Bead chip was used to perform an extensive genotyping of the MHC region. The AH18.2 was highly conserved between DDR1 and HLA-DQA1 genes; therefore most probably the second susceptibility gene is located within this region. We can exclude the region centromeric to HLA-DRA gene and telomeric to DDR1 gene. A comparison between the AH18.2 and AH8.1 haplotypes showed that 233 SNPs were different in the aforementioned conserved region. These data suggest that the 1.65 Mb MHC region between DDR1 and HLA-DRA genes is likely to carry additional susceptibility alleles for T1D on the AH18.2 haplotype. PMID:19591919

  14. Oesophageal duplication cyst mimicking hydatid cyst in endemic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Melih; Yildiz, Abdullah; Karadag, Cetin Ali; Sever, Nihat; Dokucu, Ali Ihsan

    2015-01-01

    The cystic appearance of both oesophageal duplications and pulmonary hydatid cysts can cause a misdiagnosis very easily due to rarity of cystic oesophageal duplications beside the higher incidence of hydatid cyst, especially in endemic areas. Here we report a 7-year-old girl with an oesophageal duplication cyst on the left side misdiagnosed as a hydatid cyst. The aim of the study is to report rare oesophageal duplications in the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic cysts. PMID:26702290

  15. Domain duplication, divergence, and loss events in vertebrate Msx paralogs reveal phylogenomically informed disease markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finnerty John R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Msx originated early in animal evolution and is implicated in human genetic disorders. To reconstruct the functional evolution of Msx and inform the study of human mutations, we analyzed the phylogeny and synteny of 46 metazoan Msx proteins and tracked the duplication, diversification and loss of conserved motifs. Results Vertebrate Msx sequences sort into distinct Msx1, Msx2 and Msx3 clades. The sister-group relationship between MSX1 and MSX2 reflects their derivation from the 4p/5q chromosomal paralogon, a derivative of the original "MetaHox" cluster. We demonstrate physical linkage between Msx and other MetaHox genes (Hmx, NK1, Emx in a cnidarian. Seven conserved domains, including two Groucho repression domains (N- and C-terminal, were present in the ancestral Msx. In cnidarians, the Groucho domains are highly similar. In vertebrate Msx1, the N-terminal Groucho domain is conserved, while the C-terminal domain diverged substantially, implying a novel function. In vertebrate Msx2 and Msx3, the C-terminal domain was lost. MSX1 mutations associated with ectodermal dysplasia or orofacial clefting disorders map to conserved domains in a non-random fashion. Conclusion Msx originated from a MetaHox ancestor that also gave rise to Tlx, Demox, NK, and possibly EHGbox, Hox and ParaHox genes. Duplication, divergence or loss of domains played a central role in the functional evolution of Msx. Duplicated domains allow pleiotropically expressed proteins to evolve new functions without disrupting existing interaction networks. Human missense sequence variants reside within evolutionarily conserved domains, likely disrupting protein function. This phylogenomic evaluation of candidate disease markers will inform clinical and functional studies.

  16. Webbed Penis Associated with Urethral Duplication: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Burhan Aksu; Mustafa İnan; Mehmet Pul

    2011-01-01

    Urethral duplication and webbed penis are rare congenital anomalies. Urethral duplication associated with webbed penis has not previously been reported in the literature. We describe a case of incomplete urethral duplication with webbed penis in an infant and discuss the clinical and radiological findings and treatment of this association.

  17. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  18. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Halilbasic; Fahrija Skokic; Nesad Hotic; Edin Husaric; Gordana Radoja; Selma Muratovic; Nermina Dedic; Meliha Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  19. Case report: Antenatal MRI diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esophageal duplication cysts are classified as a subgroup of foregut duplication cysts. They are very rare and are predominantly detected in children. Antenatal detection is very rare. We report a case of an esophageal duplication cyst that was accurately identified antenatally by USG and MRI

  20. Effect of Duplicate Genes on Mouse Genetic Robustness: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, analyses based on the current knockout (KO mouse phenotypes led to the conclusion that duplicate genes had almost no role in mouse genetic robustness. It has been suggested that the bias of mouse KO database toward ancient duplicates may possibly cause this knockout duplicate puzzle, that is, a very similar proportion of essential genes (PE between duplicate genes and singletons. In this paper, we conducted an extensive and careful analysis for the mouse KO phenotype data and corroborated a strong effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetics robustness. Moreover, the effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetic robustness is duplication-age dependent, which holds after ruling out the potential confounding effect from coding-sequence conservation, protein-protein connectivity, functional bias, or the bias of duplicates generated by whole genome duplication (WGD. Our findings suggest that two factors, the sampling bias toward ancient duplicates and very ancient duplicates with a proportion of essential genes higher than that of singletons, have caused the mouse knockout duplicate puzzle; meanwhile, the effect of genetic buffering may be correlated with sequence conservation as well as protein-protein interactivity.

  1. 47 CFR 76.1508 - Network non-duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Network non-duplication. 76.1508 Section 76... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1508 Network non-duplication. (a... regarding the exercise of network non-duplication rights immediately available to all appropriate...

  2. 47 CFR 76.122 - Satellite network non-duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Satellite network non-duplication. 76.122... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.122 Satellite network non-duplication. (a) Upon receiving notification pursuant...

  3. Duplication Cyst of the Sigmoid Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Domajnko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old male with developmental delay presented with abdominal pain of two days' duration. He was afebrile and his abdomen was soft with mild diffuse tenderness. There were no peritoneal signs. Plain x-ray demonstrated a large air-filled structure in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a 9×8 cm structure adjacent to the hepatic flexure containing an air-fluid level. It did not contain oral contrast and had no apparent communication with the colon. At operation, the cystic lesion was identified as a duplication cyst of the sigmoid colon that was adherent to the right upper quadrant. The cyst was excised with a segment of the sigmoid colon and a stapled colo-colostomy was performed. Recovery was uneventful. Final pathology was consistent with a duplication cyst of the sigmoid colon. The cyst was attached to the colon but did not communicate with the lumen.

  4. Improving database quality through eliminating duplicate records

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Mingzhen; Sung, Andrew H.; Cather, Martha E

    2006-01-01

    Redundant or duplicate data are the most troublesome problem in database management and applications. Approximate field matching is the key solution to resolve the problem by identifying semantically equivalent string values in syntactically different representations. This paper considers token-based solutions and proposes a general field matching framework to generalize the field matching problem in different domains. By introducing a concept of String Matching Points (SMP) in string compari...

  5. Structural relationships between highly conserved elements and genes in vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    Full Text Available Large numbers of sequence elements have been identified to be highly conserved among vertebrate genomes. These highly conserved elements (HCEs are often located in or around genes that are involved in transcription regulation and early development. They have been shown to be involved in cis-regulatory activities through both in vivo and additional computational studies. We have investigated the structural relationships between such elements and genes in six vertebrate genomes human, mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish and tetraodon and detected several thousand cases of conserved HCE-gene associations, and also cases of HCEs with no common target genes. A few examples underscore the potential significance of our findings about several individual genes. We found that the conserved association between HCE/HCEs and gene/genes are not restricted to elements by their absolute distance on the genome. Notably, long-range associations were identified and the molecular functions of the associated genes do not show any particular overrepresentation of the functional categories previously reported. HCEs in close proximity are found to be linked with different set of gene/genes. The results reflect the highly complex correlation between HCEs and their putative target genes.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: effect on viral replication of mutations at highly conserved residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, P M; Wilson, W; Byles, E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-08-01

    Sequence comparisons of the integrase (IN) proteins from different retroviruses have identified several highly conserved residues. We have introduced mutations at 16 of these sites into the integrase gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and analyzed the phenotypes of the resulting viruses. The viruses were all normal for p24 content and reverse transcriptase activity. In addition, all of the mutants could infect T-cell lines and undergo reverse transcription, as assessed by PCR analysis. Most of the mutant viruses also had normal Western blot (immunoblot) profiles, although three of the mutations resulted in reduced signals for IN relative to the wild type on the immunoblots and mutation of residue W235 completely abolished recognition of the protein by pooled sera from human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive patients. Mutations that have previously been shown to abolish activity in in vitro studies produced noninfectious viruses. The substitution of W235 was notable in producing a noninfectious virus, despite previous reports of this residue being nonessential for IN activity in vitro (A.D. Leavitt, L. Shiue, and H.E. Varmus, J. Biol. Chem. 268:2113-2119, 1993). In addition, we have identified four highly conserved residues that can be mutated without any affect on viral replication in T-cell lines. PMID:8035478

  7. Exploring duplicated regions in natural images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashar, M; Noda, K; Ohnishi, N; Mori, K

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of image regions is a common method for manipulating original images, using typical software like Adobe Photoshop, 3DS MAX, etc. In this study, we propose a duplication detection approach that can adopt two robust features based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and kernel principal component analysis (KPCA). Both schemes provide excellent representations of the image data for robust block matching. Multiresolution wavelet coefficients and KPCA-based projected vectors corresponding to image-blocks are arranged into a matrix for lexicographic sorting. Sorted blocks are used for making a list of similar point-pairs and for computing their offset frequencies. Duplicated regions are then segmented by an automatic technique that refines the list of corresponding point-pairs and eliminates the minimum offset-frequency threshold parameter in the usual detection method. A new technique that extends the basic algorithm for detecting Flip and Rotation types of forgeries is also proposed. This method uses global geometric transformation and the labeling technique to indentify the mentioned forgeries. Experiments with a good number of natural images show very promising results, when compared with the conventional PCA-based approach. A quantitative analysis indicate that the wavelet-based feature outperforms PCA- or KPCA-based features in terms of average precision and recall in the noiseless, or uncompressed domain, while KPCA-based feature obtains excellent performance in the additive noise and lossy JPEG compression environments. PMID:20350843

  8. tRNA creation by hairpin duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Jeremy; Di Giulio, Massimo; Yarus, Michael; Knight, Rob

    2005-10-01

    Many studies have suggested that the modern cloverleaf structure of tRNA may have arisen through duplication of a primordial hairpin, but the timing of this duplication event has been unclear. Here we measure the level of sequence identity between the two halves of each of a large sample of tRNAs and compare this level to that of chimeric tRNAs constructed either within or between groups defined by phylogeny and/or specificity. We find that actual tRNAs have significantly more matches between the two halves than do random sequences that can form the tRNA structure, but there is no difference in the average level of matching between the two halves of an individual tRNA and the average level of matching between the two halves of the chimeric tRNAs in any of the sets we constructed. These results support the hypothesis that the modern tRNA cloverleaf arose from a single hairpin duplication prior to the divergence of modern tRNA specificities and the three domains of life. PMID:16155749

  9. Global Alignment of Molecular Sequences via Ancestral State Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Andoni, Alexandr; Hassidim, Avinatan; Roch, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic techniques do not generally account for such common evolutionary events as site insertions and deletions (known as indels). Instead tree building algorithms and ancestral state inference procedures typically rely on substitution-only models of sequence evolution. In practice these methods are extended beyond this simplified setting with the use of heuristics that produce global alignments of the input sequences--an important problem which has no rigorous model-based solution. In this paper we consider a new version of the multiple sequence alignment in the context of stochastic indel models. More precisely, we introduce the following {\\em trace reconstruction problem on a tree} (TRPT): a binary sequence is broadcast through a tree channel where we allow substitutions, deletions, and insertions; we seek to reconstruct the original sequence from the sequences received at the leaves of the tree. We give a recursive procedure for this problem with strong reconstruction guarantees at low mut...

  10. Haplotype ancestral AH8.1 dans la mucoviscidose

    OpenAIRE

    Beucher, Julie

    2012-01-01

    La mucoviscidose est une maladie à transmission autosomique récessive, due à des mutations du gène CFTR. Les patients, partageant de mêmes mutations de CFTR et un même environnement, ont une expression phénotypique variable, suggérant l'influence d'autres gènes modifiant la sévérité de la maladie, appelés gènes modificateurs. L'atteinte respiratoire, caractérisée par une inflammation exacerbée, est un facteur principal de morbimortalité. L'haplotype ancestral AH8.1, impliqué dans la réponse i...

  11. Ancestral genome inference using a genetic algorithm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nan; Yang, Ning; Tang, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancement of technologies has now made it routine to obtain and compare gene orders within genomes. Rearrangements of gene orders by operations such as reversal and transposition are rare events that enable researchers to reconstruct deep evolutionary histories. An important application of genome rearrangement analysis is to infer gene orders of ancestral genomes, which is valuable for identifying patterns of evolution and for modeling the evolutionary processes. Among various available methods, parsimony-based methods (including GRAPPA and MGR) are the most widely used. Since the core algorithms of these methods are solvers for the so called median problem, providing efficient and accurate median solver has attracted lots of attention in this field. The "double-cut-and-join" (DCJ) model uses the single DCJ operation to account for all genome rearrangement events. Because mathematically it is much simpler than handling events directly, parsimony methods using DCJ median solvers has better speed and accuracy. However, the DCJ median problem is NP-hard and although several exact algorithms are available, they all have great difficulties when given genomes are distant. In this paper, we present a new algorithm that combines genetic algorithm (GA) with genomic sorting to produce a new method which can solve the DCJ median problem in limited time and space, especially in large and distant datasets. Our experimental results show that this new GA-based method can find optimal or near optimal results for problems ranging from easy to very difficult. Compared to existing parsimony methods which may severely underestimate the true number of evolutionary events, the sorting-based approach can infer ancestral genomes which are much closer to their true ancestors. The code is available at http://phylo.cse.sc.edu. PMID:23658708

  12. Molecular trajectories leading to the alternative fates of duplicate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Marotta

    Full Text Available Gene duplication generates extra gene copies in which mutations can accumulate without risking the function of pre-existing genes. Such mutations modify duplicates and contribute to evolutionary novelties. However, the vast majority of duplicates appear to be short-lived and experience duplicate silencing within a few million years. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to these alternative fates. Here we delineate differing molecular trajectories of a relatively recent duplication event between humans and chimpanzees by investigating molecular properties of a single duplicate: DNA sequences, gene expression and promoter activities. The inverted duplication of the Glutathione S-transferase Theta 2 (GSTT2 gene had occurred at least 7 million years ago in the common ancestor of African great apes and is preserved in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, whereas a deletion polymorphism is prevalent in humans. The alternative fates are associated with expression divergence between these species, and reduced expression in humans is regulated by silencing mutations that have been propagated between duplicates by gene conversion. In contrast, selective constraint preserved duplicate divergence in chimpanzees. The difference in evolutionary processes left a unique DNA footprint in which dying duplicates are significantly more similar to each other (99.4% than preserved ones. Such molecular trajectories could provide insights for the mechanisms underlying duplicate life and death in extant genomes.

  13. A Near-Duplicate Detection Algorithm to Facilitate Document Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Pamulaparty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Web Ming faces huge problems due to Duplicate and Near Duplicate Web pages. Detecting Near Duplicates is very difficult in large collection of data like ”internet”. The presence of these web pages plays an important role in the performance degradation while integrating data from heterogeneous sources. These pages either increase the index storage space or increase the serving costs. Detecting these pages has many potential applications for example may indicate plagiarism or copyright infringement. This paper concerns detecting, and optionally removing duplicate and near duplicate documents which are used to perform clustering of documents .We demonstrated our approach in web news articles domain. The experimental results show that our algorithm outperforms in terms of similarity measures. The near duplicate and duplicate document identification has resulted reduced memory in repositories.

  14. The evolution of Brassica napus FLOWERING LOCUST paralogues in the context of inverted chromosomal duplication blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianwei

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT and its orthologues play a central role in the integration of flowering signals within Arabidopsis and other diverse species. Multiple copies of FT, with different cis-intronic sequence, exist and appear to operate harmoniously within polyploid crop species such as Brassica napus (AACC, a member of the same plant family as Arabidopsis. Results We have identified six BnFT paralogues from the genome of B. napus and mapped them to six distinct regions, each of which is homologous to a common ancestral block (E of Arabidopsis chromosome 1. Four of the six regions were present within inverted duplicated regions of chromosomes A7 and C6. The coding sequences of BnFT paralogues showed 92-99% identities to each other and 85-87% identity with that of Arabidopsis. However, two of the paralogues on chromosomes A2 and C2, BnA2.FT and BnC2.FT, were found to lack the distinctive CArG box that is located within intron 1 that has been shown in Arabidopsis to be the binding site for theFLC protein. Three BnFT paralogues (BnA2.FT, BnC6.FT.a and BnC6.FT.b were associated with two major QTL clusters for flowering time. One of the QTLs encompassing two BnFT paralogues (BnC6.FT.a and BnC6.FT.b on chromosome C6 was resolved further using near isogenic lines, specific alleles of which were both shown to promote flowering. Association analysis of the three BnFT paralogues across 55 cultivars of B. napus showed that the alleles detected in the original parents of the mapping population used to detect QTL (NY7 and Tapidor were ubiquitous amongst spring and winter type cultivars of rapeseed. It was inferred that the ancestral FT homologues in Brassica evolved from two distinct copies, one of which was duplicated along with inversion of the associated chromosomal segment prior to the divergence of B. rapa (AA and B. oleracea (CC. At least ten such inverted duplicated blocks (IDBs were identified covering a quarter of the

  15. Babesia gibsoni internal transcribed spacer 1 region is highly conserved amongst isolates from dogs across Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Cao, Shinuo; Vudriko, Patrick; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Soma, Takehisa; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-06-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical outcome. In this study, we sequenced the 254bp Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region (ITS1) of 54 B. gibsoni isolates from 14 different geographical regions of Japan. The 54 isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni isolates reported in GenBank database (97.2-100%). Consistent with previous reports, phylogenetic analysis showed that B. gibsoni isolates from Japan formed the same clade with those from U.S.A., Australia, India and Taiwan. Our finding indicates that B. gibsoni ITS1 region is highly conserved among isolates from dogs in Japan, making it a useful genetic marker for molecular epidemiology of the parasite. PMID:26806537

  16. Antigenic potential of a highly conserved Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide inner core structure defined by chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Anika; Yang, You; Claus, Heike; Pereira, Claney L; Cox, Andrew D; Vogel, Ulrich; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2015-01-22

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. We studied the potential of synthetic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core structures as broadly protective antigens against N. meningitidis. Based on the specific reactivity of human serum antibodies to synthetic LPS cores, we selected a highly conserved LPS core tetrasaccharide as a promising antigen. This LPS inner core tetrasaccharide induced a robust IgG response in mice when formulated as an immunogenic glycoconjugate. Binding of raised mouse serum to a broad collection of N. meningitidis strains demonstrated the accessibility of the LPS core on viable bacteria. The distal trisaccharide was identified as the crucial epitope, whereas the proximal Kdo moiety was immunodominant and induced mainly nonprotective antibodies that are responsible for lack of functional protection in polyclonal serum. Our results identified key antigenic determinants of LPS core glycan and, hence, may aid the design of a broadly protective immunization against N. meningitidis. PMID:25601073

  17. Segmental duplications in the silkworm genome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Zhenglin; Kasahara, Masahiro; Morishita, Shinichi; Zhang, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Background Segmental duplications (SDs) or low-copy repeats play important roles in both gene and genome evolution. SDs have been extensively investigated in many organisms, however, there is no information about SDs in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Result In this study, we identified and annotated the SDs in the silkworm genome. Our results suggested that SDs constitute ~1.4% of the silkworm genome sequence (≥1 kb in length and ≥90% in the identity of sequence); the number is similar to that in...

  18. Gene duplication as a major force in evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santoshkumar Magadum; Urbi Banerjee; Priyadharshini Murugan; Doddabhimappa Gangapur; Rajasekar Ravikesavan

    2013-04-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for acquiring new genes and creating genetic novelty in organisms. Many new gene functions have evolved through gene duplication and it has contributed tremendously to the evolution of developmental programmes in various organisms. Gene duplication can result from unequal crossing over, retroposition or chromosomal (or genome) duplication. Understanding the mechanisms that generate duplicate gene copies and the subsequent dynamics among gene duplicates is vital because these investigations shed light on localized and genomewide aspects of evolutionary forces shaping intra-specific and inter-specific genome contents, evolutionary relationships, and interactions. Based on whole-genome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana, there is compelling evidence that angiosperms underwent two whole-genome duplication events early during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that these events were crucial for creation of many important developmental and regulatory genes found in extant angiosperm genomes. Recent studies also provide strong indications that even yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with its compact genome, is in fact an ancient tetraploid. Gene duplication can provide new genetic material for mutation, drift and selection to act upon, the result of which is specialized or new gene functions. Without gene duplication the plasticity of a genome or species in adapting to changing environments would be severely limited. Whether a duplicate is retained depends upon its function, its mode of duplication, (i.e. whether it was duplicated during a whole-genome duplication event), the species in which it occurs, and its expression rate. The exaptation of preexisting secondary functions is an important feature in gene evolution, just as it is in morphological evolution.

  19. Evolution of CONSTANS Regulation and Function after Gene Duplication Produced a Photoperiodic Flowering Switch in the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Samson; Rühl, Mark; de Montaigu, Amaury; Wötzel, Stefan; Coupland, George

    2015-09-01

    Environmental control of flowering allows plant reproduction to occur under optimal conditions and facilitates adaptation to different locations. At high latitude, flowering of many plants is controlled by seasonal changes in day length. The photoperiodic flowering pathway confers this response in the Brassicaceae, which colonized temperate latitudes after divergence from the Cleomaceae, their subtropical sister family. The CONSTANS (CO) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of the Brassicaceae, is central to the photoperiodic flowering response and shows characteristic patterns of transcription required for day-length sensing. CO is believed to be widely conserved among flowering plants; however, we show that it arose after gene duplication at the root of the Brassicaceae followed by divergence of transcriptional regulation and protein function. CO has two close homologs, CONSTANS-LIKE1 (COL1) and COL2, which are related to CO by tandem duplication and whole-genome duplication, respectively. The single CO homolog present in the Cleomaceae shows transcriptional and functional features similar to those of COL1 and COL2, suggesting that these were ancestral. We detect cis-regulatory and codon changes characteristic of CO and use transgenic assays to demonstrate their significance in the day-length-dependent activation of the CO target gene FLOWERING LOCUS T. Thus, the function of CO as a potent photoperiodic flowering switch evolved in the Brassicaceae after gene duplication. The origin of CO may have contributed to the range expansion of the Brassicaceae and suggests that in other families CO genes involved in photoperiodic flowering arose by convergent evolution. PMID:25972346

  20. Characterization of genes encoding poly(A polymerases in plants: evidence for duplication and functional specialization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R Meeks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poly(A polymerase is a key enzyme in the machinery that mediates mRNA 3' end formation in eukaryotes. In plants, poly(A polymerases are encoded by modest gene families. To better understand this multiplicity of genes, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes from several other plants, as well as from Selaginella, Physcomitrella, and Chlamydomonas, were studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using bioinformatics tools, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes were identified in the genomes of eight species in the plant lineage. Whereas Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to possess a single poly(A polymerase gene, other species possessed between two and six possible poly(A polymerase genes. With the exception of four intron-lacking genes, all of the plant poly(A polymerase genes (but not the C. reinhardtii gene possessed almost identical intron positions within the poly(A polymerase coding sequences, suggesting that all plant poly(A polymerase genes derive from a single ancestral gene. The four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerase genes were found to be essential, based on genetic analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants. GFP fusion proteins containing three of the four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerases localized to the nucleus, while one such fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm. The fact that this latter protein is largely pollen-specific suggests that it has important roles in male gametogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that poly(A polymerase genes have expanded from a single ancestral gene by a series of duplication events during the evolution of higher plants, and that individual members have undergone sorts of functional specialization so as to render them essential for plant growth and development. Perhaps the most interesting of the plant poly(A polymerases is a novel cytoplasmic poly(A polymerase that is expressed in pollen in Arabidopsis; this is reminiscent of spermatocyte-specific cytoplasmic poly(A polymerases in

  1. RNA Structure Duplications and Flavivirus Host Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villordo, Sergio M; Carballeda, Juan M; Filomatori, Claudia V; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-04-01

    Flaviviruses include a highly diverse group of arboviruses with a global distribution and a high human disease burden. Most flaviviruses cycle between insects and vertebrate hosts; thus, they are obligated to use different cellular machinery for their replication and mount different mechanisms to evade specific antiviral responses. In addition to coding for viral proteins, the viral genome contains signals in RNA structures that govern the amplification of viral components and participate in triggering or evading antiviral responses. In this review, we focused on new information about host-specific functions of RNA structures present in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of flavivirus genomes. Models and conservation patterns of RNA elements of distinct flavivirus ecological groups are revised. An intriguing feature of the 3' UTR of insect-borne flavivirus genomes is the conservation of complex RNA structure duplications. Here, we discuss new hypotheses of how these RNA elements specialize for replication in vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, and present new ideas associating the significance of RNA structure duplication, small subgenomic flavivirus RNA formation, and host adaptation. PMID:26850219

  2. Chromosome duplication in Lolium multiflorum Lam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselaine Cristina Pereira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Artificial chromosome duplication of diploid genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (2n=2x=14 is worthy to breeding, and aims to increase the expression of traits with agronomic interest. The purpose of this study was to obtain polyploid plants of L. multiflorum from local diploid populations in order to exploit adaptation and future verification of the effects of polyploidy in agronomic traits. Seedlings were immersed in different colchicine solutions for an exposure time of 3h and 24h. Ploidy determination was made by the DNA content and certified by chromosomes counts. The plants confirmed as tetraploids were placed in a greenhouse, and, at flowering, pollen viability was evaluated, and seeds were harvested to assess the stability of the progenies. The percentage of polyploids obtained was 20%. Pollen viability of the tetraploids generated ranged from 58% to 69%. The tetraploid plants obtained in the experiment generated 164 progenies, of which 109 presented DNA content compatible with the tetraploid level, showing stability of chromosome duplication in the filial generation.

  3. Reconstructing the ancestral germ line methylation state of young repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbach, Lars; Lyngsø, Rune B; Lengauer, Thomas; Hein, Jotun

    2011-06-01

    One of the key objectives of comparative genomics is the characterization of the forces that shape genomes over the course of evolution. In the last decades, evidence has been accumulated that for vertebrate genomes also epigenetic modifications have to be considered in this context. Especially, the elevated mutation frequency of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is assumed to facilitate the depletion of CpG dinucleotides in species that exhibit global DNA methylation. For instance, the underrepresentation of CpG dinucleotides in many mammalian genomes is attributed to this effect, which is only neutralized in so-called CpG islands (CGIs) that are preferentially unmethylated and thus partially protected from rapid CpG decay. For primate-specific CpG-rich transposable elements from the ALU family, it is unclear whether their elevated CpG frequency is caused by their small age or by the absence of DNA methylation. In consequence, these elements are often misclassified in CGI annotations. We present a method for the estimation of germ line methylation from pairwise ancestral-descendant alignments. The approach is validated in a simulation study and tested on DNA repeats from the AluSx family. We conclude that a predicted unmethylated state in the germ line is highly correlated with epigenetic activity of the respective genomic region. Thus, CpG-rich repeats can be facilitated as in silico probes for the epigenetic potential of their genomic neighborhood. PMID:21212152

  4. An ancestral HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus peptide with potent HIV-1 and HIV-2 fusion inhibitor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Borrego, Pedro; Calado, Rita; Marcelino, José M.; Pereira, Patrícia MR; Quintas, Alexandre; Barroso, Helena; Taveira, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    "Objectives: To produce new fusion inhibitor peptides for HIV-1 and HIV-2 based on ancestral envelope sequences. Methods: HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) ancestral transmembrane protein sequences were reconstructed and ancestral peptides were derived from the helical region 2 (HR2). The activity of one ancestral peptide (named P3) was examined against a panel of HIV-1 and HIV-2 primary isolates in TZM-bl cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells and compared to ...

  5. MarcXimiL : near duplicates detection (and similarity analysis)

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Jan; Borel, Alain

    2011-01-01

    MarcXimiL is an open source tool which works on MARCXML records and calculates similarity indices between these records. After a short theoretical introduction, the tutorial will focus on how to install, parametrize and use the tool. This tool can be implemented in order to : * prevent creation of duplicates (similar records are shown during the validation process) * identify duplicates into batch files before ingest * find duplicates inside a collection * suggest to users similar records to ...

  6. Cholecystitis of a duplicated gallbladder complicated by a cholecystoenteric fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Brady K. [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); Chess, Mitchell A. [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); Advanced Imaging, Batavia, NY (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Gallbladder duplications are uncommon anatomic variants that are sometimes mistaken for other entities on imaging. We present a surgically confirmed case of cholecystitis in a ductular-type duplicated gallbladder complicated by the formation of an inflammatory fistula to the adjacent duodenum. Both US and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were performed preoperatively, in addition to intraoperative cholangiography, which confirmed the presence of a duplicated gallbladder. (orig.)

  7. Colonic duplication in an adult mimicking a tumor of pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Duplications of the alimentary tract are uncommon congenital malformations that can present diagnostic difficulties.We report a rare case of a cystic colonic duplication in a female adult.Preoperative investigations were suggestive of pancreatic tumor.The diagnosis was established based on the histopathological examination of the resected specimen.We concluded that,though uncommon,intestinal duplication should be considered in differential diagnosis of abdominal mass.

  8. RECTAL DUPLICATION CYST IN PREVIOUS ANORECTAL MALFORMATION AND DOWN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Burgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI tract duplications are rare congenital malformations. Most of them occur in the ileum and only 1-5%, of all duplication, were in the rectum. Different clinical features including chronic constipation, rectal prolapsed or polips. We report on a 4-years-old girl with Down syndrome and anorectal malformation (ARM who was found to have a rectal duplication cyst.

  9. An Empirical Study on the Impact of Duplicate Code

    OpenAIRE

    Keisuke Hotta; Yui Sasaki; Yukiko Sano; Yoshiki Higo; Shinji Kusumoto

    2012-01-01

    It is said that the presence of duplicate code is one of the factors that make software maintenance more difficult. Many research efforts have been performed on detecting, removing, or managing duplicate code on this basis. However, some researchers doubt this basis in recent years and have conducted empirical studies to investigate the influence of the presence of duplicate code. In this study, we conduct an empirical study to investigate this matter from a different standpoint from previous...

  10. Chromosomal duplication strains of Aspergillus nidulans and their instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strains of Aspergillus nidulans with chromosomal duplication were obtained after gamma irradiation followed by crossing of the translocated strains with normal strains. From 20 analysed colonies, 12 have shown translocations induced by irradiation. Segregants from four of these translocation strains crossed to normal strains have shown to be unstable although presenting normal morphology. Two segregants were genetically analysed. The first one has shown a duplication of part of linkage groups VIII and the second one presented a duplication of a segment of linkage group V. These new duplication strains in A. nidulans open new perspectives of a more detailed study of the instability phenomenon in this fungus. (Author)

  11. Evolution of a Novel Antiviral Immune-Signaling Interaction by Partial-Gene Duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Korithoski

    Full Text Available The RIG-like receptors (RLRs are related proteins that identify viral RNA in the cytoplasm and activate cellular immune responses, primarily through direct protein-protein interactions with the signal transducer, IPS1. Although it has been well established that the RLRs, RIG-I and MDA5, activate IPS1 through binding between the twin caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs on the RLR and a homologous CARD on IPS1, it is less clear which specific RLR CARD(s are required for this interaction, and almost nothing is known about how the RLR-IPS1 interaction evolved. In contrast to what has been observed in the presence of immune-modulating K63-linked polyubiquitin, here we show that-in the absence of ubiquitin-it is the first CARD domain of human RIG-I and MDA5 (CARD1 that binds directly to IPS1 CARD, and not the second (CARD2. Although the RLRs originated in the earliest animals, both the IPS1 gene and the twin-CARD domain architecture of RIG-I and MDA5 arose much later in the deuterostome lineage, probably through a series of tandem partial-gene duplication events facilitated by tight clustering of RLRs and IPS1 in the ancestral deuterostome genome. Functional differentiation of RIG-I CARD1 and CARD2 appears to have occurred early during this proliferation of RLR and related CARDs, potentially driven by adaptive coevolution between RIG-I CARD domains and IPS1 CARD. However, functional differentiation of MDA5 CARD1 and CARD2 occurred later. These results fit a general model in which duplications of protein-protein interaction domains into novel gene contexts could facilitate the expansion of signaling networks and suggest a potentially important role for functionally-linked gene clusters in generating novel immune-signaling pathways.

  12. Slipins: ancient origin, duplication and diversification of the stomatin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young J Peter W

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stomatin is a membrane protein that was first isolated from human red blood cells. Since then, a number of stomatin-like proteins have been identified in all three domains of life. The conservation among these proteins is remarkable, with bacterial and human homologs sharing 50 % identity. Despite being associated with a variety of diseases such as cancer, kidney failure and anaemia, precise functions of these proteins remain unclear. Results We have constructed a comprehensive phylogeny of all 'stomatin-like' sequences that share a 150 amino acid domain. We show these proteins comprise an ancient family that arose early in prokaryotic evolution, and we propose a new nomenclature that reflects their phylogeny, based on the name "slipin" (stomatin-like protein. Within prokaryotes there are two distinct subfamilies that account for the two different origins of the eight eukaryotic stomatin subfamilies, one of which gave rise to eukaryotic SLP-2, renamed here "paraslipin". This was apparently acquired through the mitochondrial endosymbiosis and is widely distributed amongst the major kingdoms. The other prokaryotic subfamily gave rise to the ancestor of the remaining seven eukaryotic subfamilies. The highly diverged "alloslipin" subfamily is represented only by fungal, viral and ciliate sequences. The remaining six subfamilies, collectively termed "slipins", are confined to metazoa. Protostome stomatin, as well as a newly reported arthropod subfamily slipin-4, are restricted to invertebrate groups, whilst slipin-1 (previously SLP-1 is present in nematodes and higher metazoa. In vertebrates, the stomatin family expanded considerably, with at least two duplication events giving rise to podocin and slipin-3 subfamilies (previously SLP-3, with the retained ancestral sequence giving rise to vertebrate stomatin. Conclusion Stomatin-like proteins have their origin in an ancient duplication event that occurred early on in the evolution

  13. A dominant EV71-specific CD4+ T cell epitope is highly conserved among human enteroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruicheng Wei

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity plays a central role in determining the immunopathogenesis of viral infections. However, the role of CD4+ T cells in EV71 infection, which causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD, has yet to be elucidated. We applied a sophisticated method to identify promiscuous CD4+ T cell epitopes contained within the sequence of the EV71 polyprotein. Fifteen epitopes were identified, and three of them are dominant ones. The most dominant epitope is highly conserved among enterovirus species, including HFMD-related coxsackieviruses, HFMD-unrelated echoviruses and polioviruses. Furthermore, the CD4+ T cells specific to the epitope indeed cross-reacted with the homolog of poliovirus 3 Sabin. Our findings imply that CD4+ T cell responses to poliovirus following vaccination, or to other enteroviruses to which individuals may be exposed in early childhood, may have a modulating effect on subsequent CD4+ T cell response to EV71 infection or vaccine.

  14. A highly conserved regulatory element controls hematopoietic expression of GATA-2 in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Michael Q

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GATA-2 is a transcription factor required for hematopoietic stem cell survival as well as for neuronal development in vertebrates. It has been shown that specific expression of GATA-2 in blood progenitor cells requires distal cis-acting regulatory elements. Identification and characterization of these elements should help elucidating transcription regulatory mechanisms of GATA-2 expression in hematopoietic lineage. Results By pair-wise alignments of the zebrafish genomic sequences flanking GATA-2 to orthologous regions of fugu, mouse, rat and human genomes, we identified three highly conserved non-coding sequences in the genomic region flanking GATA-2, two upstream of GATA-2 and another downstream. Using both transposon and bacterial artificial chromosome mediated germline transgenic zebrafish analyses, one of the sequences was established as necessary and sufficient to direct hematopoietic GFP expression in a manner that recapitulates that of GATA-2. In addition, we demonstrated that this element has enhancer activity in mammalian myeloid leukemia cell lines, thus validating its functional conservation among vertebrate species. Further analysis of potential transcription factor binding sites suggested that integrity of the putative HOXA3 and LMO2 sites is required for regulating GATA-2/GFP hematopoietic expression. Conclusion Regulation of GATA-2 expression in hematopoietic cells is likely conserved among vertebrate animals. The integrated approach described here, drawing on embryological, transgenesis and computational methods, should be generally applicable to analyze tissue-specific gene regulation involving distal DNA cis-acting elements.

  15. Highly Conserved Mitochondrial Genomes among Multicellular Red Algae of the Florideophyceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun Chan; Kim, Kyeong Mi; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, JunMo; Boo, Ga Hun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Nelson, Wendy A; Yi, Gangman; Schmidt, William E; Fredericq, Suzanne; Boo, Sung Min; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Yoon, Hwan Su

    2015-08-01

    Two red algal classes, the Florideophyceae (approximately 7,100 spp.) and Bangiophyceae (approximately 193 spp.), comprise 98% of red algal diversity in marine and freshwater habitats. These two classes form well-supported monophyletic groups in most phylogenetic analyses. Nonetheless, the interordinal relationships remain largely unresolved, in particular in the largest subclass Rhodymeniophycidae that includes 70% of all species. To elucidate red algal phylogenetic relationships and study organelle evolution, we determined the sequence of 11 mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) from 5 florideophycean subclasses. These mtDNAs were combined with existing data, resulting in a database of 25 florideophytes and 12 bangiophytes (including cyanidiophycean species). A concatenated alignment of mt proteins was used to resolve ordinal relationships in the Rhodymeniophycidae. Red algal mtDNA genome comparisons showed 47 instances of gene rearrangement including 12 that distinguish Bangiophyceae from Hildenbrandiophycidae, and 5 that distinguish Hildenbrandiophycidae from Nemaliophycidae. These organelle data support a rapid radiation and surprisingly high conservation of mtDNA gene syntheny among the morphologically divergent multicellular lineages of Rhodymeniophycidae. In contrast, we find extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangements when comparing Bangiophyceae and Florideophyceae and multiple examples of gene loss among the different red algal lineages. PMID:26245677

  16. Highly conserved D-loop-like nuclear mitochondrial sequences (Numts) in tiger (Panthera tigris)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wenping Zhang; Zhihe Zhang; Fujun Shen; Rong Hou; Xiaoping Lv; Bisong Yue

    2006-08-01

    Using oligonucleotide primers designed to match hypervariable segments I (HVS-1) of Panthera tigris mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), we amplified two different PCR products (500 bp and 287 bp) in the tiger (Panthera tigris), but got only one PCR product (287 bp) in the leopard (Panthera pardus). Sequence analyses indicated that the sequence of 287 bp was a D-loop-like nuclear mitochondrial sequence (Numts), indicating a nuclear transfer that occurred approximately 4.8–17 million years ago in the tiger and 4.6–16 million years ago in the leopard. Although the mtDNA D-loop sequence has a rapid rate of evolution, the 287-bp Numts are highly conserved; they are nearly identical in tiger subspecies and only 1.742% different between tiger and leopard. Thus, such sequences represent molecular ‘fossils’ that can shed light on evolution of the mitochondrial genome and may be the most appropriate outgroup for phylogenetic analysis. This is also proved by comparing the phylogenetic trees reconstructed using the D-loop sequence of snow leopard and the 287-bp Numts as outgroup.

  17. Human Cytomegalovirus UL138 Open Reading Frame Is Highly Conserved in Clinical Strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Qi; Rong He; Yan-ping Ma; Zheng-rong Sun; Yao-hua Ji; Qiang Ruan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the variability of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL138 open reading flame (ORF) in clinical strains.Methods HCMV UL138 ORF was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR amplification products were sequenced directly, and the data were analyzed in 19 clinical strains.Results UL138 ORF in all 30 clinical strains was amplified successfully. Compared with that of Toledo strain, the nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities of UL138 ORF in all strains were 97.41% to 99.41% and 98.24% to 99.42%, respectively. All of the nucleotide mutations were substitutions. The spatial structure and post-translational modification sites of UL138 encoded proteins were conserved. The result of phylogenetic tree showed that HCMV UL138 sequence variations were not definitely related with different clinical symptoms.Conclusion HCMV UL138 ORF in clinical strains is high conservation, which might be helpful for UL138 encoded protein to play a role in latent infection of HCMV.

  18. Balancing forest-regeneration probabilities and maintenance costs in dry grasslands of high conservation priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Janine; Edwards, Thomas C., Jr.; Eggenberg, Stefan; Ismail, Sascha; Seidl, Irmi; Kienast, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Abandonment of agricultural land has resulted in forest regeneration in species-rich dry grasslands across European mountain regions and threatens conservation efforts in this vegetation type. To support national conservation strategies, we used a site-selection algorithm (MARXAN) to find optimum sets of floristic regions (reporting units) that contain grasslands of high conservation priority. We sought optimum sets that would accommodate 136 important dry-grassland species and that would minimize forest regeneration and costs of management needed to forestall predicted forest regeneration. We did not consider other conservation elements of dry grasslands, such as animal species richness, cultural heritage, and changes due to climate change. Optimal sets that included 95–100% of the dry grassland species encompassed an average of 56–59 floristic regions (standard deviation, SD 5). This is about 15% of approximately 400 floristic regions that contain dry-grassland sites and translates to 4800–5300 ha of dry grassland out of a total of approximately 23,000 ha for the entire study area. Projected costs to manage the grasslands in these optimum sets ranged from CHF (Swiss francs) 5.2 to 6.0 million/year. This is only 15–20% of the current total estimated cost of approximately CHF30–45 million/year required if all dry grasslands were to be protected. The grasslands of the optimal sets may be viewed as core sites in a national conservation strategy.

  19. Precise detection of L. monocytogenes hitting its highly conserved region possessing several specific antibody binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Abolfazl; Rasooli, Iraj; Reza Rahbar, Mohammad; Khalili, Saeed; Amani, Jafar; Ahmadi Zanoos, Kobra

    2012-07-21

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular fast-growing Gram-positive food-borne pathogen, can infect immunocompromised individuals leading to meningitis, meningoencephalitis and septicaemias. From the pool of virulence factors of the organism, ActA, a membrane protein, has a critical role in the life cycle of L. monocytogenes. High mortality rate of listeriosis necessitates a sensitive and rapid diagnostic test for precise identification of L. monocytogenes. We used bioinformatic tools to locate a specific conserved region of ActA for designing and developing an antibody-antigen based diagnostic test for the detection of L. monocytogenes. A number of databases were looked for ActA related sequences. Sequences were analyzed with several online software to find an appropriate region for our purpose. ActA protein was found specific to Listeria species with no homologs in other organisms. We finally introduced a highly conserved region within ActA sequence that possess several antibody binding sites specific to L. monocytogenes. This protein sequence can serve as an antigen for designing a relatively cheap, sensitive, and specific diagnostic test for detection of L. monocytogenes. PMID:22575546

  20. Genome-wide inference of ancestral recombination graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Matthew D; Hubisz, Melissa J; Gronau, Ilan; Siepel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The complex correlation structure of a collection of orthologous DNA sequences is uniquely captured by the "ancestral recombination graph" (ARG), a complete record of coalescence and recombination events in the history of the sample. However, existing methods for ARG inference are computationally intensive, highly approximate, or limited to small numbers of sequences, and, as a consequence, explicit ARG inference is rarely used in applied population genomics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm for ARG inference that is efficient enough to apply to dozens of complete mammalian genomes. The key idea of our approach is to sample an ARG of [Formula: see text] chromosomes conditional on an ARG of [Formula: see text] chromosomes, an operation we call "threading." Using techniques based on hidden Markov models, we can perform this threading operation exactly, up to the assumptions of the sequentially Markov coalescent and a discretization of time. An extension allows for threading of subtrees instead of individual sequences. Repeated application of these threading operations results in highly efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo samplers for ARGs. We have implemented these methods in a computer program called ARGweaver. Experiments with simulated data indicate that ARGweaver converges rapidly to the posterior distribution over ARGs and is effective in recovering various features of the ARG for dozens of sequences generated under realistic parameters for human populations. In applications of ARGweaver to 54 human genome sequences from Complete Genomics, we find clear signatures of natural selection, including regions of unusually ancient ancestry associated with balancing selection and reductions in allele age in sites under directional selection. The patterns we observe near protein-coding genes are consistent with a primary influence from background selection rather than hitchhiking, although we cannot rule out a contribution from recurrent selective sweeps. PMID:24831947

  1. Genome-wide inference of ancestral recombination graphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Rasmussen

    Full Text Available The complex correlation structure of a collection of orthologous DNA sequences is uniquely captured by the "ancestral recombination graph" (ARG, a complete record of coalescence and recombination events in the history of the sample. However, existing methods for ARG inference are computationally intensive, highly approximate, or limited to small numbers of sequences, and, as a consequence, explicit ARG inference is rarely used in applied population genomics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm for ARG inference that is efficient enough to apply to dozens of complete mammalian genomes. The key idea of our approach is to sample an ARG of [Formula: see text] chromosomes conditional on an ARG of [Formula: see text] chromosomes, an operation we call "threading." Using techniques based on hidden Markov models, we can perform this threading operation exactly, up to the assumptions of the sequentially Markov coalescent and a discretization of time. An extension allows for threading of subtrees instead of individual sequences. Repeated application of these threading operations results in highly efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo samplers for ARGs. We have implemented these methods in a computer program called ARGweaver. Experiments with simulated data indicate that ARGweaver converges rapidly to the posterior distribution over ARGs and is effective in recovering various features of the ARG for dozens of sequences generated under realistic parameters for human populations. In applications of ARGweaver to 54 human genome sequences from Complete Genomics, we find clear signatures of natural selection, including regions of unusually ancient ancestry associated with balancing selection and reductions in allele age in sites under directional selection. The patterns we observe near protein-coding genes are consistent with a primary influence from background selection rather than hitchhiking, although we cannot rule out a contribution from recurrent selective

  2. Ancestral Genomes, Sex, and the Population Structure of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of detailed knowledge of the structure and evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi populations is essential for control of Chagas disease. We profiled 75 strains of the parasite with five nuclear microsatellite loci, 24Salpha RNA genes, and sequence polymorphisms in the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene. We also used sequences available in GenBank for the mitochondrial genes cytochrome B and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1. A multidimensional scaling plot (MDS based in microsatellite data divided the parasites into four clusters corresponding to T. cruzi I (MDS-cluster A, T. cruzi II (MDS-cluster C, a third group of T. cruzi strains (MDS-cluster B, and hybrid strains (MDS-cluster BH. The first two clusters matched respectively mitochondrial clades A and C, while the other two belonged to mitochondrial clade B. The 24Salpha rDNA and microsatellite profiling data were combined into multilocus genotypes that were analyzed by the haplotype reconstruction program PHASE. We identified 141 haplotypes that were clearly distributed into three haplogroups (X, Y, and Z. All strains belonging to T. cruzi I (MDS-cluster A were Z/Z, the T. cruzi II strains (MDS-cluster C were Y/Y, and those belonging to MDS-cluster B (unclassified T. cruzi had X/X haplogroup genotypes. The strains grouped in the MDS-cluster BH were X/Y, confirming their hybrid character. Based on these results we propose the following minimal scenario for T. cruzi evolution. In a distant past there were at a minimum three ancestral lineages that we may call, respectively, T. cruzi I, T. cruzi II, and T. cruzi III. At least two hybridization events involving T. cruzi II and T. cruzi III produced evolutionarily viable progeny. In both events, the mitochondrial recipient (as identified by the mitochondrial clade of the hybrid strains was T. cruzi II and the mitochondrial donor was T. cruzi III.

  3. β-Propeller blades as ancestral peptides in protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus O Kopec

    Full Text Available Proteins of the β-propeller fold are ubiquitous in nature and widely used as structural scaffolds for ligand binding and enzymatic activity. This fold comprises between four and twelve four-stranded β-meanders, the so called blades that are arranged circularly around a central funnel-shaped pore. Despite the large size range of β-propellers, their blades frequently show sequence similarity indicative of a common ancestry and it has been proposed that the majority of β-propellers arose divergently by amplification and diversification of an ancestral blade. Given the structural versatility of β-propellers and the hypothesis that the first folded proteins evolved from a simpler set of peptides, we investigated whether this blade may have given rise to other folds as well. Using sequence comparisons, we identified proteins of four other folds as potential homologs of β-propellers: the luminal domain of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1-LD, type II β-prisms, β-pinwheels, and WW domains. Because, with increasing evolutionary distance and decreasing sequence length, the statistical significance of sequence comparisons becomes progressively harder to distinguish from the background of convergent similarities, we complemented our analyses with a new method that evaluates possible homology based on the correlation between sequence and structure similarity. Our results indicate a homologous relationship of IRE1-LD and type II β-prisms with β-propellers, and an analogous one for β-pinwheels and WW domains. Whereas IRE1-LD most likely originated by fold-changing mutations from a fully formed PQQ motif β-propeller, type II β-prisms originated by amplification and differentiation of a single blade, possibly also of the PQQ type. We conclude that both β-propellers and type II β-prisms arose by independent amplification of a blade-sized fragment, which represents a remnant of an ancient peptide world.

  4. β-Propeller Blades as Ancestral Peptides in Protein Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Klaus O.; Lupas, Andrei N.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins of the β-propeller fold are ubiquitous in nature and widely used as structural scaffolds for ligand binding and enzymatic activity. This fold comprises between four and twelve four-stranded β-meanders, the so called blades that are arranged circularly around a central funnel-shaped pore. Despite the large size range of β-propellers, their blades frequently show sequence similarity indicative of a common ancestry and it has been proposed that the majority of β-propellers arose divergently by amplification and diversification of an ancestral blade. Given the structural versatility of β-propellers and the hypothesis that the first folded proteins evolved from a simpler set of peptides, we investigated whether this blade may have given rise to other folds as well. Using sequence comparisons, we identified proteins of four other folds as potential homologs of β-propellers: the luminal domain of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1-LD), type II β-prisms, β-pinwheels, and WW domains. Because, with increasing evolutionary distance and decreasing sequence length, the statistical significance of sequence comparisons becomes progressively harder to distinguish from the background of convergent similarities, we complemented our analyses with a new method that evaluates possible homology based on the correlation between sequence and structure similarity. Our results indicate a homologous relationship of IRE1-LD and type II β-prisms with β-propellers, and an analogous one for β-pinwheels and WW domains. Whereas IRE1-LD most likely originated by fold-changing mutations from a fully formed PQQ motif β-propeller, type II β-prisms originated by amplification and differentiation of a single blade, possibly also of the PQQ type. We conclude that both β-propellers and type II β-prisms arose by independent amplification of a blade-sized fragment, which represents a remnant of an ancient peptide world. PMID:24143202

  5. Analysis of the stone ancestral hall of Guo’s tomb on Xiaotang mountainin Han dynasty architectural features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国庆

    2014-01-01

    The stone ancestral hall of Guo’s tomb in Xiaotang mountain is the earliest existing buildings on the ground in China. It has a very high historical, cultural and artistic value, and it was described by the ancient and modern scholars and experts in their books and articles. But the study of architectural of ancestral hall was emphasized from 1930s, and became a brilliant star in the Chinese historic buildings. In this article, the architectural characteristics of the stone ancestral hall are discussed through fieldworks, in order to clarify the real architecture appearance of the ancestral hall and refer more informations for comprehensive study of Xiaotang stone ancestral hall.

  6. An ancestral role for the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle S. McCommis

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, these studies suggest that the MPC plays an important and ancestral role in insulin-secreting cells in mediating glucose sensing, regulating insulin secretion, and controlling systemic glycemia.

  7. Gallbladder Duplication Associated with Gastro-Intestinal Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rahul; Gupta, Shilpi; Sharma, Pramila; Bhandari, Anu; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Mathur, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder duplication in association with other GIT anomalies is a rare entity. We report two neonates; one with duodenal atresia and the other newborn with pyloric atresia, ileal atresia and colonic atresia, both were associated with gallbladder duplication which has not been reported earlier. PMID:27123398

  8. Analysis of recent segmental duplications in the bovine genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplicated sequences are an important source of gene innovation and structural variation within mammalian genomes. We describe the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of segmental duplications in the modern domesticated cattle (Bos taurus). Using two distinct computational analyses, we estimat...

  9. A rare case of congenital Y-type urethral duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Tiwari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of urethra is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of Y-type of urethral duplication with the accessory urethra arising from posterior urethra and opening in the perineum. The orthotopic urethra was normal. The accessory urethral tract was cored, transfixed and divided. At 1 year of follow-up, the patient has no urinary complaints

  10. Rectal Duplication%直肠重复畸形

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张道荣; 牟弦琴; 李振东; 李恭才; 王修忠; 代蕊霜

    1983-01-01

    @@ 我们两院近10年来共收治先天性直肠重复畸形17例(其中河北医学院11例,西安医学院6例).均经手术及病理证实.现总结如下:临床资料本组男性6例,女性11例,最小年龄4天,最大年龄14岁.%This paper reports 17 cases of rectal duplication. There were 6 males and 11rectal duplications were divided into three bordered by a common wall.9 patients in this series were found to have this condition.a rectovestitubular fistula.B.Pararectal duplication.The duplicated bowel lies near elliptical in shape and filled with fluid.In Complicated rectal duplication.The dupticated bowel is located at the perineum near the abnormal anus and is usually associated with hypospadia.Two cases were of this type.between the duplicated bowel and normal rectum must be partially resected at the distal end.The rectovestitubular fistula should be repaired at the same time.Pararectal duplication can be completely resected.resect the duplicated bowel from perineum but leave the genital anomaly for later treatment.

  11. 42 CFR 457.626 - Prevention of duplicate payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prevention of duplicate payments. 457.626 Section... Payments to States § 457.626 Prevention of duplicate payments. (a) General rule. No payment shall be made... CFR 144.103, which is not part of, or wholly owned by, a governmental entity. Prompt payment...

  12. Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (pimplementation of the alert was shown to significantly reduce associated costs of duplicated AHP tests (p≤.001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency. PMID:22963261

  13. Double-blind ureteral duplication: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blind ending of ureteral duplication is one of the most rare anomalies of the upper urinary tract. We report two cases of ureteral duplication with a blind ending both superiorly and inferiorly, and with no definite communication with the urinary tract. (orig.)

  14. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication with artificial transcription factors targeting the highly conserved primer-binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Eberhardy; J. Goncalves; S. Coelho; D.J. Segal; B. Berkhout; C.F. Barbas

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primer-binding site (PBS) is a highly conserved region in the HIV genome and represents an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV therapies. In this study, we designed four artificial zinc finger transcription factors to bind at or adjac

  15. A Recent Whole-Genome Duplication Divides Populations of a Globally Distributed Microsporidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tom A; Nakjang, Sirintra; Campbell, Scott E; Freeman, Mark A; Eydal, Matthías; Moore, Karen; Hirt, Robert P; Embley, T Martin; Williams, Bryony A P

    2016-08-01

    The Microsporidia are a major group of intracellular fungi and important parasites of animals including insects, fish, and immunocompromised humans. Microsporidian genomes have undergone extreme reductive evolution but there are major differences in genome size and structure within the group: some are prokaryote-like in size and organisation (marine microsporidian infecting goosefish worldwide. Our analysis revealed that population structure across the Atlantic Ocean is associated with a conserved difference in ploidy, with American and Canadian isolates sharing an ancestral whole genome duplication that was followed by widespread pseudogenisation and sorting-out of paralogue pairs. While past analyses have suggested de novo gene formation of microsporidian-specific genes, we found evidence for the origin of new genes from noncoding sequence since the divergence of these populations. Some of these genes experience selective constraint, suggesting the evolution of new functions and local host adaptation. Combining our data with published microsporidian genomes, we show that nucleotide composition across the phylum is shaped by a mutational bias favoring A and T nucleotides, which is opposed by an evolutionary force favoring an increase in genomic GC content. This study reveals ongoing dramatic reorganization of genome structure and the evolution of new gene functions in modern microsporidians despite extensive genomic streamlining in their common ancestor. PMID:27189558

  16. A Recent Whole-Genome Duplication Divides Populations of a Globally Distributed Microsporidian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tom A.; Nakjang, Sirintra; Campbell, Scott E.; Freeman, Mark A.; Eydal, Matthías; Moore, Karen; Hirt, Robert P.; Embley, T. Martin; Williams, Bryony A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Microsporidia are a major group of intracellular fungi and important parasites of animals including insects, fish, and immunocompromised humans. Microsporidian genomes have undergone extreme reductive evolution but there are major differences in genome size and structure within the group: some are prokaryote-like in size and organisation (difference in ploidy, with American and Canadian isolates sharing an ancestral whole genome duplication that was followed by widespread pseudogenisation and sorting-out of paralogue pairs. While past analyses have suggested de novo gene formation of microsporidian-specific genes, we found evidence for the origin of new genes from noncoding sequence since the divergence of these populations. Some of these genes experience selective constraint, suggesting the evolution of new functions and local host adaptation. Combining our data with published microsporidian genomes, we show that nucleotide composition across the phylum is shaped by a mutational bias favoring A and T nucleotides, which is opposed by an evolutionary force favoring an increase in genomic GC content. This study reveals ongoing dramatic reorganization of genome structure and the evolution of new gene functions in modern microsporidians despite extensive genomic streamlining in their common ancestor. PMID:27189558

  17. Expression Pattern Similarities Support the Prediction of Orthologs Retaining Common Functions after Gene Duplication Events1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberer, Georg; Panda, Arup; Das Laha, Shayani; Ghosh, Tapas Chandra; Schäffner, Anton R.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of functionally equivalent, orthologous genes (functional orthologs) across genomes is necessary for accurate transfer of experimental knowledge from well-characterized organisms to others. This frequently relies on automated, coding sequence-based approaches such as OrthoMCL, Inparanoid, and KOG, which usually work well for one-to-one homologous states. However, this strategy does not reliably work for plants due to the occurrence of extensive gene/genome duplication. Frequently, for one query gene, multiple orthologous genes are predicted in the other genome, and it is not clear a priori from sequence comparison and similarity which one preserves the ancestral function. We have studied 11 organ-dependent and stress-induced gene expression patterns of 286 Arabidopsis lyrata duplicated gene groups and compared them with the respective Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes to predict putative expressologs and nonexpressologs based on gene expression similarity. Promoter sequence divergence as an additional tool to substantiate functional orthology only partially overlapped with expressolog classification. By cloning eight A. lyrata homologs and complementing them in the respective four Arabidopsis loss-of-function mutants, we experimentally proved that predicted expressologs are indeed functional orthologs, while nonexpressologs or nonfunctionalized orthologs are not. Our study demonstrates that even a small set of gene expression data in addition to sequence homologies are instrumental in the assignment of functional orthologs in the presence of multiple orthologs. PMID:27303025

  18. Novel Duplicate Address Detection with Hash Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, GuangJia; Ji, ZhenZhou

    2016-01-01

    Duplicate address detection (DAD) is an important component of the address resolution protocol (ARP) and the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP). DAD determines whether an IP address is in conflict with other nodes. In traditional DAD, the target address to be detected is broadcast through the network, which provides convenience for malicious nodes to attack. A malicious node can send a spoofing reply to prevent the address configuration of a normal node, and thus, a denial-of-service attack is launched. This study proposes a hash method to hide the target address in DAD, which prevents an attack node from launching destination attacks. If the address of a normal node is identical to the detection address, then its hash value should be the same as the "Hash_64" field in the neighboring solicitation message. Consequently, DAD can be successfully completed. This process is called DAD-h. Simulation results indicate that address configuration using DAD-h has a considerably higher success rate when under attack compared with traditional DAD. Comparative analysis shows that DAD-h does not require third-party devices and considerable computing resources; it also provides a lightweight security resolution. PMID:26991901

  19. Homologous high-throughput expression and purification of highly conserved E coli proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchmann Rainer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic factors and a dysregulated immune response towards commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD. Animal models demonstrated that the normal intestinal flora is crucial for the development of intestinal inflammation. However, due to the complexity of the intestinal flora, it has been difficult to design experiments for detection of proinflammatory bacterial antigen(s involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Several studies indicated a potential association of E. coli with IBD. In addition, T cell clones of IBD patients were shown to cross react towards antigens from different enteric bacterial species and thus likely responded to conserved bacterial antigens. We therefore chose highly conserved E. coli proteins as candidate antigens for abnormal T cell responses in IBD and used high-throughput techniques for cloning, expression and purification under native conditions of a set of 271 conserved E. coli proteins for downstream immunologic studies. Results As a standardized procedure, genes were PCR amplified and cloned into the expression vector pQTEV2 in order to express proteins N-terminally fused to a seven-histidine-tag. Initial small-scale expression and purification under native conditions by metal chelate affinity chromatography indicated that the vast majority of target proteins were purified in high yields. Targets that revealed low yields after purification probably due to weak solubility were shuttled into Gateway (Invitrogen destination vectors in order to enhance solubility by N-terminal fusion of maltose binding protein (MBP, N-utilizing substance A (NusA, or glutathione S-transferase (GST to the target protein. In addition, recombinant proteins were treated with polymyxin B coated magnetic beads in order to remove lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Thus, 73% of the targeted proteins could be expressed and purified in large-scale to give soluble proteins in the range of 500

  20. The duplication 17p13.3 phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curry, Cynthia J; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Grant, Erica;

    2013-01-01

    duplications that include both the YWHAE and LIS1 genes. These patients had a relatively distinct facial phenotype and frequent structural brain abnormalities involving the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis, and cranial base. Autism spectrum disorders were seen in a third of duplication probands, most......Chromosome 17p13.3 is a gene rich region that when deleted is associated with the well-known Miller-Dieker syndrome. A recently described duplication syndrome involving this region has been associated with intellectual impairment, autism and occasional brain MRI abnormalities. We report 34...

  1. Foregut duplication cysts of the stomach with respiratory epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodosios Theodosopoulos; Athanasios Marinis; Konstantinos Karapanos; Georgios Vassilikostas; Nikolaos Dafnios; Lazaros Samanides; Eleni Carvounis

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is a congenital rare disease entity. Gastric duplication cysts seem to appear even more rarely. Herein, two duplications cysts of the stomach in a 46 year-old female patient are presented.Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion attached to the posterior aspect of the gastric fundus, while upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a non-communicating cyst and a smaller similar cyst embedded in the gastrosplenic ligament. Excision of both cysts along with the spleen was performed and pathology reported two smooth muscle coated cysts with a pseudostratified ciliated epithelial lining (respiratory type).

  2. Duplication Cyst Presenting as Hydrocoele in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Naeem; Nayyer, Sajid; Yousaf, Abdul Rehman; Iqbal, Nayyer; Ahmed, Ejaz; Dar, Sajid Hameed

    2015-10-01

    Enteric duplication cyst can occur anywhere in Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT), from oropharynx to rectum. Their presentation depends upon the portion of GIT involved. The most common site of GIT involved is small intestine, in 50% of cases. Small intestinal duplication cyst usually present with abdominal pain or mass and rarely as intussusception, volvulus or small bowel obstruction. It may also present very rarely as inguinal hernia of which only 2 cases have been reported yet. We report a 3 years child presenting as hydrocoele of the cord which turned to be duplication cyst which is very rare presentation. PMID:26454396

  3. Methods, apparatus and system for selective duplication of subtasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade Costa, Carlos H.; Cher, Chen-Yong; Park, Yoonho; Rosenburg, Bryan S.; Ryu, Kyung D.

    2016-03-29

    A method for selective duplication of subtasks in a high-performance computing system includes: monitoring a health status of one or more nodes in a high-performance computing system, where one or more subtasks of a parallel task execute on the one or more nodes; identifying one or more nodes as having a likelihood of failure which exceeds a first prescribed threshold; selectively duplicating the one or more subtasks that execute on the one or more nodes having a likelihood of failure which exceeds the first prescribed threshold; and notifying a messaging library that one or more subtasks were duplicated.

  4. Colonic duplications: Clinical presentation and radiologic features of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blickman, J.G. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 667, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands) and Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 816, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands) and Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02114 (United States)]. E-mail: J.Blickman@rad.umcn.nl; Rieu, P.H.M. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 667, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 816, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buonomo, C. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 816, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Hoogeveen, Y.L. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 667, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 816, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Boetes, C. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 667, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Centre St Radboud, Route 816, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Diagnosis of colonic duplication can pose a potential problem even for those familiar with gastro-intestinal tract duplications in general but unaware of the condition due to its rarity and its apparently bimodal clinical presentation. In this report of five cases of surgically proven pediatric colonic duplication, we illustrate how the condition manifests clinically and describe the imaging features in an attempt to illustrate this bimodal presentation of the condition. The possible etiology, associated congenital anomalies and modes of clinical presentation are reviewed based on literature review as well as on our own experience.

  5. Finding all sorting tandem duplication random loss operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernt, Matthias; Chen, Kuan Yu; Chen, Ming Chiang;

    2011-01-01

    A tandem duplication random loss (TDRL) operation duplicates a contiguous segment of genes, followed by the random loss of one copy of each of the duplicated genes. Although the importance of this operation is founded by several recent biological studies, it has been investigated only rarely from...... a theoretical point of view. Of particular interest are sorting TDRLs which are TDRLs that, when applied to a permutation representing a genome, reduce the distance towards another given permutation. The identification of sorting genome rearrangement operations in general is a key ingredient of many algorithms...

  6. Clusters of ancestrally related genes that show paralogy in whole or in part are a major feature of the genomes of humans and other species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Walker

    Full Text Available Arrangements of genes along chromosomes are a product of evolutionary processes, and we can expect that preferable arrangements will prevail over the span of evolutionary time, often being reflected in the non-random clustering of structurally and/or functionally related genes. Such non-random arrangements can arise by two distinct evolutionary processes: duplications of DNA sequences that give rise to clusters of genes sharing both sequence similarity and common sequence features and the migration together of genes related by function, but not by common descent. To provide a background for distinguishing between the two, which is important for future efforts to unravel the evolutionary processes involved, we here provide a description of the extent to which ancestrally related genes are found in proximity.Towards this purpose, we combined information from five genomic datasets, InterPro, SCOP, PANTHER, Ensembl protein families, and Ensembl gene paralogs. The results are provided in publicly available datasets (http://cgd.jax.org/datasets/clustering/paraclustering.shtml describing the extent to which ancestrally related genes are in proximity beyond what is expected by chance (i.e. form paraclusters in the human and nine other vertebrate genomes, as well as the D. melanogaster, C. elegans, A. thaliana, and S. cerevisiae genomes. With the exception of Saccharomyces, paraclusters are a common feature of the genomes we examined. In the human genome they are estimated to include at least 22% of all protein coding genes. Paraclusters are far more prevalent among some gene families than others, are highly species or clade specific and can evolve rapidly, sometimes in response to environmental cues. Altogether, they account for a large portion of the functional clustering previously reported in several genomes.

  7. The Program of Sex Chromosome Pairing in Meiosis Is Highly Conserved Across Marsupial Species: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Jesús; Berríos, Soledad; Parra, María Teresa; Viera, Alberto; Suja, José Ángel; Prieto, Ignacio; Barbero, José Luis; Rufas, Julio S; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl

    2005-01-01

    Marsupials present a series of genetic and chromosomal features that are highly conserved in very distant species. One of these features is the absence of a homologous region between X and Y chromosomes. According to this genetic differentiation, sex chromosomes do not synapse during the first meiotic prophase in males, and a special structure, the dense plate, maintains sex chromosome association. In this report we present results on the process of meiotic sex chromosome pairing obtained fro...

  8. Molecular characterization of two galactosemia mutations: correlation of mutations with highly conserved domains in galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Reichardt, J K; Packman, S; Woo, S L

    1991-01-01

    Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of human galactose metabolism caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT). The molecular basis of this disorder is at present not well understood. We report here two missense mutations which result in low or undetectable enzymatic activity. First, we identified at nucleotide 591 a transition which substitutes glutamine 188 by arginine. The mutated glutamine is not only highly conserved in evolution (conserv...

  9. First Case of Complete Bladder Duplication in the Coronal Plane with Concomitant Duplication of the Urethra in an Adult Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Karpathakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of the lower urinary tract is a very rare congenital anomaly which is diagnosed either at birth or during early childhood. These rare malformations are most of the times accompanied by other concomitant anomalies and are therefore diagnosed immediately after birth. In some even rarer cases there are no concomitant anomalies and symptoms thus leading to a diagnosis later in childhood. This is the first case in the literature of complete bladder duplication in the coronal plane with concomitant duplication of the urethra and no other associated anomalies in a 52-year-old male who remained asymptomatic and therefore undiagnosed for more than 5 decades.

  10. Tubular colonic duplication - review of 1876-1981 literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four cases of tubular colonic duplication are reported and 53 more are reviewed from 1876-1981 literature. Eighty percent of these patients had other anomalies, most notably genital and bladder duplications. Females outnumbered the males 37 to 20. Fifty percent of patients of either sex had some form of fistulous communication. In no one was the anomaly incompatible with life. Based on the anatomy of distal ends of duplicated colon, the patients are divided in five groups, for each of which the incidence and nature of concomitant anomalies are tabulated. Because of their anatomic complexity, most patients with colonic duplication require clinical evaluation by multiple subspecialists. We have also suggested the sequence and extent to which they should be evaluated by radiologists. (orig.)

  11. Ectopic Ureter Accompanied by Duplicated Ureter: Three Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, Ufuk; Tanriverdi, Halil Ibrahim; Ozmen, Zafer; Sozubir, Selami

    2015-09-01

    We report cases of ectopic ureter accompanied by three types of ureteral duplication that had been diagnosed previously and treated for enuresis. Data from three female patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years were evaluated. The ectopic ureter was observed on the left in one case, on the right in another and bilateral in the third case. Complete duplication was found in two cases, while the third had incomplete duplication. Ureteroneocystostomy was performed in one case and subtotal nephrectomy was carried out in the other two cases. Ureteroneocystostomy was performed for the ectopic ureter found in the opposite urinary system in one of the cases. Ectopic duplicated ureter should be considered in treatment-resistant enuresis and urinary tract infections and after a careful physical examination, imaging as well as function tests should be performed. PMID:26500949

  12. Blind detection of duplicate regions in digital images

    OpenAIRE

    Čargo, Boštjan

    2009-01-01

    This work refers to the research area of digital image processing. Its main purpose is to elucidate the field of automatic digital forgery detection and, within its scope, describe a particular algorithm for blind detection of duplicated image regions: the so-called Duplicate Region Detector (DRD). The algorithm is based on principal component analysis, reduction of image blocks representations, and their lexicographical comparison. Our java implementation was tested on a population with posi...

  13. Unusual variant of infrarenal duplication of inferior vena cava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Kumar Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC duplication is a rare anomaly. Most of the cases are asymptomatic and are detected incidentally. Prior knowledge of the anomaly is essential for safe procedure by intervention radiologist, retroperitoneal operation, and multi-visceral recovery operation from deceased donor by surgeon. We report a case of infrarenal IVC duplication detected incidentally during contrast-enhanced computed tomography examination of abdomen of a patient presenting with viral hepatitis and mild obstructive jaundice.

  14. Signals of Historical Interlocus Gene Conversion in Human Segmental Duplications

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Beth L.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2013-01-01

    Standard methods of DNA sequence analysis assume that sequences evolve independently, yet this assumption may not be appropriate for segmental duplications that exchange variants via interlocus gene conversion (IGC). Here, we use high quality multiple sequence alignments from well-annotated segmental duplications to systematically identify IGC signals in the human reference genome. Our analysis combines two complementary methods: (i) a paralog quartet method that uses DNA sequence simulations...

  15. Copy Number Variants and Segmental Duplications Show Different Formation Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Philip M.; Korbel, Jan O.; Chen, Xueying; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to variation in terms of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), whole regions ranging from several kilobases up to a megabase in length differ in copy number among individuals. These differences are referred to as Copy Number Variants (CNVs) and extensive mapping of these is underway. Recent studies have highlighted their great prevalence in the human genome. Segmental Duplications (SDs) are long (>1kb) stretches of duplicated DNA with high sequence identity. First, we analyzed t...

  16. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Fernandes; Mirela Souto; Frederico Costa; Edite Oliveira; Bernardo Garicochea

    2014-01-01

    Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1) which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who...

  17. Infectious and Immunologic Phenotype of MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Michael; Kölsch, Uwe; Krüger, Renate; Unterwalder, Nadine; Hameister, Karin; Kaiser, Fabian Marc; Vignoli, Aglaia; Rossi, Rainer; Botella, Maria Pilar; Budisteanu, Magdalena; Rosello, Monica; Orellana, Carmen; Tejada, Maria Isabel; Papuc, Sorina Mihaela; Patat, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    MECP2 (methyl CpG binding protein 2) duplication causes syndromic intellectual disability. Patients often suffer from life-threatening infections, suggesting an additional immunodeficiency. We describe for the first time the detailed infectious and immunological phenotype of MECP2 duplication syndrome. 17/27 analyzed patients suffered from pneumonia, 5/27 from at least one episode of sepsis. Encapsulated bacteria (S.pneumoniae, H.influenzae) were frequently isolated. T-cell immunity showed no...

  18. Anal Canal Duplication in an 11-Year-Old-Child

    OpenAIRE

    Van Biervliet, S; Maris, E.; Vande Velde, S.; Vande Putte, D; Meerschaut, V.; Herregods, N.; R. De Bruyne; Van Winckel, M.; K. van Renterghem

    2013-01-01

    Anal canal duplication (ACD) is the least frequent digestive duplication. Symptoms are often absent but tend to increase with age. Recognition is, however, important as almost half of the patients with ACD have concomitant malformations. We present the clinical history of an eleven-year-old girl with ACD followed by a review of symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis based on all the reported cases in English literature.

  19. Ureteral Triplication and Contralateral Duplication with Vesicoureteral Reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Söylemez, Haluk; Koplay, Mustafa; Altunoluk, Bülent; Oğuz, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Ureteral triplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the urinary tract. Since its first description, only about 100 cases have been reported in the literature. The association of ureteral triplication and contralateral duplication is even rarer. We reported a case of ureteral triplication and contralateral duplication with vesicoureteral reflux. The patient was a five-year-old girl with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections, dysuria and lower abdominal pain. Intravenous Pyelography...

  20. Interrogation of alternative splicing events in duplicated genes during evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ting-Wen; Wu Timothy H; Ng Wailap V; Lin Wen-Chang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene duplication provides resources for developing novel genes and new functions while retaining the original functions. In addition, alternative splicing could increase the complexity of expression at the transcriptome and proteome level without increasing the number of gene copy in the genome. Duplication and alternative splicing are thought to work together to provide the diverse functions or expression patterns for eukaryotes. Previously, it was believed that duplicati...

  1. Social capital and health: evidence that ancestral trust promotes health among children of immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljunge, Martin

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents evidence that generalized trust promotes health. Children of immigrants in a broad set of European countries with ancestry from across the world are studied. Individuals are examined within country of residence using variation in trust across countries of ancestry. The approach addresses reverse causality and concerns that the trust measure picks up institutional factors in the individual's contextual setting. There is a significant positive estimate of ancestral trust in explaining self-assessed health. The finding is robust to accounting for individual, parental, and extensive ancestral country characteristics. Individuals with higher ancestral trust are also less likely to be hampered by health problems in their daily life, providing evidence of trust influencing real life outcomes. Individuals with high trust feel and act healthier, enabling a more productive life. PMID:25464341

  2. Reconstructed Ancestral Enzymes Impose a Fitness Cost upon Modern Bacteria Despite Exhibiting Favourable Biochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Joanne K; Prentice, Erica J; Groussin, Mathieu; Arcus, Vickery L

    2015-10-01

    Ancestral sequence reconstruction has been widely used to study historical enzyme evolution, both from biochemical and cellular perspectives. Two properties of reconstructed ancestral proteins/enzymes are commonly reported--high thermostability and high catalytic activity--compared with their contemporaries. Increased protein stability is associated with lower aggregation rates, higher soluble protein abundance and a greater capacity to evolve, and therefore, these proteins could be considered "superior" to their contemporary counterparts. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the favourable in vitro biochemical properties of reconstructed ancestral enzymes and the organismal fitness they confer in vivo. We have previously reconstructed several ancestors of the enzyme LeuB, which is essential for leucine biosynthesis. Our initial fitness experiments revealed that overexpression of ANC4, a reconstructed LeuB that exhibits high stability and activity, was only able to partially rescue the growth of a ΔleuB strain, and that a strain complemented with this enzyme was outcompeted by strains carrying one of its descendants. When we expanded our study to include five reconstructed LeuBs and one contemporary, we found that neither in vitro protein stability nor the catalytic rate was correlated with fitness. Instead, fitness showed a strong, negative correlation with estimated evolutionary age (based on phylogenetic relationships). Our findings suggest that, for reconstructed ancestral enzymes, superior in vitro properties do not translate into organismal fitness in vivo. The molecular basis of the relationship between fitness and the inferred age of ancestral LeuB enzymes is unknown, but may be related to the reconstruction process. We also hypothesise that the ancestral enzymes may be incompatible with the other, contemporary enzymes of the metabolic network. PMID:26349578

  3. Mutational dynamics of murine angiogenin duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Mario A

    2010-10-01

    Angiogenin in vertebrates and highlight the plasticity of this protein after gene duplication. Our results suggest functional divergence among mAng paralogs. This puts forward mAng as a good system candidate for testing functional plasticity of such an important protein while stresses caution when using mouse as a model to infer the consequences of mutations in the single Ang copy of humans.

  4. Laparoscopic excision of an ascending colon duplication cyst in an adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Heather R.; Craig Wengler; Charles W. Hartin; Joshua B. Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Colonic intestinal duplications are infrequent and rarely present past early childhood. We present the case of a large, ascending colon duplication in a 17-year-old boy resected using minimally invasive techniques. This appears to be the first reported case of a laparoscopic en-bloc ascending colon duplication resection in an adolescent. The diagnosis and management of colonic duplications are discussed.

  5. Gene duplication and fragmentation in the zebra finch major histocompatibility complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt David W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC has been an important focus of many vertebrate genome projects. Avian MHC organization is of particular interest because the chicken Gallus gallus, the avian species with the best characterized MHC, possesses a highly streamlined minimal essential MHC, which is linked to resistance against specific pathogens. It remains unclear the extent to which this organization describes the situation in other birds and whether it represents a derived or ancestral condition. The sequencing of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata genome, in combination with targeted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC sequencing, has allowed us to characterize an MHC from a highly divergent and diverse avian lineage, the passerines. Results The zebra finch MHC exhibits a complex structure and history involving gene duplication and fragmentation. The zebra finch MHC includes multiple Class I and Class II genes, some of which appear to be pseudogenes, and spans a much more extensive genomic region than the chicken MHC, as evidenced by the presence of MHC genes on each of seven BACs spanning 739 kb. Cytogenetic (FISH evidence and the genome assembly itself place core MHC genes on as many as four chromosomes with TAP and Class I genes mapping to different chromosomes. MHC Class II regions are further characterized by high endogenous retroviral content. Lastly, we find strong evidence of selection acting on sites within passerine MHC Class I and Class II genes. Conclusion The zebra finch MHC differs markedly from that of the chicken, the only other bird species with a complete genome sequence. The apparent lack of synteny between TAP and the expressed MHC Class I locus is in fact reminiscent of a pattern seen in some mammalian lineages and may represent convergent evolution. Our analyses of the zebra finch MHC suggest a complex history involving

  6. A New Strategy for Identification of Highly Conserved microRNAs in Non-Model Insect, Spodoptera litura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The indigenous small non-coding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, are important regulators of gene expression and many of them are evolutionarily conserved. Whether stem-loop RT-PCR, as a sensitive method, could be utilized to clone conserved miRNAs from non-model insects lacks information. Here, three miRNAs, sli-miR-14, sli-miR-2a and sli-bantam, were cloned from Spodoptera litura by stem-loop RT-PCR. Two groups of primers were designed, and one of them performed especially well and proved stable. The sequences of two highly conserved miRNAs, sli-miR-14 and sli-miR-2a were identical to those in Drosophila melanogaster. To validate the reliability of this strategy, pre-miR-14 and pre-miR-2a in S. litura as representatives were given as well; this shared high homology with those in D. melanogaster and Bombyx mori, and both mature sequences of sli-miR-14 and sli-miR-2a in their precursors shared 100% identity to the results shown by stem-loop RT-PCR. Moreover, expression patterns of these miRNAs were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR. Sli-miR-14 and sli-miR-2a could be detected successfully and their expression patterns showed similar characteristics with those in model insects, further suggesting stem-loop RT-PCR technology can be used for identification of highly conserved miRNAs in non-model insects. These results provide a simplified and efficient strategy for studying the structure and function of highly conserved miRNAs, especially some critical miRNAs in non-model insects.

  7. A skull might lie: modelling ancestral ranges and diet from genes and shape of tree squirrels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Moravec, Jiří C.; Martínková, Natália

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2015), s. 1074-1088. ISSN 1063-5157 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.1.07/2.4.00/17.0138 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Sciurini * multilocus phylogeny * geometric morphometry * speciation * ancestral range reconstruction * diet modelling Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 14.387, year: 2014

  8. Investigating the potential of ancestral state reconstruction algorithms in historical linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Gerhard; List, Johann-Mattis

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in computational historical linguistics are predominantly concerned with phylogenetic inference. However, methods for ancestral state reconstruction have been only sporadically applied. This is surprising since reconstruction is considered essential both in evolutionary biology and in classical historical linguistics. In contradistinction to phylogenetic algorithms, automatic reconstruction methods presuppose phylogenetic information in order to explain what has evolved whe...

  9. Inheritance of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype in recurrent pregnancy loss

    OpenAIRE

    Kolte, Astrid M.; Nielsen, Henriette S.; Steffensen, Rudi; Crespi, Bernard; Christiansen, Ole B

    2015-01-01

    A segment of DNA called the 8.1 ancestral haplotype is hypothesized to cause fetal loss due to a ‘selfish gene’ effect. The hypothesis was not supported, although the haplotype tended to be inherited more often than expected among girls (p=0.11) in a study of 110 mother-child pairs. Further studies are warranted.

  10. A highly conserved protein of unknown function in Sinorhizobium meliloti affects sRNA regulation similar to Hfq

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Shree P.; Minesinger, Brenda K.; Kumar, Janesh; Walker, Graham C.

    2011-01-01

    The SMc01113/YbeY protein, belonging to the UPF0054 family, is highly conserved in nearly every bacterium. However, the function of these proteins still remains elusive. Our results show that SMc01113/YbeY proteins share structural similarities with the MID domain of the Argonaute (AGO) proteins, and might similarly bind to a small-RNA (sRNA) seed, making a special interaction with the phosphate on the 5′-side of the seed, suggesting they may form a component of the bacterial sRNA pathway. In...

  11. U2AF binding selects for the high conservation of the C. elegans 3′ splice site

    OpenAIRE

    HOLLINS, COURTNEY; Zorio, Diego A.R.; MACMORRIS, MARGARET; Blumenthal, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is unusual among animals in having a highly conserved octamer sequence at the 3′ splice site: UUUU CAG/R. This sequence can bind to the essential heterodimeric splicing factor U2AF, with U2AF65 contacting the U tract and U2AF35 contacting the splice site itself (AG/R). Here we demonstrate a strong correspondence between binding to U2AF of RNA oligonucleotides with variant octamer sequences and the frequency with which such variations occur in splice sites. C. elegans U2...

  12. Site-specific basal body duplication in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Dutcher, Susan K

    2014-02-01

    Correct centriole/basal body positioning is required for numerous biological processes, yet how the cell establishes this positioning is poorly understood. Analysis of centriolar/basal body duplication provides a key to understanding basal body positioning and function. Chlamydomonas basal bodies contain structural features that enable specific triplet microtubules to be specified. Electron tomography of cultures enriched in mitotic cells allowed us to follow basal body duplication and identify a specific triplet at which duplication occurs. Probasal bodies elongate in prophase, assemble transitional fibers (TF) and are segregated with a mature basal body near the poles of the mitotic spindle. A ring of nine-singlet microtubules is initiated at metaphase, orthogonal to triplet eight. At telophase/cytokinesis, triplet microtubule blades assemble first at the distal end, rather than at the proximal cartwheel. The cartwheel undergoes significant changes in length during duplication, which provides further support for its scaffolding role. The uni1-1 mutant contains short basal bodies with reduced or absent TF and defective transition zones, suggesting that the UNI1 gene product is important for coordinated probasal body elongation and maturation. We suggest that this site-specific basal body duplication ensures the correct positioning of the basal body to generate landmarks for intracellular patterning in the next generation. PMID:24166861

  13. Retrotransposon "Qian" mediated segmental duplication in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunmin; Jiang, Ning; Zou, Ziliang; Tu, Zhijian; Chen, Anli; Zhao, Qiaoling; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2014-03-01

    Transposable elements constitute a large fraction of the eukaryotic genomes. They have the potential to alter genome structure and play a major role in genome evolution. Here, we report a segmental duplication mediated by a novel long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon as the cause of an egg-shell recessive lethal mutant (l-em mutant) in silkworm (Bombyx mori). The segmental duplication resulted in the duplication of six genes and the disruption of two genes. Disruption of BmEP80 (B. mori egg protein 80), a gene encoding a major egg-shell structure protein, is likely responsible for the lethal water-loss phenotype in the l-em/l-em mutant. Our data revealed that BmEP80 is present in the inner egg-shell layer and plays important roles in resistance to water efflux form eggs. A novel LTR retrotransposon (named as "Qian") was identified and the model for the Qian-mediated chromosomal segmental duplication was proposed. Detail biochemical and genomic analyses on the l-em mutant offer an opportunity to demonstrate that an LTR retrotransposon could trigger duplication of a chromosomal segment (∼96.3 kb) and confer novel phenotype. PMID:24462715

  14. Autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease caused by SNCA duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takuya; Ross, Owen A; Puschmann, Andreas; Dickson, Dennis W; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2016-01-01

    The discovery in 1997 that mutations in the SNCA gene cause Parkinson's disease (PD) greatly advanced our understanding of this illness. There are pathogenic missense mutations and multiplication mutations in SNCA. Thus, not only a mutant protein, but also an increased dose of wild-type protein can produce autosomal dominant parkinsonism. We review the literature on SNCA duplications and focus on pathologically-confirmed cases. We also report a newly-identified American family with SNCA duplication whose proband was autopsied. We found that over half of the reported cases with SNCA duplication had early-onset parkinsonism and non-motor features, such as dysautonomia, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), hallucinations (usually visual) and cognitive deficits leading to dementia. Only a few cases have presented with typical features of PD. Our case presented with depression and RBD that preceded parkinsonism, and dysautonomia that led to an initial diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. Dementia and visual hallucinations followed. Our patient and the other reported cases with SNCA duplications had widespread cortical Lewy pathology. Neuronal loss in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 2/3 regions were seen in about half of the autopsied SNCA duplication cases. Similar pathology was also observed in SNCA missense mutation and triplication carriers. PMID:26350119

  15. Frequency of carriers of 8.1 ancestral haplotype and its fragments in two Caucasian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiszel, Petra; Kovács, Margit; Szalai, Csaba; Yang, Yan; Pozsonyi, Eva; Blaskó, Bernadett; Laki, Judit; Prohászka, Zoltán; Fazakas, Adám; Pánczél, Pál; Hosszúfalusi, Nóra; Rajczy, Katalin; Wu, Yee-Ling; Chung, Erwin K; Zhou, Bi; Blanchong, Carol A; Vatay, Agnes; Yu, C Yung; Füst, G

    2007-01-01

    Within the human MHC region larger stretches of conserved DNA, called conserved ancestral haplotypes exist. However, many MHC haplotypes contain only fragments of an ancestral haplotype. Little is known, however, on relative distribution of the ancestral haplotypes to their fragments. Therefore we determined the frequency of carriers of the whole ancestral haplotype 8.1 (AH8.1) and its fragments in 127 healthy Hungarian people, 101 healthy Ohioian females, and in nine Hungarian families. The HLA-DQ2, HLA-DR3(17), RAGE -429C allele, the mono-S-C4B genotype, the HSP70-2 1267G allele and the TNF -308A (TNF2) allele were used as markers of the AH8.1. Frequency of carriers of the whole AH8.1 and its fragments was similar in the both populations. 18% of the subjects carried the whole AH8.1 in at least one chromosome, while 17-20%, 36-39%, and 24-29%, respectively carried two or three constituents of the haplotype, only one constituent or none of them. Similar results were obtained in the family study. In addition, marked differences were found in the relationship of the constituents' alleles to the whole AH8.1. In both populations, 29%, 50-59%, 52-56% and 76-96%, respectively of the carriers of HSP70-2 1267G, RAGE-429C, TNF2, and mono-S carriers carried the whole 8.1 haplotype. These findings may have important implications for studies of the disease associations with different MHC ancestral haplotypes. PMID:17558713

  16. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  17. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  18. Ureteral Triplication and Contralateral Duplication with Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Söylemez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral triplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the urinary tract. Since its first description, only about 100 cases have been reported in the literature. The association of ureteral triplication and contralateral duplication is even rarer. We reported a case of ureteral triplication and contralateral duplication with vesicoureteral reflux. The patient was a five-year-old girl with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections, dysuria and lower abdominal pain. Intravenous Pyelography (IVP showed duplication of the right ureter and triplication of the left ureter. In the cystourethrogram there was vesicoureteral reflux at the lower pole of the right kidney. The patient underwent right lower to upper ureteroureterostomy and excision of the distal ureter. This is the second report of ureteral triplication in Turkey. The literature concerning this rare anomaly was reviewed.

  19. Content-based network model with duplication and divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengün, Yasemin; Erzan, Ayşe

    2006-06-01

    We construct a minimal content-based realization of the duplication and divergence model of genomic networks introduced by Wagner [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 91 (1994) 4387] and investigate the scaling properties of the directed degree distribution and clustering coefficient. We find that the content-based network exhibits crossover between two scaling regimes, with log-periodic oscillations for large degrees. These features are not present in the original gene duplication model, but inherent in the content-based model of Balcan and Erzan. The scaling form of the degree distribution of the content-based model turns out to be robust under duplication and divergence, with some re-adjustment of the scaling exponents, while the out-clustering coefficient goes over from a weak power-law dependence on the degree, to an exponential decay under mutations which include splitting and merging of strings.

  20. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  1. Diversification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase in monocots and dicots is marked by multiple genome-wide duplication events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Khan, Muhammad Awais; Qiu, Wen-Ming; Li, Jing; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Qiong; Guo, Wenwu; Zhu, Tingting; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Fengjie; Li, Shaohua; Korban, Schuyler S; Han, Yuepeng

    2012-01-01

    Starch is one of the major components of cereals, tubers, and fruits. Genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, have been extensively studied in cereals but little is known about them in fruits. Due to their low copy gene number, GBSS genes have been used to study plant phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. In this study, GBSS genes have been isolated and characterized in three fruit trees, including apple, peach, and orange. Moreover, a comprehensive evolutionary study of GBSS genes has also been conducted between both monocots and eudicots. Results have revealed that genomic structures of GBSS genes in plants are conserved, suggesting they all have evolved from a common ancestor. In addition, the GBSS gene in an ancestral angiosperm must have undergone genome duplication ∼251 million years ago (MYA) to generate two families, GBSSI and GBSSII. Both GBSSI and GBSSII are found in monocots; however, GBSSI is absent in eudicots. The ancestral GBSSII must have undergone further divergence when monocots and eudicots split ∼165 MYA. This is consistent with expression profiles of GBSS genes, wherein these profiles are more similar to those of GBSSII in eudicots than to those of GBSSI genes in monocots. In dicots, GBSSII must have undergone further divergence when rosids and asterids split from each other ∼126 MYA. Taken together, these findings suggest that it is GBSSII rather than GBSSI of monocots that have orthologous relationships with GBSS genes of eudicots. Moreover, diversification of GBSS genes is mainly associated with genome-wide duplication events throughout the evolutionary course of history of monocots and eudicots. PMID:22291904

  2. The Genomes of Oryza sativa: a history of duplications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We report improved whole-genome shotgun sequences for the genomes of indica and japonica rice, both with multimegabase contiguity, or almost 1,000-fold improvement over the drafts of 2002. Tested against a nonredundant collection of 19,079 full-length cDNAs, 97.7% of the genes are aligned, without fragmentation, to the mapped super-scaffolds of one or the other genome. We introduce a gene identification procedure for plants that does not rely on similarity to known genes to remove erroneous predictions resulting from transposable elements. Using the available EST data to adjust for residual errors in the predictions, the estimated gene count is at least 38,000-40,000. Only 2%-3% of the genes are unique to any one subspecies, comparable to the amount of sequence that might still be missing. Despite this lack of variation in gene content, there is enormous variation in the intergenic regions. At least a quarter of the two sequences could not be aligned, and where they could be aligned, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rates varied from as little as 3.0 SNP/kb in the coding regions to 27.6 SNP/kb in the transposable elements. A more inclusive new approach for analyzing duplication history is introduced here. It reveals an ancient whole-genome duplication, a recent segmental duplication on Chromosomes 11 and 12, and massive ongoing individual gene duplications. We find 18 distinct pairs of duplicated segments that cover 65.7% of the genome; 17 of these pairs date back to a common time before the divergence of the grasses. More important, ongoing individual gene duplications provide a never-ending source of raw material for gene genesis and are major contributors to the differences between members of the grass family.

  3. The Genomes of Oryza sativa: a history of duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wang, Jun; Lin, Wei; Li, Songgang; Li, Heng; Zhou, Jun; Ni, Peixiang; Dong, Wei; Hu, Songnian; Zeng, Changqing; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruiqiang; Xu, Zuyuan; Li, Shengting; Li, Xianran; Zheng, Hongkun; Cong, Lijuan; Lin, Liang; Yin, Jianning; Geng, Jianing; Li, Guangyuan; Shi, Jianping; Liu, Juan; Lv, Hong; Li, Jun; Wang, Jing; Deng, Yajun; Ran, Longhua; Shi, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiyin; Wu, Qingfa; Li, Changfeng; Ren, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jingqiang; Wang, Xiaoling; Li, Dawei; Liu, Dongyuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ji, Zhendong; Zhao, Wenming; Sun, Yongqiao; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Bao, Jingyue; Han, Yujun; Dong, Lingli; Ji, Jia; Chen, Peng; Wu, Shuming; Liu, Jinsong; Xiao, Ying; Bu, Dongbo; Tan, Jianlong; Yang, Li; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Jingyi; Zhou, Yan; Yu, Yingpu; Zhang, Bing; Zhuang, Shulin; Wei, Haibin; Liu, Bin; Lei, Meng; Yu, Hong; Li, Yuanzhe; Xu, Hao; Wei, Shulin; He, Ximiao; Fang, Lijun; Zhang, Zengjin; Zhang, Yunze; Huang, Xiangang; Su, Zhixi; Tong, Wei; Li, Jinhong; Tong, Zongzhong; Li, Shuangli; Ye, Jia; Wang, Lishun; Fang, Lin; Lei, Tingting; Chen, Chen; Chen, Huan; Xu, Zhao; Li, Haihong; Huang, Haiyan; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Huayong; Li, Na; Zhao, Caifeng; Li, Shuting; Dong, Lijun; Huang, Yanqing; Li, Long; Xi, Yan; Qi, Qiuhui; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Yanling; Tian, Xiangjun; Jiao, Yongzhi; Liang, Xiaohu; Jin, Jiao; Gao, Lei; Zheng, Weimou; Hao, Bailin; Liu, Siqi; Wang, Wen; Yuan, Longping; Cao, Mengliang; McDermott, Jason; Samudrala, Ram; Wang, Jian; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Yang, Huanming

    2005-02-01

    We report improved whole-genome shotgun sequences for the genomes of indica and japonica rice, both with multimegabase contiguity, or almost 1,000-fold improvement over the drafts of 2002. Tested against a nonredundant collection of 19,079 full-length cDNAs, 97.7% of the genes are aligned, without fragmentation, to the mapped super-scaffolds of one or the other genome. We introduce a gene identification procedure for plants that does not rely on similarity to known genes to remove erroneous predictions resulting from transposable elements. Using the available EST data to adjust for residual errors in the predictions, the estimated gene count is at least 38,000-40,000. Only 2%-3% of the genes are unique to any one subspecies, comparable to the amount of sequence that might still be missing. Despite this lack of variation in gene content, there is enormous variation in the intergenic regions. At least a quarter of the two sequences could not be aligned, and where they could be aligned, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rates varied from as little as 3.0 SNP/kb in the coding regions to 27.6 SNP/kb in the transposable elements. A more inclusive new approach for analyzing duplication history is introduced here. It reveals an ancient whole-genome duplication, a recent segmental duplication on Chromosomes 11 and 12, and massive ongoing individual gene duplications. We find 18 distinct pairs of duplicated segments that cover 65.7% of the genome; 17 of these pairs date back to a common time before the divergence of the grasses. More important, ongoing individual gene duplications provide a never-ending source of raw material for gene genesis and are major contributors to the differences between members of the grass family. PMID:15685292

  4. A Method of Object-based De-duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, the world is increasingly awash in more and more unstructured data, not only because of the Internet, but also because data that used to be collected on paper or media such as film, DVDs and compact discs has moved online [1]. Most of this data is unstructured and in diverse formats such as e-mail, documents, graphics, images, and videos. In managing unstructured data complexity and scalability, object storage has a clear advantage. Object-based data de-duplication is the current most advanced method and is the effective solution for detecting duplicate data. It can detect common embedded data for the first backup across completely unrelated files and even when physical block layout changes. However, almost all of the current researches on data de-duplication do not consider the content of different file types, and they do not have any knowledge of the backup data format. It has been proven that such method cannot achieve optimal performance for compound files.In our proposed system, we will first extract objects from files, Object_IDs are then obtained by applying hash function to the objects. The resulted Object_IDs are used to build as indexing keys in B+ tree like index structure, thus, we avoid the need for a full object index, the searching time for the duplicate objects reduces to O(log n.We introduce a new concept of a duplicate object resolver. The object resolver mediates access to all the objects and is a central point for managing all the metadata and indexes for all the objects. All objects are addressable by their IDs which is unique in the universe. The resolver stores metadata with triple format. This improved metadata management strategy allows us to set, add and resolve object properties with high flexibility, and allows the repeated use of the same metadata among duplicate object.

  5. A retroperitoneal foregut duplication cyst: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Woon; Lee, Jin Hee; Byun, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Byung Ki; Sohn, Kyung Sik; Kee, Se Kook; Jeon, Jin Min [Pochon CHA University, Kumi CHA Hospital, Kumi (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young Kook [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    Retroperitoneal foregut duplication cyst is an extremely rare congenital malformation. Pathologically, this lesion contains both gastric mucosa and respiratory type mucosa; radiologically, it is often challenging to differentiate it from the other cystic neoplasms that present a similar appearance. We report on a case of retroperitoneal foregut duplication cyst that was lined by both gastric and pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium, and it was also accompanied by a pancreatic pseudocyst. Initially, it presented with peripancreatic and intrapancreatic cystic masses in an asymptomatic 30-year-old man, and this man has since undergone surgical resection.

  6. Multi-Factor Duplicate Question Detection in Stack Overflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芸; David Lo; 夏鑫; 孙建伶

    2015-01-01

    Stack Overflow is a popular on-line question and answer site for software developers to share their experience and expertise. Among the numerous questions posted in Stack Overflow, two or more of them may express the same point and thus are duplicates of one another. Duplicate questions make Stack Overflow site maintenance harder, waste resources that could have been used to answer other questions, and cause developers to unnecessarily wait for answers that are already available. To reduce the problem of duplicate questions, Stack Overflow allows questions to be manually marked as duplicates of others. Since there are thousands of questions submitted to Stack Overflow every day, manually identifying duplicate questions is a di昋cult work. Thus, there is a need for an automated approach that can help in detecting these duplicate questions. To address the above-mentioned need, in this paper, we propose an automated approach named DUPPREDICTOR that takes a new question as input and detects potential duplicates of this question by considering multiple factors. DUPPREDICTOR extracts the title and description of a question and also tags that are attached to the question. These pieces of information (title, description, and a few tags) are mandatory information that a user needs to input when posting a question. DUPPREDICTOR then computes the latent topics of each question by using a topic model. Next, for each pair of questions, it computes four similarity scores by comparing their titles, descriptions, latent topics, and tags. These four similarity scores are finally combined together to result in a new similarity score that comprehensively considers the multiple factors. To examine the benefit of DUPPREDICTOR, we perform an experiment on a Stack Overflow dataset which contains a total of more than two million questions. The result shows that DUPPREDICTOR can achieve a recall-rate@20 score of 63.8%. We compare our approach with the standard search engine of Stack

  7. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J.; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy.

  8. Evolution of Weighted Networks by Duplication-Divergence Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Guo; YAN Jia-Ren; LIU Zi-Ran; WANG Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The duplication and divergence process is ubiquitous in nature and man-made networks. Motivated by the duplication-divergence mechanism which depicts the growth of protein networks, we propose a weighted network model in which topological evolution is coupled with weight dynamics. Large scale numerical results indicate that our model can naturally generate networks with power-law-like distributions of degree, strength and weight.The degree-strength correlation is illustrated as well. These properties are in agreement well with empirical data observed in real-world systems. Furthermore, by altering the retention probability σ, weighted, structured exponential networks are realized.

  9. Analisis Duplicate File Finder Menggunakan Metode MD5 Hash

    OpenAIRE

    Juwita, Wahyuni Farah

    2015-01-01

    Hard drive is one of the core components of computer in various types and sizes. Hard drive with a largest size could be full, even it has not stored any large files. There’s a lot of possibility to have same files on a different directory, searching for the same file in each directory is very difficult and take a long time. Duplicate File Finder application is able to resolve the problem. Duplicate File Finder application be able to find out the same file that located in a different director...

  10. Complete mtDNA sequences of two millipedes suggest a new model for mitochondrial gene rearrangements: Duplication and non-random loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Wesley M.

    2001-11-08

    We determined the complete mtDNA sequences of the millipedes Narceus annularus and Thyropygus sp. (Arthropoda: Diplopoda) and identified in both genomes all 37 genes typical for metazoan mtDNA. The arrangement of these genes is identical in the two millipedes, but differs from that inferred to be ancestral for arthropods by the location of four genes/gene clusters. This novel gene arrangement is unusual for animal mtDNA, in that genes with opposite transcriptional polarities are clustered in the genome and the two clusters are separated by two non-coding regions. The only exception to this pattern is the gene for cysteine tRNA, which is located in the part of the genome that otherwise contains all genes with the opposite transcriptional polarity. We suggest that a mechanism involving complete mtDNA duplication followed by the loss of genes, predetermined by their transcriptional polarity and location in the genome, could generate this gene arrangement from the one ancestral for arthropods. The proposed mechanism has important implications for phylogenetic inferences that are drawn on the basis of gene arrangement comparisons.

  11. Identification, duplication, evolution and expression analyses of caleosins in Brassica plants and Arabidopsis subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Mingzhe; Wang, Lili; Li, Zhuowei; Taylor, David C; Li, Zhixi; Zhang, Meng

    2016-04-01

    Caleosins are a class of Ca(2+) binding proteins that appear to be ubiquitous in plants. Some of the main proteins embedded in the lipid monolayer of lipid droplets, caleosins, play critical roles in the degradation of storage lipids during germination and in lipid trafficking. Some of them have been shown to have histidine-dependent peroxygenase activity, which is believed to participate in stress responses in Arabidopsis. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, caleosins have been examined extensively. However, little is known on a genome-wide scale about these proteins in other members of the Brassicaceae. In this study, 51 caleosins in Brassica plants and Arabidopsis lyrata were investigated and analyzed in silico. Among them, 31 caleosins, including 7 in A. lyrata, 11 in Brassica oleracea and 13 in Brassica napus, are herein identified for the first time. Segmental duplication was the main form of gene expansion. Alignment, motif and phylogenetic analyses showed that Brassica caleosins belong to either the H-family or the L-family with different motif structures and physicochemical properties. Our findings strongly suggest that L-caleosins are evolved from H-caleosins. Predicted phosphorylation sites were differentially conserved in H-caleosin and L-caleosins, respectively. 'RY-repeat' elements and phytohormone-related cis-elements were identified in different caleosins, which suggest diverse physiological functions. Gene structure analysis indicated that most caleosins (38 out of 44) contained six exons and five introns and their intron phases were highly conserved. Structurally integrated caleosins, such as BrCLO3-3 and BrCLO4-2, showed high expression levels and may have important roles. Some caleosins, such as BrCLO2 and BoCLO8-2, lost motifs of the calcium binding domain, proline knot, potential phosphorylation sites and haem-binding sites. Combined with their low expression, it is suggested that these caleosins may have lost function. PMID:26786939

  12. Gene duplication and paleopolyploidy in soybean and the implications for whole genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Rex T

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soybean, Glycine max (L. Merr., is a well documented paleopolyploid. What remains relatively under characterized is the level of sequence identity in retained homeologous regions of the genome. Recently, the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and United States Department of Agriculture jointly announced the sequencing of the soybean genome. One of the initial concerns is to what extent sequence identity in homeologous regions would have on whole genome shotgun sequence assembly. Results Seventeen BACs representing ~2.03 Mb were sequenced as representative potential homeologous regions from the soybean genome. Genetic mapping of each BAC shows that 11 of the 20 chromosomes are represented. Sequence comparisons between homeologous BACs shows that the soybean genome is a mosaic of retained paleopolyploid regions. Some regions appear to be highly conserved while other regions have diverged significantly. Large-scale "batch" reassembly of all 17 BACs combined showed that even the most homeologous BACs with upwards of 95% sequence identity resolve into their respective homeologous sequences. Potential assembly errors were generated by tandemly duplicated pentatricopeptide repeat containing genes and long simple sequence repeats. Analysis of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of 80,000 randomly chosen JGI-DOE sequence traces reveals some new soybean-specific repeat sequences. Conclusion This analysis investigated both the structure of the paleopolyploid soybean genome and the potential effects retained homeology will have on assembling the whole genome shotgun sequence. Based upon these results, homeologous regions similar to those characterized here will not cause major assembly issues.

  13. Whole genome sequencing of field isolates reveals a common duplication of the Duffy binding protein gene in Malagasy Plasmodium vivax strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Menard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent human malaria parasite, causing serious public health problems in malaria-endemic countries. Until recently the Duffy-negative blood group phenotype was considered to confer resistance to vivax malaria for most African ethnicities. We and others have reported that P. vivax strains in African countries from Madagascar to Mauritania display capacity to cause clinical vivax malaria in Duffy-negative people. New insights must now explain Duffy-independent P. vivax invasion of human erythrocytes. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Through recent whole genome sequencing we obtained ≥ 70× coverage of the P. vivax genome from five field-isolates, resulting in ≥ 93% of the Sal I reference sequenced at coverage greater than 20×. Combined with sequences from one additional Malagasy field isolate and from five monkey-adapted strains, we describe here identification of DNA sequence rearrangements in the P. vivax genome, including discovery of a duplication of the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP gene. A survey of Malagasy patients infected with P. vivax showed that the PvDBP duplication was present in numerous locations in Madagascar and found in over 50% of infected patients evaluated. Extended geographic surveys showed that the PvDBP duplication was detected frequently in vivax patients living in East Africa and in some residents of non-African P. vivax-endemic countries. Additionally, the PvDBP duplication was observed in travelers seeking treatment of vivax malaria upon returning home. PvDBP duplication prevalence was highest in west-central Madagascar sites where the highest frequencies of P. vivax-infected, Duffy-negative people were reported. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The highly conserved nature of the sequence involved in the PvDBP duplication suggests that it has occurred in a recent evolutionary time frame. These data suggest that PvDBP, a merozoite surface protein involved in red cell adhesion

  14. Identification of a highly conserved valine-glycine-phenylalanine amino acid triplet required for HIV-1 Nef function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meuwissen Pieter J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nef protein of HIV facilitates virus replication and disease progression in infected patients. This role as pathogenesis factor depends on several genetically separable Nef functions that are mediated by interactions of highly conserved protein-protein interaction motifs with different host cell proteins. By studying the functionality of a series of nef alleles from clinical isolates, we identified a dysfunctional HIV group O Nef in which a highly conserved valine-glycine-phenylalanine (VGF region, which links a preceding acidic cluster with the following proline-rich motif into an amphipathic surface was deleted. In this study, we aimed to study the functional importance of this VGF region. Results The dysfunctional HIV group O8 nef allele was restored to the consensus sequence, and mutants of canonical (NL4.3, NA-7, SF2 and non-canonical (B2 and C1422 HIV-1 group M nef alleles were generated in which the amino acids of the VGF region were changed into alanines (VGF→AAA and tested for their capacity to interfere with surface receptor trafficking, signal transduction and enhancement of viral replication and infectivity. We found the VGF motif, and each individual amino acid of this motif, to be critical for downregulation of MHC-I and CXCR4. Moreover, Nef’s association with the cellular p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2, the resulting deregulation of cofilin and inhibition of host cell actin remodeling, and targeting of Lck kinase to the trans-golgi-network (TGN were affected as well. Of particular interest, VGF integrity was essential for Nef-mediated enhancement of HIV virion infectivity and HIV replication in peripheral blood lymphocytes. For targeting of Lck kinase to the TGN and viral infectivity, especially the phenylalanine of the triplet was essential. At the molecular level, the VGF motif was required for the physical interaction of the adjacent proline-rich motif with Hck. Conclusion Based on these findings, we

  15. Galbladder Duplication: Appearence On Sonography, Oral Cholecystography And Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, A.S.; SELÇUK, M.B.; YALIN, T.; H. Akan; İNCESU, L.

    2010-01-01

    Transabdominal ultrasonography (US) of a 55-year-old female demonstrated duplication of the gallbladder. This rare congenital anomaly of the biliary system is confirmed by oral cholecystography and computerized tomography (CT). The differential considerations of gallbladder duplitacion and the clinical significance are discussed.

  16. Alimentary tract duplications in children: Report of 16 years′ experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zouari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alimentary tract duplications (ATDs are a rare condition in children, characterised by a large pathogenic, clinical, and histological polymorphism. Surgical observation and pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens are the only way to confirm the diagnosis. In this study, we want to analyse the anatomical, clinical and therapeutic aspects of this entity. Patients and Methods: A total of 12 cases of ATD were diagnosed over a 16-year period at paediatric surgery department. The diagnosis was evoked on clinical and radiological data. Histological study of the resected specimens confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. Results: The mean age of patients at diagnosis was 41 months with a peak of incidence at the 1 st year of life (42%. Out of a total 12 cases, 10 were girls and 2 were boys. Abdominal pain and vomiting were the most frequent presenting features. Ultrasonography, tomodensitometry and magnetic resonance imaging were useful for diagnosis. ATDs were localised on the oesophagus in one case, the stomach in one case, the duodenum in four cases, the ileum in five cases, and the colon in one case. All these duplications were cystic, with three communicating duplications. All patients underwent surgery, and resection procedure was chosen according to duplication type and site. Histological study confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. Conclusion: ATDs are a rare condition in children. Diagnosis relies on histology, and treatment can only be by means of surgery. The outcome after surgery is generally favourable. Diagnosis and precocious surgery of ATDs can warn serious complications.

  17. Covered exstrophy with anorectal malformation and vaginal duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bawa Monika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Covered exstrophy is a rare variant of the exstrophy-epispadias complex. We report a female newborn with covered exstrophy, absent anal opening and duplication of the introitus and the lower vagina. This rare, previously unreported, combination of anomalies highlights the complexity of the embryological events in the caudal area during separation of the hindgut and allantois.

  18. Neurologic aspects of MECP2 gene duplication in male patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echenne, B.; Roubertie, A.; Lugtenberg, D.; Kleefstra, T.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Bokhoven, H. van; Lacombe, D.; Philippe, C.; Jonveaux, P.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de

    2009-01-01

    Duplications in Xq28 involving the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) have been described in male patients with severe mental disability, delayed milestones, absence of language, hypotonia replaced by spasticity and retractions, and recurrent and often severe infections. In a study involving

  19. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation. PMID:24124344

  20. Exon duplications in the ATP7A gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mie; Skjørringe, Tina; Kodama, Hiroko;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper metabolism, caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. Thirty-three Menkes patients in whom no mutation had been detected with standard diagnostic tools were screened for exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. ME...

  1. Jejunal duplication in an adult presenting with hematochezia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Setoyama, Kanae; Iwashita, Yuji; Saito, Seiya; Hanada, Norihisa; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Numata, Masatsugu; Ido, Akio

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with appetite loss, palpitations, orthostatic syncope, and hematochezia. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a proximal jejunal diverticulum with contrast extravasation. We immediately performed transoral double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to treat the bleed in the jejunum, and this revealed a small ulcer with an exposed vessel at the opening of the jejunal diverticulum. Hemostasis was achieved endoscopically with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and hemoclips. During subsequent surgery, the diverticulum was found on the mesenteric side of the jejunum. We performed laparoscopy-assisted partial resection of the jejunum, and pathological examination showed that the diverticulum shared a common proper muscle layer with the jejunum and was covered by jejunal mucosa with no ectopic mucosa. Therefore, we diagnosed jejunal duplication. After hospital discharge, the patient had no recurrence of hematochezia or anemia. We report a rare case of jejunal duplication presenting with hematochezia, which was diagnosed as jejunal diverticular bleeding by CT and DBE before surgery. Pathological analysis confirmed jejunal duplication after surgery. We suggest that intestinal diverticular bleeding, as well as duplication of the gastrointestinal tract, should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:27052396

  2. Duplication of the urethra with communication to the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The posterior channel of duplicated urethrae usually follows a straight course to end in the perineum just inside the anal verge. This unique urethra dipped into the perineum and then turned cephalad to enter the rectum above the anus. Delineation of the course of the urethra simplified management by assisting the urologist to convert the rectal passage to a hypospadiac urethra. (orig.)

  3. Duplicated Muellerian remnant in a 6-year-old boy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Helen J.; Cain, Mark P. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Urology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Karmazyn, Boaz [Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2009-08-15

    We report a 6-year-old boy with large duplicated Muellerian duct remnant who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections and dysuria. His prior urological problems included proximal hypospadias (repaired), urachal cyst, and a unilateral undescended testis. Imaging evaluation included US, MRI, and cystoscopy. Laparoscopic resection was performed via a retrovesical approach. The patient was free of symptoms after surgery. (orig.)

  4. Recurrent duplications of 17q12 associated with variable phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elyse; Douglas, Andrew; Kjaegaard, Susanne; Callewaert, Bert; Vanlander, Arnaud; Janssens, Sandra; Yuen, Amy Lawson; Skinner, Cindy; Failla, Pinella; Alberti, Antonino; Avola, Emanuela; Fichera, Marco; Kibaek, Maria; Digilio, Maria C; Hannibal, Mark C; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Bizzarri, Veronica; Renieri, Alessandra; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Piazzolla, Serena; van Oudenhove, Elke; Romano, Corrado; Schwartz, Charles; Eichler, Evan E; Slavotinek, Anne; Escobar, Luis; Rajan, Diana; Crolla, John; Carter, Nigel; Hodge, Jennelle C; Mefford, Heather C

    2015-12-01

    The ability to identify the clinical nature of the recurrent duplication of chromosome 17q12 has been limited by its rarity and the diverse range of phenotypes associated with this genomic change. In order to further define the clinical features of affected patients, detailed clinical information was collected in the largest series to date (30 patients and 2 of their siblings) through a multi-institutional collaborative effort. The majority of patients presented with developmental delays varying from mild to severe. Though dysmorphic features were commonly reported, patients do not have consistent and recognizable features. Cardiac, ophthalmologic, growth, behavioral, and other abnormalities were each present in a subset of patients. The newly associated features potentially resulting from 17q12 duplication include height and weight above the 95th percentile, cataracts, microphthalmia, coloboma, astigmatism, tracheomalacia, cutaneous mosaicism, pectus excavatum, scoliosis, hypermobility, hypospadias, diverticulum of Kommerell, pyloric stenosis, and pseudohypoparathryoidism. The majority of duplications were inherited with some carrier parents reporting learning disabilities or microcephaly. We identified additional, potentially contributory copy number changes in a subset of patients, including one patient each with 16p11.2 deletion and 15q13.3 deletion. Our data further define and expand the clinical spectrum associated with duplications of 17q12 and provide support for the role of genomic modifiers contributing to phenotypic variability. PMID:26420380

  5. Complete liver duplication with right central diaphragmatic defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 11 years old boy was admitted with history of repeated chest infections, constipation and breathing difficulty especially on eating solid diet since birth. CT scan chest showed diaphragmatic hernia. Complete liver duplication in the right chest with its independent vascular and biliary systems associated with right central diaphragmatic defect leading to diaphragmatic hernia was found during surgery. (author)

  6. Duplicate 24-hour diet study 1994 organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann RA; Hoogerbrugge R; Zoonen P van; LOC

    1999-01-01

    Duplicate diet samples collected in 1994 were analysed for organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticides. It was not possible to evaluate wether dietary intake exceeded the established Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI). For the other organophosphorous compounds as well as for the organoclorine pestic

  7. Recombination facilitates neofunctionalization of duplicate genes via originalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Ren

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently originalization was proposed to be an effective way of duplicate-gene preservation, in which recombination provokes the high frequency of original (or wild-type allele on both duplicated loci. Because the high frequency of wild-type allele might drive the arising and accumulating of advantageous mutation, it is hypothesized that recombination might enlarge the probability of neofunctionalization (Pneo of duplicate genes. In this article this hypothesis has been tested theoretically. Results Results show that through originalization recombination might not only shorten mean time to neofunctionalizaiton, but also enlarge Pneo. Conclusions Therefore, recombination might facilitate neofunctionalization via originalization. Several extensive applications of these results on genomic evolution have been discussed: 1. Time to nonfunctionalization can be much longer than a few million generations expected before; 2. Homogenization on duplicated loci results from not only gene conversion, but also originalization; 3. Although the rate of advantageous mutation is much small compared with that of degenerative mutation, Pneo cannot be expected to be small.

  8. Against Unnecessary Duplication of Selves: A Sartrean Argument Against Zahavi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gusman, S.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article I argue that Zahavi's Sartre-inspired combination of the experiential and narrative self entails an unnecessary duplication of selves. Sartre himself accused Husserl of the same mistake in The Transcendence of the Ego. He claims that Husserl's combination of the transcendental I and

  9. Punctuated evolution and transitional hybrid network in an ancestral cell cycle of fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Edgar M; Turner, Jonathan J; Gordân, Raluca; Skotheim, Jan M; Buchler, Nicolas E

    2016-01-01

    Although cell cycle control is an ancient, conserved, and essential process, some core animal and fungal cell cycle regulators share no more sequence identity than non-homologous proteins. Here, we show that evolution along the fungal lineage was punctuated by the early acquisition and entrainment of the SBF transcription factor through horizontal gene transfer. Cell cycle evolution in the fungal ancestor then proceeded through a hybrid network containing both SBF and its ancestral animal counterpart E2F, which is still maintained in many basal fungi. We hypothesize that a virally-derived SBF may have initially hijacked cell cycle control by activating transcription via the cis-regulatory elements targeted by the ancestral cell cycle regulator E2F, much like extant viral oncogenes. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that SBF can regulate promoters with E2F binding sites in budding yeast. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09492.001 PMID:27162172

  10. Signals of historical interlocus gene conversion in human segmental duplications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L Dumont

    Full Text Available Standard methods of DNA sequence analysis assume that sequences evolve independently, yet this assumption may not be appropriate for segmental duplications that exchange variants via interlocus gene conversion (IGC. Here, we use high quality multiple sequence alignments from well-annotated segmental duplications to systematically identify IGC signals in the human reference genome. Our analysis combines two complementary methods: (i a paralog quartet method that uses DNA sequence simulations to identify a statistical excess of sites consistent with inter-paralog exchange, and (ii the alignment-based method implemented in the GENECONV program. One-quarter (25.4% of the paralog families in our analysis harbor clear IGC signals by the quartet approach. Using GENECONV, we identify 1477 gene conversion tracks that cumulatively span 1.54 Mb of the genome. Our analyses confirm the previously reported high rates of IGC in subtelomeric regions and Y-chromosome palindromes, and identify multiple novel IGC hotspots, including the pregnancy specific glycoproteins and the neuroblastoma breakpoint gene families. Although the duplication history of a paralog family is described by a single tree, we show that IGC has introduced incredible site-to-site variation in the evolutionary relationships among paralogs in the human genome. Our findings indicate that IGC has left significant footprints in patterns of sequence diversity across segmental duplications in the human genome, out-pacing the contributions of single base mutation by orders of magnitude. Collectively, the IGC signals we report comprise a catalog that will provide a critical reference for interpreting observed patterns of DNA sequence variation across duplicated genomic regions, including targets of recent adaptive evolution in humans.

  11. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1 which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who presented with few clinical signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 and a conspicuous personal and familiar history of different types of cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancies. The coding region of the NF-1 gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the number of mutant copies. The NF1 gene analysis showed the following alterations: mosaic duplication of NF1, TRAF4, and MYO1D. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes (RP5-1002G3 and RP5-92689 flanking NF1 gene in 17q11.2 and CEP17 for 17q11.11.1 was performed. There were three signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in the interphases analyzed and two signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in 93% of cells. These findings show a tandem duplication of 17q11.2. Conclusion. The case suggests the possibility that NF1 gene duplication may be associated with a phenotype characterized by lymphoproliferative disorders.

  12. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Gustavo; Souto, Mirela; Costa, Frederico; Oliveira, Edite; Garicochea, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1) which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who presented with few clinical signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 and a conspicuous personal and familiar history of different types of cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancies. The coding region of the NF-1 gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the number of mutant copies. The NF1 gene analysis showed the following alterations: mosaic duplication of NF1, TRAF4, and MYO1D. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes (RP5-1002G3 and RP5-92689) flanking NF1 gene in 17q11.2 and CEP17 for 17q11.11.1 was performed. There were three signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689) in the interphases analyzed and two signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689) in 93% of cells. These findings show a tandem duplication of 17q11.2. Conclusion. The case suggests the possibility that NF1 gene duplication may be associated with a phenotype characterized by lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:25580325

  13. Highly conserved influenza A virus epitope sequences as candidates of H3N2 flu vaccine targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ko-Wen; Chien, Chih-Yi; Li, Shiao-Wen; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2012-08-01

    This study focused on identifying the conserved epitopes in a single subtype A (H3N2)-as candidates for vaccine targets. We identified a total of 32 conserved epitopes in four viral proteins [22 HA, 4PB1, 3 NA, 3 NP]. Evaluation of conserved epitopes in coverage during 1968-2010 revealed that (1) 12 HA conserved epitopes were highly present in the circulating viruses; (2) the remaining 10 HA conserved epitopes appeared with lower percentage but a significantly increasing trend after 1989 [p<0.001]; and (3) the conserved epitopes in NA, NP and PB1 are also highly frequent in wild-type viruses. These conserved epitopes also covered an extremely high percentage of the 16 vaccine strains during the 42 year period. The identification of highly conserved epitopes using our approach can also be applied to develop broad-spectrum vaccines. PMID:22698979

  14. Discovery of highly conserved unique peanut and tree nut peptides by LC-MS/MS for multi-allergen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey-Voyksner, Jennifer; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Voyksner, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Proteins unique to peanuts and various tree nuts have been extracted, subjected to trypsin digestion and analysis by liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, in order to find highly conserved peptides that can be used as markers to detect peanuts and tree nuts in food. The marker peptide sequences chosen were those found to be present in both native (unroasted) and thermally processed (roasted) forms of peanuts and tree nuts. Each peptide was selected by assuring its presence in food that was processed or unprocessed, its abundance for sensitivity, sequence size, and uniqueness for peanut and each specific variety of tree nut. At least two peptides were selected to represent peanut, almond, pecan, cashew, walnut, hazelnut, pine nut, Brazil nut, macadamia nut, pistachio nut, chestnut and coconut; to determine the presence of trace levels of peanut and tree nuts in food by a novel multiplexed LC-MS method. PMID:26471545

  15. Diaspora of diaspora: Adyge-Abkhaz returnees in the ancestral homeland

    OpenAIRE

    Erciyes, Cemre

    2008-01-01

    Focusing on the diasporic characteristics shown by ancestral return migrants, this case study looks at the Abkhaz-Adyge (Circassian) returnees from Turkey to the Caucasus and how they become the “diaspora of the diaspora.” The next generations of diasporans continue to dream of return, and, with recent developments in communication technologies and cheaper transportation, many find ways to realize this dream. There are many different forms of return, but some “return-migrate” and settle in an...

  16. COMPONENTES NUTRICIONALES Y ANTIOXIDANTES DE DOS ESPECIES DE GUAJE (Leucaena spp.): UN RECURSO ANCESTRAL SUBUTILIZADO

    OpenAIRE

    Nallely Román-Cortés; María del Rosario García-Mateos; Ana María Castillo-González; Jaime Sahagún-Castellanos; Adelina Jiménez-Arellanes

    2014-01-01

    El guaje ( Leucaena spp.) es una planta de vaina y semillas comestibles, un recurso ancestral subutilizado por los pueblos mesoamericanos. El valor nutricional y nutracéutico del guaje se desconoce pese a su consumo vigente en las poblaciones rurales. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar el contenido de minerales, compo - nentes nutricionales y antioxidantes para contribuir a la revalorización alimentaria del guaje rojo ( L. esculenta Benth.) y verde ( L. leucocephala Lam.). Los contenidos...

  17. Ancient exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon into a highly conserved mammalian neuronal enhancer of the proopiomelanocortin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M Santangelo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The proopiomelanocortin gene (POMC is expressed in the pituitary gland and the ventral hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates, producing several bioactive peptides that function as peripheral hormones or central neuropeptides, respectively. We have recently determined that mouse and human POMC expression in the hypothalamus is conferred by the action of two 5' distal and unrelated enhancers, nPE1 and nPE2. To investigate the evolutionary origin of the neuronal enhancer nPE2, we searched available vertebrate genome databases and determined that nPE2 is a highly conserved element in placentals, marsupials, and monotremes, whereas it is absent in nonmammalian vertebrates. Following an in silico paleogenomic strategy based on genome-wide searches for paralog sequences, we discovered that opossum and wallaby nPE2 sequences are highly similar to members of the superfamily of CORE-short interspersed nucleotide element (SINE retroposons, in particular to MAR1 retroposons that are widely present in marsupial genomes. Thus, the neuronal enhancer nPE2 originated from the exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon in the lineage leading to mammals and remained under purifying selection in all mammalian orders for the last 170 million years. Expression studies performed in transgenic mice showed that two nonadjacent nPE2 subregions are essential to drive reporter gene expression into POMC hypothalamic neurons, providing the first functional example of an exapted enhancer derived from an ancient CORE-SINE retroposon. In addition, we found that this CORE-SINE family of retroposons is likely to still be active in American and Australian marsupial genomes and that several highly conserved exonic, intronic and intergenic sequences in the human genome originated from the exaptation of CORE-SINE retroposons. Together, our results provide clear evidence of the functional novelties that transposed elements contributed to their host genomes throughout evolution.

  18. A highly conserved Poc1 protein characterized in embryos of the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica: localization and functional studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Fourrage

    Full Text Available Poc1 (Protein of Centriole 1 proteins are highly conserved WD40 domain-containing centriole components, well characterized in the alga Chlamydomonas, the ciliated protazoan Tetrahymena, the insect Drosophila and in vertebrate cells including Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. Functions and localizations related to the centriole and ciliary axoneme have been demonstrated for Poc1 in a range of species. The vertebrate Poc1 protein has also been reported to show an additional association with mitochondria, including enrichment in the specialized "germ plasm" region of Xenopus oocytes. We have identified and characterized a highly conserved Poc1 protein in the cnidarian Clytia hemisphaerica. Clytia Poc1 mRNA was found to be strongly expressed in eggs and early embryos, showing a punctate perinuclear localization in young oocytes. Fluorescence-tagged Poc1 proteins expressed in developing embryos showed strong localization to centrioles, including basal bodies. Anti-human Poc1 antibodies decorated mitochondria in Clytia, as reported in human cells, but failed to recognise endogenous or fluorescent-tagged Clytia Poc1. Injection of specific morpholino oligonucleotides into Clytia eggs prior to fertilization to repress Poc1 mRNA translation interfered with cell division from the blastula stage, likely corresponding to when neosynthesis normally takes over from maternally supplied protein. Cell cycle lengthening and arrest were observed, phenotypes consistent with an impaired centriolar biogenesis or function. The specificity of the defects could be demonstrated by injection of synthetic Poc1 mRNA, which restored normal development. We conclude that in Clytia embryos, Poc1 has an essentially centriolar localization and function.

  19. Specific duplication and dorsoventrally asymmetric expression patterns of Cycloidea-like genes in zygomorphic species of Ranunculaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Jabbour

    Full Text Available Floral bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy has evolved several times independently in angiosperms from radially symmetrical (actinomorphic ancestral states. Homologs of the Antirrhinum majus Cycloidea gene (Cyc have been shown to control floral symmetry in diverse groups in core eudicots. In the basal eudicot family Ranunculaceae, there is a single evolutionary transition from actinomorphy to zygomorphy in the stem lineage of the tribe Delphinieae. We characterized Cyc homologs in 18 genera of Ranunculaceae, including the four genera of Delphinieae, in a sampling that represents the floral morphological diversity of this tribe, and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this gene family in Ranunculaceae. Within each of the two RanaCyL (Ranunculaceae Cycloidea-like lineages previously identified, an additional duplication possibly predating the emergence of the Delphinieae was found, resulting in up to four gene copies in zygomorphic species. Expression analyses indicate that the RanaCyL paralogs are expressed early in floral buds and that the duration of their expression varies between species and paralog class. At most one RanaCyL paralog was expressed during the late stages of floral development in the actinomorphic species studied whereas all paralogs from the zygomorphic species were expressed, composing a species-specific identity code for perianth organs. The contrasted asymmetric patterns of expression observed in the two zygomorphic species is discussed in relation to their distinct perianth architecture.

  20. Ancestral informative marker selection and population structure visualization using sparse Laplacian eigenfunctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of a small panel of population structure informative markers can reduce genotyping cost and is useful in various applications, such as ancestry inference in association mapping, forensics and evolutionary theory in population genetics. Traditional methods to ascertain ancestral informative markers usually require the prior knowledge of individual ancestry and have difficulty for admixed populations. Recently Principal Components Analysis (PCA has been employed with success to select SNPs which are highly correlated with top significant principal components (PCs without use of individual ancestral information. The approach is also applicable to admixed populations. Here we propose a novel approach based on our recent result on summarizing population structure by graph laplacian eigenfunctions, which differs from PCA in that it is geometric and robust to outliers. Our approach also takes advantage of the priori sparseness of informative markers in the genome. Through simulation of a ring population and the real global population sample HGDP of 650K SNPs genotyped in 940 unrelated individuals, we validate the proposed algorithm at selecting most informative markers, a small fraction of which can recover the similar underlying population structure efficiently. Employing a standard Support Vector Machine (SVM to predict individuals' continental memberships on HGDP dataset of seven continents, we demonstrate that the selected SNPs by our method are more informative but less redundant than those selected by PCA. Our algorithm is a promising tool in genome-wide association studies and population genetics, facilitating the selection of structure informative markers, efficient detection of population substructure and ancestral inference.

  1. Distinct actions of ancestral vinclozolin and juvenile stress on neural gene expression in the male rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross eGillette

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to the endocrine disrupting chemical vinclozolin during gestation of an F0 generation and/or chronic restraint stress during adolescence of the F3 descendants affects behavior, physiology, and gene expression in the brain. Genes related to the networks of growth factors, signaling peptides and receptors, steroid hormone receptors and enzymes, and epigenetic related factors were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction via Taqman low density arrays targeting 48 genes in the central amygdaloid nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, medial preoptic area, lateral hypothalamus, and the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. We found that growth factors are particularly vulnerable to ancestral exposure in the central and medial amygdala; restraint stress during adolescence affected neural growth factors in the medial amygdala. Signaling peptides were affected by both ancestral exposure and stress during adolescence primarily in hypothalamic nuclei. Steroid hormone receptors and enzymes were strongly affected by restraint stress in the medial preoptic area. Epigenetic related genes were affected by stress in the ventromedial hypothalamus and by both ancestral exposure and stress during adolescence independently in the central amygdala. It is noteworthy that the lateral hypothalamus showed no effects of either manipulation. Gene expression is discussed in the context of behavioral and physiological measures previously published.

  2. AAV ancestral reconstruction library enables selection of broadly infectious viral variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Ortiz, J; Ojala, D S; Westesson, O; Weinstein, J R; Wong, S Y; Steinsapir, A; Kumar, S; Holmes, I; Schaffer, D V

    2015-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. However, enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties and to gain insights into AAV's evolutionary history, we computationally designed and experimentally constructed a putative ancestral AAV library. Combinatorial variations at 32 amino acid sites were introduced to account for uncertainty in their identities. We then analyzed the evolutionary flexibility of these residues, the majority of which have not been previously studied, by subjecting the library to iterative selection on a representative cell line panel. The resulting variants exhibited transduction efficiencies comparable to the most efficient extant serotypes and, in general, ancestral libraries were broadly infectious across the cell line panel, indicating that they favored promiscuity over specificity. Interestingly, putative ancestral AAVs were more thermostable than modern serotypes and did not use sialic acids, galactose or heparan sulfate proteoglycans for cellular entry. Finally, variants mediated 19- to 31-fold higher gene expression in the muscle compared with AAV1, a clinically used serotype for muscle delivery, highlighting their promise for gene therapy. PMID:26186661

  3. Efficient algorithms for analyzing segmental duplications with deletions and inversions in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozes Shay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplications, or low-copy repeats, are common in mammalian genomes. In the human genome, most segmental duplications are mosaics comprised of multiple duplicated fragments. This complex genomic organization complicates analysis of the evolutionary history of these sequences. One model proposed to explain this mosaic patterns is a model of repeated aggregation and subsequent duplication of genomic sequences. Results We describe a polynomial-time exact algorithm to compute duplication distance, a genomic distance defined as the most parsimonious way to build a target string by repeatedly copying substrings of a fixed source string. This distance models the process of repeated aggregation and duplication. We also describe extensions of this distance to include certain types of substring deletions and inversions. Finally, we provide a description of a sequence of duplication events as a context-free grammar (CFG. Conclusion These new genomic distances will permit more biologically realistic analyses of segmental duplications in genomes.

  4. Ancestral sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Moreno, Claudia; Lowden, Arne; Louzada, Fernando; Marqueze, Elaine; Levandovski, Rosa; Pilz, Luisa K; Valeggia, Claudia; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Golombek, Diego A; Czeisler, Charles A; Skene, Debra J; Duffy, Jeanne F; Roenneberg, Till

    2016-04-01

    While we do not yet understand all the functions of sleep, its critical role for normal physiology and behaviour is evident. Its amount and temporal pattern depend on species and condition. Humans sleep about a third of the day with the longest, consolidated episode during the night. The change in lifestyle from hunter-gatherers via agricultural communities to densely populated industrialized centres has certainly affected sleep, and a major concern in the medical community is the impact of insufficient sleep on health [1,2]. One of the causal mechanisms leading to insufficient sleep is altered exposure to the natural light-dark cycle. This includes the wide availability of electric light, attenuated exposure to daylight within buildings, and evening use of light-emitting devices, all of which decrease the strength of natural light-dark signals that entrain circadian systems [3]. PMID:27046809

  5. A Limited Role for Gene Duplications in the Evolution of Platypus Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Emily S.W.; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Whittington, Camilla M; Warren, Wesley C.; Belov, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by adaptive selection is believed to be the primary driver of venom evolution. However, to date, no studies have evaluated the importance of gene duplications for venom evolution using a genomic approach. The availability of a sequenced genome and a venom gland transcriptome for the enigmatic platypus provides a unique opportunity to explore the role that gene duplication plays in venom evolution. Here, we identify gene duplication events and correlate them with expr...

  6. Multiple Isolated Enteric Duplication Cysts in an Infant - A Diagnostic Dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Udiya, Alok Kumar; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Chauhan, Udit; Singhal, Shweta; Prabhu, Shailesh M

    2016-01-01

    Completely isolated enteric duplication cysts are a rare variety of enteric duplication cysts having an independent blood supply with no communication with any part of the adjacent bowel segment. We report a case showing two completely isolated enteric duplication cysts originating in the greater omentum and transverse mesocolon in an infant. Multiple isolated enteric duplication cysts involving non-contiguous bowel segments have not been previously reported in the literature. In addition the...

  7. Laparoscopic excision of an ascending colon duplication cyst in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather R. Nolan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic intestinal duplications are infrequent and rarely present past early childhood. We present the case of a large, ascending colon duplication in a 17-year-old boy resected using minimally invasive techniques. This appears to be the first reported case of a laparoscopic en-bloc ascending colon duplication resection in an adolescent. The diagnosis and management of colonic duplications are discussed.

  8. Y-type urethral duplication presented with perineal fistula in a boy

    OpenAIRE

    Dayanc, Murat; Irkilata, Hasan Cem; Kibar, Yusuf; BOZKURT, Yasar; Basal, Seref; Xhafa, Ajet

    2010-01-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the lower urinary system and has varied presentation. According to the Effmann classification, type IIA2-Y urethral duplication is charcterized by the duplicated urethra originating from the bladder neck and opening into either the rectum or the perineum. The accessory urethra is normal and functional and the normally positioned dorsal urethra is hypoplastic and stenotic in unusual form of Y-type duplication. We present a new case with unus...

  9. Duplication of cervical oesophagus: A case report and review of literatures

    OpenAIRE

    Nazem M; Amouee A; Eidy M; Khan Ishfaq; Javed H

    2010-01-01

    Foregut duplication is commonly found in the posterior mediastinum. 10-20% of these anomalies are associated with oesophageal duplication. It can occur in all parts of oesophageal length. Although duplication of cervical oesophagus has been previously reported, but a majority of them were found in thoracic oesophagus. Infants with oesophageal duplication usually manifested by respiratory distress or asymptomatic thoracic mass, casually, detected in X-ray. A 7-month-old infant weighing ...

  10. Duplication of CYP2D6 predicts high clearance of desipramine but high clearance does not predict duplication of CYP2D6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, T K; Bathum, L; Brøsen, Kim

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Duplication of CYP2D6 causes very rapid metabolism of CYP2D6 substrates such as desipramine. However, we have previously shown that in the Danish population, only about 15% of very rapid metabolisers, defined as subjects with a metabolic ratio of sparteine of 0.15 or less, carried a...... duplicated allele. The question is whether gene duplication is a relatively rare cause (perhaps predictor) of very rapid metabolism or whether a low metabolic ratio is a poor predictor of this. METHODS: After measuring metabolic ratios anew, we selected six volunteers with duplication of CYP2D6 and metabolic...... duplication of CYP2D6 is poor; there must be other causes (or predictors) of very rapid metabolism and with much higher frequency than duplication of CYP2D6....

  11. 7 CFR 27.23 - Duplicate sets of samples of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. 27.23 Section 27... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.23 Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. The duplicate sets of samples shall be inclosed in wrappers...

  12. Evidence for the fixation of gene duplications by positive selection in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Moreira, Margarida; Arguello, J Roman; Gottipati, Srikanth; Harshman, L G; Grenier, Jennifer K; Clark, Andrew G

    2016-06-01

    Gene duplications play a key role in the emergence of novel traits and in adaptation. But despite their centrality to evolutionary processes, it is still largely unknown how new gene duplicates are initially fixed within populations and later maintained in genomes. Long-standing debates on the evolution of gene duplications could be settled by determining the relative importance of genetic drift vs. positive selection in the fixation of new gene duplicates. Using the Drosophila Global Diversity Lines (GDL), we have combined genome-wide SNP polymorphism data with a novel set of copy number variant calls and gene expression profiles to characterize the polymorphic phase of new genes. We found that approximately half of the roughly 500 new complete gene duplications segregating in the GDL lead to significant increases in the expression levels of the duplicated genes and that these duplications are more likely to be found at lower frequencies, suggesting a negative impact on fitness. However, we also found that six of the nine gene duplications that are fixed or close to fixation in at least one of the five populations in our study show signs of being under positive selection, and that these duplications are likely beneficial because of dosage effects, with a possible role for additional mutations in two duplications. Our work suggests that in Drosophila, theoretical models that posit that gene duplications are immediately beneficial and fixed by positive selection are most relevant to explain the long-term evolution of gene duplications in this species. PMID:27197209

  13. Partial craniofacial duplication: a review of the literature and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Melinda A; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lara-Sanchez, Pedro A; Schweitzer, Daniela; Jacobson, Lia; Clarke, Noreen; Hammoudeh, Jeffery; Urata, Mark M; Magee, William P

    2014-06-01

    Diprosopus (Greek; di-, "two" + prosopon, "face"), or craniofacial duplication, is a rare craniofacial anomaly referring to the complete duplication of facial structures. Partial craniofacial duplication describes a broad spectrum of congenital anomalies, including duplications of the oral cavity. This paper describes a 15 month-old female with a duplicated oral cavity, mandible, and maxilla. A Tessier type 7 cleft, midline meningocele, and duplicated hypophysis were also present. The preoperative evaluation, surgical approach, postoperative results, and a review of the literature are presented. The surgical approach was designed to preserve facial nerve innervation to the reconstructed cheek and mouth. The duplicated mandible and maxilla were excised and the remaining left maxilla was bone grafted. Soft tissue repair included closure of the Tessier type VII cleft. Craniofacial duplication remains a rare entity that is more common in females. The pathophysiology remains incompletely characterized, but is postulated to be due to duplication of the notochord, as well as duplication of mandibular growth centres. While diprosopus is a severe deformity often associated with anencephaly, patients with partial duplication typically benefit from surgical treatment. Managing craniofacial duplication requires a detailed preoperative evaluation as well as a comprehensive, staged treatment plan. Long-term follow up is needed appropriately to address ongoing craniofacial deformity. PMID:23969147

  14. 47 CFR 76.92 - Cable network non-duplication; extent of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable network non-duplication; extent of... RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.92 Cable network non-duplication; extent of protection....

  15. 47 CFR 76.93 - Parties entitled to network non-duplication protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parties entitled to network non-duplication... RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.93 Parties entitled to network non-duplication...

  16. Auditing SNOMED Integration into the UMLS for Duplicate Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Chuan; Geller, James; Elhanan, Gai; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The UMLS contains terms from many sources. Every update of a source requires reintegration. Each new term needs to be assigned to a preexisting UMLS concept, or a new concept must be created. Whenever the integration process unnecessarily creates a new concept, this is undesirable. We report on a method to detect such undesirable duplicate concepts. Terms are removed from the UMLS and reintegrated using “piecewise synonym generation.” The concept of the reintegrated term is programmatically compared to the initial concept of the term (before removal). If they are different, this indicates an error, either in the integration process or in the initial concept. Thus, such a term-concept pair is deemed suspicious. A study of five hierarchies of the SNOMED found 7.7% suspicious matches. A human expert needs to evaluate the correctness of suspicious concepts. In a sample of 149 of those, 19% of concepts were found to be duplicates. PMID:21346993

  17. Reversion in variants from a duplication strain of Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strains of Aspergillus nidulans with a chromosome segment in duplicate, one in normal position and one translocated to another chromosome, are unstable at mitosis. In addition to variants which result from deletions in either of the duplicate segments, which usually have improved morphology, they produce variants with deteriorated morphology. Three deteriorated variants reverted frequently to parental type morphology, both spontaneously and after ultra-violet treatment. Of six reversions analysed genetically, five were due to suppressors and one was probably due to back mutation. The suppressors segregated as single genes and were not linked to the mutation which they suppress. The instability of these so-called 'deteriorated' variants is discussed in relation to mitotic instability phenomena in A. nidulans. (orig.)

  18. Fault Tolerant Heterogeneous Limited Duplication Scheduling algorithm for Decentralized Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. NITIN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fault tolerance is one of the most desirable property in decentralized grid computing systems, where computational resources are geographically distributed. These resources collaborate in order to execute workflow applications as fast as possible. In workflow applications, tasks are dependent on each other, so it becomes extremely vital that scheduling techniques should also have some decentralized fault tolerant mechanism. In this paper, we have proposed a decentralized fault tolerant mechanism which utilize the checkpoint concept; for Heterogeneous Limited Duplication (HLD algorithm. HLD is based on task duplication scheduling in heterogeneous environment. There are two fold benefits firstly; if node failure occurs then rest of grid nodes sustain the execution of application. Secondly, less makespan of application is obtained using checkpoint concept. Therefore, application scheduled over decentralized grid systems (which are known for their unreliable behavior will yield results fast utilizing algorithm proposed in this paper.

  19. A rare case of duodenal duplication treated surgically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Ali Uzun; Neset Koksal; Munire Kayahan; Atilla Celik; Gamze Klcoglu; Selvinaz Ozkara

    2009-01-01

    Duodenal duplication, a rare congenital malformation,can also be observed in adulthood. Although it can be cystic or tubular, communicating or noncommunicating, cystic and non-communicating forms are the most common. Several complications, such as obstruction, bleeding, perforation and pancreatitis, may result. Optimal treatment is total excision,although endoscopic procedures have also been described in appropriate cases. If total excision is not possible, subtotal excision and internal derivation can be performed. The 38-year-old woman presented here had occasional attacks of abdominal pain and obstruction, and we considered the diagnosis of duodenal duplication by abdominal computerized tomography. As we confirmed the diagnosis with operative findings and histopathological signs, we treated her with subtotal excision and intraduodenal cystoduodenostomy.

  20. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  1. Can the US shale revolution be duplicated in europe ?

    OpenAIRE

    Aurélien Saussay

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the rapid increase in shale gas and shale oil production in the United States has profoundly changed energy markets in North America, and has led to a significant decrease in American natural gas prices. The possible existence of large shale deposits in Europe, mainly in France, Poland and the United Kingdom, has fostered speculation on whether the "shale revolution", and its accompanying macroeconomic impacts, could be duplicated in Europe. However, a number of uncertai...

  2. Inferring optimal species trees under gene duplication and loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayzid, M S; Mirarab, S; Warnow, T

    2013-01-01

    Species tree estimation from multiple markers is complicated by the fact that gene trees can differ from each other (and from the true species tree) due to several biological processes, one of which is gene duplication and loss. Local search heuristics for two NP-hard optimization problems - minimize gene duplications (MGD) and minimize gene duplications and losses (MGDL) - are popular techniques for estimating species trees in the presence of gene duplication and loss. In this paper, we present an alternative approach to solving MGD and MGDL from rooted gene trees. First, we characterize each tree in terms of its "subtree-bipartitions" (a concept we introduce). Then we show that the MGD species tree is defined by a maximum weight clique in a vertex-weighted graph that can be computed from the subtree-bipartitions of the input gene trees, and the MGDL species tree is defined by a minimum weight clique in a similarly constructed graph. We also show that these optimal cliques can be found in polynomial time in the number of vertices of the graph using a dynamic programming algorithm (similar to that of Hallett and Lagergren(1)), because of the special structure of the graphs. Finally, we show that a constrained version of these problems, where the subtree-bipartitions of the species tree are drawn from the subtree-bipartitions of the input gene trees, can be solved in time that is polynomial in the number of gene trees and taxa. We have implemented our dynamic programming algorithm in a publicly available software tool, available at http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/phylo/software/dynadup/. PMID:23424130

  3. Bionic Duplication of Fresh Navodon septentrionalis Fish Surface Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohui Zhou; Zhongze Gu; Chao Pan; Lanlan Pan; Jing Wang; Bing Qu

    2011-01-01

    Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface was fabricated by replicating topography of the fresh fish skin surface of Navodon septentrionalis with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer. A two-step replicating method was developed to make the surface structure of the fresh fish skin be replicated with high fidelity. After duplication, it was found that the static contact angle of the replica was as large as 173°. Theoretic analysis based on Young's and Cassie-Baxter (C-B) model was performed to expla...

  4. Efficient image duplicated region detection model using sequential block clustering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekeh, M. A.; Maarof, M. A.; Rohani, M. F.; Mahdian, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2013), s. 73-84. ISSN 1742-2876 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Image forensic * Copy–paste forgery * Local block matching Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.986, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/ZOI/mahdian-efficient image duplicated region detection model using sequential block clustering.pdf

  5. Prevalent RNA recognition motif duplication in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yihsuan S; Gomez, Shawn M; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-05-01

    The sequence-specific recognition of RNA by proteins is mediated through various RNA binding domains, with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) being the most frequent and present in >50% of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Many RBPs contain multiple RRMs, and it is unclear how each RRM contributes to the binding specificity of the entire protein. We found that RRMs within the same RBP (i.e., sibling RRMs) tend to have significantly higher similarity than expected by chance. Sibling RRM pairs from RBPs shared by multiple species tend to have lower similarity than those found only in a single species, suggesting that multiple RRMs within the same protein might arise from domain duplication followed by divergence through random mutations. This finding is exemplified by a recent RRM domain duplication in DAZ proteins and an ancient duplication in PABP proteins. Additionally, we found that different similarities between sibling RRMs are associated with distinct functions of an RBP and that the RBPs tend to contain repetitive sequences with low complexity. Taken together, this study suggests that the number of RBPs with multiple RRMs has expanded in mammals and that the multiple sibling RRMs may recognize similar target motifs in a cooperative manner. PMID:24667216

  6. Duplication: a Mechanism Producing Disassortative Mixing Networks in Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dan; LIU Zeng-Rong; WANG Jia-Zeng

    2007-01-01

    Assortative/disassortative mixing is an important topological property of a network. A network is called assortative mixing if the nodes in the network tend to connect to their connectivity peers, or disassortative mixing if nodes with low degrees are more likely to connect with high-degree nodes. We have known that biological networks such as protein-protein interaction networks (PPI), gene regulatory networks, and metabolic networks tend to be disassortative. On the other hand, in biological evolution, duplication and divergence are two fundamental processes. In order to make the relationship between the property of disassortative mixing and the two basic biological principles clear and to study the cause of the disassortative mixing property in biological networks, we present a random duplication model and an anti-preference duplication model. Our results show that disassortative mixing networks can be obtained by both kinds of models from uncorrelated initial networks.Moreover, with the growth of the network size, the disassortative mixing property becomes more obvious.

  7. OTX2 duplication is implicated in hemifacial microsomia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Zielinski

    Full Text Available Hemifacial microsomia (HFM is the second most common facial anomaly after cleft lip and palate. The phenotype is highly variable and most cases are sporadic. We investigated the disorder in a large pedigree with five affected individuals spanning eight meioses. Whole-exome sequencing results indicated the absence of a pathogenic coding point mutation. A genome-wide survey of segmental variations identified a 1.3 Mb duplication of chromosome 14q22.3 in all affected individuals that was absent in more than 1000 chromosomes of ethnically matched controls. The duplication was absent in seven additional sporadic HFM cases, which is consistent with the known heterogeneity of the disorder. To find the critical gene in the duplicated region, we analyzed signatures of human craniofacial disease networks, mouse expression data, and predictions of dosage sensitivity. All of these approaches implicated OTX2 as the most likely causal gene. Moreover, OTX2 is a known oncogenic driver in medulloblastoma, a condition that was diagnosed in the proband during the course of the study. Our findings suggest a role for OTX2 dosage sensitivity in human craniofacial development and raise the possibility of a shared etiology between a subtype of hemifacial microsomia and medulloblastoma.

  8. Tubulin evolution in insects: gene duplication and subfunctionalization provide specialized isoforms in a functionally constrained gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadagkar Sudhindra R

    2010-04-01

    with microtubule-associated proteins. CTT residues overwhelming comprise the co-evolving residues between Drosophila alpha 2 and beta 3 tubulin proteins, indicating CTT specializations can be mediated at the level of the tubulin dimer. Gene duplications post-dating separation of the insect orders are unevenly distributed, most often appearing in major alpha 1 and minor beta 2 clades. More than 40 introns are found in tubulins. Their distribution among tubulins reveals that insertion and deletion events are common, surprising given their potential for disrupting tubulin coding sequence. Compensatory evolution is found in Drosophila beta 2 tubulin cis-regulation, and reveals selective pressures acting to maintain testis expression without the use of previously identified testis cis-regulatory elements. Conclusion Tubulins have stringent structure/function relationships, indicated by strong purifying selection, the loss of many gene duplication products, alpha-beta co-evolution in the tubulin dimer, and compensatory evolution in beta 2 tubulin cis-regulation. They evolve through gene duplication, subfunctionalization in expression domain and divergence of duplication products, largely in CTT residues that mediate interactions with other proteins. This has resulted in the tissue-specific minor insect isoforms, and in particular the highly diverse α3, α4, and β2 reproductive tissue-specific tubulin isoforms, illustrating that even a highly conserved protein family can participate in the adaptive process and respond to sexual selection.

  9. Multiple Isolated Enteric Duplication Cysts in an Infant - A Diagnostic Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Gurucharan S; Chauhan, Udit; Singhal, Shweta; Prabhu, Shailesh M

    2016-01-01

    Completely isolated enteric duplication cysts are a rare variety of enteric duplication cysts having an independent blood supply with no communication with any part of the adjacent bowel segment. We report a case showing two completely isolated enteric duplication cysts originating in the greater omentum and transverse mesocolon in an infant. Multiple isolated enteric duplication cysts involving non-contiguous bowel segments have not been previously reported in the literature. In addition the transverse mesocolon duplication cyst was infected showing septations and loss of double wall sign resulting in difficulty in imaging diagnosis. Both the cysts were excised and confirmed on histopathology. PMID:26894149

  10. Highly conserved antigenic epitope regions of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes between 2009 H1N1 and seasonal H1N1 influenza: vaccine considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ping; Yu, Shouyi; Wu, Changyou; Liang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    An immunoinformatics study was conducted to determine the highly conserved antigenic epitope regions of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes in the humoral immunity and CD4+ and CD8+ T cellular immunity between 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) and seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1) viruses. It was found that in sH1N1 viruses, 29 epitope regions of HA genes and 8 epitope regions of NA genes which had been experimentally identified, were highly conserved (97.1-100.0%) in the corresponding genes and pre...

  11. Highly conserved non-coding sequences and the 18q critical region for short stature: a common mechanism of disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Rizzolio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD are heterogeneous disorders with several different etiologies and they are responsible for most cases of short stature. Mutations in different genes have been identified but still many patients did not present mutations in any of the known genes. Chromosomal rearrangements may also be involved in short stature and, among others, deletions of 18q23 defined a critical region for the disorder. No gene was yet identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now report a balanced translocation X;18 in a patient presenting a breakpoint in 18q23 that was surprisingly mapped about 500 Kb distal from the short stature critical region. It separated from the flanking SALL3 gene a region enriched in highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNE that appeared to be regulatory sequences, active as enhancers or silencers during embryonic development. CONCLUSION: We propose that, during pituitary development, the 18q rearrangement may alter expression of 18q genes or of X chromosome genes that are translocated next to the HCNEs. Alteration of expression of developmentally regulated genes by translocation of HCNEs may represent a common mechanism for disorders associated to isolated chromosomal rearrangements.

  12. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. → Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. → The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. → The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  13. A monoclonal antibody targeting a highly conserved epitope in influenza B neuraminidase provides protection against drug resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tracey M; Li, Changgui; Bucher, Doris J; Hashem, Anwar M; Van Domselaar, Gary; Wang, Junzhi; Farnsworth, Aaron; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; He, Runtao; Brown, Earl G; Hurt, Aeron C; Li, Xuguang

    2013-11-01

    All influenza viral neuraminidases (NA) of both type A and B viruses have only one universally conserved sequence located between amino acids 222-230. A monoclonal antibody against this region has been previously reported to provide broad inhibition against all nine subtypes of influenza A NA; yet its inhibitory effect against influenza B viral NA remained unknown. Here, we report that the monoclonal antibody provides a broad inhibition against various strains of influenza B viruses of both Victoria and Yamagata genetic lineage. Moreover, the growth and NA enzymatic activity of two drug resistant influenza B strains (E117D and D197E) are also inhibited by the antibody even though these two mutations are conformationally proximal to the universal epitope. Collectively, these data suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral NA is exposed sufficiently to allow access by inhibitory antibody during the course of infection; it could represent a potential target for antiviral agents and vaccine-induced immune responses against diverse strains of type B influenza virus. PMID:24140051

  14. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Anwar M. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Van Domselaar, Gary [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi [National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, Beijing (China); She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sui, Jianhua [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); He, Runtao [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Marasco, Wayne A. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Li, Xuguang, E-mail: Sean.Li@hc-sc.gc.ca [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  15. A highly conserved epitope-vaccine candidate against varicella-zoster virus induces neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Liu, Jian; Chen, Chunye; Ye, Xiangzhong; Xu, Longfa; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-03-18

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a highly infectious agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ). Vaccination is by far the most effective way to prevent these diseases. More safe, stable and efficient vaccines, such as epitope-based vaccines, now have been increasingly investigated by many researchers. However, only a few VZV neutralizing epitopes have been identified to date. We have previously identified a linear epitope between amino acid residues 121 and 135 of gE. In this study, we validated that this epitope is highly conserved amongst different VZV strains that covered five existing phylogenetic clades with an identity of 100%. We evaluated the immunogenicity of the recombinant hepatitis B virus core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) which included amino acids (121-135). VZV-gE-specific antibodies were detected in immunized mouse serum using ELISA. The anti-peptide antiserum positively detected VZV via Western blot and immunofluorescent staining assays. More importantly, these peptides could neutralize VZV, indicating that these peptides represented neutralizing epitopes. These findings have important implications for the development of epitope-based protective VZV vaccines. PMID:26873057

  16. The Polycomb protein and E3 ubiquitin ligase Ring1B harbors an IRES in its highly conserved 5' UTR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Boutsma

    Full Text Available Ring1B is an essential member of the highly conserved Polycomb group proteins, which orchestrate developmental processes, cell growth and stem cell fate by modifying local chromatin structure. Ring1B was found to be the E3 ligase that monoubiquitinates histone H2A, which adds a new level of chromatin modification to Polycomb group proteins. Here we report that Ring1B belongs to the exclusive group of proteins that for their translation depend on a stable 5' UTR sequence in their mRNA known as an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES. In cell transfection assays the Ring1B IRES confers significantly higher expression levels of Ring1B than a Ring1B cDNA without the IRES. Also, dual luciferase assays show strong activity of the Ring1B IRES. Although our findings indicate Ring1B can be translated under conditions where cap-dependent translation is impaired, we found the Ring1B IRES to be cap-dependent. This raises the possibility that translational control of Ring1B is a multi-layered process and that translation of Ring1B needs to be maintained under varying conditions, which is in line with its essential role as an E3 ligase for monoubiquitination of histone H2A in the PRC1 Polycomb protein complex.

  17. Neanderthal and Denisova genetic affinities with contemporary humans: introgression versus common ancestral polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Robert K; Uribe, Gabriel; Jimenez, Eric B; Weiss, Mark A; Herrera, Kristian J; Regueiro, Maria; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-11-01

    Analyses of the genetic relationships among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans have suggested that 1-4% of the non-Sub-Saharan African gene pool may be Neanderthal derived, while 6-8% of the Melanesian gene pool may be the product of admixture between the Denisovans and the direct ancestors of Melanesians. In the present study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity among a worldwide collection of contemporary human populations with respect to the genetic constitution of these two archaic hominins and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee). We partitioned SNPs into subsets, including those that are derived in both archaic lineages, those that are ancestral in both archaic lineages and those that are only derived in one archaic lineage. By doing this, we have conducted separate examinations of subsets of mutations with higher probabilities of divergent phylogenetic origins. While previous investigations have excluded SNPs from common ancestors in principal component analyses, we included common ancestral SNPs in our analyses to visualize the relative placement of the Neanderthal and Denisova among human populations. To assess the genetic similarities among the various hominin lineages, we performed genetic structure analyses to provide a comparison of genetic patterns found within contemporary human genomes that may have archaic or common ancestral roots. Our results indicate that 3.6% of the Neanderthal genome is shared with roughly 65.4% of the average European gene pool, which clinally diminishes with distance from Europe. Our results suggest that Neanderthal genetic associations with contemporary non-Sub-Saharan African populations, as well as the genetic affinities observed between Denisovans and Melanesians most likely result from the retention of ancient mutations in these populations. PMID:23872234

  18. Chromosome painting in three-toed sloths: a cytogenetic signature and ancestral karyotype for Xenarthra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Nathália F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenarthra (sloths, armadillos and anteaters represent one of four currently recognized Eutherian mammal supraorders. Some phylogenomic studies point to the possibility of Xenarthra being at the base of the Eutherian tree, together or not with the supraorder Afrotheria. We performed painting with human autosomes and X-chromosome specific probes on metaphases of two three-toed sloths: Bradypus torquatus and B. variegatus. These species represent the fourth of the five extant Xenarthra families to be studied with this approach. Results Eleven human chromosomes were conserved as one block in both B. torquatus and B. variegatus: (HSA 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 21 and the X chromosome. B. torquatus, three additional human chromosomes were conserved intact (HSA 1, 3 and 4. The remaining human chromosomes were represented by two or three segments on each sloth. Seven associations between human chromosomes were detected in the karyotypes of both B. torquatus and B. variegatus: HSA 3/21, 4/8, 7/10, 7/16, 12/22, 14/15 and 17/19. The ancestral Eutherian association 16/19 was not detected in the Bradypus species. Conclusions Our results together with previous reports enabled us to propose a hypothetical ancestral Xenarthran karyotype with 48 chromosomes that would differ from the proposed ancestral Eutherian karyotype by the presence of the association HSA 7/10 and by the split of HSA 8 into three blocks, instead of the two found in the Eutherian ancestor. These same chromosome features point to the monophyly of Xenarthra, making this the second supraorder of placental mammals to have a chromosome signature supporting its monophyly.

  19. Chromosome painting in three-toed sloths: a cytogenetic signature and ancestral karyotype for Xenarthra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Xenarthra (sloths, armadillos and anteaters) represent one of four currently recognized Eutherian mammal supraorders. Some phylogenomic studies point to the possibility of Xenarthra being at the base of the Eutherian tree, together or not with the supraorder Afrotheria. We performed painting with human autosomes and X-chromosome specific probes on metaphases of two three-toed sloths: Bradypus torquatus and B. variegatus. These species represent the fourth of the five extant Xenarthra families to be studied with this approach. Results Eleven human chromosomes were conserved as one block in both B. torquatus and B. variegatus: (HSA 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 21 and the X chromosome). B. torquatus, three additional human chromosomes were conserved intact (HSA 1, 3 and 4). The remaining human chromosomes were represented by two or three segments on each sloth. Seven associations between human chromosomes were detected in the karyotypes of both B. torquatus and B. variegatus: HSA 3/21, 4/8, 7/10, 7/16, 12/22, 14/15 and 17/19. The ancestral Eutherian association 16/19 was not detected in the Bradypus species. Conclusions Our results together with previous reports enabled us to propose a hypothetical ancestral Xenarthran karyotype with 48 chromosomes that would differ from the proposed ancestral Eutherian karyotype by the presence of the association HSA 7/10 and by the split of HSA 8 into three blocks, instead of the two found in the Eutherian ancestor. These same chromosome features point to the monophyly of Xenarthra, making this the second supraorder of placental mammals to have a chromosome signature supporting its monophyly. PMID:22429690

  20. Ancestral polymorphism and recent invasion of transposable elements in Drosophila species

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    Dias Elaine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the evolution of transposable elements, some processes, such as ancestral polymorphisms and horizontal transfer of sequences between species, can produce incongruences in phylogenies. We investigated the evolutionary history of the transposable elements Bari and 412 in the sequenced genomes of the Drosophila melanogaster group and in the sibling species D. melanogaster and D. simulans using traditional phylogenetic and network approaches. Results Maximum likelihood (ML phylogenetic analyses revealed incongruences and unresolved relationships for both the Bari and 412 elements. The DNA transposon Bari within the D. ananassae genome is more closely related to the element of the melanogaster complex than to the sequence in D. erecta, which is inconsistent with the species phylogeny. Divergence analysis and the comparison of the rate of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site of the Bari and host gene sequences explain the incongruence as an ancestral polymorphism that was inherited stochastically by the derived species. Unresolved relationships were observed in the ML phylogeny of both elements involving D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. sechellia. A network approach was used to attempt to resolve these relationships. The resulting tree suggests recent transfers of both elements between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. The divergence values of the elements between these species support this conclusion. Conclusions We showed that ancestral polymorphism and recent invasion of genomes due to introgression or horizontal transfer between species occurred during the evolutionary history of the Bari and 412 elements in the melanogaster group. These invasions likely occurred in Africa during the Pleistocene, before the worldwide expansion of D. melanogaster and D. simulans.

  1. The mitochondrial genome structure of Xenoturbella bocki (phylum Xenoturbellida is ancestral within the deuterostomes

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    Lanfear Robert

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genome comparisons contribute in multiple ways when inferring animal relationships. As well as primary sequence data, rare genomic changes such as gene order, shared gene boundaries and genetic code changes, which are unlikely to have arisen through convergent evolution, are useful tools in resolving deep phylogenies. Xenoturbella bocki is a morphologically simple benthic marine worm recently found to belong among the deuterostomes. Here we present analyses comparing the Xenoturbella bocki mitochondrial gene order, genetic code and control region to those of other metazoan groups. Results The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Xenoturbella bocki was determined. The gene order is most similar to that of the chordates and the hemichordates, indicating that this conserved mitochondrial gene order might be ancestral to the deuterostome clade. Using data from all phyla of deuterostomes, we infer the ancestral mitochondrial gene order for this clade. Using inversion and breakpoint analyses of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, we test conflicting hypotheses for the phylogenetic placement of Xenoturbella and find a closer affinity to the hemichordates than to other metazoan groups. Comparative analyses of the control region reveal similarities in the transcription initiation and termination sites and origin of replication of Xenoturbella with those of the vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial sequence indicate a weakly supported placement as a basal deuterostome, a result that may be the effect of compositional bias. Conclusion The mitochondrial genome of Xenoturbella bocki has a very conserved gene arrangement in the deuterostome group, strikingly similar to that of the hemichordates and the chordates, and thus to the ancestral deuterostome gene order. Similarity to the hemichordates in particular is suggested by inversion and breakpoint analysis. Finally, while phylogenetic analyses of the

  2. Contrasting determinants of abundance in ancestral and colonized ranges of an invasive brood parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, D.C.; O'Connor, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Avian species distributions are typically regarded as constrained by spatially extensive variables such as climate, habitat, spatial patchiness, and microhabitat attributes. We hypothesized that the distribution of a brood parasite depends as strongly on host distribution patterns as on biophysical factors and examined this hypothesis with respect to the national distribution of the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater). We applied a classification and regression (CART) analysis to data from the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) and the Christmas Bird Count (CBC) and derived hierarchically organized statistical models of the influence of climate and weather, cropping and land use, and host abundance and distribution on the distribution of the Brown-headed Cowbird within the conterminous United States. The model accounted for 47.2% of the variation in cowbird incidence, and host abundance was the top predictor with an R2 of 18.9%. The other predictors identified by the model (crops 15.7%, weather and climate 14.3%, and region 9.6%) fit the ecological profile of this cowbird. We showed that host abundance was independent of these environmental predictors of cowbird distribution. At the regional scale host abundance played a very strong role in determining cowbird abundance in the cowbird?s colonized range east and west of their ancestral range in the Great Plains (26.6%). Crops were not a major predictor for cowbirds in their ancestral range, although they are the most important predictive factor (33%) for the grassland passerines that are the cowbird?s ancestral hosts. Consequently our findings suggest that the distribution of hosts does indeed take precedence over habitat attributes in shaping the cowbird?s distribution at a national scale, within an envelope of constraint set by biophysical factors.

  3. Analysis of Ancestral and Functionally Relevant CD5 Variants in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carmen Cenit; Mario Martínez-Florensa; Marta Consuegra; Lizette Bonet; Elena Carnero-Montoro; Noelia Armiger; Miguel Caballero-Baños; Maria Teresa Arias; Daniel Benitez; Norberto Ortego-Centeno; Enrique de Ramón; José Mario Sabio; García-Hernández, Francisco J; Carles Tolosa; Ana Suárez

    2014-01-01

    Objective: CD5 plays a crucial role in autoimmunity and is a well-established genetic risk factor of developing RA. Recently, evidence of positive selection has been provided for the CD5 Pro224-Val471 haplotype in East Asian populations. The aim of the present work was to further analyze the functional relevance of non-synonymous CD5 polymorphisms conforming the ancestral and the newly derived haplotypes (Pro224-Ala471 and Pro224-Val471, respectively) as well as to investigate the potential r...

  4. Ancestral heritage saves tribes during 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Kalligeris, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    The 1 April 2007 magnitude Ms 8.1 earthquake off the New Georgia Group in the Solomon Islands generated a tsunami that killed 52 with locally focused run-up heights of 12 m, local flow depths of 5 m as well as tectonic uplift up to 3.6 m and subsidence down to -1.5 m. A reconnaissance team deployed within one week investigated 65 coastal settlements on 13 remote Islands. The ancestral heritage ``run to high ground after an earthquake'' passed on to younger generations by survivors of smaller historic tsunamis triggered an immediate spontaneous self evacuation containing the death toll.

  5. Independent large scale duplications in multiple M. tuberculosis lineages overlapping the same genomic region.

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    Brian Weiner

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of most human tuberculosis, infects one third of the world's population and kills an estimated 1.7 million people a year. With the world-wide emergence of drug resistance, and the finding of more functional genetic diversity than previously expected, there is a renewed interest in understanding the forces driving genome evolution of this important pathogen. Genetic diversity in M. tuberculosis is dominated by single nucleotide polymorphisms and small scale gene deletion, with little or no evidence for large scale genome rearrangements seen in other bacteria. Recently, a single report described a large scale genome duplication that was suggested to be specific to the Beijing lineage. We report here multiple independent large-scale duplications of the same genomic region of M. tuberculosis detected through whole-genome sequencing. The duplications occur in strains belonging to both M. tuberculosis lineage 2 and 4, and are thus not limited to Beijing strains. The duplications occur in both drug-resistant and drug susceptible strains. The duplicated regions also have substantially different boundaries in different strains, indicating different originating duplication events. We further identify a smaller segmental duplication of a different genomic region of a lab strain of H37Rv. The presence of multiple independent duplications of the same genomic region suggests either instability in this region, a selective advantage conferred by the duplication, or both. The identified duplications suggest that large-scale gene duplication may be more common in M. tuberculosis than previously considered.

  6. Consistency and inconsistency of consensus methods for inferring species trees from gene trees in the presence of ancestral population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGiorgio, Michael; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-08-01

    In the last few years, several statistically consistent consensus methods for species tree inference have been devised that are robust to the gene tree discordance caused by incomplete lineage sorting in unstructured ancestral populations. One source of gene tree discordance that has only recently been identified as a potential obstacle for phylogenetic inference is ancestral population structure. In this article, we describe a general model of ancestral population structure, and by relying on a single carefully constructed example scenario, we show that the consensus methods Democratic Vote, STEAC, STAR, R(∗) Consensus, Rooted Triple Consensus, Minimize Deep Coalescences, and Majority-Rule Consensus are statistically inconsistent under the model. We find that among the consensus methods evaluated, the only method that is statistically consistent in the presence of ancestral population structure is GLASS/Maximum Tree. We use simulations to evaluate the behavior of the various consensus methods in a model with ancestral population structure, showing that as the number of gene trees increases, estimates on the basis of GLASS/Maximum Tree approach the true species tree topology irrespective of the level of population structure, whereas estimates based on the remaining methods only approach the true species tree topology if the level of structure is low. However, through simulations using species trees both with and without ancestral population structure, we show that GLASS/Maximum Tree performs unusually poorly on gene trees inferred from alignments with little information. This practical limitation of GLASS/Maximum Tree together with the inconsistency of other methods prompts the need for both further testing of additional existing methods and development of novel methods under conditions that incorporate ancestral population structure. PMID:27086043

  7. Was the tail bud the ancestral centre where the fin developmental program evolved in chordates?

    OpenAIRE

    Cotoras, D.D.; M.L. Allende

    2015-01-01

    The structural origin of the vertebrates’ paired limbs is still an unsolved problem. Historically, two hypotheses have been raised to explain the origin of vertebrate limbs: the Archipterygium Hypothesis and the Fin Fold Hypothesis. Current knowledge provides support for both ideas. In the recent years, it has been also suggested that (1) all appendages correspond to body axis duplications and (2) they are originated by the ventralization of the developmental program present in the median fin...

  8. Sporadic inclusion body myositis in Japanese is associated with the MHC ancestral haplotype 52.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Adrian Phillip; Allcock, Richard James Nigel; Mastaglia, Frank; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Laing, Nigel

    2006-05-01

    In Caucasians, sporadic inclusion body myositis has been associated with the MHC ancestral haplotypes; HLA-A1, B8, DR3 (8.1AH) and HLA-B35, DR1 (35.2AH). It is not known whether these haplotypes carry susceptibility for the disease in other ethnic groups. We report here the results of HLA-B and -DRB1 typing using a high-resolution sequence-based technique in a cohort of 31 Japanese patients with definite sIBM. Patient allele frequencies were 40.3% for HLA-B*5201 (10.7% in controls: pHLA-DRB1*1502 (10% in controls: p<0.001). Both alleles were found together as part of a conserved haplotype (52.1AH) at a frequency of 37.1% in patients (8.4% in controls: p<0.001). This is the first description of a haplotypic MHC association with sporadic inclusion body myositis in Japanese patients. These findings indicate that different MHC ancestral haplotypes are associated with sIBM in different ethnic groups and further emphasize the importance of genetic factors in this condition. PMID:16564169

  9. Contributions of ancestral inter-species recombination to the genetic diversity of extant Streptomyces lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andam, Cheryl P; Choudoir, Mallory J; Vinh Nguyen, Anh; Sol Park, Han; Buckley, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    Streptomyces species produce many important antibiotics and have a crucial role in soil nutrient cycling. However, their evolutionary history remains poorly characterized. We have evaluated the impact of homologous recombination on the evolution of Streptomyces using multi-locus sequence analysis of 234 strains that represent at least 11 species clusters. Evidence of inter-species recombination is widespread but not uniform within the genus and levels of mosaicism vary between species clusters. Most phylogenetically incongruent loci are monophyletic at the scale of species clusters and their subclades, suggesting that these recombination events occurred in shared ancestral lineages. Further investigation of two mosaic species clusters suggests that genes acquired by inter-species recombination may have become fixed in these lineages during periods of demographic expansion; implicating a role for phylogeography in determining contemporary patterns of genetic diversity. Only by examining the phylogeny at the scale of the genus is apparent that widespread phylogenetically incongruent loci in Streptomyces are derived from a far smaller number of ancestral inter-species recombination events. PMID:26849310

  10. Comparative analysis of rosaceous genomes and the reconstruction of a putative ancestral genome for the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genome mapping studies in Rosaceae have been conducted until now by aligning genetic maps within the same genus, or closely related genera and using a limited number of common markers. The growing body of genomics resources and sequence data for both Prunus and Fragaria permits detailed comparisons between these genera and the recently released Malus × domestica genome sequence. Results We generated a comparative analysis using 806 molecular markers that are anchored genetically to the Prunus and/or Fragaria reference maps, and physically to the Malus genome sequence. Markers in common for Malus and Prunus, and Malus and Fragaria, respectively were 784 and 148. The correspondence between marker positions was high and conserved syntenic blocks were identified among the three genera in the Rosaceae. We reconstructed a proposed ancestral genome for the Rosaceae. Conclusions A genome containing nine chromosomes is the most likely candidate for the ancestral Rosaceae progenitor. The number of chromosomal translocations observed between the three genera investigated was low. However, the number of inversions identified among Malus and Prunus was much higher than any reported genome comparisons in plants, suggesting that small inversions have played an important role in the evolution of these two genera or of the Rosaceae.

  11. Bearing the unbearable: ancestral transmission through dreams and moving metaphors in the analtyic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Judith

    2012-11-01

    This paper explores how untold and unresolved intergenerational trauma may be transmitted through unconscious channels of communication, manifesting in the dreams of descendants. Unwitting carriers for that which was too horrific for their ancestors to bear, descendants may enter analysis through an unconscious need to uncover past secrets, piece together ancestral histories before the keys to comprehending their terrible inheritance die with their forebears. They seek the relational containment of the analytic relationship to provide psychological conditions to bear the unbearable, know the unknowable, speak the unspeakable and redeem the unredeemable. In the case of 'Rachael', initial dreams gave rise to what Hobson (1984) called 'moving metaphors of self' in the analytic field. Dream imagery, projective and introjective processes in the transference-countertransference dynamics gradually revealed an unknown ancestral history. I clarify the back and forth process from dream to waking dream thoughts to moving metaphors and differentiate the moving metaphor from a living symbol. I argue that the containment of the analytic relationship nested within the security of the analytic space is a necessary precondition for such healing processes to occur. PMID:23130614

  12. RNA-DNA differences in human mitochondria restore ancestral form of 16S ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Avital, Gal; Levin, Liron; Richards, Allison L; Hachen, Naomi; Rebolledo Jaramillo, Boris; Nekrutenko, Anton; Zarivach, Raz; Mishmar, Dan

    2013-11-01

    RNA transcripts are generally identical to the underlying DNA sequences. Nevertheless, RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) were found in the nuclear human genome and in plants and animals but not in human mitochondria. Here, by deep sequencing of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and RNA, we identified three RDD sites at mtDNA positions 295 (C-to-U), 13710 (A-to-U, A-to-G), and 2617 (A-to-U, A-to-G). Position 2617, within the 16S rRNA, harbored the most prevalent RDDs (>30% A-to-U and ∼15% A-to-G of the reads in all tested samples). The 2617 RDDs appeared already at the precursor polycistrone mitochondrial transcript. By using traditional Sanger sequencing, we identified the A-to-U RDD in six different cell lines and representative primates (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pigmaeus, and Macaca mulatta), suggesting conservation of the mechanism generating such RDD. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 1700 vertebrate mtDNA sequences supported a thymine as the primate ancestral allele at position 2617, suggesting that the 2617 RDD recapitulates the ancestral 16S rRNA. Modeling U or G (the RDDs) at position 2617 stabilized the large ribosomal subunit structure in contrast to destabilization by an A (the pre-RDDs). Hence, these mitochondrial RDDs are likely functional. PMID:23913925

  13. Ancestral origin of the ATTCT repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Almeida

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by cerebellar ataxia and seizures. The disease is caused by a large ATTCT repeat expansion in the ATXN10 gene. The first families reported with SCA10 were of Mexican origin, but the disease was soon after described in Brazilian families of mixed Portuguese and Amerindian ancestry. The origin of the SCA10 expansion and a possible founder effect that would account for its geographical distribution have been the source of speculation over the last years. To unravel the mutational origin and spread of the SCA10 expansion, we performed an extensive haplotype study, using closely linked STR markers and intragenic SNPs, in families from Brazil and Mexico. Our results showed (1 a shared disease haplotype for all Brazilian and one of the Mexican families, and (2 closely-related haplotypes for the additional SCA10 Mexican families; (3 little or null genetic distance in small normal alleles of different repeat sizes, from the same SNP lineage, indicating that they are being originated by a single step mechanism; and (4 a shared haplotype for pure and interrupted expanded alleles, pointing to a gene conversion model for its generation. In conclusion, we show evidence for an ancestral common origin for SCA10 in Latin America, which might have arisen in an ancestral Amerindian population and later have been spread into the mixed populations of Mexico and Brazil.

  14. In silico resurrection of the major vault protein suggests it is ancestral in modern eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Toni K; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Penny, David

    2013-01-01

    Vaults are very large oligomeric ribonucleoproteins conserved among a variety of species. The rat vault 3D structure shows an ovoid oligomeric particle, consisting of 78 major vault protein monomers, each of approximately 861 amino acids. Vaults are probably the largest ribonucleoprotein structures in eukaryote cells, being approximately 70 nm in length with a diameter of 40 nm--the size of three ribosomes and with a lumen capacity of 50 million Å(3). We use both protein sequences and inferred ancestral sequences for in silico virtual resurrection of tertiary and quaternary structures to search for vaults in a wide variety of eukaryotes. We find that the vault's phylogenetic distribution is widespread in eukaryotes, but is apparently absent in some notable model organisms. Our conclusion from the distribution of vaults is that they were present in the last eukaryote common ancestor but they have apparently been lost from a number of groups including fungi, insects, and probably plants. Our approach of inferring ancestral 3D and quaternary structures is expected to be useful generally. PMID:23887922

  15. EBS7 is a plant-specific component of a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation system in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yidan; Zhang, Congcong; Wang, Dinghe; Su, Wei; Liu, Linchuan; Wang, Muyang; Li, Jianming

    2015-09-29

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is an essential part of an ER-localized protein quality-control system for eliminating terminally misfolded proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ERAD machinery is conserved among yeast, animals, and plants; however, it remains unknown if the plant ERAD system involves plant-specific components. Here we report that the Arabidopsis ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 suppressor 7 (EBS7) gene encodes an ER membrane-localized ERAD component that is highly conserved in land plants. Loss-of-function ebs7 mutations prevent ERAD of brassinosteroid insensitive 1-9 (bri1-9) and bri1-5, two ER-retained mutant variants of the cell-surface receptor for brassinosteroids (BRs). As a result, the two mutant receptors accumulate in the ER and consequently leak to the plasma membrane, resulting in the restoration of BR sensitivity and phenotypic suppression of the bri1-9 and bri1-5 mutants. EBS7 accumulates under ER stress, and its mutations lead to hypersensitivity to ER and salt stresses. EBS7 interacts with the ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Arabidopsis thaliana HMG-CoA reductase degradation 1a (AtHrd1a), one of the central components of the Arabidopsis ERAD machinery, and an ebs7 mutation destabilizes AtHrd1a to reduce polyubiquitination of bri1-9. Taken together, our results uncover a plant-specific component of a plant ERAD pathway and also suggest its likely biochemical function. PMID:26371323

  16. Identification of a highly conserved and surface exposed B-cell epitope on the nucleoprotein of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xun; Ge, Pinghui; Wang, Xuliang; Yang, Kunyu; Yu, Hai; Zhao, Qinjian; Chen, Yixin; Xia, Ningshao

    2014-06-01

    Influenza virus still poses a major threat to human health worldwide. The nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A virus plays an essential role in the viral replication and transcription and hence becomes a promising therapeutic target. NP forms a complicated conformation under native conditions and might denature when performing immunoassays such as western blot in the study of NP function. Therefore, it is useful to make an NP specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes linear epitope instead of conformational epitope. In this study, a recombinant NP (rNP) of influenza A virus was over-expressed and used to generate a panel of anti-NP mAbs. These anti-NP mAbs were grouped into three classes based on their reactivity in Western blots. Only Class I mAb can react with linear rNP fragments. One of Class I mAb, 4D2, was characterized further by epitope mapping with a series of overlapping synthetic peptides, indicating that the 4D2 epitope is a surface exposed, linear epitope between amino acid residues 243 and 251. This epitope is highly conserved among different influenza A viruses with an identity of 98.4% (17,922/18,210). Western blot, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry experiments all indicated 4D2 is highly specific to NP of influenza A virus. The results demonstrated that 4D2 can be used as a research tool for functional study of NP in the replication cycle of influenza A virus. Further work is needed to understand the function and importance of this epitope. PMID:24136709

  17. Allelic Lineages of the Ficolin Genes (FCNs) Are Passed from Ancestral to Descendant Primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Tina; Nissen, Janna; Fog, Lea Munthe; Koch, Claus; Frost Bertelsen, Mads; Garred, Peter

    2011-01-01

    -human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non...... the Shannon entropy revealing that all three proteins are generally highly conserved. Ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 showed the highest diversity, whereas ficolin-3 was more conserved. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were present in non-human primate sera with the same characteristic oligomeric structures as seen in...

  18. Enhancement of RNA synthesis by promoter duplication in tombusviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replication of tombusviruses, small plus-strand RNA viruses of plants, is regulated by cis-acting elements present in the viral RNA. The role of cis-acting elements can be studied in vitro by using a partially purified RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) preparation obtained from tombusvirus-infected plants , Virology 276, 279- 288). Here, we demonstrate that the minus-strand RNA of tombusviruses contains, in addition to the 3'-terminal minimal plus-strand initiation promoter, a second cis-acting element, termed the promoter proximal enhancer (PPE). The PPE element enhanced RNA synthesis by almost threefold from the adjacent minimal promoter in the in vitro assay. The sequence of the PPE element is 70% similar to the minimal promoter, suggesting that sequence duplication of the minimal promoter may have been the mechanism leading to the generation of the PPE. Consistent with this proposal, replacement of the PPE element with the minimal promoter, which resulted in a perfectly duplicated promoter region, preserved its enhancer-like function. In contrast, mutagenesis of the PPE element or its replacement with an artificial G/C-rich sequence abolished its stimulative effect on initiation of RNA synthesis in vitro. In vivo experiments are also consistent with the role of the PPE element in enhancement of tombusvirus replication. Sequence comparison of several tombusviruses and related carmoviruses further supports the finding that duplication of minimal promoter sequences may have been an important mechanism during the evolution of cis-acting elements in tombusviruses and related RNA viruses

  19. Bionic Duplication of Fresh Navodon septentrionalis Fish Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Qu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface was fabricated by replicating topography of the fresh fish skin surface of Navodon septentrionalis with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS elastomer. A two-step replicating method was developed to make the surface structure of the fresh fish skin be replicated with high fidelity. After duplication, it was found that the static contact angle of the replica was as large as 173°. Theoretic analysis based on Young's and Cassie-Baxter (C-B model was performed to explain the relationship between structure and hydrophobicity.

  20. 10p Duplication characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiktor, A.; Feldman, G.L.; Van Dyke, D.L.; Kratkoczki, P.; Ditmars, D.M. Jr. [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We describe a patient with severe failure to thrive, mild-moderate developmental delay, cleft lip and palate, and other anomalies. Routine cytogenetic analysis documented a de novo chromosome rearrangement involving chromosome 4, but the origin of the derived material was unknown. Using chromosome specific painting probes, the karyotype was defined as 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(q35;p11.23). Characterization of the dup(10p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis provides another example of the usefulness of this technology in identifying small deletions, duplications, or supernumerary marker chromosomes. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  1. An Adult Gastric Duplication Cyst Mimicking a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Takenori; Furihata, Makoto; Nagao, Sayaka; Wada, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a rare case of a 24-year-old man who presented with severe epigastralgia after consuming a considerable amount of broiled meat. Computed tomography revealed a cystic lesion adjacent to the distal stomach, with high intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Upper endoscopy showed a cystic mass measuring 6 cm in diameter, mimicking a submucosal tumor adjacent to the pyloric valve, with duodenum invagination, characteristic of ball valve syndrome. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed that the lesion was contiguous through the first to the third layer of the stomach. Therefore, we performed distal gastrectomy. Pathology showed that the lesion was a gastric duplication cyst without malignancy. PMID:27580540

  2. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Arising From a Gastric Duplication Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Diego Cabrera; Machicado, Jorge; Davogustto, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDC) are rarely diagnosed in adults, but previous cases have been associated with malignancy. We present a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) arising from a GDC in a 71-year-old woman who presented with 3 years of early satiety, anorexia, abdominal distention, and weight loss. Abdominal CT showed a 9.3 x 5.2 x 9.5-cm well-circumscribed cystic mass arising 3 cm above the gastroduodenal junction. The cyst was resected, and histopathology was consistent with GDC. Future studies are needed to clarify the malignant potential of GDC and the molecular pathways for its development. PMID:27144196

  3. Tracheal Atresia with Segmental Esophageal Duplication: An Unusual Anatomic Arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaerty, Kirsten; Thomas, Joseph T; Petersen, Scott; Tan, Edwin; Kumar, Sailesh; Gardener, Glenn; Armes, Jane

    2016-01-01

    An unusual anatomic configuration of segmental tracheal agenesis/atresia with esophageal duplication on autopsy in a fetus that demised in utero at 29 weeks is reported. The mother was scanned initially for a cardiac anomaly at 20 weeks and on follow-up scan at 27 weeks had polyhydramnios and underwent amnioreduction. The final autopsy diagnosis was vertebral, ano-rectal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb malformations (VACTERL). We discuss the autopsy findings along with the embryological mechanisms and compare the configuration with Floyd's classification for tracheal agenesis. The difficulties in prenatal diagnosis are discussed. PMID:26367770

  4. Intragenic Duplication A Novel Mutational Mechanism in Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, M. T.; Geisz, A.; Brusgaard, K.;

    2011-01-01

    cationic trypsinogen (p.K23_I24insIDK). The aim of the present study was to characterize the effect of this unique genetic alteration on the function of human cationic trypsinogen. METHODS: Wild-type and mutant cationic trypsinogens were produced recombinantly and purified to homogeneity. Trypsinogen...... autoactivation. Activation by human cathepsin B also was accelerated by 10-fold. Secretion of the p.K23_I24insIDK mutant from transfected cells was diminished, consistent with intracellular autoactivation. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of an intragenic duplication within the PRSS1 gene causing hereditary...

  5. Duplication common bile duct. Case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anatomical variations of the biliary duct are so common that they can considered to be rather like normal and not as congenital malformations, nevertheless inside these rare enough subtypes exist as the duplication of the choledocho. In this article the clinical case appears of patient of 27 years who had presented multiple episodes of biliary colic the last one of them associated with jaundice and to whom during the ERCP document this anatomical infrequent enough variation. A review of the literature appears besides brings over of this anomaly.

  6. Esophageal carcinoma originating in a duplication cyst: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimenta Amadeu P. A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the case report of a 61-year-old man, admitted with middle third squamous cell esophageal carcinoma. He was submitted to a curative gastroesophageal resection via a medium laparotomy and a right thoracotomy. An intrathoracic esophagogastric anastomosis was performed. The pathological analysis of the surgical specimen revealed a squamous cell carcinoma clearly originating from the epithelial lining of an esophageal duplication cyst. Immunohistochemitry showed p 53 staining of the tumor cells. The patient at 11 month follow up was asymptomatic.

  7. A survey of innovation through duplication in the reduced genomes of twelve parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D DeBarry

    Full Text Available We characterize the prevalence, distribution, divergence, and putative functions of detectable two-copy paralogs and segmental duplications in the Apicomplexa, a phylum of parasitic protists. Apicomplexans are mostly obligate intracellular parasites responsible for human and animal diseases (e.g. malaria and toxoplasmosis. Gene loss is a major force in the phylum. Genomes are small and protein-encoding gene repertoires are reduced. Despite this genomic streamlining, duplications and gene family amplifications are present. The potential for innovation introduced by duplications is of particular interest. We compared genomes of twelve apicomplexans across four lineages and used orthology and genome cartography to map distributions of duplications against genome architectures. Segmental duplications appear limited to five species. Where present, they correspond to regions enriched for multi-copy and species-specific genes, pointing toward roles in adaptation and innovation. We found a phylum-wide association of duplications with dynamic chromosome regions and syntenic breakpoints. Trends in the distribution of duplicated genes indicate that recent, species-specific duplicates are often tandem while most others have been dispersed by genome rearrangements. These trends show a relationship between genome architecture and gene duplication. Functional analysis reveals: proteases, which are vital to a parasitic lifecycle, to be prominent in putative recent duplications; a pair of paralogous genes in Toxoplasma gondii previously shown to produce the rate-limiting step in dopamine synthesis in mammalian cells, a possible link to the modification of host behavior; and phylum-wide differences in expression and subcellular localization, indicative of modes of divergence. We have uncovered trends in multiple modes of duplicate divergence including sequence, intron content, expression, subcellular localization, and functions of putative recent duplicates that

  8. Drosophila duplication hotspots are associated with late-replicating regions of the genome.

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    Margarida Cardoso-Moreira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Duplications play a significant role in both extremes of the phenotypic spectrum of newly arising mutations: they can have severe deleterious effects (e.g. duplications underlie a variety of diseases but can also be highly advantageous. The phenotypic potential of newly arisen duplications has stimulated wide interest in both the mutational and selective processes shaping these variants in the genome. Here we take advantage of the Drosophila simulans-Drosophila melanogaster genetic system to further our understanding of both processes. Regarding mutational processes, the study of two closely related species allows investigation of the potential existence of shared duplication hotspots, and the similarities and differences between the two genomes can be used to dissect its underlying causes. Regarding selection, the difference in the effective population size between the two species can be leveraged to ask questions about the strength of selection acting on different classes of duplications. In this study, we conducted a survey of duplication polymorphisms in 14 different lines of D. simulans using tiling microarrays and combined it with an analogous survey for the D. melanogaster genome. By integrating the two datasets, we identified duplication hotspots conserved between the two species. However, unlike the duplication hotspots identified in mammalian genomes, Drosophila duplication hotspots are not associated with sequences of high sequence identity capable of mediating non-allelic homologous recombination. Instead, Drosophila duplication hotspots are associated with late-replicating regions of the genome, suggesting a link between DNA replication and duplication rates. We also found evidence supporting a higher effectiveness of selection on duplications in D. simulans than in D. melanogaster. This is also true for duplications segregating at high frequency, where we find evidence in D. simulans that a sizeable fraction of these mutations is

  9. Identification of the ancestral haplotype for apolipoprotein B suggests an African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and traces their subsequent migration to Europe and the Pacific.

    OpenAIRE

    Rapacz, J; Chen, L.; Butler-Brunner, E; Wu, M J; Hasler-Rapacz, J O; Butler, R.; Schumaker, V N

    1991-01-01

    The probable ancestral haplotype for human apolipoprotein B (apoB) has been identified through immunological analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla serum and sequence analysis of their DNA. Moreover, the frequency of this ancestral apoB haplotype among different human populations provides strong support for the African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and their subsequent migration from Africa to Europe and to the Pacific. The approach used here for the identification of the ancestral human apoB ha...

  10. Intron-exon organization of the active human protein S gene PS. alpha. and its pseudogene PS. beta. : Duplication and silencing during primate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploos van Amstel, H.; Reitsma, P.H.; van der Logt, C.P.; Bertina, R.M. (University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1990-08-28

    The human protein S locus on chromosome 3 consists of two protein S genes, PS{alpha} and PS{beta}. Here the authors report the cloning and characterization of both genes. Fifteen exons of the PS{alpha} gene were identified that together code for protein S mRNA as derived from the reported protein S cDNAs. Analysis by primer extension of liver protein S mRNA, however, reveals the presence of two mRNA forms that differ in the length of their 5{prime}-noncoding region. Both transcripts contain a 5{prime}-noncoding region longer than found in the protein S cDNAs. The two products may arise from alternative splicing of an additional intron in this region or from the usage of two start sites for transcription. The intron-exon organization of the PS{alpha} gene fully supports the hypothesis that the protein S gene is the product of an evolutional assembling process in which gene modules coding for structural/functional protein units also found in other coagulation proteins have been put upstream of the ancestral gene of a steroid hormone binding protein. The PS{beta} gene is identified as a pseudogene. It contains a large variety of detrimental aberrations, viz., the absence of exon I, a splice site mutation, three stop codons, and a frame shift mutation. Overall the two genes PS{alpha} and PS{beta} show between their exonic sequences 96.5% homology. Southern analysis of primate DNA showed that the duplication of the ancestral protein S gene has occurred after the branching of the orangutan from the African apes. A nonsense mutation that is present in the pseudogene of man also could be identified in one of the two protein S genes of both chimpanzee and gorilla. This implicates that silencing of one of the two protein S genes must have taken place before the divergence of the three African apes.

  11. Rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy using segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Kong

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was use a simple and rapid procedure, called segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (SD-QF-PCR, for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies. This method is based on the co-amplification of segmental duplications located on two different chromosomes using a single pair of fluorescent primers. The PCR products of different sizes were subsequently analyzed through capillary electrophoresis, and the aneuploidies were determined based on the relative dosage between the two chromosomes. Each primer set, containing five pairs of primers, was designed to simultaneously detect aneuploidies located on chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y in a single reaction. We applied these two primer sets to DNA samples isolated from individuals with trisomy 21 (n = 36; trisomy 18 (n = 6; trisomy 13 (n = 4; 45, X (n = 5; 47, XXX (n = 3; 48, XXYY (n = 2; and unaffected controls (n = 40. We evaluated the performance of this method using the karyotyping results. A correct and unambiguous diagnosis with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, was achieved for clinical samples examined. Thus, the present study demonstrates that SD-QF-PCR is a robust, rapid and sensitive method for the diagnosis of common aneuploidies, and these analyses can be performed in less than 4 hours for a single sample, providing a competitive alternative for routine use.

  12. On the Approximability of Comparing Genomes with Duplicates

    CERN Document Server

    Angibaud, Sébastien; Rusu, Irena; Thevenin, Annelyse; Vialette, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    A central problem in comparative genomics consists in computing a (dis-)similarity measure between two genomes, e.g. in order to construct a phylogeny. All the existing measures are defined on genomes without duplicates. However, we know that genes can be duplicated within the same genome. One possible approach to overcome this difficulty is to establish a one-to-one correspondence (i.e. a matching) between genes of both genomes, where the correspondence is chosen in order to optimize the studied measure. In this paper, we are interested in three measures (number of breakpoints, number of common intervals and number of conserved intervals) and three models of matching (exemplar, intermediate and maximum matching models). We prove that, for each model and each measure M, computing a matching between two genomes that optimizes M is APX-hard. We also study the complexity of the following problem: is there an exemplarization (resp. an intermediate/maximum matching) that induces no breakpoint? We prove the problem...

  13. Partial facial duplication (diprosopus in a goat kid : clinical communication

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    S. Mukaratirwa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical and clinical features of a live-born diprosopic goat kid are described. The kid had two faces with two eyes each, two complete oral cavities and nostrils and two ears. Caudal to the neck, the kid grossly appeared normal. Both mouths of the kid showed synchronous suckling motions. Elevated respiratory and heart rates were recorded and the temperature was subnormal. Radiological examination showed a single trunk and vertebral column, normal limbs, two sets of jaws, three orbits, and contrast radiography revealed a single patent oesophagus. There was maxillary and mandibular duplication resulting in two faces. There was a cleft palate. The oropharyngeal regions of each face merged to form a single laryngopharynx and oesophagus. There was a single brain with hypoplasia of the cerebellum. The left and right cerebral hemispheres were fused rostrally, and there was duplication of the optic chiasma and the pituitary gland. The olfactory tract was absent and the superficial origins of most of the cranial nerves were not discernible.

  14. Partial facial duplication (diprosopus) in a goat kid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaratirwa, S; Sayi, S T

    2006-03-01

    The anatomical and clinical features of a live-born diprosopic goat kid are described. The kid had two faces with two eyes each, two complete oral cavities and nostrils and two ears. Caudal to the neck, the kid grossly appeared normal. Both mouths of the kid showed synchronous suckling motions. Elevated respiratory and heart rates were recorded and the temperature was subnormal. Radiological examination showed a single trunk and vertebral column, normal limbs, two sets of jaws, three orbits, and contrast radiography revealed a single patent oesophagus. There was maxillary and mandibular duplication resulting in two faces. There was a cleft palate. The oropharyngeal regions of each face merged to form a single laryngopharynx and oesophagus. There was a single brain with hypoplasia of the cerebellum. The left and right cerebral hemispheres were fused rostrally, and there was duplication of the optic chiasma and the pituitary gland. The olfactory tract was absent and the superficial origins of most of the cranial nerves were not discernible. PMID:16700476

  15. Infantile spasms associated with proximal duplication of chromosome 15q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, P M; Spinner, N B; Sovinsky, L; Zackai, E H; Chance, P F

    1996-09-01

    We describe a case of infantile spasms associated with a chromosome abnormality (supernumerary inverted duplication of chromosome 15 [47,XX,+inv dup(15)]). The patient was nondysmorphic and presented with mild hypotonia and delay in acquisition of gross motor milestones before the diagnosis of seizures at age 7 months. Additional features included unilateral sensorineural deafness and torticollis. Molecular cytogenetic studies confirmed that the patient has a large inv dup(15). Inv dup(15) chromosomes are variable with respect to the size and genetic composition of the chromosome and in their phenotypic effects. Patients with small inv dup(15s) may have no phenotypic abnormalities, whereas patients with large inv dup(15s) may have multiple abnormalities. ACTH therapy resulted in prompt remission of seizures and resolution of EEG abnormalities. This is the second report of a patient with IS and a supernumerary inv dup(15). Several genes code for neurotransmitter receptor subunits located in the duplicated region of chromosome 15, and abnormal dosage of these genes may be involved in the genesis of seizure activity in carriers of the inv dup(15). Chromosome analysis may lead to a specific diagnosis in infants with unexplained infantile spasms. PMID:8888053

  16. Ancestral state reconstruction of body size in the Caniformia (Carnivora, Mammalia): the effects of incorporating data from the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finarelli, John A; Flynn, John J

    2006-04-01

    A recent molecular phylogeny of the mammalian order Carnivora implied large body size as the ancestral condition for the caniform subclade Arctoidea using the distribution of species mean body sizes among living taxa. "Extant taxa-only" approaches such as these discount character state observations for fossil members of living clades and completely ignore data from extinct lineages. To more rigorously reconstruct body sizes of ancestral forms within the Caniformia, body size and first appearance data were collected for 149 extant and 367 extinct taxa. Body sizes were reconstructed for four ancestral nodes using weighted squared-change parsimony on log-transformed body mass data. Reconstructions based on extant taxa alone favored large body sizes (on the order of 10 to 50 kg) for the last common ancestors of both the Caniformia and Arctoidea. In contrast, reconstructions incorporating fossil data support small body sizes (fossil data was discarded, body size reconstructions became ambiguous, demonstrating that incorporating both character state and temporal information from fossil taxa unambiguously supports a small ancestral body size, thereby falsifying hypotheses derived from extant taxa alone. Body size reconstructions for Caniformia, Arctoidea, and Musteloidea were not sensitive to potential errors introduced by uncertainty in the position of extinct lineages relative to the molecular topology, or to missing body size data for extinct members of an entire major clade (the aquatic Pinnipedia). Incorporating character state observations and temporal information from the fossil record into hypothesis testing has a significant impact on the ability to reconstruct ancestral characters and constrains the range of potential hypotheses of character evolution. Fossil data here provide the evidence to reliably document trends of both increasing and decreasing body size in several caniform clades. More generally, including fossils in such analyses incorporates evidence of

  17. Dose–Sensitivity, Conserved Non-Coding Sequences, and Duplicate Gene Retention Through Multiple Tetraploidies in the Grasses

    OpenAIRE

    Schnable, James C; Pedersen, Brent S.; Subramaniam, Sabarinath; Freeling, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome duplications, or tetraploidies, are an important source of increased gene content. Following whole genome duplication, duplicate copies of many genes are lost from the genome. This loss of genes is biased both in the classes of genes deleted and the subgenome from which they are lost. Many or all classes are genes preferentially retained as duplicate copies are engaged in dose sensitive protein–protein interactions, such that deletion of any one duplicate upsets the status quo of...

  18. Highly conserved serine residue 40 in HIV-1 p6 regulates capsid processing and virus core assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solbak Sara MØ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of two late assembly (L- domains. Although p6 is located within one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene, the 52 amino acid peptide binds at least to two cellular budding factors (Tsg101 and ALIX, is a substrate for phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, and mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into viral particles. As expected, known functional domains mostly overlap with several conserved residues in p6. In this study, we investigated the importance of the highly conserved serine residue at position 40, which until now has not been assigned to any known function of p6. Results Consistently with previous data, we found that mutation of Ser-40 has no effect on ALIX mediated rescue of HIV-1 L-domain mutants. However, the only feasible S40F mutation that preserves the overlapping pol open reading frame (ORF reduces virus replication in T-cell lines and in human lymphocyte tissue cultivated ex vivo. Most intriguingly, L-domain mediated virus release is not dependent on the integrity of Ser-40. However, the S40F mutation significantly reduces the specific infectivity of released virions. Further, it was observed that mutation of Ser-40 selectively interferes with the cleavage between capsid (CA and the spacer peptide SP1 in Gag, without affecting cleavage of other Gag products. This deficiency in processing of CA, in consequence, led to an irregular morphology of the virus core and the formation of an electron dense extra core structure. Moreover, the defects induced by the S40F mutation in p6 can be rescued by the A1V mutation in SP1 that generally enhances processing of the CA-SP1 cleavage site. Conclusions Overall, these data support a so far unrecognized function of p6 mediated by Ser-40 that occurs independently of the L-domain function, but selectively

  19. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

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    Amsterdam Adam

    2006-06-01

    identification of approximately 25% of the essential genes required for craniofacial development. The identification of zebrafish models for two human disease syndromes indicates that homologs to the other genes are likely to also be relevant for human craniofacial development. The initial characterization of wdr68 suggests an important role in craniofacial development for the highly conserved Wdr68-Dyrk1 protein complexes.

  20. The maize INDETERMINATE1 flowering time regulator defines a highly conserved zinc finger protein family in higher plants

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    Colasanti Joseph

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maize INDETERMINATE1 gene, ID1, is a key regulator of the transition to flowering and the founding member of a transcription factor gene family that encodes a protein with a distinct arrangement of zinc finger motifs. The zinc fingers and surrounding sequence make up the signature ID domain (IDD, which appears to be found in all higher plant genomes. The presence of zinc finger domains and previous biochemical studies showing that ID1 binds to DNA suggests that members of this gene family are involved in transcriptional regulation. Results Comparison of IDD genes identified in Arabidopsis and rice genomes, and all IDD genes discovered in maize EST and genomic databases, suggest that ID1 is a unique member of this gene family. High levels of sequence similarity amongst all IDD genes from maize, rice and Arabidopsis suggest that they are derived from a common ancestor. Several unique features of ID1 suggest that it is a divergent member of the maize IDD family. Although no clear ID1 ortholog was identified in the Arabidopsis genome, highly similar genes that encode proteins with identity extending beyond the ID domain were isolated from rice and sorghum. Phylogenetic comparisons show that these putative orthologs, along with maize ID1, form a group separate from other IDD genes. In contrast to ID1 mRNA, which is detected exclusively in immature leaves, several maize IDD genes showed a broad range of expression in various tissues. Further, Western analysis with an antibody that cross-reacts with ID1 protein and potential orthologs from rice and sorghum shows that all three proteins are detected in immature leaves only. Conclusion Comparative genomic analysis shows that the IDD zinc finger family is highly conserved among both monocots and dicots. The leaf-specific ID1 expression pattern distinguishes it from other maize IDD genes examined. A similar leaf-specific localization pattern was observed for the putative ID1 protein

  1. Highly conserved gene order and numerous novel repetitive elements in genomic regions linked to wing pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halder Georg

    2008-07-01

    over very long evolutionary time scales. Conclusion Here we have demonstrated the tractability of progressing from a genetic linkage map to genomic sequence data in Heliconius butterflies. We have also shown that fine-scale gene order is highly conserved between distantly related Heliconius species, and also between Heliconius and B. mori. Together, these findings suggest that genome structure in macrolepidoptera might be very conserved, and show that mapping and positional cloning efforts in different lepidopteran species can be reciprocally informative.

  2. ReAS: Recovery of ancestral sequences for transposable elements from the unassembled reads of a whole genome shotgun.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqiang Li

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe an algorithm, ReAS, to recover ancestral sequences for transposable elements (TEs from the unassembled reads of a whole genome shotgun. The main assumptions are that these TEs must exist at high copy numbers across the genome and must not be so old that they are no longer recognizable in comparison to their ancestral sequences. Tested on the japonica rice genome, ReAS was able to reconstruct all of the high copy sequences in the Repbase repository of known TEs, and increase the effectiveness of RepeatMasker in identifying TEs from genome sequences.

  3. Duplication of the vertebral artery: report of two cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplication of the vertebral artery is rare. We report two cases in which it was an incidental finding. In the first, duplication of the right vertebral artery was demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and conventional angiography. The second patient had duplication of the right vertebral artery demonstrated by MRA. We discuss the origin of this abnormality, its radiological implications and its potential clinical significance are discussed. (orig.)

  4. An Improved Approach to perform Crawling and avoid Duplicate Web Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Khurana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available When a web search is performed it includes many duplicate web pages or the websites. It means we can get number of similar pages at different web servers. We are proposing a Web Crawling Approach to Detect and avoid Duplicate or Near Duplicate WebPages. In this proposed work we are presenting a keyword Prioritization based approach to identify the web page over the web. As such pages will beidentified it will optimize the web search.

  5. An Improved Approach to perform Crawling and avoid Duplicate Web Pages

    OpenAIRE

    Dhiraj Khurana

    2012-01-01

    When a web search is performed it includes many duplicate web pages or the websites. It means we can get number of similar pages at different web servers. We are proposing a Web Crawling Approach to Detect and avoid Duplicate or Near Duplicate WebPages. In this proposed work we are presenting a keyword Prioritization based approach to identify the web page over the web. As such pages will beidentified it will optimize the web search.

  6. Gene duplication and the origins of morphological complexity in pancrustacean eyes, a genomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Serb Jeanne M; Syme Anna E; Villacorta Carlos; Plachetzki David C; Pankey M Sabrina; Rivera Ajna S; Omilian Angela R; Oakley Todd H

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Duplication and divergence of genes and genetic networks is hypothesized to be a major driver of the evolution of complexity and novel features. Here, we examine the history of genes and genetic networks in the context of eye evolution by using new approaches to understand patterns of gene duplication during the evolution of metazoan genomes. We hypothesize that 1) genes involved in eye development and phototransduction have duplicated and are retained at higher rates in a...

  7. Adaptive Evolution of Genes Duplicated from the Drosophila pseudoobscura neo-X Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Richard P.; Hilldorfer, Benedict B.; Koch, Jessica L.; Lockton, Steven; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila X chromosomes are disproportionate sources of duplicated genes, and these duplications are usually the result of retrotransposition of X-linked genes to the autosomes. The excess duplication is thought to be driven by natural selection for two reasons: X chromosomes are inactivated during spermatogenesis, and the derived copies of retroposed duplications tend to be testis expressed. Therefore, autosomal derived copies of retroposed genes provide a mechanism for their X-linked paralogs to “escape” X inactivation. Once these duplications have fixed, they may then be selected for male-specific functions. Throughout the evolution of the Drosophila genus, autosomes have fused with X chromosomes along multiple lineages giving rise to neo-X chromosomes. There has also been excess duplication from the two independent neo-X chromosomes that have been examined—one that occurred prior to the common ancestor of the willistoni species group and another that occurred along the lineage leading to Drosophila pseudoobscura. To determine what role natural selection plays in the evolution of genes duplicated from the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome, we analyzed DNA sequence divergence between paralogs, polymorphism within each copy, and the expression profiles of these duplicated genes. We found that the derived copies of all duplicated genes have elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism, suggesting that they are under relaxed selective constraints. The derived copies also tend to have testis- or male-biased expression profiles regardless of their chromosome of origin. Genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome appear to be under less constraints than those duplicated from other chromosome arms. We also find more evidence for historical adaptive evolution in genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome, suggesting that they are under a unique selection regime in which elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism provides a large reservoir of functional variants, some of which are

  8. Autism, language delay and mental retardation in a patient with 7q11 duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Depienne, C; Heron, D; Betancur, C; Benyahia, B; Trouillard, O; Bouteiller, D; Verloes, A; LeGuern, E.; Leboyer, M; Brice, A

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are found in a subset of patients with autism. Duplications involving loci associated with behavioural disturbances constitute an especially good candidate mechanism. The Williams–Beuren critical region (WBCR), located at 7q11.23, is commonly deleted in Williams–Beuren microdeletion syndrome (WBS). However, only four patients with a duplication of the WBCR have been reported to date. Here, 206 patients with autism spectrum disorders were screened for the WBCR duplic...

  9. Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Congenital Disease Often Misdiagnosed in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Falleti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal duplication is a rare congenital disease which affected more commonly the ileum, while the stomach is rarely involved. Generally diagnosed in paediatric or young age, it could be difficult to suspect a gastrointestinal duplication in adults. Herein, we report a 55-year-old male with a gastric duplication cyst found on routinely checkup for chronic hepatitis and first misdiagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST; we also discuss its embryology.

  10. The imperfect ancestral recombination graph reconstruction problem: upper bounds for recombination and homoplasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Fumei; Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    2010-06-01

    One of the central problems in computational biology is the reconstruction of evolutionary histories. While models incorporating recombination and homoplasy have been studied separately, a missing component in the theory is a robust and flexible unifying model which incorporates both of these major biological events shaping genetic diversity. In this article, we introduce the first such unifying model and develop algorithms to find the optimal ancestral recombination graph incorporating recombinations and homoplasy events. The power of our framework is the connection between our formulation and the Directed Steiner Arborescence Problem in combinatorial optimization. We implement linear programming techniques as well as heuristics for the Directed Steiner Arborescence Problem, and use our methods to construct evolutionary histories for both simulated and real data sets. PMID:20583925

  11. Where did the chili get its spice? Biogeography of capsaicinoid production in ancestral wild chili species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, Joshua J; Manchego, Carlos; Haak, David C; Levey, Douglas J

    2006-03-01

    The biogeography of pungency in three species of wild chili in the chaco and surrounding highland habitats of southeastern Bolivia is described. We report that Capsicum chacoense, C. baccatum, and C. eximium are polymorphic for production of capsaicin and its analogs, such that completely pungent and completely nonpungent individuals co-occur in some populations. In C. chacoense, the density of plants and the proportion of pungent plants increased with elevation. Above 900 m, all individuals in all populations except two were pungent; nonpungent individuals in at least one of the two polymorphic populations were likely a result of spreading by humans. The occurrence of pungent and nonpungent individuals in three species of ancestral Capsicum and the geographic variation of pungency within species suggest that production of capsaicin and its analogs entails both costs and benefits, which shift from one locality to another. Determining the selection pressures behind such shifts is necessary to understand the evolution of pungency in chilies. PMID:16572297

  12. Colonic duplication in an adult who presented with chronic constipation attributed to hypothyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tihomir Kekez; Goran Augustin; Irena Hrstic; Dubravko Smud; Mate Majerovic; Zeljko Jelincic; Emil Kinda

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplications are an uncommon congenital abnormality that manifest before the age of two in 80% of cases. Heal duplication is the most common while colonic duplication, either cystic or tubular, occurs in 10%-15% of cases and remains asymptomatic and undiagnosed in most cases. Mostly occurring in pediatric patients, colonic duplication is encountered in adults in only a few cases. The most common clinical manifestations are abdominal pain and intestinal obstruction. Rarely, duplications present with signs of acute abdomen or acute bleeding. This study reports a case of colonic duplication in an adult who presented with chronic constipation. Complete diagnostic workup was made on several occasions during the previous eight year period, but no pathology was found and chronic constipation was attributed to hypothyroidism caused by long standing Hashimoto thyroiditis. Multislice CT, performed because of abdominal distension, defined colonic pathology but the definite diagnosis of duplication of the transversal colon was made at operation. The cystic duplication and the adjacent part of the ascending and transversal colon were excised en-block. This study implies that colonic duplication, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of chronic constipation even when precipitating factors for constipation, such as hypothyroidism are present.

  13. Duplicated gall bladder detected on 99m Tc HIDA hepatobiliary scintigraphy: A report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall bladder (GB) duplication is a rare condition often found incidentally; most of these detected on screening Ultrasonography (USG) for abdominal colic. Nuclear hepatobiliary scan, popularly known as hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid (HIDA) scan, with its biliary kinetics, is highly specific for picking up abnormalities related to biliary tract and GB. We report two cases of duplication of GB visualized on HIDA scan. First case highlights the role of HIDA scan in diagnosis of duplicated GB, where USG was equivocal with a number of differentials, whereas in the second case, HIDA helped to rule out obstruction in this case of duplicated GB identified on USG; ruling out biliary cause for the abdominal colic

  14. Error analysis of filtering operations in pixel-duplicated images of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, diabetic retinopathy is chosen for a sample target image to demonstrate the effectiveness of image enlargement through pixel duplication in identifying regions of interest. Pixel duplication is presented as a simpler alternative to data interpolation techniques for detecting small structures in the images. A comparative analysis is performed on different image processing schemes applied to both original and pixel-duplicated images. Structures of interest are detected and and classification parameters optimized for minimum false positive detection in the original and enlarged retinal pictures. The error analysis demonstrates the advantages as well as shortcomings of pixel duplication in image enhancement when spatial averaging operations (smoothing filters) are also applied.

  15. Magmatism and Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits of the Southern Ancestral Cascade Arc, Western Nevada and Eastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Henry, Christopher D., (compiler); Vikre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Many epithermal gold-silver deposits are temporally and spatially associated with late Oligocene to Pliocene magmatism of the southern ancestral Cascade arc in western Nevada and eastern California. These deposits, which include both quartz-adularia (low- and intermediate-sulfidation; Comstock Lode, Tonopah, Bodie) and quartz-alunite (high-sulfidation; Goldfield, Paradise Peak) types, were major producers of gold and silver. Ancestral Cascade arc magmatism preceded that of the modern High Cascades arc and reflects subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. Ancestral arc magmatism began about 45 Ma, continued until about 3 Ma, and extended from near the Canada-United States border in Washington southward to about 250 km southeast of Reno, Nevada. The ancestral arc was split into northern and southern segments across an inferred tear in the subducting slab between Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak in northern California. The southern segment extends between 42°N in northern California and 37°N in western Nevada and was active from about 30 to 3 Ma. It is bounded on the east by the northeast edge of the Walker Lane. Ancestral arc volcanism represents an abrupt change in composition and style of magmatism relative to that in central Nevada. Large volume, caldera-forming, silicic ignimbrites associated with the 37 to 19 Ma ignimbrite flareup are dominant in central Nevada, whereas volcanic centers of the ancestral arc in western Nevada consist of andesitic stratovolcanoes and dacitic to rhyolitic lava domes that mostly formed between 25 and 4 Ma. Both ancestral arc and ignimbrite flareup magmatism resulted from rollback of the shallowly dipping slab that began about 45 Ma in northeast Nevada and migrated south-southwest with time. Most southern segment ancestral arc rocks have oxidized, high potassium, calc-alkaline compositions with silica contents ranging continuously from about 55 to 77 wt%. Most lavas are porphyritic and contain coarse plagioclase

  16. Evolutionary history of assassin bugs (insecta: hemiptera: Reduviidae: insights from divergence dating and ancestral state reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song Hwang

    Full Text Available Assassin bugs are one of the most successful clades of predatory animals based on their species numbers (∼6,800 spp. and wide distribution in terrestrial ecosystems. Various novel prey capture strategies and remarkable prey specializations contribute to their appeal as a model to study evolutionary pathways involved in predation. Here, we reconstruct the most comprehensive reduviid phylogeny (178 taxa, 18 subfamilies to date based on molecular data (5 markers. This phylogeny tests current hypotheses on reduviid relationships emphasizing the polyphyletic Reduviinae and the blood-feeding, disease-vectoring Triatominae, and allows us, for the first time in assassin bugs, to reconstruct ancestral states of prey associations and microhabitats. Using a fossil-calibrated molecular tree, we estimated divergence times for key events in the evolutionary history of Reduviidae. Our results indicate that the polyphyletic Reduviinae fall into 11-14 separate clades. Triatominae are paraphyletic with respect to the reduviine genus Opisthacidius in the maximum likelihood analyses; this result is in contrast to prior hypotheses that found Triatominae to be monophyletic or polyphyletic and may be due to the more comprehensive taxon and character sampling in this study. The evolution of blood-feeding may thus have occurred once or twice independently among predatory assassin bugs. All prey specialists evolved from generalist ancestors, with multiple evolutionary origins of termite and ant specializations. A bark-associated life style on tree trunks is ancestral for most of the lineages of Higher Reduviidae; living on foliage has evolved at least six times independently. Reduviidae originated in the Middle Jurassic (178 Ma, but significant lineage diversification only began in the Late Cretaceous (97 Ma. The integration of molecular phylogenetics with fossil and life history data as presented in this paper provides insights into the evolutionary history of

  17. Genes Suggest Ancestral Colour Polymorphisms Are Shared across Morphologically Cryptic Species in Arctic Bumblebees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H Williams

    Full Text Available Our grasp of biodiversity is fine-tuned through the process of revisionary taxonomy. If species do exist in nature and can be discovered with available techniques, then we expect these revisions to converge on broadly shared interpretations of species. But for the primarily arctic bumblebees of the subgenus Alpinobombus of the genus Bombus, revisions by some of the most experienced specialists are unusual for bumblebees in that they have all reached different conclusions on the number of species present. Recent revisions based on skeletal morphology have concluded that there are from four to six species, while variation in colour pattern of the hair raised questions as to whether at least seven species might be present. Even more species are supported if we accept the recent move away from viewing species as morphotypes to viewing them instead as evolutionarily independent lineages (EILs using data from genes. EILs are recognised here in practice from the gene coalescents that provide direct evidence for their evolutionary independence. We show from fitting both general mixed Yule/coalescent (GMYC models and Poisson-tree-process (PTP models to data for the mitochondrial COI gene that there is support for nine species in the subgenus Alpinobombus. Examination of the more slowly evolving nuclear PEPCK gene shows further support for a previously unrecognised taxon as a new species in northwestern North America. The three pairs of the most morphologically similar sister species are separated allopatrically and prevented from interbreeding by oceans. We also find that most of the species show multiple shared colour patterns, giving the appearance of mimicry among parts of the different species. However, reconstructing ancestral colour-pattern states shows that speciation is likely to have cut across widespread ancestral polymorphisms, without or largely without convergence. In the particular case of Alpinobombus, morphological, colour-pattern, and

  18. PROCESS IN THE HIGH CONSERVATION VALUE (HCV) CONCEPT WITHIN COMMUNITY-MANAGED FORESTS: CASE STUDY OF COPAL AND BB COMMUNITY FORESTS IN CAMEROON

    OpenAIRE

    ADJÉ OLIVIER AHIMIN; MARIE MBOLO

    2010-01-01

    The concept of "High Conservation Value" which was initially used by the Forest Stewardship Council, now plays an increasingly important role in several areas, and most significantly in the design and implementation of development projects. Within the framework of certification of community forests in Cameroon, this concept has been implemented in close collaboration with interested communities. Based on the activities conducted, it is worth noting that the consideration of informal managemen...

  19. Potential pitfall of DMSA scintigraphy in patients with ureteral duplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5-wk-old male presented with radiographic findings of a duplicated collecting system. A [/sup 99m/Tc]DMSA scan was requested to evaluate cortical function. Images obtained immediately. postinjection showed activity restricted to the upper poles; in contrast, delayed images at 4 hr showed activity in the bladder and throughout both kidneys. Catheterizing the patient drained the activity from the bladder but had little effect on the refluxed renal activity. The early [/sup 99m/Tc]DMSA images were critical in making the proper interpretation. Technetium-99m DMSA is excreted into the urine and this fact needs to be considered when interpreting scans of patients with possible reflux or obstruction. When DMSA scans are obtained in pediatric patients with possible reflux, catheterization prior to the study and early images prior to the appearance of DMSA in the collecting system are recommended

  20. Potential pitfall of DMSA scintigraphy in patients with ureteral duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, F.; Snow, B.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    A 5-wk-old male presented with radiographic findings of a duplicated collecting system. A (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA scan was requested to evaluate cortical function. Images obtained immediately. postinjection showed activity restricted to the upper poles; in contrast, delayed images at 4 hr showed activity in the bladder and throughout both kidneys. Catheterizing the patient drained the activity from the bladder but had little effect on the refluxed renal activity. The early (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA images were critical in making the proper interpretation. Technetium-99m DMSA is excreted into the urine and this fact needs to be considered when interpreting scans of patients with possible reflux or obstruction. When DMSA scans are obtained in pediatric patients with possible reflux, catheterization prior to the study and early images prior to the appearance of DMSA in the collecting system are recommended.

  1. Biochemical approaches in identifying mutants and duplicates in germplasm collections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Traditional taxonomy and germplasm evaluations are extended by biochemical methods, the latter being often faster and more precise. Today we apply 4 basically different electrophoretic techniques (PAGIF, PoroPAGE, SDS-PAGE, PAGE) and combinations thereof since each method has its limitations, particularly PAGIF and SDS-PAGE. The storage proteins and esterases of plants yield very stable electrophoretic patterns under various environmental conditions. The same is true for the total DNA, split by restrictases, and separated by non-linear gradient PAGE in the range from 120 to 4200 bp. In the potato germplasm collection of CIP (Lima, Peru) about 11,000 duplicates (from 15,000 clones) were eliminated. The collection of sweet potatoes from CIP and AVRDC is under investigation. (author)

  2. Gene duplications in prokaryotes can be associated with environmental adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lempicki Richard A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication is a normal evolutionary process. If there is no selective advantage in keeping the duplicated gene, it is usually reduced to a pseudogene and disappears from the genome. However, some paralogs are retained. These gene products are likely to be beneficial to the organism, e.g. in adaptation to new environmental conditions. The aim of our analysis is to investigate the properties of paralog-forming genes in prokaryotes, and to analyse the role of these retained paralogs by relating gene properties to life style of the corresponding prokaryotes. Results Paralogs were identified in a number of prokaryotes, and these paralogs were compared to singletons of persistent orthologs based on functional classification. This showed that the paralogs were associated with for example energy production, cell motility, ion transport, and defence mechanisms. A statistical overrepresentation analysis of gene and protein annotations was based on paralogs of the 200 prokaryotes with the highest fraction of paralog-forming genes. Biclustering of overrepresented gene ontology terms versus species was used to identify clusters of properties associated with clusters of species. The clusters were classified using similarity scores on properties and species to identify interesting clusters, and a subset of clusters were analysed by comparison to literature data. This analysis showed that paralogs often are associated with properties that are important for survival and proliferation of the specific organisms. This includes processes like ion transport, locomotion, chemotaxis and photosynthesis. However, the analysis also showed that the gene ontology terms sometimes were too general, imprecise or even misleading for automatic analysis. Conclusions Properties described by gene ontology terms identified in the overrepresentation analysis are often consistent with individual prokaryote lifestyles and are likely to give a competitive

  3. Recurrent Gene Duplication Diversifies Genome Defense Repertoire in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mia T; Vander Wende, Helen M; Hsieh, Emily; Baker, EmilyClare P; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-07-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise large fractions of many eukaryotic genomes and imperil host genome integrity. The host genome combats these challenges by encoding proteins that silence TE activity. Both the introduction of new TEs via horizontal transfer and TE sequence evolution requires constant innovation of host-encoded TE silencing machinery to keep pace with TEs. One form of host innovation is the adaptation of existing, single-copy host genes. Indeed, host suppressors of TE replication often harbor signatures of positive selection. Such signatures are especially evident in genes encoding the piwi-interacting-RNA pathway of gene silencing, for example, the female germline-restricted TE silencer, HP1D/Rhino Host genomes can also innovate via gene duplication and divergence. However, the importance of gene family expansions, contractions, and gene turnover to host genome defense has been largely unexplored. Here, we functionally characterize Oxpecker, a young, tandem duplicate gene of HP1D/rhino We demonstrate that Oxpecker supports female fertility in Drosophila melanogaster and silences several TE families that are incompletely silenced by HP1D/Rhino in the female germline. We further show that, like Oxpecker, at least ten additional, structurally diverse, HP1D/rhino-derived daughter and "granddaughter" genes emerged during a short 15-million year period of Drosophila evolution. These young paralogs are transcribed primarily in germline tissues, where the genetic conflict between host genomes and TEs plays out. Our findings suggest that gene family expansion is an underappreciated yet potent evolutionary mechanism of genome defense diversification. PMID:26979388

  4. Antiquity of Ediacaran Fossils, Early Shelled Organisms, Recent Radiometric Age-Dates from India and Ancestral Biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A.

    2008-03-01

    U-Pb zircon ages and Pb-Pb limestone ages assign Ediacaran and shelly fossils reported from India between 1750 and 950 Ma indicating ancestral diversification of metazoans. Simple bacterial life must have began earlier and may be found in meteorites.

  5. ReAS: Recovery of ancestral sequences for transposable elements from the unassembled reads of a whole genome shotgun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Ye, Jia; Li, Songgang;

    2005-01-01

    in comparison to their ancestral sequences. Tested on the japonica rice genome, ReAS was able to reconstruct all of the high copy sequences in the Repbase repository of known TEs, and increase the effectiveness of RepeatMasker in identifying TEs from genome sequences. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Sep...

  6. Temporal pattern of loss/persistence of duplicate genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways after teleost-specific genome duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Yukuto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genomic studies have revealed a teleost-specific third-round whole genome duplication (3R-WGD event occurred in a common ancestor of teleost fishes. However, it is unclear how the genes duplicated in this event were lost or persisted during the diversification of teleosts, and therefore, how many of the duplicated genes contribute to the genetic differences among teleosts. This subject is also important for understanding the process of vertebrate evolution through WGD events. We applied a comparative evolutionary approach to this question by focusing on the genes involved in long-term potentiation, taste and olfactory transduction, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, based on the whole genome sequences of four teleosts; zebrafish, medaka, stickleback, and green spotted puffer fish. Results We applied a state-of-the-art method of maximum-likelihood phylogenetic inference and conserved synteny analyses to each of 130 genes involved in the above biological systems of human. These analyses identified 116 orthologous gene groups between teleosts and tetrapods, and 45 pairs of 3R-WGD-derived duplicate genes among them. This suggests that more than half [(45×2/(116+45] = 56.5% of the loci, probably more than ten thousand genes, present in a common ancestor of the four teleosts were still duplicated after the 3R-WGD. The estimated temporal pattern of gene loss suggested that, after the 3R-WGD, many (71/116 of the duplicated genes were rapidly lost during the initial 75 million years (MY, whereas on average more than half (27.3/45 of the duplicated genes remaining in the ancestor of the four teleosts (45/116 have persisted for about 275 MY. The 3R-WGD-derived duplicates that have persisted for a long evolutionary periods of time had significantly larger number of interacting partners and longer length of protein coding sequence, implying that they tend to be more multifunctional than the singletons after the 3R-WGD. Conclusion

  7. 周代宗庙礼制考%The Research on the Etiquettes of Zhou Dynasty’s Ancestral Temple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王启敏

    2015-01-01

    周代社会中与宗庙相关的礼制多种多样。宗庙始成要举行落成典礼,作歌诗以纪之。祭庙的形式可谓五花八门,而且祭者的态度要十分的恭敬、严谨。诸侯有丧事了,要在宗庙吊唁,规矩也很多。此外,如天子即位,天子(或诸侯)娶妻、嫁女、出国、归国、出征、凯旋等都要在宗庙举行郑重的祭告仪式。在宗庙的守护、装饰、迁移等方面,在当时也有着严格的、不同的礼节制度要遵守。%In Zhou dynasty the related ancestral temple customs are various. After the completion of ancestral temple, it should be inaugurated and poems should be made to memorize. The forms of memorial temples are varied. The attitude of the emperor and monarch muse be very respectful. The same was the monarch’s condolences at the ancestral temple. In addition, the ascending to the throne as emperor, or monarch, getting married or married abroad, returning to the homeland and triumphing must be held in the ancestral temple solemnly and be reported to ancestral temple. The temple’s guardian, decoration, migration and the others also have restricted rules to obey.

  8. Megalourethra with Y-Type Duplication of Urethra Presented as Perianal Fistula: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Shashi Verma; Goto Gangkak; Sher Singh Yadav; Vinay Tomar

    2015-01-01

    Megalourethra with Y-type duplication is an extremely rare anomaly. We report here one such case, diagnosed with retrograde urethrogram, which was done from both penile meatus and perianal opening simultaneously. Patient was successfully treated by laser optical internal urethrotomy (OIU), excision of duplicated urethra, and reduction urethroplasty in a single stage.

  9. Megalourethra with Y-Type Duplication of Urethra Presented as Perianal Fistula: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shashi; Gangkak, Goto; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Megalourethra with Y-type duplication is an extremely rare anomaly. We report here one such case, diagnosed with retrograde urethrogram, which was done from both penile meatus and perianal opening simultaneously. Patient was successfully treated by laser optical internal urethrotomy (OIU), excision of duplicated urethra, and reduction urethroplasty in a single stage. PMID:26146583

  10. Doublet Production in the Development of Medieval and Modern Spanish: New Approaches to Phonolexical Duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Darren W.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation offers new approaches to an old and well-known problem in the study of the development of Romance varieties: duplicate lexis or doublets. Traditional analyses of duplication are narrow in scope both in what qualifies as a doublet (the popular/learned opposition has dominated, to the exclusion of other pairs) and in channels of…

  11. Duplicate management in mining open source literature for knowledge and intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the collection and processing of Open Source information for knowledge discovery and other intelligence purposes, no matter how clever the search algorithm or analyst, a persistent problem is the management of the sheer volume of information identified. This information comes in the form of unstructured, semi-structured and structured data. One of the key issues that exacerbate this information overload is the production of duplicate or near-duplicate information. Another is the collection of data that has little relevance or utility to the subject matter of interest (referred to as Spam in this document). This paper focuses on the identification and removal of duplicate, near-duplicate information and Spam in the context of a state-of-the-art Technology Data Analysis System that is specifically designed to organize information around an organization's technology strategy. To that end, the paper provides the analysis of the design and algorithmic infrastructure developed to create a mechanized system that virtually eliminates the duplicative and irrelevant information resulting from Open Source data gathering activities. This system, the Automated Knowledge Discovery System (AKDS), is designed to automate the identification, retrieval, analysis, and organization of scientific, technical, and business data and provide a continual surveillance of the current state of the technologies of specific interest to an organization. This paper focuses on the text analysis modules that enable the identification of duplicate and irrelevant information. In this paper, these concepts are referred to as duplicate and near duplicate detection and irrelevant information (Spam) filtering. (author)

  12. A family with an inverted tandem duplication 5q22.1q23.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T; Bartels, I; Liehr, T; Burfeind, P; Zoll, B; Shoukier, M

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a 3-year-old boy with short stature, developmental delay and mild facial dysmorphic signs. Karyotype analysis and array-CGH revealed a pure duplication 5q22.1q23.2 with a length of 14.25 Mb. As demonstrated by multicolor-fluorescence in situ hybridization, the duplicated segment was orientated in an inverted tandem manner. One of the 2 older half-brothers of the index patient was intellectually disabled and showed short stature as well. The mother of the siblings was only 149 cm in height. The affected half-brother as well as the mother of the siblings were tested positive for the same duplication. Duplications of the long arm of chromosome 5 are rare. There are 16 reported cases of different 5q segments with a pure duplication and no additional chromosomal imbalance. In order to refine the 5q-duplication phenotype, reported cases were recently classified in 3 groups on the basis of clinical findings and the involved chromosome segments. However, our case does not fit in any of these groups but is placed in the interjacent chromosomal area between 2 of these groups. Overall, this is the second reported family with a duplication of 5q22.1q23.2 and both families share phenotypic features like short stature, facial dysmorphic signs and speech delay. The reported family provides further information for delineating phenotype-genotype correlations of pure duplications of the 5q region. PMID:23051634

  13. Dose-sensitivity, conserved noncoding sequences and duplicate gene retention through multiple tetraploidies in the grasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Schnable

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome duplications, or tetraplodies, are an important source of increased gene content. Following whole genome duplication, duplicate copies of many genes are lost from the genome. This loss of genes is biased both in the classes of genes deleted and the subgenome from which they are lost. Many or all classes are genes preferentially retained as duplicate copies are engaged in dose sensitive protein-protein interactions, such that deletion of any one duplicate upsets the status quo of subunit concentrations, and presumably lowers fitness as a result. Transcription factors are also preferentially retained following every whole genome duplications studied. This has been explained as a consequence of protein-protein interactions, just as for other highly retained classes of genes. We show that the quantity of conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs associated with genes predicts the likelyhood of their retention as duplicate pairs following whole genome duplication. As many CNSs likely represent binding sites for transcriptional regulators, we propose that the likelyhood of gene retention following tetraploidy may also be influenced by dose-sensitive protein-DNA interactions between the regulatory regions of CNS-rich genes -- nicknamed "bigfoot genes" – and the proteins that bind to them. Using grass genomes, we show that differential loss of CNSs from one member of a pair following the pregrass tetraploidy reduces its chance of retention in the subsequent maize-lineage tetraploidy.

  14. Schizophrenia as a prodromal symptom in a patient harboring SNCA duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Shogo; Ikeda, Aya; Nishioka, Kenya; Furuya, Hirokazu; Tashiro, Mari; Matsushima, Takashi; Li, Yuanzhe; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Funayama, Manabu; Morinobu, Shigeru; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a patient who developed delusions and auditory hallucinations and was clinically diagnosed as having schizophrenia. Ten years after the onset of schizophrenia, the disease progressed to mild parkinsonism. SNCA duplication was confirmed. This case expands the spectrum of clinical features in carriers of SNCA duplication. PMID:26880146

  15. Case of a congenital urethral duplication being unmasked following circumcision for balanitis xerotica obliterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Matthew; Woodward, Mark; Lambert, Anthony

    2010-07-01

    We present the case of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with an Effmann Type II A1 urethral duplication after routine circumcision for balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO). We discuss the pathophysiology, investigation and management both of BXO and urethral duplication. PMID:20529516

  16. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. 73.3556 Section 73.3556 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or...

  17. In ovo omnia: diversification by duplication in fish and other vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Braasch, Ingo; Salzburger, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Gene and genome duplications are considered to be the main evolutionary mechanisms contributing to the unrivalled biodiversity of bony fish. New studies of vitellogenin yolk proteins, including a report in BMC Evolutionary Biology, reveal that the genes underlying key evolutionary innovations and adaptations have undergone complex patterns of duplication and functional evolution.

  18. In ovo omnia: diversification by duplication in fish and other vertebrates : [minireview

    OpenAIRE

    Braasch, Ingo; Salzburger, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Gene and genome duplications are considered to be the main evolutionary mechanisms contributing to the unrivalled biodiversity of bony fish. New studies of vitellogenin yolk proteins, including a report in BMC Evolutionary Biology, reveal that the genes underlying key evolutionary innovations and adaptations have undergone complex patterns of duplication and functional evolution.

  19. Analysis on the reconstruction accuracy of the Fitch method for inferring ancestral states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünewald Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As one of the most widely used parsimony methods for ancestral reconstruction, the Fitch method minimizes the total number of hypothetical substitutions along all branches of a tree to explain the evolution of a character. Due to the extensive usage of this method, it has become a scientific endeavor in recent years to study the reconstruction accuracies of the Fitch method. However, most studies are restricted to 2-state evolutionary models and a study for higher-state models is needed since DNA sequences take the format of 4-state series and protein sequences even have 20 states. Results In this paper, the ambiguous and unambiguous reconstruction accuracy of the Fitch method are studied for N-state evolutionary models. Given an arbitrary phylogenetic tree, a recurrence system is first presented to calculate iteratively the two accuracies. As complete binary tree and comb-shaped tree are the two extremal evolutionary tree topologies according to balance, we focus on the reconstruction accuracies on these two topologies and analyze their asymptotic properties. Then, 1000 Yule trees with 1024 leaves are generated and analyzed to simulate real evolutionary scenarios. It is known that more taxa not necessarily increase the reconstruction accuracies under 2-state models. The result under N-state models is also tested. Conclusions In a large tree with many leaves, the reconstruction accuracies of using all taxa are sometimes less than those of using a leaf subset under N-state models. For complete binary trees, there always exists an equilibrium interval [a, b] of conservation probability, in which the limiting ambiguous reconstruction accuracy equals to the probability of randomly picking a state. The value b decreases with the increase of the number of states, and it seems to converge. When the conservation probability is greater than b, the reconstruction accuracies of the Fitch method increase rapidly. The reconstruction

  20. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  1. Genetic response of Paspalum plicatulum to genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihmüller, Emilse; Beltrán, Celina; Sartor, María; Espinoza, Francisco; Spampinato, Claudia; Pessino, Silvina

    2014-06-01

    Paspalum plicatulum is a perennial rhizomatous grass with natural diploid and polyploid cytotypes. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of sequence polymorphisms arising immediately after genome autoduplication in this species. Two mixoploid plants (4C and 7D) were previously obtained through colchicine treatment of seeds generated by open pollination of a diploid plant (H14-2x). Diploid and tetraploid sectors from both mixoploids were dissected to generate two ploidy series (4C-2x/4C-4x and 7D-2x/7D-4x). Molecular fingerprints were generated from the maternal plant H14-2x, both ploidy series (4C-2x/4C-4x and 7D-2x/7D-4x), and a tetraploid plant (C1) produced by selfing 7D-4x. Our results indicate that immediately after polyploidization P. plicatulum suffers genetic rearrangements affecting ~28-38 % of the genome. Band gain and loss were equally prevalent at a statistically significant level. At least 5.62 % of the genome experimented recurrent genetic variation in a non-random basis with a confidence of 94.88 %. A significant proportion of novel bands (36 out of 195; 18.4 %) was detected in the C1 tetraploid plant. Half of these bands were not amplified in either H14-2x or 7D-4x, while the remainders were present in H14-2x but absent in 7D-4x. Our results indicate the occurrence of a considerable number of genetic changes in P. plicatulum immediately after polyploidization, some of which were recurrently detected in different independent events. Moreover, we confirmed that after polyploidization, lost ancestral alleles were spontaneously recovered in further generations, a phenomenon previously reported by other research groups. PMID:24858395

  2. Derived immune and ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalde, Iñigo; Allentoft, Morten E; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Santpere, Gabriel; Chiang, Charleston W K; DeGiorgio, Michael; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Rasmussen, Simon; Quilez, Javier; Ramírez, Oscar; Marigorta, Urko M; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; Prada, María Encina; Encinas, Julio Manuel Vidal; Nielsen, Rasmus; Netea, Mihai G; Novembre, John; Sturm, Richard A; Sabeti, Pardis; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Navarro, Arcadi; Willerslev, Eske; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2014-03-13

    Ancient genomic sequences have started to reveal the origin and the demographic impact of farmers from the Neolithic period spreading into Europe. The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated with immunity and diet. However, the limited data available from earlier hunter-gatherers preclude an understanding of the selective processes associated with this crucial transition to agriculture in recent human evolution. Here we sequence an approximately 7,000-year-old Mesolithic skeleton discovered at the La Braña-Arintero site in León, Spain, to retrieve a complete pre-agricultural European human genome. Analysis of this genome in the context of other ancient samples suggests the existence of a common ancient genomic signature across western and central Eurasia from the Upper Paleolithic to the Mesolithic. The La Braña individual carries ancestral alleles in several skin pigmentation genes, suggesting that the light skin of modern Europeans was not yet ubiquitous in Mesolithic times. Moreover, we provide evidence that a significant number of derived, putatively adaptive variants associated with pathogen resistance in modern Europeans were already present in this hunter-gatherer. PMID:24463515

  3. Transgenerational actions of environmental compounds on reproductive disease and identification of epigenetic biomarkers of ancestral exposures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Manikkam

    Full Text Available Environmental factors during fetal development can induce a permanent epigenetic change in the germ line (sperm that then transmits epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in the absence of any subsequent exposure. The epigenetic transgenerational actions of various environmental compounds and relevant mixtures were investigated with the use of a pesticide mixture (permethrin and insect repellant DEET, a plastic mixture (bisphenol A and phthalates, dioxin (TCDD and a hydrocarbon mixture (jet fuel, JP8. After transient exposure of F0 gestating female rats during the period of embryonic gonadal sex determination, the subsequent F1-F3 generations were obtained in the absence of any environmental exposure. The effects on the F1, F2 and F3 generations pubertal onset and gonadal function were assessed. The plastics, dioxin and jet fuel were found to promote early-onset female puberty transgenerationally (F3 generation. Spermatogenic cell apoptosis was affected transgenerationally. Ovarian primordial follicle pool size was significantly decreased with all treatments transgenerationally. Differential DNA methylation of the F3 generation sperm promoter epigenome was examined. Differential DNA methylation regions (DMR were identified in the sperm of all exposure lineage males and found to be consistent within a specific exposure lineage, but different between the exposures. Several genomic features of the DMR, such as low density CpG content, were identified. Exposure-specific epigenetic biomarkers were identified that may allow for the assessment of ancestral environmental exposures associated with adult onset disease.

  4. Evidence from cyclostomes for complex regionalization of the ancestral vertebrate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Fumiaki; Pascual-Anaya, Juan; Oisi, Yasuhiro; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Aota, Shin-ichi; Adachi, Noritaka; Takagi, Wataru; Hirai, Tamami; Sato, Noboru; Murakami, Yasunori; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    The vertebrate brain is highly complex, but its evolutionary origin remains elusive. Because of the absence of certain developmental domains generally marked by the expression of regulatory genes, the embryonic brain of the lamprey, a jawless vertebrate, had been regarded as representing a less complex, ancestral state of the vertebrate brain. Specifically, the absence of a Hedgehog- and Nkx2.1-positive domain in the lamprey subpallium was thought to be similar to mouse mutants in which the suppression of Nkx2-1 leads to a loss of the medial ganglionic eminence. Here we show that the brain of the inshore hagfish (Eptatretus burgeri), another cyclostome group, develops domains equivalent to the medial ganglionic eminence and rhombic lip, resembling the gnathostome brain. Moreover, further investigation of lamprey larvae revealed that these domains are also present, ruling out the possibility of convergent evolution between hagfish and gnathostomes. Thus, brain regionalization as seen in crown gnathostomes is not an evolutionary innovation of this group, but dates back to the latest vertebrate ancestor before the divergence of cyclostomes and gnathostomes more than 500 million years ago. PMID:26878236

  5. WEB LOG PREPROCESSING BASED ON PARTIAL ANCESTRAL GRAPH TECHNIQUE FOR SESSION CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Chitra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Web access log analysis is to analyze the patterns of web site usage and the features of users behavior. It is the fact that the normal Log data is very noisy and unclear and it is vital to preprocess the log data for efficient web usage mining process. Preprocessing comprises of three phases which includes data cleaning, user identification and session construction. Session construction is very vital and numerous real world problems can be modeled as traversals on graph and mining from these traversals would provide the requirement for preprocessing phase. On the other hand, the traversals on unweighted graph have been taken into consideration in existing works. This paper oversimplifies this to the case where vertices of graph are given weights to reflect their significance. The proposed method constructs sessions as a Partial Ancestral Graph which contains pages with calculated weights. This will help site administrators to find the interesting pages for users and to redesign their web pages. After weighting each page according to browsing time a PAG structure is constructed for each user session. Existing system in which there is a problem of learning with the latent variables of the data and the problem can be overcome by the proposed method.

  6. The ancestral circadian clock of monarch butterflies: role in time-compensated sun compass orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, S M

    2007-01-01

    The circadian clock has a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, which contributes to navigation to the overwintering grounds. The location of circadian clock cells in monarch brain has been identified in the dorsolateral protocerebrum (pars lateralis); these cells express PERIOD, TIMELESS, and a Drosophila-like cryptochrome designated CRY1. Monarch butterflies, like all other nondrosophilid insects examined so far, express a second cry gene (designated insect CRY2) that encodes a vertebrate-like CRY that is also expressed in pars lateralis. An ancestral circadian clock mechanism has been defined in monarchs, in which CRY1 functions as a blue light photoreceptor for photic entrainment, whereas CRY2 functionswithin the clockwork as themajor transcriptional repressor of an intracellular negative transcriptional feedback loop. A CRY1-staining neural pathway has been identified that may connect the circadian (navigational) clock to polarized light input important for sun compass navigation, and a CRY2-positive neural pathway has been discovered that may communicate circadian information directly from the circadian clock to the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass. The monarch butterfly may thus use the CRY proteins as components of the circadian mechanism and also as output molecules that connect the clock to various aspects of the sun compass apparatus. PMID:18419268

  7. Detection of Weakly Conserved Ancestral Mammalian RegulatorySequences by Primate Comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian-fei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Chanan, Sumita; Cheng,Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.; Boffelli, Dario

    2006-06-01

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detectcryptic functional elements, which are too weakly conserved among mammalsto distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem, weexplored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  8. The vomeronasal complex of nocturnal strepsirhines and implications for the ancestral condition in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Eva C; Dennis, John C; Bhatnagar, Kunwar P; Durham, Emily L; Burrows, Anne M; Bonar, Christopher J; Steckler, Natalie K; Morrison, Edward E; Smith, Timothy D

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates the vomeronasal organ in extant nocturnal strepsirhines as a model for ancestral primates. Cadaveric samples from 10 strepsirhine species, ranging from fetal to adult ages, were studied histologically. Dimensions of structures in the vomeronasal complex, such as the vomeronasal neuroepithelium (VNNE) and vomeronasal cartilage (VNC) were measured in serial sections and selected specimens were studied immunohistochemically to determine physiological aspects of the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Osteological features corresponding to vomeronasal structures were studied histologically and related to 3-D CT reconstructions. The VNC consistently rests in a depression on the palatal portion of the maxilla, which we refer to as the vomeronasal groove (VNG). Most age comparisons indicate that in adults VNNE is about twice the length compared with perinatal animals. In VNNE volume, adults are 2- to 3-fold larger compared with perinatal specimens. Across ages, a strong linear relationship exists between VNNE dimensions and body length, mass, and midfacial length. Results indicate that the VNNE of nocturnal strepsirhines is neurogenic postnatally based on GAP43 expression. In addition, based on Olfactory Marker Protein expression, terminally differentiated VSNs are present in the VNNE. Therefore, nocturnal strepsirhines have basic similarities to rodents in growth and maturational characteristics of VSNs. These results indicate that a functional vomeronasal system is likely present in all nocturnal strepsirhines. Finally, given that osteological features such as the VNG are visible on midfacial bones, primate fossils can be assessed to determine whether primate ancestors possessed a vomeronasal complex morphologically similar to that of modern nocturnal strepsirhines. PMID:24249398

  9. A PCA-based method for ancestral informative markers selection in structured populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; ZHANG Lei; DENG Hong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Identification of population structure can help trace population histories and identify disease genes.Structured association (SA) is a commonly used approach for population structure identification and association mapping. A major issue with SA is that its performance greatly depends on the informativeness and the numbers of ancestral informative markers (AIMs). Present major AIM selection methods mostly require prior individual ancestry information, which is usually not available or uncertain in practice. To address this potential weakness, we herein develop a novel approach for AIM selection based on principle component analysis (PCA), which does not require prior ancestry information of study subjects. Our simulation and real genetic data analysis results suggest that, with equivalent AIMs,PCA-based selected AIMs can significantly increase the accuracy of inferred individual ancestries compared with traditionally randomly selected AIMs. Our method can easily be applied to whole genome data to select a set of highly informative AIMs in population structure, which can then be used to identify potential population structure and correct possible statistical biases caused by population stratification.

  10. The hypothetical ancestral animal. the Urmetazoa: telomerase activity in sponges (Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISABEL M. MÜLLER

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Sponges (Porifera represent the lowest metazoan phylum, characterized by a pronounced plasticity in the determination of cell lineages, and they are the closest related taxon to the hypothetical ancestral animal, the Urmetazoa, from which the metazoan lineages diverged. In a first approach to elucidate the molecular mechanisms controlling the switch from the cell lineage with a putative indefinite growth capacity to senescent, somatic cells, the activity of the telomerase as an indicator for immortality has been determined. The studies were performed with the marine demosponges Suberites domuncula and Geodia cydonium, in vivo with tissue but also in vitro using the primmorph system. Primmorphs are formed from dissociated cells which have retained their proliferation potency. It was found that the activity of telomerase in tissue of both sponges is high. Based on this and additional findings it is assumed that the separation of the senescent sponge cell lineage from the immortal germ-/somatic cell lineage is triggered by the loss of contact to cell adhesion factors. First evidence is included which suggests that the final progress of the senescent, telomerase-negative cells to cell death is caused by apoptosis.

  11. Evolutionary Psychology: How Psychological Mechanisms Shaped by Natural Selection for Ancestral Environments Produce Current Behaviours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Crawford

    2009-01-01

    The central purpose of this paper is to explain how Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection can be used in understanding current human behaviour. First, Darwin's logic is briefly described. Development is an important issue when applying evolutionary theory to human behaviour. The notion of innate developmental orga-nization of psychological mechanisms is introduced. The possible social and political outcomes produced when differ-ent levels of innate developmental organization are paired with different beliefs about it are considered. The notion of psychological mechanisms as evolved adaptations is considered in some detail. Then I discuss different ways evo-htionists think about how genes are involved in the development of adaptations. The paper concludes with a frame-work for considering how ancestral adaptations function in current environments and outlines some ways of studying them. In China and many other parts of the world people desire a more harmonious society. Ⅰ hope that this paper will be of some small help in achieving this great task.

  12. A PCA-based method for ancestral informative markers selection in structured populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Identification of population structure can help trace population histories and identify disease genes. Structured association (SA) is a commonly used approach for population structure identification and association mapping. A major issue with SA is that its performance greatly depends on the informa-tiveness and the numbers of ancestral informative markers (AIMs). Present major AIM selection meth-ods mostly require prior individual ancestry information, which is usually not available or uncertain in practice. To address this potential weakness, we herein develop a novel approach for AIM selection based on principle component analysis (PCA), which does not require prior ancestry information of study subjects. Our simulation and real genetic data analysis results suggest that, with equivalent AIMs, PCA-based selected AIMs can significantly increase the accuracy of inferred individual ancestries compared with traditionally randomly selected AIMs. Our method can easily be applied to whole genome data to select a set of highly informative AIMs in population structure, which can then be used to identify potential population structure and correct possible statistical biases caused by population stratification.

  13. Inheritance of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype in recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid M; Nielsen, Henriette S; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH) (HLA-A1, C7, B8, C4AQ0, C4B1, DR3, DQ2) is a remarkably long and conserved haplotype in the human major histocompatibility complex. It has been associated with both beneficial and detrimental effects, consistent with antagonistic....... The objective was to test the gestational drive theory for the 8.1AH in women with RPL and their live born children. METHODOLOGY: We investigated the inheritance of the 8.1AH from 82 heterozygous RPL women to 110 live born children. All participants were genotyped for HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in DNA from...... EDTA-treated blood or buccal swaps. Inheritance was compared with a Mendelian inheritance of 50% using a two-sided exact binomial test. RESULTS: We found that 55% of the live born children had inherited the 8.1AH, which was not significantly higher than the expected 50% (P = 0.29). Interestingly, we...

  14. Gene duplication and divergence affecting drug content in Cannabis sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiblen, George D; Wenger, Jonathan P; Craft, Kathleen J; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Mehmedic, Zlatko; Treiber, Erin L; Marks, M David

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is an economically important source of durable fibers, nutritious seeds, and psychoactive drugs but few economic plants are so poorly understood genetically. Marijuana and hemp were crossed to evaluate competing models of cannabinoid inheritance and to explain the predominance of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) in marijuana compared with cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) in hemp. Individuals in the resulting F2 population were assessed for differential expression of cannabinoid synthase genes and were used in linkage mapping. Genetic markers associated with divergent cannabinoid phenotypes were identified. Although phenotypic segregation and a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the THCA/CBDA ratio were consistent with a simple model of codominant alleles at a single locus, the diversity of THCA and CBDA synthase sequences observed in the mapping population, the position of enzyme coding loci on the map, and patterns of expression suggest multiple linked loci. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests a history of duplication and divergence affecting drug content. Marijuana is distinguished from hemp by a nonfunctional CBDA synthase that appears to have been positively selected to enhance psychoactivity. An unlinked QTL for cannabinoid quantity may also have played a role in the recent escalation of drug potency. PMID:26189495

  15. Duplicate Address Detection Table in IPv6 Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisherov, Farkhod; Kim, Taihoon

    In IP networks, each computer or communication equipment needs an IP address. To supply enough IP addresses, the new Internet protocol IPv6 is used in next generatoion mobile communication. Although IPv6 improves the existing IPv4 Internet protocol, Duplicate Address Detection (DAD) mechanism may consume resources and suffer from long delay. DAD is used to ensure whether the IP address is unique or not. When a mobile node performs an inter-domain handoff, it will first generate a new IP and perform a DAD procedure. The DAD procedure not only wastes time but also increases the signaling load on Internet. In this paper, the author proposes a new DAD mechanism to speed up the DAD procedure. A DAD table is created in access or mobility routers in IP networks and record all IP addresses of the area. When a new IP address needs to perform DAD, it can just search in the DAD table to confirm the uniqueness of the address.

  16. Duplicated Collecting System in a Series of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belde KASAP

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report a series of children with duplicated collecting system (DCS and associated problems. MATERIAL and METHODS: The data of patients with DCS between 1996 and 2011 was reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: DCS was reported in 59 (M/F:18/41 patients. Mean age at diagnosis was 81.5±41.3 (3- 159 months, mean follow-up duration was 32.2±29.1 (3-130 months. Presenting symptoms were urinary tract infection in 33, nocturnal enuresis in three, diurnal enuresis in two, kidney stones in three and miscellaneous in the rest of the patients. The diagnostic modalities were magnetic resonance urography in three, voiding cystourography in fi ve and intravenous pyelography in the rest. Twentyfour (41% had right-sided, 24 (41% had left-sided and 11 (18% had bilateral DCS in a total of 70 renal units. Insertion of ureters into the bladder could be demonstrated in 33 units (20 incomplete, 13 complete. Vesicoureteral refl ux was found in 16, and ureterocele was found in four renal units. There was refl ux to both moieties in two patients. Surgical interventions included partial nephrectomy in two, ureteroureterostomy in one and anti-refl ux surgery in three of the patients. One patient had Noonan Syndrome and another had atrial septal defect. CONCLUSION: This series was reported to emphasize the clinical and anatomical problems associated with DCS.

  17. Horizontal transfer, not duplication, drives the expansion of protein families in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Treangen

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus, average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes--xenologs--persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes--paralogs--are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein-protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families.

  18. Craniofacial Duplication (Diprosopus) in the Cat — Case Report and Review of the Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kitten displaying the features of symmetrical partial duplication of the head (diprosopus) is described. The morphological description of this double monster is compared to three previous similar cases. All four cases were similar in that duplication of the orbits and eyes were not completed and fission of the oral and nasal cavities and their contents were partial. Furthermore, the central nervous systems were duplicated as far caudal as the brain stem. Present case displayed cleft palate in the two faces, a feature that was not described earlier. Though diprosopus is a rare anomaly in cats, it is more common than in the dog, pig and sheep. In cattle, anterior duplications are one of the largest groups of congenital anomalies. Based on generally accepted considerations concerning the mechanism behind the formation of monozyous twins, conjoined twins and anterior duplications, integrated with experimental data on induction of duplications in animals, an hypothesis is proposed for early embryonic fission. It suggests a constant cleaving factor active along the median plane with affinity to midline structures. Its temporal relations with the developing embryo, especially in susceptible species, decide the degree and type of duplication

  19. Discarding duplicate ditags in LongSAGE analysis may introduce significant error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn Stephan A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During gene expression analysis by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, duplicate ditags are routinely removed from the data analysis, because they are suspected to stem from artifacts during SAGE library construction. As a consequence, naturally occurring duplicate ditags are also removed from the analysis leading to an error of measurement. Results An algorithm was developed to analyze the differential occurrence of SAGE tags in different ditag combinations. Analysis of a pancreatic acinar cell LongSAGE library showed no sign of a general amplification bias that justified the removal of all duplicate ditags. Extending the analysis to 10 additional LongSAGE libraries showed no justification for removal of all duplicate ditags either. On the contrary, while the error introduced in original SAGE by removal of naturally occurring duplicate ditags is insignificant, it leads to an error of up to 3 fold in LongSAGE. However, the algorithm developed for the analysis of duplicate ditags was able to identify individual artifact ditags that originated from rare nucleotide variations of tags and vector contamination. Conclusion The removal of all duplicate ditags was unfounded for the datasets analyzed and led to large errors. This may also be the case for other LongSAGE datasets already present in databases. Analysis of the ditag population, however, can identify artifact tags that should be removed from analysis or have their tag count adjusted.

  20. Penile Duplication and Two Anal Openings Report of a Very Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel Al M. Bakheet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Penile duplication (diphallus is an extremely rare disorder. It is almost always associated with other malformations like double bladder, exstrophy of the cloacae, imperforate anus, duplication of the rectosigmoid and vertebral deformities. Meanwhile anal canal duplication, the most distal and least common duplication of the digestive tube and is a very rare congenital malformation.Case Presentation: A 21 days old Egyptian neonate is reported with complete penile duplication and two scrotums with each one carrying two palpable testes. Both penises have normal shaft with normally located meatus. Clear urine voids from both meati spontaneously. The child had also a fold of redundant skin about 4×5 cm at the anal region in which two separate anal openings are present. In rectal examination we found two normal anuses passing stool spontaneously. Ascending (voiding cystourethrography revealed two penises with two separate meatuses and one bladder from which the two urethras go out separately. Intravenous pyelogram (IVP revealed two normal kidneys and ureters. Barium study revealed duplication of rectum and colon, otherwise normal GIT.Conclusion: In our review of the literature, we did not come across any other case of this variety of the penile duplication and congenital presence of two anuses. Unfortunately the patient expired before any surgical correction.

  1. Ancient genome duplications during the evolution of kiwifruit (Actinidia) and related Ericales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tao; Huang, Hongwen; Barker, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims To assess the number and phylogenetic distribution of large-scale genome duplications in the ancestry of Actinidia, publicly available expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) for members of the Actinidiaceae and related Ericales, including tea (Camellia sinensis), were analysed. Methods Synonymous divergences (Ks) were calculated for all duplications within gene families and examined for evidence of large-scale duplication events. Phylogenetic comparisons for a selection of orthologues among several related species in Ericales and two outgroups permitted placement of duplication events in relation to lineage divergences. Gene ontology (GO) categories were analysed for each whole-genome duplication (WGD) and the whole transcriptome. Key Results Evidence for three ancient WGDs in Actinidia was found. Analyses of paleologue GO categories indicated a different pattern of retained genes for each genome duplication, but a pattern consistent with the dosage-balance hypothesis among all retained paleologues. Conclusions This study provides evidence for one independent WGD in the ancestry of Actinidia (Ad-α), a WGD shared by Actinidia and Camellia (Ad-β), and the well-established At-γ WGD that occurred prior to the divergence of all taxa examined. More ESTs in other taxa are needed to elucidate which groups in Ericales share the Ad-β or Ad-α duplications and their impact on diversification. PMID:20576738

  2. Gene duplication in the major insecticide target site, Rdl, in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnant, Emily J; Good, Robert T; Schmidt, Joshua M; Lumb, Christopher; Robin, Charles; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip

    2013-09-01

    The Resistance to Dieldrin gene, Rdl, encodes a GABA-gated chloride channel subunit that is targeted by cyclodiene and phenylpyrazole insecticides. The gene was first characterized in Drosophila melanogaster by genetic mapping of resistance to the cyclodiene dieldrin. The 4,000-fold resistance observed was due to a single amino acid replacement, Ala(301) to Ser. The equivalent change was subsequently identified in Rdl orthologs of a large range of resistant insect species. Here, we report identification of a duplication at the Rdl locus in D. melanogaster. The 113-kb duplication contains one WT copy of Rdl and a second copy with two point mutations: an Ala(301) to Ser resistance mutation and Met(360) to Ile replacement. Individuals with this duplication exhibit intermediate dieldrin resistance compared with single copy Ser(301) homozygotes, reduced temperature sensitivity, and altered RNA editing associated with the resistant allele. Ectopic recombination between Roo transposable elements is involved in generating this genomic rearrangement. The duplication phenotypes were confirmed by construction of a transgenic, artificial duplication integrating the 55.7-kb Rdl locus with a Ser(301) change into an Ala(301) background. Gene duplications can contribute significantly to the evolution of insecticide resistance, most commonly by increasing the amount of gene product produced. Here however, duplication of the Rdl target site creates permanent heterozygosity, providing unique potential for adaptive mutations to accrue in one copy, without abolishing the endogenous role of an essential gene. PMID:23959864

  3. The X chromosome of monotremes shares a highly conserved region with the eutherian and marsupial X chromosomes despite the absence of X chromosome inactivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, J M; Spencer, J. A.; Riggs, A D; Graves, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Eight genes, located on the long arm of the human X chromosome and present on the marsupial X chromosome, were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomes of the platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus, one of the three species of monotreme mammals. All were located on the X chromosome. We conclude that the long arm of the human X chromosome represents a highly conserved region that formed part of the X chromosome in a mammalian ancestor at least 150 million years ago. Since three of these g...

  4. The roles of segmental and tandem gene duplication in the evolution of large gene families in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumgarten Andrew

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most genes in Arabidopsis thaliana are members of gene families. How do the members of gene families arise, and how are gene family copy numbers maintained? Some gene families may evolve primarily through tandem duplication and high rates of birth and death in clusters, and others through infrequent polyploidy or large-scale segmental duplications and subsequent losses. Results Our approach to understanding the mechanisms of gene family evolution was to construct phylogenies for 50 large gene families in Arabidopsis thaliana, identify large internal segmental duplications in Arabidopsis, map gene duplications onto the segmental duplications, and use this information to identify which nodes in each phylogeny arose due to segmental or tandem duplication. Examples of six gene families exemplifying characteristic modes are described. Distributions of gene family sizes and patterns of duplication by genomic distance are also described in order to characterize patterns of local duplication and copy number for large gene families. Both gene family size and duplication by distance closely follow power-law distributions. Conclusions Combining information about genomic segmental duplications, gene family phylogenies, and gene positions provides a method to evaluate contributions of tandem duplication and segmental genome duplication in the generation and maintenance of gene families. These differences appear to correspond meaningfully to differences in functional roles of the members of the gene families.

  5. 47 CFR 76.120 - Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Network non-duplication protection, syndicated... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.120 Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules...

  6. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  7. The hidden duplication past of the plant pathogen Phytophthora and its consequences for infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Cindy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oomycetes of the genus Phytophthora are pathogens that infect a wide range of plant species. For dicot hosts such as tomato, potato and soybean, Phytophthora is even the most important pathogen. Previous analyses of Phytophthora genomes uncovered many genes, large gene families and large genome sizes that can partially be explained by significant repeat expansion patterns. Results Analysis of the complete genomes of three different Phytophthora species, using a newly developed approach, unveiled a large number of small duplicated blocks, mainly consisting of two or three consecutive genes. Further analysis of these duplicated genes and comparison with the known gene and genome duplication history of ten other eukaryotes including parasites, algae, plants, fungi, vertebrates and invertebrates, suggests that the ancestor of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum most likely underwent a whole genome duplication (WGD. Genes that have survived in duplicate are mainly genes that are known to be preferentially retained following WGDs, but also genes important for pathogenicity and infection of the different hosts seem to have been retained in excess. As a result, the WGD might have contributed to the evolutionary and pathogenic success of Phytophthora. Conclusions The fact that we find many small blocks of duplicated genes indicates that the genomes of Phytophthora species have been heavily rearranged following the WGD. Most likely, the high repeat content in these genomes have played an important role in this rearrangement process. As a consequence, the paucity of retained larger duplicated blocks has greatly complicated previous attempts to detect remnants of a large-scale duplication event in Phytophthora. However, as we show here, our newly developed strategy to identify very small duplicated blocks might be a useful approach to uncover ancient polyploidy events, in particular for heavily rearranged genomes.

  8. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah L Rogers

    Full Text Available Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10-9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10-10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes.

  9. Antisense-induced exon skipping for duplications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting specific exons the DMD reading frame is restored and partially functional dystrophins are produced. Following proof of concept in cultured muscle cells from patients with various deletions and point mutations, we now focus on single and multiple exon duplications. These mutations are in principle ideal targets for this approach since the specific skipping of duplicated exons would generate original, full-length transcripts. Methods Cultured muscle cells from DMD patients carrying duplications were transfected with AONs targeting the duplicated exons, and the dystrophin RNA and protein were analyzed. Results For two brothers with an exon 44 duplication, skipping was, even at suboptimal transfection conditions, so efficient that both exons 44 were skipped, thus generating, once more, an out-of-frame transcript. In such cases, one may resort to multi-exon skipping to restore the reading frame, as is shown here by inducing skipping of exon 43 and both exons 44. By contrast, in cells from a patient with an exon 45 duplication we were able to induce single exon 45 skipping, which allowed restoration of wild type dystrophin. The correction of a larger duplication (involving exons 52 to 62, by combinations of AONs targeting the outer exons, appeared problematic due to inefficient skipping and mistargeting of original instead of duplicated exons. Conclusion The correction of DMD duplications by exon skipping depends on the specific exons targeted. Its options vary from the ideal one, restoring for the first time the true, wild type dystrophin, to requiring more 'classical' skipping strategies, while the correction of multi-exon deletions may need the design of tailored approaches.

  10. Genotype-phenotype characterization in 13 individuals with chromosome Xp11.22 duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Sarah E; Argiropoulos, Bob; Lines, Matthew; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Mcgowan-Jordan, Jean; Geraghty, Michael T; Tsang, Marilyn; Eswara, Marthand; Tezcan, Kamer; Adams, Kelly L; Linck, Leesa; Himes, Patricia; Kostiner, Dana; Zand, Dina J; Stalker, Heather; Driscoll, Daniel J; Huang, Taosheng; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Li, Xu; Chen, Emily

    2016-04-01

    We report 13 new individuals with duplications in Xp11.22-p11.23. The index family has one male and two female members in three generations with mild-severe intellectual disability (ID), speech delay, dysmorphic features, early puberty, constipation, and/or hand and foot abnormalities. Affected individuals were found to have two small duplications in Xp11.22 at nucleotide position (hg19) 50,112,063-50,456,458 bp (distal) and 53,160,114-53,713,154 bp (proximal). Collectively, these two regions include 14 RefSeq genes, prompting collection of a larger cohort of patients, in an attempt to delineate critical genes associated with the observed phenotype. In total, we have collected data on nine individuals with duplications overlapping the distal duplication region containing SHROOM4 and DGKK and eight individuals overlapping the proximal region including HUWE1. Duplications of HUWE1 have been previously associated with non-syndromic ID. Our data, with previously published reports, suggest that duplications involving SHROOM4 and DGKK may represent a new syndromic X-linked ID critical region associated with mild to severe ID, speech delay +/- dysarthria, attention deficit disorder, precocious puberty, constipation, and motor delay. We frequently observed foot abnormalities, 5th finger clinodactyly, tapering fingers, constipation, and exercise intolerance in patients with duplications of these two genes. Regarding duplications including the proximal region, our observations agree with previous studies, which have found associations with intellectual disability. In addition, expressive language delay, failure to thrive, motor delay, and 5th finger clinodactyly were also frequently observed in patients with the proximal duplication. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26692240

  11. Identification of the ancestral haplotype for apolipoprotein B suggests an African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and traces their subsequent migration to Europe and the Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probable ancestral haplotype for human apolipoprotein B (apoB) has been identified through immunological analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla serum and sequence analysis of their DNA. Moreover, the frequency of this ancestral apoB haplotype among different human populations provides strong support for the African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and their subsequent migration from Africa to Europe and to the Pacific. The approach used here for the identification of the ancestral human apoB haplotype is likely to be applicable to many other genes

  12. Identification of the ancestral haplotype for apolipoprotein B suggests an African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and traces their subsequent migration to Europe and the Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapacz, J.; Hasler-Rapacz, J.O. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)); Chen, L.; Wu, Mingjiuan; Schumaker, V.N. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Butler-Brunner, E.; Butler, R. (Swiss Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Bern (Switzerland))

    1991-02-15

    The probable ancestral haplotype for human apolipoprotein B (apoB) has been identified through immunological analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla serum and sequence analysis of their DNA. Moreover, the frequency of this ancestral apoB haplotype among different human populations provides strong support for the African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and their subsequent migration from Africa to Europe and to the Pacific. The approach used here for the identification of the ancestral human apoB haplotype is likely to be applicable to many other genes.

  13. The Crystal Structure of Aq_328 from the Hyperthermophilic Bacteria Aquifex aeolicus Shows an Ancestral Histone Fold

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Yang; Tereshko, Valentina; Kim, Youngchang; Zhang, Rongguang; Collart, Frank; Yousef, Mohammed; Kossiakoff, Anthony; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The structure of Aq_328, an uncharacterized protein from hyperthermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus, has been determined to 1.9 Å by using multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing. Although the amino acid sequence analysis shows that Aq_328 has no significant similarity to proteins with a known structure and function, the structure comparison by using the Dali server reveals that it: (1) assumes a histone-like fold, and (2) is similar to an ancestral nuclear histone protein (PDB ...

  14. Genotype-based ancestral background consistently predicts efficacy and side effects across treatments in CATIE and STAR*D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Adkins

    Full Text Available Only a subset of patients will typically respond to any given prescribed drug. The time it takes clinicians to declare a treatment ineffective leaves the patient in an impaired state and at unnecessary risk for adverse drug effects. Thus, diagnostic tests robustly predicting the most effective and safe medication for each patient prior to starting pharmacotherapy would have tremendous clinical value. In this article, we evaluated the use of genetic markers to estimate ancestry as a predictive component of such diagnostic tests. We first estimated each patient's unique mosaic of ancestral backgrounds using genome-wide SNP data collected in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE (n = 765 and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D (n = 1892. Next, we performed multiple regression analyses to estimate the predictive power of these ancestral dimensions. For 136/89 treatment-outcome combinations tested in CATIE/STAR*D, results indicated 1.67/1.84 times higher median test statistics than expected under the null hypothesis assuming no predictive power (p<0.01, both samples. Thus, ancestry showed robust and pervasive correlations with drug efficacy and side effects in both CATIE and STAR*D. Comparison of the marginal predictive power of MDS ancestral dimensions and self-reported race indicated significant improvements to model fit with the inclusion of MDS dimensions, but mixed evidence for self-reported race. Knowledge of each patient's unique mosaic of ancestral backgrounds provides a potent immediate starting point for developing algorithms identifying the most effective and safe medication for a wide variety of drug-treatment response combinations. As relatively few new psychiatric drugs are currently under development, such personalized medicine offers a promising approach toward optimizing pharmacotherapy for psychiatric conditions.

  15. Genetic evidence for the ancestral loss of short-wavelength-sensitive cone pigments in mysticete and odontocete cetaceans.

    OpenAIRE

    Levenson, D H; Dizon, A

    2003-01-01

    All mammals ancestrally possessed two types of cone pigments, an arrangement that persists in nearly all contemporary species. However, the absence of one of these cone types, the short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) cone, has recently been established in several delphinoid cetacean species, indicating that the loss of this pigment type may be widespread among cetaceans. To evaluate the functional condition of SWS cones in cetaceans, partial SWS cone-opsin gene sequences were obtained from nuclea...

  16. Effect of the assignment of ancestral CpG state on the estimation of nucleotide substitution rates in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keightley Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolutionary studies in mammals often estimate nucleotide substitution rates within and outside CpG dinucleotides separately. Frequently, in alignments of two sequences, the division of sites into CpG and non-CpG classes is based simply on the presence or absence of a CpG dinucleotide in either sequence, a procedure that we refer to as CpG/non-CpG assignment. Although it likely that this procedure is biased, it is generally assumed that the bias is negligible if species are very closely related. Results Using simulations of DNA sequence evolution we show that assignment of the ancestral CpG state based on the simple presence/absence of the CpG dinucleotide can seriously bias estimates of the substitution rate, because many true non-CpG changes are misassigned as CpG. Paradoxically, this bias is most severe between closely related species, because a minimum of two substitutions are required to misassign a true ancestral CpG site as non-CpG whereas only a single substitution is required to misassign a true ancestral non-CpG site as CpG in a two branch tree. We also show that CpG misassignment bias differentially affects fourfold degenerate and noncoding sites due to differences in base composition such that fourfold degenerate sites can appear to be evolving more slowly than noncoding sites. We demonstrate that the effects predicted by our simulations occur in a real evolutionary setting by comparing substitution rates estimated from human-chimp coding and intronic sequence using CpG/non-CpG assignment with estimates derived from a method that is largely free from bias. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that a common method of assigning sites into CpG and non CpG classes in pairwise alignments is seriously biased and recommends against the adoption of ad hoc methods of ancestral state assignment.

  17. Impacts of Plant-Based Foods in Ancestral Hominin Diets on the Metabolism and Function of Gut Microbiota In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Gary S Frost; Walton, Gemma E; Jonathan R Swann; Psichas, Arianna; Costabile, Adele; Johnson, Laura P.; Sponheimer, Matt; Glenn R Gibson; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ancestral human populations had diets containing more indigestible plant material than present-day diets in industrialized countries. One hypothesis for the rise in prevalence of obesity is that physiological mechanisms for controlling appetite evolved to match a diet with plant fiber content higher than that of present-day diets. We investigated how diet affects gut microbiota and colon cells by comparing human microbial communities with those from a primate that has an extreme plan...

  18. Impacts of plant-based foods in ancestral hominin diets on the metabolism and function of gut microbiota in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Gary S Frost; Gemma E Walton; Swann, Jonathan R.; Psichas, Arianna; Costabile, Adele; Laura P. Johnson; Sponheimer, Matt; Glenn R Gibson; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Ancestral human populations had diets containing more indigestible plant material than present-day diets in industrialized countries. One hypothesis for the rise in prevalence of obesity is that physiological mechanisms for controlling appetite evolved to match a diet with plant fiber content higher than that of present-day diets. We investigated how diet affects gut microbiota and colon cells by comparing human microbial communities with those from a primate that has an extreme plant-based d...

  19. Synchronous thoracic and abdominal enteric duplication cysts: Accurate detection with 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enteric duplication cysts (EDCs) are uncommon congenital anomalies, which can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract and vary greatly in presentation, size, location and symptoms. Ectopic gastric mucosa is reported to be found in 20-30% of these duplications. 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy is a useful modality for preoperative localization of the ectopic functioning gastric mucosa in the EDCs. We report a case where 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy was useful in detecting synchronous thoracic and abdominal duplication cysts with functioning gastric mucosa thus having an impact on the patient management

  20. BcMF26a and BcMF26b Are Duplicated Polygalacturonase Genes with Divergent Expression Patterns and Functions in Pollen Development and Pollen Tube Formation in Brassica campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Meiling; Yu, Youjian; Jiang, Jingjing; Song, Limin; Liang, Ying; Ma, Zhiming; Xiong, Xingpeng; Cao, Jiashu

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase (PG) is one of the cell wall hydrolytic enzymes involving in pectin degradation. A comparison of two highly conserved duplicated PG genes, namely, Brassica campestris Male Fertility 26a (BcMF26a) and BcMF26b, revealed the different features of their expression patterns and functions. We found that these two genes were orthologous genes of At4g33440, and they originated from a chromosomal segmental duplication. Although structurally similar, their regulatory and intron sequences largely diverged. QRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of BcMF26b was higher than that of BcMF26a in almost all the tested organs and tissues in Brassica campestris. Promoter activity analysis showed that, at reproductive development stages, BcMF26b promoter was active in tapetum, pollen grains, and pistils, whereas BcMF26a promoter was only active in pistils. In the subcellular localization experiment, BcMF26a and BcMF26b proteins could be localized to the cell wall. When the two genes were co-inhibited, pollen intine was formed abnormally and pollen tubes could not grow or stretch. Moreover, the knockout mutants of At4g33440 delayed the growth of pollen tubes. Therefore, BcMF26a/b can participate in the construction of pollen wall by modulating intine information and BcMF26b may play a major role in co-inhibiting transformed plants. PMID:26153985

  1. BcMF26a and BcMF26b Are Duplicated Polygalacturonase Genes with Divergent Expression Patterns and Functions in Pollen Development and Pollen Tube Formation in Brassica campestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Lyu

    Full Text Available Polygalacturonase (PG is one of the cell wall hydrolytic enzymes involving in pectin degradation. A comparison of two highly conserved duplicated PG genes, namely, Brassica campestris Male Fertility 26a (BcMF26a and BcMF26b, revealed the different features of their expression patterns and functions. We found that these two genes were orthologous genes of At4g33440, and they originated from a chromosomal segmental duplication. Although structurally similar, their regulatory and intron sequences largely diverged. QRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of BcMF26b was higher than that of BcMF26a in almost all the tested organs and tissues in Brassica campestris. Promoter activity analysis showed that, at reproductive development stages, BcMF26b promoter was active in tapetum, pollen grains, and pistils, whereas BcMF26a promoter was only active in pistils. In the subcellular localization experiment, BcMF26a and BcMF26b proteins could be localized to the cell wall. When the two genes were co-inhibited, pollen intine was formed abnormally and pollen tubes could not grow or stretch. Moreover, the knockout mutants of At4g33440 delayed the growth of pollen tubes. Therefore, BcMF26a/b can participate in the construction of pollen wall by modulating intine information and BcMF26b may play a major role in co-inhibiting transformed plants.

  2. Placental expression of pituitary hormones is an ancestral feature of therian mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menzies Brandon R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The placenta is essential for supplying nutrients and gases to the developing mammalian young before birth. While all mammals have a functional placenta, only in therian mammals (marsupials and eutherians does the placenta closely appose or invade the uterine endometrium. The eutherian placenta secretes hormones that are structurally and functionally similar to pituitary growth hormone (GH, prolactin (PRL and luteinizing hormone (LH. Marsupial and eutherian mammals diverged from a common ancestor approximately 125 to 148 million years ago and developed distinct reproductive strategies. As in eutherians, marsupials rely on a short-lived but functional placenta for embryogenesis. Results We characterized pituitary GH, GH-R, IGF-2, PRL and LHβ in a macropodid marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. These genes were expressed in the tammar placenta during the last third of gestation when most fetal growth occurs and active organogenesis is initiated. The mRNA of key growth genes GH, GH-R, IGF-2 and PRL were expressed during late pregnancy. We found significant up-regulation of GH, GH-R and IGF-2 after the start of the rapid growth phase of organogenesis which suggests that the placental growth hormones regulate the rapid phase of fetal growth. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of the existence of pituitary hormones in the marsupial placenta. Placental expression of these pituitary hormones has clearly been conserved in marsupials as in eutherian mammals, suggesting an ancestral origin of the evolution of placental expression and a critical function of these hormones in growth and development of all therian mammals.

  3. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inui, Ken [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Sagane, Yoshimasa [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Miyata, Keita [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Suzuki, Tomonori [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Shikamori, Yasuyuki [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan); Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-watana@bioindustry.nodai.ac.jp [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  4. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. ► NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. ► NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. ► Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X35-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  5. Paraphyly of organelle DNAs in Cycas Sect. Asiorientales due to ancient ancestral polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Tsai-Wen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study addresses the apportionment of genetic diversity between Cycas revoluta and C. taitungensis, species that constitute the section Asiorientales and represent a unique, basal lineage of the Laurasian genus Cycas. Fossil evidence indicates divergence of the section from the rest of Cycas at least 30 million years ago. Geographically, C. taitungensis is limited to Taiwan whereas C. revoluta is found in the Ryukyu Archipelago and on mainland China. Results The phylogenies of ribosomal ITS region of mtDNA and the intergenic spacer between atpB and rbcL genes of cpDNA were reconstructed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed paraphyly of both loci in the two species and also in the section Asiorientales. The lack of reciprocal monophyly between these long isolated sections is likely due to persistent shared ancestral polymorphisms. Molecular dating estimated that mt- and cp DNA lineages coalesced to the most recent common ancestors (TMRCA about 327 (mt and 204 MYA (cp, corresponding with the divergence of cycad sections in the Mesozoic. Conclusion Fates of newly derived mutations of cycads follow Klopfstein et al.'s surfing model where the majority of new mutations do not spread geographically and remain at low frequencies or are eventually lost by genetic drift. Only successful 'surfing mutations' reach very high frequencies and occupy a large portion of a species range. These mutations exist as dominant cytotypes across populations and species. Geographical subdivision is lacking in both species, even though recurrent gene flow by both pollen and seed is severely limited. In total, the contrasting levels between historical and ongoing gene flow, large population sizes, a long lifespan, and slow mutation rates in both organelle DNAs have all likely contributed to the unusually long duration of paraphyly in cycads.

  6. Can the US shale revolution be duplicated in Europe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, the rapid increase in shale gas and shale oil production in the United States has profoundly changed energy markets in North America, and has led to a significant decrease in American natural gas prices. The possible existence of large shale deposits in Europe, mainly in France, Poland and the United Kingdom, has fostered speculation on whether the 'shale revolution', and its accompanying macro-economic impacts, could be duplicated in Europe. However, a number of uncertainties, notably geological, technological and regulatory, make this possibility unclear. We present a techno-economic model, SHERPA (Shale Exploitation and Recovery Projection and Analysis), to analyze the main determinants of the profitability of shale wells and plays. We calibrate our model using production data from the leading American shale plays. We use SHERPA to estimate three shale gas production scenarios exploring different sets of geological and technical hypotheses for the largest potential holder of shale gas deposits in Europe, France. Even considering that the geology of the potential French shale deposits is favorable to commercial extraction, we find that under assumptions calibrated on U.S. production data, natural gas could be produced at a high breakeven price of $8.6 per MMBtu, and over a 45 year time-frame have a net present value of $19.6 billion - less than 1% of 2012 French GDP. However, the specificities of the European context, notably high deposit depth and stricter environmental regulations, could increase drilling costs and further decrease this low profitability. We find that a 40% premium over American drilling costs would make shale gas extraction uneconomical. Absent extreme well productivity, it appears very difficult for shale gas extraction to have an impact on European energy markets comparable to the American shale revolution. (author)

  7. Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Peter W H

    2015-01-01

    The Cambrian explosion describes an apparently rapid increase in the diversity of bilaterian animals around 540-515 million years ago. Bilaterian animals explore the world in three-dimensions deploying forward-facing sense organs, a brain, and an anterior mouth; they possess muscle blocks enabling efficient crawling and burrowing in sediments, and they typically have an efficient 'through-gut' with separate mouth and anus to process bulk food and eject waste, even when burrowing in sediment. A variety of ecological, environmental, genetic, and developmental factors have been proposed as possible triggers and correlates of the Cambrian explosion, and it is likely that a combination of factors were involved. Here, I focus on a set of developmental genetic changes and propose these are part of the mix of permissive factors. I describe how ANTP-class homeobox genes, which encode transcription factors involved in body patterning, increased in number in the bilaterian stem lineage and earlier. These gene duplications generated a large array of ANTP class genes, including three distinct gene clusters called NK, Hox, and ParaHox. Comparative data supports the idea that NK genes were deployed primarily to pattern the bilaterian mesoderm, Hox genes coded position along the central nervous system, and ParaHox genes most likely originally specified the mouth, midgut, and anus of the newly evolved through-gut. It is proposed that diversification of ANTP class genes played a role in the Cambrian explosion by contributing to the patterning systems used to build animal bodies capable of high-energy directed locomotion, including active burrowing. PMID:26605046

  8. Bilateral inferior vena cava filter insertion in a patient with duplication of the infrarenal vena cava.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, S

    2010-06-19

    BACKGROUND: Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter insertion is a commonly performed procedure for indications such as recurrent pulmonary emboli or contraindication to anticoagulation. Symptomatic duplication of the IVC is exceedingly rare with only a handful of cases being described in the literature. AIM: We report an unusual case of a patient with symptomatic duplication of the IVC. RESULT: A 53-year-old woman presented at our hospital for resection of a cerebral metastasis from a non-small cell lung cancer following a recent diagnosis of bilateral lower limb deep venous thrombosis. This required perioperative reversal of anticoagulation and IVC filter insertion. Conventional venography performed during filter insertion documented the existence of a duplicated IVC. CONCLUSION: We present a case of a symptomatic duplication of the IVC requiring filter insertion. We review the developmental anatomy of the IVC along with the diagnostic findings and management strategies available.

  9. Acute abdominal pain presenting as a rare appendiceal duplication: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Appendiceal duplication is a rare anomaly that can manifest as right lower quadrant pain. There are several variations described for this condition. We recommend aggressive operative management should this anatomical variation present in the presence of acute appendicitis. Case presentation We report the case of a 15-year-old African American girl who presented to our hospital with right lower quadrant pain and was subsequently found to have appendiceal duplication. Conclusion There are two categorical systems that have described and stratified appendiceal duplication. Both classification systems have been outlined and referenced in this case report. A computed tomography scan has been included to provide a visual aid to help identify true vermiform appendiceal duplication. The presence of this anatomical abnormality is not a reason for surgical intervention; however, should this be found in the setting of acute appendicitis, aggressive resection of both appendices is mandatory.

  10. Ocular findings associated with chromosome 22q11.2 duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Brian J; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Wootton, Georgia; Dawson, Lindsay; Zackai, Elaine; Binenbaum, Gil

    2016-06-01

    We describe the ocular features of the chromosome 22q11.2 duplication syndrome and provide ophthalmologic examination recommendations for affected patients. The medical records of 19 children with chromosome 22q11.2 duplication who had undergone complete ophthalmological examination, including dilated fundus examination and cycloplegic refraction, were studied retrospectively. Over half of the children with 22q11.2 duplication syndrome were found to have visually significant ocular abnormalities, including 6 with strabismus, 2 with moderately high astigmatism requiring glasses, 1 with unilateral congenital cataract requiring surgery, 1 with optic disk drusen, 1 with bilateral megalocornea with normal eye pressures, 1 with nystagmus that resolved spontaneously, and 1 with delayed visual maturation. Because of the high incidence of conditions that could affect visual development, we recommend that children with 22q11.2 duplication syndrome have a complete ophthalmological examination on diagnosis and regular vision screenings by their primary care physician thereafter. PMID:27108843

  11. Gene duplication and the origins of morphological complexity in pancrustacean eyes, a genomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serb Jeanne M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplication and divergence of genes and genetic networks is hypothesized to be a major driver of the evolution of complexity and novel features. Here, we examine the history of genes and genetic networks in the context of eye evolution by using new approaches to understand patterns of gene duplication during the evolution of metazoan genomes. We hypothesize that 1 genes involved in eye development and phototransduction have duplicated and are retained at higher rates in animal clades that possess more distinct types of optical design; and 2 genes with functional relationships were duplicated and lost together, thereby preserving genetic networks. To test these hypotheses, we examine the rates and patterns of gene duplication and loss evident in 19 metazoan genomes, including that of Daphnia pulex - the first completely sequenced crustacean genome. This is of particular interest because the pancrustaceans (hexapods+crustaceans have more optical designs than any other major clade of animals, allowing us to test specifically whether the high amount of disparity in pancrustacean eyes is correlated with a higher rate of duplication and retention of vision genes. Results Using protein predictions from 19 metazoan whole-genome projects, we found all members of 23 gene families known to be involved in eye development or phototransduction and deduced their phylogenetic relationships. This allowed us to estimate the number and timing of gene duplication and loss events in these gene families during animal evolution. When comparing duplication/retention rates of these genes, we found that the rate was significantly higher in pancrustaceans than in either vertebrates or non-pancrustacean protostomes. Comparing patterns of co-duplication across Metazoa showed that while these eye-genes co-duplicate at a significantly higher rate than those within a randomly shuffled matrix, many genes with known functional relationships in model organisms

  12. Combined duplication of the colon and vermiform appendix in an adult patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sahin Kabay; Mehmet Yucel; Faik Yaylak; Alper Hacioglu; Mustafa C Algin; Esra G Olgun; Levent Sahin; Tayfun Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Combined duplication of the colon and vermiform appendix is one of the rare congenital anomalities of the alimentary tract. Only a few cases have been reported in the adult population. A 28-year-old man presented to the clinic with a mass in the right flank. Imaging showed only a hydronephrotic atrophic kidney. The final diagnosis was only available at exploration. Combined duplication of the tubular colon and vermiform appendix was confirmed histopathologically. The patient was treated with nephrectomy and complete resection of the duplicated colon and vermiform appendix. The patient recovered uneventfully, and has done well for the past year. This is believed to be one of the first reports of combined duplication of the tubular colon and vermiform appendix as a cause of hydronephrotic atrophic kidney in an adult patient.

  13. Epicardial oesophageal duplication with hiatal hernia in a case of Turner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors of this paper report the first case of epicardial oesophageal duplication causing hiatal hernia in a patient afflicted with Turner's syndrome, and they discuss its possible etiology. (orig.)

  14. Management of gallbladder duplication using a single-site robotic-assisted approach: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Melanie Adams; Kaplin, Aviva Wallace; Kushnir, Leon; Montero-Pearson, Per

    2016-06-01

    Gallbladder duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. Here, we describe a 29-year-old female who presents with classic symptoms of biliary colic. A duplicated gallbladder was recognized on preoperative ultrasound. This case report reviews a single-site robotic-assisted cholecystectomy with a cystic duct duplication. The patient underwent the surgery without complication. Due to the aberrant anatomy of the cystic triangle, it was decided to mobilize the gallbladder in a dome-down fashion. True gallbladder duplication can be categorized according to cystic duct orientation based on Boyden's classification. Preoperative diagnosis is essential to prevent surgical complications. A laparoscopic approach can be carried out safely in the hands of a skilled surgeon. This case report shows that the robotic-assisted surgical approach is a viable and safe alternative. PMID:27039190

  15. Characterization of patients with duplicated z-hypnotic use: A population-based study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hua Hsieh, MS

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Duplicated z-hypnotic users were more likely to receive prescriptions with long duration and high daily dose. Healthcare professionals and policy makers are recommended to put more efforts into dealing with this urgent drug safety issue.

  16. Duplication of the IGFBP-2 gene in teleost fish: protein structure and functionality conservation and gene expression divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 is a secreted protein that binds and regulates IGF actions in controlling growth, development, reproduction, and aging. Elevated expression of IGFBP-2 is often associated with progression of many types of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the identification and characterization of two IGFBP-2 genes in zebrafish and four other teleost fish. Comparative genomics and structural analyses suggest that they are co-orthologs of the human IGFBP-2 gene. Biochemical assays show that both zebrafish igfbp-2a and -2b encode secreted proteins that bind IGFs. These two genes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. During embryogenesis, IGFBP-2a mRNA is initially detected in the lens, then in the brain boundary vasculature, and subsequently becomes highly expressed in the liver. In the adult stage, liver has the highest levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA, followed by the brain. Low levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA were detected in muscle and in the gonad in male adults only. IGFBP-2b mRNA is detected initially in all tissues at low levels, but later becomes abundant in the liver. In adult males, IGFBP-2b mRNA is only detected in the liver. In adult females, it is also found in the gut, kidney, ovary, and muscle. To gain insights into how the IGFBP-2 genes may have evolved through partitioning of ancestral functions, functional and mechanistic studies were carried out. Expression of zebrafish IGFBP-2a and -2b caused significant decreases in the growth and developmental rates and their effects are comparable to that of human IGFBP-2. IGFBP-2 mutants with altered IGF binding-, RGD-, and heparin-binding sites were generated and their actions examined. While mutating the RGD and heparin binding sites had little effect, altering the IGF binding site abolished its biological activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that IGFBP-2 is a conserved regulatory protein and it inhibits

  17. The fate of the duplicated androgen receptor in fishes: a late neofunctionalization event?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haendler Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the observation of an increased number of paralogous genes in teleost fishes compared with other vertebrates and on the conserved synteny between duplicated copies, it has been shown that a whole genome duplication (WGD occurred during the evolution of Actinopterygian fish. Comparative phylogenetic dating of this duplication event suggests that it occurred early on, specifically in teleosts. It has been proposed that this event might have facilitated the evolutionary radiation and the phenotypic diversification of the teleost fish, notably by allowing the sub- or neo-functionalization of many duplicated genes. Results In this paper, we studied in a wide range of Actinopterygians the duplication and fate of the androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4, a nuclear receptor known to play a key role in sex-determination in vertebrates. The pattern of AR gene duplication is consistent with an early WGD event: it has been duplicated into two genes AR-A and AR-B after the split of the Acipenseriformes from the lineage leading to teleost fish but before the divergence of Osteoglossiformes. Genomic and syntenic analyses in addition to lack of PCR amplification show that one of the duplicated copies, AR-B, was lost in several basal Clupeocephala such as Cypriniformes (including the model species zebrafish, Siluriformes, Characiformes and Salmoniformes. Interestingly, we also found that, in basal teleost fish (Osteoglossiformes and Anguilliformes, the two copies remain very similar, whereas, specifically in Percomorphs, one of the copies, AR-B, has accumulated substitutions in both the ligand binding domain (LBD and the DNA binding domain (DBD. Conclusion The comparison of the mutations present in these divergent AR-B with those known in human to be implicated in complete, partial or mild androgen insensitivity syndrome suggests that the existence of two distinct AR duplicates may be correlated to specific functional differences that may be

  18. Intestinal duplication and retroperitoneal teratoma in child hoof: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a case of intestinal duplication and retroperitoneal teratoma in a 7-year-old patient with evident mass and abdominal pain to explain; that it was submitted to study conventional X-ray, ultrasonography, computed tomography and subsequent exploiting laparotomia. The anatomopathological study verified intestinal duplication and ripe teratoma. In the existent medical literature it was not found any similar case. (author)

  19. Mouse model implicates GNB3 duplication in a childhood obesity syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Goldlust, Ian S.; Hermetz, Karen E.; Catalano, Lisa M.; Barfield, Richard T.; Cozad, Rebecca; Wynn, Grace; Ozdemir, Alev Cagla; Conneely, Karen N.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Dharamrup, Shikha; Hegde, Madhuri R.; Kim, Katherine H.; Angle, Brad; Colley, Alison; Webb, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a genomic disorder that causes obesity, intellectual disability, and seizures. Children with this syndrome carry an unbalanced chromosome translocation that results in the duplication of over 100 genes, including G protein β3 (GNB3). Although GNB3 polymorphisms have been associated with obesity, hypertension, and diabetes, the mechanism of GNB3 pathogenesis is unknown. We created a transgenic mouse model that carries a duplication of GNB3, weighs significantly more than wild-type ...

  20. Approximating the edit distance for genomes with duplicate genes under DCJ, insertion and deletion

    OpenAIRE

    Shao Mingfu; Lin Yu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Computing the edit distance between two genomes under certain operations is a basic problem in the study of genome evolution. The double-cut-and-join (DCJ) model has formed the basis for most algorithmic research on rearrangements over the last few years. The edit distance under the DCJ model can be easily computed for genomes without duplicate genes. In this paper, we study the edit distance for genomes with duplicate genes under a model that includes DCJ operations, insertions and ...

  1. Host Mitochondrial Association Evolved in the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii via Neofunctionalization of a Gene Duplicate

    OpenAIRE

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; English, Elizabeth D.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Pernas, Lena F.; Parker, Michelle L.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Boyle, Jon P.

    2016-01-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other animals, host mitochondrial association (HMA) is driven by a gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. However, the importance of MAF1 gene duplication in the evolution of HMA is not understood, nor is the impact of HMA on parasite biology. Here we used within- and between-species comparative analysis to determine that the MAF1 locus is duplicated in T. gondii and its nearest extant...

  2. Divergence of Gene Body DNA Methylation and Evolution of Plant Duplicate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that gene body DNA methylation is associated with gene expression. However, whether and how deviation of gene body DNA methylation between duplicate genes can influence their divergence remains largely unexplored. Here, we aim to elucidate the potential role of gene body DNA methylation in the fate of duplicate genes. We identified paralogous gene pairs from Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) genomes and reprocessed their single-base resolution methylome data....

  3. Advanced Bloom Filter Based Algorithms for Efficient Approximate Data De-Duplication in Streams

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Suman K.; Dutta, Sourav; Narang, Ankur; Bhattacherjee, Souvik

    2012-01-01

    Applications involving telecommunication call data records, web pages, online transactions, medical records, stock markets, climate warning systems, etc., necessitate efficient management and processing of such massively exponential amount of data from diverse sources. De-duplication or Intelligent Compression in streaming scenarios for approximate identification and elimination of duplicates from such unbounded data stream is a greater challenge given the real-time nature of data arrival. St...

  4. Duplication of the cervical esophagus: a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a newborn with a cervical esophageal duplication cyst, a rare developmental anomaly of the neck. Only a few cases of this cystic entity have been described in the literature to date. This case is unique in that the patient had an air-fluid level within the lesion as a result of communication of the duplication cyst with the native esophagus. (orig.)

  5. Concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in three related seabird species

    OpenAIRE

    Birt Tim P; Taylor Scott A; Morris-Pocock James A; Friesen Vicki L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Many population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) assume that mitochondrial genomes do not undergo recombination. Recently, concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions has been documented in a range of taxa. Although the molecular mechanism that facilitates concerted evolution is unknown, all proposed mechanisms involve mtDNA recombination. Results Here, we document a duplication of a large region (cytochrome b, tRNAThr, tRN...

  6. Evolutionary Patterns of RNA-Based Duplication in Non-Mammalian Chordates

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Chen; Ming Zou; Beide Fu; Xin Li; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Xiaoni Gan; Dengqiang Wang; Wen Wang; Manyuan Long; Shunping He

    2011-01-01

    The role of RNA-based duplication, or retroposition, in the evolution of new gene functions in mammals, plants, and Drosophila has been widely reported. However, little is known about RNA-based duplication in non-mammalian chordates. In this study, we screened ten non-mammalian chordate genomes for retrocopies and investigated their evolutionary patterns. We identified numerous retrocopies in these species. Examination of the age distribution of these retrocopies revealed no burst of young re...

  7. Imaging Findings of Duodenal Duplication Cyst Complicated with Duodenal Intussusception and Biliary Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Diez, Eduardo; Pellón Dabén, Raúl; Crespo Del Pozo, Juan; González Sánchez, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal duplication cyst is an extremely rare congenital anomaly usually diagnosed in childhood. However, it may remain asymptomatic for a long period. In adults it usually manifests with symptoms related to complications as pancreatitis, jaundice, or intussusception. We present the radiology findings of a patient with a duodenal intussusception secondary to a duplication cyst. The usefulness of the magnetic resonance (MR) in this case is highlighted. PMID:26989550

  8. Multiple Enteric Duplication Cysts in a Twin Fetus: Diagnosis and management

    OpenAIRE

    Shahila Sheik; Mariam Mathew; Mohamed Abdellatif; Asim Qureshi; Prakash Mandhan

    2013-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract. These can be suspected if cystic lesions are noted in the fetal abdomen during an antenatal ultrasonogram. The differential diagnoses of fetal intra-abdominal cystic lesions include fetal omental cysts, fetal mesenteric cysts, meconium pseudocysts and fetal ovarian cysts. We report an antenatally diagnosed enteric duplication cyst in one of a set of twin fetuses which was managed successfully.

  9. Evolution of pigment synthesis pathways by gene and genome duplication in fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volff Jean-Nicolas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coloration and color patterning belong to the most diverse phenotypic traits in animals. Particularly, teleost fishes possess more pigment cell types than any other group of vertebrates. As the result of an ancient fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD, teleost genomes might contain more copies of genes involved in pigment cell development than tetrapods. No systematic genomic inventory allowing to test this hypothesis has been drawn up so far for pigmentation genes in fish, and almost nothing is known about the evolution of these genes in different fish lineages. Results Using a comparative genomic approach including phylogenetic reconstructions and synteny analyses, we have studied two major pigment synthesis pathways in teleost fish, the melanin and the pteridine pathways, with respect to different types of gene duplication. Genes encoding three of the four enzymes involved in the synthesis of melanin from tyrosine have been retained as duplicates after the FSGD. In the pteridine pathway, two cases of duplicated genes originating from the FSGD as well as several lineage-specific gene duplications were observed. In both pathways, genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes, tyrosinase and GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GchI, have additional paralogs in teleosts compared to tetrapods, which have been generated by different modes of duplication. We have also observed a previously unrecognized diversity of gchI genes in vertebrates. In addition, we have found evidence for divergent resolution of duplicated pigmentation genes, i.e., differential gene loss in divergent teleost lineages, particularly in the tyrosinase gene family. Conclusion Mainly due to the FSGD, teleost fishes apparently have a greater repertoire of pigment synthesis genes than any other vertebrate group. Our results support an important role of the FSGD and other types of duplication in the evolution of pigmentation in fish.

  10. Impact of picture archiving communication systems on rates of duplicate imaging: a before-after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Lingsong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic health information systems, such as picture archiving communication systems (PACS, are commonly believed to reduce the need for duplicate testing. However, empirical data to support this belief are not available. Methods Before-after study using administrative claims data from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan to determine whether the introduction of PACS at 10 hospitals in the Thames Valley region of southwestern Ontario, Canada between June 2004 and December 2005 reduced the frequency of duplicate imaging examinations. The imaging modalities studied were: chest and abdominal X-ray; computed tomography of the abdomen/pelvis, head, and chest. The frequency of duplicate testing was examined at 3 different time frames: 7 days, 30 days, and 60 days after a given index test. Results Overall frequencies of duplicate imaging were: 2.7% within 7 days of an index imaging test, 6.7% within 30 days, and 9.8% within 60 days. Comparing the 12 months before and 12 months after PACS, absolute reductions in the frequency of duplicate X-rays using 7-day, 30-day, and 60-day time frames were: 0.2% (P = 0.01, 0.6% (P increases in the frequency of duplicate CT scans after PACS of 0.0% (P = 0.92, 0.5% (P = 0.01, and 0.5% (P = 0.01, respectively. Conclusion The frequency of duplicate imaging is relatively low and we did not find large reductions in duplicate imaging after the introduction of PACS. Independent evaluation of electronic medical systems should be conducted to confirm widely held beliefs of their potential benefits.

  11. Divergence of exonic splicing elements after gene duplication and the impact on gene structures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhou, Li; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xianfeng; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2009-01-01

    Background The origin of new genes and their contribution to functional novelty has been the subject of considerable interest. There has been much progress in understanding the mechanisms by which new genes originate. Here we examine a novel way that new gene structures could originate, namely through the evolution of new alternative splicing isoforms after gene duplication. Results We studied the divergence of exonic splicing enhancers and silencers after gene duplication and the contributio...

  12. Bowel conservation in a case of giant jejuno-ileal duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sham Minakshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of very long tubular bowel duplications poses a special challenge to even the most skilled surgeon. In these cases, mucosal stripping is usually employed. We report a novel case of a two-year-old boy, with 120 cm long jejuno-ileal duplication, wherein, bowel salvage was achieved, utilizing the Bianchi principle, originally described for bowel lengthening in cases of short bowel syndrome.

  13. De-Duplication Complexity of Fingerprint Data in Large-Scale Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nalla Pattabhi Ramaiah; C. Krishna Mohan

    2014-01-01

    De-duplication using biometrics has gained much attention from research communities as it provides a unique identity for each and every individual among the large population. De-duplication is the process of removing the instances of multiple enrollments by the same person using the person’s biometric data. An important issue in the large-scale de-duplication applications is the speed of matching and the accuracy of the matching because the number of persons to be enrolled runs into millions. This paper presents an efficient method to improve the accuracy of fingerprint de-duplication in de-centralized manner. De-duplication accuracy decreases because of the noise present in the data, which would cause improper slap fingerprint segmentation. In this paper, an attempt is made to remove the noise present in the data by using binarization of slap fingerprint images and region labeling of desired regions with 8-adjacency neighborhood. The distinct feature of this technique is to remove the noise present in the data for an accurate slap fingerprint segmentation and improve the de-duplica- tion accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate that the fingerprint segmentation rate and de-duplication accuracy are improved significantly.

  14. Reprever: resolving low-copy duplicated sequences using template driven assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Medvedev, Paul; Paton, Tara A; Bafna, Vineet

    2013-07-01

    Genomic sequence duplication is an important mechanism for genome evolution, often resulting in large sequence variations with implications for disease progression. Although paired-end sequencing technologies are commonly used for structural variation discovery, the discovery of novel duplicated sequences remains an unmet challenge. We analyze duplicons starting from identified high-copy number variants. Given paired-end mapped reads, and a candidate high-copy region, our tool, Reprever, identifies (a) the insertion breakpoints where the extra duplicons inserted into the donor genome and (b) the actual sequence of the duplicon. Reprever resolves ambiguous mapping signatures from existing homologs, repetitive elements and sequencing errors to identify breakpoint. At each breakpoint, Reprever reconstructs the inserted sequence using profile hidden Markov model (PHMM)-based guided assembly. In a test on 1000 artificial genomes with simulated duplication, Reprever could identify novel duplicates up to 97% of genomes within 3 bp positional and 1% sequence errors. Validation on 680 fosmid sequences identified and reconstructed eight duplicated sequences with high accuracy. We applied Reprever to reanalyzing a re-sequenced data set from the African individual NA18507 to identify >800 novel duplicates, including insertions in genes and insertions with additional variation. polymerase chain reaction followed by capillary sequencing validated both the insertion locations of the strongest predictions and their predicted sequence. PMID:23658221

  15. Detection of age-related duplications in mtDNA from human muscles and bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacan, Marie; Thèves, Catherine; Keyser, Christine; Farrugia, Audrey; Baraybar, Jose-Pablo; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2011-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the age-related accumulation of duplications in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extracted from skeletal muscle. This kind of mutation had not yet been studied in bone. The detection of age-related mutations in bone tissue could help to estimate age at death within the context of legal medicine or/and anthropological identification procedures, when traditional osteological markers studied are absent or inefficient. As we detected an accumulation of a point mutation in mtDNA from an older individual's bones in a previous study, we tried here to identify if three reported duplications (150, 190, 260 bp) accumulate in this type of tissue. We developed a sensitive method which consists in the use of back-to-back primers during amplification followed by an electrophoresis capillary analysis. The aim of this study was to confirm that at least one duplication appears systematically in muscle tissue after the age of 20 and to evaluate the duplication age appearance in bones extracted from the same individuals. We found that the number of duplications increase from 38 years and that at least one duplicated fragment is present in 50% of cases after 70 years in this tissue. These results confirm that several age-related mutations can be detected in the D-loop of mtDNA and open the way for the use of molecular markers for age estimation in forensic and/or anthropological identification. PMID:20358214

  16. Analysis of the DNA sequence and duplication history of human chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Sharpe, Ted; Young, Sarah K; Rowen, Lee; O'Neill, Keith; Whittaker, Charles A; Kamal, Michael; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Yang, Xiaoping; Abbasi, Nissa; Abouelleil, Amr; Arachchi, Harindra M; Baradarani, Lida; Birditt, Brian; Bloom, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Burke, Jeremy; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dorris, Lester; Dors, Monica; Eichler, Evan E; Engels, Reinhard; Fahey, Jessica; Fleetwood, Peter; Friedman, Cynthia; Gearin, Gary; Hall, Jennifer L; Hensley, Grace; Johnson, Ericka; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kaur, Amardeep; Locke, Devin P; Madan, Anuradha; Munson, Glen; Jaffe, David B; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Naylor, Jerome W; Nesbitt, Ryan; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Ratcliffe, Amber; Rounsley, Steven; She, Xinwei; Sneddon, Katherine M B; Stewart, Sandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Stone, Sabrina M; Topham, Kerri; Vincent, Dascena; Wang, Shunguang; Zimmer, Andrew R; Birren, Bruce W; Hood, Leroy; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-03-30

    Here we present a finished sequence of human chromosome 15, together with a high-quality gene catalogue. As chromosome 15 is one of seven human chromosomes with a high rate of segmental duplication, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the duplication structure of the chromosome. Segmental duplications in chromosome 15 are largely clustered in two regions, on proximal and distal 15q; the proximal region is notable because recombination among the segmental duplications can result in deletions causing Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. Sequence analysis shows that the proximal and distal regions of 15q share extensive ancient similarity. Using a simple approach, we have been able to reconstruct many of the events by which the current duplication structure arose. We find that most of the intrachromosomal duplications seem to share a common ancestry. Finally, we demonstrate that some remaining gaps in the genome sequence are probably due to structural polymorphisms between haplotypes; this may explain a significant fraction of the gaps remaining in the human genome. PMID:16572171

  17. Concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in three related seabird species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birt Tim P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA assume that mitochondrial genomes do not undergo recombination. Recently, concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions has been documented in a range of taxa. Although the molecular mechanism that facilitates concerted evolution is unknown, all proposed mechanisms involve mtDNA recombination. Results Here, we document a duplication of a large region (cytochrome b, tRNAThr, tRNAPro, ND6, tRNAGlu and the control region in the mitochondrial genome of three related seabird species. To investigate the evolution of duplicate control regions, we sequenced both control region copies (CR1 and CR2 from 21 brown (Sula leucogaster, 21 red-footed (S. sula and 21 blue-footed boobies (S. nebouxii. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the duplicated control regions are predominantly evolving in concert; however, approximately 51 base pairs at the 5' end of CR1 and CR2 exhibited a discordant phylogenetic signal and appeared to be evolving independently. Conclusions Both the structure of the duplicated region and the conflicting phylogenetic signals are remarkably similar to a pattern found in Thalassarche albatrosses, which are united with boobies in a large clade that includes all procellariiform and most pelecaniform seabirds. Therefore we suggest that concerted evolution of duplicated control regions either is taxonomically widespread within seabirds, or that it has evolved many times.

  18. Gene Duplication, Gene Conversion and the Evolution of the Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Nonrecombining chromosomes, such as the Y, are expected to degenerate over time due to reduced efficacy of natural selection compared to chromosomes that recombine. However, gene duplication, coupled with gene conversion between duplicate pairs, can potentially counteract forces of evolutionary decay that accompany asexual reproduction. Using a combination of analytical and computer simulation methods, we explicitly show that, although gene conversion has little impact on the probability that duplicates become fixed within a population, conversion can be effective at maintaining the functionality of Y-linked duplicates that have already become fixed. The coupling of Y-linked gene duplication and gene conversion between paralogs can also prove costly by increasing the rate of nonhomologous crossovers between duplicate pairs. Such crossovers can generate an abnormal Y chromosome, as was recently shown to reduce male fertility in humans. The results represent a step toward explaining some of the more peculiar attributes of the human Y as well as preliminary Y-linked sequence data from other mammals and Drosophila. The results may also be applicable to the recently observed pattern of tetraploidy and gene conversion in asexual, bdelloid rotifers. PMID:20551442

  19. Processes of fungal proteome evolution and gain of function: gene duplication and domain rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During evolution, organisms have gained functional complexity mainly by modifying and improving existing functioning systems rather than creating new ones ab initio. Here we explore the interplay between two processes which during evolution have had major roles in the acquisition of new functions: gene duplication and protein domain rearrangements. We consider four possible evolutionary scenarios: gene families that have undergone none of these event types; only gene duplication; only domain rearrangement, or both events. We characterize each of the four evolutionary scenarios by functional attributes. Our analysis of ten fungal genomes indicates that at least for the fungi clade, species significantly appear to gain complexity by gene duplication accompanied by the expansion of existing domain architectures via rearrangements. We show that paralogs gaining new domain architectures via duplication tend to adopt new functions compared to paralogs that preserve their domain architectures. We conclude that evolution of protein families through gene duplication and domain rearrangement is correlated with their functional properties. We suggest that in general, new functions are acquired via the integration of gene duplication and domain rearrangements rather than each process acting independently

  20. Duplicate study on the dietary intake of PCDD/F by small children from Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dietary intake of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) by 42 small children at the age of 14 to 47 months was measured by the duplicate method. The children were living in urban or rural areas of Northrhine-Westphalia, Germany, and had different food consumption behaviour. The duplicates were collected over a period of seven days between May and September 1998. The PCDD/F-levels in the food duplicates were in the range of 39.2 to 325 pg I-TEq/kgdryweight (median: 90.7; arithmetic mean: 96.6). The doses were between 0.681 and 5.43 pg I-TEq/(kgbodyweight day) with a median of 1.56 and an arithmetric mean of 1.60. The aspired limit of 1 pg I-TEq/(kgbodyweight . day) was exceeded by most children. Food duplicates of children living in an urban industrialized area with food consumption including products from the family owned vegetable gardens or the surrounding area and/or products from domestic animals showed no statistically significant different PCDD/F-concentrations, calculated as I-TEq, than food duplicates of children living in a rural area with similar food consumption behavior or than food duplicates of children consuming exclusively food from the supermarket. The same was observed for the calculated intake rates of PCDD/F. Efforts to reduce the contamination of food with PCDD/F should be continued. (orig.)

  1. A Common Ancestral Mutation in CRYBB3 Identified in Multiple Consanguineous Families with Congenital Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Li, David; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2016-01-01

    development. Conclusion Here, we report a common ancestral mutation in CRYBB3 associated with autosomal recessive congenital cataracts identified in four familial cases of Pakistani origin. PMID:27326458

  2. Effects of interleukin-10 on cutaneous wounds and scars in humans of African continental ancestral origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieran, Ingrid; Taylor, Catherine; Bush, Jim; Rance, Mark; So, Karen; Boanas, Adam; Metcalfe, Anthony; Hobson, Rosalind; Goldspink, Nick; Hutchison, John; Ferguson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Scars in humans of African continental ancestry heal with an exaggerated inflammatory response and a generally wider scar. Interleukin-10 is an anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic cytokine. A randomized controlled trial in Caucasians found that exogenous interleukin-10 resulted in improved macroscopic scar appearance and reduced scar redness. We investigated the effects of interleukin-10 on cutaneous scarring in volunteers of African ancestral origin in an exploratory, single-center, within-subject, double-blind randomized controlled trial. Fifty-six subjects received two of four potential prerandomized concentrations of interleukin-10 (5, 25, 100, and 250 ng/100 µL) in two full-thickness incisions on the upper inner arms. Anatomically matching incisions on the contralateral arm were treated with placebo. Scars were excised at 1 month for histological analysis and were redosed with the same regimen. Resultant excision scars were followed up for 12 months for scar width measurement and scoring. Scoring was performed by trial doctors, subjects, and a panel. Incisions treated with 100 ng/100 µL interleukin-10 had significantly reduced microscopic scar widths. Incisions treated with 5 and 25 ng/100 µL interleukin-10 were also narrower, but not significantly. There were no differences observed in pro-inflammatory or pro-fibrotic markers between interleukin-10 and placebo treatment. There was no long-term evidence that 100 ng/100 µL interleukin-10 had a therapeutic effect on macroscopic scar width or appearance, as excisions treated with this concentration were significantly wider than placebo between 8 and 12 months of maturation. Doctors showed a trend toward favoring the macroscopic appearance of placebo-treated excisions compared with those treated with 250 ng/100 µL interleukin-10. Panelists scored placebo-treated excisions as significantly better-appearing than those treated with 250 ng/100 µL interleukin-10. Doctors' scores showed a

  3. The X chromosome of monotremes shares a highly conserved region with the eutherian and marsupial X chromosomes despite the absence of X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.; Graves, J.A.M. (La Trobe Univ., Bundoora, Victoria (Australia)); Riggs, A.D. (Beckman Inst., Duarte, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Eight genes, located on the long arm of the human X chromosome and present on the marsupial X chromosome, were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomes of the platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus, one of the three species of monotreme mammals. All were located on the X chromosome. The authors conclude that the long arm of the human X chromosome represents a highly conserved region that formed part of the X chromosome in a mammalian ancestor at least 150 million years ago. Since three of these genes are located on the long arm of the platypus X chromosome, which is G-band homologous to the Y chromosome and apparently exempt from X chromosome inactivation, the conservation of this region has evidently not depended on isolation by X-Y chromosome differentiation and X chromosome inactivation.

  4. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of aminopeptidase N in the host insect leading to its evolutionary success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, K; Yaoi, K; Shimada, N; Kadotani, T; Sato, R

    1999-06-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal protein, Cry1Aa toxin, binds to a specific receptor in insect midguts and has insecticidal activity. Therefore, the structure of the receptor molecule is probably a key factor in determining the binding affinity of the toxin and insect susceptibility. The cDNA fragment (PX frg1) encoding the Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of an aminopeptidase N (APN) or an APN family protein from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella midgut was cloned and sequenced. A comparison between the deduced amino acid sequence of PX frg1 and other insect APN sequences shows that Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of APN family protein. In this paper, we propose a model to explain the mechanism that causes B. thuringiensis evolutionary success and differing insect susceptibility to Cry1Aa toxin. PMID:10366728

  5. The Grooved Rodent Incisor Recapitulates Rudimentary Teeth Characteristics of Ancestral Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Tang, Q; Jung, H-S

    2016-07-01

    It is known from the paleontology studies of eutherian mammals that incisor numbers were reduced during evolution. The evolutionary lost incisors may remain as vestigial structures at embryonic stages. The recapitulation of the incisor patterns among mammalian species will potentially uncover the mechanisms underlying the phenotypic transition of incisors during evolution. Here, we showed that a minute tooth formed in the presumptive groove region of the gerbil upper incisor at the early developmental stages, during which multiple epithelial swellings and Shh transcription domains spatiotemporally appeared in the dental epithelium, suggests the existence of vestigial dental primordia. Interestingly, when we trimmed the surrounding mesenchyme from incisor tooth germs at or before the bud stage prior to ex vivo culture, the explants developed different incisor phenotypes ranging from triplicated incisors, duplicated incisors, to Lagomorpha-like incisors, corresponding to the incisor patterns in the eutherian mammals. These results imply that the phenotypic transition of incisors during evolution, as well as the achievement of ultimate incisors in adults, arose from differential integrations of primordia. However, when the incisor tooth germ was trimmed at the cap stage, a grooved incisor developed similar to the normal condition. Furthermore, the incisor tooth germ developed a small but smooth incisor after the additional removal of the minute tooth and a lateral rudiment. These results suggest that multiple dental primordia integrated before the cap stage, with the labial primordia contributing to the labial face of the functional incisor. The minute tooth that occupied the boundary of the 2 labial primordia might be implicated in the groove formation. This study sheds light on how rudiments incorporate into functional organs and aids the understanding of incisor evolution. PMID:26912224

  6. La modernidad, el cuidado de la salud y la cultura ancestral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecilia Becerra

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available La modernidad es tanto un período histórico como un concepto filosófico y sociológico que impuso la razón y el método formal sobre todos los actos políticos, sociales y epistemológicos de las distintas culturas del mundo. La modernidad se construyó en su momento sobre el imaginario de la superioridad europea1 y durante el período colonial fue la causante del proceso avasallador de exterminio y de desconocimiento de las sociedades y culturas indígenas de América. Ella, con sus valores patriarcales y formales, desplazó la ética del cuidado y del abrigo de los pueblos autóctonos imponiendo una lógica racional, calculadora e impersonal. Al desconocer y casi negar en su totalidad la cosmovisión ancestral de curar y cuidar, relegó los ejercicios profesionalizantes de la salud bajo el amparo de la mercantilización del capitalismo mundial integrado. La modernidad, desde el inicio y en la actualidad, ha impregnado la cultura de todos los pueblos y ha condicionado todos los actos académicos en las instituciones escolares y universitarias. La perpetuación de un modelo positivista y occidentalizado ha sido una constante en las aulas universitarias y en las disciplinas, sobre todo en las ciencias de la salud. Históricamente el conocimiento en salud ha sido construido con base en el enfoque positivista y la concepción biologista del proceso salud-enfermedad, lo cual lleva a una fragmentación del saber, disyunción del sujeto y el objeto en la producción del conocimiento, y a una incapacidad de asumir al ser humano en todas sus dimensiones, razón de ser de la acción en salud, como totalidad y unidad integral2. Este panorama aquí planteado deja un gran reto epistemológico a los profesionales y a los docentes de las ciencias de la salud en general y de enfermería en particular. Vista la enfermería desde la fundamentación del cuidado de la salud, no se puede descontextualizar ni escindir de nuestra propia cultura, pretendiendo

  7. La modernidad, el cuidado de la salud y la cultura ancestral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecilia Becerra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La modernidad es tanto un período histórico como un concepto filosófico y sociológico que impuso la razón y el método formal sobre todos los actos políticos, sociales y epistemológicos de las distintas culturas del mundo. La modernidad se construyó en su momento sobre el imaginario de la superioridad europea1 y durante el período colonial fue la causante del proceso avasallador de exterminio y de desconocimiento de las sociedades y culturas indígenas de América.Ella, con sus valores patriarcales y formales, desplazó la ética del cuidado y del abrigo de los pueblos autóctonos imponiendo una lógica racional, calculadora e impersonal. Al desconocer y casi negar en su totalidad la cosmovisión ancestral de curar y cuidar, relegó los ejercicios profesionalizantes de la salud bajo el amparo de la mercantilización del capitalismo mundial integrado.La modernidad, desde el inicio y en la actualidad, ha impregnado la cultura de todos los pueblos y ha condicionado todos los actos académicos en las instituciones escolares y universitarias. La perpetuación de un modelo positivista y occidentalizado ha sido una constante en las aulas universitarias y en las disciplinas, sobre todo en las ciencias de la salud. Históricamente el conocimiento en salud ha sido construido con base en el enfoque positivista y la concepción biologista del proceso salud-enfermedad, lo cual lleva a una fragmentación del saber, disyunción del sujeto y el objeto en la producción del conocimiento, y a una incapacidad de asumir al ser humano en todas sus dimensiones, razón de ser de la acción en salud, como totalidad y unidad integral2.Este panorama aquí planteado deja un gran reto epistemológico a los profesionales y a los docentes de las ciencias de la salud en general y de enfermería en particular. Vista la enfermería desde la fundamentación del cuidado de la salud, no se puede descontextualizar ni escindir de nuestra propia cultura, pretendiendo

  8. The highly conserved 5' untranslated region as an effective target towards the inhibition of Enterovirus 71 replication by unmodified and appropriate 2'-modified siRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Jun-Xia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a highly infectious agent that plays an etiological role in hand, foot, and mouth disease. It is associated with severe neurological complications and has caused significant mortalities in recent large-scale outbreaks. Currently, no effective vaccine or specific clinical therapy is available against EV71. Methods Unmodified 21 nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and classic 2′-modified (2′-O-methylation or 2′-fluoro modification siRNAs were designed to target highly conserved 5′ untranslated region (UTR of the EV71 genome and employed as anti-EV71 agents. Real-time TaqMan RT-PCR, western blot analysis and plaque assays were carried out to evaluate specific viral inhibition by the siRNAs. Results Transfection of rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells with siRNAs targeting the EV71 genomic 5′ UTR significantly delayed and alleviated the cytopathic effects of EV71 infection, increased cell viability in EV71-infected RD cells. The inhibitory effect on EV71 replication was sequence-specific and dosage-dependent, with significant corresponding decreases in viral RNA, VP1 protein and viral titer. Appropriate 2′-modified siRNAs exhibited similar RNA interference (RNAi activity with dramatically increased serum stability in comparison with unmodified counterparts. Conclusion Sequences were identified within the highly conserved 5′ UTR that can be targeted to effectively inhibit EV71 replication through RNAi strategies. Appropriate 2′-modified siRNAs provide a promising approach to optimizing siRNAs to overcome barriers on RNAi-based antiviral therapies for broader administration.

  9. Evolution of developmental roles of Pax2/5/8 paralogs after independent duplication in urochordate and vertebrate lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Cañestro Cristian; Bassham Susan; Postlethwait John H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene duplication provides opportunities for lineage diversification and evolution of developmental novelties. Duplicated genes generally either disappear by accumulation of mutations (nonfunctionalization), or are preserved either by the origin of positively selected functions in one or both duplicates (neofunctionalization), or by the partitioning of original gene subfunctions between the duplicates (subfunctionalization). The Pax2/5/8 family of important developmental re...

  10. Functional divergence of gene duplicates – a domain-centric view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaladkar Mugdha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplicates have been shown to evolve at different rates. Here we further investigate the mechanism and functional underpinning of this phenomenon by assessing asymmetric evolution specifically within functional domains of gene duplicates. Results Based on duplicate genes in five teleost fishes resulting from a whole genome duplication event, we first show that a Fisher Exact test based approach to detect asymmetry is more sensitive than the previously used Likelihood Ratio test. Using our Fisher Exact test, we found that the evolutionary rate asymmetry in the overall protein is largely explained by the asymmetric evolution within specific protein domains. Moreover, among cases of asymmetrically evolving domains, for the gene copy containing a fast evolving domain, the non-synonymous substitutions often cluster within the fast evolving domain. We found that rare substitutions were preferred within asymmetrically evolving domains suggestive of functional divergence. While overall ~32 % of the domains tested were found to be evolving asymmetrically, certain protein domains such as the Tyrosine and Ser/Thr Kinase domains had a much greater prevalence of asymmetric evolution. Finally, based on the spatial expression of Zebra fish duplicate proteins during development, we found that protein pairs containing asymmetrically evolving domains had a greater divergence in gene expression as compared to the duplicate proteins that did not exhibit asymmetric evolution. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that the previously observed asymmetry in the overall duplicate protein evolution is largely due to divergence of specific domains of the protein, and coincides with divergence in spatial expression domains.

  11. NASAwide electronic publishing system: Electronic printing and duplicating, stage-2 evaluation report (GSFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuey, Richard C.; Lane, Robert; Hart, Susan V.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Scientific and Technical Information Office was assigned the responsibility to continue with the expansion of the NASAwide networked electronic duplicating effort by including the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) as an additional node to the existing configuration of networked electronic duplicating systems within NASA. The subject of this report is the evaluation of a networked electronic duplicating system which meets the duplicating requirements and expands electronic publishing capabilities without increasing current operating costs. This report continues the evaluation reported in 'NASA Electronic Publishing System - Electronic Printing and Duplicating Evaluation Report' (NASA TM-106242) and 'NASA Electronic Publishing System - Stage 1 Evaluation Report' (NASA TM-106510). This report differs from the previous reports through the inclusion of an external networked desktop editing, archival, and publishing functionality which did not exist with the previous networked electronic duplicating system. Additionally, a two-phase approach to the evaluation was undertaken; the first was a paper study justifying a 90-day, on-site evaluation, and the second phase was to validate, during the 90-day evaluation, the cost benefits and productivity increases that could be achieved in an operational mode. A benchmark of the functionality of the networked electronic publishing system and external networked desktop editing, archival, and publishing system was performed under a simulated daily production environment. This report can be used to guide others in determining the most cost effective duplicating/publishing alternative through the use of cost/benefit analysis and return on investment techniques. A treatise on the use of these techniques can be found by referring to 'NASA Electronic Publishing System -Cost/Benefit Methodology' (NASA TM-106662).

  12. Estimation of hominoid ancestral population sizes under bayesian coalescent models incorporating mutation rate variation and sequencing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ralph; Yang, Ziheng

    2008-09-01

    Estimation of population parameters for the common ancestors of humans and the great apes is important in understanding our evolutionary history. In particular, inference of population size for the human-chimpanzee common ancestor may shed light on the process by which the 2 species separated and on whether the human population experienced a severe size reduction in its early evolutionary history. In this study, the Bayesian method of ancestral inference of Rannala and Yang (2003. Bayes estimation of species divergence times and ancestral population sizes using DNA sequences from multiple loci. Genetics. 164:1645-1656) was extended to accommodate variable mutation rates among loci and random species-specific sequencing errors. The model was applied to analyze a genome-wide data set of approximately 15,000 neutral loci (7.4 Mb) aligned for human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque. We obtained robust and precise estimates for effective population sizes along the hominoid lineage extending back approximately 30 Myr to the cercopithecoid divergence. The results showed that ancestral populations were 5-10 times larger than modern humans along the entire hominoid lineage. The estimates were robust to the priors used and to model assumptions about recombination. The unusually low X chromosome divergence between human and chimpanzee could not be explained by variation in the male mutation bias or by current models of hybridization and introgression. Instead, our parameter estimates were consistent with a simple instantaneous process for human-chimpanzee speciation but showed a major reduction in X chromosome effective population size peculiar to the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, possibly due to selective sweeps on the X prior to separation of the 2 species. PMID:18603620

  13. Extensive Chromosomal Reorganization in the Evolution of New World Muroid Rodents (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae): Searching for Ancestral Phylogenetic Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Adenilson Leão; Malcher, Stella Miranda; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Mendes-Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Sigmodontinae rodents show great diversity and complexity in morphology and ecology. This diversity is accompanied by extensive chromosome variation challenging attempts to reconstruct their ancestral genome. The species Hylaeamys megacephalus--HME (Oryzomyini, 2n = 54), Necromys lasiurus--NLA (Akodontini, 2n = 34) and Akodon sp.--ASP (Akodontini, 2n = 10) have extreme diploid numbers that make it difficult to understand the rearrangements that are responsible for such differences. In this study we analyzed these changes using whole chromosome probes of HME in cross-species painting of NLA and ASP to construct chromosome homology maps that reveal the rearrangements between species. We include data from the literature for other Sigmodontinae previously studied with probes from HME and Mus musculus (MMU) probes. We also use the HME probes on MMU chromosomes for the comparative analysis of NLA with other species already mapped by MMU probes. Our results show that NLA and ASP have highly rearranged karyotypes when compared to HME. Eleven HME syntenic blocks are shared among the species studied here. Four syntenies may be ancestral to Akodontini (HME2/18, 3/25, 18/25 and 4/11/16) and eight to Sigmodontinae (HME26, 1/12, 6/21, 7/9, 5/17, 11/16, 20/13 and 19/14/19). Using MMU data we identified six associations shared among rodents from seven subfamilies, where MMU3/18 and MMU8/13 are phylogenetic signatures of Sigmodontinae. We suggest that the associations MMU2entire, MMU6proximal/12entire, MMU3/18, MMU8/13, MMU1/17, MMU10/17, MMU12/17, MMU5/16, MMU5/6 and MMU7/19 are part of the ancestral Sigmodontinae genome. PMID:26800516

  14. Ancestral polymorphism at the major histocompatibility complex (MHCIIß in the Nesospiza bunting species complex and its sister species (Rowettia goughensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rensburg Alexandra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is an important component of the vertebrate immune system and is frequently used to characterise adaptive variation in wild populations due to its co-evolution with pathogens. Passerine birds have an exceptionally diverse MHC with multiple gene copies and large numbers of alleles compared to other avian taxa. The Nesospiza bunting species complex (two species on Nightingale Island; one species with three sub-species on Inaccessible Island represents a rapid adaptive radiation at a small, isolated archipelago, and is thus an excellent model for the study of adaptation and speciation. In this first study of MHC in Nesospiza buntings, we aim to characterize MHCIIß variation, determine the strength of selection acting at this gene region and assess the level of shared polymorphism between the Nesospiza species complex and its putative sister taxon, Rowettia goughensis, from Gough Island. Results In total, 23 unique alleles were found in 14 Nesospiza and 2 R. goughensis individuals encoding at least four presumably functional loci and two pseudogenes. There was no evidence of ongoing selection on the peptide binding region (PBR. Of the 23 alleles, 15 were found on both the islands inhabited by Nesospiza species, and seven in both Nesospiza and Rowettia; indications of shared, ancestral polymorphism. A gene tree of Nesospiza MHCIIß alleles with several other passerine birds shows three highly supported Nesospiza-specific groups. All R. goughensis alleles were shared with Nesospiza, and these alleles were found in all three Nesospiza sequence groups in the gene tree, suggesting that most of the observed variation predates their phylogenetic split. Conclusions Lack of evidence of selection on the PBR, together with shared polymorphism across the gene tree, suggests that population variation of MHCIIß among Nesospiza and Rowettia is due to ancestral polymorphism rather than local selective

  15. Thermotolerant Yeast Strains Adapted by Laboratory Evolution Show Trade-Off at Ancestral Temperatures and Preadaptation to Other Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    adaptive laboratory evolution, we previously isolated seven Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved growth at 40°C. Here, we show that genetic adaptations to high temperature caused a growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures, reduced cellular functions, and improved tolerance of other stresses...... proteins showed that the lethal temperature for yeast is around 49°C, as a large fraction of the yeast proteins denature above this temperature. Our analysis also indicated that the number of functions involved in controlling the growth rate decreased in the thermotolerant strains compared with the number...

  16. Gene and genome duplications in vertebrates : the one-to-four (-to-eight in fish) rule and the evolution of novel gene functions

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Axel; Schartl, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    One important mechanism for functional innovation during evolution is the duplication of genes and entire genomes. Evidence is accumulating that during the evolution of vertebrates from early deuterostome ancestors entire genomes were duplicated through two rounds of duplications (the oneto- two-to-four rule). The first genome duplication in chordate evolution might predate the Cambrian explosion. The second genome duplication possibly dates back to the early Devonian. Recent data suggest t...

  17. A novel duplication polymorphism in the FANCA promoter and its association with breast and ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FANCA gene is one of the genes in which mutations lead to Fanconi anaemia, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and predisposition to malignancy. FANCA is also a potential breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. A novel allele was identified which has a tandem duplication of a 13 base pair sequence in the promoter region. We screened germline DNA from 352 breast cancer patients, 390 ovarian cancer patients and 256 normal controls to determine if the presence of either of these two alleles was associated with an increased risk of breast or ovarian cancer. The duplication allele had a frequency of 0.34 in the normal controls. There was a non-significant decrease in the frequency of the duplication allele in breast cancer patients. The frequency of the duplication allele was significantly decreased in ovarian cancer patients. However, when malignant and benign tumours were considered separately, the decrease was only significant in benign tumours. The allele with the tandem duplication does not appear to modify breast cancer risk but may act as a low penetrance protective allele for ovarian cancer

  18. Adenocarcinoma arising from gastric duplication: a case report with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Shohachi; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Morita, Yoshifumi; Oishi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inaba, Keisuke; Kamiya, Kinji; Miura, Katsutoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2008-12-01

    Gastric duplication is a rare congenital malformation. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with adenocarcinoma derived from gastric duplication. He was referred to our institute because of persistent vomiting due to pyloric stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed two cystic lesions: a 2-cm mass located along the greater curvature of the upper gastric corpus and a 3-cm mass adjacent to the bulbus. Under the diagnosis of gastric duplication cysts, the oral cyst was removed with the gastric wall and the other cyst lesion firmly adhered to the bulbus was treated with distal gastrectomy. Based on histological findings showing adenocarcinoma in the anal duplication cyst wall and regional lymph node metastases and cancer invasion into the duodenal stump, pancreatoduodenectomy was performed 9 days after the initial surgery. Invasion into the pancreas head and duodenal walls was seen in the resected specimen. Although the postoperative course was uneventful, he died of local recurrence and multiple liver metastases 14 months after surgical treatment. This case report with literature review indicates that alimentary tract duplication cysts should be recognized as risky lesions of cancer development in patients aged 50 years or over. PMID:26193693

  19. A case of de novo duplication of 15q24-q26.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Ran Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Distal duplication, or trisomy 15q, is an extremely rare chromosomal disorder characterized by prenatal and postnatal overgrowth, mental retardation, and craniofacial malformations. Additional abnormalities typically include an unusually short neck, malformations of the fingers and toes, scoliosis and skeletal malformations, genital abnormalities, particularly in affected males, and, in some cases, cardiac defects. The range and severity of symptoms and physical findings may vary from case to case, depending upon the length and location of the duplicated portion of chromosome 15q. Most reported cases of duplication of the long arm of chromosome 15 frequently have more than one segmental imbalance resulting from unbalanced translocations involving chromosome 15 and deletions in another chromosome, as well as other structural chromosomal abnormalities. We report a female newborn with a de novo duplication, 15q24- q26.3, showing intrauterine overgrowth, a narrow asymmetric face with down-slanting palpebral fissures, a large, prominent nose, and micrognathia, arachnodactyly, camptodactyly, congenital heart disease, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter. Chromosomal analysis showed a 46,XX,inv(9(p12q13,dup(15(q24q26.3. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed a gain of 42 clones on 15q24-q26.3. This case represents the only reported patient with a de novo 15q24-q26.3 duplication that did not result from an unbalanced translocation and did not have a concomitant monosomic component in Korea.

  20. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly. PMID:26772748

  1. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline G. Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly.

  2. Duplication of cervical oesophagus: A case report and review of literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazem M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Foregut duplication is commonly found in the posterior mediastinum. 10-20% of these anomalies are associated with oesophageal duplication. It can occur in all parts of oesophageal length. Although duplication of cervical oesophagus has been previously reported, but a majority of them were found in thoracic oesophagus. Infants with oesophageal duplication usually manifested by respiratory distress or asymptomatic thoracic mass, casually, detected in X-ray. A 7-month-old infant weighing about 7.5 kg, with the signboard of respiratory distress, fever and nutritional intolerance was admitted to our hospital. Physical examination showed dehydration, stridor, tachypnoea, intercostal retraction and neck stiffness. Plain chest radiogram showed dubious cystic mass in the distal neck. Cervical and chest computed tomography scan showed neck cystic lesion disseminated to posterior mediastinum, probably propagated to the respiratory system. Cystic lesion connected to oesophagus was partially resected, oesophagus was repaired and remaining mucous of a cyst was removed, then gastrostomy tube was applied. Although cervical oesophageal duplication cysts are rare, but they must be considered as one of the differential diagnoses of cervical mass with respiratory distress in infants.

  3. Pattern of Nucleotide Substitutions in Growth Hormone-Prolactin Gene Family: A Paradigm for Evolution by Gene Duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, T.

    1993-01-01

    The growth hormone-prolactin gene family in mammals is an interesting example of evolution by gene duplication. Divergence among members of duplicated gene families and among species was examined by using reported gene sequences of growth hormone, prolactin and their receptors. Sequence divergence among species was found to show a general tendency in which a generation-time effect is pronounced for synonymous substitutions but not so for nonsynonymous substitutions. Divergence among duplicate...

  4. DNA Sequence Duplication in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1: Evidence of an Ancient Partnership between Chromosomes I and II†

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Madhusudan; Fu, Yun-Xin; Mackenzie, Chris; Kaplan, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    The complex genome of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, composed of chromosomes I (CI) and II (CII), has been sequenced and assembled. We present data demonstrating that the R. sphaeroides genome possesses an extensive amount of exact DNA sequence duplication, 111 kb or ∼2.7% of the total chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA sequence duplications were aligned to each other by using MUMmer. Frequency and size distribution analyses of the exact DNA duplications revealed that the interchromosomal d...

  5. Conservation of shh cis-regulatory architecture of the coelacanth is consistent with its ancestral phylogenetic position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modern coelacanth (Latimeria is the extant taxon of a basal sarcopterygian lineage and sister group to tetrapods. Apart from certain apomorphic traits, its morphology is characterized by a high degree of retention of ancestral vertebrate structures and little morphological change. An insight into the molecular evolution that may explain the unchanged character of Latimeria morphology requires the analysis of the expression patterns of developmental regulator genes and their cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. Results We describe the comparative and functional analysis of the sonic hedgehog (shh genomic region of Latimeria menadoensis. Several putative enhancers in the Latimeria shh locus have been identified by comparisons to sarcopterygian and actinopterygian extant species. Specific sequence conservation with all known actinopterygian enhancer elements has been detected. However, these elements are selectively missing in more recently diverged actinopterygian and sarcopterygian species. The functionality of the putative Latimeria enhancers was confirmed by reporter gene expression analysis in transient transgenic zebrafish and chick embryos. Conclusions Latimeria shh CRMs represent the ancestral set of enhancers that have emerged before the split of lobe-finned and ray-finned fishes. In contrast to lineage-specific losses and differentiations in more derived lineages, Latimeria shh enhancers reveal low levels of sequence diversification. High overall sequence conservation of shh conserved noncoding elements (CNE is consistent with the general trend of high levels of conservation of noncoding DNA in the slowly evolving Latimeria genome.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of a newfound bat-borne hantavirus supports a laurasiatherian host association for ancestral mammalian hantaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Peter T; Drexler, Jan F; Kallies, René; Ličková, Martina; Bokorová, Silvia; Mananga, Gael D; Szemes, Tomáš; Leroy, Eric M; Krüger, Detlev H; Drosten, Christian; Klempa, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae) were believed to originate from rodent reservoirs. However, genetically distinct hantaviruses were lately found in shrews and moles, as well as in bats from Africa and Asia. Bats (order Chiroptera) are considered important reservoir hosts for emerging human pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a novel hantavirus, provisionally named Makokou virus (MAKV), in Noack's Roundleaf Bat (Hipposideros ruber) in Gabon, Central Africa. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomic l-segment showed that MAKV was the most closely related to other bat-borne hantaviruses and shared a most recent common ancestor with the Asian hantaviruses Xuan Son and Laibin. Breakdown of the virus load in a bat animal showed that MAKV resembles rodent-borne hantaviruses in its organ distribution in that it predominantly occurred in the spleen and kidney; this provides a first insight into the infection pattern of bat-borne hantaviruses. Ancestral state reconstruction based on a tree of l gene sequences of all relevant hantavirus lineages was combined with phylogenetic fossil host hypothesis testing, leading to a statistically significant rejection of the mammalian superorder Euarchontoglires (including rodents) but not the superorder Laurasiatheria (including shrews, moles, and bats) as potential hosts of ancestral hantaviruses at most basal tree nodes. Our data supports the emerging concept of bats as previously overlooked hantavirus reservoir hosts. PMID:27051047

  7. Allelic lineages of the ficolin genes (FCNs) are passed from ancestral to descendant primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Tina; Nissen, Janna; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Koch, Claus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Garred, Peter

    2011-01-01

    -human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non...... the Shannon entropy revealing that all three proteins are generally highly conserved. Ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 showed the highest diversity, whereas ficolin-3 was more conserved. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were present in non-human primate sera with the same characteristic oligomeric structures as seen in...

  8. Cecal duplication cyst: A rare case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Shyam Raj Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplication cysts of the alimentary tract are very rare congenital anomalies. Out of all these cases, two-thirds of them manifest before the age of 2 years. They are common in ileum, but very rare in cecum. Some of them may remain asymptomatic and present in the adulthood. The lesion may be tubular or cystic. Several theories have been postulated, but true etiology is not known. We hereby report a case of a 10-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain in the pediatric surgery outpatient department. Diagnosis of cecal duplication cyst was confirmed on histopathology. This report implies that although alimentary tract duplications are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children who presents with acute abdominal pain.

  9. Three-Phase Scheme for Supporting Time-Constrained Data with Duplication in Wireless Broadcast Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Chun; Lin, Lien-Fa; Wang, Shih-Chia

    The wireless data broadcast techniques raised in 1990s. Since the wireless data dissemination techniques are emerged, more and more data services are proposed based on the wireless data broadcast techniques in these years. Among the new services, the time-constraint data broadcast service is critical for many real-time related applications, and has been studied in the recent years. However, the related works did not consider the duplicate pages of requests on data scheduling. Hence, in this paper, we consider the duplicate pages in the multi-page time-constraint data broadcast service. We first proposed a duplication page-optimized architecture for supporting the multi-page time-constraint data broadcast service. We then proposed a three-phase scheme for the time-slot sharing optimizer to improve the bandwidth utility of the TDA-based program. The experiments reveal that our proposed indeed significantly reduce the number of used channels for a data broadcast server.

  10. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst. PMID:26691370

  11. Prenatal detection of 5q14.3 duplication including MEF2C and brain phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Claudia; Spaccini, Luigina; Righini, Andrea; Parazzini, Cecilia; Conte, Giorgio; Crosti, Francesca; Redaelli, Serena; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Avagliano, Laura; Rustico, Mariangela

    2016-05-01

    The 5q14.3 duplication is a rare condition comprising speech and developmental delay, microcephaly, and mild ventriculomegaly. The region 5q14.3 contains several genes but the predominant role for the onset of the neurodevelopmental phenotype has been attributed to MEF2C. We describe the prenatal identification of 5q14.3 duplication, including MEF2C, in a monochorionic twin pregnancy with corpus callosum anomalies, confirmed by autopsy. To the best of our knowledge, this cerebral finding has been observed for the first time in 5q14.3 duplication patients, possibly widening the neurological picture of this scarcely known syndrome. A pathogenetic role of MEF2C overexpression in brain development may be assumed, but further studies are needed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864752

  12. Artificial duplicate reads in sequencing data of 454 Genome Sequencer FLX System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dong; Yangyi Chen; Yan Shen; Shengyue Wang; Guoping Zhao; Weirong Jin

    2011-01-01

    The 454 Genome Sequencer (GS) FLX System is one of the next-generation sequencing systems featured by long reads, high accuracy, and ultra-high throughput.Based on the mechanism of emulsion PCR, a unique DNA template would only generate a unique sequence read after being amplified and sequenced on GS FLX.However,biased amplification of DNA templates might occur in the process of emulsion PCR, which results in production of artificial duplicate reads.Under the condition that each DNA template is unique to another, 3.49%-18.14% of total reads in GS FLX-sequencing data were found to be artificial duplicate reads.These duplicate reads may lead to misunderstanding of sequencing data and special attention should be paid to the potential biases they introduced to the data.

  13. Autism Spectrum Disorder, Developmental and Psychiatric Features in 16p11.2 Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Snyder, LeeAnne; D'Angelo, Debra; Chen, Qixuan; Bernier, Raphael; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Wallace, Arianne Stevens; Gerdts, Jennifer; Kanne, Stephen; Berry, Leandra; Blaskey, Lisa; Kuschner, Emily; Roberts, Timothy; Sherr, Elliot; Martin, Christa L; Ledbetter, David H; Spiro, John E; Chung, Wendy K; Hanson, Ellen

    2016-08-01

    The 16p11.2 duplication (BP4-BP5) is associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), although significant heterogeneity exists. Quantitative ASD, behavioral and neuropsychological measures and DSM-IV diagnoses in child and adult carriers were compared with familial non-carrier controls, and to published results from deletion carriers. The 16p11.2 duplication phenotype ranges widely from asymptomatic presentation to significant disability. The most common diagnoses were intellectual disability, motor delays and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in children, and anxiety in adults. ASD occurred in nearly 20 % of child cases, but a majority of carriers did not show the unique social features of ASD. The 16p11.2 duplication phenotype is characterized by wider variability than the reciprocal deletion, likely reflecting contributions from additional risk factors. PMID:27207092

  14. Dating and functional characterization of duplicated genes in the apple (Malus domestica Borkh. by analyzing EST data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanzol Javier

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication is central to genome evolution. In plants, genes can be duplicated through small-scale events and large-scale duplications often involving polyploidy. The apple belongs to the subtribe Pyrinae (Rosaceae, a diverse lineage that originated via allopolyploidization. Both small-scale duplications and polyploidy may have been important mechanisms shaping the genome of this species. Results This study evaluates the gene duplication and polyploidy history of the apple by characterizing duplicated genes in this species using EST data. Overall, 68% of the apple genes were clustered into families with a mean copy-number of 4.6. Analysis of the age distribution of gene duplications supported a continuous mode of small-scale duplications, plus two episodes of large-scale duplicates of vastly different ages. The youngest was consistent with the polyploid origin of the Pyrinae 37-48 MYBP, whereas the older may be related to γ-triplication; an ancient hexapolyploidization previously characterized in the four sequenced eurosid genomes and basal to the eurosid-asterid divergence. Duplicated genes were studied for functional diversification with an emphasis on young paralogs; those originated during or after the formation of the Pyrinae lineage. Unequal assignment of single-copy genes and gene families to Gene Ontology categories suggested functional bias in the pattern of gene retention of paralogs. Young paralogs related to signal transduction, metabolism, and energy pathways have been preferentially retained. Non-random retention of duplicated genes seems to have mediated the expansion of gene families, some of which may have substantially increased their members after the origin of the Pyrinae. The joint analysis of over-duplicated functional categories and phylogenies, allowed evaluation of the role of both polyploidy and small-scale duplications during this process. Finally, gene expression analysis indicated that 82

  15. Duplication of the CD8 beta-chain gene as a marker of the man-gorilla-chimpanzee clade.

    OpenAIRE

    Delarbre, C; Nakauchi, H; Bontrop, R.; Kourilsky, P.; Gachelin, G

    1993-01-01

    In earlier studies we have found that the gene encoding the CD8 beta chain is duplicated in man. We demonstrate here that the duplicated genes are both located on chromosome 2. We have also studied the moment of the duplication event relative to the evolution of higher primates by using genomic DNA of a panel of primates. Our data strongly suggest that duplication occurred after the orangutan lineage had split and before the chimpanzee, gorilla, and man clade diverged, some 8-9.5 million year...

  16. Multiple bursts of pancreatic ribonuclease gene duplication in insect-eating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Meng, Fanxing; He, Beibei; Han, Naijian; Li, Gang; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-09-10

    Pancreatic ribonuclease gene (RNASE1) was previously shown to have undergone duplication and adaptive evolution related to digestive efficiency in several mammalian groups that have evolved foregut fermentation, including ruminants and some primates. RNASE1 gene duplications thought to be linked to diet have also been recorded in some carnivores. Of all mammals, bats have evolved the most diverse dietary specializations, mainly including frugivory and insectivory. Here we cloned, sequenced and analyzed RNASE1 gene sequences from a range of bat species to determine whether their dietary adaptation is mirrored by molecular adaptation. We found that seven insect-eating members of the families Vespertilionidae and Molossidae possessed two or more duplicates, and we also detected three pseudogenes. Reconstructed RNASE1 gene trees based on both Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods supported independent duplication events in these two families. Selection tests revealed that RNASE1 gene duplicates have undergone episodes of positive selection indicative of functional modification, and lineage-specific tests revealed strong adaptive evolution in the Tadarida β clade. However, unlike the RNASE1 duplicates that function in digestion in some mammals, the bat RNASE1 sequences were found to be characterized by relatively high isoelectric points, a feature previously suggested to promote defense against viruses via the breakdown of double-stranded RNA. Taken together, our findings point to an adaptive diversification of RNASE1 in these two bat families, although we find no clear evidence that this was driven by diet. Future experimental assays are needed to resolve the functions of these enzymes in bats. PMID:23644026

  17. The ORF59 DNA polymerase processivity factor homologs of Old World primate RV2 rhadinoviruses are highly conserved nuclear antigens expressed in differentiated epithelium in infected macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnside Kellie L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ORF59 DNA polymerase processivity factor of the human rhadinovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, is required for efficient copying of the genome during virus replication. KSHV ORF59 is antigenic in the infected host and is used as a marker for virus activation and replication. Results We cloned, sequenced and expressed the genes encoding related ORF59 proteins from the RV1 rhadinovirus homologs of KSHV from chimpanzee (PtrRV1 and three species of macaques (RFHVMm, RFHVMn and RFHVMf, and have compared them with ORF59 proteins obtained from members of the more distantly-related RV2 rhadinovirus lineage infecting the same non-human primate species (PtrRV2, RRV, MneRV2, and MfaRV2, respectively. We found that ORF59 homologs of the RV1 and RV2 Old World primate rhadinoviruses are highly conserved with distinct phylogenetic clustering of the two rhadinovirus lineages. RV1 and RV2 ORF59 C-terminal domains exhibit a strong lineage-specific conservation. Rabbit antiserum was developed against a C-terminal polypeptide that is highly conserved between the macaque RV2 ORF59 sequences. This anti-serum showed strong reactivity towards ORF59 encoded by the macaque RV2 rhadinoviruses, RRV (rhesus and MneRV2 (pig-tail, with no cross reaction to human or macaque RV1 ORF59 proteins. Using this antiserum and RT-qPCR, we determined that RRV ORF59 is expressed early after permissive infection of both rhesus primary fetal fibroblasts and African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (Vero in vitro. RRV- and MneRV2-infected foci showed strong nuclear expression of ORF59 that correlated with production of infectious progeny virus. Immunohistochemical studies of an MneRV2-infected macaque revealed strong nuclear expression of ORF59 in infected cells within the differentiating layer of epidermis corroborating previous observations that differentiated epithelial cells are permissive for replication of KSHV-like rhadinoviruses

  18. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: subunit structure, functional binding sites, and ion transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been highly conserved during animal evolution, and in all the species and tissues studied so far, including mammals, it is a pseudosymmetric, pentameric complex of related subunits with very similar physical properties. All subunits of these nicotinic receptors were derived from a common ancestral gene, probably by way of gene duplications occurring very early in animal evolution. 45 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Protein Connectivity and Protein Complexity Promotes Human Gene Duplicability in a Mutually Exclusive Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Tanusree; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2010-01-01

    It has previously been reported that protein complexity (i.e. number of subunits in a protein complex) is negatively correlated to gene duplicability in yeast as well as in humans. However, unlike in yeast, protein connectivity in a protein–protein interaction network has a positive correlation with gene duplicability in human genes. In the present study, we have analyzed 1732 human and 1269 yeast proteins that are present both in a protein–protein interaction network as well as in a protein ...

  20. A Narrow Internal Auditory Canal with Duplication in a Patient with Congenital Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) with duplication is a rare anomaly of the temporal bone. It is associated with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve may cause the hearing loss. We present an unusual case of an isolated narrow IAC with duplication that was detected by a CT scan. In this case, the IAC was divided by a bony septum into an empty stenotic inferoposterior portion and a large anterosuperior portion containing the facial nerve that was clearly delineated on MRI